Sample records for area rhode island

  1. 77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...naval restricted area located in the waters of Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical...practice minefield and conduct mine detection and mine sweeping exercises. As a...Part 334 Danger zones, Navigation (water), Restricted areas,...

  2. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  3. Rhode Island Critical Resource Atlas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used to assist planners, scientists, geographers, and others to visualize data sets. This particular project created draws on data from the state of Rhode Island's Geographic Information System (RIGIS) database in order to assist land managers and other interested parties. The project was created with support from the Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension, and a number of other organizations. On the site, visitors can click on maps of forests and wetlands, land use patterns, groundwater resources, soil hydrology, and biodiversity. On the site's homepage, visitors can also use the "Towns" drop down menu to look at information for different cities throughout the state. Additionally, the "Watershed Atlas" area provides detailed maps of the twelve watersheds located in Rhode Island.

  4. 77 FR 42651 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area, Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, Approximately 4 Nautical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Approximately 4 Nautical Miles Due South of Lands End in Newport, RI AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps...located 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode Island. The RA was established...located 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode Island. The RA is...

  5. Availability of ground water in the Blackstone River area Rhode Island and Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Herbert E.; Dickerman, David C.

    1974-01-01

    The Blackstone River study area covers 83 square miles of northern Rhode Island and 5 square miles of adjacent Massachusetts (fig. 1). It includes parts of the Blackstone, Moshassuck, and Tenmile River basins, and a coastal area that drains to the brackish Seekonk and Providence Rivers. In Rhode Island, all or parts of the suburban towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, and Smithfield and all or parts of the cities of Central Falls, East Povidence, Pawtucket, Providence, and Woonsocket are within the study area. Also included are parts of the towns Attleboro and North Attleborough in Massachusetts. In 1970, total population was about 240,000, which was equivalent to about one-fourth of the total population of Rhode Island. Fresh water usage in 1970 by public-supply systems and self-supplied industry was about 33 mgd (million gallons per day), which was equal to 22 percent of total fresh water use in Rhode Island for all purposes except generation of electric power (fig. 2). Anticipated increases in population and per capita water requirements are likely to cause the demand for water to more than double within the next 50 years. A significant part of this demand can be met from wells that tap the principal streams. This aquifer yielded an average of 10 mgd in 1970 and is capable of sustaining a much higher yield. The primary objectives of the study were to determine and map the saturated thickness and transmissivity of the stratified-drift aquifer and to assess the potential sustained yield of those parts of the aquifer favorable for large-scale development of water. A secondary objective was to describe ground-water quality and to evaluate the impact of induced infiltration of polluted stream water on the quality of native ground water. This report is based on analysis of drillers' records of more than 700 wells and borings which include 462 lithologic logs; 35 specific-capacity determinations; 12 aquifer tests, including detailed tests at two sites to determine streambed infiltration rates; chemical analyses of 92 ground-water and 15 stream-water samples; and geologic mapping. Selected base data are published in a separate (Johnston and Dickerman, in press). The authors are indebted to well drillers, especially American Drilling and Boring Company, R.E. Chapman Company, and Layne New England Company, for making their records available; to the water departments of the towns of Cumberland and Lincoln, for allowing aquifer tests of their well fields; to the Rhode Island Department of Health, for providing data on water quality and use; and to many other federal, state, and municipal agencies, companies, and individuals who supplied information. Their contributions are gratefully acknowledged.

  6. 40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

  7. 40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...AQCR 120 X Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

  8. 40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...AQCR 120 X Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

  9. Numerical simulation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Big River Management Area, central Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board is considering use of groundwater resources from the Big River Management Area in central Rhode Island because increasing water demands in Rhode Island may exceed the capacity of current sources. Previous water-resources investigations in this glacially derived, valley-fill aquifer system have focused primarily on the effects of potential groundwater-pumping scenarios on streamflow depletion; however, the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands have not been assessed, and such assessments are a requirement of the State’s permitting process to develop a water supply in this area. A need for an assessment of the potential effects of pumping on wetlands in the Big River Management Area led to a cooperative agreement in 2008 between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island. This partnership was formed with the goal of developing methods for characterizing wetland vegetation, soil type, and hydrologic conditions, and monitoring and modeling water levels for pre- and post-water-supply development to assess potential effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands. This report describes the hydrogeology of the area and the numerical simulations that were used to analyze the interaction between groundwater and surface water in response to simulated groundwater withdrawals. The results of this analysis suggest that, given the hydrogeologic conditions in the Big River Management Area, a standard 5-day aquifer test may not be sufficient to determine the effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wetlands. Model simulations showed water levels beneath Reynolds Swamp declined by about 0.1 foot after 5 days of continuous pumping, but continued to decline by an additional 4 to 6 feet as pumping times were increased from a 5-day simulation period to a simulation period representative of long-term average monthly conditions. This continued decline in water levels with increased pumping time is related to the shift from the primary source of water to the pumped wells being derived from aquifer storage during the early-time (5 days) simulation to being derived more from induced infiltration from the flooded portion of the Big River (southernmost extent of the Flat River Reservoir) during the months of March through October or from captured groundwater discharge to this portion of the Big River when the downstream Flat River Reservoir is drained for weed control during the months of November through February, as was the case for the long-term monthly conditions.

  10. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count data book is the fourth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 28 indicators in five areas: (1) family and community; (2) economic well-being, including median household income, poverty rate, and percent of children in families receiving cash…

  11. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count report examined statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters addressed the areas of: family and community; economic well-being; child health; safety; and education. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income;…

  12. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 49 indicators (6 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic…

  13. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the eighth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 53 indicators (3 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic diversity);…

  14. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the fifth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 30 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

  15. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the sixth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 37 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

  16. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 43 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (including median household income,…

  17. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher…

  18. Rhode Island School Terrorist Attack Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Michael W. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the state of safety and terrorist attack preparedness in Rhode Island Schools as determined by Rhode Island school leader perceptions. The study is descriptive in nature as it gathers data to describe a particular event or situation. Using a researcher generated survey based on terrorist preparedness guidelines and suggestions…

  19. Rhode Island Election Tickets: A Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell J. DeSimone; Daniel C. Schofield

    2007-01-01

    Rhode Island was the first English colony in America to issue printed election ballots, with the first issued in the mid-1740s. This survey of Rhode Island election tickets, while not exhaustive, is representative of the use of tickets in elections spanning a period of over 150 years and documents state and local politics, political factions and election results from the

  20. Hydrologic data for Block Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Emily

    1993-01-01

    This report was compiled as part of a study to assess the hydrogeology and the quality and quantity of fresh ground water on Block Island, Rhode Island. Hydrologic data were collected on Block Island during 1988-91. The data are pre- sented in illustrations and tables. Data collec- ted include precipitation, surfae-water, ground- water, lithologic, and well-construction and dis- charge information. Precipitation data include total monthly precipitation values from 11 rain gages and water-quality analyses of 14 precipi- tation samples from one station. Surface-water data include water-level measurements at 12 ponds, water-quality data for five ponds, and field specific-conductance measurements at 56 surface- water sites (streams, ponds, and springs). Ground- water data include water-level measurements at 159 wells, water-quality data at 150 wells, and field specific-conductance data at 52 wells. Lithologic logs for 375 wells and test borings, and construc- tion and location data for 570 wells, springs, and test borings are included. In addition, the data set contains data on water quality of water samples, collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health during 1976-91, from Fresh and Sands Ponds and from wells at the Block Island Water Company well field north of Sands Pond.

  1. Office of the Secretary of State: Rhode Island State Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Far more than a collection of basic government documents, the Rhode Island State Library website is a nice resource for anyone seeking to learn more about the Ocean State. The materials here are divided into three main sections: "Research Tools", "Publications", and "Everything RI". In "Research Tools", users will find executive orders issued by the governor, annual reports, as well as state regulations and rules. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains some colorful historical documents, including the Rhode Island Royal Charter of 1663 and the state constitution. Finally, the "Everything RI" area contains documents that narrate the state's history, such as "State Symbols", "Famous Rhode Islanders", "Rhode Island Landmarks", and "City & Town Incorporation Dates". Just for reference, some of the notable persons from the Ocean State include George M. Cohan, Anne Hutchinson, and baseball legend Nap Lajoie.

  2. Sex Trafficking and Decriminalized Prostitution in Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie Shapiro

    2009-01-01

    Rhode Island is the only state in the United States where prostitution is decriminalized indoors. Since decriminalization in 1980, the sex industry has expanded and Rhode Island has become a destination for commercial sex in New England. Rhode Island is one of only three states that have not had a human trafficking prosecution. Rhode Island has had no prosecutions of

  3. 2005 -2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    for providing direction to the GIS community in Rhode Island. 2. Management of the RIGIS database will include2005 - 2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM The Rhode;1 2005 - 2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM EXECUTIVE

  4. Three Guidance Programs in Providence, Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirico, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes three programs implemented in the Providence, Rhode Island, elementary schools to improve students' self-image. These include a guidance/puppetry program, student of the week awards, and a behavioral management system. (JAC)

  5. A PILOT PLAN FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP IN RHODE ISLAND, THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT ORGANIZATION IN A REGION OF RHODE ISLAND.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OSTRANDER, RAYMOND H.; AND OTHERS

    A MODEL FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT ORGANIZATION IN RHODE ISLAND IS PROPOSED AS A PILOT PLAN FOR EDUCATION LEADERSHIP. SEVEN SCHOOL COMMITTEES AND FIVE SUPERINTENDENTS ARE ADMINISTERING THE SEVEN RHODE ISLAND DISTRICTS WHICH COVER AN AREA OF 22 SQUARE MILES. THIS DIFFUSION OF EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES WITHIN THE SMALL AREA AFFECTS THE EXTENT TO WHICH…

  6. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.121 ...Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile radius of any high...Area. (2) All waters of Rhode Island Sound, Narragansett Bay, the...

  7. Sea-floor geology in central Rhode Island Sound south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Worley, C.R.; Nadeau, M.A.; Van Hoy, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. NOAA collected multibeam-echosounder data during hydrographic survey H11995 in a 63-square-kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island. The USGS collected sediment samples, bottom video, and still photographs from 27 stations in this study area to verify an interpretation of the bathymetric data. Collected data are used to map areas of scour depressions and erosional outliers, megaripples, boulders, and relatively undisturbed modern marine sediments. In general, much of the eastern part of the study area, a submerged segment of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, is bouldery. Bottom photography shows boulders are generally encrusted with hydrozoans, algae, and anemone. Scour depressions, presumably formed by long-period storm waves, and erosional outliers of Holocene sediments dominate the western part of the study area and several large areas in the east. The scour depressions tend to have coarser grained sediment than intervening erosional outliers. The coarseness likely creates turbulence in the water over these areas, which prevents fine-grained sediment deposition. Several small areas of megaripples are visible in the bathymetry data in the west. Other sandy areas are typically rippled, with burrows, worm tubes, and starfish present.

  8. Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts area contingency plan, updated through change 4

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-03-27

    Change 4 updates the Area Contingency Plan, which describes the strategy for a coordinated Federal, State, and Local response to a discharge of oil or a release of a hazardous substance from a vessel, offshore facility, or onshore facility operating within the boundaries of the area of responsibility for Captain of the Port, Providence.

  9. MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

  10. Healthy Mothers, Healthy Infants: Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count issue brief details the strides made in Rhode Island over the last 10 years to improve maternal and child health, focusing on efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. The brief notes that Rhode Island has made significant progress in several areas of maternal and infant care, most notably in access to insurance and early…

  11. RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

  12. 77 FR 43514 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ...utilize this anchorage area. The effect of this rule is not significant...Narragansett Bay or Rhode Island Sound at the entrance to Narragansett...Narragansett Bay or Rhode Island Sound. The anchorage imposes no monetary...they can better evaluate its effects on them and participate in...

  13. 78 FR 28149 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...PR] Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...the handling of cranberries grown in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...handling of cranberries produced in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,...

  14. 77 FR 52595 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ...IR] Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...of cranberries produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,...

  15. 75 FR 20514 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...of cranberries produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,...

  16. 78 FR 24333 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ...FIR] Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,...

  17. 75 FR 18394 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...cranberries produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut,...

  18. 78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island AGENCY...has been prepared for Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR...mitigation program at Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island....

  19. University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Narragansett, Rhode Island, the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) of URI offers instruction leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography as well as in interdisciplinary and related areas such as atmospheric chemistry. Site includes information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, news, and publications. Outreach initiatives are numerous and are targeted at a wide audience.

  20. Rhode Island Child Care Salary--1989. Submitted to the Rhode Island Workforce 2000 Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Association for the Education of Young Children, Barrington.

    A survey gathered information on salaries, working conditions, benefits, and turnover of early childhood providers in Rhode Island. The sample was drawn from 30 percent of the state's full-day care centers, part-day nursery schools, after-school programs, prekindergarten programs attached to elementary schools, and home day care providers. All…

  1. GRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHY UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    of highest eddy kinetic energy. The array comprised inverted echo sounders equipped with bottom pressureGRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHY UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND NARRAGANSETT, RHODE ISLAND Inverted Echo Sounder Data Report Kuroshio Extension System Study (KESS) April 2004 to July 2006 GSO Technical Report

  2. Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    . Randolph Watts June 2007 #12;#12;Abstract The Inverted Echo Sounder (IES) is an ocean bottom out for IES Models 6.1 and 6.2 at URI/GSO. A separate document, Inverted Echo Sounder User's ManualGraduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island Narragansett, Rhode Island Inverted Echo

  3. University of Rhode Island inAdvance June 19 , 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    of this year's Rick Ligi Team MVP Award. More... URI SMILE program founder named one of Rhode Island's Women the number of men from the College who served in World War I was 334. "It's important to remember Rhode Island State College men who died in World War I. More... First student to graduate in URI and U

  4. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  5. Policy and Procedures, University of Rhode Island Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, James W.

    A guide to policies and procedures of the University of Rhode Island Foundation is presented. Attention is directed to the following concerns: fund-raising policies, the act incorporating the University of Rhode Island Foundation, by-laws, dual signature system, nominating committee responsibilities and procedures, policy and guidelines for the…

  6. Rhode Island School and District Accountability System. Technical Bulletin. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the Rhode Island Department of Education introduced its revised accountability system that incorporated the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law, the Rhode Island Comprehensive Education Strategy (CES), and Article 31, which requires the state commissioner to make judgments about school performance on a regular…

  7. Museum of Art-Rhode Island School of Design

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is the largest art museum in Rhode Island, and one of the largest in the United States. Founded in 1893, the Museum's collection, like its parent organization RISD, reflects the fact that after the Civil War Rhode Island was the most industrialized state in the country. As stated on the Museum's website, the region's prosperity was based on the manufacture of goods from silverware to steam engines, resulting in a desire to better educate the population in industrial design and fine art. Today, the Museum's collection consists of over 84,000 objects, with particular strengths in costume and textiles, 19th century American decorative arts, and photography. The Museum is also the home of the Aaron Siskind Center for the Study of Photography. On the website visitors can browse collection areas, explore the Grand Gallery, "A salon-style picture gallery displaying European paintings from the Renaissance through the early 19th century", listen to curators, and read about current exhibitions.

  8. Tsunami hazard assessment for the island of Rhodes, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnoni, Gianluca; Armigliato, Alberto; Zaniboni, Filippo; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The island of Rhodes is part of the Dodecanese archipelago, and is one of the many islands that are found in the Aegean Sea. The tectonics of the Rhodes area is rather complex, involving both strike-slip and dip-slip (mainly thrust) processes. Tsunami catalogues (e.g. Papadopulos et al, 2007) show the relative high frequency of occurrence of tsunamis in this area, some also destructive, in particular between the coasts of Rhodes and Turkey. In this part of the island is located the town of Rhodes, the capital and also the largest and most populated city. Rhodes is historically famous for the Colossus of Rhodes, collapsed following an earthquake, and nowadays is a popular tourist destination. This work is focused on the hazard assessment evaluation with research performed in the frame of the European project NearToWarn. The hazard is assessed by using the worst-credible case scenario, a method introduced and used to study local tsunami hazard in coastal towns like Catania, Italy, and Alexandria, Egypt (Tinti et al., 2012). The tsunami sources chosen for building scenarios are three: two located in the sea area in front of the Turkish coasts where the events are more frequent represent local sources and were selected in the frame of the European project NearToWarn, while one provides the case of a distant source. The first source is taken from the paper Ebeling et al. (2012) and modified by UNIBO and models the earthquake and small tsunami occurred on 25th April 1957.The second source is a landslide and is derived from the TRANSFER Project "Database of Tsunamigenic Non-Seismic Sources" and coincides with the so-called "Northern Rhodes Slide", possibly responsible for the 24th March 2002 tsunami. The last source is the fault that is located close to the island of Crete believed to be responsible for the tsunami event of 1303 that was reported to have caused damage in the city of Rhodes. The simulations are carried out using the finite difference code UBO-TSUFD that solves the Navier Stokes equations in shallow water approximation. To cover the entire basin two nested grids (a coarse one with 30 arc sec resolution and a finer one with 200 m resolution) are used, constructed on bathymetry data provided by the TRANSFER database. The results, as fields of highest wave elevation, maximum flood, maximum speed, arrival times and synthetic tide-gauges, are provided and discussed both individually (i.e. separately for each source) as well as in the form of a single, aggregate result, as required by the worst-case scenario technique. References Ebeling, C.W., Okal., E.A., Kalligeris, N., Synolakis, C.E.: Modern seismological reassessment and tsunami simulation of historical Hellenic Arc earthquakes. Tectonophysics, 530-531, 225-239, 2012. Papadopoulos, G. A., Daskalaki, E., Fokaefs, A., and Giraleas, N.: Tsunami hazards in the Eastern Mediterranean: strong earthquakes and tsunamis in the East Hellenic Arc and Trench system, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 57-64, doi:10.5194/nhess-7-57-2007, 2007. Tinti S., Pagnoni G., Armigliato A., and Tonini R.: Tsunami inundation scenarios and tsunami vulnerability assessment forthe town of Alexandria, Egypt, Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-10325, 2012, EGU General Assembly 2012.

  9. US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

  10. University of Rhode Island inAdvance October 11, 2007

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    -tie event Saturday, October 13 at the Westin Hotel in Providence. During the ceremonies, the University undertaken by a non-profit entity in Rhode Island. More than $50 million in commitments has been raised

  11. 76 FR 16322 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...Washington, and Long Island in the State of...continuance referendum be conducted among eligible...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut...referendum shall be conducted during the period...Massachusetts, Rhode Island,...

  12. Nonpublic Education in Rhode Island: Alternatives for the Future. A Study for the Rhode Island Special Commission To Study the Entire Field of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Henry M.; And Others

    This study was commissioned by the State of Rhode Island to provide a factual basis for future education policy decisions. Since Rhode Island has a higher percentage of children in nonpublic schools than any other State, the future of these schools is particularly crucial. Nonpublic schools in Rhode Island are divided into two basic types:…

  13. REACTOR DOSIMETRY STUDY OF THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. E. HOLDEN; R. N. RECINIELLO; J.-P. HU

    2005-01-01

    The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC), located on the Narragansett Bay Campus of the University of Rhode Island, is a state-owned and US NRC-licensed nuclear facility constructed for educational and industrial applications. The main building of RINSC houses a two-megawatt (2 MW) thermal power critical reactor immersed in demineralized water within a shielded tank. As its original design in

  14. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

  15. University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography 215215215215 South Ferry RoadSouth Ferry RoadSouth Ferry RoadSouth Ferry Road Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography. © Copyright 2002-2007 by University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate

  16. Combined multibeam and bathymetry data from Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound: a regional perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Danforth, William W.; Blankenship, Mark R.; Clos, Andrew R.; Glomb, Kimberly A.; Lewit, Peter G.; Nadeau, Megan A.; Wood, Douglas A.; Parker, Castleton E.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research and management communities because of this area's ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Geologically interpreted digital terrain models from individual surveys provide important benthic environmental information, yet many applications of this information require a geographically broader perspective. For example, individual surveys are of limited use for the planning and construction of cross-sound infrastructure, such as cables and pipelines, or for the testing of regional circulation models. To address this need, we integrated 14 contiguous multibeam bathymetric datasets that were produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during charting operations into one digital terrain model that covers much of Block Island Sound and extends eastward across Rhode Island Sound. The new dataset, which covers over 1244 square kilometers, is adjusted to mean lower low water, gridded to 4-meter resolution, and provided in Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 19, North American Datum of 1983 and geographic World Geodetic Survey of 1984 projections. This resolution is adequate for sea-floor feature and process interpretation but is small enough to be queried and manipulated with standard Geographic Information System programs and to allow for future growth. Natural features visible in the data include boulder lag deposits of winnowed Pleistocene strata, sand-wave fields, and scour depressions that reflect the strength of oscillating tidal currents and scour by storm-induced waves. Bedform asymmetry allows interpretations of net sediment transport. Anthropogenic features visible in the data include shipwrecks and dredged channels. Together the merged data reveal a larger, more continuous perspective of bathymetric topography than previously available, providing a fundamental framework for research and resource management activities offshore of Rhode Island.

  17. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. We allow hunting of white-tailed deer on designated areas...

  18. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. We allow hunting of white-tailed deer on designated areas...

  19. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. We allow hunting of white-tailed deer on designated areas...

  20. Non-energy resources, Connecticut and Rhode Island coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, N.F.; Lewis, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Cores collected from Long Island Sound, Connecticut, were used to establish control on the geologic framework of the area. Lithologic and stratigraphic analyses verified the presence of the following units: (1) Cretaceous coastal plain, (2) Pleistocene glacial till, (3) late Pleistocene glacial lake, (4) late Pleistocene glacial outwash, and (5) Holocene fluvial, estuarine and marine deposits. Cores collected in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, were obtained from inferred, relict shoreline features and were analyzed for heavy mineral content. Concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 3.4%; no significant downcore changes were found. The results indicated that surficial sediments in areas of high-velocity tidal flow yield greater amounts of heavy minerals than do inferred placer deposits. During the second phase of the program of study, Connecticut and Rhode Island pooled resources to develop a study plan for the comprehensive quantification of all non-energy resources in the adjacent waters of the states. A literature and data survey was conducted to assess the occurrence, extent, and accessibility of these resources. Sand and gravel and heavy minerals were found in concentrations offering potential for resource exploitation. Constraints on exploitation include (1) water depth restrictions for the protection of shellfish beds and public beaches, (2) fishing activities, (3) military, commercial, and fishing vessel traffic, (4) seafloor cable routes and (5) dump sites. Deposits composed of Pleistocene glacial sediments and/or Holocene marine sediments in regions of little or no user conflict were identified as sites potentially suitable for resource exploitation. The study plan stated additional data needs (geophysical profiling and vibracore sampling) at these sites. Subsequent to these recommendations, high-resolution seismic profiles and sidescan sonographs were obtained from these sites. Seismic stratigraphic analyses confirm the presence of extensive deposits of potential economic value. ?? 1989.

  1. 75 FR 64949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...determination suspends the requirements for Rhode Island to submit an attainment demonstration...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) 8-hour ozone nonattainment...impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory...

  2. 75 FR 31288 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) 8-hour ozone nonattainment...determination suspends the requirements for Rhode Island to submit an attainment demonstration...impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory...

  3. 77 FR 37653 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers for Arizona, Maryland and Rhode Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ...locations, Arizona, Maryland, and Rhode Island. These MEP centers will become...1,000,000 for the state of Rhode Island. The projects awarded under this...timely received proposals will be conducted to determine eligibility,...

  4. 78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ...September 18, 2013, at the Rhode Island Urban League, 246 Prairie Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 02905. The purpose of the orientation...address. The meetings will be conducted pursuant to the provisions of...

  5. The Rhode Island state house--the competition (1890-1892)

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Hilary A. (Hilary Ann)

    1988-01-01

    This is a study of the design competition for the new State House in Providence, Rhode Island, which began in 1890 and ended in 1892. The competition was supervised by the Rhode Island State House Commission, a body formed ...

  6. Denitrification Capacity in a Subterranean Estuary below a Rhode Island Fringing Salt Marsh

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    Park Service, Acadia National Park, P. O. Box 177, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609 4 Institute of Ecosystem and Life Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 136 Woodward Hall, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 3 National

  7. Evaluating prediction uncertainty of areas contributing recharge to well fields of multiple water suppliers in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt River Basins, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesz, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Three river basins in central Rhode Island-the Hunt River, the Annaquatucket River, and the Pettaquamscutt River-contain 15 production wells clustered in 4 pumping centers from which drinking water is withdrawn. These high-capacity production wells, operated by three water suppliers, are screened in coarse-grained deposits of glacial origin. The risk of contaminating water withdrawn by these well centers may be reduced if the areas contributing recharge to the well centers are delineated and these areas protected from land uses that may affect the water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began an investigation in 2009 to improve the understanding of groundwater flow and delineate areas contributing recharge to the well centers as part of an effort to protect the source of water to these well centers. A groundwater-flow model was calibrated by inverse modeling using nonlinear regression to obtain the optimal set of parameter values, which provide a single, best representation of the area contributing recharge to a well center. Summary statistics from the calibrated model were used to evaluate the uncertainty associated with the predicted areas contributing recharge to the well centers. This uncertainty analysis was done so that the contributing areas to the well centers would not be underestimated, thereby leaving the well centers inadequately protected. The analysis led to contributing areas expressed as a probability distribution (probabilistic contributing areas) that differ from a single or deterministic contributing area. Groundwater flow was simulated in the surficial deposits and the underlying bedrock in the 47-square-mile study area. Observations (165 groundwater levels and 7 base flows) provided sufficient information to estimate parameters representing recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial deposits and hydraulic conductance of streambeds. The calibrated value for recharge to valley-fill deposits was 27.3 inches per year (in/yr) and to upland till deposits was 18.7 in/yr. Calibrated values for horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the valley-fill deposits ranged from 20 to 480 feet per day (ft/d) and of the upland till deposits was 16.2 ft/d. Calibrated values of streambed hydraulic conductance ranged from 10,000 to 52,000 feet squared per day. Values of recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the valley-fill deposits were the most precisely estimated, whereas the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of till deposits was the least precisely estimated. Simulated areas contributing recharge to the well centers on the basis of the calibrated model ranged from 0.19 to 1.12 square miles (mi2) and covered a total area of 2.79 mi2 for average well center withdrawal rates during 2004-08 (235 to 1,858 gallons per minute (gal/min)). Simulated areas contributing recharge for the maximum well center pumping capacities (800 to 8,500 gal/min) ranged from 0.37 to 3.53 mi2 and covered a total area of 7.99 mi2 in the modeled area. Simulated areas contributing recharge extend upgradient of the well centers to upland till and to groundwater divides. Some areas contributing recharge include small, isolated areas remote from the well centers. Relatively short groundwater traveltimes from recharging locations to discharging wells indicated the wells are vulnerable to contamination from land-surface activities: median traveltimes ranged from 2.9 to 5.0 years for the well centers, and 78 to 93 percent of the traveltimes were 10 years or less for the well centers. Land cover in the areas contributing recharge includes a substantial amount of urban land use for the two well centers in the Hunt River Basin, agriculture and sand and gravel mining uses for the well center in the Annaquatucket River Basin, and, for the well center in the Pettaquamscutt River Basin, land use is primarily undeveloped. Model-prediction uncertainty was evaluated using a Monte Carlo analysis. The parameter variance-covariance matrix from nonlinear regression was used to cre

  8. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power in Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. In Rhode Island, any private rights in the flowing waters of a river or stream depend upon ownership of the abutting land. It appears Rhode Island follows the reasonable use theory of riparian law. The Department of Environmental Management is the most significant administrative agency with regard to dam construction, alteration, and operation in the state of Rhode Island.

  9. Coleoptera of Rhode Island: An On-Line Checklist

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sikes, Derek S.

    A creative presentation of checklist data by graduate student Derek Sikes of the University of Connecticut, this site provides access to taxonomic information on the beetles of Rhode Island. Featuring a searchable (by Family or Species) database, the site also includes an introduction, a map of Rhode Island, and a selection of source references. Typical returns provide Family, Subfamily, Species, and Determiner name, with hyperlinks to Voucher source(s). The searchable database includes 96 expected and documented families, 2,413 expected and documented species, and 511 apparent new state records.

  10. Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

  11. Rhode Island Career Education State Plan. Final Report, 1977-1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    A statewide career education needs assessment was conducted to evaluate career education in Rhode Island. Items in ten areas (self-awareness, career awareness, attitude development, educational awareness, daily living skills, stereotype elimination, career planning and decision-making skills, information, career exploration, and career…

  12. Researching the Laws of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail I Winson

    2003-01-01

    Roger Williams is generally recognized as the founder of Rhode Island. Although his settlement of Providence in 1636 was not the first or only settlement in the area, he was able to open the whole region to English settlement. Due to his friendship with local Indians and knowledge of their language he obtained land from the Indians and assisted other

  13. Race to the Top. Rhode Island. State-Reported APR: Year One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes Rhode Island's progress in implementing a comprehensive and coherent approach to education reform from the time of application through June 30, 2011. In particular, this report highlights key accomplishments over the reporting period in the four reform areas: standards and assessments, data systems to support instruction,…

  14. Economic Competitiveness and International Knowledge. A Special Policy Briefing for Rhode Island Legislators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Boston, MA.

    A policy briefing report discusses the initiatives currently in place in Rhode Island that are designed to enhance that state's economic and educational effectiveness in order to improve its international competitive position. The report is divided into four major areas of discussion: (1) an overview of the global economic challenge and the New…

  15. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ...utilize this anchorage area. The effect of this rule would not be significant...in Narragansett Bay or Rhode Island Sound at the entrance to Narragansett Bay...that they can better evaluate its effects on them and participate in the...

  16. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

  17. Community College of Rhode Island: Annual Report, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

    This annual report on the students, programs, faculty and staff, and finances of the Community College of Rhode Island includes both a narrative highlighting major changes and accomplishments, and a statistical presentation. The narrative section of the report begins with the president's message, followed by information on the following points of…

  18. Project Conversion: A PPBS Model for North Smithfield, Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Paul F.

    The object of this practicum was to help the small North Smithfield (Rhode Island) School System convert its budgetary procedures from a traditional Function/Object Budget to a Planning, Programing, Budgeting System (PPBS) format. The practicum effort incorporated an inservice training component for key staff members, plus a cooperative effort…

  19. Rhode Island Adult Basic Education. National Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulmetis, John

    A study was conducted to compare the Rhode Island Adult Basic Education (ABE) program with the ABE programs of other states and U.S. possessions. (The purpose of this study was to collect data on specific program variables which were not addressed by the National Advisory Council on Adult Education's 1978 Summary Report.) The data, pertaining only…

  20. Community College of Rhode Island. Annual Report, 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

    This annual report on the students, programs, faculty and staff, and finances of the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) includes both a narrative highlighting major changes and accomplishments and a statistical presentation. The narrative provides a message from the President and discusses 1992-93 enrollments; degrees offered; cooperative…

  1. Community College of Rhode Island: Annual Report, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

    This 1996 annual report describes major initiatives and outcomes for students, programs, faculty and staff, and finances at Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI). Following a message from the President reviewing priorities for 1996, CCRI initiatives are described related to workforce development, including customized programs, a…

  2. University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 26, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    forthcoming book, Colleges with a Conscience: 81 Great Schools with Outstanding Community Involvement (Random national psychology award Kathryn Quina, a professor of psychology at the University of Rhode Island, has the honor at the Association for Women in Psychology's national conference held in Tampa, Fla., earlier

  3. Ted Sizer's Opening Remarks, Fall Forum 2000, Providence, Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizer, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    This article presents Ted Sizer's opening remarks during the Fall Forum in 2000 at Providence, Rhode Island. In his opening remarks, Sizer reviews what the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is, and what it is not. CES, he contends, is not a fixed school design but rather, a set of ideas, ideas and conditions and convictions, called principles,…

  4. Continuing Evolution: The Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, Diane M.; O'Keefe, Beverly; Diffendale, Charlotte; Cohen, Amy; Schennum, Ruth; Pucciarelli, Larry; Collins, Cheryl; Merrifield, Margaret; Nardone, Virginia; Martin, Marilyn; Bryan, Linda; DeRobbio, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This narrative chronicles the continued evolution and development of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute, an intensive 5-day inservice professional development program designed for educational leaders from various sectors of the early care and education field. The goal is to review the continued use of successful practices…

  5. University of Rhode Island inAdvance June 5 , 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    to Prevent Substance Abuse" programs, also known as "Project BEST," to 6th through 8th grade children... URI researchers work on substance use prevention with Rhode Island middle school students Based, officials, and parents, URI Psychology Professor Wayne Velicer is bringing "Tailored Interventions

  6. The Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Program: An Exploratory Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    On January 3, 2006, the Rhode Island General Assembly enacted legislation that mandated the Department of Health (DOH) to implement a program to register qualified patients and their caregivers to allow possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana for personal use for statutorily defined illnesses and debilitating conditions. This exploratory program evaluation used the Conceptual Model of Nursing and

  7. University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 22, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    -Up in the Catholic Church won a CINE Golden Eagle Award in 2004. The gala and documentary screening are scheduledUniversity of Rhode Island inAdvance May 22, 2008 Volume 5, Issue 11 Golden Grads celebrate Golden 2008 Golden Grad celebration will be held May 30-31. Tale a look at the events we have planned

  8. University of Rhode Island inAdvance September 1, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Open House on September 17 Join us for the official grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony ecologist says abundant seaweed, algae in Narragansett Bay not unusual Rhode Island boaters and beachgoers accumulating on beaches, and occasional algae blooms in Narragansett Bay. "There are many factors contributing

  9. 76 FR 61131 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00008

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Rhode Island dated 09/26/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/27/2011 through 08/29/2011. Effective Date: 09/26/2011. Physical Loan...

  10. University of Rhode Island Adapted Aquatics Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scraba, Paula J.; Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    An overview is presented of the aquatics course, adapted for persons with disabilities, at the University of Rhode Island. A description of the course includes information on course requirements, objectives, content and learning activities, assignments, modules used in the course, and a course syllabus. A description of the course organization and…

  11. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION ABATEMENT ALTERNATIVES: PICILLO PROPERTY, COVENTRY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the second phase of a two-phase investigation undertaken by the MITRE Corp. to determine the nature and severity of ground and surface water contamination at the Picillo property in Coventry, Rhode Island and to make recommendations for permanent abatement o...

  12. University of Rhode Island inAdvance July 3, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    /14/08 12:09:13 PM] #12;University of Rhode Island inAdvance student-athletes. Seeking nominations The ROTC Alumni Chapter is seeking nominations to the URI ROTC Hall of Fame. Membership in the Hall of Fame is open to any person who is either an ROTC alumnus of URI, a supporter of the URI Cramer

  13. State of Rhode Island Vocational Education Part D. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Murray H.

    Covering the time period of May 1974 to August 1975, the document is an evaluation report of eight career education projects in Rhode Island elementary and secondary schools funded under part D of the Vocational Amendments Act of 1968. The evaluation data were collected by on-site visits and teacher observations. Unstructured interviews were…

  14. Rhode Island High School Diploma System Technical Assistance Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This Technical Assistance Bulletin is to be utilized by districts and schools to design and implement their components of the Rhode Island High School Diploma System (Diploma System) as required by the RI Board of Regents' "Regulations Regarding High School and Ensuring Literacy for Students Entering High School" (Regents' Regulations) issued in…

  15. State Summary of Rhode Island. Ed Watch Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Trust, Washington, DC.

    This report provides data on the academic achievement gap that separates low-income and minority students from other students, examining how well different groups of students perform in Rhode Island and noting inequities in teacher quality, course offerings, and funding. Included are tables and data that provide: a frontier gap analysis (a…

  16. Rhode Island School and District Accountability System Technical Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    On January 8, 2002, the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was reauthorized as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). NCLB required states to establish a single accountability system that includes every school and district. Rhode Island proposed an accountability model incorporating NCLB requirements to the US Department of…

  17. University of Rhode Island inAdvance July 7, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Center official grand opening Join us for the official grand opening and ribbon cutting ceremony initiative The University will take a leadership role in Rhode Island's new worksite wellness initiative species that makes up red tide. The vessel transported officials from the state's Department

  18. Unviersity of Rhode Island Library Reference Sources in Gerontology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Catherine E.

    Thirty-two sources in gerontology, located at the University of Rhode Island Library, are listed in this annotated bibliography as well as some interdisciplinary sources. This bibliography contains material published as recently as 1996 and includes annotations of an "Older Americans Almanac," bibliographies, a biographical dictionary, the…

  19. Wind Turbine Project at the University of Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Auriane Koster

    2006-01-01

    In the Fall of 2003, an initiative to develop and install a wind turbine on the University of Rhode Islands Kingston Campus was proposed by an undergraduate student, Courtney Blodgett. To spearhead this initiative, the Renewable Energy Club (REC) was created and recognized by the Student Senate, and support was received by the URI Offices of the President and Provost.

  20. renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    renewable energy from waste 1730 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, DC 20036 WWW Energy and Security Act of 2009 that was released as a discussion draft on March 31. While waste-to-energy gas reductions and renewable energy provided by waste-to-energy and if it implemented policies

  1. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 13, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    , the impact on Antarctic ecology could be serious, according to University of Rhode Island researchers 'rebreather' device for scuba divingOne drawback to scuba diving has always been the short duration, an advanced technology may soon be available so divers can dive longer on one tank of air. Junior ocean

  2. University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 12, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    parking spaces for students. Officials launched the projects at a celebration of the last days of Hope of Rhode Island inAdvance College of Nursing names 2005 top alumna At its 10th Annual Alumni Recognition Day, the URI College of Nursing honored Barbara Hazard Munro '61, M.S. '74, dean of the William F

  3. Childhood Lead Poisoning. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Ann-Marie, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.; Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most common pediatric health problems is childhood lead poisoning. This report examines the preventable problem of lead poisoning. The report describes childhood lead poisoning as both a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible, and as a housing problem. More than half the housing units in Rhode Island

  4. University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 25, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    to be shipwrecks," said Rod Mather, a URI associate professor of maritime history and underwater archaeology who in Newport Harbor Marine archaeologists from the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project and the University the archaeology and geology of the Aegean and Black seas. The expedition's primary focus is to study the seafloor

  5. 33 CFR 334.78 - Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.78 Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands...

  6. Offshore wind farm siting procedures applied offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Christopher M.

    Since 2008, the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) has been leading a Rhode Island Ocean Area Management Plan (RIOSAMP) in partnership with the University of Rhode Island, resulting in an extensive multidisciplinary analysis of the Rhode Island offshore environment and its suitability for siting an offshore wind farm. As part of the RIOSAMP project, a standard siting optimization approach was first developed based on a siting index defined as the ratio of costs associated with the wind farm deployment to the available wind resource. This index, combined within a marine spatial planning approach to address ecological and societal constraints, provided an initial macro-siting tool (Spaulding et al., 2010). The multiple GIS layers required in this approach and the absence of theoretical support to optimize the resulting zoning, led to an extension of the initial optimization approach into a more comprehensive macro-siting optimization tool, integrating societal and ecological constraints into the siting tool, the Wind Farm Siting Index (WIFSI) (Grilli et al, 2012). The projects led to the definition of several favorable development areas including a Renewable Energy Zone (REZ) off of Block Island, in State Waters. Deep Water Wind Inc. (DWW) plans to install and commission five 6 MW direct drive Siemens lattice jacket turbines in the REZ area, by 2014. In this thesis two major steps are accomplished to refine and expand the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool. First the macro-siting tool is expanded to include a model simulating the exclusionary zones defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. Second a micro-siting model is developed, optimizing the relative position of each turbine within a wind farm area. The micro-siting objective is to minimize, (1) the loss in power due to the loss of wind resource in the wake of the turbines (wake "effect"), and (2) the cable costs that inter-connect the turbines and connecting the farm to the land. The REZ area is chosen as test site for the algorithm, and an optimal layout for the 5 turbines is found and discussed. Similarly the FAA tool is applied to the Block Island airport demonstrating the complexity of the FAA exclusionary area, and defining the limits of the exclusionary areas. The FAA regulation model is a geometric model in which all major (FAA) regulations within RI and the RI topography are embedded. The user specifies the dimension of the proposed turbines and an airport of interest, and a map of exclusionary zones specific to the turbine height and rules applying to the airport is generated. The model is validated for the entire state of Rhode Island. The micro-siting model finds the optimum placement of each turbine for a given number of turbines within an area. It includes the aerodynamic constraints (loss in wind speed within the wake of a turbine) associated to the deployment of arrays of turbines and the cable interconnection cost. It is combined with the technical, ecological, and social constraints used in the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool to provide a comprehensive micro-siting tool. In the optimization algorithm, a simple wake model and turbine-clustering algorithm are combined with the WIFSI in an objective function; the objective function is optimized with a genetic algorithm (GA).

  7. Water Resources Data, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolow, R.S.; Zanca, J.L.; Driskell, T.R.; Ramsbey, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Massachusetts and Rhode Island consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This report contains discharge records for 108 gaging stations, stage records for 2 gaging stations, stage records for 3 ponds; monthend contents of 1 reservoir, precipitation totals at 8 gaging stations; water quality for 27 gaging stations, air temperature at 2 climatological stations; water levels for 129 observation wells, and ground-water quality for 15 wells. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not a part of the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements and miscellaneous surface-water-quality data. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

  8. Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island Date: 9/26/2011 Prepared byEdit, ArcEditor, ArcEurope, ArcExplorer, ArcExpress, ArcGIS, ArcGlobe, ArcGrid, ArcIMS, ARC/INFO, ArcInfo, ArcInfo Librarian, ArcInfo--Professional GIS, ArcInfo--The World's GIS, ArcLessons, ArcLocation, Arc

  9. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  10. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  11. Balancing Ground-Water Withdrawals and Streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Dickerman, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Ground water withdrawn for water supply reduces streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin in Rhode Island. These reductions may adversely affect aquatic habitats. A hydrologic model was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, Town of North Kingstown, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, and Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation to aid water-resource planning in the basin. Results of the model provide information that helps water suppliers and natural-resource managers evaluate strategies for balancing ground-water development and streamflow reductions in the basin.

  12. Eutrophication and management initiatives for the control of nutrient inputs to Rhode Island coastal lagoons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia Lee; Stephen Olsen

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of developing eutrophic conditions in small temperate lagoons along the coast of Rhode Island suggests that\\u000a in such shallow, macrophyte based systems the response to nutrient enrichment differs from that described for plankton based\\u000a systems. The nitrogen loadings per unit area of the salt ponds are 240–770 mmol N per m2 per year. Instead of the high nutrient

  13. A Precipitation-Runoff Model for the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2007-01-01

    A Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model of the Blackstone River Basin was developed and calibrated to study the effects of changing land- and water-use patterns on water resources. The 474.5 mi2 Blackstone River Basin in southeastern Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is experiencing rapid population and commercial growth throughout much of its area. This growth and the corresponding changes in land-use patterns are increasing stress on water resources and raising concerns about the future availability of water to meet residential and commercial needs. Increased withdrawals and wastewater-return flows also could adversely affect aquatic habitat, water quality, and the recreational value of the streams in the basin. The Blackstone River Basin was represented by 19 hydrologic response units (HRUs): 17 types of pervious areas (PERLNDs) established from combinations of surficial geology, land-use categories, and the distribution of public water and public sewer systems, and two types of impervious areas (IMPLNDs). Wetlands were combined with open water and simulated as stream reaches that receive runoff from surrounding pervious and impervious areas. This approach was taken to achieve greater flexibility in calibrating evapotranspiration losses from wetlands during the growing season. The basin was segmented into 50 reaches (RCHRES) to represent junctions at tributaries, major lakes and reservoirs, and drainage areas to streamflow-gaging stations. Climatological, streamflow, water-withdrawal, and wastewater-return data were collected during the study to develop the HSPF model. Climatological data collected at Worcester Regional Airport in Worcester, Massachusetts and T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, were used for model calibration. A total of 15 streamflow-gaging stations were used in the calibration. Streamflow was measured at eight continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey cooperative streamflow-gaging network, and at seven partial-record stations installed in 2004 for this study. Because the model-calibration period preceded data collection at the partial-record stations, a continuous streamflow record was estimated at these stations by correlation with flows at nearby continuous-record stations to provide additional streamflow data for model calibration. Water-use information was compiled for 1996-2001 and included municipal and commercial/industrial withdrawals, private residential withdrawals, golf-course withdrawals, municipal wastewater-return flows, and on-site septic effluent return flows. Streamflow depletion was computed for all time-varying ground-water withdrawals prior to simulation. Water-use data were included in the model to represent the net effect of water use on simulated hydrographs. Consequently, the calibrated values of the hydrologic parameters better represent the hydrologic response of the basin to precipitation. The model was calibrated for 1997-2001 to coincide with the land-use and water-use data compiled for the study. Four long-term stations (Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island) that monitor flow at 3.3, 5.4, 19, and 88 percent of the total basin area, respectively, provided the primary model-calibration points. Hydrographs, scatter plots, and flow-duration curves of observed and simulated discharges, along with various model-fit statistics, indicated that the model performed well over a range of hydrologic conditions. For example, the total runoff volume for the calibration period simulated at the Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island streamflow-gaging stations differed from the observed runoff v

  14. Potential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    - stitutions for water allocation leave market forces which exclude consideration of water scarcity to dictatePotential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island Arthur Gold the potential for conflict among residential and agricultural users of water in southern Rhode Island. The model

  15. EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER,

    E-print Network

    EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS devices in lobster traps has proven effective in allowingthe release of sublegal-sized American lobster Rhode Island lobster fishery. The use ofrectangular vents (42 x 152mm) resulted in a 79% decrease

  16. Application of Ra-223 as a Tracer of Groundwater in Southern Rhode Island Principle Investigators

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    ), Groundwater nitrogen in southern Rhode Island: concentrations and fluxes, Estuaries (in preparation) Kelly, R radionuclide tracer results to estimate the flux of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, in groundwaterApplication of Ra-223 as a Tracer of Groundwater in Southern Rhode Island Watersheds Principle

  17. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers (ESA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  18. The Nation's Report Card: State Reading 2002, Report for Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerry, Laura; Lutkus, Anthony

    This report provides selected results from the 2002 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for Rhode Island's public-school students at grades 4 and 8. Since 1992, reading has been assessed in four different years at the state level (at grade 4 in 1992 and 1994, and at both grades 4 and 8 in 1998 and 2002). Rhode Island participated in…

  19. In Rhode Island, an Unusual Marriage of Engineering and Languages Lures Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Students in the University of Rhode Island's International Engineering Program (IEP) spend a semester studying at an overseas university and another six months interning at a company abroad; at the end of five years, they earn two degrees, in engineering and a foreign language. Despite the extra academic demands, nearly a third of Rhode Island's…

  20. A Standards-Based Guide for Social Studies Programs in Rhode Island Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Dennis, Ed.; Fogle, Faith, Ed.

    The Rhode Island state social studies curriculum for history, geography, civics, economics, and the behavioral sciences should promote civic responsibility and active civic participation. Rhode Island recommends that teachers and administrators use national social studies content standards rather than support the development of their own state…

  1. Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P.G.; Parker, Castle E.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

  2. Recent marine podocopid Ostracoda of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Williams, R. B.

    1966-11-23

    ni. FM 6. Propontocypris edwardsi ( CusHmAN), a-c, RV int., LV hinge, both valves dorsal, X 90. Williams-Podocopid Ostracoda of Narragansett Bay 13 Material.-Specimens 34, of which 29 were articulated. Distribution.-Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island... hinge, X100; 7c, both valves dorsal . X100. FIG. 7. Sclerochilus conforms (NORMAN), a-c, RV int., LV hinge, both valves dorsal, X100. Family LOXOCONCHIDAE Sars, 1925 Genus LOXOCONCHA Sars Loxoconcha SARS, 1866, p. 61; SARS, 1926, p. 217; ALEX- ANDER...

  3. Spatial Patterns of Productivity in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koweek, D. A.; Prell, W. L.; Alexandre, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    Rhode Island is upgrading its sewage treatment plants to reduce the input of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to Narragansett Bay. Although Narragansett Bay is a nitrogen-limited ecosystem, consensus has not been reached on how the reduction in DIN will alter patterns of primary production. An accurate understanding of spatial productivity patterns is essential for effective estuarine management. In order to understand productivity patterns, estuarine scientists have traditionally used chlorophyll a (Chl. a) abundance as a productivity proxy. However, Chl. a in the water column is very dependent on immediate water column conditions and is not stable in the sediment. Chlorophyll degradation products (collectively referred to as chlorins) are stable biomarkers and their abundance can indicate past levels of Chl. a. We analyzed surface sediments from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island using the chlorin paleoproductivity proxy. Surface sediments have the added advantage of integrating over longer time scales (yearly-decadal) and can be more indicative of production patterns than water column Chl. a. Small sample size (0.25g) allows for high-resolution stratigraphy. Samples were injected (20 ?L injection loop) into an HPLC with a fluorescence detector operating in off-column mode (?ex=407 nm and (?em=662 nm). Preliminary results suggest a decrease in productivity between the upper and lower portions of Narragansett Bay. Our results will help characterize this shift in productivity patterns.

  4. Rhode Island Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education. Regulations Governing the Education of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Providence.

    This document contains regulations of the Rhode Island Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education governing the education of children with disabilities. Statutory language is provided that addresses the following areas: (1) purposes of the legislation; (2) definitions of terms used in the statutory language; (3) local education agency…

  5. REWSET: A prototype seismic and tsunami early warning system in Rhodes island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Gerasimos; Argyris, Ilias; Aggelou, Savvas; Karastathis, Vasilis

    2014-05-01

    Tsunami warning in near-field conditions is a critical issue in the Mediterranean Sea since the most important tsunami sources are situated within tsunami wave travel times starting from about five minutes. The project NEARTOWARN (2012-2013) supported by the EU-DG ECHO contributed substantially to the development of new tools for the near-field tsunami early warning in the Mediterranean. One of the main achievements is the development of a local warning system in the test-site of Rhodes island (Rhodes Early Warning System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis - REWSET). The system is composed by three main subsystems: (1) a network of eight seismic early warning devices installed in four different localities of the island, one in the civil protection, another in the Fire Brigade and another two in municipality buildings; (2) two radar-type (ultrasonic) tide-gauges installed in the eastern coastal zine of the island which was selected since research on the historical earthquake and tsunami activity has indicated that the most important, near-field tsunami sources are situated offshore to the east of Rhodes; (3) a crisis Geographic Management System (GMS), which is a web-based and GIS-based application incorporating a variety of thematic maps and other information types. The seismic early warning devices activate by strong (magnitude around 6 or more) earthquakes occurring at distances up to about 100 km from Rhodes, thus providing immediate mobilization of the civil protection. The tide-gauges transmit sea level data, while during the crisis the GMS supports decisions to be made by civil protection. In the near future it is planned the REWSET system to be integrated with national and international systems. REWSET is a prototype which certainly could be developed in other coastal areas of the Mediterranean and beyond.

  6. Sidescan-sonar imagery, multibeam bathymetry, and surficial geologic interpretations of the sea floor in Rhode Island Sound, off Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Twomey, Erin R.; Danforth, William W.; Haupt, Todd A.; Crocker, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology in estuaries and sounds along the northeastern coast of the United States. This report interprets the area covered by NOAA Survey H11320, about 72 km² of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound (RIS), located about 8 km south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island (fig. 1). Previous work in RIS includes studies of both sea-floor processes and subsurface geologic framework. McMaster (1960) mapped surficial sediment samples in Narragansett Bay and RIS and McMaster and others (1968) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in Block Island Sound and RIS. O'Hara and Oldale (1980) collected seismic-reflection profiles, sidescan-sonar data, and vibracores in eastern RIS (fig. 2). They interpreted the geologic history, assessed sand and gravel resources, and evaluated the mining impact of these resources. McMaster's (1960) interpretation of the surficial sediment within this study area consisted of sand with several isolated areas of gravel. Several other sediment samples were previously obtained within the study area: three National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) dredge samples from 1942 consisted of sand and one National Ocean Service (NOS) sample from 1939 was rocky (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). The purpose of this report is to define the sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments and interpret processes occurring on the sea floor using sidescan-sonar imagery, multibeam bathymetry, and historic seismic-reflection profiles.

  7. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52

    E-print Network

    SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52 ( SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORTKay, Secretary, Fish and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE larval abundance in the Western half of Greenwi ch Bay in 1952 2\\\\ #12;SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE

  8. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-02-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  9. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  10. Water Resources Data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolow, R.S.; Comeau, L.Y.; Zanca, J.L.; Ramsbey, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Massachusetts and Rhode Island each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the States. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data-Massachusetts and Rhode Island.' Hydrologic data are also available through the Massachusetts-Rhode Island District Home Page on the world-wide web (http://ma.water.usgs.gov). Historical data and real-time data (for sites equipped with satellite gageheight telemeter) are also available. The home page also contains a link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Home Page where streamflow data from locations throughout the United States can be retrieved. This report series includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels of ground-water wells. This volume contains discharge records at 93 gaging stations; monthend contents of 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 22 gaging stations; and water levels for 139 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 1 and 2. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. This series of annual reports for Massachusetts and Rhode Island began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water-resources data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on stream discharge and stage and on lake or reservoir contents and stage, through September 1960, were published annually under the title 'Surface-Water Supply of the United States, Parts 1A and 1B.' For the 1961 through 1970 water years, the data were published in two 5-year reports. Data on chemical quality, temperature, and suspended sediment for the 1941 through 1970 water years were published annually under the title 'Quality of Surface Waters of the United States,' and water levels for the 1939 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services, Box 25286, Denver Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MARI-98-1.' For archiving and general distribution, the reports for 1971-74 water years also are identified as water-data reports. These water-data reports are for sale in paper copy or in microfiche by the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Comme

  11. Water Resources Data Massachusetts and Rhode Island Water Year 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolow, R.S.; Zanca, J.L.; Murino, Domenic, Jr.; Ramsbey, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Massachusetts and Rhode Island each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the States. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data-Massachusetts and Rhode Island.' Hydrologic data are also available through the Massachusetts-Rhode Island District Home Page on the world-wide web (http://ma.water.usgs.gov). Historical data and real-time data (for sites equipped with satellite gage-height telemeter) are also available. The home page also contains a link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Home Page where streamflow data from locations throughout the United States can be retrieved. This report series includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of ground-water wells; and water quality of ground-water wells. This volume contains discharge records at 90 gaging stations; stage records at 2 gaging stations; monthend contents of 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 31 gaging stations; water quality at 27 observation wells; and water levels for 139 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 1 and 2. Short-term water-quality data were collected at 21 gaging stations and 27 observation wells and are shown in figure 3. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. This series of annual reports for Massachusetts and Rhode Island began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water-resources data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on stream discharge and stage and on lake or reservoir contents and stage, through September 1960, were published annually under the title 'Surface-Water Supply of the United States, Parts 1A and 1B.' For the 1961 through 1970 water years, the data were published in two 5-year reports. Data on chemical quality, temperature, and suspended sediment for the 1941 through 1970 water years were published annually under the title 'Quality of Surface Waters of the United States,' and water levels for the 1939 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services, Box 25286, Denver Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MARI-98-1.' For archiving and general d

  12. Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Central Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Denny, J.F.; Haupt, T.A.; Crocker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology of areas along the northeastern coast of the United States. During 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE conducted Hydrographic Survey H11321 in Rhode Island Sound. This sidescan-sonar and bathymetry survey covers an area of 93 km? located 12 km southeast of Brenton Point, RI in water depths of 28-39 m (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to delineate sea floor features and sedimentary environments of this area in central Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11321 and seismic-reflection data from a previous USGS field study (Needell and others, 1983a). This is important for the study of benthic habitats and provides a framework for future research. Prior work in this area includes the mapping of surface sediments and surficial geology. McMaster (1960) collected sediment samples from Rhode Island Sound and Narragansett Bay and mapped our study area as having a sandy sea floor. In addition, one sample of sand from the National Ocean Service (NOS) Hydrographic Database came from a location in the northeast part of our study area in 1939 (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). McMaster and others (1968) used seismic-reflection profiles to map the locations of a cuesta of Cretaceous sediments crossing Rhode Island Sound and post-Cretaceous drainage channels. Knebel and others (1982) identified sedimentary environments in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan sonographs. Needell and others (1983b) studied the Quaternary geology and mapped the structure, sedimentary environments, and geologic hazards in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection data. Sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11320, which overlaps the far eastern edge of our study area, was interpreted to consist of basins surrounded by a moraine and bathymetric highs composed of till with areas of rocks, sand waves, hummocks, glaciolacustrine erosional outliers, small scarps and elongate hills (fig. 1; McMullen and others, 2007). Some of those features extend into this study area.

  13. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

  14. 78 FR 63383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas Permitting Authority and Tailoring...primarily relating to regulation of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) under Rhode Island's...Significant Deterioration and Title V Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule.''...

  15. Modeling of an MTBE plume at Pascoag, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrttinen, A.; Boving, T.; Kolditz, O.

    2009-05-01

    A numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed to predict the extent of impact from methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) release on a down-gradient drinking water well field. An MTBE incident in Pascoag, Rhode Island, was used as a case study and the plume’s past and future development was simulated using scenario analysis. The numerical code used was GeoSys/Rockflow, which permits a coupled flow and transport simulation as one object, thus alleviating the need for simulating the MTBE fate with separate flow and transport codes. The numerical model was built on available hydrogeological and chemical data as well as on GIS information of the site. By comparing the simulated results with observed field data, it was found that the model could provide reliable results even when the simulated aquifer was simplified to a two-dimensional flow and transport domain. Finally, the calibrated model was used for exploring a location that may be suitable for a new well field. Despite the model limitations associated with uncertainties of data and simplifying assumptions, numerical modeling of this MTBE contaminated site proved a useful tool and provided guidance for future municipal well field operation strategies and aquifer remediation alternatives.

  16. Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center at the University of Rhode Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-15

    Based at the University of Rhode Island, the Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center (DFCSC) "supports state, national, and international public welfare through education, research, training, and service in forensic investigations and securing information systems." The website provides access to news from the fields of digital forensics and cyber security, along with working papers, materials on ongoing research projects, and academic programs. In the "Resources" area, visitors can look over information from the Department of Homeland Security, along with a collection of free cyber security tools. In the "Academics" area, visitors can learn about the Center's academic degree and certificate programs. Finally, the "Research" area contains their technical reports and student theses on a diverse set of topics.

  17. Marine Benthic Communities of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds and What they're Good For

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benthic invertebrates of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds include those adapted to near-shore habitats with variable temperature and salinity, mid-shelf species with narrower requirements, and boreal species that avoid elevated temperatures. Studies of benthic fauna in th...

  18. Restoring the lobster stock near Rhode Island: the North Cape lobster restoration program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Cooper; M. Clancy

    2005-01-01

    In a winter storm in January 1996, the oil barge North Cape ran aground on Moonstone Beach in Rhode Island, spilling approximately 800,000 gallons of home heating oil into Block Island Sound and onto the shore. It is estimated that 9 million American lobsters from juveniles to adults were killed in the spill, along with several thousand birds, and millions

  19. The Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Program: Experience with statewide hearing screening (1993-1996)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty R. Vohr; Lisa M. Carty; Patricia E. Moore; Kristen Letourneau

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate key outcomes of a universal hearing screen\\/rescreen program for all births with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in all 8 maternity hospitals in the state of Rhode Island over a 4-year period.Study design: This was a retrospective analysis of the hearing screen\\/rescreen refer data collected prospectively for 53,121 survivors born in Rhode

  20. Organochlorine concentrations in prefledging common terns Sterna hirundo at three Rhode Island USA colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bunck, C.M.; Stafford, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDPEs) in carcasses of prefledging Common Terns (Sterna hirundo) at three Rhode Island colonies support the hypothesis that local contamination is responsible for among-colony differences observed in eggs in an earlier study. The highest concentrations of DDE and PCBs (mean=0.24 and 2.8 ppm wet weight) were found in prefledging terns from Providence, a highly industrialized area, and the lowest (DDE range=nd-0.11, PCBs mean=0.85) in terns from Price Neck, an undeveloped area 40 km to the south, PCDPEs were detected in 3 of 14 tern carcasses from Providence and were not detected in carcasses from 2 other colonies. The occurrence and concentrations of DDE and PCBs in killifish (Fundulus spp.), a major dietary item of Common Terns, qualitatively demonstrated the same trend among locations.

  1. Organochlorine concentrations in prefledging common terns at three Rhode Island colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Bunck, C.M.; Stafford, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Concentrations of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDPEs) in carcasses of prefledging Common Terns (Sterna hirundo) at three Rhode Island colonies support the hypothesis that local contamination is responsible for among-colony differences observed in eggs in an earlier study. The highest concentrations of DDE and PCBs (mean = 0.24 and 2.8 ppm wet weight) were found in prefledging terns from Providence, a highly industrializedd area, and the lowest (DDE range = nd-011I, PCBs mean = 0.85) in terns from Price Neck, an undeveloped area 40 km to the south. PCDPEs were detected in 3 of 14 tern carcases from Providence and were not detected in carcasses from 2 other colonies. The occurrence and concentrations of DDE and PCBs in killifish (Fundulus spp.), a major dietary item of Common Terns, qualitatively demonstrated the same trend among locations

  2. Evaluating the Teacher Center Pilots: The Third Annual Report, 1974-1975. Volume 3, Rhode Island Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covert, Robert W.

    This four-part report provides an analysis of the Rhode Island Teacher Center (RITC) pilot program during the fiscal year 1975. Part 1 discusses the Center's major function, objectives, and relationship to the Bureau of Technical Assistance within the Rhode Island State Department of Education. Part 2 examines the survey of teachers and…

  3. The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Toward a Coherent System of Allocating State Aid to Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is clearly a challenging task. This paper presents the Rhode Island story on school funding reform. First, the paper begins with a short history of Rhode Island's school finance system and the key factors that called for school funding reform. Second, the paper discusses…

  4. Education Watch: Rhode Island. Key Education Facts and Figures. Achievement, Attainment and Opportunity. From Elementary School through College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Trust, Washington, DC.

    This report compares Rhode Island's reading and mathematics performance on the most recent administrations of the state assessment with performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). To indicate how Rhode Island is doing in narrowing the academic achievement gap between African American and Latino students and their white,…

  5. Race to the Top. Rhode Island Report. Year 2: School Year 2011-2012. [State-Specific Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of Rhode Island's Year 2 Race to the Top implementation, highlighting successes and accomplishments, identifying challenges, and providing lessons learned from implementation from approximately September 2011 through September 2012. In Year 2, Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE)…

  6. Side-by-Side: Novice and Veteran Principals Are a Powerful Mix for Learning in Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Donna; Carlson, Donna Vigneau

    2008-01-01

    Two key insights guide Rhode Island's work to support principals. First, leaders at all experience levels need support from a network of colleagues. Second, leaders grow when they work with colleagues of diverse experience levels. That led Rhode Island to create a continuum of support that enables principals to address their learning needs through…

  7. A Status Study of Elementary and Middle/Junior-High School Music Education in Rhode Island, 1973. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Univ., Kingston. Dept. of Music.

    This final report and status study codified the professional dimension of existing educational programs in music at the elementary and middle/junior high school levels in Rhode Island public schools. A substantial portion of the questionnaire sent to listed music instructors in the state of Rhode Island was composed of applicable minimum optimum…

  8. Race to the Top. Rhode Island Report. Year 1: School Year 2010-2011. [State-Specific Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of Rhode Island's Year 1 Race to the Top implementation, highlighting successes and accomplishments, identifying challenges, and providing lessons learned from implementation to date. According to the State, in Year 1, Rhode Island greatly increased statewide capacity to begin…

  9. Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Block Island Sound, offshore Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; McMullen, K.Y.; Blankenship, M.A.; Glomb, K.A.; Wright, D.B.; Smith, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 634 square kilometers of sea floor in Block Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic surveys H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139, these combined acoustic data and the sea-floor sediment sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2011-006-FA (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, wind farms and fisheries) along the Rhode Island inner continental shelf.

  10. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  11. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  12. Sociodemographic and Health-Related Risk Factors Associated with Tooth Loss Among Adults in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Catherine A.; Oh, Junhie; Fuller, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Oral health is an integral component of overall health and well-being. Very little Rhode Island state-level information exists on the determinants of tooth loss. The objective of this study was to systematically identify sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, health conditions and disabilities, and dental insurance coverage associated with tooth loss among noninstitutionalized adults in Rhode Island. Methods We analyzed Rhode Island’s 2008 and 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data in 2011. The survey had 4 response categories for tooth loss: none, 1 to 5, 6 or more but not all, and all. We used multinomial logistic regression models to assess the relationship between 4 risk factor domains and tooth loss. Results An estimated 57.6% of Rhode Island adults had all their teeth, 28.9% had 1 to 5 missing teeth, 8.9% had 6 to 31 missing teeth, and 4.6% were edentulous. Respondents who had low income, low education, unhealthy behaviors (ie, were former or current smokers and did not engage in physical activity), chronic conditions (ie, diabetes and obesity) or disabilities, and no dental insurance coverage were more likely to have fewer teeth compared with their referent groups. However, the association of these variables with tooth loss was not uniform by age group. Conclusion Adults who report risky health behaviors or impaired health may be considered target subpopulations for prevention of tooth loss and promotion of good oral health. PMID:23537519

  13. Records of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing birds (Aves) in Rhode Island, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerwin E. Hyland; Jenifer Bernier; Daniel Markowski; Andrew MacLachlan; Zuhair Amr; Jay Pitocchelli; James Myers; Renjie Hu

    2000-01-01

    Incidental to studies on Lyme disease in Rhode Island, a total of 531 birds represented by 68 species, was collected and examined for the presence of ticks and other ectoparasites. Of these birds, a total of 230, comprising 36 species, harbored ticks in the pre-adult stage. In all 1,174 ticks were collected. Tick burden ranged from 1 to 76 specimens

  14. A POPULATION MODEL FOR THE DIAMONDBACK TERRAPIN IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diamondback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin is listed as a state-endangered species in Rhode Island, and there is only one known breeding population in the state. The Barrington Land Conservation Trust has been monitoring the nesting activity of this population since 1990 and ha...

  15. Tourism and waterfront renewal: assessing residential perception in Newport, Rhode Island, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald H. Krausse

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the perception of harbor residents on tourism and waterfront redevelopments in Newport, Rhode Island. In the summer of 1992, about 160 surveys were conducted of households located directly in the tourism district. The results indicate that by and large the waterfront community perceives the current traffic conditions, inadequate parking, lack of privacy,

  16. Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction among State Agency Rehabilitation Counselors: Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Marcheta; Satcher, Jamie

    The job satisfaction and organizational commitment of rehabilitation counselors working in the public rehabilitation agency in Rhode Island are the focus of this study. Participants were 23 rehabilitation counselor survey respondents whose agencies agreed to take part in the study. A total of 50 surveys were mailed. Job satisfaction was measured…

  17. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND -COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILE MARKETING CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND - COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILE MARKETING CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET www.uri.edu/hss/tmd HS_TXMK_ BS TEXTILE MARKETING (TXMK)...... 120 credits Name: Entering Business Requirements (37 credits) Textile Requirements (29 credits) BUS 201 Financial Accounting (3) ECN

  18. Assessment of Non-English Speaking Students in Rhode Island. Appendices to the Final Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Univ., Kingston. Curriculum Research and Development Center.

    In response to a 1979 mandate, a survey was conducted to determine the number of non English speaking school age children in Rhode Island. This document contains instruments used in the survey, as well as tabulated results. Included are (1) a fact sheet distributed to school districts about the district total by language groups; (2) a…

  19. Population Status of the Seaside Sparrow in Rhode Island: A 25-Year Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) is currently listed as a species of ?special concern? in Rhode Island and has been designated as a ?watch list? species in the Partners in Flight North American Landbird Conservation Plan. To assess the population status of breeding Seas...

  20. Research and Development Project in Career Education. [Providence, Rhode Island] Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, William J., Jr.

    The project, conducted from June 1973 to December 1974, was designed to further the development of career education activities in Rhode Island. The goals and objectives of the project were as follows: (1) a synthesis of statewide and national information regarding career education models; (2) development of three model types focusing on the…

  1. REDUCED FOREST COVER AND CHANGES IN BREEDING BIRD SPECIES COMPOSITION IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship of land use/cover, riparian vegetation, and avian populations. Our objective was to compare the vegetation structure in riparian corridors with the composition of breeding bird populations in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds alo...

  2. Evaluation of a Universally-Free School Breakfast Program Demonstration Project: Central Falls, Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John T.; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Kelly, Gayle Leitch

    In early 1994, Central Falls, Rhode Island's Kids First, a collaborative partnership between the Central Falls School Department and local community leaders, launched a pilot universally-free school breakfast program (UF-SBP) called "Operation Breakfast." One of the goals of Operation Breakfast was to improve SBP participation; school breakfast…

  3. Community College of Rhode Island Report on Career Placement and External Transfer of 1990 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Coll. of Rhode Island, Warwick.

    In 1991, a survey was conducted of the 1,301 students who graduated from the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) in 1990 to identify the educational goals and career directions of CCRI graduates; to gather information about the employment status and salary ranges of graduates who elected full-time employment; and to identify colleges and…

  4. Final Report on Defining and Classifying Cases of Child Abuse in Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    A questionnaire survey of 565 professionals in seven occupational and organizational contexts (physicians, psychiatrists, elementary school counselors and principals, public and private social workers, and police officers) in Rhode Island was undertaken to investigate the process by which child abuse is defined and identified. In addition to the…

  5. USE OF A RHODE ISLAND SALT POND BY JUVENILE WINTER FLOUNDER, PSEUDOPLEURONECTES AMERICANUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used a 1.75 m2 drop ring sampler in June and July of 2000 to quantify populations of juvenile flatfishes and other small nekton in Ninigret Pond, Rhode Island. The drop sampler was deployed in approximately 1 m of water from a boom mounted on the bow of a small boat. Abundance...

  6. US EPA WINTER FLOUNDER PROJECTS AND OTHER WORK IN RHODE ISLAND SALT PONDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We will briefly summarize selected EPA research in Rhode Island's salt ponds from 2000 through 2003. In one project, during the summer of 2000, we used a 1.75 m2 drop sampler to quantify populations of juvenile flatfishes and other small nekton in Ninigret Pond. Mean abundance ...

  7. The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Developing New Strategies on Equity and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is a challenging task. Too often, state leaders embrace major school funding reform only when they are directed by court decisions. In this seemingly contentious policy domain, the Rhode Island General Assembly defied the odds--working in a recessionary climate and in the…

  8. NEKTON HABITAT QUALITY AT SHALLOW-WATER SITES IN TWO RHODE ISLAND COASTAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated nekton habitat quality at five shallow-water sites in two Rhode Island systems by comparing nekton densities and biomass, number of species, prey availability and feeding, and abundance of winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus. Nekton density and biomass wer...

  9. School District Regionalization in Rhode Island: Relationship with Spending and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In Rhode Island, unless costs for education are controlled, taxpayers could face increased property taxes, increased sales tax on goods and services, and tax increases to existing fees to raise revenue (NEEP, 2010). Reducing the number of school districts was cited as the number two solution by the New England Economic Partnership in 2010 to…

  10. MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1

    E-print Network

    MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1 MICHAEL J. FOGARTY? DAVID v. D. BORDEN, 3 AND HOWARD J. RUSSELL' ABSTRACT In 1974 and 1975 a total of3,063 American lobster movement patterns. Lobster movements at inshore locations were generally localized; the mean distance

  11. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  12. LINKING JUVENILE FISH AND THEIR HABITATS: AN EXAMPLE FROM NARRAGANSETT BAY ,RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used two methods and existing field survey data to link juvenile fish and their habitats. The first method used seine survey data collected monthly from July to October 1988-1996 at fixed stations in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Thirteen fish species making up 1% or more of...

  13. In Rhode Island, Building a bRIdge to the Knowledge Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Adam

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Rhode Island was in the early stages of refocusing its economic development efforts on transitioning to a knowledge-based economy. This move would require an educated workforce, largely deemed the responsibility of the state's 11 public and private institutions of higher education. For a state with slightly over a million residents and…

  14. University of Rhode Island inAdvance Online Newsletter July 17, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    today! Calling all film buffs The Alumni Association invites you to opening night of the Rhode IslandCoy Stadium. Join alumni, family, and friends for a great night out as the PawSox take on Syracuse. Gates open of summertime algae blooms Seaweed covered beaches and algae filled waterways are an increasing problem around

  15. A COMAPRISON OF MERCURY IN MINK AND FISHER IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparison of total mercury concentrations and nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values in muscle tissue and stomach contents of mink (Mustela vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti) from Rhode Island in 2000- 2003 showed results which appeared to reflect dietary differences betwee...

  16. Lessons From the Classroom Level: Federal and State Accountability in Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srikantaiah, Deepa; Zhang, Ying; Swayhoover, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    In the winter and spring of 2007-08, the Center on Education Policy (CEP) expanded its ongoing research on the impact of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) by conducting case studies of six schools in Rhode Island to learn more about the influence of NCLB and related state accountability policies on curriculum, instruction, and student…

  17. The Status of Transition Class Programs in Rhode Island Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrowski, Patricia Maslin

    To learn the extent to which transition class programs had been implemented in the Rhode Island public schools, all districts in the state were surveyed. The survey was designed to gather basic information about transition programs operating throughout the state, and learn why such programs have not been introduced in some districts. Findings,…

  18. A State Accountability System as a Technology of Social Control: The Case of Rhode Island, USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWalters, Peter; Cheek, Dennis W.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the recently developed state accountability system for public elementary and secondary schools in Rhode Island. Discusses accountability systems as technologies of social control and considers the costs, benefits, uncertainties, and necessary tensions associated with accountability systems. (Author/SLD)

  19. Rhode Island Teacher's Assistant Professional Development Plan. A Report to the General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anselmo, Doris

    The Rhode Island Teacher Assistant Professional Development Plan emphasizes developing school district capacity to provide appropriate training to teacher assistants. The Department recognizes that the most effective professional development is linked to the needs of the individual in light of the needs of students they support. The plan's primary…

  20. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Rhode Island State Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

  1. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Rhode Island related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  2. Research on the Effectiveness of the Rhode Island Adult Drug Court

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen T. Burke

    2009-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of the Rhode Island Adult Drug Court Program (RIADC) by examining the impact of the treatment modalities offered by the Drug Court on paticipants' likelihood of graduating successfully from the Program. Uses data on the seventy-one participants in the Program during the 2005\\/6 Court cycle, and describes the results in detail.

  3. USING WINTER FLOUNDER GROWTH RATES TO ASSSESS HABITAT QUALITY IN RHODE ISLAND'S COASTAL LAGOONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used growth rates of juvenile winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus, to assess habitat quality in 3 of Rhode Island's coastal salt ponds that had differing levels of nutrients and human development. In each pond, 1 m2 cages were placed in vegetated and unvegetated habi...

  4. Rhode Island Pension Reform: Implications and Opportunities for Education. Education Sector Policy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriot-Hatfield, Jennie; Monahan, Amy; Rosenberg, Sarah; Tucker, Bill

    2011-01-01

    On August 24, 2010, the state of Rhode Island received some outstanding news. Its yearlong, bipartisan effort to develop new policies to spur educational improvement was about to pay off. The state, along with eight others and the District of Columbia, was named a winner of the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. The…

  5. METAL SURVEY OF THE MARINE CLAM 'PITAR MORRHUANA' COLLECTED NEAR A RHODE ISLAND (USA) ELECTROPLATING PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic fauna were collected from 17 stations in mid-Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during September 1973 from the vicinity of the recently-closed Quonset Point electroplating facility. Despite repeated sampling, most of the 14 species of molluscs taken, including the widgeon cl...

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN JUVENILE WINTER FLOUNDER AND MULTIPLE-SCALE HABITAT VARIATION IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid random-sampling method was used to relate densities of juvenile winter flounder to multiple scales of habitat variation in Narragansett Bay and two nearby coastal lagoons in Rhode Island. We used a 1-m beam trawl with attached video camera, continuous GPS track overlay, ...

  7. Comprehensive School Counseling in Rhode Island: Access to Services and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimmitt, Carey; Wilkerson, Belinda

    2012-01-01

    This study explored relationships among school counseling practices, secondary school demographics, and student outcomes in the state of Rhode Island during a 2-year period. The results showed strong and consistent correlations between increased amounts of school counseling services and positive student outcomes. Schools with higher percentages of…

  8. RISK ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY - PHASE III NAVAL CONSTRUCTION BATTALION CENTER - DAVISVILLE, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to etermine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. llen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was cl...

  9. The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

  10. Continuity in the Rhode Island Writing Project: Keeping Teachers at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozbek, Susan; Roemer, Marjorie; Sanzen, Keith; Vander Does, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Presenters' Collaborative Network (PCN) was started in 2002 to support the creation of a corps of teacher-consultants who would lead workshops for the Rhode Island Writing Project (RIWP) at local schools and conferences. The PCN is a group of teachers, past participants from summer institutes or year-round embedded programs in schools that…

  11. BS in Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS) degree program University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Medicinal Chemistry Toxicology Pharmacoeconomics Pharmaceutics 1st and 2nd year 3rd and 4th year 120 creditsBS in Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS) degree program University of Rhode Island March 4, 2011. Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, updated 02/18/2013 To prepare students for careers

  12. USING A FISH INDEX TO ASSESS HABITAT QUALITY IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed an estuarine index of biotic integrity to assess habitat quality in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Fish were collected at 18 fixed stations with a 61-m x 3.05-m beach seine once per month in July and August from 1988 to 1999. Stations were designated high or low qua...

  13. A Plan for an Out-of-District Transportation Cooperative in Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Robert W.

    Less than five percent of the pupils in northeastern Rhode Island Region I are transported to schools or educational centers outside of their districts. However, about 20 percent of the total transportation costs are expended for out-of-district transportation of nonpublic school, vocational, and special education students. The purpose of the…

  14. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    Noting that childhood lead poisoning is one of the most common preventable pediatric health problems, this report examines lead poisoning as a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible and as a housing problem directly related to a shortage of safe, affordable housing. The report details screening rates in Rhode

  15. Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Western Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Haupt, T.A.; Crocker, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working together to interpret sea-floor geology along the northeastern coast of the United States. In 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE completed survey H11322, a sidescan-sonar and bathymetric survey that covers about 60 square kilometers of the sea floor in western Rhode Island Sound. This report interprets sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA survey H11322 to delineate sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in the study area. Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous Coastal Plain sediments in Rhode Island Sound underlie Pleistocene glacial drift that affects the distribution of surficial Holocene marine and transgressional sediments. The study area has three bathymetric highs separated by a channel system. Features and patterns in the sidescan-sonar imagery include low, moderate, and high backscatter; sand waves; scarps; erosional outliers; boulders; trawl marks; and dredge spoils. Four sedimentary environments in the study area, based on backscatter and bathymetric features, include those characterized by erosion or nondeposition, coarse-grained bedload transport, sorting and reworking, and deposition. Environments characterized by erosion or nondeposition and coarse-grained bedload transport are located in shallower areas and environments characterized by deposition are located in deeper areas; environments characterized by sorting and reworking processes are generally located at moderate depths.

  16. Impact of Immigration on the Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Rhode Island?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Kwara, Awewura; Martin, Melissa; Gillani, Fizza S.; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mutungi, Peninnah; Crellin, Joyce; Obaro, Stephen; Gosciminski, Michael; Carter, E. Jane; Rastogi, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    While foreign-born persons constitute only 11% of the population in the state of Rhode Island, they account for more than 65% of incident tuberculosis (TB) annually. We investigated the molecular-epidemiological differences between foreign-born and U.S.-born TB patients to estimate the degree of recent transmission and identify predictors of clustering. A total of 288 isolates collected from culture-confirmed TB cases in Rhode Island between 1995 and 2004 were fingerprinted by spoligotyping and 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. Of the 288 fingerprinted isolates, 109 (37.8%) belonged to 36 genetic clusters. Our findings demonstrate that U.S.-born patients, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific islanders, and uninsured patients were significantly more likely to be clustered. Recent transmission among the foreign-born population was restricted and occurred mostly locally, within populations originating from the same region. Nevertheless, TB transmission between the foreign-born and U.S.-born population should not be neglected, since 80% of the mixed clusters of foreign- and U.S.-born persons arose from a foreign-born source case. We conclude that timely access to routine screening and treatment for latent TB infection for immigrants is vital for disease elimination in Rhode Island. PMID:21159930

  17. Impact of immigration on the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Kwara, Awewura; Martin, Melissa; Gillani, Fizza S; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mutungi, Peninnah; Crellin, Joyce; Obaro, Stephen; Gosciminski, Michael; Carter, E Jane; Rastogi, Nalin

    2011-03-01

    While foreign-born persons constitute only 11% of the population in the state of Rhode Island, they account for more than 65% of incident tuberculosis (TB) annually. We investigated the molecular-epidemiological differences between foreign-born and U.S.-born TB patients to estimate the degree of recent transmission and identify predictors of clustering. A total of 288 isolates collected from culture-confirmed TB cases in Rhode Island between 1995 and 2004 were fingerprinted by spoligotyping and 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. Of the 288 fingerprinted isolates, 109 (37.8%) belonged to 36 genetic clusters. Our findings demonstrate that U.S.-born patients, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific islanders, and uninsured patients were significantly more likely to be clustered. Recent transmission among the foreign-born population was restricted and occurred mostly locally, within populations originating from the same region. Nevertheless, TB transmission between the foreign-born and U.S.-born population should not be neglected, since 80% of the mixed clusters of foreign- and U.S.-born persons arose from a foreign-born source case. We conclude that timely access to routine screening and treatment for latent TB infection for immigrants is vital for disease elimination in Rhode Island. PMID:21159930

  18. Digital seismic-reflection data from western Rhode Island Sound, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel Neecho. Data from this survey were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center's Data Library. Due to recent interest in the geology of Rhode Island Sound and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from this cruise were scanned and converted to Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (LORAN-C) time delays to latitudes and longitudes, which are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format.

  19. HIV prevention needs among street-based male sex workers in Providence, Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Landers, Stewart; Closson, Elizabeth F; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Holcomb, Richard; Spurlock, Shannon; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2014-11-01

    We examined data derived from a needs assessment of the personal and social characteristics and HIV risk behavior of street-based male sex workers, in Providence, Rhode Island, who engage in transactional sexual intercourse with other men. Substance use, injected drugs, needle sharing, and psychosocial distress were highly prevalent among the sample. History of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse was associated with increased risk of condomless anal sexual intercourse with paying male clients. PMID:25211761

  20. Disparities in Pregnancy Healthcare Utilization Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women in Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erica Bromley; Anthony Nunes; Maureen G. Phipps

    Low healthcare utilization is a prime contributor to adverse health outcomes in both the general population and the Hispanic\\u000a community. This study compares background characteristics and rates of prenatal and postpartum health care utilization between\\u000a Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Using the Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2002–2008,\\u000a we assess rates of prenatal and postpartum healthcare utilization

  1. Ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts by children--Rhode Island, January 1994-July 1996 .

    PubMed

    1997-02-14

    During 1995, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) received 7917 reports of potentially toxic exposures to tobacco products among children aged < or = 6 years in the United States. Most cases of nicotine poisoning among children result from their ingestion of cigarettes or cigars. Acute nicotine poisoning is characterized by rapid onset of symptoms that may be severe when large amounts have been ingested. During January 1994-July 1996, the Rhode Island Poison Control Center (RIPCC) received 146 reports of ingestion of products containing nicotine by children aged < or = 6 years. To characterize risk factors for and outcomes associated with ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts among children aged < or = 6 years, the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDH) analyzed data from the RIPCC and the 1996 Rhode Island Health Interview Survey (RIHIS). This report summarizes the findings of the study, which indicate that ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts by children aged < or = 6 years resulted in minor toxic effects and occurred more frequently in households where smoking was permitted in the presence of children and where cigarettes and cigarette wastes were accessible to children. PMID:9045041

  2. Site monitoring and analysis, Region 1. Volume 3, Site monitoring reports: Rhode Island and Maine, Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, L.B.

    1991-08-01

    In Rhode Island, January 14--16, 1991 and January 29--31, 1991, the Weatherization Assistance Programs of Warwick Community Action, Inc. (WCA) and South County Community Action, Inc. (SCCA) were monitored by B & M Technological Services, Inc. Provided in this summary is a brief discussion of the significant similarities and differences encountered between the two Rhode Island agencies in the areas of: Organization and Staffing, Energy Conservation Measures Analysis, Procurement and Fiscal Management Procedures, and Budget Category Performance. In Maine, during the periods May 7--9, 14--16, and 19--21, 1991 the Weatherization Assistance Programs of Community Concepts, Inc. (CCI); Waldo County Committee for Social Action (WCCSA); and Micoast Human Resource Council (MCHRC); were monitored by B & M Technological Services, Inc. Provided in this summary is a brief discussion of the significant similarities and differences encountered among the three Maine agencies in the areas of: Organization and Staffing, Energy Conservation Measures Analysis, Procurement and Fiscal Management Procedures, and Budget Category Performance.

  3. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  4. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-02-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  5. University of Rhode Island inAdvance August 31, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    discover Santorini eruption much larger than originally believed An international team of scientists has directions from the Greek island of Santorini. "These deposits have changed our thinking about the total

  6. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 2, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    kingdom of Tambora The eruption of Mount Tambora on the Indonesian island of Sumbawa in 1815, the largest volcanic eruption in human history, killed 117,000 people and extinguished the tiny kingdom of Tambora

  7. Solar energy system performance evaluation, M. F. Smith, Jamestown, Rhode Island, October 1979-April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ashman, E.N.

    1980-01-01

    M.F. Smith is a single-family residence containing 2240 square feet of conditioned space in Jamestown, Rhode Island. The active solar energy system has been operating since July 1978 and is designed to supply 78% of the space heating requirements and 51% of the hot water. The gross collector array is 512 ft/sup 2/. The cover of the collector is made of a double-glazing, light weight durable translucent fiberglass material, bonded to support aluminum I-beam guide core. Water is the transfer medium of the collector. Heat from the collector is stored in a standing 3150-gallon concrete tank located in the basement of the house. Heat is distributed to the living area by a water-to-air heat pump with a heating capacity of 33,000 Btu/hr. The heat pump draws heat from the water and heats air which is blown throughout the house by means of a duct system. The systems actually produced 78% of the space heating requirements and 73% of the hot water.

  8. Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of ground water in Tiverton, Rhode Island, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinshu; Quinn, James G.

    1988-12-01

    Ground water samples from several private wells serving individual homes in Tiverton, Rhode Island were analyzed for petroleum contamination over a 19-month period. The hydrocarbon concentrations initially ranged from 68 to 2350 ppb and then gradually decreased to lower values, ranging from 6 to 1650 ppb, at the end of the study. Samples from the well with the highest hydrocarbon concentration (2350 to 1650 ppb) were investigated in some detail because this was considered a possible source of the petroleum contamination in the area. These studies indicated that most of the hydrocarbons were in the dissolved phase (<1.0 ?m) of the ground water and that it contained large amounts of naphthalene, methyl and dimethyl naphthalenes, and ethyl naphthalenes. In addition, the qualitative distribution of hydrocarbons changed as the concentration decreased over the course of the investigation. There appeared to be preferential loss of the more volatile and easily degraded components relative to the higher molecular weight and more refractory hydrocarbons. Some of the wells at this location are contaminated with at least two different petroleum products, i.e. gasoline and fuel oil. The exact nature and source of the contaminant is not known; it may be spilled or leaking petroleum products, or other materials containing petroleum hydrocarbons (e.g. commercial or industrial cleaning solutions). Based on differences in the qualitative distribution of components, some of the wells contain hydrocarbons that have been environmentally altered or that originate from a source other than the most contaminated well

  9. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...Production area. Production area means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin,...

  10. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...Production area. Production area means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin,...

  11. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...Production area. Production area means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin,...

  12. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...Production area. Production area means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin,...

  13. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...Production area. Production area means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin,...

  14. Estimation of water withdrawal and distribution, water use, and wastewater collection and return flow in Cumberland, Rhode Island, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horn, M.A.; Craft, P.A.; Bratton, Lisa

    1994-01-01

    Water-use data collected in Rhode Island by different State agencies or maintained by different public suppliers and wastewater- treatment facilities need to be integrated if these data are to be used in making water- resource management decisions. Water-use data for the town of Cumberland, a small area in northeastern Rhode Island, were compiled and integrated to provide an example of how the procedure could be applied. Integration and reliability assessment of water-use data could be facilitated if public suppliers, wastewater- treatment facilities, and State agencies used a number of standardized procedures for data collection and computer storage. The total surface water and ground water withdrawn in the town of Cumberland during 1988 is estimated to be 15.39 million gallons per day, of which 11.20 million gallons per day was exported to other towns. Water use in Cumberland included 2.51 million gallons per day for domestic use, 0.68 million gallons per day for industrial use, 0.27 million gallons per day for commercial use, and 0.73 million gallons per day for other use, most of which were unmetered use. Disposal of waste- water in Cumberland included 2.03 million gallons per day returned to the hydrologic system and 1.73 million gallons per day exported from Cumberland for wastewater treatment. Consumptive use during 1988 is estimated to be 0.43 million gallons per day.

  15. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  16. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Groundwater Resources: A Case Study of Southwest Coastal Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossida, Maggie

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluates the effect of sea level rise, induced by the global warming, and the effect of pumping, on the groundwater resources of the coastal aquifer of the Quonochontaug Neck Area, in southwest Rhode Island, USA. A three dimensional groundwater model was built for the year 1999, using Visual MODFLOW software. The simulation was run in steady state, with the freshwater and saltwater bodies treated as immiscible fluids, and thus diffusion and dispersion were not taken into account. The interface between the freshwater and the denser saltwater was simulated as a sharp interface, using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation. The movement of the interface under different future scenarios was evaluated, and the possibility of saltwater intrusion into the public water supply wells of the area was assessed. The basic groundwater model of the area was build and calibrated to available observation data from monitoring wells for the year 1999. A sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the model's behavior. Future scenarios for the years 2020, 2050 and 2100 were simulated for different sea level rise rates and various pumping rates. The sea level rise rates varied from a local minimum, observed in the nearby Newport tidal gage, to the global maximum predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), while the pumping rates ranged from the current rate to maximum increased rate projected for the year 2100. The model concluded that the groundwater table responds to the sea level rise by increasing its head, and that the depth to the interface between the freshwater and the saltwater decreases. Increased pumping rates exacerbate those observations. Under some combined scenarios of sea level rise and pumping, the water supply wells can be threatened by the possibility of saltwater intrusion and contamination. Some adaptation strategies and suggestions were formulated as part of the conclusions of this study, and the limitations of the simulation were also evaluated.

  17. Conundrums in childhood asthma severity, control, and health care use: Puerto Rico versus Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cynthia A.; Klein, Robert B.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Fritz, Gregory K.; Seifer, Ronald; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Santana, Jose Rodriguez; Colon, Angel; Alvarez, Maria; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Ortega, Alexander N.; Martinez-Nieves, Brenda; Canino, Glorisa

    2012-01-01

    Background The lifetime prevalence of self-reported asthma among Puerto Ricans is very high, with increased asthma hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and mortality rates. Differences in asthma severity between the mainland and island, however, remain largely unknown. Objective We sought to characterize differences in asthma severity and control among 4 groups: (1) Island Puerto Ricans, (2) Rhode Island (RI) Puerto Ricans, (3) RI Dominicans, and (4) RI whites. Methods Eight hundred five children aged 7 to 15 years completed a diagnostic clinic session, including a formal interview, physical examination, spirometry, and allergy testing. Using a visual grid adapted from the Global Initiative for Asthma, asthma specialists practicing in each site determined an asthma severity rating. A corresponding level of asthma control was determined by using a computer algorithm. Results Island Puerto Ricans had significantly milder asthma severity compared with RI Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and whites (P < .001). Island Puerto Ricans were not significantly different from RI whites in asthma control. RI Puerto Ricans showed a trend toward less control compared with island Puerto Ricans (P = .061). RI Dominicans had the lowest rate of controlled asthma. Paradoxically, island Puerto Ricans had more emergency department visits in the past 12 months (P < .001) compared with the 3 RI groups. Conclusions Potential explanations for the paradoxic finding of milder asthma in island Puerto Ricans in the face of high health care use are discussed. Difficulties in determining guideline-based composite ratings for severity versus control are explored in the context of disparate groups. PMID:19615729

  18. Rhode Island Water Supply System Management Plan Database (WSSMP-Version 1.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    In Rhode Island, the availability of water of sufficient quality and quantity to meet current and future environmental and economic needs is vital to life and the State's economy. Water suppliers, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board (RIWRB), and other State agencies responsible for water resources in Rhode Island need information about available resources, the water-supply infrastructure, and water use patterns. These decision makers need historical, current, and future water-resource information. In 1997, the State of Rhode Island formalized a system of Water Supply System Management Plans (WSSMPs) to characterize and document relevant water-supply information. All major water suppliers (those that obtain, transport, purchase, or sell more than 50 million gallons of water per year) are required to prepare, maintain, and carry out WSSMPs. An electronic database for this WSSMP information has been deemed necessary by the RIWRB for water suppliers and State agencies to consistently document, maintain, and interpret the information in these plans. Availability of WSSMP data in standard formats will allow water suppliers and State agencies to improve the understanding of water-supply systems and to plan for future needs or water-supply emergencies. In 2002, however, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a law that classifies some of the WSSMP information as confidential to protect the water-supply infrastructure from potential terrorist threats. Therefore the WSSMP database was designed for an implementation method that will balance security concerns with the information needs of the RIWRB, suppliers, other State agencies, and the public. A WSSMP database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the RIWRB. The database was designed to catalog WSSMP information in a format that would accommodate synthesis of current and future information about Rhode Island's water-supply infrastructure. This report documents the design and implementation of the WSSMP database. All WSSMP information in the database is, ultimately, linked to the individual water suppliers and to a WSSMP 'cycle' (which is currently a 5-year planning cycle for compiling WSSMP information). The database file contains 172 tables - 47 data tables, 61 association tables, 61 domain tables, and 3 example import-link tables. This database is currently implemented in the Microsoft Access database software because it is widely used within and outside of government and is familiar to many existing and potential customers. Design documentation facilitates current use and potential modification for future use of the database. Information within the structure of the WSSMP database file (WSSMPv01.mdb), a data dictionary file (WSSMPDD1.pdf), a detailed database-design diagram (WSSMPPL1.pdf), and this database-design report (OFR2004-1231.pdf) documents the design of the database. This report includes a discussion of each WSSMP data structure with an accompanying database-design diagram. Appendix 1 of this report is an index of the diagrams in the report and on the plate; this index is organized by table name in alphabetical order. Each of these products is included in digital format on the enclosed CD-ROM to facilitate use or modification of the database.

  19. The Development of an Integrated Vocational Academic Instructional Manual for the Rhode Island Department of Education. Emergence of VTO Education in America Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lembo, Beverly F.

    A manual was developed for use by the Rhode Island Department of Education to introduce the faculty of the William R. Davies, Jr. Career and Technical High School (Lincoln, Rhode Island) and other secondary schools to the rationale for integration of academic and vocational instruction. A literature review was conducted to provide a conceptual…

  20. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy in an Academic Practice in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Touzard Romo, F; Resnick, B; Perez-Cioe, M; Flanigan, TP; Kojic, E; Beckwith, CG

    2015-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is an increasingly utilized treatment modality that has been proven to be safe and cost-effective for treating infections that require prolonged antimicrobial treatment. Adequate patient selection, a structured OPAT team with an effective communication system, and routine clinical monitoring are key elements to establish a successful OPAT program. The Infectious Diseases and Immunology Center at The Miriam Hospital offers a multidisciplinary OPAT model coordinated by infectious diseases specialists and serves as a major referral center in Rhode Island. PMID:25562060

  1. The brave new world of GEC evaluation: the experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center.

    PubMed

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these efforts, and the modifications to assessment that ensued in response to the increased accountability requirements. The evaluation focused on RIGEC's series of continuing education, day-long workshops for health and social service professionals, the completion of all seven of which leads to a Certificate in Interdisciplinary Practice in Geriatrics. PMID:22816974

  2. Possible correlation of Precambrian rocks of Newport, Rhode Island, with those of Anglesey, Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, Nicholas; Skehan, James W.

    1981-12-01

    The bedded succession in Newport, Rhode Island, consists of the metavolcanic Price's Neck formation and the older metasedimentary Newport formation. The Newport formation consists of turbidites, sandstone and conglomerate, slate, phyllite, bedded ash, and olistostromes. The Price's Neck formation consists of agglomeratic breccia, conglomerate, coarse to fine tuff, and graded tuffite merging into tuffaceous sedimentary rock. Both sequences have been affected by two principal fold-generating deformations. The Price's Neck formation was first folded into upright to overturned folds (F1), whereas the Newport formation was folded into overturned to recumbent folds. In the Price's Neck formation, the F1 folds trend east-west to north-northeast-south-southwest, Whereas the F2 folds trend approximately east-west. In the main outcrop area the F1 folds in the Newport formation are dominantly north-south trending, are strongly overturned toward the east, and in the west are recumbent and subisoclinal to isoclinal. The second deformation produced a low-lying cleavage and relatively small folds that verge toward the east. The difference in the style of folding is attributed to ductility contrast between the rocks of the two stratigraphic sequences. The Newport granite, which intrudes the Price's Neck and Newport formations, has a metamorphic aureole. The granite was emplaced prior to the F2 movements but after the F1 movements. The succession therefore is late Precambrian in age, because the granite is about 600 m.y. old. The deformation of the sediments may be attributed to the “Avalonian orogeny” that is manifested in Anglesey, Wales, and northern France as the Cadomian. There are strong similarities between Anglesey and Newport in lithologies, stratigraphic succession, and plutonic history.

  3. Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

  4. University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 24, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    to fraudulent drug pricing and marketing conduct of TAP Pharmaceutical Products; and Agnes Doody, Communication Council won awards in philanthropy and community service; risk management; membership recruitment in the areas of council management; risk management and reduction; me

  5. Assessing BMP Performance Using Microtox Toxicity Analysis - Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been shown to be effective in reducing runoff and pollutants from urban areas and thus provide a mechanism to improve downstream water quality. Currently, BMP performance regarding water quality improvement is assessed through measuring each...

  6. University of Rhode Island inAdvance June 9, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Managers Association. These gifts will help establish a URI Greek LEAD (Leadership Education in emergencies An elderly woman in Woonsocket is rushed to the hospital with a heart attack. Her area hospital

  7. Hydrogeology and Simulated Ground-Water Flow in the Salt Pond Region of Southern Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Sorenson, Jason R.; Stone, Janet R.; Moran, S. Bradley; Hougham, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The Salt Pond region of southern Rhode Island extends from Westerly to Narragansett Bay and forms the natural boundary between the Atlantic Ocean and the shallow, highly permeable freshwater aquifer of the South Coastal Basin. Large inputs of fresh ground water coupled with the low flushing rates to the open ocean make the salt ponds particularly susceptible to eutrophication and bacterial contamination. Ground-water discharge to the salt ponds is an important though poorly quantified source of contaminants, such as dissolved nutrients. A ground-water-flow model was developed and used to delineate the watersheds to the salt ponds, including the areas that contribute ground water directly to the ponds and the areas that contribute ground water to streams that flow into ponds. The model also was used to calculate ground-water fluxes to these coastal areas for long-term average conditions. As part of the modeling analysis, adjustments were made to model input parameters to assess potential uncertainties in model-calculated watershed delineations and in ground-water discharge to the salt ponds. The results of the simulations indicate that flow to the salt ponds is affected primarily by the ease with which water is transmitted through a glacial moraine deposit near the regional ground-water divide, and by the specified recharge rate used in the model simulations. The distribution of the total freshwater flow between direct ground-water discharge and ground-water-derived surface-water (streamflow) discharge to the salt ponds is affected primarily by simulated stream characteristics, including the streambed-aquifer connection and the stream stage. The simulated position of the ground-water divide and, therefore, the model-calculated watershed delineations for the salt ponds, were affected only by changes in the transmissivity of the glacial moraine. Selected changes in other simulated hydraulic parameters had substantial effects on total freshwater discharge and the distribution of direct ground-water discharge and ground-water-derived surface-water (streamflow) discharge to the salt ponds, but still provided a reasonable match to the hydrologic data available for model calibration. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions of watershed areas and ground-water discharge to the salt ponds, additional hydrogeologic data would be required to constrain the model input parameters that have the greatest effect on the simulation results.

  8. Local tsunami early warning: the case of Rhodes island, Greece, and the NEARTOWARN (EU-DG ECHO) prevention project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Argyris, Ilias; Fokaefs, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Local, that is near-field, tsunamis occur in the global ocean including the Mediterranean Sea and its connected seas. For such tsunamis the first wave has very short travel time of arrival (less than 30 min.) to the closest coastal zone thus making the early warning a very difficult task. An efficient, end-to-end early tsunami warning system in local conditions should fulfill the condition that the time needed for the earthquake detection, plus the time needed for the warning message transmission to the authorities and afterwards to the general public and/or other task groups, plus the time needed for response and real evacuation is less than the travel time of the first wave. In the physiographic conditions of the Mediterranean Sea it is extremely hard to satisfy such a condition unless the total time needed to response in early warning is drastically minimized. The project Near-Field Tsunami Warning and Emergency Planning (NEARTOWARN, which is supported by the EU DG-ECHO prevention programme, aims, among others, to establish a system in Rhodes island, Greece, with the purpose to meet needs for local early tsunami warning. To minimize the time for emergency in less than 30 sec, seismic alert devices (SED's) make the core component of the system. SED's are activated and send alerting signals as soon as a P-phase of seismic wave is detected in the near-field but for a predetermined threshold of ground motion. Then, emergency starts while SED's activate remotely other devices, such as computers with data bases of pre-calculated tsunami simulations, surveillance cameras etc. The system is completed with tide-gauges, simulated tsunami scenarios and emergency planning supported by a Geographical Management System. Rhodes island in Dodecanese, South Aegean Sea, Greece, has been selected as a test-area for the development of the prototype system given that it was hit by large tsunamigenic earthquakes several times in the past.

  9. Inclusion of Limited-English-Proficient Students in Rhode Island's Grade 4 Mathematics Performance Assessment. CSE Technical Report 486.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie; Taylor, Grace; Betebenner, Damian

    The effect of testing accommodations, such as extra time, oral reading of the assessment, or small group testing, on the participation and performance levels of limited-English-proficient students (LEP) on the Rhode Island Grade 4 Mathematics Performance Assessment was studied. A pilot study was conducted with 22 classes of students to provide…

  10. The 1984 Graduates of the Community College of Rhode Island: Results of a Replication of Last Year's Survey of Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, William

    A survey was conducted to determine the immediate plans of the 1,545 students who graduated from the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) in 1984. Study findings, based on a response rate of 62%, included the following: (1) the 1984 graduates had a higher percentage of females than the overall college enrollment, with women making up nearly…

  11. The Campus Visit Experience: Improving Student Recruitment at the University of Rhode Island. Report of the Admissions Advisory Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to identify best practices in the design of college and university admissions facilities with the goal of enhancing recruitment and yield of prospective students. The Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island conducted a literature review examining the importance of the campus visit experience…

  12. "What Did You Do in the War, Grandma?" An Oral History of Rhode Island Women during World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Linda P.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that oral history is a unique way to learn about past events and experiences. Describes an oral history project that resulted in the publication of 26 stories of Rhode Island women during World War II. Discusses the stories and their impact on the students who conducted the oral history interviews. (CFR)

  13. CHILD, Inc. Head Start & the University of Rhode Island Partnership: The Early Head Start Continuous Improvement & Evaluation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, David A.; Horm-Wingerd, Diane M.; Golas, Julianna C.

    One of the first joint efforts of the collaborative partnership of the University of Rhode Island and the CHILD, Inc. Head Start program has been the design of the Early Head Start Continuous Improvement and Evaluation Project (EHS Plan), research designed to assess and continuously strengthen the quality of services offered to children and…

  14. Assessing State Performance in Equalizing Access to Educational Resources: The Case of Rhode Island (1992-1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastrup, Jerry C.

    2002-01-01

    Uses a foundation-equalizing model to develop a number of indicators measuring the extent to which states utilize the full range of equalization tools at its disposal. Illustrates the utility of these indicators through an evaluation of the school finance reform instituted by Rhode Island between 1992 and 1996. (Contains 25 references.)…

  15. 76 FR 51383 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...BOEM-2011-0049] Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the OCS Offshore Rhode Island...to propose the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the OCS...

  16. Measured Mercury Contamination in Freshwater Fish in Rhode Island Compared with Predictions From a Regional Environmental Mercury Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Edible tissue of largemouth bass collected at 29 freshwater sites across the variable landscape of Rhode Island, USA showed a 27 fold range in total mercury concentrations [Hg], from 0.04 to 1.0 ppm (wet). Twenty-one variables, including water quality data and geographic informat...

  17. THE RELAXATION BETWEEN PORE WATER CHEMISTRY AND BENTHIC FLUXES OF NUTRIENTS AND MANGANESE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic fluxes of dissolved nutrients and manganese from biologically disturbed, relatively unpolluted sediment in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been measured. Analyses of the vertical gradients of chemical species dissolved in pore waters and the uptake of (22)Na from the...

  18. Energy Conservation Measures for the Charles E. Shea Senior High School, Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Public Service Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Innovation Group, Providence, RI.

    Presented is a study of energy conservation opportunities in a Rhode Island high school. With the aid of an infrared camera system, researchers documented heat losses that were not evident to the naked eye. Each infrared thermogram obtained showed one or more types of heat loss and identified the specific sections of the building where the…

  19. Determination of trace elements, including regional tracers, in Rhode Island precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, Roy W.; Rahn, Kenneth A.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.

    Sampling and analytical methods have been developed to determine 20-40 trace elements plus sulfate in precipitation. Samples are collected on an event basis in polyethylene bags, and are then freeze-dried and analyzed by instrumental neutron activation. Concentration data are presented for 3 years' precipitation samples from southern Rhode Island. Elemental solubility data are presented for a smaller set of samples. Elemental concentrations vary seasonally: crustal and pollutant elements have maximum concentrations in summer, and marine elements have maxima in the winter. The data were collected for use in receptor modelling studies, and the four elements most useful as tracers for regional pollution sources (Se, As, Sb, and noncrustal V) are all well determined.

  20. Opportunities for improving legislative public health policy in Rhode Island through evidence-based education.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, Moise; Winter, Ronald; Marshall, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The Rhode Island General Assembly considers nearly 3000 bills yearly--spanning the entire range of issues related to state government and legislative policy. This review analyzes the modest number of 40 "health-related" bills introduced during the 2009 session. It is often not clear to what extent these proposals consistently received analysis by both informed and independent organizations or experts regarding their "evidence-based" foundations. Only 25 of these bills received a committee hearing, and eventually become law. Hence, there may be a reasonable opportunity for expert, non-partisan organizations to provide the General Assembly with information related to proposed legislation on a routine or "as requested" basis. This study provides a systematic analysis of this degree of effort based on data regarding health- related legislation proposed during the 2009 session of the RI General Assembly. PMID:24087822

  1. The Rhode Island lead paint lawsuit: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Rabin, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Reports of child lead poisoning from paint date back over a hundred years. The lead paint companies were well aware of that hazard long before they ceased the sale of lead paint. Throughout the 20th century there was a gradually increasing acknowledgment by public health officials of the need to remove lead paint from the environment of young children, but minimal public resources were made available to do so. Beginning in the 1980s, lawsuits were filed against the industry; however, for legal/technical reasons, none was successful until a Rhode Island jury held that three former paint manufacturers had knowingly created a "public nuisance." Consequently, ongoing and future lawsuits may yield the resources for an end to child lead poisoning. PMID:17317634

  2. Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

  3. Sea-floor geology in northwestern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Woods, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 69-square-kilometer area of northwestern Block Island Sound, are used with sediment samples, and still and video photography of the sea floor, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 43 stations within this area, to interpret the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. Features on the sea floor include boulders, sand waves, scour depressions, modern marine sediments, and trawl marks. Boulders, which are often several meters wide, are found in patches in the shallower depths and tend to be overgrown with sessile flora and fauna. They are lag deposits of winnowed glacial drift, and reflect high-energy environments characterized by processes associated with erosion and nondeposition. Sand waves and megaripples tend to have crests that either trend parallel to shore with 20- to 50-meter (m) wavelengths or trend perpendicular to shore with several-hundred-meter wavelengths. The sand waves reflect sediment transport directions perpendicular to shore by waves, and parallel to shore by tidal or wind-driven currents, respectively. Scour depressions, which are about 0.5 m lower than the surrounding sea floor, have floors of gravel and coarser sand than bounding modern marine sediments. These scour depressions, which are conspicuous in the sidescan-sonar data because of their more highly reflective coarser sediment floors, are likely formed by storm-generated, seaward-flowing currents and maintained by the turbulence in bottom currents caused by their coarse sediments. Areas of the sea floor with modern marine sediments tend to be relatively flat to current-rippled and sandy.

  4. Occurrence and distribution in Rhode Island of Hunterellus hookeri (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), a wasp parasitoid of Ixodes dammini.

    PubMed

    Hu, R; Hyland, K E; Mather, T N

    1993-01-01

    The wasp Hunterellus hookeri Howard parasitizes several species of ixodid ticks including Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin, the vector of Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi, in the northeastern United States. We detected the occurrence and evaluated the distribution of this wasp parasitoid in populations of I. dammini in Rhode Island. There has been no intentional introduction of a tick parasitoid recorded anywhere in Rhode Island; yet, we found this wasp at one of the six study sites (Prudence Island), where it parasitized 21 (n = 243) and 17% (n = 284) of nymphal I. dammini collected during 1988 and 1989, respectively. The proportion of nymphs parasitized was greatest during May (46%) and was less in June (18%), July (18%), and August (11%). In Rhode Island, the wasp was only found parasitizing ticks at the site with the highest (by a factor of 2) tick population, confirming similar observations in Massachusetts and New York. It is suggested that establishment as well as the distribution of H. hookeri depends upon a super abundant deer tick population. The usefulness of this parasitoid as a biological control agent is yet unknown. PMID:8433338

  5. Gazetteer of hydrologic characteristics of streams in Massachusetts; Taunton and Ten Mile River basins and coastal river basins of Mount Hope Bay, Narragansett Bay, and Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wandle, S.W.; Keezer, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The study area includes streams draining the Taunton River (562 square miles), the Tenmile River (53.1 square miles), and the minor streams flowing into Mount Hope Bay, Narragansett Bay, and Rhode Island Sound in southern Massachusetts, and adjacent areas of Rhode Island. Drainage areas, using the latest available 1:24 ,000 scale topographic maps, were computed for the first time for streams draining more than 3 square miles and were re-computed for data-collection sites. Streamflow characteristics, at 10 gaging stations were calculated using a new data base with daily flow records through 1981. These characteristics include annual and monthly flow statistics, duration of daily flow values, and the annual 7-day mean low flow at the 2-year and 10-year recurrence intervals. Seven-day low-flow statistics are presented for 44 partial-record sites and the procedures used to determine the hydrologic characteristics of a basin are summarized. Basin characteristics representing 14 commonly used indices to estimate various streamflows are presented for selected gaged streams. This gazetteer will aid in the planning and managing of water-resources related activities, and will provide a common data base for governmental agencies and the engineering and planning communities. (USGS)

  6. Availability of ground water in the lower Pawcatuck River basin, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Joseph B.; Johnston, Herbert E.; Malmberg, Glenn T.

    1974-01-01

    The lower Pawcatuck River basin in southwestern Rhode Island is an area of about 169 square miles underlain by crystalline bedrock over which lies a relatively thin mantle of glacial till and stratified drift. Stratified drift, consisting dominantly of sand and gravel, occurs in irregularly shaped linear deposits that are generally less than a mile wide and less than 125 feet thick; these deposits are found along the Pawcatuck River, its tributaries, and abandoned preglacial channels. Deposits of stratified sand and gravel constitute the principal aquifer in the lower Pawcatuck basin and the only one capable of sustaining yields of 100 gallons per minute or more to individual wells. Water available for development in this aquifer consists of water in storage--potential ground-water runoff to streams--plus infiltration that can be induced from streams. Minimum annual ground-water runoff from the sand and gravel aquifer is calculated to be at least 1.17 cubic feet per second per square mile, or 0.76 million gallons per day per square mile. Potential recharge by induced infiltration is estimated to range from about 250 to 600 gallons per day per linear foot of streambed for the principal streams. In most areas, induced infiltration from streams constitutes the major source of water potentially available for development by wells. Because subsurface hydraulic connection in the sand and gravel aquifer is poor in several places, the deposits are conveniently divisible into several ground-water reservoirs. The potential yield from five of the most promising ground-water reservoirs is evaluated by means of mathematical models. Results indicate that continuous withdrawals ranging from 1.3 to 10.3 million gallons per day, and totaling 31 million gallons per day, are obtainable from these reservoirs. Larger yields may be recovered by different well placement, spacing, construction and development, pumping practice, and so forth. Withdrawals at the rates indicated will reduce streamflow downstream from pumping centers but generally will not result in streams going dry, provided the water is returned to the basin. Export of water from the basin will require careful consideration of the effects of such withdrawals on low streamflow. Export from the Pawcatuck basin of 27 million gallons per day, estimated to be available from ground-water reservoirs in the upper Pawcatuck basin, in addition to 37.5 million gallons per day available in the lower Pawcatuck basin, will markedly reduce low streamflow. The 90-percent duration flow of the Pawcatuck River at Westerly would be reduced from 75 million gallons per day to perhaps as little as 21 million gallons per day. The chemical quality of water from both the sand and gravel aquifer and associated streams is suitable for most purposes. The water is soft, slightly acidic, and typically has a dissolved-solids content of less than 75 milligrams per liter. Some treatment may be required locally for removal of iron and manganese to meet recommended standards of the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water.

  7. Characteristics of softwater streams in Rhode Island. III. Distribution of macrophytic vegetation in a small drainage basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Sheath; JoAnn M. Burkholder; Julie A. Hambrook; Amy M. Hogeland; Elizabeth Hoy; Michael E. Kane; Mary O. Morison; Alan D. Steinman; Kathryn L. Van Alstyne

    1986-01-01

    The Wood River watershed, a small well-defined drainage basin in Rhode Island was monitored seasonally for all macrophytic\\u000a vegetation and various physical variables. Twenty-four segments, 20 m in length were sampled. Mean stream depth, width and\\u000a current velocity increased by 3 to 8 fold from 1st- to 4th-order segments. Light penetration was positively correlated with\\u000a the above variables (p <

  8. Access to and Use of Asthma Health Services Among Latino Children: The Rhode Island-Puerto Rico Asthma Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Jandasek, Barbara; Ortega, Alexander N.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Fritz, Gregory K.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B.; Canino, Glorisa

    2012-01-01

    This study determines asthma-related health care access and utilization patterns for Latino children of Puerto Rican and Dominican origin residing in Rhode Island (RI) and Latino children residing in Puerto Rico (Island). Data included 804 families of children with persistent asthma recruited from clinics. Island children were less likely to receive regular asthma care and care from a consistent provider and more likely to have been to the emergency department and hospitalized for asthma than RI children. Island children were 2.33 times more likely to have used the emergency department for asthma compared with RI non-Latino White (NLW) children. Latino children residing in both Island and RI were less likely to have used specialty care and more likely to have had a physician visit for asthma in the past year than RI NLW children. The differences might reflect the effects of the different delivery systems on pediatric health care utilization and asthma management. PMID:21536604

  9. Integrated Assessment of Behavioral and Environmental Risk Factors for Lyme Disease Infection on Block Island, Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Peter J.; Niccolai, Linda; Steeves, Tanner; O’Keefe, Corrine Folsom; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject’s age and the density of shrub edges on the subject’s property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject’s age, shrub edge density (increase risk) and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk). Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections. PMID:24416278

  10. Cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey's stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadoury, R.A.; Smath, J.A.; Fontaine, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The report documents the results of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey 's continuous-record stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 91 gaging stations being operated in Massachusetts are being operated to provide data for two special purpose hydrologic studies, and they are planned to be discontinued at the conclusion of the studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed on 63 continuous-record gaging stations in Massachusetts and 15 stations in Rhode Island, at budgets of $353,000 and $60,500, respectively. Current operations policies result in average standard errors per station of 12.3% in Massachusetts and 9.7% in Rhode Island. Minimum possible budgets to maintain the present numbers of gaging stations in the two States are estimated to be $340,000 and $59,000, with average errors per station of 12.8% and 10.0%, respectively. If the present budget levels were doubled, average standards errors per station would decrease to 8.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Further budget increases would not improve the standard errors significantly. (USGS)

  11. A Statewide Intervention Reduces BMI in Adults: Shape Up Rhode Island Results

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.; Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Crane, Melissa M.; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad; Gorin, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    Given the epidemic of obesity, approaches to weight loss that can be applied on a community, state, or national level are needed. We report results from Shape Up Rhode Island 2007 (SURI), a state-wide Internet based program involving team-based competition to increase physical activity and achieve weight loss. A total of 4,717 adults (84% female; mean BMI = 29.6 kg/m2) enrolled in the 16 week weight loss competition of SURI and 3311 completed at least 12 weeks. Completers reported losing 3.2 ± 3.4 kg, and 30% achieved a clinically significant weight loss of 5% or more. Although modest, these weight losses shifted the BMI distribution from a mean BMI of 29.4 to 28.2 kg/m2 and reduced the population that was obese from 39% to 31%. More conservative intent-to-treat analyses and analysis of 132 participants with objective weights still showed a significant reduction in BMI of ?0.8 units. These findings suggest that state-wide weight loss campaigns can produce modest weight losses in large numbers of participants. These data provide a bench-mark that can be used for comparisons with other state-wide campaigns. Research on ways to improve such campaigns is needed. PMID:19180068

  12. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  13. Liver response to diet and estrogen in white Leghorn and Rhode Island Red chickens.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Jensen, L S

    1985-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the response of Rhode Island Reds (RIR) and White Leghorns (WL) to estradiol (E2) administration and diets of different composition. In growing chickens injected with E2 for 7 days, RIR accumulated significantly more hepatic lipid and had significantly less plasma lipid than WL. Both RIR and WL, injected for 4 days with E2, had lower hepatic lipids when fed a diet containing fish meal, alfalfa meal, and torula yeast (FAY) than when fed a corn-soybean meal diet (CS). Plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity was significantly lower for RIR. Feeding a FAY diet to laying hens significantly reduced hepatic lipids in WL but not in RIR. Implantation of tubes containing E2 in RIR-laying hens resulted in a significant body weight loss and 25% mortality, while a similar treatment in WL-laying hens caused no body weight loss or mortality. Injecting both RIR and WL-laying hens with E2 caused a marked body weight loss and high mortality in both breeds although WL were less severely affected. The results show that breeds of chickens respond differently to both E2 administration and changes in diet composition. PMID:4039822

  14. The effect of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island property sales price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Susan Shim

    This dissertation uses the hedonic pricing model to study the impact of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island house sales prices. The first two manuscripts are on lake water quality and use RI house sales transactions from 1988--2012. The third studies wind turbines using RI house sales transactions from 2000--2013. The first study shows that good lake water quality increases lakefront property price premium. It also shows that environmental amenities, such as forests, substitute for lake amenity as the property's distance from the lake increases. The second lake water quality study incorporates time variables to examine how environmental amenity values change over time. The results show that property price premium associated with good lake water quality does not change as it is constant in proportion to housing prices with short term economic fluctuations. The third study shows that wind turbines have a negative and significant impact on housing prices. However, this is highly location specific and varies with neighborhood demographics. All three studies have policy implications which are discussed in detail in the manuscripts below.

  15. Health-Hazard Evaluation report HETA 84-496-1766, Applied Plastics, Slocum, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Stoekel, M.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In response to a request from the owners of Applied Plastics, Inc. (SIC-3079), Slocum, Rhode Island, an investigation was made of possible cases of polymer fume fever among workers complaining of fever, chills, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea, musculoskeletal pain and headache. Urinary fluoride levels measured in preshift samples ranged from 0.3 milligrams/gram (mg/g) to 1.5 mg/g and from 0.2 mg/g to 1.0 mg/g in postshift samples. Breathing-zone samples showed low levels of toluene and most had a trace amount of hexane equivalents. All levels of toxic substances were well below permissible exposure limits. The authors conclude that even though the environmental and medical studies did not demonstrate high exposure levels or absorption of fumes, workers did demonstrate sometimes incapacitating symptoms of polymer fume fever. Based on this, the authors recommend changes in work practices, improved ventilation, closer attention to no smoking policies, and improved personal hygiene.

  16. Marine ecological-risk assessment pilot study for Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.K.; Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Nelson, W.G.; Pesch, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    An ecological risk assessment framework was applied to characterize aquatic risks associated with hazardous waste disposal at Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island. An initial screening phase (I) assessed exposure and related that exposure to toxicological endpoints for bivalves, amphipods, sea urchins, and biomarker assays. Results showed little evidence of major contamination in sediments or tissues except for relatively high levels of polychlorinated biphenols (PBC), butyltins compounds (TBT), and fecal coliforms observed in Allen Harbor. Effects were detected in mussel physiology, sea urchin fertilization and development, biomarker responses, and soft shell clam histology. Possible sources of contamination and toxicity from the landfill leachate, surface runoff, and recreational boating were examined using a temporaland spatial sampling scheme. Chemical and toxicological information obtained implicated all three sources as affecting Allen Harbor water quality. Laboratory bioassays of landfill exposure media, employing a variety of marine species using acute and chronic endpoints, are being used to provide data for the development of an exposure-response model for risk to the marine environment. The model will define current risk and provide an interpretive framework for long-term monitoring.

  17. Distribution of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) in residential lawns on Prudence Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, M.C.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of nymphal Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in residential lawns was assessed by flagging on Prudence Island, RI. The number of ticks per sample was five times greater in lawns adjacent to woods than in lawns adjacent to other lawns. Relative tick abundance was negatively correlated with distance from the woods, but the decline was gradual. Spirochete prevalence in ticks did not differ among lawn types or at different distances from the woods. Therefore, barriers that keep people away from the wood edge probably lower the risk of acquiring Lyme disease, but there is still a risk. Even with physical barriers at lawn-wood edges, personal precautions to prevent tick bites should be followed.

  18. Nesting by one-year-old black-crowned night herons on Hope Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Davis, W.E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    There have been few consistent reports concerning the frequency and success of nesting attempts by immature night herons of the genus Nycticorax . One-year-old Black-crowned Night Herons (Nycticonax nyctiocrax ) mated to 2-yr-old or older birds built nests and incubated eggs in the wild (Gross 1923). In a captive colony, many 1-yr-old pairs of night herons courted and built nests, and one pair successfully raised four young (Noble and Wurm 1942). One pair of 1-yr-old night herons laid eggs but did not produce young in a captive colony at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. In contrast, in a 3-yr study of a colony of about 350 Black-crowned Night Heron pairs on Long Island, New York, no 1-yr-old breeders were observed (Allen and Mangels 1940).

  19. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  20. Benthic diatoms and sulfide fluctuations: Upper basin of Pettaquamscutt River, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, D. M.; Hargraves, P. E.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if seasonal anoxia affects the community composition and abundance of benthic diatoms in an estuarine basin. Subtidal benthic diatoms were collected monthly at 1-m water depth intervals from 2 to 7 m in an estuarine basin of Pettaquamscutt River, Rhode Island, during 1981. Water samples were collected at the same depths to measure temperature, salinity, oxygen and sulfide levels. The basin became stratified above 7 m in June and the interface between oxic and anoxic waters remained at 5 or 5·5 m until December when it rose to above 4 m. Motile, biraphid diatoms dominated on the muddy sediments and live cell counts of these were insignificant below 5·5 m. At shallower depths, abundance was seasonally bimodal. In the spring, a peak began in April at 3 m (later in the season with increasing depth) and a smaller fall peak began in October at 4 and 5 m (later at shallower depths). Highest standing crop in August was at 5·5 m when 1% PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) was at 4 m. The position of the interface between oxic and anoxic waters after stratification of the water column affected both abundance and species composition of benthic diatoms within 1·5 m above it. Navicula gregaria Donkin and N. ammophila Grunow dominated the spring and summer assemblages at all depths, but after September N. gregaria vanished from the basin below 3 m. In fall and winter, distinctly different populations were present at 4-5·5 m and at 2 m. The assemblage at 4 m and below consisted of sulfide-tolerant species of Navicula. Healthy populations of Navicula ammophila Grunow, N. pseudocrassirostris Hustedt, and N. peregrina (Ehrenberg) Kützing together reached 138 × 10 3 cells cm -2 at less than 1% light levels and up to 88 ?M sulfide.

  1. Climatic variability of the circulation in the Rhode Island Sound: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yiyong; Rothstein, Lew; Liu, Qianqian; Zhang, Shuwen

    2013-09-01

    Seasonal and interannual variability of the circulation in the Rhode Island Sound (RIS) is investigated by employing the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with two configurations in which a local-scale model with very fine resolution over the RIS is nested within a regional-scale model covering the entire US Northeastern Continental Shelf. The models are driven by tidal harmonics, climatological river discharge, and realistic ocean open boundary conditions and atmospheric forcing from January 2004 to December 2009. Results show that the tidal residual current forms a cyclonic circulation in the RIS, with amplitude of a few centimeters per second. During summer, the cyclonic circulation is significantly strengthened owing to tidal mixing and local stratification. However, due to strong northwesterly winds in winter, the cyclonic circulation disappears and instead the surface currents in the RIS move offshore. Simulations further indicate that the RIS winter currents, in terms of their magnitude and direction, have interannual variability that appears to be related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) winter index. In addition, the southwestward jet near the southern New England shelf break is found to intensify (weaken) during the low (high) phases of the NAO with a lag of about 1 year. The ROMS models are also used to examine the response of the regional ocean circulation to global warming, with both atmospheric forcing and open boundary conditions obtained from global climate model outputs. As the climate warms, it is found that the cyclonic gyre in the RIS is intensified, and this change is due to an intensification of the larger-scale cyclonic coastal ocean circulation over the Middle Atlantic Bight in a warming climate.

  2. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

  3. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  4. The 18th and Rhode Island Garden in San Francisco's Potrero Hill neighborhood and other urban farms could benefit from the new law. Urban Farming Law Breaks New Ground

    E-print Network

    Handy, Susan L.

    --both commercially and as a noncommercial enterprise such as a community garden. "This law is targeted to do twoThe 18th and Rhode Island Garden in San Francisco's Potrero Hill neighborhood and other urban farms to the lot that is home to the 18th and Rhode Island Garden. At 0.11 acres, its value is about $570

  5. 77 FR 14715 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Control Technology (RACT) for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone Standard AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...Air Act (CAA) with respect to the 1997 8-hour ozone standard. The intended effect of this action is to propose approval of Rhode...

  6. Concentrations and source apportionment of PM10 and associated major and trace elements in the Rhodes Island, Greece.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Georgios; Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios; Samara, Constantini

    2012-08-15

    Ambient concentrations of PM(10) and associated major and trace elements were measured over the cold and the warm season of 2007 at two sites located in the Rhodes Island (Greece), in Eastern Mediterranean, aimed at source apportionment by Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor modeling. Source chemical profiles, necessary in CMB modeling, were obtained for a variety of emission sources that could possibly affect the study area, including sea spray, geological material, soot emissions from the nearby oil-fuelled thermal power plant, and other anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular traffic, residential oil combustion, wood burning, and uncontrolled open-air burning of agricultural biomass and municipal waste. Source apportionment of PM(10) and elemental components was carried out by employing an advanced CMB version, the Robotic Chemical Mass Balance model (RCMB). Vehicular emissions were found to be major PM(10) contributor accounting, on average, for 36.8% and 31.7% during the cold period, and for 40.9% and 39.2% in the warm period at the two sites, respectively. The second largest source of ambient PM(10), with minor seasonal variation, was secondary sulfates (mainly ammonium and calcium sulfates), with total average contribution around 16.5% and 18% at the two sites. Soil dust was also a remarkable source contributing around 22% in the warm period, whereas only around 10% in the cold season. Soot emitted from the thermal power plant was found to be negligible contributor to ambient PM(10) (<1%), however it appeared to appreciably contribute to the ambient V and Ni (11.3% and 5.1%, respectively) at one of the sites during the warm period, when electricity production is intensified. Trajectory analysis did not indicate any transport of Sahara dust; on the contrary, long range transport of soil dust from arid continental regions of Minor Asia and of biomass burning aerosol from the countries surrounding the Black Sea was considered possible. PMID:22705902

  7. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  8. Departmental Web Sites: Best Practices for Improving Student Recruitment--A Report of the Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to identify best practices in the design and content of college and university academic department Web sites that have been shown to enhance the recruitment of prospective students. The Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island conducted a literature review on the importance of college,…

  9. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996: An Examination of Its Impact on Legal Immigrants and Refugees in Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serpa, Fernando A.

    This report describes a 1998 consultation conducted to examine the impact of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 on legal immigrants and refugees in Rhode Island. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act restricted access of documented immigrants to a wide range of government programs such as…

  10. Chemical Technology at the Community College of Rhode Island: Curricular Approaches Designed To Reflect the Demands of a Diverse Population Entering Chemical Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajian, Harry

    In an effort to provide nontraditional students with the same opportunity as traditional students to reach the highest level of skills and competencies associated with hi-tech, high-wage employment, the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) offers alternatives to its historically successful full-time day program in chemical technology.…

  11. Forty Years of Excellence and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) Conference (40th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 9-12, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The NEAIR 2013 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Newport, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Aspiring to the Role of "Data Badass:" Some Thoughts on the Political Context of IR (Mark Freeman); (2) Data-Driven Internal Benchmarks and Successful Learning Outcomes (Mamta Saxena…

  12. Migrant Programs in the Northeastern States -- Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, (Special Section) The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    Prepared for use by agencies working with migrant and seasonal farmworkers, this directory lists programs, services, and resources available to these farmworkers in the Northeastern states of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Obtained from Federal, State, and…

  13. State of Rhode Island Department of Administration Office of Library and Information Services. Five-Year State Plan for the Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for its Five-Year Plan for the years 2008 through 2012, the Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services has reviewed a variety of information resources, including studies, publications, surveys and stakeholder meetings, to assist in understanding the state, its people, its future and the potential role of libraries. This…

  14. Building a Culture of Evidence: IR Support, Initiative & Leadership. Proceedings of the Annual NEAIR Conference (35th, Providence, Rhode Island, November 1-4, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Bonnie, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The NEAIR 2008 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Providence, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: The Mission Engagement Index as a Measure of Progress on Mission Goals (Ellen M. Boylan); (2) Building, Sustaining, and Developing Research University…

  15. Information Works! Measuring Rhode Island Schools for Change 2000. Statewide Analysis, 2000. Productive, Caring and Mutually Intriguing Teacher/Student Relationships: What's It Going To Take?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Providence.

    This annual report presents state-level data about education in Rhode Island, focusing this year on what appears to support or obstruct the relationship most central to education, that of teacher and student. Data are provided for the state's 37 school districts (including 1 operated by the state). The sections of the report are: (1) "Student…

  16. An Evaluation of a Routine Opt-Out Rapid HIV Testing Program in a Rhode Island Jail

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Curt G.; Bazerman, Lauri; Cornwall, Alexandra H.; Patry, Emily; Poshkus, Michael; Fu, Jeannia; Nunn, Amy

    2013-01-01

    There is an increased prevalence of HIV among incarcerated populations. We conducted a rapid HIV testing pilot program using oral specimens at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections jail. 1364 detainees were offered rapid testing upon jail entrance and 98% completed testing. Twelve detainees had reactive rapid tests, one of which was a new HIV diagnosis. To evaluate the program qualitatively, we conducted key informant interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders. There was overwhelming support for the oral fluid rapid HIV test. Correctional staff reported improved inmate processing due to the elimination of phlebotomy required with conventional HIV testing. Delivering negative rapid HIV test results in real-time during the jail intake process remained a challenge but completion of confirmatory testing among those with reactive rapid tests was possible. Rapid HIV testing using oral specimens in the RIDOC jail was feasible and preferred by correctional staff. PMID:21689040

  17. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in elementary school children in Rhode Island: associated psychosocial factors and medications used.

    PubMed

    Harel, Ephat H; Brown, William D

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore psychosocial factors associated with referral for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) evaluation or ADHD diagnosis among elementary school children in Rhode Island, as well as to examine the extent of drug therapy among this population. A survey was distributed to parents/guardians of 2,800 3rd- to 5th-grade public school students in 4 Rhode Island school districts. The average age of the children was 9.0 +/- 1.0 years with 52% girls. Approximately 12% of the students had been referred for ADHD evaluation (RFE). Of these, 52% (6% of all children in the survey) were receiving psychoactive prescription medications daily. While the male:female ratio in the non-RFE group was almost 1:1, there were more boys than girls in the RFE group (male/female ratio of 3:1, p < 0.0001) and in the medicated group (male/female ratio 4:1, p < 0.0001). RFE children and medicated children were older than classroom peers (p < 0.0001), and had a greater degree of school misconduct (p < 0.0001). RFE children and medicated children were significantly less likely to have parents who completed college (p < 0.05), were significantly more likely to have stepparents (p < 0.05), and to be only children (p < 0.05) when compared with their peers. Amphetamine was the most commonly prescribed drug (used by 54% of the medicated children) followed by methylphenidate (43%). Nearly 18% of the medicated children were receiving 1 to 3 additional psychoactive prescription medications on a daily basis. In conclusion, RFE children and children medicated for ADHD were more likely to have a stepparent, have no siblings, and have parents that had not completed college. Amphetamine rather than methylphenidate accounted for the majority of medications used in this study, and simultaneous use of multiple psychoactive medications was reported in 18% of the medicated children. PMID:12921450

  18. 75 FR 5898 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island...New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island...New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long...

  19. Distribution of salinity in ground water from the interpretation of borehole-geophysical logs and salinity data, Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Brandon, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of salinity in ground water at Calf Pasture Point, a small coastal peninsula bounded by Narragansett Bay on the east and Allen Harbor on the west, in Davisville, Rhode Island, was interpreted from borehole-geophysical data and previously collected salinity data to help identify potential flowpaths of contaminated ground water to surface-water bodies. The surficial material at this 40-acre site, which ranges in thickness from about 30 to 85 feet, is composed of an upper sand unit, a silt unit, and a till unit overlying bedrock. Borehole-geophysical data indicate that fresh ground water is present in all surficial units in the northern and northwestern part of the site. In the central and eastern parts of the site, where most of the current land surface is composed of dredged fill placed in a small saltwater embayment, brackish and saline ground water predominate. Fresh ground water moving into this area from upgradient and recharge to this extended land surface from precipitation is diluting the saline groundwater in the upper sand and till units, and to a lesser extent in the silt unit. In this area, the freshwater-flow system is slowly expanding towards Narragansett Bay and the entrance channel to Allen Harbor.

  20. Assessment of Habitat and Streamflow Requirements for Habitat Protection, Usquepaug-Queen River, Rhode Island, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Parker, Gene W.

    2003-01-01

    The relations among stream habitat and hydrologic conditions were investigated in the Usquepaug?Queen River Basin in southern Rhode Island. Habitats were assessed at 13 sites on the mainstem and tributaries from July 1999 to September 2000. Channel types are predominantly low-gradient glides, pools, and runs that have a sand and gravel streambed and a forest or shrub riparian zone. Along the stream margins,overhanging brush, undercut banks supported by roots, and downed trees create cover; within the channel, submerged aquatic vegetation and woody debris create cover. These habitat features decrease in quality and availability with declining streamflows, and features along stream margins generally become unavailable once streamflows drop to the point at which water recedes from the stream banks. Riffles are less common, but were identified as critical habitat areas because they are among the first to exhibit habitat losses or become unavailable during low-flow periods. Stream-temperature data were collected at eight sites during summer 2000 to indicate the suitability of those reaches for cold-water fish communities. Data indicate stream temperatures provide suitable habitat for cold-water species in the Fisherville and Locke Brook tributaries and in the mainstem Queen River downstream of the confluence with Fisherville Brook. Stream temperatures in the Usquepaug River downstream from Glen Rock Reservoir are about 6?F warmer than in the Queen River upstream from the impoundment. These warmer temperatures may make habitat in the Usquepaug River marginal for cold-water species. Fish-community composition was determined from samples collected at seven sites on tributaries and at three sites on the mainstem Usquepaug?Queen River. Classification of the fish into habitat-use groups and comparison to target fish communities developed for the Quinebaug and Ipswich Rivers indicated that the sampled reaches of the Usquepaug?Queen River contained most of the riverine fish species that would have been expected to occur in this area. Streamflow records from the gaging station Usquepaug River near Usquepaug were used to (1) determine streamflow requirements for habitat protection by use of the Tennant method, and (2) define a flow regime that mimics the river's natural flow regime by use of the Range of Variability Approach. The Tennant streamflow requirement, defined as 30 percent of the mean annual flow, was 0.64 cubic feet per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2). This requirement should be considered an initial estimate because flows measured at the Usquepaug River gaging station are reduced by water withdrawals upstream from the gage. The streamflow requirements may need to be revised once a watershed-scale precipitationrunoff model of the Usquepaug River is complete and a simulation of streamflows without water withdrawals has been determined. Streamflow requirements for habitat protection were also determined at seven riffle sites by use of the Wetted-Perimeter and R2Cross methods. Two of these sites were on the mainstem Usquepaug River, one was on the mainstem Queen River, and four were on tributaries and the headwaters of the Queen River. Median streamflow requirements for habitat protection for these sites were 0.41 (ft3/s)/mi2, determined by the Wetted-Perimeter method and 0.72 ft3/s/mi2, determined by the R2Cross method.

  1. Assemblages of Dragonfly Species that Emerged from Small Wetlands Along an Urbanization Gradient Within the State of Rhode Island, from May to October 2004.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliberti, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Dragonfly exuviae were collected during six visits to 21 small wetlands, from mid-May through mid-October 2004. The 21 palustrine wetlands range from highly anthropogenic sites in greater Providence, to small, natural ponds in rural Rhode Island. Exuviae were identified to species in the laboratory. Dragonfly communities are analyzed for assemblage patterns. Land-use in surrounding wetland buffers, along with water quality measurements, are evaluated for landscape and environmental factors which affect species distributions.

  2. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Rhode Island's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 435 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 440 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

  3. Field verification program for small wind turbines, Block Island, Rhode Island. Quarterly report for the period October to December 1999

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry G. duPont

    2000-01-01

    The proposal is to install and monitor five 10-kW residential wind turbines on 25-meter towers on Block Island, which has excellent wind resources and high electricity costs. The harsh environment will provide an opportunity for accelerated reliability testing of an enhanced wind turbine and other equipment.

  4. The North Cape oil spill: hydrocarbons in Rhode Island coastal waters and Point Judith Pond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Reddy; J. G. Quinn

    2001-01-01

    On 19 January 1996, the North Cape oil barge ran aground near Moonstone Beach, RI, and spilled over 2700 metric tons of No. 2 fuel oil during a severe winter storm. High winds and rough seas drove the oil into the water column, and the oil spread throughout Block Island Sound and into several coastal salt ponds. Over 50 water

  5. The nutritional effect of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves as feed supplement on Rhode Island Red hen egg production and quality.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elezz Fouad Mohammed, Khaled; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald; Solorio-Sanchez, Javier Francisco

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves (MOL) as feed supplement on the performance and egg quality of Rhode Island Red (RIR) hens under the tropical conditions of Yucatan, Mexico. Forty-eight RIR hens were allocated in 12 floor pen replicates each with four birds. Thereafter, the replicates were divided into three groups which were corresponded to ad libitum feed (control), ad libitum feed supplemented with MOL T1 (AL + MOL) and restricted feed amount (20% lower than control) with MOL T2 (RCD + MOL), respectively. T1 (AL + MOL) had higher egg laying rate (71.4% versus 66.6%), higher daily egg mass production (45.4 versus 41.9 g/day), lower feed intake (121.3 versus 127.5 g/day) and better feed conversion ratio (2.8 versus 3.2 g feed:g egg) versus control. T2 / (RCD + MOL) had lower values of body weight, egg laying rate, egg weight and egg mass, and recorded better feed conversion ratio than the control group. The control group recorded a higher percentage of pecked eggs versus T1 and T2 (6.5% versus 1.2% and 2.0 %). Similar intake of MOL (3.1 and 3.4 g DM/day) was recorded in T1 (AL + MOL) and T2 (RCD + MOL). Yolk color was improved significantly in T1 (AL + MOL) than both control and T2 (RCD + MOL), while T2 (RCD + MOL) had eggs with lower yolk and higher albumen percentages than the other two ad libitum groups. The results suggest that MOL could be used successfully as sustainable tropical feed resource for RIR hens. PMID:22207478

  6. Preliminary study of sources and processes of enrichment of manganese in water from University of Rhode Island supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvey, William Dudley; Johnston, Herbert E.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved manganese have increased from 0.0 to as much as 3.3 mg/liter over a period of years in closely spaced University of Rhode Island supply wells. The wells tap stratified glacial deposits and derive part of their water from infiltration from a nearby river-pond system. The principal sources of the manganese seem to be coatings of oxides and other forms of manganese on granular aquifer materials and organic-rich sediments on the bottom of the pond and river. Chemical analyses of water from an observation well screened from 3 to 5 feet below the pond bottom indicate that infiltration of water through organic-rich sediments on the pond bottom is the likely cause of manganese enrichment in the well supplies. After passing through the organic layer, the water contains concentrations of manganese as high as 1.2 mg/liter. Manganese in water in concentrations that do not cause unpleasant taste is not regarded to be toxicologically significant. However, concentrations in excess of a few tenths of a milligram per liter are undesirable in public supplies and in many industrial supplies. Brown and others (21970) note that waters containing manganese in concentrations less than 0.1 mg/liter seldom prove troublesome, but that those containing more than 0.5 mg/liter may form objectionable deposits on cooked food, laundry, and plumbing fixtures. The U.S. Public health Service (1962) recommends that the concentrations of manganese in drinking and culinary water not exceed 0.05 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. 75 FR 44179 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...see 40 CFR Section 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...for so long as the area continues to attain...ozone NAAQS. 40 CFR 51.918. Complete...rule (see 40 CFR 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...

  8. COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

  9. LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, NAD RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem compo...

  10. 75 FR 8571 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ...period. In addition, preliminary ozone data for 2009 show this area continues to attain the 1997 ozone NAAQS. II. What Is the Effect of This Action? If this determination...under the provisions of EPA's ozone implementation rule (see...

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBURBAN LAND USE ON HABITAT AND BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF COASTAL RHODE ISLAND STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our watershed ecosystems. The...

  12. Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.; Myers, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Common tern cIutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, .from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends .found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

  13. Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Common tern (Sterna hirundinae ) clutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

  14. THE FOOD HABITS OF FIVE CRAB SPECIES AT PETTAQUAMSCUTT RIVER, RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    crab, OIralipes ocellatus; mud crab. Ne(Ypanope tezana; and spider crab, Libinia emarginata, Callinectes sapidus; lady crabs, Ovalipes ocellatus; and mud crabs, Neopanopeus texana, have also been found powered by an 18 hp outboard motor (see Ropes [1968] for a description of the dredge). Intertidal areas

  15. Imprint of the Past: Ecological History of Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because environmental problems are often caused by an accumulation of impacts over several decades or even centuries, it is necessary to look at the environmental history of an area to understand what happened, and why, before solutions can be devised. This case study of Greenwic...

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

  17. The Nation's Report Card Science 2011 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A representative sample of 122,000 eighth-graders participated in the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science assessment, which is designed to measure students' knowledge and abilities in the areas of physical science, life science, and Earth and space sciences. This report covers the overall results, achievement level…

  18. The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

  19. Potential for localized groundwater contamination in a porous pavement parking lot setting in Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boving, Thomas B.; Stolt, Mark H.; Augenstern, Janelle; Brosnan, Brian

    2008-08-01

    The control of polluted surface runoff and the assessment of possible impacts on groundwater is a concern at the local and regional scale. On this background, a study investigates possible impacts of organic and inorganic pollutants (including bacteria) originating from a permeable asphalt parking lot on the water quality immediately beneath it. The functioning of the permeable pavement, including clogging and restricted vertical percolation, was also evaluated. Four nested sample ports (shallow and deep) were installed below low- and high-traffic areas, including one port outside the parking lot. At least initially there was a good hydraulic connection between the parking surface and the shallow sample ports. The presence of a geotextile layer at the base of the parking lot structure, however, was identified in lab tests as one factor restricting vertical percolation to the deeper ports. Clogging of the permeable surface was most pronounced in heavy traffic areas and below snow pile storage areas. Corroborated by high electric conductivity and chloride measurements, sand brought in by cars during winter was the principal cause for clogging. No bacteria or BOD were found in percolating water. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were present at concentrations near minimum detection limit. Nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) were being leached into the ground via the permeable parking lot surface at annual flux rates of 0.45 0.84 g/m2/year. A multi-species tracer test demonstrated a retention capacity of the permeable parking lot structure of >90% for metals and 27% for nutrients, respectively.

  20. Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, K.; Silver, B.; Boudreaux-Bartels, F.; Harlow, L.; Knickle, H.; Mederer, H.; Peckham, J.; Roheim, C.; Trubatch, J.; Webster, K.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative. The 5 goals are (1) to increase the numbers of women STEM faculty, (2) to provide faculty development opportunities, (3) to improve networks of professional and social support, (4) to assess the academic work environment for all faculty, and (5) to implement long-term changes throughout the university that promote a supportive work environment for women STEM faculty. Accomplishments during the first year include (1) hiring several ADVANCE Assistant Professors, (2) developing workshops on critical skills for junior faculty (grant writing, negotiations, mentoring), (3) initiating a series of lunch meetings where pertinent topical and work-family issues are discussed informally, (4) awarding small Incentive grants for research and other projects that enhance the careers of women STEM faculty, (5) developing and modifying university policies on family leave and dual career couple recruitment, (6) developing and implementing quantitative and qualitative assessment tools for baseline and ongoing campus-wide work climate surveys within the context of a theoretical model for change, and (7) offering directed self-study workshops for entire departments using a trained facilitator. The ADVANCE Assistant Professor position, unique to URI's program, allows a new hire to spend the first 2-3 years developing a research program without teaching obligations. ADVANCE pays their salary during this time, at which point they transition to a regular faculty position. During this first of five years of NSF funding, the ADVANCE program has been met with campus wide enthusiasm and interest from both faculty and administration. Further, the program has the potential for invigorating not only STEM departments, but also the wider university, in offering innovative and engaging workshops and policies, as well as providing an opportunity for ongoing self-study through bi-annual surveys across the university.

  1. Natural and human causes of a flash flood in a small catchment (Rhodes Island, Greece) based on atmospheric forcing and runoff modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karalis, Sotirios; Katsafados, Petros; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Tsanakas, Konstantinos; Valkanou, Kanella

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the natural (hydro-meteorological and geomorphological) and human induced factors responsible for a flash flood event that occurred on November 22nd, 2013 in a small ungauged catchment (covering an area of about 24km2) of Rhodes Island, Greece. The flash flooding killed four people and caused over â¬10 million worth of damages located mainly around the Kremasti village. In this study the reconstruction of this extreme hydro-meteorological event is attempted by using detailed spatiotemporal rainfall information, a physically based hydrological model (LISEM) and the 1D hydraulic model HEC-RAS. Furthermore, the human impacts, which are responsible for extreme flood discharge within the drainage basin, are recorded and mapped. The major meteorological feature of this event is associated with the passage of a cold front over SE Aegean Sea. The destructive flash flood was triggered by the extreme precipitation (almost 100 mm in 4 hours was recorded at the meteorological stations closest to the flooded area). An advanced nowcasting method is applied in order to provide high spatiotemporal distribution of the precipitation over the catchment area. OpenLisem (Limbourg Soil Erosion Model) is used as a runoff model for exploring the response of the catchment. It is a freeware raster model (based on PCRaster) that simulates the surface water and sediment balance for every gridcell. It is event based and has fine spatial and temporal resolution. The model is designed to simulate the effects of detailed land use changes or conservation measures on runoff, flooding and erosion during heavy rainstorms. Since OpenLISEM provides a detailed simulation of runoff processes, it is very demanding on input data (it requires a minimum of 24 maps depending on the input options). The PCRaster GIS functionality was used to derive the necessary data from the basic maps (DEM, land unit map and map of impermeable areas). The sources for the basic maps include geological, hydrogeological, and land-cover maps, as well as recent detailed orthophotomaps. After the hydrograph was derived from OpenLISEM, the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is employed in order to route it through the Kremasti stream channel. This procedure served as a model validation since it provided the ability to compare the models' results against the 'high water' marks on the bridge and discuss issues such as surface roughness coefficient.

  2. RHODE ISLAND SSURGO SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a digital soil survey and is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The information was collected by digitizing maps, by compiling information onto a planimetric correct base and digitizing, or by revis...

  3. Estimating soil erosion in Natura 2000 areas located on three semi-arid Mediterranean Islands.

    PubMed

    Zaimes, George N; Emmanouloudis, Dimitris; Iakovoglou, Valasia

    2012-03-01

    A major initiative in Europe is the protection of its biodiversity. To accomplish this, specific areas from all countries of the European Union are protected by the establishment of the "Natura 2000" network. One of the major threats to these areas and in general to ecosystems is soil erosion. The objective of this study was to quantitatively estimate surface soil losses for three of these protected areas that are located on semi-arid islands of the Mediterranean. One Natura 2000 area was selected from each of the following islands: Sicily in Italy, Cyprus and Rhodes in Greece. To estimate soil losses, Gerlach troughs were used. These troughs were established on slopes that ranged from 35-40% in four different vegetation types: i) Quercus ilex and Quercus rotundifolia forests, ii) Pinus brutia forests, iii) "Phrygana" shrublands and iv) vineyards. The shrublands had the highest soil losses (270 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)) that were 5-13 times more than the other three vegetation types. Soil losses in these shrublands should be considered a major concern. However, the other vegetation types also had high soil losses (21-50 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Conclusively, in order to enhance and conserve the biodiversity of these Natura 2000 areas protective management measures should be taken into consideration to decrease soil losses. PMID:23033694

  4. 75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of...Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will...presentation on citizen science activities on the islands, an...

  5. Practice-based evidence informs environmental health policy and regulation: a case study of residential lead-soil contamination in Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Marcella Remer; Burdon, Andrea; Boekelheide, Kim

    2014-01-15

    Prior to 1978, the exteriors of Rhode Island's municipal water towers were painted with lead-containing paint. Over time, this lead-containing paint either flaked-off or was mechanically removed and deposited on adjacent residential properties. Residents challenged inconsistencies across state agencies and federal requirements for collecting and analyzing soil samples. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the efficacy of Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) soil sampling regulations in determining the extent of lead contamination on residential properties using real world data. Researchers interviewed key government personnel, reviewed written accounts of events and regulations, and extracted and compiled lead data from environmental soil sampling on 31 residential properties adjacent to six municipal water towers. Data were available for 498 core samples. Approximately 26% of the residential properties had lead soil concentrations >1000 mg/kg. Overall, lead concentration was inversely related to distance from the water tower. Analysis indicated that surface samples alone were insufficient to classify a property as "lead safe". Potential for misclassification using RIDOH regulations was 13%. For properties deemed initially "lead free", the total number of samples was too few to analyze. Post-remediation lead-soil concentrations suggest the extent of lead contamination may have been deeper than initially determined. Additional data would improve the ability to draw more meaningful and generalized conclusions. Inconsistencies among regulatory agencies responsible for environmental health obfuscate transparency and erode the public's trust in the regulatory process. Recommendations for improvement include congruency across departmental regulations and specific modifications to lead-soil sampling regulations reflective of lowered CDC reference blood lead value for children 1 to 5 years old (5 ?g/dL). While scientific research informed the initial development of these environmental health policies and regulations, practice-based evidence did not support their efficacy in context of real world practice. PMID:24055667

  6. Hydrostratigraphy of Tree Island Cores from Water Conservation Area 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNeill, Donald F.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2003-01-01

    Cores and borehole-geophysical logs collected on and around two tree islands in Water Conservation Area 3 have been examined to develop a stratigraphic framework for these ecosystems. Especially important is the potential for the exchange of ground water and surface water within these features. The hydrostratigraphic results from this study document the lithologic nature of the foundation of the tree islands, the distribution of porous intervals, the potential for paleotopographic influence on their formation, and the importance of low-permeability, subaerial-exposure horizons on the vertical exchange of ground water and surface water. Figure 1. Location of Tree Islands 3AS3 and 3BS1. [larger image] Results from this hydrostratigraphic study indicate that subtle differences occur in lithofacies and topography between the on-island and off-island subsurface geologic records. Specifics are described herein. Firstly, at both tree-island sites, the top of the limestone bedrock is slightly elevated beneath the head of the tree islands relative to the off-island core sites and the tail of the tree islands, which suggests that bedrock 'highs' acted as 'seeds' for the development of the tree islands of this study and possibly many others. Secondly, examination of the recovered core and the caliper logs tentatively suggest that the elevated limestone beneath the tree islands may have a preferentially more porous framework relative to limestone beneath the adjacent areas, possibly providing a ground-water-to-surface-water connection that sustains the tree island system. Finally, because the elevation of the top of the limestone bedrock at the head of Tree Island 3AS3 is slightly higher than the surrounding upper surface of the peat, and because the wetland peats have a lower hydraulic conductivity than the limestone bedrock (Miami Limestone and Fort Thompson Formation), it is possible that there is a head difference between surface water of the wetlands and the ground water in underlying limestone bedrock.

  7. Training Family Medicine Residents to Build and Remodel a Patient Centered Medical Home in Rhode Island: A Team Based Approach to PCMH Education.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rabin; Furey, Christopher; Goldberg, Arnold; Ashley, David; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2014-01-01

    Primary Care practices in the United States are undergoing rapid transformation into Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs), prompting a need to train resident physicians in this new model of primary care. However, few PCMH curricula are described or evaluated in the literature. We describe the development and implementation of an innovative, month-long, team-based, block rotation, integrated into the Brown Family Medicine Residency Program, within the context of statewide PCMH practice transformation in Rhode Island. The PCMH resident team (first-, second- and third-year residents) gain PCMH skills, with progressive levels of responsibility through residency. In addition to traditional supervised direct outpatient care, learning activities include: active participation in PCMH transformation projects, population health level patient management, quality improvement activities, interdisciplinary teamwork, chronic disease management (including leading group medical visits), and PCMH specific didactics paired with weekly projects. This new clinical block rotation and team holds promise as a model to train residents for future PCMH primary care practices. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2015-04.asp, free with no login]. PMID:25830172

  8. Distribution of selected volatile organic compounds determined with water-to-vapor diffusion samplers at the interface between ground water and surface water, Centredale Manor site, North Providence, Rhode Island, September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Lyford, Forest P.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in soils and ground water at the Centredale Manor Superfund Site in North Providence, Rhode Island. In September 1999, water-to-vapor diffusion samplers were placed in the bottom sediments of waterways adjacent to the site to identify possible contaminated ground-water discharge areas. The approximate12-acre site is a narrow stretch of land between the eastern bank of the Woonasquatucket River, downstream from the U.S. Route 44 bridge and a former mill raceway. The samplers were placed along a 2,250-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River, in the former mill raceway several hundred feet to the east and parallel to the river, and in a cross channel between the river and former mill raceway. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 84 of the 104 water-to-vapor diffusion samplers retrieved. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloro-ethylene were the principal volatile organic compounds detected. The highest vapor concentrations measured for these two chemicals were from diffusion samplers located along an approximate 100-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River about 500 feet downstream of the bridge; here trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations ranged from about 2,000 to 180,000 and 1,600 to 1,400,000 parts per billion by volume, respectively. Upstream and downstream from this reach and along the former mill raceway, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations from the diffusion samples were generally less than 100 parts per billion by volume. Along the lower reaches of the river and mill raceway, however, and in the cross channel, vapor concentrations of trichloroethylene exceeded 100 parts per billion by volume and tetrachloroethylene exceeded 1,000 parts per billion by volume in several diffusion samples. Although diffusion sample vapor concentrations are higher than water concentrations in surface waters and in ground water, and they should only be interpreted qualitatively as relative values, these values provide important information as to potential discharge areas of contaminants.

  9. WESTERN CHICHAGOF AND YAKOBI ISLANDS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, ALASKA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Bruce R.; Kimball, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of mineral-resource studies of the Western Chichagof and Yakobi Islands Wilderness study area, southeastern Alaska, five areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential and four areas of probable mineral-resource potential have been delineated. No energy resource potential was identified in this study. Current knowledge of the detailed geology of the study area is confined to areas adjacent to the wellknown mineral deposits. The remainder of the study area is well mineralized, but the extent of mineralization is inadequately known. Detailed geologic and geochemical studies of the lesser known areas would provide a more complete resource assessment.

  10. 33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.865...Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area....

  11. 76 FR 45007 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  12. 75 FR 62632 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  13. 75 FR 47060 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  14. 75 FR 7541 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  15. 75 FR 76523 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  16. 76 FR 17992 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  17. 75 FR 55403 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  18. 76 FR 2195 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  19. 75 FR 39331 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  20. 75 FR 33896 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine). AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  1. 75 FR 18955 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  2. 76 FR 10943 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  3. 76 FR 22168 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  4. 75 FR 25318 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  5. 76 FR 37198 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  6. 75 FR 4139 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  7. 75 FR 11999 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  8. 76 FR 32022 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  9. 76 FR 6187 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal...meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public...

  10. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  11. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  12. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  13. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  14. Long Island Sound area contingency plan. Change 3

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Contained in this revision are: Updated Marine Firefighting annex; Updated Hazardous Material response annex; Comprehensive update of resource phone numbers; Listing of State Historic Protection Officers (SHPO`s); Response techniques and listing of facilities which handle Group V Oils; and Substantial update to the Sensitive Areas on Long Island.

  15. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  16. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  17. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  18. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  19. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  20. 33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

  1. 33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

  2. 33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

  3. 33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

  4. 33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

  5. Waterspout-Tornado Events in the Canary Islands Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, E.; Hernandez, M.; Sanz, R.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to twofold. First, we describe and characterize tornado and waterspout events in the Canary islands area. Event occurrences are gathered from literature and documented spotted cases for the past ten years. In order to characterize each case we make use of atmospheric sounding and of a local high resolution model (MM5). Sencondly, we employ a Szilagyi nomogram to compare the waterspout and tornado appearance conditions in the Canary islands to those at other locations, assessing the capabilities of such graphic as a prediction tool. Finally, we envisage and design a database in order to keep record of future cases for further reseach.

  6. 2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Sitz

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

  7. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

  10. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  11. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  12. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  13. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1430 - Apra Inner Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted area. 334.1430 Section 334.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1430 Apra Inner Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...and NOAA chart 530 (San Diego to Aleutian Islands...District. The area south of...and NOAA chart 530 (San Diego to Aleutian Islands...District. The area south of...and NOAA chart 530 (San Diego to Aleutian...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...restricted area. (a) The area. All the water of the cove bounded by the south shore of Treasure Island, the north shore of Yerba Buena Island, and the connecting causeway, west of a line extending from the southeast corner of the most southerly...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...restricted area. (a) The area. All the water of the cove bounded by the south shore of Treasure Island, the north shore of Yerba Buena Island, and the connecting causeway, west of a line extending from the southeast corner of the most southerly...

  18. 33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...restricted area. (a) The area. All the water of the cove bounded by the south shore of Treasure Island, the north shore of Yerba Buena Island, and the connecting causeway, west of a line extending from the southeast corner of the most southerly...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...restricted area. (a) The area. All the water of the cove bounded by the south shore of Treasure Island, the north shore of Yerba Buena Island, and the connecting causeway, west of a line extending from the southeast corner of the most southerly...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...restricted area. (a) The area. All the water of the cove bounded by the south shore of Treasure Island, the north shore of Yerba Buena Island, and the connecting causeway, west of a line extending from the southeast corner of the most southerly...

  1. Rhode Island After 3PM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children--more than a quarter of children--are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their…

  2. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. The Accountability Illusion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  5. Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island

    PubMed Central

    Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A.Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004–2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed. PMID:22451785

  6. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  7. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  8. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  9. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  10. Q:\\Awards\\External\\Rhodes\\Rhodes Application.docx The Rhodes Scholarship

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Q:\\Awards\\External\\Rhodes\\Rhodes Application.docx The Rhodes Scholarship DUE DATE@mcmaster.ca Phone: 905-525-9140 Ext. 23145 OFFICE USE ONLY: DATE RECEIVED SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 1989 1995 13 #12;Q:\\Awards\\External in length. #12;Q:\\Awards\\External\\Rhodes\\Rhodes Application.docx Name

  11. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  12. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  13. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  14. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  15. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands;...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands;...

  18. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  19. Groundwater flow in a relatively old oceanic volcanic island: the Betancuria area, Fuerteventura Island, Canary Islands, Spain.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

    2014-10-15

    The island of Fuerteventura is the oldest of the Canary Islands' volcanic archipelago. It is constituted by volcanic submarine and subaerial activity and intrusive Miocene events, with some residual later volcanism and Quaternary volcanic deposits that have favored groundwater recharge. The climate is arid, with an average rainfall that barely attains 60 mm/year in the coast and up to 200 mm/year in the highlands. The aquifer recharge is small but significant; it is brackish due to large airborne atmospheric salinity, between 7 and 15 gm(-2)year(-1) of chloride deposition, and high evapo-concentration in the soil. The average recharge is estimated to be less than about 5 mm/year at low altitude and up to 10 mm/year in the highlands, and up to 20 mm/year associated to recent lava fields. Hydrochemical and water isotopic studies, supported by water table data and well and borehole descriptions, contribute a preliminary conceptual model of groundwater flow and water origin in the Betancuria area, the central area of the island. In general, water from springs and shallow wells tends to be naturally brackish and of recent origin. Deep saline groundwater is found and is explained as remnants of very old marine water trapped in isolated features in the very low permeability intrusive rocks. Preliminary radiocarbon dating indicates that this deep groundwater has an apparent age of less than 5000 years BP but it is the result of mixing recent water recharge with very old deep groundwater. Most of the groundwater flow occurs through the old raised volcanic shield of submarine and subaerial formations and later Miocene subaerial basalts. Groundwater transit time through the unsaturated zone is of a few decades, which allows the consideration of long-term quasi-steady state recharge. Transit times are up to a few centuries through the saturated old volcanics and up to several millennia in the intrusive formations, where isolated pockets of very old water may exist. PMID:25108255

  20. Biogeographic and Ecological Regulation of Disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre Virus in Island Mice Is Related to Island Area, Precipitation, and Predator Richness.

    E-print Network

    Allan, Brian

    Is Related to Island Area, Precipitation, and Predator Richness. Author(s): John L. Orrock, Brian F. Allan Nombre Virus in Island Mice Is Related to Island Area, Precipitation, and Predator Richness John L mice from the eight California Channel Islands was greater with increased precipitation (a measure

  1. Establishment, management, and maintenance of the phoenix islands protected area.

    PubMed

    Rotjan, Randi; Jamieson, Regen; Carr, Ben; Kaufman, Les; Mangubhai, Sangeeta; Obura, David; Pierce, Ray; Rimon, Betarim; Ris, Bud; Sandin, Stuart; Shelley, Peter; Sumaila, U Rashid; Taei, Sue; Tausig, Heather; Teroroko, Tukabu; Thorrold, Simon; Wikgren, Brooke; Toatu, Teuea; Stone, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The Republic of Kiribati's Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the equatorial central Pacific, is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site on earth. Created in 2008, it was the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) of its kind (at the time of inception, the largest in the world) and includes eight low-lying islands, shallow coral reefs, submerged shallow and deep seamounts and extensive open-ocean and ocean floor habitat. Due to their isolation, the shallow reef habitats have been protected de facto from severe exploitation, though the surrounding waters have been continually fished for large pelagics and whales over many decades. PIPA was created under a partnership between the Government of Kiribati and the international non-governmental organizations-Conservation International and the New England Aquarium. PIPA has a unique conservation strategy as the first marine MPA to use a conservation contract mechanism with a corresponding Conservation Trust established to be both a sustainable financing mechanism and a check-and-balance to the oversight and maintenance of the MPA. As PIPA moves forward with its management objectives, it is well positioned to be a global model for large MPA design and implementation in similar contexts. The islands and shallow reefs have already shown benefits from protection, though the pending full closure of PIPA (and assessments thereof) will be critical for determining success of the MPA as a refuge for open-ocean pelagic and deep-sea marine life. As global ocean resources are continually being extracted to support a growing global population, PIPA's closure is both timely and of global significance. PMID:25358303

  2. 33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

  3. 33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

  4. 33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

  5. 33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

  6. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...restricted). The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicholas Island,...

  7. The lichen genus Ramalina Ach. ( Ramalinaceae) on the outlying islands of the New Zealand geographic area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M Bannister; D. J Blanchon

    2003-01-01

    The diversity of species of Ramalina occurring on the outlying islands of the New Zealand geographic area is linked to their methods of dispersal and the origin and principal climatic features of the islands themselves. It appears that species of Ramalina have reached these islands by transoceanic, wind-borne dispersal of ascospores and soredia, not necessarily in the direction of the

  8. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  13. Interdune areas of the back-island dune field, North Padre Island, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Gary; Kocurek, Gary

    1984-04-01

    The small, young (about 100 yrs) back-island dune field on north Padre Island, south Texas, consists of fairly persistant oblique dunes (up to 6 m high) with well-developed interdune areas that grade northwestward to small, ephemeral transverse and barchan dunes with interconnected "interdune" areas, thence sheet sand areas. The subhumid climate is marked by rain associated with frontal systems and tropical storms. Winds are seasonally bimodal—prevailing southeasterly are punctuated by northerly and northwesterly winds with the passage of frontal systems in winter. The entire dune field and individual oblique dunes show a net migration of about 15 m yr -1 to the northwest. The dunes however are on a seasonally reversing track, changing their slipface direction and migration direction with frontal systems. One year of monitoring shows sand transport in the dune-interdune system to be complex and cyclic. During the wind reversals of winter, dunes are very ineffecfive sand traps owing to loss of flow separation, and much sand is lost to the interdune areas. Interdune areas store sand during these wet winter months as a result of the wind reversals and higher moisture content. During the summer, the interdune areas deflate and the dunes build in size. The overall dune field deposit appears to consist of three laterally contiguous zones from southeast to northwest: (1) continuous, climbing oblique dune and interdune deposits; (2) discontinuous lenses of dune sand in overall "interdune layers"; and (3) a chaotic mixture of dune and horizontal deposits of the sheet sand areas. One year's mapping and trenching documents that interdune sedimentary structures are extremely variable laterally and vertically reflecting specific microenvironments within the interdune flat. Wet-surface features consist of current and wave ripples, channel fill, miniature deltas, wrinkle marks, mini-ripples, rills, algae and sand volcanoes. Abundant adhesion structures, rain-impacted ripples, brecciated surfaces and microtopography reflect damp-surface deposits. Dry-surface features are predominately wind ripples; others include small isolated barchan and shadow dunes, organic debris lag surfaces, deflation scours, beetle bioturbation, plant-root structures associated with shadow-dunes, and grainfall from the adjacent dunes. Interdune deposits account for about 40% of the total dune field deposits, which seems reasonable compared to some ancient examples. By virtue of occupying a relative "basin", interdune deposits are selectively preserved compared to dune deposits. In general, interdune sedimentation is enhanced by non-eolian depositional mechanisms, a high water table, early evaporatic cements, and a variable wind regime. The actual thicknesses of individual dune and interdune deposits are less on Padre than ancient examples, reflecting the relative scale of the bedforms. In many respects, sequences of sedimentary structure in Padre Island interdune deposits are typical of ancient, coastal interdune strata, but some marked departures occur. Adhesion structures, relatively rare in some ancient examples but abundant within Padre interdune deposits, seem favored by the small size of dune and interdune area, the climate and a variable wind regime. Penecontemporaneous deformation, absent in Padre interdune deposits but pronounced in some ancient examples, probably reflects dune size and the nature of the deposits. Wavy laminae in ancient interdune deposits probably result from many causes, but seem best represented by modern examples of evaporitic algal/bacterial-formed structures.

  14. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  17. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  19. Joint Field Hearing on H.R. 6: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the House Committee on Education and Labor and the Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (Providence, Rhode Island, October 4, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities.

    This document presents, as part of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, witness testimony and prepared statements on the subject of professional development in the elementary and secondary school systems. Witnesses included Rhode Island (RI) elementary and secondary school principals and teachers, officials from the…

  20. 78 FR 70005 - Naval Base Ventura County, San Nicolas Island, California; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ...the Officer in Charge, San Nicolas Island. (4) Submarine...cables within the restricted area pose a risk to the equipment...Notice that the restricted area or section(s) ALPHA...11th Naval District, San Diego, Calif. Dated:...

  1. Volume 8, Number 1, Spring 2010 A Newsletter for Alumni and Friends of the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    associations from the other coasts and annually trek to Washington, DC, to educate our elected officials Island's Graduate School of Oceanography Gerber and Gonzalez Unite Efforts after 30+ Years Ray P. Gerber we overlapped. Then, he moved to Puerto Rico to work at the state university. At GSO we shared much

  2. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  5. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  6. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section...off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The danger...Commander, Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of Guam. 72...Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of Guam. ...Islands, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico are quarantined. [43 FR...

  8. RADIOCARBON AGES OF DEPOSITS IN VOLCANIC SEQUENCES OF THE COLORADAS AREA, ISLAND, MEXICO

    E-print Network

    Farmer, Jack D.

    deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulatedNO.2, RADIOCARBON AGES OF DEPOSITS IN VOLCANIC SEQUENCES OF THE COLORADAS AREA, ISLAND, MEXICO JACK of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Coloradas, a broad, gently terrain comprising

  9. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  10. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  11. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  12. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  13. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Sicily Island, Louisiana (Sicily Island area levee project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demcheck, Dennis K.; Dupuy, Alton J.

    1980-01-01

    Samples consisting of composited core material were collected from five areas by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide data on the impact of proposed channel excavation and levee construction in the Sicily Island area, Louisiana. Samples of receiving water from the five areas, selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material of the levee fill material, also were collected. Chemical and physical analyses were performed on samples of core material and native water and on elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water mixtures. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (USGS)

  14. 33 CFR 165.122 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. 165.122 Section...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. (a) Description of...the navigable waters of the Providence River from Conimicut Point to the...

  15. 33 CFR 165.122 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. 165.122 Section...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. (a) Description of...the navigable waters of the Providence River from Conimicut Point to the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.122 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. 165.122 Section...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. (a) Description of...the navigable waters of the Providence River from Conimicut Point to the...

  17. 33 CFR 165.122 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. 165.122 Section...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. (a) Description of...the navigable waters of the Providence River from Conimicut Point to the...

  18. 33 CFR 165.122 - Regulated Navigation Area: Navigable waters within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. 165.122 Section...within Narragansett Bay and the Providence River, Rhode Island. (a) Description of...the navigable waters of the Providence River from Conimicut Point to the...

  19. Recommendations for a Barrier Island Breach Management Plan for Fire Island National Seashore, including the Otis Pike High Dune Wilderness Area, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Foley, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is developing engineering plans, including economic costs and benefits, for storm damage reduction along an 83 mile stretch of the coastal barrier islands and beaches on the south shore of Long Island, NY from Fire Island Inlet east to the Montauk Point headland. The plan, expected to include various alternatives for storm protection and erosion mitigation, is referred to as the Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Plan (FIMP). These plans are expected to follow the Corps of Engineers’ Environmental Operating Principles striving for long term environmental sustainability and balance between environmental protection and protection of human health and property. Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS), a 19,579 acre unit of the National Park System includes a 32 mile long coastal barrier island located within the FIMP project area. A seven-mile section of the park, Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness Area, is also a designated Federal Wilderness Area. The FIIS includes not only the barrier island and sand dunes, but also several islands, sand flats and wetlands landward of the barrier, submerged parts of Great South Bay shoreface, extending approximately 4,000 feet into the bay with the inner shelf region extending approximately 1,000 feet seaward of the Fire Island shoreline. The Fire Island barrier islands, a sand-starved system dominated by highly dynamic processes, are struggling to maintain their integrity in the face of sea-level rise and storms. Adding to the dilemma is that development on the barriers and the mainland has increased greatly during the past 50 years. As such, managers and decision makers in federal agencies, state agencies and local governments are challenged to balance tradeoffs between protection of lives and property, public access and long term conservation of natural habitats and processes and the plants and animals that depend on these habitats. National Park Service (NPS) policy stipulates that natural coastal processes be maintained to the greatest extent possible and not be impeded so as to conserve landforms, habitats and natural ecosystem resources that reply on the landforms and processes for long-term sustainability of the national park. Storms and associated processes such as waves, tides, currents and relative sea-level change are critical elements for the formation and evolution of these barrier islands, sand dunes, back-barrier sand flats and lagoons and vegetated wetlands. Processes such as wave run-up, overwash and barrier beaching, which occur during elevated storm surge are all necessary processes in enabling the efficient transfer of sediments, nutrients and marine water from the Atlantic Ocean across barriers and into Great South Bay. A large body of scientific data and information published over the past 50 years shows that such transfers of sediment and water from the ocean to the bays are essential for the long-term maintenance of the barrier island and back-bay systems and their biologically diverse habitats an d ecosystems. Current relative sea-level rise (~12 in/century) is chronic and pervasive in driving Long Island coastal change and with the likelihood of accelerating sea level rise in the near future, coastal hazards such as erosion, inundation, and storm surge flooding will increase, with corresponding increased risk to life and property on both Fire Island and on the mainland. In addition, the cumulative effects over the past century and more, both direct and indirect, of human impacts on the Long Island coast have altered the barrier beach and dunes and sediment transport processes. These impacts have likely increased the potential for breaching and increased risk to life and property on the coast and the mainland. Examples of direct impacts are: the stone jetties at Moriches, Shinnecock, and Fire Island tidal inlets and groin field structures at Westhampton that alter littoral processes, armoring and erosion-control stabilization of the headlandds such as the Montauk Point headlands, and deepening of n

  20. A TROPICAL GARDEN FLORA, PLANTS CULTIVATED IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS AND OTHER TROPICAL AREAS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pemberton, R.W. A Tropical Garden Flora, Plants Cultivated in the Hawaiian Islands and Other Tropical Areas. Economic Botany This is an invited book review of an important new reference book on plants cultivated in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. This is the long awaited update of ...

  1. From concept to practice: using the School Health Index to create healthy school environments in Rhode Island elementary schools. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  2. Inventory of selected freshwater-ecology studies from the New England Coastal Basins (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island), 1937-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tessler, Steven; Coles, J.F.; Beaulieu, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    An inventory of published studies that address freshwater ecology within the New England Coastal Basins was created through computerized bibliographic literature searches and consultation with environmental agencies. Assembled papers were classified to associate their contents with one or more states, ecoregions, river basins, and ecological topics. Full references and their classifications were entered into a bibliographic software program and then exported to a data-base application to generate a checklist summary of study contents. This report presents a listing and classification of 154 selected studies, published between 1937 and 1997, that provide background knowledge and serve as general aquatic-ecology references for the New England Coastal Basins study area.

  3. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

  4. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

  5. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

  6. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

  7. The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Use of Arthropod Rarity for Area Prioritisation: Insights from the Azorean Islands

    PubMed Central

    Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A. V.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at ‘global’ scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and ‘regional’ scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity. A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce. PMID:22479498

  9. Use of arthropod rarity for area prioritisation: insights from the Azorean Islands.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A V

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at 'global' scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and 'regional' scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity.A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce. PMID:22479498

  10. Heat Island Effect in urban Areas and its Impact on the Energy Behaviour of Buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Papadopoulos; E.-A. Kalognomou

    2003-01-01

    The net effect of the urban thermal process is to make the city temperatures generally higher than those of the surrounding suburb or rural areas. The phenomenon of heat islands is rather complex, both the modelling and the spot measurements approach providing only a partial description of it, as the energy balance differences that cause this effect depend on the

  11. ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the Asian/Pacific Islander population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Census tigerlin...

  12. INVESTIGATIONS OF REPORTED PLANT AND ANIMAL HEALTH EFFECTS IN THE THREE MILE ISLAND AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of investigations into reported problems with plants and animals which may be related to the operation of and accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are presented. The kinds of problems reported are listed, and potential areas of concern (such as the ...

  13. 78 FR 67300 - Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...Island, and eliminate the western area entirely. These...affect children. 11. Indian Tribal Governments This...Federal Government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution...Federal Government and Indian tribes. 12. Energy...Sec. 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas...

  14. Supporting Information Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene on Cu

    E-print Network

    Geohegan, David B.

    Supporting Information Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene on Cu Using S6: Large single crystal graphene grains (SCGG) gown on f300 and f400 as indicated. #12;Figure S75: Terminated size of graphene grain after 2 hours of continuous growth on f300 (Cu foil oxidized

  15. Urban climate and clues of heat island events in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena, Andrews José de; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa; França, José Ricardo de Almeida; Peres, Leonardo de Faria; Xavier, Luciano Nóbrega Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    This paper aims to map the thermal field in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ) considering the atmospheric characteristics and the land use that contribute to understanding the urban heat island. Three thermal maps are defined through the use of Landsat5-TM satellite images for three winter events chosen for the decades of 1980, 1990, and 2000, respectively. The results reveal a concentration of warmer cores in urban central areas as well as some local warmer areas in suburban region. Sites with lower temperatures correspond to vegetated areas which are away from the central part of the MARJ, including points of suburban areas. This work emphasizes the importance of the combined analysis of surface temperature with land use and atmospheric conditions, depicting a distinct pattern of heat islands for tropical climate.

  16. PLANT INVASIONS IN RHODE ISLAND RIPARIAN ZONES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vegetation in riparian zones provides valuable wildlife habitat while enhancing instream habitat and water quality. Forest fragmentation, sunlit edges, and nutrient additions from adjacent development may be sources of stress on riparian zones. Landscape plants may include no...

  17. December 31, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    upstroke (like in the squid giant axon), or multiple upstrokes when "burst firing." The Hodgkin that of the squid giant axon model: nonlinear membrane conductances are modeled using a saturation value

  18. University of Rhode Island HEALTH SERVICES

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Health Information Management For pickup Mail to patient Mail to addressee Verbal Other RISKS INFORMATION Patient's Name: Date of Birth: Address: Patient's ID#: Phone: Permission is hereby given for URI AND CONSEQUENCES OF FAXING MEDICAL RECORDS ACCEPTED PATIENT SIGNATURE DATE WITNESS SIGNATURE OTHER PHYSICIAN

  19. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    (GSM 9.10). Regulations governing work taken in non-matriculating status are given in GSM 3.30, transfer credit in GSM 7.20, and credit by examination in GSM 7.30. The PROGRAM CREDIT section should system should also be submitted. These courses must satisfy the requirements for transfer credit stated

  20. RHODE ISLAND DIGITAL ORTHOPHOTO QUADRANGLE MOSAIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground resolution, quarter-quadrangle (3.75-minutes of latitude by 3.75-minutes of longitude) image cast on the Universal Tra...

  1. 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher…

  2. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This year the Center on Education Policy analyzed data on the achievement of different groups of students in two distinct ways. First, it looked at grade 4 test results to determine whether the performance of various groups improved at three achievement levels--basic and above, proficient and above, and advanced. Second, it looked at gaps between…

  3. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Animal Sci & Technology - BS 5 EL_ANSC_BS ELSCI RDV 1 2 18 1 4 3 23 26 011201 Water and Soil Science - BS Not Reported Grand TotalNon-Res. Alien Afric. Amer. Native Amer. Asian/Pacific #12;400801 Physics - BA 5 AS

  4. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Total 010699 URB HORT & TURF MGT 05 RD228BOS 14 4 1 3 15 7 22 020101 AGR & RES TECHNOLOGY 05 RD240BOS 1 7 3 10 Non-Res. Alien Afric. Amer. Native Amer. Asian/Pacific Hispanic White Unknown Grand Total #12

  5. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Animal Sci & Technology - BS 5 EL_ANSC_BS ELSCI RDV 3 3 19 1 4 22 26 011201 Water and Soil Science - BS 5_CHEM_BS AS PHY 3 1 3 1 4 Hispanic White Not Reported Grand TotalNon-Res. Alien Afric. Amer. Native Amer. Asian

  6. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    .20 of the Graduate Student Manual (GSM 9.20). Regulations governing work taken in non-degree status are given in GSM 3.32, transfer credit in GSM 7.20 and credit by examination in GSM 7.30. The PROGRAM CREDIT section

  7. December 31, 2013 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    Engineering BME 307 Bioelectricity Fall 2013 Action Potential in the Human Node of Ranvier (Schwarz 1995 model describes the membrane's electrical characteristics in the node of Ranvier in humans [1 and currents to those in the squid giant axon. The Ranvier node model uses five state variables: 1. Vm

  8. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl...

  9. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl...

  10. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 161, 2004, pp. 983993. Printed in Great Britain. Microbial silicification in Iodine Pool, Waimangu geothermal area, North Island,

    E-print Network

    Konhauser, Kurt

    . 983 Microbial silicification in Iodine Pool, Waimangu geothermal area, North Island, New Zealand spring pools. Iodine Pool, located in the Waimangu geothermal area on the North Island of New Zealand

  11. Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area

    SciTech Connect

    Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

  12. 33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1460 Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island;...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1460 Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island;...

  14. Effects and risk evaluation of oil spillage in the sea areas of Changxing island.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanxi; Xu, Jianling; Zhao, Wenkui; Zhang, Jiquan

    2014-08-01

    This paper evaluated the oil spillage risk in the waters near the island of Changxing in Dalian (China) based on the established risk assessment index. Four wind regimes (windless, northerly wind, westerly wind and southerly wind) were selected as weather conditions for the dynamic prediction of oil drift. If an oil spill occurs near the Koumen (a place near the island of Changxing), the forecast and evaluation are conducted based on a three-dimensional mathematical model of oil spillage, and the results obtained show the scope of the affected area when winds from various directions are applied. The oil spillage would, under various conditions, flow into the northern and western sea area of Changxing Island Bay, namely the Dalian harbor seal National Nature Reserve, and create adverse effects on the marine ecological environment. The rationality of combining the established oil spillage risk comprehensive index system with model prediction is further confirmed. Finally, preventive measures and quick fixes are presented in the case of accidental oil spillages. The most effective method to reduce environment risk is to adopt reasonable preventive measures and quick fixes. PMID:25153473

  15. 33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS § 334.1160 San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area...danger zone. A sector in San Pablo Bay adjacent to the westerly shore of...Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California, will conduct target...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1080 - San Francisco Bay adjacent to northeast corner of Treasure Island; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Bay adjacent to northeast corner of Treasure Island...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1080 San Francisco Bay adjacent to northeast corner of Treasure...

  17. 76 FR 32950 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Economic Census of Island Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ...Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa. The economic census...Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or American Samoa. III. Data OMB Control...1,500. U.S. Virgin Islands: 3,000. American Samoa: 600. Estimated...

  18. Three-dimensional seismic study of structures and salt tectonics of Eugene Island Area offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Ye

    1997-01-01

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1997 Major Subject: Geophysics THREF DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC STUDY OF STRUCTURES AND SALT TECTONICS OF EUGENE ISLAND AREA OFFSHORE LOUISIANA, GULF OF MEKICO A Thesis by YE XIONG Submitted to Texas... Philip D. Rabinowitz- (Head of Department) December 1997 Major Subject: Geophysics 111 ABSTRACT Three-Dimensional Seismic Study of Structures and Salt Tectonics of Eugene Island Area, Offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico. (December 1997) Ye Xiong, B...

  19. Landsat TM-based analysis of land area and vegetation cover change on six selected Alabama and Mississippi barrier islands (1984-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstanley, Hunter Clark

    Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island are located 10-20 kilometers south of the Mississippi and Alabama coastlines. These six barrier islands serve as an important shield to southern areas of Mississippi and Alabama from tropical cyclone (hurricane) impacts such as storm surge and destructive waves. The islands are also home to a delicate ecosystem of many different types of flora and fauna. Over the course of the past three decades, all six islands have been subjected to several hurricane events. This, coupled with the natural state of the erosion, has led to the islands losing total land area and vegetation. This thesis research focuses on quantifying the vegetation loss and total land area loss on Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island during the time period from 1984 to 2011. A special focus is given to impacts of Hurricanes Georges, Ivan, Katrina, Gustav, and Ike which affected the northern Gulf Coast in 1998, 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively. This research utilizes Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper Imagery. Supervised classifications and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analyses are performed on each scene to analyze the total land area and vegetation cover of each island. The results of this research show the total extent of land and vegetation loss on each island from 1984 to 2011, and which islands are most vulnerable to erosion and vegetation loss. The results also reveal how all five hurricanes affected each individual island.

  20. Island Biogeography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Jungck (BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium; Biology)

    2005-12-16

    This excel workbook demonstrates the principles of the MacArthur-Wilson theory of Island Biogeography. It allows the user to define the mainland species pool, area of the island, and distance of the island from the mainland. Graphical output included species richness equilibrium at varying island size and distance. The workbook also allows the user to calculate a species-area function for data entered into the data input page. Several datasets on island area and species richness are included for various types of islands and species. Variables and formulas are defined in the accompanying tutorial.

  1. Geologists Search for Evidence of Ancient Beach Deposits and Uplifted Shorelines on Simeonof Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys dig into coastal bluffs of Simeonof Island in search of evidence for ancient beach deposits and tectonically uplifted shorelines....

  2. São Paulo urban heat islands have a higher incidence of dengue than other urban areas.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ricardo Vieira; Albertini, Marcos Roberto; Costa-da-Silva, André Luis; Suesdek, Lincoln; Franceschi, Nathália Cristina Soares; Bastos, Nancy Marçal; Katz, Gizelda; Cardoso, Vivian Ailt; Castro, Bronislawa Ciotek; Capurro, Margareth Lara; Allegro, Vera Lúcia Anacleto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat islands are characterized by high land surface temperature, low humidity, and poor vegetation, and considered to favor the transmission of the mosquito-borne dengue fever that is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. We analyzed the recorded dengue incidence in Sao Paulo city, Brazil, in 2010-2011, in terms of multiple environmental and socioeconomic variables. Geographical information systems, thermal remote sensing images, and census data were used to classify city areas according to land surface temperature, vegetation cover, population density, socioeconomic status, and housing standards. Of the 7415 dengue cases, a majority (93.1%) mapped to areas with land surface temperature >28°C. The dengue incidence rate (cases per 100,000 inhabitants) was low (3.2 cases) in high vegetation cover areas, but high (72.3 cases) in low vegetation cover areas where the land surface temperature was 29±2°C. Interestingly, a multiple cluster analysis phenogram showed more dengue cases clustered in areas of land surface temperature >32°C, than in areas characterized as low socioeconomic zones, high population density areas, or slum-like areas. In laboratory experiments, A. aegypti mosquito larval development, blood feeding, and oviposition associated positively with temperatures of 28-32°C, indicating these temperatures to be favorable for dengue transmission. Thus, among all the variables studied, dengue incidence was most affected by the temperature. PMID:25523076

  3. Floods of November 12, 1974 in the Charlotte Amalie area, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haire, W.J.; Johnson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    The flood on St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, of November 12, 1974, was the largest recorded flood in the area from Fort Christian through Charlotte Amalie and Frenchtown to the end of Crown Bay. This flood has a recurrence interval of about 60 years. With the exception of a few narrow beaches, very little flooding occurred outside of the Charlotte Amalie area. The flood boundaries are controlled to a large extent by the prevailing channel and flood-plain conditions. Inundation from future floods may be affected by changes in channel conditions, alteration of waterway openings at roads, changes in runoff characteristics of the stream caused by increased urbanization, and other cultural developments. The areas inundated by the 1974 flood are shown on 2 maps. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Bimini Islands: a characterization of the two major nursery areas; status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Trave, Claudia; Sheaves, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Bimini Islands (Bahamas, 25°44' N 79°16' W) are characterized by a unique tropical marine environment which provides critical nursery habitats and food resources for many important species of ecological and economical value. Two areas are particularly important in the function and dynamics of the local marine environment: North Sound and South Bimini. Since 1998 the northern part of the island has been subject to an intense urbanization process that involves the construction of an extensive touristic complex. Over the years this activity has radically modified a substantial portion of the land, and part of the underwater environment as well, threatening the fragile balance of the North Sound nursery ground. Effects on marine habitats and on local species have been reported, and although some measures to limit the damage have already been taken, the local ecosystem could ultimately suffer from continuation of the construction work on the area. In 2010, we performed surveys of both main nursery grounds to assess the current ecological status and the main differences between the two areas, investigating macrobenthic epifauna abundance, seagrass density and abiotic parameters. The results of this study indicate that the ecosystem still appears in reasonably healthy condition, although showing some concerning trends. These data provide baseline conditions to assess further changes, and possibly to support the development of plans for the conservation of the North Sound and South Bimini coastal ecosystems. PMID:24936392

  5. Biogeographic and ecological regulation of disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre virus in island mice is related to island area, precipitation, and predator richness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orrock, John L.; Allan, Brian F.; Drost, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The relative roles of top-down and bottom-up forces in affecting disease prevalence in wild hosts is important for understanding disease dynamics and human disease risk. We found that the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the agent of a severe disease in humans (hantavirus pulmonary syndrome), in island deer mice from the eight California Channel Islands was greater with increased precipitation (a measure of productivity), greater island area, and fewer species of rodent predators. In finding a strong signal of the ecological forces affecting SNV prevalence, our work highlights the need for future work to understand the relative importance of average rodent density, population fluctuations, behavior, and specialist predators as they affect SNV prevalence. In addition to illustrating the importance of both bottom-up and top-down limitation of disease prevalence, our results suggest that predator richness may have important bearing on the risk of exposure to animal-borne diseases that affect humans.

  6. Back-island and open-ocean shorelines, and sand areas of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, April 12, 1989, to September 5, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guy, Kristy K.

    2015-01-01

    This Data Series Report includes several open-ocean shorelines, back-island shorelines, back-island shoreline points, sand area polygons, and sand lines for Assateague Island that were extracted from natural-color orthoimagery (aerial photography) dated from April 12, 1989, to September 5, 2013. The images used were 0.3–2-meter (m)-resolution U.S. Geological Survey Digital Orthophoto Quarter Quads (DOQQ), U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) images, and Virginia Geographic Information Network Virginia Base Map Program (VBMP) images courtesy of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The back-island shorelines were hand-digitized at the intersect of the apparent back-island shoreline and transects spaced at 20-m intervals. The open-ocean shorelines were hand-digitized at the approximate still water level, such as tide level, which was fit through the average position of waves and swash apparent on the beach. Hand-digitizing was done at a scale of approximately 1:2,000. The sand polygons were derived by using an image-processing unsupervised classification technique that separates images into classes. The classes were then visually categorized as either sand or not sand. Also included in this report are 20-m-spaced transect lines and the transect base lines.

  7. Evolution of the urban heat island at a large coastal urban area of Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Founda, D.; Pierros, F.; Nastos, P. T.; Petrakis, M.

    2012-04-01

    Urban heat islands (UHI) are in the focus of research interest during past decades, as they concern densely populated areas, thus having a great impact on health of citizens, but also on environment and economy of cities. The linkage between urban heat islands and climatic change is of particular importance, especially in areas where - according to future projections - significant warming is expected, as the urban effect amplifies regional warming. The study focuses on the city of Athens and concerns the temporal evolution on the mesoscale of UHI over the period 1975-2010. Although the study of the spatial distribution of the urban heat island in Athens has revealed large differences of the air temperature between the central zone of the city and surrounding rural stations (reaching up to 10 oC in certain cases), it is quite important to study the rates of UHI changes on the mesoscale and extract information on whether UHI is amplified, stabilized or has declined over time. It is mentioned that Athens has undergone dramatic changes during recent decades as regards land use/land cover map and population distribution. The knowledge of the rates of UHI changes will also reveal the 'true' rates of background warming which is observed in the area during the study period. Annual and seasonal values were calculated from daily average, maximum and minimum temperature at seven stations of different characteristics of the area of interest (urban/ suburban/ coastal/rural). From the comparison of the average air temperature between the rural and urban stations, it was found that the intensity of UHI increases by approximately +0.2 oC/decade on an annual basis over the study period, but the results are strongly dependent on the season. In summer and spring, the rate of UHI changes is more pronounced, amounting to +0.4 oC/decade (statistically significant at 0.05 CL). Moreover, it was found that the rate of change is higher in the maximum than in the minimum air temperature. It was also estimated that urban effect accounts almost for the half of the observed warming trends in the area, on an annual base.

  8. Areas contributing recharge to production wells and effects of climate change on the groundwater system in the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    Climate projections for the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins from downscaled output from general circulation models indicate that mean annual temperature might increase by 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit and 8.0 degrees Fahrenheit by the late 21st century (2070–99) compared with the late 20th century (1970–99) under scenarios of lower and higher emissions of greenhouse gases, respectively. By the late 21st century, winter and spring precipitation is projected to increase by 12 to 17 percent, summer precipitation to increase by about the same as mean annual precipitation (8 percent), and fall precipitation to decrease by 5 percent for both emission scenarios compared with

  9. The Urban Heat Island Behavior of a Large Northern Latitude Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Hertel, W.; Mykleby, P.

    2012-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience elevated temperatures relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in vegetation cover, buildings and other development, and infrastructure. Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of the outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. Temperatures in the urban center can be 2-5°C warmer during the daytime and as much as 10°C at night. Urban warming is responsible for excessive energy consumption, heat-related health effects, an increase in urban pollution, degradation of urban ecosystems, changes in the local meteorology, and an increase in thermal pollution into urban water bodies. One mitigation strategy involves manipulating the surface energy budget to either reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed at the surface or offset absorbed energy through latent cooling. Options include using building materials with different properties of reflectivity and emissivity, increasing the reflectivity of parking lots, covering roofs with vegetation, and increasing the amount of vegetation overall through tree planting or increasing green space. The goal of the Islands in the Sun project is to understand the formation and behavior of urban heat islands and to mitigate their effects through sensible city engineering and design practices. As part of this project, we have been characterizing the UHI of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA), a 16,000 square kilometer urban and suburban region located in east central Minnesota that includes the two cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, and evaluating mitigation strategies for reducing urban warming. Annually, the TCMA has a modest 2-3°C UHI that is especially apparent in winter when the urban core can be up to 5-6°C warmer than the surrounding countryside. We present an analysis of regional temperature variations from a dense network of sensors located throughout the TCMA. We focus on the diurnal and seasonal behavior of the TCMA UHI with an emphasis on the contribution of different land use types on the UHI. We also present a comparison of thermal and radiative properties of two different roofing materials with data collected from the roof of the Science Museum of Minnesota in Saint Paul, MN. The impact of the TCMA UHI on thermal pollution into local water bodies is also investigated.

  10. Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D. (NASA-Ames Research Center, MS-239-4, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Farmer, M.C. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Anthropology); Berger, R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Depts. of Geography and Anthropology and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. The authors obtained [sup 14]C ages of 4690 [plus minus] 270 Bp (5000-5700 cal Bp) and 5040 [plus minus] 460 Bp (53090-6300 cal Bp) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lonas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacustrine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. These [sup 14]C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in the region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

  11. Potential Mentors for Summer Interns -2014 Harbor Branch Scientific/Engineering Staff and Areas of Research

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    : Hanisak, Dennis - Research Professor (Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1977) Interests: physiology and ecology of marine plants (primarily macroalgae and sea grasses), including their primary production

  12. GIS-aided port area plane design on project for Dongluo island-port in Fuzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zong, Yueguang; He, Jinliao

    2008-10-01

    Up to now, the site selection of deepwater port has become a hot issue in the construction and planning of many estuary port cities. At the same time, there are various schemes about the location of deepwater port in Fuzhou and different opinions on them. Under this background, a new project for Dongluo Island-Port has been put forward. Port engineering has distinct spatial attributes, so its design is closely related to geographic spatial location. According to common engineering technique standards of seaport's location and construction, this paper explores the port area plane design of the new project by spatial analysis means of GIS. Main technical processes include applying the ARC/INFO9.0 and ArcView3.2 software to build elevation data firstly, then overlay the feature coverage to the base map to implement spatial analysis, and obtain the design coverage for port area finally. Combining with technical criterions of port area plane design, the paper analyses the design effect and concludes that the berths arrangement accords with the demand of transport capacity and the items layout accords with the engineering technique criterions as well, therefore the port area plane design is technically feasible as a whole.

  13. Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Groundwater in the Western Coastal Area in Jeju Volcanic Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hamm, S.; Lee, J.; Koh, G.; Hwang, S.

    2008-12-01

    Residents in Jeju volcanic island use most part of water resources from groundwater. Actually, in the island, there exist no perennial streams or rivers due to extremely high infiltration rate of water into surface soils and rocks (basalt and trachyte). In the western part of Jeju Island, high pumping rate of wells caused great drawdown especially during drought period. By this current trend, great decline of groundwater level as well as seawater intrusion is predictable. According to drill data from 13 wells for monitoring seawater intrusion installed in the western part of the island by the authority of Jeju Special Governed Island, the geology of the western area is composed of five units: lava sequence (hyaloclastic breccia, acicular feldspar basalt, olivine basalt, aphanitic feldspar basalt, augite feldspar basalt, and porphyritic feldspar basalt), sedimentary layer (containing gravel and sand) intercalated in lava sequences, Seoguipo Formation (gravels, unconsolidated sands, shell fossils, and sandy mudstone), trachyandesite and tuff occurring in Seoguipo Formation, and U Formation. Geophysical well logging on the five monitoring wells (Panpo (PP), Kosan (KS), Shindo (SD), Ilgwa (IG), and Hamo (HM)), resulted in approximately 20~40 cps (counts per second) of natural gamma intensity in lava sequence. High gamma intensity of approximately 60 cps is noticeble in the sedimentary layer intercalated in lava sequence, and in Seoguipo Formation, especially clay minerals. Electric conductivity (EC) on PP, KS and IG wells showed 100~400 ?S/cm with fresh water range. However, EC on SD and HM wells increased up to around 20,000~10,000 ?S/cm with depth, which indicates variation from freshwater to salt water. Pumping tests were performed on nine monitoring wells in the range of 900~2,300m3/d and with an average discharge rate of 1,371m3/d. Among them, data from only five monitoring wells were used for pumping test analysis, since the other four wells were highly affected by tide. Transmissivity was estimated using transmissivity (T) ~ specific capacity (Q/s) relationsip: T = 0.99(Q/s)0.89/ proposed by Hamm et al. (2005). T estimates ranged from 21.9 to 2664.3m2/d, and Q/s estimates ranged from 32.4 to 7,143m2/d. The average drawdown is 12.9 m, between 0.1 and 40 m, presenting a wide variation of drawdown on different monitoring wells. From drill data, geophysical logs, and pumping tests, it is concluded that main aquifers develops in jointed parts in lava sequence, especially hyaloclastic breccia, and gravels and unconsolidated sands in Seoguipo Formation. Keywords: transmissivity, specific capacity, geophygical log, pumping test, Jeju volcainc Island Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by of the 21st Century Frontier R&D Program (project no. 3-4-3 of the Sustainable Water Resources Research Center) and by the 2nd stage of the BK21 Project, Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea.

  14. Marine protected areas and resilience to sedimentation in the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, B. S.; Selkoe, K. A.; White, C.; Albert, S.; Aswani, S.; Lauer, M.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of marine protected areas (MPAs) to provide protection from indirect stressors, via increased resilience afforded by decreased impact from direct stressors, remains an important and unresolved question about the role MPAs can play in broader conservation and resource management goals. Over a five-year period, we evaluated coral and fish community responses inside and outside three MPAs within the Roviana Lagoon system in Solomon Islands, where sedimentation pressure from upland logging is substantial. We found little evidence that MPAs decrease impact or improve conditions and instead found some potential declines in fish abundance. We also documented modest to high levels of poaching during this period. Where compliance with management is poor, and indirect stressors play a dominant role in determining ecosystem condition, as appears to be the case in Roviana Lagoon, MPAs may provide little management benefit.

  15. Geologists in Search of Tsunami Deposits on Simeonof Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys use a hand-driven corer to sample soils and marsh sediment on Simeonof Island as part of an investigation to investigate evidence for earthquakes and tsunamis in the Shumagin Islands....

  16. Reprint of “Deep epibenthic communities in two contrasting areas of the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Montserrat; Abelló, Pere; Ordines, Francesc; Massutí, Enric

    2014-10-01

    Epibenthic communities were studied in two areas, off western and southern Mallorca (Balearic Islands, western Mediterranean), which differ in the oceanographic conditions and show different degrees of oligotrophy. Sampling was performed with beam trawl at two seasons (December 2009 and July 2010) and at depths between 228 and 900 m. A total of 199 taxa were identified, of which the most diverse were decapod crustaceans and fishes. Depth was the main factor structuring megafaunal assemblages. In the shelf break the shrimps Plesionika heterocarpus, P. antigai, Processa nouveli and P. canaliculata were dominant. In the upper slope, P. acanthonotus, Boreomysis arctica, Gaidropsarus biscayensis and Aristeus antennatus were the species that most contributed to the group formation, whereas in the middle slope the crustaceans P. acanthonotus and Munida tenuimana dominated. Specific abundances were relatively low everywhere. Diversity H? values ranged from 2.19 to 3.17, being higher in Sóller. Using species abundance data, significant differences were identified concerning both area and season in both shelf break and upper slope strata, while no significant differences were found in the middle slope stratum. The analysis of functional groups showed that both depth and area had a significant effect on their differential distribution.

  17. HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

  18. Contribution to the study of the diet of four owl species (Aves, Strigiformes) from mainland and island areas of Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haralambos Alivizatos; Vassilis Goutner; Stamatis Zogaris

    The diets of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba), Little Owl (Athene noctua), Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) and Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo) were studied through analysis of pellets collected at 13 different continental areas and islands of Greece. The most important prey of the Barn Owl was mammals (mainly Microtus, Mus, Apodemus, Rat- tus and Crocidura), although birds and amphibians were

  19. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL...Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL...Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska...

  1. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL...Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL...Pacific Halibut Fisheries Pt. 300, Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska...

  3. Contributions of increased agricultural abandonment area to recent surface warming trend in Shikoku Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, R.; Nishimori, M.; Iizumi, T.; Osawa, T.

    2012-04-01

    A remarkable increasing trend in abandoned cropland has already been observed in hilly and mountainous areas, Japan. Changes to abandoned areas from cropland (typically, paddy fields) could have impacts on surface air temperatures and their trends. We evaluated contributions of land surface change, specifically, the recently reported increases in abandoned cropland on daily maximum, mean, and minimum temperature with Shikoku Island, Japan where croplands have been significantly decreasing taken as an example. Land use change was expressed by the modifications of physical land surface parameters, i.e., surface albedo, evaporative efficiency, roughness length, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The sensitivity of the air temperatures to each land surface parameter was then derived from the numerical experiments using three-dimensional regional atmospheric model (JMA-NHM) and artificially modified land surface conditions. An accurate estimation of the contributions is expected as the JMA-NHM model allows us to consider three-dimensional land-atmosphere interactions that are impossible for one-dimensional land surface model alone. We set the five land surface parameters and calculated a sensitivity of temperatures in regard to each land surface parameter change for the periods of 15th June to 15th August 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005 when cropland area are presented in Japan. The experiment result showed that surface albedo and evaporative efficiency had significant sensitivity on the daily maximum and mean temperatures whereas heat capacity and thermal conductivity were impactful on the daily minimum temperature. Roughness length was less impactful for any temperatures. Parameter sensitivity showed geographical distribution, such as significant impact in inland area rather than coastal area for the response of daily mean temperature by surface albedo and evaporative efficiency changes. Lower sensitivity in coastal area was attributed to thermal advection from surrounding sea (e.g. land and sea breeze), mitigating air temperature changes caused by land surface parameter change. We derived geographical distributions of parameter sensitivity on air temperatures with these processes. Temperature changes for 1985-2005 caused by cropland decreasing or abandoned cropland and building lots increasing were estimated based on parameter sensitivity to temperatures which were derived in previous calculation and cropland area data obtained from the Census for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries data set (Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan). Calculated temperature changes for 21-years using the sensitivity and the dataset were respectively 39.6, 46.0, and 27.5 % for the daily maximum, mean and minimum temperature to trends of 18-sites averaged observation stations in Shikoku Island, indicating significant impact of land surface change on air temperatures. An evaluation method we applied in this study first calculated land surface parameter sensitivities on air temperatures with three-dimensional atmospheric model and secondly calculated linear combination of products of each sensitivity and cropland change ratio. Although first calculation needs high calculation cost because it uses three-dimensional atmospheric model, second one has little cost if once sensitivities were derived. This method would enable us to make air temperature change scenario caused by various land use change scenario without high numerical calculation costs.

  4. The plant geography of dredged-material islands along the Texas coast

    E-print Network

    Irish, Gary Joe

    1978-01-01

    Island. 12. Soil data ? Port Isabel Island. 65 67 13. Soil salinities of the supra-tidal zones of Bird Island and Jellyfish Island. 70 14. Island area and environmental data. 77 15. Multiple regressions of ordination positions on vegetated area... Drift Island Reed Island Gnat Island Tortuga Island Mangrove Island Crane Island Wind Tidal Flats Island Mesquite Island Port Mansfield Island Discontinued Island Jellyfish Island Bird Island Port Isabel Island Location Trinity Bay Trinity...

  5. Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area Pollock Seasons, 1991-2013 Updated 4/10/14

    E-print Network

    Page 1 Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area Pollock Seasons, 1991-2013 Updated 4/10/14 Area and 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 Sector Season Open Close Days Open Close Days Open Close Days Open Close Days Open Close Days Inshore BS A Season 20-Jan 6-Mar 46 20-Jan 24-Mar 63 20-Jan 2-Mar 41 20-Jan 1

  6. UV nanoimprint lithography for the realization of large-area ordered SiGe/Si(001) island arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Lausecker, E.; Brehm, M.; Grydlik, M.; Hackl, F.; Fromherz, T.; Schaeffler, F.; Bauer, G. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Bergmair, I.; Muehlberger, M. [Functional Surfaces and Nanostructures, Profactor GmbH, 4407 Steyr-Gleink (Austria)

    2011-04-04

    We use UV nanoimprint lithography for the pit-patterning of silicon substrates. Ordered silicon-germanium islands are grown inside these pits by molecular-beam epitaxy on arrays of 3x3 mm{sup 2} and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. AFM-based statistics reveals an extremely uniform size distribution of the islands in the patterned areas. These results are confirmed by very narrow and uniform PL peaks recorded at various positions across the patterned arrays.

  7. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions of Nettilling Lake area (Baffin Island, Nunavut): A multi-proxy analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Anne; Pienitz, Reinhard; Francus, Pierre; Zdanowicz, Christian; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    The paleoclimate and paleolimnological history of several Arctic regions remains poorly known. This is the case for the area around Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Nunavut), the largest lake of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. To reconstruct the past environmental history of this area, a highly innovative multi-proxy approach combining physical, magnetic, chemical and biological properties preserved in lake sediments was used. One particular goal of this study was to investigate the possible coupling between sedimentation processes observed in the lake and melt rates of nearby Penny Ice Cap. A 1-m long sediment core was retrieved from a small bay in the northeastern part of Nettilling Lake during the summer of 2010. This sampling area was chosen based on the hypothesis that incoming glacial meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap would leave a strong climate-modulated signal that would be reflected in the sedimentary sequence. The core was analyzed by both non-destructive (X-radiography (X-ray), microfluorescence-X (µ-XRF), magnetic susceptibility) and destructive (Loss On Ignition, grain size, water content, thin sections, diatoms) techniques. Radiometric AMS 14C and 210Pb/137Cs age determinations, as well as paleomagnetic measurements, were used to develop the core chronology, yielding an estimated bottom age of approximately 1365 AD. The sedimentation rate (0.15 cm.yr-1) in Nettilling Lake was found to be high compared to other Arctic lakes, due to inputs of highly turbid meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap with high suspended sediment loads. Significant correlations were found between geochemical profiles of elements linked to detrital inputs (Si, Ti, K, Ca) and melt rates from Penny Ice Cap since the 19th century. This suggests that variations in detrital elements in Nettilling Lake sediments might be used as an indirect indicator of regional climate fluctuations (e.g., summer temperatures) that determine glacier melt rates.

  8. Survey of Vegetated Areas and Muskox Populations in East-Central Ellesmere Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. HENRY; B. FREEDMAN

    The results of 1981-84 summer helicopter surveys and ground reconnaissance of east-central Ellesmere Island are presented. This was the first systematic ecological survey to be conducted in this region of the Canadian High Arctic. Central Ellesmere Island is dominated by two large ice fields separated by the deglaciated Sverdmp Pass (79\\

  9. Ecological biogeography of southern ocean islands: species-area relationships, human impacts, and conservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have concluded that southern ocean islands are anomalous because past glacial extent and current temperature apparently explain most variance in their species richness. Here, the relationships between physical variables and species richness of vascular plants, insects, land and seabirds, and mammals were reexamined for these islands. Indigenous and introduced species were distinguished, and relationships between the latter and

  10. Thermal maturation in the Ellef Ringnes Island and surrounding area, Sverdrup Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gentzis, T. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Goodarzi, F. [National Resources Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

    1998-12-01

    Determining thermal maturity studies in the Ellef Ringnes Island area was complicated by numerous factors, such as the presence of cavings, bitumen staining, and igneous intrusions. Cavings are a problem in certain intervals in Hoodoo H-37, Dome Bay P-36, and Helicopter J-12. Bitumen staining resulting in suppression of reflectance has occurred in the lower part of the Jameson Bay shales in Elve M-40. Thick sills resulted in increase of Ro to 4.0%, whereas thin sills had a minimal impact on reflectance increase. Other features observed include overpressuring caused by hydrocarbon generation in the Schei Point source rocks as well as in the Jameson and Ringnes Shales, and a kinky Ro profile caused by the presence of low-permeability gas-bearing reservoirs in the Heiberg sandstones in Jackson Bay G-16A. The presence of sapropelic coals with HI up to 329 mg HC/gTOC in Heiberg sandstones in Elve M-40 containing Botryococcus algae should also be noted.

  11. Skin cancer screening on a fishing island and in an inland agricultural area of Japan.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Saburo; Anan, Takashi; Kai, Yoshitaka; Goto, Mizuki; Arakawa, Shoko; Shimizu, Fumiaki; Hatano, Yutaka; Sato, Haruaki; Shibuya, Hiromi; Katagiri, Kazumoto; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2005-11-01

    We performed skin cancer screening from 2000 to 2004 at two locations in Japan's Oita Prefecture: Himeshima, a small fishing island, and Naoiri, an inland agricultural area. We found 108 and 21 cases of AK in Himeshima and Naoiri, respectively. None of the AKs transformed into SCC, and 21.7% of the AKs underwent spontaneous remission during our observation period. The prevalence and incidence of AK in Himeshima were five times higher than in Naoiri: 1,399 and 826 per 100,000 population, respectively, in the fishing village, vs. 261 and 164 in the agricultural community. Seven and three cases of BCC were observed in Himeshima and Naoiri, respectively. There were two cases of SCC in Himeshima. The highest risk ratio of skin types I to III was 9.2 in Himeshima. Although people engaged in outdoor occupations are thought to be more prone to skin cancer and precancerous skin lesions, our results suggested different potentials for AK in people engaged in different outdoor occupations. PMID:16361747

  12. Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rouleau, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Eastman, Jeffrey [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Eres, Gyula [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We describe a two-step approach for suppressing nucleation of graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition. In the first step, as received Cu foils are oxidized in air at temperatures up to 500 C to remove surface impurities and to induce the regrowth of Cu grains during subsequent annealing in H2 flow at 1040 C prior to graphene growth. In the second step, transient reactant cooling is performed by using a brief Ar pulse at the onset of growth to induce collisional deactivation of the carbon growth species. The combination of these two steps results in a three orders of magnitude reduction in the graphene nucleation density, enabling the growth of millimeter-size single crystal graphene grains. A kinetic model shows that suppressing nucleation promotes a cooperative island growth mode that favors the formation of large area single crystal graphene, and it is accompanied by a roughly 3 orders of magnitude increase in the reactive sticking probability of methane compared to that in random nucleation growth.

  13. 77 FR 13147 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...Northeastern University, Forsyth Street, Shillman Hall, Room 220, Boston, MA. The agenda will include: A presentation about the geology of Boston Harbor Islands; elections of officers; bylaws review; park update; and, public comment. The meeting will...

  14. Greek Islands, Western Asia Minor as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This north-looking view shows the western margin of Turkey (right) and the Dodecanese Islands of Greece between the Aegean Sea (left) and the Sea of Crete (foreground). The largest island is Crete (foreground) with the semicircular island of Thira beyond. Thira is dominated by the volcanoe Santorini. Two airplane contrails appear between the Turkish mainland and the large island of Rhodes immediately offshore. The narrow straits of the Dardanelles, joining the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, can be detected top left.

  15. EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Naval Live Oaks Area, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Florida, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, first-surface (FS) topography, and canopy-height (CH) datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Naval Live Oaks Area in Florida's Gulf Islands National Seashore, acquired June 30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations. For more information about similar projects, please visit the Decision Support for Coastal Science and Management website.

  16. NONTARGET ARTHROPODS CAPTURED IN CUE-LURE-BAITED BUCKET TRAPS AT AREA-WIDE PEST MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION SITES IN KAMUELA AND KULA, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seventy and 2,371 specimens or about 1.1 and 34.4 individuals per day were captured in melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), cue-lure monitoring/suppression traps at two area-wide integrated pest management implementation sites in Kula (Maui Island) and Kamuela (Hawaii Island), respectively...

  17. Using soil island plantings as dispersal vectors in large area copper tailings reforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Everett, R. [Dept. of Agriculture, Wenatchee, WA (United States). Forestry Science Lab.

    1998-12-31

    The Wenatchee National Forest undertook the reforestation of the 80 acre (35 ha) Holden copper mine tailings of Washington State in 1989 by using 20, one-fourth acre, triangular shaped soil islands as a source of plant propagules targeted for gravel-covered tailings surfaces. The islands were constructed of soil and surface litter transported from a nearby gravel pit, and planted with four species of conifer seedlings, the shrub Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) and eight species of grasses. Conifer and alder seedlings were also planted in graveled covered tailings with amendments. Since reproductive status of the conifers would not occur for several years, this propagule vector hypothesis was tested by measuring the distances traveled onto the tailings surface by grass seeds. The number of grass shoots established in four treatment blocks in target plots downwind from the soil island source plantings was also determined. After 36 months, grass seed had migrated to a distance of 32 feet (11 m) from the soil island source. Grass shoots were present within 10 feet (3 m) downwind of the soil island, the most frequent being Mountain brome (Bromus marginatus). Among the tree species, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Sitka alder grew an average of 6 inches (15--16 cm) after 40 months on the soil islands but somewhat less on the tailing surface. By the third growing season, the only tree species in reproductive condition on the tailings was alder. The soil-island technique is successful for grass dispersal and may have potential for conifer and alder migration.

  18. A Case Study in the Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs): the Islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relles, Noelle J.

    The islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, were both mapped along their leeward coasts for dominant coral community and other benthic cover in the early 1980s. This mapping effort offers a unique baseline for comparing changes in the benthic community of the two islands since that time, particularly given the marked differences between the two islands. Bonaire is well-protected and completely surrounded by a marine protected area (MPA), which includes two no-diving marine reserves; additionally, Bonaire's population is only around 15,000. In contrast, the island of Curacao is home to 140,000 inhabitants and marine protection is limited, with a reef area of 600 ha established as a "paper" park (i.e., little enforcement). Video transects collected by SCUBA over the reefs were collected on Bonaire in January of 2008; when compared to data from 1985, coral cover had declined in the shallowest portion of the reef (< 5 m) and was mostly the result of declines in Acropora spp., whereas head corals increased. Transects closest to the no-diving marine reserves showed higher coral cover and diversity than transects located farther from the reserves. Satellite remote sensing techniques were used to create landscape-scale reef maps along the leeward coasts of both islands, which could differentiate areas of high hard coral cover (> 20%), predominantly sand (> 50%) and areas where hard coral and sand were mixed with soft corals, sea whips and marine plants. These modern maps (2007-09) were groundtruthed using the video data collected on Bonaire for accuracy and then compared to the early 1980s maps of the reefs on both islands. Bonaire experienced declines in coral cover overall and the remaining coral was increasingly patchy; however, changes in patch characteristics were not significant over the time period, but status as a marine reserve and the sheltering of the shoreline did appear to buffer against coral loss. Surprisingly, the island of Curacao did not experience a decline in total coral cover, but did become increasingly patchy, significantly more so than Bonaire. The Curacao Underwater Park afforded no additional protection against coral loss or fragmentation than an adjacent unprotected area of reef. The difference between the two islands in coral loss versus fragmentation has the potential for a unique natural experiment to study the effects of habitat fragmentation in the absence of overall habitat loss at the landscape scale. The Bonaire National Marine Park could benefit by restricting visitors to its most frequented dive sites by increasing the cost of entry into a tiered pay system, thus generating more income for education and management of the park, as well as deterring some divers from these overused sites. Satellite remote sensing-derived maps are useful for rapid reef mapping and can be utilized for comparison to ancillary maps created by more traditional methods. Satellite-derived maps can only distinguish benthic habitats coarsely (3-4 habitat classes) and are only as reliable as their source data, they benefit greatly from fieldwork to determine depth, geographic location, and benthic habitat cover in real time.

  19. Earth Island

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Earth Island Web site is maintained by the Earth Island Institute (EII). EII also publishes the Earth Island Journal quarterly. The current issue of the journal can be browsed by section or by subject, and offers current news, world reports, and feature articles on a wide range of environmental subject areas. Earth Island also undertakes a number of projects that are discussed at the site as well as in a portion of the journal. The entire site is searchable. This is an excellent site for those interested in keeping up on environmental issues.

  20. Assessment for National Park Candidate Area Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: A case study from the Argyll Islands and Coast 

    E-print Network

    Garoufalia, Christina

    2007-01-01

    This thesis outlines an assessment approach for national park designation purpose using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis. The case study area is ‘Argyll Islands and Coast’ situated in west Scotland. Four different ...