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1

77 FR 42651 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area, Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, Approximately 4 Nautical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Disestablishment of Restricted Area, Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, Approximately 4 Nautical Miles Due South of Lands End in Newport, RI AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of...

2012-07-20

2

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rhode Island. 81.340 Section 81.340 Protection of Environment...Attainment Status Designations § 81.340 Rhode Island. Rhode IslandâTSP Designated area Does not meet primary...

2013-07-01

3

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01

4

Rhode Island Critical Resource Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used to assist planners, scientists, geographers, and others to visualize data sets. This particular project created draws on data from the state of Rhode Island's Geographic Information System (RIGIS) database in order to assist land managers and other interested parties. The project was created with support from the Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension, and a number of other organizations. On the site, visitors can click on maps of forests and wetlands, land use patterns, groundwater resources, soil hydrology, and biodiversity. On the site's homepage, visitors can also use the "Towns" drop down menu to look at information for different cities throughout the state. Additionally, the "Watershed Atlas" area provides detailed maps of the twelve watersheds located in Rhode Island.

5

Availability of ground water in the Blackstone River area Rhode Island and Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Blackstone River study area covers 83 square miles of northern Rhode Island and 5 square miles of adjacent Massachusetts (fig. 1). It includes parts of the Blackstone, Moshassuck, and Tenmile River basins, and a coastal area that drains to the brackish Seekonk and Providence Rivers. In Rhode Island, all or parts of the suburban towns of Cumberland, Lincoln, North Smithfield, and Smithfield and all or parts of the cities of Central Falls, East Povidence, Pawtucket, Providence, and Woonsocket are within the study area. Also included are parts of the towns Attleboro and North Attleborough in Massachusetts. In 1970, total population was about 240,000, which was equivalent to about one-fourth of the total population of Rhode Island. Fresh water usage in 1970 by public-supply systems and self-supplied industry was about 33 mgd (million gallons per day), which was equal to 22 percent of total fresh water use in Rhode Island for all purposes except generation of electric power (fig. 2). Anticipated increases in population and per capita water requirements are likely to cause the demand for water to more than double within the next 50 years. A significant part of this demand can be met from wells that tap the principal streams. This aquifer yielded an average of 10 mgd in 1970 and is capable of sustaining a much higher yield. The primary objectives of the study were to determine and map the saturated thickness and transmissivity of the stratified-drift aquifer and to assess the potential sustained yield of those parts of the aquifer favorable for large-scale development of water. A secondary objective was to describe ground-water quality and to evaluate the impact of induced infiltration of polluted stream water on the quality of native ground water. This report is based on analysis of drillers' records of more than 700 wells and borings which include 462 lithologic logs; 35 specific-capacity determinations; 12 aquifer tests, including detailed tests at two sites to determine streambed infiltration rates; chemical analyses of 92 ground-water and 15 stream-water samples; and geologic mapping. Selected base data are published in a separate (Johnston and Dickerman, in press). The authors are indebted to well drillers, especially American Drilling and Boring Company, R.E. Chapman Company, and Layne New England Company, for making their records available; to the water departments of the towns of Cumberland and Lincoln, for allowing aquifer tests of their well fields; to the Rhode Island Department of Health, for providing data on water quality and use; and to many other federal, state, and municipal agencies, companies, and individuals who supplied information. Their contributions are gratefully acknowledged.

Johnston, Herbert E.; Dickerman, David C.

1974-01-01

6

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

7

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters address the areas of family and community, economic well-being, child health, safety, and education. The statistical portrait is based on 23 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income; (3)…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

8

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examined statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters addressed the areas of: family and community; economic well-being; child health; safety; and education. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income;…

Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; And Others

9

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters address the areas of family and community, economic well-being, child health, safety, and education. The statistical portrait is based on 20 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income; (3)…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

10

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife...Hunting and Fishing § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A....

2013-10-01

11

Rhode Island Hurricane Evacuation Study Technical Data Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains the support documentation to the main report entitled the Rhode Island Hurricane Evacuation Study Technical Data Report, April 1995. The purpose of the study is to provide the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency and Rhode Island ...

1995-01-01

12

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Rhode Island Federal program. 939.700 Section 939.700...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.700 Rhode Island Federal program. (a) This part...

2009-07-01

13

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island Federal program. 939.700 Section 939.700...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.700 Rhode Island Federal program. (a) This part...

2010-07-01

14

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rhode Island Federal program. 939.700 Section 939.700...SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.700 Rhode Island Federal program. (a) This part...

2013-07-01

15

Assessing Tech Prep. A Rhode Island Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI), in collaboration with the Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, developed a consortium which introduced tech prep to over 75% of the high schools statewide. The Tech Prep Associate Degree (TPAD) Program provides students with a concrete program of study which begins in 11th…

MacQueen, Andrea B.

16

Hydrologic data for Block Island, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report was compiled as part of a study to assess the hydrogeology and the quality and quantity of fresh ground water on Block Island, Rhode Island. Hydrologic data were collected on Block Island during 1988-91. The data are pre- sented in illustrations and tables. Data collec- ted include precipitation, surfae-water, ground- water, lithologic, and well-construction and dis- charge information. Precipitation data include total monthly precipitation values from 11 rain gages and water-quality analyses of 14 precipi- tation samples from one station. Surface-water data include water-level measurements at 12 ponds, water-quality data for five ponds, and field specific-conductance measurements at 56 surface- water sites (streams, ponds, and springs). Ground- water data include water-level measurements at 159 wells, water-quality data at 150 wells, and field specific-conductance data at 52 wells. Lithologic logs for 375 wells and test borings, and construc- tion and location data for 570 wells, springs, and test borings are included. In addition, the data set contains data on water quality of water samples, collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health during 1976-91, from Fresh and Sands Ponds and from wells at the Block Island Water Company well field north of Sands Pond.

Burns, Emily

1993-01-01

17

Office of the Secretary of State: Rhode Island State Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Far more than a collection of basic government documents, the Rhode Island State Library website is a nice resource for anyone seeking to learn more about the Ocean State. The materials here are divided into three main sections: "Research Tools", "Publications", and "Everything RI". In "Research Tools", users will find executive orders issued by the governor, annual reports, as well as state regulations and rules. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains some colorful historical documents, including the Rhode Island Royal Charter of 1663 and the state constitution. Finally, the "Everything RI" area contains documents that narrate the state's history, such as "State Symbols", "Famous Rhode Islanders", "Rhode Island Landmarks", and "City & Town Incorporation Dates". Just for reference, some of the notable persons from the Ocean State include George M. Cohan, Anne Hutchinson, and baseball legend Nap Lajoie.

18

Hydrologic, vegetation, and soil data collected in selected wetlands of the Big River Management area, Rhode Island, from 2008 through 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Rhode Island Water Resources Board planned to develop public water-supply wells in the Big River Management Area in Kent County, Rhode Island. Research in the United States and abroad indicates that groundwater withdrawal has the potential to affect wetland hydrology and related processes. In May 2008, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island formed a partnership to establish baseline conditions at selected Big River wetland study sites and to develop an approach for monitoring potential impacts once pumping begins. In 2008 and 2009, baseline data were collected on the hydrology, vegetation, and soil characteristics at five forested wetland study sites in the Big River Management Area. Four of the sites were located in areas of potential drawdown associated with the projected withdrawals. The fifth site was located outside the area of projected drawdown and served as a control site. The data collected during this study are presented in this report.

Borenstein, Meredith S.; Golet, Francis C.; Armstrong, David S.; Breault, Robert F.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Weiskel, Peter K.

2012-01-01

19

Sex Trafficking and Decriminalized Prostitution in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhode Island is the only state in the United States where prostitution is decriminalized indoors. Since decriminalization in 1980, the sex industry has expanded and Rhode Island has become a destination for commercial sex in New England. Rhode Island is one of only three states that have not had a human trafficking prosecution. Rhode Island has had no prosecutions of

Melanie Shapiro

2009-01-01

20

Estimated Water Use and Availability in the East Narragansett Bay Study Area, Rhode Island, 1995-99  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water availability became a concern in Rhode Island during a drought in 1999, and further investigation was needed to assess the current demands on the hydrologic system from withdrawals during periods of little to no precipitation. The low ground-water levels and streamflows measured in Rhode Island prompted initiation of a series of studies on water use and availability in each major drainage area in Rhode Island for the period 1995?99. The investigation of the East Narragansett Bay area is the last of these studies. The East Narragansett Bay study area (130.9 square miles) includes small sections of the Ten Mile and Westport River Basins in Rhode Island. The area was divided into three regions (islands and contiguous land areas separated by the bay) within each of which the freshwater water use and availability were assessed. During the study period from 1995 through 1999, three major public water suppliers in the study area withdrew 7.601 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) from ground-water and surface-water reservoirs. The estimated water withdrawals by minor public water suppliers during the study period were 0.063 Mgal/d. Total self-supply domestic, industrial, commercial, and agricultural withdrawals from the study area averaged 1.891 Mgal/d. Total water use in the study area averaged 16.48 Mgal/d, of which about 8.750 Mgal/d was imported from other basins. The average return flow to freshwater within the basin was 2.591 Mgal/d, which included effluent from permitted facilities and septic systems. The average return flow to saltwater (Narragansett Bay) outside of the basin was about 45.21 Mgal/d and included discharges by permitted facilities (wastewater-treatment plants and Rhode Island Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems). The PART program, a computerized hydrograph-separation application, was used for the data collected at two selected index stream-gaging stations in the East Narragansett Bay study area to determine water availability on the basis of the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow; the base flow for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario; and the base flow for the Aquatic Base Flow scenario for both stations. Base flows in the study area were lowest in September for the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles. The safe yields determined for the surface-water reservoirs (14.10 Mgal/d) were added to the estimated available ground water (gross yield) in the Southeastern Narragansett and East Narragansett Islands regions to give the total available water. The water availability in the study area at the 50th percentile ranged from 33.18 Mgal/d in September to 94.62 Mgal/d in June, water availability for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario at the 50th percentile ranged from 21.87 Mgal/d in September to 83.03 Mgal/d in June, and water availability for the Aquatic Base Flow scenario at the 50th percentile ranged from 14.10 Mgal/d in August and September to 65.48 Mgal/d in June. Because water withdrawals and use are greater during the summer than at other times of the year, water availability in June, July, August, and September was compared to water withdrawals in the three regions. For the study period, the withdrawals in July were higher than in the other summer months. For the 50th percentile, the ratios of water withdrawn to water available were close to one in August for the estimated basic and Aquatic Base Flow scenarios and in September for the estimated 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario. For the 25th percentile, the ratios were close to one in August for the estimated basic and for the 7-day, 10-year low-flow scenario, and were close to one in July for the estimated Aquatic Base Flow scenario. A long-term water budget was calculated for the East Narragansett Bay study area to identify and assess inflows and outflows by region. The water withdrawals and return flows used in the budget were from 1995 through 1999. Total inflow and outflow were calculated separately for each region.

Wild, Emily C.

2007-01-01

21

Estimated Water Use and Availability in the East Narragansett Bay Study Area, Rhode Island, 1995-99.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water availability became a concern in Rhode Island during a drought in 1999, and further investigation was needed to assess the current demands on the hydrologic system from withdrawals during periods of little to no precipitation. The low ground-water l...

E. C. Wild

2007-01-01

22

Outpatient Mental Health Benefits in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the last several years considerable attention has been devoted to the need for public policies to influence the availability of outpatient mental health insurance coverage in Rhode Island. A number of experts have expressed opinions on this issue a...

1983-01-01

23

Geology of Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In preparing the present treatise and the accompanying geologic map of Massachusetts and Rhode Island (PI. X, in pocket) I have endeavored to use all the material available. The matter has been greatly condensed, for the detailed geology of a considerable part of the area will be described in a number of forthcoming folios of the Geologic Atlas of the United States. The Holyoke folio, published in 1898, covered the major part of the Triassic rocks in Massachusetts, but as those rocks have since been more thoroughly studied they are here treated in greater detail to bring their discussion up to date.

Emerson, Benjamin Kendall

1917-01-01

24

Children's Mental Health Services in Rhode Island. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Rhode Island KIDS COUNT issue brief, one of a series presenting an in-depth look at issues affecting the health, safety, education, and economic well-being of children, focuses on children's mental health services in the state. The brief reports that mental health services for children in Rhode Island are fragmented, with inadequate capacity…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

25

The horse and deer flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Tabanidae of Rhode Island were surveyed using Rhode Island canopy traps placed at 20 locations in the state during the summers of 1999 and 2000. In total, 5,120 flies were collected, which included 55 species in the genera Chrysops, Hybomitra, Tabanus, Merycomyia, and Stonemyia. Distributional and ecological information is provided for each species in Rhode Island.

Bartlett, K.; Alm, S.R.; LeBrun, R.; Ginsberg, H.

2002-01-01

26

Human Babesia microti Incidence and Ixodes scapularis Distribution, Rhode Island, 1998–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distribution of nymphal Ixodes scapularis in Rhode Island was used as a logistical regressor for predicting presence of human babesiosis. Although the incidence of babesiosis is increasing in southern Rhode Island, large areas of the state are free of babesiosis risk. I n recent years, cases of human babesiosis have increased across the northeastern United States, especially in coastal areas

Sarah E. Rodgers; Thomas N. Mather

2007-01-01

27

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Rhode Island showed gains--improvements in reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for most racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income students, and boys and girls. Achievement gaps between students narrowed in most cases at grades 4 and 8.…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

28

MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

29

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These two Kids Count brief reports discuss issues related to the well-being of Rhode Island children. The first report identifies ways to measure the impact of state and federal welfare reform proposals on children who receive benefits through Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). Potential measures of success for welfare reform include…

Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.

1996-01-01

30

Human Babesia microti incidence and Ixodes scapularis distribution, Rhode Island, 1998-2004.  

PubMed

Distribution of nymphal Ixodes scapularis in Rhode Island was used as a logistical regressor for predicting presence of human babesiosis. Although the incidence of babesiosis is increasing in southern Rhode Island, large areas of the state are free of babesiosis risk. PMID:17553286

Rodgers, Sarah E; Mather, Thomas N

2007-04-01

31

Human Babesia microti Incidence and Ixodes scapularis Distribution, Rhode Island, 1998-2004  

PubMed Central

Distribution of nymphal Ixodes scapularis in Rhode Island was used as a logistical regressor for predicting presence of human babesiosis. Although the incidence of babesiosis is increasing in southern Rhode Island, large areas of the state are free of babesiosis risk.

Rodgers, Sarah E.

2007-01-01

32

RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

33

Results for Rhode Island's Children: Progress and Challenges. A Report by Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Based on the Goals of the Rhode Island Children's Cabinet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examines trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children, highlighting progress made in reaching the goals for children set by the Rhode Island Children's Cabinet in 1997 and discussing the remaining challenges. This statistical portrait is based on trends in 24 indicators of child well being: (1) prenatal care; (2)…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

34

Water conservation for Rhode Island lawns  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, water professionals in Rhode Island developed a program for home lawn irrigation scheduling that adapted an agricultural soil moisture model for use on home lawns. The key to the program, which emphasized supplemental watering only, was a water factor'' that was developed from daily simulation models for lawns on two soil textures. The program was pilot-tested in 1990 and ran statewide in the 1991 growing season. The simulation model relied on a single weather station for moisture data. Analysis of rainfall amounts suggested that computerized irrigation scheduling for home lawns requires spatially data. Variability in factors such as rooting depth and soil composition caused additional concern about the accuracy of the recommendations. It was concluded the computerized farm-based irrigation scheduling programs for the Northeast cannot be easily adapted to home lawn water management over a broad area. Instead, emphasis should be placed on linking sprinkler calibrations rates to soil types. Low-maintenance landscaping also should be encouraged in suburban areas.

McCann, A.; Gold, A.J.; Mallon, K.; Gorres, J. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources)

1994-04-01

35

Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 13 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance and water temperature. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2009 (October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2009). Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 monitoring stations by the USGS during WY 2009 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2009. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 27 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2009. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.50 to 17 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,400,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,200,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2009; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 10,000 to 64,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 110,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 21.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.001 mg/L as N, median nitrate concentration was 0.02 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.09 mg/L as P, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 61 and 16 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100 mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 190 kg/d (61 kg/d/mi2), 12 g/d (4.5 g/d/mi2), 93 g/d (32 g/d/mi2), 420 g/d (290 g/d/mi2), 6,200 million colony forming units per day (CFU?106/d) (2,600 CFU?106/d/mi2), and 1,100 CFU?106/d (340 CFU?106/d/mi2), respectively. 1The arithmetic mean of the individual daily mean discharges for the year noted or for the designated period.

Breault, Robert F.; Smith, Kirk P.

2010-01-01

36

Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance and water temperature. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2010 (October 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010). Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 monitoring stations by the USGS during WY 2010 as part of a long sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Waterquality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2010. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 39 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2010. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.7 to 27 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,500,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2010; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 11,000 to 66,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 18,000 to 110,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 20.2 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.06 mg/L as phosphorus, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 93 and 16 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 170 kg/d (73 kg/d/mi2), 11 g/d (5.3 g/d/mi2), 74 g/d (39 g/d/mi2), 340 g/d (170 g/d/mi2), 5,700 million colony forming units per day (CFUx106/d) (2,300 CFUx106/d/mi2), and 620 CFUx106/d (440 CFUx106/d/mi2), respectively.

Smith, Kirk P.; Breault, Robert F.

2011-01-01

37

Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2011 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2011. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 37 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2011. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.5 to about 21 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kg (kilograms) of sodium and 2,600,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2011; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 9,800 to 53,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 90,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 20.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.07 mg/L as phosphorus, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 33 and 23 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 230 kilograms per day (kg/d) (80 kilograms per day per square mile (kg/d/mi2)); 10 grams per day (g/d) (6.3 grams per day per square mile (g/d/mi2)); 110 g/d (29 g/d/mi2); 610 g/d (270 g/d/mi2); 4,600 million colony forming units per day (CFUx106/d) (2,500 CFUx106/d/mi2); and 1,800 CFUx106/d (810 CFUx106/d/mi2), respectively.

Smith, Kirk P.

2013-01-01

38

Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2012 (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2012 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB were summarized by using values of central tendency and used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2012. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 26 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2012. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.40 to about 17 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2012; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 8,700 to 51,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 14,000 to 87,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 19 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was less than 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.06 mg/L as phosphorus, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 43 and 16 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 200 kilograms per day (kg/d) (71 kilograms per day per square mile (kg/d/mi2)); 15 grams per day (g/d) (5.4 grams per day per square mile (g/d/mi2)); 100 g/d (38 g/d/mi2); 500 g/d (260 g/d/mi2); 4,300 million colony forming units per day (CFUx106/d) (1,500 CFUx106/d/mi2); and 1,000 CFUx106/d (360 CFUx106/d/mi2), respectively.

Smith, Kirk P.

2014-01-01

39

75 FR 31288 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of the 1997...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone nonattainment...suspension of the requirements for Rhode Island to submit an attainment...

2010-06-03

40

40 CFR 52.2081 - EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. 52.2081 Section...IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Rhode Island § 52.2081 EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. The following...

2013-07-01

41

40 CFR 282.89 - Rhode Island State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rhode Island State-Administered Program. 282...Approved State Programs § 282.89 Rhode Island State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Rhode Island is approved to administer and...

2013-07-01

42

77 FR 14691 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available Control Technology...SIP) revisions submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...revisions demonstrate that the State of Rhode Island meets the requirements of reasonably...

2012-03-13

43

78 FR 63383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of Significant Deterioration...approve certain revisions to the Rhode Island State Implementation Plan (SIP) primarily...Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) under Rhode Island's Prevention of Significant...

2013-10-24

44

78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island AGENCY...has been prepared for Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR...mitigation program at Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island....

2013-06-28

45

33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82 Section 334...Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport,...

2013-07-01

46

University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Narragansett, Rhode Island, the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) of URI offers instruction leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography as well as in interdisciplinary and related areas such as atmospheric chemistry. Site includes information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, news, and publications. Outreach initiatives are numerous and are targeted at a wide audience.

47

Motorcycle helmet use in rhode island.  

PubMed

Motorcycle crashes are a major public health concern and place economic stresses on the health care system. Helmets have been shown to reduce both motorcycle-related fatalities and head injuries. Universal motorcycle helmet laws in other states have shown to be effective at increasing helmet use. The current Rhode Island motorcycle helmet law does not require every motorcycle rider to wear a helmet. Given the number of deaths and injuries that could be prevented, public health efforts to increase helmet use through education and legislation should be considered for review. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2013-12.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24303509

Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Hayda, Roman A; Adams, Charles A; Cosgrove, G Rees; Born, Christopher T

2013-01-01

48

75 FR 18521 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal...the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR...2010, the President issued a major disaster declaration under the authority of...

2010-04-12

49

Disaster Planning and Recovery for Archival Materials in Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This plan was developed to prevent any unnecessary loss of Rhode Island's library resources in the event of a disaster. Representatives from public, academic, and special libraries, town clerks' offices, and historical societies formed the Rhode Island Disaster Information Task Force, which collected materials from a wide range of institutions.…

Sautter, Roberta; Shea, Margaret

50

Policy and Procedures, University of Rhode Island Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A guide to policies and procedures of the University of Rhode Island Foundation is presented. Attention is directed to the following concerns: fund-raising policies, the act incorporating the University of Rhode Island Foundation, by-laws, dual signature system, nominating committee responsibilities and procedures, policy and guidelines for the…

Leslie, James W.

51

One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility  

SciTech Connect

Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

Malloy, M.G.

1997-11-01

52

Museum of Art-Rhode Island School of Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is the largest art museum in Rhode Island, and one of the largest in the United States. Founded in 1893, the Museum's collection, like its parent organization RISD, reflects the fact that after the Civil War Rhode Island was the most industrialized state in the country. As stated on the Museum's website, the region's prosperity was based on the manufacture of goods from silverware to steam engines, resulting in a desire to better educate the population in industrial design and fine art. Today, the Museum's collection consists of over 84,000 objects, with particular strengths in costume and textiles, 19th century American decorative arts, and photography. The Museum is also the home of the Aaron Siskind Center for the Study of Photography. On the website visitors can browse collection areas, explore the Grand Gallery, "A salon-style picture gallery displaying European paintings from the Renaissance through the early 19th century", listen to curators, and read about current exhibitions.

53

US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01

54

Equations for Estimating Selected Streamflow Statistics in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Regional regression equations were developed for estimating selected naturalunaffected by alterationstreamflows of specific flow durations and low-flow frequency statistics for ungaged stream sites in Rhode Island. Selected at-site streamflow statistics a...

A. M. Waite G. C. Bent P. A. Steeves

2014-01-01

55

Cigarette smoking behavior among Rhode Island physicians, 1963-83.  

PubMed Central

A survey of practicing physicians in Rhode Island revealed a cigarette smoking rate of only 8.3 per cent in 1983. This represents a continuation of the consistent decrease seen in the percentage of physician smokers in each such survey since 1963. Under age 30, the rate was only 4.5 per cent. An exponential model suggests that the overall rate for Rhode Island physicians will be below 3 per cent by the year 2000.

Buechner, J S; Perry, D K; Scott, H D; Freedman, B E; Tierney, J T; Waters, W J

1986-01-01

56

Developing and Applying a Transportation Model for Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research project focuses on Aquidneck Island in the State of Rhode Island. The research project has two primary objectives. First, the project builds the foundation for coordinated transportation and land use planning on Aquidneck Island using TransC...

F. Atash K. Woodward J. Boyce S. Eisenbeiser

2004-01-01

57

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. We allow hunting of white-tailed deer on designated areas...

2012-10-01

58

Combined multibeam and bathymetry data from Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound: a regional perspective  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research and management communities because of this area's ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Geologically interpreted digital terrain models from individual surveys provide important benthic environmental information, yet many applications of this information require a geographically broader perspective. For example, individual surveys are of limited use for the planning and construction of cross-sound infrastructure, such as cables and pipelines, or for the testing of regional circulation models. To address this need, we integrated 14 contiguous multibeam bathymetric datasets that were produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during charting operations into one digital terrain model that covers much of Block Island Sound and extends eastward across Rhode Island Sound. The new dataset, which covers over 1244 square kilometers, is adjusted to mean lower low water, gridded to 4-meter resolution, and provided in Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 19, North American Datum of 1983 and geographic World Geodetic Survey of 1984 projections. This resolution is adequate for sea-floor feature and process interpretation but is small enough to be queried and manipulated with standard Geographic Information System programs and to allow for future growth. Natural features visible in the data include boulder lag deposits of winnowed Pleistocene strata, sand-wave fields, and scour depressions that reflect the strength of oscillating tidal currents and scour by storm-induced waves. Bedform asymmetry allows interpretations of net sediment transport. Anthropogenic features visible in the data include shipwrecks and dredged channels. Together the merged data reveal a larger, more continuous perspective of bathymetric topography than previously available, providing a fundamental framework for research and resource management activities offshore of Rhode Island.

Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Danforth, William W.; Blankenship, Mark R.; Clos, Andrew R.; Glomb, Kimberly A.; Lewit, Peter G.; Nadeau, Megan A; Wood, Douglas A.; Parker, Castleton E.

2014-01-01

59

Effects of alternative instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options in the Big River Area, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Transient numerical ground-water-flow simulation and optimization techniques were used to evaluate potential effects of instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options and resultant streamflow depletions in the Big River Area, Rhode Island. The 35.7 square-mile (mi2) study area includes three river basins, the Big River Basin (30.9 mi2), the Carr River Basin (which drains to the Big River Basin and is 7.33 mi2 in area), the Mishnock River Basin (3.32 mi2), and a small area that drains directly to the Flat River Reservoir. The overall objective of the simulations was to determine the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn from the three basins when constrained by streamflow requirements at four locations in the study area and by maximum rates of withdrawal at 13 existing and hypothetical well sites. The instream-flow requirement for the outlet of each basin and the outfall of Lake Mishnock were the primary variables that limited the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. A requirement to meet seasonal ground-water-demand patterns also limits the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn by up to about 50 percent of the total withdrawals without the demand-pattern constraint. Minimum water-supply demands from a public water supplier in the Mishnock River Basin, however, did not have a substantial effect on withdrawals in the Big River Basin. Hypothetical dry-period instream-flow requirements and the effects of artificial recharge also affected the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. Results of simulations indicate that annual average ground-water withdrawal rates that range up to 16 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) can be withdrawn from the study area under simulated average hydrologic conditions depending on instream-flow criteria and water-supply demand patterns. Annual average withdrawals of 10 to 12 Mgal/d are possible for proposed demands of 3.4 Mgal/d in the Mishnock Basin, and for a constant annual instream-flow criterion of 0.5 cubic foot per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2) at the four streamflow-constraint locations. An average withdrawal rate of 10 Mgal/d can meet estimates of future (2020) water-supply needs of surrounding communities in Rhode Island. This withdrawal rate represents about 13 percent of the average 2002 daily withdrawal from the Scituate Reservoir (76 Mgal/d), the State?s largest water supply. Average annual withdrawal rates of 6 to 7 Mgal/d are possible for more stringent instream-flow criteria that might be used during dry-period hydrologic conditions. Two example scenarios of dry-period instream-flow constraints were evaluated: first, a minimum instream flow of 0.1 cubic foot per second at any of the four constraint locations; and second, a minimum instream flow of 10 percent of the minimum monthly streamflow estimate for each streamflow-constraint location during the period 1961?2000. The State of Rhode Island is currently (2004) considering methods for establishing instream-flow criteria for streams within the State. Twelve alternative annual, seasonal, or monthly instream-flow criteria that have been or are being considered for application in southeastern New England were used as hypothetical constraints on maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates in management-model calculations. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 5 to 16 Mgal/d under five alternative annual instream-flow criteria. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 0 to 13.6 Mgal/d under seven alternative seasonal or monthly instream-flow criteria. The effect of ground-water withdrawals on seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows under each criterion also were compared. Evaluation of management-model results indicates that a single annual instream-flowcriterion may be sufficient to preserve seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows and meet water-supply demands in the Big River Area, because withdrawals from wells in the Big

Granato, Gregory E.; Barlow, Paul M.

2005-01-01

60

75 FR 57188 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-R01-RCRA-2010-0561; FRL-9203-3] Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous...SUMMARY: The State of Rhode Island has applied to EPA for final authorization...oppose the Federal authorization of Rhode Island for this particular rule. There...

2010-09-20

61

Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; Lebrun, Roger A.

2013-01-01

62

Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in rhode island.  

PubMed

West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation. PMID:23819140

Ginsberg, Howard S; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S; Lebrun, Roger A

2013-01-01

63

Continuing Evolution: The Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This narrative chronicles the continued evolution and development of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute, an intensive 5-day inservice professional development program designed for educational leaders from various sectors of the early care and education field. The goal is to review the continued use of successful practices…

Horm, Diane M.; O'Keefe, Beverly; Diffendale, Charlotte; Cohen, Amy; Schennum, Ruth; Pucciarelli, Larry; Collins, Cheryl; Merrifield, Margaret; Nardone, Virginia; Martin, Marilyn; Bryan, Linda; DeRobbio, Gail

2004-01-01

64

The Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Program: An Exploratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

On January 3, 2006, the Rhode Island General Assembly enacted legislation that mandated the Department of Health (DOH) to implement a program to register qualified patients and their caregivers to allow possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana for personal use for statutorily defined illnesses and debilitating conditions. This exploratory program evaluation used the Conceptual Model of Nursing and

Charles R. Alexandre

2010-01-01

65

High Order GPS Base Station Support for Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this project is to provide enhanced web-access to high-accuracy GPS base station reference files for the transportation planning, engineering, and emergency response communities in Rhode Island. In August and September of 2000, we worked in...

P. August C. LaBash D. Chapman R. Duhaime

2001-01-01

66

Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Rhode Island's Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rhode Island is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

2011-01-01

67

Dance Proficiency in Rhode Island: Opportunities and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rhode Island has recently mandated a new kind of arts requirement for high school graduation that involves proving proficiency in one of four art forms: music, visual art, theater, or dance. How the state came to mandate this law, how proficiency is currently defined and assessed in dance, and what effects the cuts in arts education funding will…

Oliver, Wendy; Sprague, Marty

2007-01-01

68

Flexible Layered Pavement Design Procedure for Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For the purpose of recommending a flexible pavement design procedure for Rhode Island using the AASHO Interim Guide, a study was made of 13 sites on selected in-service flexible pavements. Data obtained and tests performed include ADT, vehicle classificat...

V. A. Nacci K. Moultrop M. C. Wang M. T. Huston

1977-01-01

69

Unviersity of Rhode Island Library Reference Sources in Gerontology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty-two sources in gerontology, located at the University of Rhode Island Library, are listed in this annotated bibliography as well as some interdisciplinary sources. This bibliography contains material published as recently as 1996 and includes annotations of an "Older Americans Almanac," bibliographies, a biographical dictionary, the…

Morrison, Catherine E.

70

ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the performance of Rhode Island's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in…

ACT, Inc., 2012

2012-01-01

71

Childhood Lead Poisoning. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the most common pediatric health problems is childhood lead poisoning. This report examines the preventable problem of lead poisoning. The report describes childhood lead poisoning as both a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible, and as a housing problem. More than half the housing units in Rhode Island

Harrington, Ann-Marie, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.; Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.

1997-01-01

72

Ted Sizer's Opening Remarks, Fall Forum 2000, Providence, Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents Ted Sizer's opening remarks during the Fall Forum in 2000 at Providence, Rhode Island. In his opening remarks, Sizer reviews what the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is, and what it is not. CES, he contends, is not a fixed school design but rather, a set of ideas, ideas and conditions and convictions, called principles,…

Sizer, Theodore

2009-01-01

73

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Criteria for this evaluation were developed by the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Environments were recognized after literature research, surface and subsurface geologic reconnaissance, and examination of known uranium occurrences and aeroradioactivity anomalies. Environments

R. C. Zollinger; R. P. Blauvelt; R. T. Chew

1982-01-01

74

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

2008-01-01

75

Rhode Island Career Education State Plan. Final Report, 1977-1978.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A statewide career education needs assessment was conducted to evaluate career education in Rhode Island. Items in ten areas (self-awareness, career awareness, attitude development, educational awareness, daily living skills, stereotype elimination, career planning and decision-making skills, information, career exploration, and career…

Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

76

Race to the Top. Rhode Island. State-Reported APR: Year One  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes Rhode Island's progress in implementing a comprehensive and coherent approach to education reform from the time of application through June 30, 2011. In particular, this report highlights key accomplishments over the reporting period in the four reform areas: standards and assessments, data systems to support instruction,…

US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

77

Offshore wind farm siting procedures applied offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2008, the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) has been leading a Rhode Island Ocean Area Management Plan (RIOSAMP) in partnership with the University of Rhode Island, resulting in an extensive multidisciplinary analysis of the Rhode Island offshore environment and its suitability for siting an offshore wind farm. As part of the RIOSAMP project, a standard siting optimization approach was first developed based on a siting index defined as the ratio of costs associated with the wind farm deployment to the available wind resource. This index, combined within a marine spatial planning approach to address ecological and societal constraints, provided an initial macro-siting tool (Spaulding et al., 2010). The multiple GIS layers required in this approach and the absence of theoretical support to optimize the resulting zoning, led to an extension of the initial optimization approach into a more comprehensive macro-siting optimization tool, integrating societal and ecological constraints into the siting tool, the Wind Farm Siting Index (WIFSI) (Grilli et al, 2012). The projects led to the definition of several favorable development areas including a Renewable Energy Zone (REZ) off of Block Island, in State Waters. Deep Water Wind Inc. (DWW) plans to install and commission five 6 MW direct drive Siemens lattice jacket turbines in the REZ area, by 2014. In this thesis two major steps are accomplished to refine and expand the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool. First the macro-siting tool is expanded to include a model simulating the exclusionary zones defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. Second a micro-siting model is developed, optimizing the relative position of each turbine within a wind farm area. The micro-siting objective is to minimize, (1) the loss in power due to the loss of wind resource in the wake of the turbines (wake "effect"), and (2) the cable costs that inter-connect the turbines and connecting the farm to the land. The REZ area is chosen as test site for the algorithm, and an optimal layout for the 5 turbines is found and discussed. Similarly the FAA tool is applied to the Block Island airport demonstrating the complexity of the FAA exclusionary area, and defining the limits of the exclusionary areas. The FAA regulation model is a geometric model in which all major (FAA) regulations within RI and the RI topography are embedded. The user specifies the dimension of the proposed turbines and an airport of interest, and a map of exclusionary zones specific to the turbine height and rules applying to the airport is generated. The model is validated for the entire state of Rhode Island. The micro-siting model finds the optimum placement of each turbine for a given number of turbines within an area. It includes the aerodynamic constraints (loss in wind speed within the wake of a turbine) associated to the deployment of arrays of turbines and the cable interconnection cost. It is combined with the technical, ecological, and social constraints used in the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool to provide a comprehensive micro-siting tool. In the optimization algorithm, a simple wake model and turbine-clustering algorithm are combined with the WIFSI in an objective function; the objective function is optimized with a genetic algorithm (GA).

O'Reilly, Christopher M.

78

Prevention and control of hepatitis C in rhode island.  

PubMed

Concern about the morbidity and mortality of hepatitis C infection is increasing. Persons born from 1945 to 1965 are most significantly affected, with the majority unaware of their infection, and will otherwise go untreated. Up to three-fourths of hepatitis C-related deaths occur in this population of "baby boomers." Since 2007, mortality from hepatitis C has exceeded that from HIV, nationally and in Rhode Island. New treatment options for hepatitis C emphasize the potential for cure of hepatitis C that is distinct from HIV. Financial resources and integration of hepatitis C partners and services in Rhode Island will be instrumental in reducing hepatitis C infections and increasing the number of cases cured. We describe public health investments in the past, present, and future to implement strategies for effectively addressing hepatitis C in the state. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24983017

Alexander-Scott, Nicole E; Lemire, Angela; Larson, H Elsa; Bandy, Utpala

2014-01-01

79

Radio control of water heaters in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

A VHF-FM radio communication system was used to control the lower heating elements of 100 residential customers in Rhode Island. The hours of control were 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. during weekdays from June through September of 1987. Topics discussed include sample selection, pre-experiment testing, equipment performance and analysis of results. The diversified demand reduction attributable to control in the summer

J. J. Bzura

1989-01-01

80

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

2011-10-01

81

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

2010-10-01

82

Electrical wiring configurations and childhood leukemia in Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

The study of the relationship between childhood leukemia and electric power line configurations in the greater Denver, Colorado, area by Wertheimer and Leeper (Am J Epidemiol 109: 273-284, 1979) was repeated in Rhode Island, focusing on leukemia (age at onset, 0-20 years; year of onset, 1964-1978). The addresses of 119 leukemia patients and 240 controls were studied by mapping power lines within 50 yards (45.72 m) of each residence. The shortest distance between each power line and the point of the residence closest to it was found; the number and types of wires in each power line were noted. Exposure weights were assigned each type of wire using Wertheimer and Leeper's median field strength reading for each. Assuming that the strength of the field decreases with the square of the distance from its source, and that fields generated by different wires grouped in the same power line are simply additive, a summary value of relative exposure was calculated for each address. Quartile exposure values for controls were used to group patient exposures. Contrary to Wertheimer and Leeper's results, no relationship was found between leukemia and electric power line configurations.

Fulton, J.P.; Cobb, S.; Preble, L.; Leone, L.; Forman, E.

1980-03-01

83

Assessment of drug abuser treatment needs in Rhode Island.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Rhode Island's Division of Substance Abuse asked us to assess the State's drug treatment needs and make recommendations regarding its treatment system for the next three years. METHODS. We used a statewide telephone drug use survey of 5,176 households supplemented by drug-related hospital discharges, Division of Drug Control statistics, and interviews with providers, state officials, and out-of-state experts. Drug abuse was measured with items from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Abusers were asked if they were receiving or wanted to receive treatment. RESULTS. Survey responses, used to estimate the unmet need for drug treatment, indicated a need to triple drug treatment services. Regression models using survey data indicated that the treatment network was overly centralized in the Providence area. Interviews with state officials, clinicians, and out-of-state experts provided material for recommendations on reimbursement policy, treatment mix, quality assurance, and cost containment. CONCLUSIONS. The RI Department of Health's certificate-of-need program adopted our overall recommendation for tripling the drug treatment system as its guideline in evaluating proposals for new treatment facilities. With State funding of a new adolescent center and expansion of outpatient slots in the private sector, this recommendation has now been fully implemented.

McAuliffe, W E; Breer, P; Ahmadifar, N W; Spino, C

1991-01-01

84

A Precipitation-Runoff Model for the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model of the Blackstone River Basin was developed and calibrated to study the effects of changing land- and water-use patterns on water resources. The 474.5 mi2 Blackstone River Basin in southeastern Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is experiencing rapid population and commercial growth throughout much of its area. This growth and the corresponding changes in land-use patterns are increasing stress on water resources and raising concerns about the future availability of water to meet residential and commercial needs. Increased withdrawals and wastewater-return flows also could adversely affect aquatic habitat, water quality, and the recreational value of the streams in the basin. The Blackstone River Basin was represented by 19 hydrologic response units (HRUs): 17 types of pervious areas (PERLNDs) established from combinations of surficial geology, land-use categories, and the distribution of public water and public sewer systems, and two types of impervious areas (IMPLNDs). Wetlands were combined with open water and simulated as stream reaches that receive runoff from surrounding pervious and impervious areas. This approach was taken to achieve greater flexibility in calibrating evapotranspiration losses from wetlands during the growing season. The basin was segmented into 50 reaches (RCHRES) to represent junctions at tributaries, major lakes and reservoirs, and drainage areas to streamflow-gaging stations. Climatological, streamflow, water-withdrawal, and wastewater-return data were collected during the study to develop the HSPF model. Climatological data collected at Worcester Regional Airport in Worcester, Massachusetts and T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, were used for model calibration. A total of 15 streamflow-gaging stations were used in the calibration. Streamflow was measured at eight continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey cooperative streamflow-gaging network, and at seven partial-record stations installed in 2004 for this study. Because the model-calibration period preceded data collection at the partial-record stations, a continuous streamflow record was estimated at these stations by correlation with flows at nearby continuous-record stations to provide additional streamflow data for model calibration. Water-use information was compiled for 1996-2001 and included municipal and commercial/industrial withdrawals, private residential withdrawals, golf-course withdrawals, municipal wastewater-return flows, and on-site septic effluent return flows. Streamflow depletion was computed for all time-varying ground-water withdrawals prior to simulation. Water-use data were included in the model to represent the net effect of water use on simulated hydrographs. Consequently, the calibrated values of the hydrologic parameters better represent the hydrologic response of the basin to precipitation. The model was calibrated for 1997-2001 to coincide with the land-use and water-use data compiled for the study. Four long-term stations (Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island) that monitor flow at 3.3, 5.4, 19, and 88 percent of the total basin area, respectively, provided the primary model-calibration points. Hydrographs, scatter plots, and flow-duration curves of observed and simulated discharges, along with various model-fit statistics, indicated that the model performed well over a range of hydrologic conditions. For example, the total runoff volume for the calibration period simulated at the Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island streamflow-gaging stations differed from the observed runoff v

Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

2007-01-01

85

Generalized water-table map of Block Island, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The map shows the altitude of water table surface above seal level in the glacial deposits that form Block Island. Because the sediments are only moderately permeable, the water table is close to the to the surface in most parts of the island, even in hilly areas. The map represents a generalized water-table configuration on the basis of data from many different sampling periods; because the data were collected at different times, they should not be used to determine a specific depth to water at a particular site. Water levels measured in 117 shallow wells (less than 35 feet deep) from June through September 1962 and from March through September 1988-90--periods when water levels were at about the same altitude above sea level--ranged from less than 1 to 24 feet below land surface and averaged about 6 feet below land surface.

Johnston, H. E.; Veeger, A. I.

1994-01-01

86

Surficial Geology in Central Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island: Interpretations of Sidescan Sonar and Multibeam Bathymetry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introducation: The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology in estuaries along the coast of the northeastern United States. The purpose of our present study is to determine the distributions of surficial sediments and sedimentary environments in two areas of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, using sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution bathymetry, and sediment data. This study provides a framework for future studies on topics such as benthic habitats and oceanographic processes that control the transport and distribution of bottom sediments. This study mapped two separate areas totalling about 33 km? One area lies in West Passage between Plum Point, Quonset Point and Conanicut Island; the other area lies in East Passage around Dyer Island and extends south of Prudence Island (fig. 1).

McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Larry J.; Signell, Richard P.; Denny, Jane F.; Crocker, Jim M.; Beaver, Andrew L.; Schattgen, P. Tod

2006-01-01

87

Estimated Water Use and Availability in the Lower Blackstone River Basin, Northern Rhode Island and South-Central Massachusetts, 1995-99.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Blackstone River basin includes approximately 475 square miles in northern Rhode Island and south-central Massachusetts. The study area (198 square miles) comprises six subbasins of the lower Blackstone River basin. The estimated population for the st...

L. K. Barlow

2003-01-01

88

Your Court. How the Rhode Island Judiciary System Works. First Edition and Teacher's Resource Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first part of this document, designed for middle school students, describes the Rhode Island court system. A history of the court in Rhode Island, an explanation of courts and their jurisdictions, the jury, appointment and duties of judges, court personnel, and sentencing are explained. An appendix outlines the rights of crime victims, the…

Leonard, Donald E.

89

Safe Voluntary Exit Plans for Gang Involved Youth in Rhode Island: A Qualitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted with the intent of understanding safe exit plans for gang involved youth. There is limited literature around the existence of exit planning in the State of Rhode Island. Three interviews were conducted with four local stakeholders in the Rhode Island community. These interviews revealed that at risk youth can be safely guided out of gang life

Patricia Foley

2011-01-01

90

Assessment of the Efficiency of Hospital Utilization at Rhode Island Hospital.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to assist the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Rhode Island Hospital (RIH) to assess the appropriateness of hospital bed use at RIH. The primary objective of the study was to estimate the percent of inappropriate adu...

1982-01-01

91

REWSET: A prototype seismic and tsunami early warning system in Rhodes island, Greece  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tsunami warning in near-field conditions is a critical issue in the Mediterranean Sea since the most important tsunami sources are situated within tsunami wave travel times starting from about five minutes. The project NEARTOWARN (2012-2013) supported by the EU-DG ECHO contributed substantially to the development of new tools for the near-field tsunami early warning in the Mediterranean. One of the main achievements is the development of a local warning system in the test-site of Rhodes island (Rhodes Early Warning System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis - REWSET). The system is composed by three main subsystems: (1) a network of eight seismic early warning devices installed in four different localities of the island, one in the civil protection, another in the Fire Brigade and another two in municipality buildings; (2) two radar-type (ultrasonic) tide-gauges installed in the eastern coastal zine of the island which was selected since research on the historical earthquake and tsunami activity has indicated that the most important, near-field tsunami sources are situated offshore to the east of Rhodes; (3) a crisis Geographic Management System (GMS), which is a web-based and GIS-based application incorporating a variety of thematic maps and other information types. The seismic early warning devices activate by strong (magnitude around 6 or more) earthquakes occurring at distances up to about 100 km from Rhodes, thus providing immediate mobilization of the civil protection. The tide-gauges transmit sea level data, while during the crisis the GMS supports decisions to be made by civil protection. In the near future it is planned the REWSET system to be integrated with national and international systems. REWSET is a prototype which certainly could be developed in other coastal areas of the Mediterranean and beyond.

Papadopoulos, Gerasimos; Argyris, Ilias; Aggelou, Savvas; Karastathis, Vasilis

2014-05-01

92

Lower syringe sharing and re-use after syringe legalization in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Increased access to sterile syringes reduces the transmission of HIV, viral hepatitis and other infectious diseases, without increasing injection drug use. In Rhode Island, in 2000, syringes were legalized to reduce spread of disease but remained outlawed in Massachusetts until 2006. Drug users undergoing inpatient detoxification in Rhode Island and Massachusetts were surveyed about their syringe usage between October 2001 and August 2003. Two hundred forty-seven Rhode Island, and 226 Massachusetts inpatients completed surveys. Of these, 61% (n=151) from Rhode Island and 46% (n=105) from Massachusetts reported injecting within 6 months. Respondents from Rhode Island reported reusing a syringe in the last 30 days less often than Massachusetts respondents (0.35 versus 0.50; 95% CI on difference 0.01-0.29). Syringe re-use and sharing among drug injectors in Rhode Island was markedly lower than in Massachusetts. This difference is attributed at least in part to the legalization of non-prescription sterile syringes in Rhode Island in 2000. Laws and policies that increase legal syringe availability can decrease injection related transmission of HIV and other infectious diseases. PMID:17386980

Rich, Josiah D; Hogan, Joseph W; Wolf, Francis; DeLong, Allison; Zaller, Nickolas D; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Reinert, Steven

2007-07-10

93

The Rhode Island medical marijuana program: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

On January 3, 2006, the Rhode Island General Assembly enacted legislation that mandated the Department of Health (DOH) to implement a program to register qualified patients and their caregivers to allow possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana for personal use for statutorily defined illnesses and debilitating conditions. This study was designed to describe the formulation and implementation of the program; identify stakeholder expectations and perceptions of the program; identify patient's expectations prior to enrollment; and identify patient's perceived experience of the enrollment process. The study findings indicated that 309 different practitioners had certified 980 patients was an indication of a level of program effectiveness meeting patient needs; that there was no indication that patients had been arrested or prosecuted for participating in the program; and that despite ongoing concerns with consistent access to marijuana, patients were pleased that the program existed. PMID:21511683

Alexandre, Charles R

2011-05-01

94

Availability of ground water, upper Pawcatuck River basin, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The upper Pawcatuck River basin is a 70-square-mile area in southcentral Rhode Island consisting of broad, rolling hills and narrow valleys in the north and fiat-floored plains in the south. It is drained by the Pawcatuck River and its two major tributaries, the Usquepaug-Queen River and the Chipuxet River. Analysis of the water budget for the basin shows that approximately 94 mgd (million gallons per day) or about 63 percent of the precipitation flows out of the basin as streamflow. Of this amount, about 66 mgd is from ground-water seepage. Two ground-water reservoirs composed of glacial deposits of sand and gravel and capable of substantial yields are in the basin. The larger reservoir underlies the central part of the Usquepaug-Queen River valley. This reservoir ranges in width from 3,000 to 4,000 feet and is 32,000 feet long. A large part of the reservoir contains sand and gravel more than 100 feet thick, having a permeability of more than 1,000 gallons per day per square foot. The yield of this reservoir is estimated to be about 17 mgd. The smaller ground-water reservoir is in the Chipuxet River valley. It is about 4,000 feet wide and 16,000 feet long. A large part of this reservoir contains sand and gravel more than 150 feet thick having a permeability of more than 1,000 gallons per day per square foot. The yield of the Chipuxet reservoir is estimated to be about 8.6 mgd. Mineral content of water from both of the reservoirs is generally less than 200 parts per million of dissolved solids. However, in the Chipuxet groundwater reservoir the dissolved solids are somewhat higher, and the iron content is a problem. Only about 1.5 mgd of water is used in the basin. Most of it is used for public supplies and is obtained from wells not tapping the Usquepaug-Queen or Chipuxet ground-water reservoirs. Estimates of the 25 mgd of ground water potentially available are believed to be conservative, and substantially larger quantities may actually be available when development takes place.

Allen, William Burrows; Hahn, Glenn Walter; Brackley, Richard A.

1966-01-01

95

Water Resources Data Massachusetts and Rhode Island Water Year 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Massachusetts and Rhode Island each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the States. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data-Massachusetts and Rhode Island.' Hydrologic data are also available through the Massachusetts-Rhode Island District Home Page on the world-wide web (http://ma.water.usgs.gov). Historical data and real-time data (for sites equipped with satellite gage-height telemeter) are also available. The home page also contains a link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Home Page where streamflow data from locations throughout the United States can be retrieved. This report series includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents of lakes and reservoirs; water levels of ground-water wells; and water quality of ground-water wells. This volume contains discharge records at 90 gaging stations; stage records at 2 gaging stations; monthend contents of 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 31 gaging stations; water quality at 27 observation wells; and water levels for 139 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 1 and 2. Short-term water-quality data were collected at 21 gaging stations and 27 observation wells and are shown in figure 3. Miscellaneous hydrologic data were collected at various sites that were not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. This series of annual reports for Massachusetts and Rhode Island began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Prior to introduction of this series and for several water years concurrent with it, water-resources data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island were published in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Papers. Data on stream discharge and stage and on lake or reservoir contents and stage, through September 1960, were published annually under the title 'Surface-Water Supply of the United States, Parts 1A and 1B.' For the 1961 through 1970 water years, the data were published in two 5-year reports. Data on chemical quality, temperature, and suspended sediment for the 1941 through 1970 water years were published annually under the title 'Quality of Surface Waters of the United States,' and water levels for the 1939 through 1974 water years were published under the title 'Ground-Water Levels in the United States.' The above mentioned Water-Supply Papers may be consulted in the libraries of the principal cities of the United States and may be purchased from U.S. Geological Survey, Information Services, Box 25286, Denver Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225-0286. Publications similar to this report are published annually by the Geological Survey for all States. These official Survey reports have an identification number consisting of the two-letter State abbreviation, the last two digits of the water year, and the volume number. For example, this volume is identified as 'U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report MARI-98-1.' For archiving and general d

Socolow, R. S.; Zanca, J. L.; Murino, Domenic, Jr.; Ramsbey, L. R.

2000-01-01

96

Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

Not Available

1981-07-01

97

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 89-155-1979, Arcade Parking Garage, Providence, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Arcade Parking Garage (SIC-7525), in Providence, Rhode Island, was evaluated for possible hazardous health conditions due to the presence of carbon-monoxide (630080) fumes. The garage has nine parking levels, eight above ground. The building was const...

E. A. Kaiser

1989-01-01

98

Contribution of Chronic Petroleum Inputs to Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound Sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sediment cores from Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound have been analyzed for petroleum hydrocarbons and compared with a relatively unpolluted sediment core from the Gulf of Maine. The sediments were analyzed for unbound hydrocarbons, hydrocarbons bo...

E. S. Van Vleet J. G. Quinn

1978-01-01

99

Safety Belt Usage Rates at High Schools and Colleges in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the implementation, analysis, and results of a model seat belt survey targeting Rhode Island high school and college students. This study was conducted to gather baseline information on seat belt usage patterns and characteristics, ca...

D. J. Berman J. Schaffran A. Fong

2004-01-01

100

Hydrogeology and water resources of Block Island, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water is present on Block Island as a lens of freshwater that overlies saltwater. Yields of 2 to 5 gallons per minute are obtainable throughout the island, and yields of 25 gallons per minute are possible at many wells. Annual water use during 1990 is estimated to have been 53 million gallons, of which approximately 17 million gallons was delivered from a water company at Sands Pond. Demand by water company customers from May through October averages 74,000 gallons per day. The sustainable yield of Sands Pond during the drought years estimated to be only 45,000 gallons per day. Withdrawal of the remaining 29,000 gallons per day from Fresh Pond, proposed as an alternative source, would produce an estimated water-level decline of less than 1 foot. Block Island consists of a Pleistocene moraine deposit that includes meltwater deposits, till, sediment-flow deposits, and glacially transported blocks of Cretaceous strata and pre-Late Wisconsinan glacial deposits. The water table is a subdued reflection of the land-surface topography and flow is generally from the central, topographic highs toward the coast. Layers of low hydraulic- conductivity material impede vertical flow, creating steep vertical gradients. No evidence of widespread ground-water contamination was found during this study. Nitrate concentrations were below Federal Maximum Contaminant Levels at each of the 83 sites sampled. No evidence of dissolved organic constituents was found in groundwater at the 10 sites sampled, and ground-water samples collected near the landfill showed no evidence of contamination from landfill leachate. Dissolved-iron concentrations exceeded the Federal Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level in groundwater at 26 of 76 wells sampled. High iron concentrations were found predominantly in the eastern and northern parts of the island and are attributed to the presence of iron-bearing minerals and organic matter in the aquifer.

Veeger, A. I.; Johnston, H. E.

1994-01-01

101

Water-Quality Conditions and Constituent Loads, Water Years 1996-2002, and Water-Quality Trends, Water Years 1983-2002, in the Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Scituate Reservoir is the primary source of drinking water for more than 60 percent of the population of Rhode Island. Water-quality data and streamflow data collected at 37 surface-water monitoring stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 2002, (water years (WY) 1996-2002) were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions and constituent loads in the drainage area. Trends in water quality, including physical properties and concentrations of constituents, were investigated for the same period and for a longer period from October 1, 1982 through September 30, 2002 (WY 1983-2002). Water samples were collected and analyzed by Providence Water Supply Board, the agency that manages the Scituate Reservoir. Streamflow data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. Median values and other summary statistics were calculated for WY 1996-2002 for all 37 monitoring stations for pH, color, turbidity, alkalinity, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, orthophosphate, iron, and manganese. Instantaneous loads and yields (loads per unit area) of total coliform and E. coli bacteria (indicator bacteria), chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, iron, and manganese were calculated for all sampling dates during WY 1996-2002 for the 23 stations with streamflow data. Values of physical properties and concentrations of constituents were compared to State and Federal water-quality standards and guidelines, and were related to streamflow, land-use characteristics, and road density. Tributary stream water in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area for WY 1996-2002 was slightly acidic (median pH of all stations equal to 6.1) and contained low concentrations of chloride (median 13 milligrams per liter (mg/L)), nitrate (median 0.04 mg/L as N), and orthophosphate (median 0.04 mg/L as P). Turbidity and alkalinity values also were low with median values of 0.62 nephelometric turbidity units and 4.8 mg/L as calcium carbonate, respectively. Indicator bacteria were detected in samples from all stations, but median concentrations were low, 23 and 9 colony-forming units per 100 mL for total coliform and E. coli bacteria, respectively. Median values of several physical properties and median concentrations of several constituents that can be related to human activities correlated positively with the percentages of developed land and correlated negatively with the percentages of forest cover in the drainage areas of the monitoring stations. Median concentrations of chloride also correlated positively with the density of roads in the drainage areas of monitoring stations, likely reflecting the effects of road-salt applications. Median values of color correlated positively with the percentages of wetlands in the drainage areas of monitoring stations, reflecting the natural sources of color in tributary stream waters. Negative correlations of turbidity, indicator bacteria, and chloride with streamflow likely reflect seasonal patterns, in which higher values and concentrations of these properties and constituents occur during low-flow conditions at the ends of water years. Similar seasonal patterns were observed for pH, alkalinity, and color. Loads and yields of chloride, nitrate, orthophosphate, and bacteria varied among monitoring stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Loads generally were higher at stations with larger drainage areas and at stations in the eastern, more developed parts of the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Yields generally were higher at stations in the eastern parts of the drainage area. Upward trends in pH were identified for nearly half the monitoring stations and may reflect regional reductions in acid precipitation. Upward and downward trends were identified in chloride concentrations at various stations; upward trends may reflect the effects of increasing development, whereas strong downward trends at

Nimiroski, Mark T.; DeSimone, Leslie A.; Waldron, Marcus C.

2008-01-01

102

Adult Sexual Assault Evaluations at Rhode Island Emergency Departments, 1995–2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence and identify the temporal patterns of visits to Rhode Island emergency\\u000a departments (EDs) by adults who were sexually assaulted. Visits to all Rhode Island EDs from January 1995–June 2001 by adults\\u000a who were sexually assaulted were identified using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification\\u000a (ICD-9) codes. Medical records

Roland C. Merchant; Tse Chiang Lau; Tao Liu; Kenneth H. Mayer; Bruce M. Becker

2009-01-01

103

Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

1984-01-01

104

Estimating the true prevalence of hepatitis C in rhode island.  

PubMed

Although there is a large health, social, and economic burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the United States, the number of persons infected with HCV in Rhode Island (RI) is unknown. To inform the expansion of HCV-related public health efforts in RI, and because surveillance data are lacking and national surveys, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), likely underestimate true HCV prevalence, we reviewed published peer-reviewed and grey literature to more accurately estimate the prevalence of HCV in RI. The results of our review suggest that between 16,603 and 22,660 (1.7%-2.3%) persons in RI have ever been infected with HCV. Assuming a spontaneous clearance rate of 26%, we estimate that between 12,286 and 16,768 (1.2%-1.7%) have ever been or are currently chronically infected with HCV. Findings suggest the urgent need for improved HCV screening in RI, and that reducing morbidity and mortality from HCV will require a dramatic scale-up of testing, linkage to care, treatment and cure. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24983016

Kinnard, Elizabeth N; Taylor, Lynn E; Galárraga, Omar; Marshall, Brandon Dl

2014-01-01

105

The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Rhode Island, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, sea level rise and subsidence, agriculture and precision farming, and other business uses. Today, high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the sources for creating elevation models and other elevation datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data, on a national basis, that are (on average) 30 years old and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative (Snyder, 2012a,b), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

Carswell, William J., Jr.

2013-01-01

106

Delineation of Areas Contributing Recharge to Selected Public-Supply Wells in Glacial Valley-Fill and Wetland Settings, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the geohydrology and the areas contributing recharge and sources of water to eight publicsupply wells in three study areas: the Cumberland and Lincoln study area includes two Cumberland wells and three Lincoln wells, the North Smithf...

P. J. Friesz

2004-01-01

107

Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 12, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The State of New York and the six New England States of Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island compose Segment 12 of this Atlas (fig. 1). The seven States have a total land area of about 116,000 square miles (table 1); all but a small area in southwestern New York has been glaciated. Population in the States of Segment 12 totals about 30,408,000 (table 1) and is concentrated in southern and eastern Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and especially New York (fig. 1). The northern part of the segment and the mountainous areas of New York and much of New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine are sparsely populated. The percentage of population supplied from ground-water sources during 1980 was 54 to 60 percent in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont (table 1). Nearly all rural, domestic, and small-community water systems obtain water from wells that are, in comparison with other sources, the safest and the least expensive to install and maintain. Where water demand is great-in the urban areas of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island-sophisticated reservoir, pipeline, and purification systems are economically feasible and are needed to meet demands. Surface water is the principal source of supply in these four States, and ground water was used to supply only 24 to 35 percent of their population during 1980 (table 1).

Olcott, Perry G.

1995-01-01

108

The Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Program: Experience with statewide hearing screening (1993-1996)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate key outcomes of a universal hearing screen\\/rescreen program for all births with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in all 8 maternity hospitals in the state of Rhode Island over a 4-year period.Study design: This was a retrospective analysis of the hearing screen\\/rescreen refer data collected prospectively for 53,121 survivors born in Rhode

Betty R. Vohr; Lisa M. Carty; Patricia E. Moore; Kristen Letourneau

1998-01-01

109

75 FR 20514 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This rule changes reporting dates prescribed under the marketing order that regulates the handling of cranberries grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island in the State of New York. The order is administered locally by the Cranberry Marketing Committee (Committee). This rule revises the due......

2010-04-20

110

"Into Your Hands His Life and Liberty...." A Collection of Significant Cases from the Rhode Island Courts. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six cases from Rhode Island court history are presented in this document. The cases, dating from the time of Roger Williams to the 1970s, examine religious freedom, personal freedom, treason, robbery, murder, and drug possession. Each case is summarized and questions are supplied to help students understand crime and punishment in Rhode Island. A…

Leonard, Donald E.; Mattson, John O., Ed.

111

The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Toward a Coherent System of Allocating State Aid to Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is clearly a challenging task. This paper presents the Rhode Island story on school funding reform. First, the paper begins with a short history of Rhode Island's school finance system and the key factors that called for school funding reform. Second, the paper discusses…

Wong, Kenneth K.

2011-01-01

112

Side-by-Side: Novice and Veteran Principals Are a Powerful Mix for Learning in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two key insights guide Rhode Island's work to support principals. First, leaders at all experience levels need support from a network of colleagues. Second, leaders grow when they work with colleagues of diverse experience levels. That led Rhode Island to create a continuum of support that enables principals to address their learning needs through…

Braun, Donna; Carlson, Donna Vigneau

2008-01-01

113

Race to the Top. Rhode Island Report. Year 2: School Year 2011-2012. [State-Specific Summary Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of Rhode Island's Year 2 Race to the Top implementation, highlighting successes and accomplishments, identifying challenges, and providing lessons learned from implementation from approximately September 2011 through September 2012. In Year 2, Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE)…

US Department of Education, 2013

2013-01-01

114

Race to the Top. Rhode Island Report. Year 1: School Year 2010-2011. [State-Specific Summary Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of Rhode Island's Year 1 Race to the Top implementation, highlighting successes and accomplishments, identifying challenges, and providing lessons learned from implementation to date. According to the State, in Year 1, Rhode Island greatly increased statewide capacity to begin…

US Department of Education, 2012

2012-01-01

115

Fiscal year 1986 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Research Center  

SciTech Connect

Water resources projects included a detailed partitioning of nitrogen in soil solution, turf clipping, and soil organic for various fertilizer rates; a better method of managing lawn turf to minimize nitrate contamination of ground water was found. Extensive studies showed chloride concentration for river baseflows in Rhode Island lower than the current EPA standards and advisory limits. Both road density and the subsoil layer under the highway in swamp areas were found to affect the chloride concentration. A numerical model of two-phase (gasoline/groundwater) immiscible fluid flow through soil was developed to predict gasoline movement in aquifer and for optimizing the pumping rates in a clean-up process. Effects of alum coagulant dosage, mixing intensity, and mixing time on direct water filtration performance and its optimization in sand filters were investigated.

Poon, C.P.C.

1987-07-01

116

Childhood Lead Poisoning: Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that childhood lead poisoning is one of the most common preventable pediatric health problems, this report examines lead poisoning as a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible and as a housing problem directly related to a shortage of safe, affordable housing. The report details screening rates in Rhode

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

117

The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

Piro, Joseph M.

2005-01-01

118

Socioeconomic Correlates of Current and Regular Smoking among College Students in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine how sociodemographic variables, in particular socioeconomic status, correlate with current and regular smoking among college students in Rhode Island. Participants and Methods: Over a 4-year period (academic year 2000-2001 to 2003-2004), the authors examined sociodemographic correlates of…

Clarkin, Patrick F.; Tisch, Linda A.; Glicksman, Arvin S.

2008-01-01

119

Comprehensive School Counseling in Rhode Island: Access to Services and Student Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored relationships among school counseling practices, secondary school demographics, and student outcomes in the state of Rhode Island during a 2-year period. The results showed strong and consistent correlations between increased amounts of school counseling services and positive student outcomes. Schools with higher percentages of…

Dimmitt, Carey; Wilkerson, Belinda

2012-01-01

120

The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Developing New Strategies on Equity and Accountability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is a challenging task. Too often, state leaders embrace major school funding reform only when they are directed by court decisions. In this seemingly contentious policy domain, the Rhode Island General Assembly defied the odds--working in a recessionary climate and in the…

Wong, Kenneth K.

2013-01-01

121

In Rhode Island, Building a bRIdge to the Knowledge Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2008, Rhode Island was in the early stages of refocusing its economic development efforts on transitioning to a knowledge-based economy. This move would require an educated workforce, largely deemed the responsibility of the state's 11 public and private institutions of higher education. For a state with slightly over a million residents and…

Leonard, Adam

2012-01-01

122

Guidelines for Career Education 7-9 for Rhode Island: Agribusiness and Natural Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guidelines for implementing an exploratory career education curriculum in agribusiness and natural resources for Rhode Island students in grades 7-9 are presented. Section 1 presents a rationale, general objectives, suggestions for teacher preparation, explanation and scoring of interest inventory and achievement test, and resource list…

Rhode Island Univ., Kingston. Coll. of Resource Development.

123

US EPA WINTER FLOUNDER PROJECTS AND OTHER WORK IN RHODE ISLAND SALT PONDS  

EPA Science Inventory

We will briefly summarize selected EPA research in Rhode Island's salt ponds from 2000 through 2003. In one project, during the summer of 2000, we used a 1.75 m2 drop sampler to quantify populations of juvenile flatfishes and other small nekton in Ninigret Pond. Mean abundance ...

124

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Rhode Island State Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

2007-01-01

125

The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR): translating theory into research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovative and effective health promotion interventions targeted on older adults within a public health framework will be increasingly important as the US population ages dramatic- ally. The benefits of healthier lifestyles for older adults include increased functional ability and improved quality of life. The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR) Project is a multi- behavioral health

Phillip G. Clark; Claudio R. Nigg; Geoffrey Greene; Deborah Riebe

2002-01-01

126

Assessment of Non-English Speaking Students in Rhode Island. Final Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1979, Rhode Island legislators mandated an assessment of the number of non English speaking children in the State. The resulting study was comprised of two main phases. The first, a census of non English speaking students, included (1) a teacher survey, in which every teacher listed his/her students and indicated an observed primary language…

Rhode Island Univ., Kingston. Curriculum Research and Development Center.

127

Assessment of Sexual Harassment within the University of Rhode Island Community.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1979, reports of sexual harassment and accusations of sexual assault at the University of Rhode Island led to the formation of a Sexual Harassment Committee. One of the tasks undertaken by a subgroup of this committee was a survey of the university community to identify actual experiences of and the attitudes of student and staff toward sexual…

Lott, Bernice; And Others

128

Gordon Conference on Proteins Held in Newport, Rhode Island on 20-24th June 1988.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Gordon Conference on 'Proteins' was held from the 20th to the 24th of June, 1988 at Salve Regina College in Newport, Rhode Island. Topics included: What Can Peptides Tell Us About Proteins (and Vice Versa); New Methods in Structure Determination; The ...

J. Hermans

1990-01-01

129

Fiscal Year 1987 Program Report: Rhode Island Water Resource Research Center,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1987 program objective was to conduct studies and research of value to the New England region as well as to assist in the solution of problems in the State of Rhode Island. Current and anticipated state and regional water problems are contamination of...

P. C. Poon

1988-01-01

130

Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Rhode Island related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

2013-01-01

131

Lessons from the Classroom Level about Federal and State Accountability in Rhode Island and Illinois. Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the winter of 2008, the Center on Education Policy (CEP) released reports examining the impact of national and state accountability systems on curriculum, instruction, and student achievement in Rhode Island and Illinois. Using classroom observations and interviews with school administrators, instructional specialists, teachers, parents, and…

Center on Education Policy, 2009

2009-01-01

132

ALP: Alternate Learning Project; Overview of a Model High School in Providence, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alternate Learning Project (ALP) is a community based public high school in Providence, Rhode Island. The ALP student population participates in a program offering individualized basic skills instruction, college preparatory courses, career exploration activities, and a broad arts curriculum. Throughout, the emphasis is on continuous…

Kenyon, Charles B.

133

Overview of Project Year 2000 in Rhode Island Public Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monthly report documents the accomplishments of the Year 2000 project in Rhode Island's public higher education. It reviews computer problems related to the Year 2000 date change, noting the basic technical solution necessary to avoid disruption to higher education, and summarizes Executive Order 99-1, issued in January 1999, requiring all…

Rhode Island State Board of Governors for Higher Education, Providence.

134

Rhode Island Project for Children Who Are Deaf-Blind, 1995-1999. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes accomplishments and activities of a four-year federally funded Rhode Island project for children who are deaf blind. Major accomplishments included: (1) parents (of 65 identified individuals) received greater access to an increased number and variety of support resources; (2) professionals linked to individuals with…

Dell, Susan J.

135

A POPULATION MODEL FOR THE DIAMONDBACK TERRAPIN IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

The diamondback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin is listed as a state-endangered species in Rhode Island, and there is only one known breeding population in the state. The Barrington Land Conservation Trust has been monitoring the nesting activity of this population since 1990 and ha...

136

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-155-1979, Arcade Parking Garage, Providence, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Arcade Parking Garage, in Providence, Rhode Island, was evaluated for possible hazardous health conditions due to the presence of carbon monoxide fumes. The garage has nine parking levels, eight above ground. The building was constructed of reinforced poured concrete and the above ground parking spaces were open to the outside, allowing the free circulation of air. Environmental monitoring consisted

1989-01-01

137

Investing in Low-Wage Workers: Lessons from Family Child Care in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While child care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the country, most employment in this field is precarious and low-wage. Investing in Low-Wage Workers profiles the Day Care Justice Co-op, a group of largely Latina and African American women living and working in some of Rhode Island's poorest communities. Determined to improve family…

Roder, Anne; Seavey, Dorie

2006-01-01

138

Rhode Island Teacher's Assistant Professional Development Plan. A Report to the General Assembly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rhode Island Teacher Assistant Professional Development Plan emphasizes developing school district capacity to provide appropriate training to teacher assistants. The Department recognizes that the most effective professional development is linked to the needs of the individual in light of the needs of students they support. The plan's primary…

Anselmo, Doris

139

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN JUVENILE WINTER FLOUNDER AND MULTIPLE-SCALE HABITAT VARIATION IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

A rapid random-sampling method was used to relate densities of juvenile winter flounder to multiple scales of habitat variation in Narragansett Bay and two nearby coastal lagoons in Rhode Island. We used a 1-m beam trawl with attached video camera, continuous GPS track overlay, ...

140

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-346-2030, Graphic Creations, Inc. , Warren, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to a request from the management of Graphic Creations, Inc., Warren, Rhode Island, an evaluation was made of employee exposures to hydroquinone and printing press cleaning solvents which contained benzene. The printing process involves photographic art work producing a negative, making a plate, exposing the plate in an exposure frame, and installing the plate on the press. The

E. A. Kaiser; K. P. McManus

1990-01-01

141

METAL SURVEY OF THE MARINE CLAM 'PITAR MORRHUANA' COLLECTED NEAR A RHODE ISLAND (USA) ELECTROPLATING PLANT  

EPA Science Inventory

Benthic fauna were collected from 17 stations in mid-Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during September 1973 from the vicinity of the recently-closed Quonset Point electroplating facility. Despite repeated sampling, most of the 14 species of molluscs taken, including the widgeon cl...

142

The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

2012-01-01

143

Solar water heating and data monitoring systems at South County Hospital, Wakefield, Rhode Island. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daystar Corporation installed a solar\\/electric, domestic water heating system in the Borda Wing of the South County Hospital, Wakefield, Rhode Island, in 1975. THe primary purpose of this project was to study the feasibility of the use of Solar Energy in a commercial, healthcare institution. The thermal performance of this system was monitored from December 1976 through March 1978. The

R. D. Cummings; D. J. Peck; W. J. Hall

1979-01-01

144

Meeting changing conditions at the Rhode Island Medical Center Cogeneration Plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1902 the Central Power Plant (CPP) was established at the Rhode Island Medical Center (RIMC) to provide heat and electricity for the facility and to make the Center self-sufficient. The plant consisted of coal fired boilers and steam engine driven generators. In 1936 a new cogeneration plant was built and consisted of two General Electric Company steam turbine generators

D. P. Galamaga; P. T. Bowen

2009-01-01

145

Mentoring in Early Childhood Professional Development: Evaluation of the Rhode Island Child Development Specialist Apprenticeship Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Quality Child Care Initiative, the federal apprenticeship program applied to the field of early care and education, has been implemented in over 40 states. This federal initiative was designed to reduce turnover, increase wages, provide a more stable environment for children, and lower the concern of parents. Rhode Island received funding in…

Uttley, Clarissa M.; Horm, Diane M.

2008-01-01

146

Coastal uplift, earthquakes and active faulting of Rhodes Island (Aegean Arc): modeling based on geodetic inversion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geodetic inversion technique was used to model the fault pattern responsible for the uplifted Holocene notches along the NE Rhodes Island coast (SE edge of the Hellenic (Aegean) Arc). Input in the modeling was the elevation of uplifted notches, up to 6000 yr old, which are interpreted to reflect remains of fossil shorelines, to testify to a series of

Villy A Kontogianni; Nikos Tsoulos; Stathis C Stiros

2002-01-01

147

System design and implementation of a computerized Rhode Island water resources information system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water resources data from various federal and state agencies of Rhode Island were collected, analyzed and reorganized. The nature of the data was studied. A conceptual model representing the entities and relationships among the data was derived by means of a semantic data model. The conceptual model was then mapped into a logical file structure represented by a pseudo Data

1987-01-01

148

USE OF A RHODE ISLAND SALT POND BY JUVENILE WINTER FLOUNDER, PSEUDOPLEURONECTES AMERICANUS  

EPA Science Inventory

We used a 1.75 m2 drop ring sampler in June and July of 2000 to quantify populations of juvenile flatfishes and other small nekton in Ninigret Pond, Rhode Island. The drop sampler was deployed in approximately 1 m of water from a boom mounted on the bow of a small boat. Abundance...

149

Migratory Behavior and Growth of Juvenile Anadromous Alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus, in a Rhode Island Drainage  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of juvenile alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) migrating seaward from Hamilton Reservoir, North Kingstown, Rhode Island, did so on less than 10 per cent of the total days of their period of residence in freshwater during 1970, 1971, and 1972. Extensive migration occurred following increases in pond outflow, abrupt water temperature declines, and\\/or precipitation. Daily patterns of movement were unimodal,

William A. Richkus

1975-01-01

150

A Plan for an Out-of-District Transportation Cooperative in Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Less than five percent of the pupils in northeastern Rhode Island Region I are transported to schools or educational centers outside of their districts. However, about 20 percent of the total transportation costs are expended for out-of-district transportation of nonpublic school, vocational, and special education students. The purpose of the…

Plante, Robert W.

151

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Elementary School Children in Rhode Island: Associated Psychosocial Factors and Medications Used  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to explore psychosocial factors associated with referral for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) evaluation or ADHD diagnosis among elementary school children in Rhode Island, as well as to examine the extent of drug therapy among this population. A survey was distributed to parents\\/guardians of 2,800 3rdto 5th-grade public school students in 4 Rhode Island school districts.

Ephat H. Harel; William D. Brown

2003-01-01

152

"It's been a long road to acceptance": midwives in Rhode Island, 1970-2000.  

PubMed

A resurgence of midwifery came to Rhode Island in the 1970s. Midwives acted as modern health care professionals to conserve a traditional woman-centered birth, but the battle was long and arduous, from Dr. Ellen Stone attempting to eliminate midwives in the state in 1912 to doctors using the death of 2 home birth infants in the 1980s to undermine the growing presence of professional nurse-midwives in the state. Midwives prevailed when the state legislature passed measures in 1988 and 1990 increasing the power and authority of midwives, and when a federal grant in 1993 allowed the University of Rhode Island to open the first training program for nurse-midwives in the state. PMID:24032236

Caron, Simone M

2014-01-01

153

Hepatitis C Prevention and Needle Exchange Programs in Rhode Island: ENCORE.  

PubMed

As Rhode Island's only needle exchange program, ENCORE (Education, Needle Exchange, Counseling, Outreach, and REferrals) serves a wide range of clients infected or at risk for infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Through its on-site and outreach platforms across Rhode Island, ENCORE is in a unique position to serve at-risk individuals who may not otherwise present for prevention, testing and care for HCV, as well as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this article, we discuss the role of needle exchange programs in preventing HCV transmission, and provide an overview of the history and current operations of ENCORE. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24983019

Joseph, Raynald; Kofman, Aaron; Larney, Sarah; Fitzgerald, Paul

2014-01-01

154

Digital seismic-reflection data from western Rhode Island Sound, 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel Neecho. Data from this survey were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center's Data Library. Due to recent interest in the geology of Rhode Island Sound and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from this cruise were scanned and converted to Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (LORAN-C) time delays to latitudes and longitudes, which are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Soderberg, N. K.

2009-01-01

155

Intervening on Exercise and Nutrition in Older AdultsThe Rhode Island SENIOR Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presented are the basic design, methods, and baseline data analyses for the Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR Project) an experimental study to investigate the relative effectiveness of a 12-month, stage of readiness to change-based multiple-behavior intervention (exercise and nutrition) compared to single-behavior interventions in a community-dwelling population of 1,277 older adults. Relationships between stage of

Phillip G. Clark; Joseph S. Rossi; Mary L. Greaney; Deborah A. Riebe; Geoffrey W. Greene; Sandra D. Saunders; Faith D. Lees; Claudio R. Nigg

2005-01-01

156

RHODE ISLAND SUPREME COURT RULES FOR LESBIAN CO-PARENT VISITATION RIGHTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a 3-2 ruling, the Rhode Island Supreme Court held on September 25 that the state's Family Court has jurisdiction to deal with a claim for child visitation by a lesbian co- parent. Adopting the approach taken by the New Jersey Supreme Court in V.C. v. M.J.B., 748 A. 2d 539 (N.J. 2000) and the Wisconsin Supreme Court in Custody

Elaine Chapnik; Ian Chesir-Teran; Steven Kolodny; K. Jacob Ruppert; Daniel R Schaffer; Robert Wintemute; Leo L. Wong

157

Ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts by children--Rhode Island, January 1994-July 1996 .  

PubMed

During 1995, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) received 7917 reports of potentially toxic exposures to tobacco products among children aged < or = 6 years in the United States. Most cases of nicotine poisoning among children result from their ingestion of cigarettes or cigars. Acute nicotine poisoning is characterized by rapid onset of symptoms that may be severe when large amounts have been ingested. During January 1994-July 1996, the Rhode Island Poison Control Center (RIPCC) received 146 reports of ingestion of products containing nicotine by children aged < or = 6 years. To characterize risk factors for and outcomes associated with ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts among children aged < or = 6 years, the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDH) analyzed data from the RIPCC and the 1996 Rhode Island Health Interview Survey (RIHIS). This report summarizes the findings of the study, which indicate that ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts by children aged < or = 6 years resulted in minor toxic effects and occurred more frequently in households where smoking was permitted in the presence of children and where cigarettes and cigarette wastes were accessible to children. PMID:9045041

1997-02-14

158

Long-Term Ground-Water Levels and Transmissivity in the Blackstone River Basin, Northern Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water provides about 7.7 million gallons per day, or 28 percent of total water use in the Rhode Island part of the Blackstone River Basin. Primary aquifers in the basin are stratified glacial deposits, composed mostly of sand and gravel along valley bottoms. The ground-water and surface-water system in the Blackstone River Basin is under stress due to population growth, out-of-basin water transfers, industrialization, and changing land-use patterns. Streamflow periodically drops below the Aquatic Base Flow standard, and ground-water withdrawals add to stress on aquatic habitat during low-flow periods. Existing hydrogeologic data were reviewed to examine historical water-level trends and to generate contour maps of water-table altitudes and transmissivity of the sand and gravel aquifer in the Blackstone River Basin in Rhode Island. On the basis of data from four long-term observation wells, water levels appear to have risen slightly in the study area during the past 55 years. Analysis of available data indicates that increased rainfall during the same period is a likely contributor to the water-level rise. Spatial patterns of transmissivity are shown over larger areas and have been refined on the basis of more detailed data coverage as compared to previous mapping studies.

Eggleston, Jack R.; Church, Peter E.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

2007-01-01

159

Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

1980-01-01

160

Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

1984-01-01

161

Estimation of water withdrawal and distribution, water use, and wastewater collection and return flow in Cumberland, Rhode Island, 1988  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-use data collected in Rhode Island by different State agencies or maintained by different public suppliers and wastewater- treatment facilities need to be integrated if these data are to be used in making water- resource management decisions. Water-use data for the town of Cumberland, a small area in northeastern Rhode Island, were compiled and integrated to provide an example of how the procedure could be applied. Integration and reliability assessment of water-use data could be facilitated if public suppliers, wastewater- treatment facilities, and State agencies used a number of standardized procedures for data collection and computer storage. The total surface water and ground water withdrawn in the town of Cumberland during 1988 is estimated to be 15.39 million gallons per day, of which 11.20 million gallons per day was exported to other towns. Water use in Cumberland included 2.51 million gallons per day for domestic use, 0.68 million gallons per day for industrial use, 0.27 million gallons per day for commercial use, and 0.73 million gallons per day for other use, most of which were unmetered use. Disposal of waste- water in Cumberland included 2.03 million gallons per day returned to the hydrologic system and 1.73 million gallons per day exported from Cumberland for wastewater treatment. Consumptive use during 1988 is estimated to be 0.43 million gallons per day.

Horn, M. A.; Craft, P. A.; Bratton, Lisa

1994-01-01

162

77 FR 30551 - Commercial Renewable Energy Transmission on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island, Notice of Proposed Grant Area and Request...in the Area of the Deepwater Wind Block Island Transmission System Proposal AGENCY...1) Describe the Deepwater Wind Block Island LLC (Deepwater Wind) Transmission...

2012-05-23

163

Modern sedimentary environments on the Rhode Island inner shelf, off the eastern United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analyses of side-scan sonar records along with previously published bathymetric, textural and subbottom data reveal the sedimentary environments on the inner Continental Shelf south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The bottom topography in this area is characterized by a broad central depression bordered by shallow, irregular sea floor on the north and east and by a discontinuous, curvilinear ridge on the south and west. Four distinct environments were identified: 1. (1) Pre-Mesozoic coastal rocks are exposed on the sea floor at isolated locations near the shore (waterdepths <32 m). These exposures have pronounced, irregular topographic relief and produce blotchy patterns on side-scan sonographs. 2. (2) Glacial moraine deposits form the discontinuous offshore ridge. These deposits have hummocky sea-floor relief, are covered by lag gravel and boudlers, and appear as predominantly black (strongly reflective) patterns on the side-scan records. 3. (3) Over most of the shallow, irregular bottom in the northeast, on the flanks of the morainal ridge, and atop bathymetric highs, the sea floor is characterized as a mosaic of light and dark patches and lineations. The dark (more reflective) zones are areas of coarse sands and megaripples (wavelengths = 0.8-1.2 m that either have no detectable relief or are slightly depressed relative to surrounding (light) areas of finer-grained sands. 4. (4) Smooth beds that produce nearly featureless patterns on the sonographs occupy the broad central bathymetric depression as well as smaller depressions north and east of Block Island. Within the broad depression, sonographs having practically no shading indicate a central zone of modern sandy silt, whereas records having moderate tonality define a peripheral belt of silty sand. The sedimentary environments that are outlined range from erosional or non-depositional (bedrock, glacial moraine) to depositional (featureless beds), and include areas that may reflect a combination of erosional and depositional processes (textural patchiness). The distribution and characteristics of the environments reveal the general post-glacial sedimentary history of this area and provide a guide to future utilization of the shelf surface. ?? 1982.

Knebel, H. J.; Needell, S. W.; O'Hara, C. J.

1982-01-01

164

Rhode Island Water Supply System Management Plan Database (WSSMP-Version 1.0)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Rhode Island, the availability of water of sufficient quality and quantity to meet current and future environmental and economic needs is vital to life and the State's economy. Water suppliers, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board (RIWRB), and other State agencies responsible for water resources in Rhode Island need information about available resources, the water-supply infrastructure, and water use patterns. These decision makers need historical, current, and future water-resource information. In 1997, the State of Rhode Island formalized a system of Water Supply System Management Plans (WSSMPs) to characterize and document relevant water-supply information. All major water suppliers (those that obtain, transport, purchase, or sell more than 50 million gallons of water per year) are required to prepare, maintain, and carry out WSSMPs. An electronic database for this WSSMP information has been deemed necessary by the RIWRB for water suppliers and State agencies to consistently document, maintain, and interpret the information in these plans. Availability of WSSMP data in standard formats will allow water suppliers and State agencies to improve the understanding of water-supply systems and to plan for future needs or water-supply emergencies. In 2002, however, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a law that classifies some of the WSSMP information as confidential to protect the water-supply infrastructure from potential terrorist threats. Therefore the WSSMP database was designed for an implementation method that will balance security concerns with the information needs of the RIWRB, suppliers, other State agencies, and the public. A WSSMP database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the RIWRB. The database was designed to catalog WSSMP information in a format that would accommodate synthesis of current and future information about Rhode Island's water-supply infrastructure. This report documents the design and implementation of the WSSMP database. All WSSMP information in the database is, ultimately, linked to the individual water suppliers and to a WSSMP 'cycle' (which is currently a 5-year planning cycle for compiling WSSMP information). The database file contains 172 tables - 47 data tables, 61 association tables, 61 domain tables, and 3 example import-link tables. This database is currently implemented in the Microsoft Access database software because it is widely used within and outside of government and is familiar to many existing and potential customers. Design documentation facilitates current use and potential modification for future use of the database. Information within the structure of the WSSMP database file (WSSMPv01.mdb), a data dictionary file (WSSMPDD1.pdf), a detailed database-design diagram (WSSMPPL1.pdf), and this database-design report (OFR2004-1231.pdf) documents the design of the database. This report includes a discussion of each WSSMP data structure with an accompanying database-design diagram. Appendix 1 of this report is an index of the diagrams in the report and on the plate; this index is organized by table name in alphabetical order. Each of these products is included in digital format on the enclosed CD-ROM to facilitate use or modification of the database.

Granato, Gregory E.

2004-01-01

165

Rhode Island Tech Prep Program Guide. Tech Prep Associate Degree Program. Technical Programs. Business/Office Administration Programs. Allied Health/Dental Health Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide for educators outlines how the tech prep program has evolved in Rhode Island, the type of students most likely to benefit from the program, and how the program works. It begins with tech prep success stories, tech prep associate degree activity timeline, and director of Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) Tech Prep…

Community Coll. of Rhode Island, Warwick.

166

"Killed by its mother": infanticide in Providence County, Rhode Island, 1870 to 1938.  

PubMed

This article analyzes infanticide based on the Coroners' Records for Providence County, Rhode Island, from the 1870s to 1938 to determine doctors' and coroners' attitudes toward mothers who killed. The nineteenth century witnessed a medical discourse on the possibility of postpartum insanity as a cause of infanticide. While some women claimed temporary insanity, and some doctors and coroners legitimated this defense, its application to mothers who killed was arbitrary. They determined who deserved this diagnosis based on the woman's character, her forthrightness, and extenuating circumstances. Infanticide divided the profession nationally and at the local level and prevented doctors or coroners from speaking in a united voice on the issue. This article does not attempt to follow cases of infanticide through to jury verdicts. Instead, it provides an opportunity to analyze the circumstances women faced that led them to kill their newborns, and to analyze the responses of doctors and coroners to these mothers who killed. Unlike the findings of other studies, neither physicians nor coroners in Rhode Island were united in a claim of ignorance to save these women from guilty verdicts. PMID:20939145

Caron, Simone

2010-01-01

167

Hydrogeology and Simulated Ground-Water Flow in the Salt Pond Region of Southern Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Salt Pond region of southern Rhode Island extends from Westerly to Narragansett Bay and forms the natural boundary between the Atlantic Ocean and the shallow, highly permeable freshwater aquifer of the South Coastal Basin. Large inputs of fresh ground water coupled with the low flushing rates to the open ocean make the salt ponds particularly susceptible to eutrophication and bacterial contamination. Ground-water discharge to the salt ponds is an important though poorly quantified source of contaminants, such as dissolved nutrients. A ground-water-flow model was developed and used to delineate the watersheds to the salt ponds, including the areas that contribute ground water directly to the ponds and the areas that contribute ground water to streams that flow into ponds. The model also was used to calculate ground-water fluxes to these coastal areas for long-term average conditions. As part of the modeling analysis, adjustments were made to model input parameters to assess potential uncertainties in model-calculated watershed delineations and in ground-water discharge to the salt ponds. The results of the simulations indicate that flow to the salt ponds is affected primarily by the ease with which water is transmitted through a glacial moraine deposit near the regional ground-water divide, and by the specified recharge rate used in the model simulations. The distribution of the total freshwater flow between direct ground-water discharge and ground-water-derived surface-water (streamflow) discharge to the salt ponds is affected primarily by simulated stream characteristics, including the streambed-aquifer connection and the stream stage. The simulated position of the ground-water divide and, therefore, the model-calculated watershed delineations for the salt ponds, were affected only by changes in the transmissivity of the glacial moraine. Selected changes in other simulated hydraulic parameters had substantial effects on total freshwater discharge and the distribution of direct ground-water discharge and ground-water-derived surface-water (streamflow) discharge to the salt ponds, but still provided a reasonable match to the hydrologic data available for model calibration. To reduce the uncertainty in predictions of watershed areas and ground-water discharge to the salt ponds, additional hydrogeologic data would be required to constrain the model input parameters that have the greatest effect on the simulation results.

Masterson, John P.; Sorenson, Jason R.; Stone, Janet R.; Moran, S. Bradley; Hougham, Andrea

2007-01-01

168

Local tsunami early warning: the case of Rhodes island, Greece, and the NEARTOWARN (EU-DG ECHO) prevention project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Local, that is near-field, tsunamis occur in the global ocean including the Mediterranean Sea and its connected seas. For such tsunamis the first wave has very short travel time of arrival (less than 30 min.) to the closest coastal zone thus making the early warning a very difficult task. An efficient, end-to-end early tsunami warning system in local conditions should fulfill the condition that the time needed for the earthquake detection, plus the time needed for the warning message transmission to the authorities and afterwards to the general public and/or other task groups, plus the time needed for response and real evacuation is less than the travel time of the first wave. In the physiographic conditions of the Mediterranean Sea it is extremely hard to satisfy such a condition unless the total time needed to response in early warning is drastically minimized. The project Near-Field Tsunami Warning and Emergency Planning (NEARTOWARN, which is supported by the EU DG-ECHO prevention programme, aims, among others, to establish a system in Rhodes island, Greece, with the purpose to meet needs for local early tsunami warning. To minimize the time for emergency in less than 30 sec, seismic alert devices (SED's) make the core component of the system. SED's are activated and send alerting signals as soon as a P-phase of seismic wave is detected in the near-field but for a predetermined threshold of ground motion. Then, emergency starts while SED's activate remotely other devices, such as computers with data bases of pre-calculated tsunami simulations, surveillance cameras etc. The system is completed with tide-gauges, simulated tsunami scenarios and emergency planning supported by a Geographical Management System. Rhodes island in Dodecanese, South Aegean Sea, Greece, has been selected as a test-area for the development of the prototype system given that it was hit by large tsunamigenic earthquakes several times in the past.

Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Argyris, Ilias; Fokaefs, Anna

2013-04-01

169

Debunking the Myths: An Evaluation of Opposition to the Arming of Campus Law Enforcement Officers in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In March 2010, a committee formed by the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education recommended the arming of police officers at the state's three institutions of higher learning. The issue of arming campus police personnel is one fraught with political, philosophical, social, perceptual, and personal tensions, yet it is crucial to the…

Wilson, Charles P.; Wilson, Shirley A.

2011-01-01

170

Estimated Water Use and Availability in the Pawtuxet and Quinebaug River Basins, Rhode Island, 1995-99.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A drought in 1999, and an investigation was needed to assess demands on the hydrologic system from withdrawals during periods of little to no precipitation. The low water levels during the drought prompted the U.S. Geological Survey and the Rhode Island W...

E. C. Wild M. T. Nimiroski

2006-01-01

171

Ground-water flow and contaminant transport at a radioactive-materials processing site, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Liquid wastes from an enriched-uranium cold-scrap recovery plant at Wood River Junction, Rhode Island, were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds and trenches from 1966 through 1980. Leakage from the ponds and trenches resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water extending northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin.

Ryan, Barbara J.; Kipp, Kenneth L., Jr.

1997-01-01

172

Energy Conservation Measures for the Charles E. Shea Senior High School, Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Public Service Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a study of energy conservation opportunities in a Rhode Island high school. With the aid of an infrared camera system, researchers documented heat losses that were not evident to the naked eye. Each infrared thermogram obtained showed one or more types of heat loss and identified the specific sections of the building where the…

New England Innovation Group, Providence, RI.

173

The Campus Visit Experience: Improving Student Recruitment at the University of Rhode Island. Report of the Admissions Advisory Committee  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this report was to identify best practices in the design of college and university admissions facilities with the goal of enhancing recruitment and yield of prospective students. The Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island conducted a literature review examining the importance of the campus visit experience…

Online Submission, 2011

2011-01-01

174

Measured Mercury Contamination in Freshwater Fish in Rhode Island Compared with Predictions From a Regional Environmental Mercury Model  

EPA Science Inventory

Edible tissue of largemouth bass collected at 29 freshwater sites across the variable landscape of Rhode Island, USA showed a 27 fold range in total mercury concentrations [Hg], from 0.04 to 1.0 ppm (wet). Twenty-one variables, including water quality data and geographic informat...

175

Small Group Health Insurance Reform in Rhode Island: Promises and Pitfalls of the HEALTHpact Plan  

PubMed Central

Objective This study analyzes what design elements inhibited enrollment in HEALTHpact. Study Setting HEALTHpact is a high deductible plan with a premium capped at 10 percent of the average Rhode Island wage. Deductibles are reduced if enrollees meet wellness criteria. Study Design Qualitative case study. Data Collection Archival documents and 23 interviews. Principal Findings Inclusion of a subsidy would have led to lower premiums and more generous coverage. Although priced lower than other plans, HEALTHpact still did not offer good value for most firms. Wellness incentives also were too complex. Conclusions Subsidies for purchase of insurance coverage are critical to national reform of the small group market. Designers also will need to carefully balance program complexity with innovation in encouraging wellness and product appeal.

Alan Miller, Edward; Trivedi, Amal; Kuo, Sylvia; Mor, Vincent

2011-01-01

176

The conversion of the 2 MW reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center  

SciTech Connect

The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more U-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with a desire to upgrade the characteristics and capability of the reactor, have resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor have been neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents and opportunity to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper presents the current conclusions of both aspects. 2 refs., 9 figs.

DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Spring, E.F. (Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center; Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center)

1989-01-01

177

Reporting of Real Time River Levels in Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction In times of floods and droughts, immediate access to river level data is important to officials charged with the responsibilities of protecting lives and property by taking actions to diminish the adverse effects of the emergency. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with many Federal, State, and local agencies, is the Nation's principal collector of accurate and unbiased streamflow data, and thus is the agency emergency officials rely on to provide the needed river data. The USGS operates and maintains more than 7,000 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations on rivers in the United States; 84 of these stations are in Massachusetts and Rhode Island (see fig. 1). The river levels are recorded every 15 minutes at most of the stations; the river level data are then converted to streamflow data. Recorders equipped with telemetry (satellite radios or telephone modems) can provide almost immediate access to vital river levels.

Gadoury, Russell A.

1997-01-01

178

Water resources data for Massachusetts and Rhode Island, water year 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report includes records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; contents and elevation of lakes and ponds; and water levels of ground-water wells. This volume contains discharge records for 112 gaging stations; stage records for 2 gaging stations; stage records for 2 ponds; month-end contents of 1 reservoir; precipitation totals at 6 gaging stations; water quality for 21 gaging stations; air temperature at 2 climatological stations; and water levels for 131 observation wells. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 1 and 2. Hydrologic data were collected at many sites that were not involved in the systematic data-collection program; these data are published as miscellaneous discharge measurements, miscellaneous surface-water-quality, and miscellaneous ground-water-quality data. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Socolow, R. S.; Comeau, L.Y.; Murino, Domenic, Jr.

2005-01-01

179

Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Soderberg, N. K.

2009-01-01

180

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 93-0751-2408, Providence Ambulatory Health Care Foundation, Inc., Fox Point Health Care Center, Providence, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the Providence Ambulatory Health Care Foundation, an evaluation of the ventilation system at the Fox Point Health Care Center (SIC-8011), Providence, Rhode Island was conducted. The clinic served a population considered to ha...

N. C. Burton D. Sylvain

1994-01-01

181

The Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART): A New Statewide Autism Collaborative.  

PubMed

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by core deficits in social interaction, language and repetitive behaviors. The need for services is rising sharply as the number of children identified with autism increases. The Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment (RI-CART) was founded in 2009 with the goal of increasing communication among autism researchers throughout the state and improving treatment for children with autism. RI-CART members have several exciting projects in progress, with its larger aim being the creation of a statewide research registry. A statewide registry would benefit research in Rhode Island and allow for larger collaborations nationally. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-05.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24791265

Gerber, Alan; Morrow, Eric; Sheinkopf, Stephen; Anders, Thomas

2014-01-01

182

Notes from the field: increase in fentanyl-related overdose deaths - rhode island, november 2013-march 2014.  

PubMed

During November 2013-March 2014, twice as many all-intent drug overdose deaths were reported in Rhode Island as were reported during the same period in previous years. Most deaths were among injection-drug users, and a large percentage involved fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is 50-100 times more potent than morphine. Clusters of fentanyl-related deaths have been reported recently in several states. From April 2005 to March 2007, time-limited active surveillance from CDC and the Drug Enforcement Administration identified 1,013 deaths caused by illicit fentanyl use in New Jersey; Maryland; Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Michigan; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acetyl fentanyl, an illegally produced fentanyl analog, caused a cluster of overdose deaths in northern Rhode Island in 2013. PMID:24941333

Mercado-Crespo, Melissa C; Sumner, Steven A; Spelke, M Bridget; Sugerman, David E; Stanley, Christina

2014-06-20

183

Effects of Water-Management Strategies on Water Resources in the Pawcatuck River Basin, Southwestern Rhode Island and Southeastern Connecticut  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pawcatuck River Basin in southwestern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut is an important high-quality water resource for domestic and public supplies, irrigation, recreation, and the aquatic ecosystem. Concerns about the effects of water withdrawals on aquatic habitat in the basin have prompted local, State, and Federal agencies to explore water-management strategies that minimize the effects of withdrawals on the aquatic habitat. As part of this process, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Rhode Island Water Resources Board completed a study to assess the effects of current (2000-04) and potential water withdrawals on streamflows and groundwater levels using hydrologic simulation models developed for the basin. The major findings of the model simulations are: *Moving highly variable seasonal irrigation withdrawals from streams to groundwater wells away from streams reduces short-term fluctuations in streamflow and increases streamflow in the summer when flows are lowest. This occurs because of the inherent time lag between when water is withdrawn from the aquifer and when it affects streamflow. *A pumped well in the vicinity of small streams indicates that if withdrawals exceed available streamflow, groundwater levels drop substantially as a consequence of water lost from aquifer storage, which may reduce the time wetlands and vernal pools are saturated, affecting the animal and plant life that depend on these habitats. *The effects of pumping on water resources such as ponds, streams, and wetlands can be minimized by relocating pumping wells, implementing seasonal pumping schemes that utilize different wells and pumping rates, or both. *The effects of projected land-use change, mostly from forest to low- and medium density housing, indicate only minor changes in streamflow at the subbasin scale examined; however, at a local scale, high flows could increase, and low flows could decrease as a result of increased impervious area. In some instances, low flows could increase slightly as a result of decreased evapotranspiration from the loss of deeprooted vegetation (forest) associated with development. *In some subbasins where large areas of agricultural lands were converted to low- and medium-density housing, low flows increase because the consumptive domestic water use was projected to be less than consumptive agricultural water use. All agricultural water use was for irrigation purposes and was assumed to be lost from the basin through evapotranspiration.

Breault, Robert F.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Bent, Gardner C.; Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.; Scherer, J. Eric; Crawley, Kathleen M.

2009-01-01

184

Characteristics of softwater streams in Rhode Island. III. Distribution of macrophytic vegetation in a small drainage basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wood River watershed, a small well-defined drainage basin in Rhode Island was monitored seasonally for all macrophytic\\u000a vegetation and various physical variables. Twenty-four segments, 20 m in length were sampled. Mean stream depth, width and\\u000a current velocity increased by 3 to 8 fold from 1st- to 4th-order segments. Light penetration was positively correlated with\\u000a the above variables (p <

Robert G. Sheath; JoAnn M. Burkholder; Julie A. Hambrook; Amy M. Hogeland; Elizabeth Hoy; Michael E. Kane; Mary O. Morison; Alan D. Steinman; Kathryn L. Van Alstyne

1986-01-01

185

Using risk-based analysis and geographic information systems to assess flooding problems in an urban watershed in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

This article provides an overview of the use of risk-based analysis (RBA) in flood damage assessment, and it illustrates the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in identifying flood-prone areas, which can aid in flood-mitigation planning assistance. We use RBA to calculate expected annual flood damages in an urban watershed in the state of Rhode Island, USA. The method accounts for the uncertainty in the three primary relationships used in computing flood damage: (1) the probability that a given flood will produce a given amount of floodwater, (2) the probability that a given amount of floodwater will reach a certain stage or height, and (3) the probability that a certain stage of floodwater will produce a given amount of damage. A greater than 50% increase in expected annual flood damage is estimated for the future if previous development patterns continue and flood-mitigation measures are not taken. GIS is then used to create a map that shows where and how often floods might occur in the future, which can help (1) identify priority areas for flood-mitigation planning assistance and (2) disseminate information to public officials and other decision-makers. PMID:17318700

Hardmeyer, Kent; Spencer, Michael A

2007-04-01

186

Using Risk-Based Analysis and Geographic Information Systems to Assess Flooding Problems in an Urban Watershed in Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article provides an overview of the use of risk-based analysis (RBA) in flood damage assessment, and it illustrates the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in identifying flood-prone areas, which can aid in flood-mitigation planning assistance. We use RBA to calculate expected annual flood damages in an urban watershed in the state of Rhode Island, USA. The method accounts for the uncertainty in the three primary relationships used in computing flood damage: (1) the probability that a given flood will produce a given amount of floodwater, (2) the probability that a given amount of floodwater will reach a certain stage or height, and (3) the probability that a certain stage of floodwater will produce a given amount of damage. A greater than 50% increase in expected annual flood damage is estimated for the future if previous development patterns continue and flood-mitigation measures are not taken. GIS is then used to create a map that shows where and how often floods might occur in the future, which can help (1) identify priority areas for flood-mitigation planning assistance and (2) disseminate information to public officials and other decision-makers.

Hardmeyer, Kent; Spencer, Michael A.

2007-04-01

187

Cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey's stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report documents the results of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey 's continuous-record stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 91 gaging stations being operated in Massachusetts are being operated to provide data for two special purpose hydrologic studies, and they are planned to be discontinued at the conclusion of the studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed on 63 continuous-record gaging stations in Massachusetts and 15 stations in Rhode Island, at budgets of $353,000 and $60,500, respectively. Current operations policies result in average standard errors per station of 12.3% in Massachusetts and 9.7% in Rhode Island. Minimum possible budgets to maintain the present numbers of gaging stations in the two States are estimated to be $340,000 and $59,000, with average errors per station of 12.8% and 10.0%, respectively. If the present budget levels were doubled, average standards errors per station would decrease to 8.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Further budget increases would not improve the standard errors significantly. (USGS)

Gadoury, R. A.; Smath, J. A.; Fontaine, R. A.

1985-01-01

188

Access to and Use of Asthma Health Services Among Latino Children: The Rhode Island-Puerto Rico Asthma Center Study  

PubMed Central

This study determines asthma-related health care access and utilization patterns for Latino children of Puerto Rican and Dominican origin residing in Rhode Island (RI) and Latino children residing in Puerto Rico (Island). Data included 804 families of children with persistent asthma recruited from clinics. Island children were less likely to receive regular asthma care and care from a consistent provider and more likely to have been to the emergency department and hospitalized for asthma than RI children. Island children were 2.33 times more likely to have used the emergency department for asthma compared with RI non-Latino White (NLW) children. Latino children residing in both Island and RI were less likely to have used specialty care and more likely to have had a physician visit for asthma in the past year than RI NLW children. The differences might reflect the effects of the different delivery systems on pediatric health care utilization and asthma management.

Jandasek, Barbara; Ortega, Alexander N.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Fritz, Gregory K.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B.; Canino, Glorisa

2012-01-01

189

Access to and use of asthma health services among Latino children: the Rhode Island-Puerto Rico asthma center study.  

PubMed

This study determines asthma-related health care access and utilization patterns for Latino children of Puerto Rican and Dominican origin residing in Rhode Island (RI) and Latino children residing in Puerto Rico (Island). Data included 804 families of children with persistent asthma recruited from clinics. Island children were less likely to receive regular asthma care and care from a consistent provider and more likely to have been to the emergency department and hospitalized for asthma than RI children. Island children were 2.33 times more likely to have used the emergency department for asthma compared with RI non-Latino White (NLW) children. Latino children residing in both Island and RI were less likely to have used specialty care and more likely to have had a physician visit for asthma in the past year than RI NLW children. The differences might reflect the effects of the different delivery systems on pediatric health care utilization and asthma management. PMID:21536604

Jandasek, Barbara; Ortega, Alexander N; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Fritz, Gregory K; Kopel, Sheryl J; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B; Canino, Glorisa

2011-12-01

190

Integrated Assessment of Behavioral and Environmental Risk Factors for Lyme Disease Infection on Block Island, Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject’s age and the density of shrub edges on the subject’s property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject’s age, shrub edge density (increase risk) and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk). Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections.

Krause, Peter J.; Niccolai, Linda; Steeves, Tanner; O'Keefe, Corrine Folsom; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

2014-01-01

191

HCV among The Miriam Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital Adult ED Patients.  

PubMed

The Emergency Department (ED) appears to be an ideal place to conduct hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of prior HCV test positivity among adult (18-64 year-old) patients at The Miriam Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital EDs, as well as the undiagnosed HCV antibody seroprevalence among patients with any self-reported injection or non-injection drug use who agreed to undergo rapid HCV antibody testing. The prevalence of prior HCV test positivity among 8,500 adult ED patients was approximately 4.6%, and the previously undiagnosed HCV antibody seroprevalence among 621 drug-using adult ED patients was 1.6%. Among the ten ED patients with a positive rapid HCV antibody test not previously diagnosed, eight were born after 1965 and six never had injected drugs. If current HCV screening recommendations were followed exclusively in this setting, this practice would have missed half of those with a positive rapid HCV antibody test. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:24983020

Merchant, Roland C; Baird, Janette R; Liu, Tao; Taylor, Lynn E

2014-01-01

192

Evaluation of Possible Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Survey of Rhode Island Physicians  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with undiagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are often evaluated initially by primary care physicians (PCPs). Despite the frequency with which PCPs evaluate chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea, little is known about how they approach these symptoms. Objectives To determine the diagnostic practices and referral patterns of PCPs when confronting a patient with potential IBD. Methods We conducted a mail survey of PCPs practicing in Rhode Island. Clinical vignettes describing patients with chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea were presented. Respondents were asked to indicate how they would evaluate these scenarios and when they would refer to a specialist. Results 432 PCPs were surveyed; 35.6% responded. Wide variation in PCPs’ definitions of chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea was found, with only 26% and 51 % of physicians, respectively, defining these symptoms to be chronic per standard definitions. Laboratory testing was found to vary significantly with practice type (p<0.01 for 2 patient groups). Patient age influenced the ordering of diagnostic imaging (p<0.0001), while patient gender did not. Conclusions There is significant variability among PCPs in the threshold after which common gastrointestinal symptoms become chronic as well as in their diagnostic evaluation of these symptoms. This variability may lead to a lag in the diagnosis of IBD and influence patient outcomes.

Saha, Sumona; Lam, Manuel; Roberson, Erica; Shah, Samir; LeLeiko, Neal S.; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Bright, Renee; Flowers, Nicole; Merrick, Marjorie

2013-01-01

193

The Changing Face of HIV in Pregnancy in Rhode Island 2004-2009  

PubMed Central

Meeting the needs of HIV-infected pregnant women requires understanding their backgrounds and potential barriers to care and safe pregnancy. Foreign-born women are more likely to have language, educational, and economic barriers to care, but may be even more likely to choose to keep a pregnancy. Data from HIV-infected pregnant women and their children in Rhode Island were analyzed to identify trends in demographics, viral control, terminations, miscarriages, timing of diagnosis, and adherence to followup. Between January 2004 and December 2009, 76 HIV-infected women became pregnant, with a total of 95 pregnancies. Seventy-nine percent of the women knew their HIV status prior to becoming pregnant. Fifty-four percent of the women were foreign-born and 38 percent of the 16 women who chose to terminate their pregnancies were foreign-born. While the number of HIV-infected women becoming pregnant has increased only slightly, the proportion that are foreign-born has been rising, from 41 percent between 2004 and 2005 to 57.5 percent between 2006 and 2009. A growing number of women are having multiple pregnancies after their HIV diagnosis, due to the strength of their desire for childbearing and the perception that HIV is a controllable illness that does not preclude the creation of a family.

Firth, Jacqueline; Wang, Chia-Ching; Gillani, Fizza; Alexander, Nicole; Dufort, Elizabeth; Rana, Aadia; Cu-Uvin, Susan

2012-01-01

194

Fiscal Year 1987 program report: Rhode Island Water Resource Research Center  

SciTech Connect

The 1987 program objective was to conduct studies and research of value to the New England region as well as to assist in the solution of problems in the State of Rhode Island. Current and anticipated state and regional-water problems are contamination of surface and groundwater by natural radioactivity such as radon, by chemicals from industrial and agricultural activities, septic tank and leach field, improperly managed landfills and the lack of public awareness and public participation in water-quality protection and management. It was found in the 1987 program that an epithermal neutron-activation analysis was best suitable for measuring uranium and thorium of which radon is the decayed product. Lower U and Th were found in calc-alkalic and mafic volcanic rocks while higher concentrations were found in the alkalic and peraluminous rocks. A computer model using finite-element method to simulate fluid flows through fractured porous media was developed for predicting the extent of ground-water contamination in the State.

Poon, P.C.

1988-07-01

195

Health-Hazard Evaluation report HETA 84-496-1766, Applied Plastics, Slocum, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the owners of Applied Plastics, Inc. (SIC-3079), Slocum, Rhode Island, an investigation was made of possible cases of polymer fume fever among workers complaining of fever, chills, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea, musculoskeletal pain and headache. Urinary fluoride levels measured in preshift samples ranged from 0.3 milligrams/gram (mg/g) to 1.5 mg/g and from 0.2 mg/g to 1.0 mg/g in postshift samples. Breathing-zone samples showed low levels of toluene and most had a trace amount of hexane equivalents. All levels of toxic substances were well below permissible exposure limits. The authors conclude that even though the environmental and medical studies did not demonstrate high exposure levels or absorption of fumes, workers did demonstrate sometimes incapacitating symptoms of polymer fume fever. Based on this, the authors recommend changes in work practices, improved ventilation, closer attention to no smoking policies, and improved personal hygiene.

Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Stoekel, M.; Durand, J.M.

1987-01-01

196

Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

1987-01-01

197

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-346-2030, Graphic Creations, Inc. , Warren, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the management of Graphic Creations, Inc., Warren, Rhode Island, an evaluation was made of employee exposures to hydroquinone and printing press cleaning solvents which contained benzene. The printing process involves photographic art work producing a negative, making a plate, exposing the plate in an exposure frame, and installing the plate on the press. The only ventilation was an air conditioning unit installed in 1972. The evaluation results indicated exposures to isopropyl-alcohol concentrations ranging from nondetectable to 31.4mg/m3, naphtha from 81.74 to 914.8mg/m3, and 2-butoxyethanol from nondetectable to 2.56mg/m3. Personal breathing zone exposures to benzene were observed to range from 0.98 to 1.0 parts per million. Hydroquinone was not detected. The author concludes that a health hazard did exist for employees exposed to naphtha, benzene and 2-butoxyethanol. The author recommends measures to minimize these exposures.

Kaiser, E.A.; McManus, K.P.

1990-04-01

198

Distribution of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) in residential lawns on Prudence Island, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of nymphal Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in residential lawns was assessed by flagging on Prudence Island, RI. The number of ticks per sample was five times greater in lawns adjacent to woods than in lawns adjacent to other lawns. Relative tick abundance was negatively correlated with distance from the woods, but the decline was gradual. Spirochete prevalence in ticks did not differ among lawn types or at different distances from the woods. Therefore, barriers that keep people away from the wood edge probably lower the risk of acquiring Lyme disease, but there is still a risk. Even with physical barriers at lawn-wood edges, personal precautions to prevent tick bites should be followed.

Carroll, M. C.; Ginsberg, H. S.; Hyland, K. E.

1992-01-01

199

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01

200

Importance of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in the nitrogen dynamics and ecology of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

Denitrification (N/sub 2/ flux) measurements were made in sediment cores collected from three stations in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during various times throughout a year. Denitrification rates ranged from approximately 10 ..mu..g-at m/sup -2/ h/sup -1/ at 2/sup 0/C in sediments from the relatively polluted site in the Providence River area to 115 ..mu..g-at m/sup -2/ h/sup -1/ in October collected sediments (15/sup 0/C) from both the Providence River and Offshore sites. The amount of nitrogen involved in denitrification in Narragansett Bay sediments accounts for approximately 35% of the organic nitrogen being remineralized in the sediments. The rest is being returned to the water column as NH/sub 4//sup +/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NO/sub 2//sup -/. Denitrification represents a major sink for fixed nitrogen in the Bay, since annually N/sub 2/ production is equal to approximately 50% of the fixed inorganic nitrogen loading to the Bay. This loss of a major portion of the nitrogen loading as N/sub 2/ during the benthic remineralization of organic matter in coastal sediments may be an important sink in the global marine nitrogen budget. Narragansett Bay sediments are also a source of nitrous oxide. Rates of N/sub 2/O production ranged from 20 to over 900 nmol m/sup -2/ h/sup -1/. Higher N/sub 2/O production rates were measured from polluted sediments compared to relatively unpolluted sediments, indicating that cultural eutrophication of coastal areas may result in increased global production of this gas which is involved in stratospheric ozone destruction.

Seitzinger, S.P.

1982-01-01

201

Ground water input to coastal salt ponds of southern Rhode Island estimated using 226Ra as a tracer.  

PubMed

The naturally occurring radionuclide 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 years) was used as a tracer to determine ground water input to Point Judith, Potter, Green Hill and Ninigret ponds in southern Rhode Island. Measurements of 226Ra activity were made in samples collected from salt ponds, pore waters, sediments, and local ground water wells during June-August, 1997. These results were combined with a simple box model to derive ground water input fluxes of 0.1-0.3 cm3 cm-2 d-1 (2-5 x 10(7) L d-1), which are comparable to previous estimates of ground water input to these ponds. PMID:11379069

Scott, M K; Moran, S B

2001-01-01

202

Concentrations and source apportionment of PM10 and associated major and trace elements in the Rhodes Island, Greece.  

PubMed

Ambient concentrations of PM(10) and associated major and trace elements were measured over the cold and the warm season of 2007 at two sites located in the Rhodes Island (Greece), in Eastern Mediterranean, aimed at source apportionment by Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor modeling. Source chemical profiles, necessary in CMB modeling, were obtained for a variety of emission sources that could possibly affect the study area, including sea spray, geological material, soot emissions from the nearby oil-fuelled thermal power plant, and other anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular traffic, residential oil combustion, wood burning, and uncontrolled open-air burning of agricultural biomass and municipal waste. Source apportionment of PM(10) and elemental components was carried out by employing an advanced CMB version, the Robotic Chemical Mass Balance model (RCMB). Vehicular emissions were found to be major PM(10) contributor accounting, on average, for 36.8% and 31.7% during the cold period, and for 40.9% and 39.2% in the warm period at the two sites, respectively. The second largest source of ambient PM(10), with minor seasonal variation, was secondary sulfates (mainly ammonium and calcium sulfates), with total average contribution around 16.5% and 18% at the two sites. Soil dust was also a remarkable source contributing around 22% in the warm period, whereas only around 10% in the cold season. Soot emitted from the thermal power plant was found to be negligible contributor to ambient PM(10) (<1%), however it appeared to appreciably contribute to the ambient V and Ni (11.3% and 5.1%, respectively) at one of the sites during the warm period, when electricity production is intensified. Trajectory analysis did not indicate any transport of Sahara dust; on the contrary, long range transport of soil dust from arid continental regions of Minor Asia and of biomass burning aerosol from the countries surrounding the Black Sea was considered possible. PMID:22705902

Argyropoulos, Georgios; Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios; Samara, Constantini

2012-08-15

203

76 FR 40248 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure...from the States of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. These submittals...the submittals from Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, with one...

2011-07-08

204

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30

205

Maximum Stream Temperature Estimation from Air Temperature Data and its Relationship to Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) Habitat Requirements in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

A literature review of critical maximum stream temperatures for brook trout was made. In addition, various stream temperature models were examined in order to assess their value. Analysis of annual local air temperature records indicated a significant increase of about 2.66 degrees centigrade in data from the Kingston, Rhode Island weather station. No significant changes in the ground water levels

S. Saila; M. Cheeseman; D. Poyer

206

Resource Book for Teachers for Use With, "...Into Your Hands His Life and Liberty..." A Collection of Significant Cases from the Rhode Island Courts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for use with the student text, "Into Your Hands His Life and Liberty. A Collection of Significant Cases from the Rhode Island Courts," this teachers' guide presents activities, lesson strategies, related activities, court decisions, and additional questions. The cases, dating from Roger Williams to the 1970s, examine religious freedom,…

Leonard, Donald E.; Mattson, John O., Ed.

207

State of Rhode Island Department of Administration Office of Library and Information Services. Five-Year State Plan for the Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In preparation for its Five-Year Plan for the years 2008 through 2012, the Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services has reviewed a variety of information resources, including studies, publications, surveys and stakeholder meetings, to assist in understanding the state, its people, its future and the potential role of libraries. This…

Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services, 2008

2008-01-01

208

Departmental Web Sites: Best Practices for Improving Student Recruitment--A Report of the Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this report was to identify best practices in the design and content of college and university academic department Web sites that have been shown to enhance the recruitment of prospective students. The Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island conducted a literature review on the importance of college,…

Online Submission, 2010

2010-01-01

209

Water-Qualtiy Conditions and Relation to Drainage-Basin Characteristics in the Scituate Reservoir Basin, Rhode Island, 1982-95.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality conditions and relation to drainage-basin characteristics in the Scituate Reservoir drainage basin in Rhode Island between 1982 and 1995. The report presents a series of analyses of water-quality dat...

R. F. Breault M. C. Waldron L. K. Barlow D. C. Dickerman

2000-01-01

210

How State and Federal Accountability Policies Have Influenced Curriculum and Instruction in Three States: Common Findings from Rhode Island, Illinois, and Washington  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report takes an in-depth look at how classroom practices in Rhode Island, Illinois, and Washington State have been influenced by state accountability policies and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). It examines how teachers and administrators have responded to increased accountability and pressure to meet state standards. Drawing from case…

Srikantaiah, Deepa

2009-01-01

211

Chemical Technology at the Community College of Rhode Island: Curricular Approaches Designed To Reflect the Demands of a Diverse Population Entering Chemical Technology Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to provide nontraditional students with the same opportunity as traditional students to reach the highest level of skills and competencies associated with hi-tech, high-wage employment, the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) offers alternatives to its historically successful full-time day program in chemical technology.…

Hajian, Harry

212

An Overview of Education Outreach From the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Office of Marine Programs (OMP) at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) is a national leader in ocean science education and outreach. Current and planned efforts target grades K-16 and a variety of public audiences. Funding from a host of federal agencies, foundations, and industry has allowed OMP to serve as a bridge between its audiences and GSO scientists and graduate students for over 25 years. From museum exhibits to scientist /educator partnerships and interactive educational Internet sites, OMP projects cover a wide range of activities. Successes and lessons learned will be discussed, in particular with regard to engaging the scientific community in education and outreach. Implications for the impact on science education will be highlighted.

Scowcroft, G. A.

2003-12-01

213

A technique for estimating ground-water levels at sites in Rhode Island from observation-well data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimates of future high, median, and low ground- water levels are needed for engineering and architectural design decisions and for appropriate selection of land uses. For example, the failure of individual underground sewage-disposal systems due to high ground-water levels can be prevented if accurate water-level estimates are available. Estimates of extreme or average conditions are needed because short duration preconstruction obser- vations are unlikely to be adequately represen- tative. Water-level records for 40 U.S. Geological Survey observation wells in Rhode Island were used to describe and interpret water-level fluctuations. The maximum annual range of water levels average about 6 feet in sand and gravel and 11 feet in till. These data were used to develop equations for estimating future high, median, and low water levels on the basis of any one measurement at a site and records of water levels at observation wells used as indexes. The estimating technique relies on several assumptions about temporal and spatial variations: (1) Water levels will vary in the future as they have in the past, (2) Water levels fluctuate seasonally (3) Ground-water fluctuations are dependent on site geology, and (4) Water levels throughout Rhode Island are subject to similar precipitation and climate. Comparison of 6,697 estimates of high, median, and low water levels (depth to water level exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time, respectively) with the actual measured levels exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time at 14 sites unaffected by pumping and unknown reasons, yielded mean squared errors ranging from 0.34 to 1.53 square feet, 0.30 to 1.22 square feet, and 0.32 to 2.55 square feet, respectively. (USGS)

Socolow, Roy S.; Frimpter, Michael H.; Turtora, Michael; Bell, Richard W.

1994-01-01

214

Short Communication: Transmitted Drug Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology in Antiretroviral Naive HIV Type 1-Infected Patients in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Abstract Transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance has important clinical and epidemiological consequences including earlier treatment failure and forward transmission of resistance strains in high-risk groups. To evaluate the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island, we collected genotypic, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from treatment-naive individuals presenting to the largest outpatient HIV clinic in the state from January 2007 to November 2007. Sequences from 35 treatment-naive individuals were available, 83% of whom were men who had sex with men (MSM). All sequences were HIV-1 subtype B. Drug resistance mutations were identified in 7/35 [20%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08–0.37] patients, six of whom had K103N. Two phylogenetic transmission clusters were found, involving 17% (6/35) of individuals, three in each cluster. We did not find an association between belonging to a cluster and age, gender, AIDS-defining illness, CD4 cell count, or viral load. Drug resistance mutations were more commonly observed in transmission clusters (p?=?0.08). Individuals in one cluster all had K103N and were MSM who had attended local bathhouses. Individuals forming clusters were significantly more likely to have visited a bathhouse compared to nonclusters (p?=?0.02). The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island is high, further justifying genotypic testing on presentation to care and prior to treatment initiation. Molecular epidemiological analysis and association of resistance with phylogenetic networks using data obtained for clinical purposes may serve as useful tools for the prevention of drug resistance transmission and for contact tracing.

Tashima, Karen; Cartwright, Charles P.; Gillani, Fizza S.; Mintz, Orli; Zeller, Kimberly; Kantor, Rami

2011-01-01

215

Carabid beetle diversity and distribution in Boston Harbor Islands national park area (Coleoptera, Carabidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract As part of an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Boston Harbor Islands national park area, an inventory of carabid beetles on 13 islands was conducted. Intensive sampling on ten of the islands, using an assortment of passive traps and limited hand collecting, resulted in the capture of 6,194 specimens, comprising 128 species. Among these species were seven new state records for Massachusetts (Acupalpus nanellus, Amara aulica, Amara bifrons, Apenes lucidulus, Bradycellus tantillus, Harpalus rubripes and Laemostenus terricola terricola—the last also a new country record; in passing we report also new state records for Harpalus rubripes from New York and Pennsylvania, Amara ovata from Pennsylvania, and the first mainland New York records for Asaphidion curtum). For most islands, there was a clear relationship between species richness and island area. Two islands, however, Calf and Grape, had far more species than their relatively small size would predict. Freshwater marshes on these islands, along with a suite of hygrophilous species, suggested that habitat diversity plays an important role in island species richness. Introduced species (18) comprised 14.0% of the total observed species richness, compared to 5.5% (17 out of 306 species) documented for Rhode Island. We surmise that the higher proportion of introduced species on the islands is, in part, due to a higher proportion of disturbed and open habitats as well as high rates of human traffic. We predict that more active sampling in specialized habitats would bring the total carabid fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands closer to that of Rhode Island or eastern Massachusetts in richness and composition; however, isolation, human disturbance and traffic, and limited habitat diversity all contribute to reducing the species pool on the islands relative to that on the mainland.

Davidson, Robert L.; Rykken, Jessica; Farrell, Brian

2011-01-01

216

The Rhode Island ICU collaborative: a model for reducing central line-associated bloodstream infection and ventilator-associated pneumonia statewide  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundImplementing bundles of best practices has been shown to provide patients with recommended care and reduce medical errors. Rhode Island's (RI) hospital leaders, quality organisations and insurers discussed the results of a quality improvement initiative in Michigan, the Keystone project, and explored the possibility of replicating these results statewide in RI.DesignHospital executives and intensive care unit (ICU) staff, RI's quality

Vera A DePalo; Lynn McNicoll; Margaret Cornell; Jean Marie Rocha; Laura Adams; Peter J Pronovost

2010-01-01

217

State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles Rhode Island's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 435 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 440 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

Center on Education Policy, 2011

2011-01-01

218

Distribution of salinity in ground water from the interpretation of borehole-geophysical logs and salinity data, Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of salinity in ground water at Calf Pasture Point, a small coastal peninsula bounded by Narragansett Bay on the east and Allen Harbor on the west, in Davisville, Rhode Island, was interpreted from borehole-geophysical data and previously collected salinity data to help identify potential flowpaths of contaminated ground water to surface-water bodies. The surficial material at this 40-acre site, which ranges in thickness from about 30 to 85 feet, is composed of an upper sand unit, a silt unit, and a till unit overlying bedrock. Borehole-geophysical data indicate that fresh ground water is present in all surficial units in the northern and northwestern part of the site. In the central and eastern parts of the site, where most of the current land surface is composed of dredged fill placed in a small saltwater embayment, brackish and saline ground water predominate. Fresh ground water moving into this area from upgradient and recharge to this extended land surface from precipitation is diluting the saline groundwater in the upper sand and till units, and to a lesser extent in the silt unit. In this area, the freshwater-flow system is slowly expanding towards Narragansett Bay and the entrance channel to Allen Harbor.

Church, Peter E.; Brandon, William C.

1999-01-01

219

Biogeochemistry of Fatty Acids in Recent Sediments From Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fatty acid composition of sediments from Narragansett Bay show significant variation between certain areas of the Bay. Both the organic carbon and fatty acid concentrations decrease with increasing distance from the Providence River area - an area whi...

J. W. Farrington J. G. Quinn

1972-01-01

220

Water-quality assessment of the New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island : environmental settings and implications for water quality and aquatic biota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island constitute one of 59 study units selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. England Coastal Basins study unit encompasses the fresh surface waters and ground waters in a 23,000 square-mile area that drains to the Atlantic Ocean. Major basins include those of the Kennebec, Androscoggin, Saco, Merrimack, Charles, Blackstone, Taunton, and Pawcatuck Rivers. Defining the environmental setting of the study unit is the first step in designing and conducting a multi-disciplinary regional water-quality assessment. The report describes the natural and human factors that affect water quality in the basins and includes descriptions of the physiography, climate, geology, soils, surface- and ground-water hydrology, land use, and the aquatic ecosystem. Although surface-water quality has greatly improved over the past 30 years as a result of improved wastewater treatment at municipal and industrial wastewater facilities, a number of water-quality problems remain. Industrial and municipal wastewater discharges, combined sewer overflows, hydrologic modifications from dams and water diversions, and runoff from urban land use are the major causes of water-quality degradation in 1998. The most frequently detected contaminants in ground water in the study area are volatile organic compounds, petroleum-related products, nitrates, and chloride and sodium. Sources of these contaminants include leaking storage tanks, accidental spills, landfills, road salting, and septic systems and lagoons. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in fish tissue from streams and lakes throughout the study area.

Flanagan, Sarah M.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Robinson, Keith W.; Coles, James F.

1999-01-01

221

Preliminary study of sources and processes of enrichment of manganese in water from University of Rhode Island supply wells  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of dissolved manganese have increased from 0.0 to as much as 3.3 mg/liter over a period of years in closely spaced University of Rhode Island supply wells. The wells tap stratified glacial deposits and derive part of their water from infiltration from a nearby river-pond system. The principal sources of the manganese seem to be coatings of oxides and other forms of manganese on granular aquifer materials and organic-rich sediments on the bottom of the pond and river. Chemical analyses of water from an observation well screened from 3 to 5 feet below the pond bottom indicate that infiltration of water through organic-rich sediments on the pond bottom is the likely cause of manganese enrichment in the well supplies. After passing through the organic layer, the water contains concentrations of manganese as high as 1.2 mg/liter. Manganese in water in concentrations that do not cause unpleasant taste is not regarded to be toxicologically significant. However, concentrations in excess of a few tenths of a milligram per liter are undesirable in public supplies and in many industrial supplies. Brown and others (21970) note that waters containing manganese in concentrations less than 0.1 mg/liter seldom prove troublesome, but that those containing more than 0.5 mg/liter may form objectionable deposits on cooked food, laundry, and plumbing fixtures. The U.S. Public health Service (1962) recommends that the concentrations of manganese in drinking and culinary water not exceed 0.05 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

Silvey, William Dudley; Johnston, Herbert E.

1977-01-01

222

Age, sex, and road-use patterns of motor vehicular trauma in Rhode Island: A population-based hospital emergency department study  

SciTech Connect

Population-based hospital emergency department data on motor vehicle traffic trauma in Rhode Island, 1984-85, are analyzed by age, sex, and road-use status. Annualized rates of overall and severe trauma were 1,195 cases (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1,164, 1,225) and 102 cases (95% CI = 94, 111) per 100,000 population, respectively. Overall and severe rates peaked at ages 15-24 years. Male rate excesses were most pronounced for motorcycle and pedal cycle trauma.

Rockett, I.R.H.; Lieberman, E.S.; Hollinshead, W.H.; Putnam, S.L.; Thode, H.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA) Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (USA) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (USA))

1990-12-01

223

Effects of feeding different levels of cooked and sun dried fish offal on carcass traits of growing Rhode Island Red chicks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fourteen days old Rhode Island Red chicks were used to evaluate effects of processed fish offal (fishmeal) on DM intake (DMI),\\u000a body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR = DMI\\/BWG) and carcass traits. Ten chicks were assigned to each of 3 replicates\\u000a of 6 diets (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, containing 0, 3.32, 6.64, 9.96, 13.28 and 16.6%

Tegene Negesse; Asrat Tera

2010-01-01

224

Hydrogeology, water quality, and ground-water-development alternatives in the Upper Wood River Ground-Water Reservoir, Rhode Island. Water resources investigations  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the hydrogeology, water quality, and ground-water-development alternatives in the upper Wood River ground-water reservoir, Rhode Island. The report includes discussion of (1) recharge to and hydraulic properties of the stratified-drift aquifer, (2) stream-aquifer interconnection, (3) assessment of the quality of ground water and surface water, (4) input to and calibration of a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model, and (5) results of simulations of the effect of alternative ground-water-development schemes on ground-water levels and streamflow.

Dickerman, D.C.; Bell, R.W.

1993-12-31

225

STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTING AND RESTORING RHODE ISLAND'S WATERSHEDS ON MULTIPLE SCALES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Clean Water Act has traditionally preserved the quality and quantity of a region's water by focusing resources on areas with known or anticipated problems. USEPA Region 1 is taking the supplemental, longer-range approach of protecting areas of New England where natural resour...

226

Record of a tectonically-controlled regression captured by changes in carbonate skeletal associations on a structured island shelf (mid-Pleistocene, Rhodes, Greece)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Plio-Pleistocene warm-temperate carbonate deposits along the SE coast of Rhodes (Greece) formed on a highly structured island 'shelf' during a major transgression-regression cycle, which reached bathyal depth during maximal transgression. The complex palaeobathymetry exhibits many characteristics of submarine canyons, especially of so-called 'blind' or 'headless' canyons — a canyon type, which is especially common in the modern Mediterranean. This study presents the palaeoenvironmental evolution of one of these canyons, which is today represented by the Lardos valley, eastern central Rhodes. The studied section comprises the middle Pleistocene (900-300 ka) and describes a shallowing-upward trend from bathyal to circalitoral depth. Thin fossiliferous debris flow layers document turnovers and abundance changes in fauna and floral of hard-bottom communities, which developed on the adjacent basement slopes and highs. The comparison of the obtained results with other studies from the southeastern coast of Rhodes suggests a high degree of diachroneity of lithological boundaries of these Plio-Pleistocene deposits, which can be best explained by progressive infill of small depocentres located at different altitude levels. Hence, lithological changes are interpreted to be time-transgressive from distal (low altitude) to proximal (high altitude) during transgression while time-transgressive from proximal to distal during regression. Consequently, the best chronostratigraphic correlation horizon is the surface of maximal transgression. The most probable age for this surface could be estimated at 1.1 to 0.8 Ma, 0.2-0.5 Ma younger than previous estimates. Furthermore, the current lithostratigraphic schemes for the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of southeastern Rhodes are reviewed and revised.

Titschack, Jürgen; Joseph, Nina; Fietzke, Jan; Freiwald, André; Bromley, Richard G.

2013-01-01

227

COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS  

EPA Science Inventory

Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

228

LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, NAD RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem compo...

229

Island Research Natural Area: Guidebook Supplement 35.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This guidebook describes The Island Research Natural Area, an 84-ha (208-ac) tract established to represent examples of the western juniper/big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass (Juniperus occidentalis/Artemisia tridentata/Pseudoroegneria spicata), and the w...

R. Halvorson R. Schuller

2008-01-01

230

Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Common tern (Sterna hirundinae ) clutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

Custer, T. W.; Franson, J. C.; Moore, J. F.

1986-01-01

231

Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Common tern cIutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, .from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends .found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.; Myers, J.E.

1986-01-01

232

Imprint of the Past: Ecological History of Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island  

EPA Science Inventory

Because environmental problems are often caused by an accumulation of impacts over several decades or even centuries, it is necessary to look at the environmental history of an area to understand what happened, and why, before solutions can be devised. This case study of Greenwic...

233

Spanish-speaking Americans. Ethnic Heritage Studies Program of Rhode Island, Appendix C.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reading materials by Spanish-speaking Americans, which constitute curricular materials for secondary school and college ethnic studies programs, are presented. The selection includes five stories and a poem in Spanish and an essay and autobiographical narrative in English. The writers of the materials represent the following areas: Columbia,…

Navascues, Michael, Comp.

234

Imprint of the Past: Ecological History of Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Because environmental problems are often caused by an accumulation of impacts over several decades or even centuries, it is necessary to look at the environmental history of an area to understand what happened and why, before solutions can be devised. Thi...

C. E. Pesch E. J. Shumchenia M. A. Charpentier M. C. Pelletier

2012-01-01

235

The influence of suburban land use on habitat and biotic integrity of coastal Rhode Island streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian\\u000a vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our\\u000a watershed ecosystems. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between watershed land use and the integrity\\u000a of benthic invertebrate communities in

Suzanne M. Lussier; Sara N. da Silva; Michael Charpentier; James F. Heltshe; Susan M. Cormier; Donald J. Klemm; Marnita Chintala; Saro Jayaraman

2008-01-01

236

Potential for localized groundwater contamination in a porous pavement parking lot setting in Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The control of polluted surface runoff and the assessment of possible impacts on groundwater is a concern at the local and regional scale. On this background, a study investigates possible impacts of organic and inorganic pollutants (including bacteria) originating from a permeable asphalt parking lot on the water quality immediately beneath it. The functioning of the permeable pavement, including clogging and restricted vertical percolation, was also evaluated. Four nested sample ports (shallow and deep) were installed below low- and high-traffic areas, including one port outside the parking lot. At least initially there was a good hydraulic connection between the parking surface and the shallow sample ports. The presence of a geotextile layer at the base of the parking lot structure, however, was identified in lab tests as one factor restricting vertical percolation to the deeper ports. Clogging of the permeable surface was most pronounced in heavy traffic areas and below snow pile storage areas. Corroborated by high electric conductivity and chloride measurements, sand brought in by cars during winter was the principal cause for clogging. No bacteria or BOD were found in percolating water. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were present at concentrations near minimum detection limit. Nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) were being leached into the ground via the permeable parking lot surface at annual flux rates of 0.45 0.84 g/m2/year. A multi-species tracer test demonstrated a retention capacity of the permeable parking lot structure of >90% for metals and 27% for nutrients, respectively.

Boving, Thomas B.; Stolt, Mark H.; Augenstern, Janelle; Brosnan, Brian

2008-08-01

237

Patterns of health-related quality of life and patterns associated with health risks among Rhode Island adults  

PubMed Central

Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important consideration in assessing the impact of chronic disease on individuals as well as in populations. HRQOL is often assessed using multiple indicators. The authors sought to determine if multiple indicators of HRQOL could be used to characterize patterns of HRQOL in a population, and if so, to examine the association between such patterns and demographic, health risk and health condition covariates. Methods Data from Rhode Island's 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used for this analysis. The BRFSS is a population-based random-digit-dialed telephone survey of adults ages 18 and older. In 2004 RI's BRFSS interviewed 3,999 respondents. A latent class regression (LCR) model, using 9 BRFSS HRQOL indicators, was used to determine latent classes of HRQOL for RI adults and to model the relationship between latent class membership and covariates. Results RI adults were categorized into four latent classes of HRQOL. Class 1 (76%) was characterized by good physical and mental HRQOL; Class 2 (9%) was characterized as having physically related poor HRQOL; Class 3 (11%) was characterized as having mentally related poor HRQOL; and Class 4 (4%) as having both physically and mentally related poor HRQOL. Class 2 was associated with older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, or with having asthma or diabetes. Class 3 was associated with being female, current smoking, or having asthma or disability. Class 4 was associated with almost all the same predictors of Classes 2 and 3, i.e. older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, current smoking, with having asthma or diabetes, or with low income. Conclusion Using a LCR model, the authors found 4 distinct patterns of HRQOL among RI adults. The largest class was associated with good HRQOL; three smaller classes were associated with poor HRQOL. We identified the characteristics of subgroups at higher-risk for each of the three classes of poor HRQOL. Focusing interventions on the high-risk populations may be one approach to improving HRQOL in RI.

Jiang, Yongwen; Hesser, Jana Earl

2008-01-01

238

Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in selected river reaches in the Pawtuxet River Basin, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this event, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 56 river miles in the Pawtuxet River Basin to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) at specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled included the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Dry Brook, Meshanticut Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, Quidneck Brook, and two unnamed tributaries referred to as South Branch Pawtuxet River Tributary A1 and Tributary A2. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 using steady-state simulations. Updates to the models included incorporation of new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were assessed using high-water marks (HWMs) obtained in a related study following the March– April 2010 flood and the simulated water levels at the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP), which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the basin. HWMs were obtained at 110 sites along the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, and Quidneck Brook. Differences between the 2010 HWM elevations and the simulated 0.2-percent AEP WSEs from flood insurance studies (FISs) and the updated models developed in this study varied with most differences attributed to the magnitude of the 0.2-percent AEP flows. WSEs from the updated models generally are in closer agreement with the observed 2010 HWMs than with the FIS WSEs. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to observed 2010 HWMs provides a measure of the hydraulic model performance, which indicates the updated models better represent flooding at other AEPs than the existing FIS models.

Zarriello, Phillip J.; Olson, Scott A.; Flynn, Robert H.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

2014-01-01

239

Songbird diversity along an urban powerline right-of-way in Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential of powerline rights-of-way to provide songbird habitat in an urbanizing environment was assessed over a 7-month.period. Comparisons of species richness and total number of birds observed were made with a nearby residential development. The right-of-way, for 7 years free from herbicide manipulation, exhibited a greater number of species (but fewer individuals) and higher bird species diversity (BSD) than the residential area. The importance of mixed-shrub communities for the provision of niches for songbirds was demonstrated by increased BSD in residential vacant lots and sections of the right-of-way containing a variety of vegetative profiles. Recommendations are presented on right-of-way vegetation management to enhance songbird utilization.

Geibert, Edward H.

1980-05-01

240

Natural and human causes of a flash flood in a small catchment (Rhodes Island, Greece) based on atmospheric forcing and runoff modeling techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the natural (hydro-meteorological and geomorphological) and human induced factors responsible for a flash flood event that occurred on November 22nd, 2013 in a small ungauged catchment (covering an area of about 24km2) of Rhodes Island, Greece. The flash flooding killed four people and caused over â¬10 million worth of damages located mainly around the Kremasti village. In this study the reconstruction of this extreme hydro-meteorological event is attempted by using detailed spatiotemporal rainfall information, a physically based hydrological model (LISEM) and the 1D hydraulic model HEC-RAS. Furthermore, the human impacts, which are responsible for extreme flood discharge within the drainage basin, are recorded and mapped. The major meteorological feature of this event is associated with the passage of a cold front over SE Aegean Sea. The destructive flash flood was triggered by the extreme precipitation (almost 100 mm in 4 hours was recorded at the meteorological stations closest to the flooded area). An advanced nowcasting method is applied in order to provide high spatiotemporal distribution of the precipitation over the catchment area. OpenLisem (Limbourg Soil Erosion Model) is used as a runoff model for exploring the response of the catchment. It is a freeware raster model (based on PCRaster) that simulates the surface water and sediment balance for every gridcell. It is event based and has fine spatial and temporal resolution. The model is designed to simulate the effects of detailed land use changes or conservation measures on runoff, flooding and erosion during heavy rainstorms. Since OpenLISEM provides a detailed simulation of runoff processes, it is very demanding on input data (it requires a minimum of 24 maps depending on the input options). The PCRaster GIS functionality was used to derive the necessary data from the basic maps (DEM, land unit map and map of impermeable areas). The sources for the basic maps include geological, hydrogeological, and land-cover maps, as well as recent detailed orthophotomaps. After the hydrograph was derived from OpenLISEM, the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is employed in order to route it through the Kremasti stream channel. This procedure served as a model validation since it provided the ability to compare the models' results against the 'high water' marks on the bridge and discuss issues such as surface roughness coefficient.

Karalis, Sotirios; Katsafados, Petros; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Tsanakas, Konstantinos; Valkanou, Kanella

2014-05-01

241

Economic Impact of Block Island Race Week.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Block Island, an area of 11 square miles lies 15 miles off the Rhode Island Coast. Biennially since 1965, the Storm Trysail Club of New York has sponsored a week of yacht races at Block Island. The event, which takes place in the third week of June, comes...

J. F. Farrell

1973-01-01

242

Implementation of routine HIV testing in an acute care hospital in Rhode Island: a nurse-initiated opt-out pilot project.  

PubMed

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expanded HIV screening of adults ages 13-64 years in 2006 from risk based to routine. Early detection and treatment improve patient outcomes and prevent disease transmission. This article describes a pilot program in which nurses in an adult inpatient unit at an acute care hospital offer HIV testing to all patients ages 18-64 upon admission through standing orders. The pilot, Standing Orders for Routine Testing (SORT), is a response to changes in state law and regulations in the majority of states including Rhode Island, which have occurred following the CDC policy change. The SORT pilot involves collaboration with interdisciplinary partners and education of unit nurses. PMID:23270811

Costello, Joanne F; Sliney, Anne; MacLeod, Cindy; Carpentier, Michelle; Garofalo, Rebecca; Flanigan, Timothy

2013-01-01

243

50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas E Appendix E to Part 622...622, App. E Appendix E to Part 622âCaribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas Table 1 of...

2013-10-01

244

Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island: Implications for Phytoplankton in Coastal Waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One indicator of health in estuarine and coastal ecosystems is the ability of local waters to transmit sunlight to planktonic, macrophytic, and other submerged vegetation for photosynthesis. The concentration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a primary factor affecting the absorption of incident sunlight in coastal and estuarine waters. In estuaries, CDOM concentrations vary due to changes in salinity gradients, inflows of industrial and domestic effluents, and the production of new dissolved organic matter from marine biologic activity. CDOM absorption data have been collected from a variety of waters. However, there are a limited number of measurements along the US east coast and a general lack of data from New England waters. This study characterized the temporal and spatial variability of CDOM absorption over an annual cycle in Narragansett Bay and Block Island Sound (Rhode Island). Results suggested that, in Narragansett Bay, the magnitude of CDOM absorption is related to the seasonal variability of freshwater input from surrounding watersheds and new CDOM production from in situ biologic activity. The data show that the average CDOM absorption coefficient at 412 nm was 0·45 m -1 and the average spectral slope was 0·020 nm -1.

Keith, D. J.; Yoder, J. A.; Freeman, S. A.

2002-11-01

245

33 CFR 334.1070 - San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted area. 334.1070 Section...334.1070 San Francisco Bay between Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island; naval restricted...

2013-07-01

246

Proposed Big Island Lakes Eastern Wilderness Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report concerns proposed legislation to establish the Big Island Lakes as a unit of the National Wilderness Preservation System, Hiawatha National Forest, Schoolcraft County, State of Michigan, under the provisions of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and 'T...

1973-01-01

247

Hydrostratigraphy of Tree Island Cores from Water Conservation Area 3  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cores and borehole-geophysical logs collected on and around two tree islands in Water Conservation Area 3 have been examined to develop a stratigraphic framework for these ecosystems. Especially important is the potential for the exchange of ground water and surface water within these features. The hydrostratigraphic results from this study document the lithologic nature of the foundation of the tree islands, the distribution of porous intervals, the potential for paleotopographic influence on their formation, and the importance of low-permeability, subaerial-exposure horizons on the vertical exchange of ground water and surface water. Figure 1. Location of Tree Islands 3AS3 and 3BS1. [larger image] Results from this hydrostratigraphic study indicate that subtle differences occur in lithofacies and topography between the on-island and off-island subsurface geologic records. Specifics are described herein. Firstly, at both tree-island sites, the top of the limestone bedrock is slightly elevated beneath the head of the tree islands relative to the off-island core sites and the tail of the tree islands, which suggests that bedrock 'highs' acted as 'seeds' for the development of the tree islands of this study and possibly many others. Secondly, examination of the recovered core and the caliper logs tentatively suggest that the elevated limestone beneath the tree islands may have a preferentially more porous framework relative to limestone beneath the adjacent areas, possibly providing a ground-water-to-surface-water connection that sustains the tree island system. Finally, because the elevation of the top of the limestone bedrock at the head of Tree Island 3AS3 is slightly higher than the surrounding upper surface of the peat, and because the wetland peats have a lower hydraulic conductivity than the limestone bedrock (Miami Limestone and Fort Thompson Formation), it is possible that there is a head difference between surface water of the wetlands and the ground water in underlying limestone bedrock.

McNeill, Donald F.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

2003-01-01

248

Health assessment for Davis GSR Landfill, Glocester, Rhode Island, Region 1. CERCLIS No. RID980731459. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Davis GSR Landfill (GSR) is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List. Preliminary on-site sampling results have demonstrated volatile organic compounds in ground water and surface water. The contaminants present in groundwater at this site are trichloroethylene, ethylbenzene, toluene, chloromethane, tetrahydrofuran, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 1,2 dichloroethane. GSR represents a potential public health concern to area residents. However, information available on this site is not currently adequate to determine if a public health concern exists to these residents. At a minimum, future investigations of this site should include a characterization of the site and site contaminants, and a characterization of the hydrogeology of the area.

Not Available

1989-04-10

249

Water Quality in the New England Coastal Basins, Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island 1999-2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains the major findings of a 1999?2001 assessment of water quality in the New England Coastal Basins. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the New England Coastal Basins summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from http://nh.water.usgs.gov/CurrentProjects/nawqa/nawqaweb.htm. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

Robinson, Keith W.; Flanagan, Sarah M.; Ayotte, Joseph D.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Chalmers, Ann; Coles, James F.; Cuffney, Thomas F.

2004-01-01

250

The Accountability Illusion: Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

2009-01-01

251

Rhode Island After 3PM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children--more than a quarter of children--are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their…

Afterschool Alliance, 2009

2009-01-01

252

33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...the former position of San Nicolas Island East End Light), which point...

2013-07-01

253

78 FR 67300 - Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas...restricted anchorage areas of San Nicolas Island, California. At the request of the United...the restricted anchorage at San Nicolas Island will accurately reflect the needs...

2013-11-12

254

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. ...980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area. ...of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island, Calif., extending about 3 miles...

2013-07-01

255

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO). Selected South Pacific Island Marine Areas. Volume 1. Area 1 - Nauru Island and Ocean Island, Area 2 - Gilbert Islands. Area 3 - Canton And Phoenix Islands. Area 4 - Christmas and Jarvis Islands, area 5 - Solomon Islands, NE. area 6 - Solomon Islands SW. area 7 - Funafuti Atoll. area 8 - Marquesas Islands.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1979-01-01

256

Economic Development Program, Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the study was to inventory land and buildings available for economic development, and to discover employment problems and opportunities within the city of Newport. The project has assisted a wide range of employers, from a mussels growing busi...

1978-01-01

257

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment...950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment...landing in the waters east of San Clemente Island. (2) All persons in the area...

2013-07-01

258

Long Island Sound area contingency plan. Change 3  

SciTech Connect

Contained in this revision are: Updated Marine Firefighting annex; Updated Hazardous Material response annex; Comprehensive update of resource phone numbers; Listing of State Historic Protection Officers (SHPO`s); Response techniques and listing of facilities which handle Group V Oils; and Substantial update to the Sensitive Areas on Long Island.

NONE

1998-12-31

259

Social survey of Three Mile Island area residents. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recognizing that there is concern among government officials, utility company officials, engineers, physical, social, and behavioral scientists, and the general public about the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident, the overall objective of this report is to examine how the accident affected TMI area residents. This final report is a detailed analysis and description of the summary results published

S. D. Brunn; J. H. Jr Johnson; D. J. Zeigler

1979-01-01

260

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas. 13.1178 Section...Restrictions § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other areas. The following are...approaching within 100 yards of South Marble Island; or Flapjack Island; or any of...

2013-07-01

261

Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island  

PubMed Central

Abstract Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004–2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed.

Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A.Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

2012-01-01

262

Joint Field Hearing on H.R. 6: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the House Committee on Education and Labor and the Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (Providence, Rhode Island, October 4, 1993).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents, as part of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, witness testimony and prepared statements on the subject of professional development in the elementary and secondary school systems. Witnesses included Rhode Island (RI) elementary and secondary school principals and teachers, officials from the…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities.

263

43 CFR 19.3 - Reviews of roadless areas and roadless islands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Reviews of roadless areas and roadless islands. 19.3 Section 19.3 Public Lands...Reviews of roadless areas and roadless islands. (a) The Secretary is required...contiguous acres or more and every roadless island in the national wildlife refuges...

2013-10-01

264

50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas 1 ...to Part 679âBering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99...00â² W long, and north of the Aleutian Islands and straight lines between the...

2013-10-01

265

50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas...Figure 1 to Part 679âBering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas...170°00â² W long, and north of the Aleutian Islands and straight lines between...

2009-10-01

266

50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas...Figure 1 to Part 679âBering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas...170°00â² W long, and north of the Aleutian Islands and straight lines between...

2010-10-01

267

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01

268

Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), for tributaries to the Scituate R...

K. P. Smith

2013-01-01

269

33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. 334.1160...Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo. (a) The...adjacent to the westerly shore of Mare Island with a radius of 4,700 yards,...

2013-07-01

270

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO) Selected South Pacific Island Marine Areas Volume 3. Area 17 - Tahiti Island and Moorea Island, Area 18 - Tuamotu Archipelago, Area 19 - Pitcairn Island, Area 20 - Easter Island, Area 21 - Isla San Ambrosio and Isla San Felix, Area 22 - Islas Juan Fernandez, Area 23 - Norfolk Island, Area 24 - Chatham Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1979-01-01

271

Interdune areas of the back-island dune field, North Padre Island, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The small, young (about 100 yrs) back-island dune field on north Padre Island, south Texas, consists of fairly persistant oblique dunes (up to 6 m high) with well-developed interdune areas that grade northwestward to small, ephemeral transverse and barchan dunes with interconnected "interdune" areas, thence sheet sand areas. The subhumid climate is marked by rain associated with frontal systems and tropical storms. Winds are seasonally bimodal—prevailing southeasterly are punctuated by northerly and northwesterly winds with the passage of frontal systems in winter. The entire dune field and individual oblique dunes show a net migration of about 15 m yr -1 to the northwest. The dunes however are on a seasonally reversing track, changing their slipface direction and migration direction with frontal systems. One year of monitoring shows sand transport in the dune-interdune system to be complex and cyclic. During the wind reversals of winter, dunes are very ineffecfive sand traps owing to loss of flow separation, and much sand is lost to the interdune areas. Interdune areas store sand during these wet winter months as a result of the wind reversals and higher moisture content. During the summer, the interdune areas deflate and the dunes build in size. The overall dune field deposit appears to consist of three laterally contiguous zones from southeast to northwest: (1) continuous, climbing oblique dune and interdune deposits; (2) discontinuous lenses of dune sand in overall "interdune layers"; and (3) a chaotic mixture of dune and horizontal deposits of the sheet sand areas. One year's mapping and trenching documents that interdune sedimentary structures are extremely variable laterally and vertically reflecting specific microenvironments within the interdune flat. Wet-surface features consist of current and wave ripples, channel fill, miniature deltas, wrinkle marks, mini-ripples, rills, algae and sand volcanoes. Abundant adhesion structures, rain-impacted ripples, brecciated surfaces and microtopography reflect damp-surface deposits. Dry-surface features are predominately wind ripples; others include small isolated barchan and shadow dunes, organic debris lag surfaces, deflation scours, beetle bioturbation, plant-root structures associated with shadow-dunes, and grainfall from the adjacent dunes. Interdune deposits account for about 40% of the total dune field deposits, which seems reasonable compared to some ancient examples. By virtue of occupying a relative "basin", interdune deposits are selectively preserved compared to dune deposits. In general, interdune sedimentation is enhanced by non-eolian depositional mechanisms, a high water table, early evaporatic cements, and a variable wind regime. The actual thicknesses of individual dune and interdune deposits are less on Padre than ancient examples, reflecting the relative scale of the bedforms. In many respects, sequences of sedimentary structure in Padre Island interdune deposits are typical of ancient, coastal interdune strata, but some marked departures occur. Adhesion structures, relatively rare in some ancient examples but abundant within Padre interdune deposits, seem favored by the small size of dune and interdune area, the climate and a variable wind regime. Penecontemporaneous deformation, absent in Padre interdune deposits but pronounced in some ancient examples, probably reflects dune size and the nature of the deposits. Wavy laminae in ancient interdune deposits probably result from many causes, but seem best represented by modern examples of evaporitic algal/bacterial-formed structures.

Hummel, Gary; Kocurek, Gary

1984-04-01

272

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2013-07-01

273

The roles of island area per se and habitat diversity in the species-area relationships of four Lesser Antillean faunal groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. We analysed the relationships between species richness, island area, and habitat diversity for birds, bats, butterflies, and reptiles and amphibians on 19 islands in the Lesser Antilles. Habitat diversity was quantified by Simpson's index based on the total areas of five vegetation types on each island. Island area varied over two orders of magnitude (13-1510km2) and habitat diversity

Robert E. Ricklefs; Irby J. Lovette

1999-01-01

274

RHODES to Intelligent Transportation Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

To help fulfill the promises of ITS (intelligent transportation system), the ATLAS (Advanced Traffic and Logistics Algorithms and Systems) research center is developing and testing the RHODES (real-time hierarchical optimized distributed effective system) traffic control system. We believe that RHODES play a major role in the realization of future Advanced Traffic Management Systems, a major component of ITS.

Pitu B. Mirchandani; Fei-yue Wang

2005-01-01

275

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679âAleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2013-10-01

276

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1400 Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii...The area. That portion of the Pacific Ocean lying offshore of Oahu between Ewa...

2013-07-01

277

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2011-10-01

278

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2012-10-01

279

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2010-10-01

280

From concept to practice: using the School Health Index to create healthy school environments in Rhode Island elementary schools. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

281

Public health assessment for Newport Naval Education/Training Center Middletown, Newport County, Rhode Island, Region 1. CERCLIS No. RI6170085470. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) is an indeterminate public health hazard. Five areas at NETC are being investigated under the remedial investigation/feasibility study: McAllister Point Landfill, Melville North Landfill, Tank Farm Four, Tank Farm Five, and the Old Fire Fighting Training Area. Contaminants of concern have been detected in groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil, and sediment at NETC. Contaminants of concern in that area include metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Potential pathways of exposure to contaminated surface soil and sediment were identified. In addition, there could be future exposure to contaminated groundwater and subsurface soil in areas, such as Melville North Landfill, that are scheduled for development. The food chain is also a potentially complete pathway. The extent of contamination of shellfish must be further characterized before the health implications of exposure to those potential pathways can be evaluated. Contaminants of concern identified in the potential pathways include metals, PAHs, PCBs, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides.

Not Available

1993-08-06

282

Inventory of selected freshwater-ecology studies from the New England Coastal Basins (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island), 1937-97  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An inventory of published studies that address freshwater ecology within the New England Coastal Basins was created through computerized bibliographic literature searches and consultation with environmental agencies. Assembled papers were classified to associate their contents with one or more states, ecoregions, river basins, and ecological topics. Full references and their classifications were entered into a bibliographic software program and then exported to a data-base application to generate a checklist summary of study contents. This report presents a listing and classification of 154 selected studies, published between 1937 and 1997, that provide background knowledge and serve as general aquatic-ecology references for the New England Coastal Basins study area.

Tessler, Steven; Coles, J. F.; Beaulieu, K. M.

1999-01-01

283

9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of...the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of...Northern Mariana Islands, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico are quarantined....

2010-01-01

284

Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands: High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. Drug Market Analysis, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the Puerto Rico/U.S. Islands High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Drug Market Analysis for 2011. The overall drug threat to the Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/USVI) HIDTA has remained relatively consistent over the past year. Drug tra...

2011-01-01

285

Tourism and Specific Risk Areas for Cryptococcus gattii, Vancouver Island, Canada  

PubMed Central

We compared travel histories of case-patients with Cryptococcus gattii infection during 1999–2006 to travel destinations of the general public on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Findings validated and refined estimates of risk on the basis of place of residence and showed no spatial progression of risk areas on this island over time.

Chambers, Catharine; MacDougall, Laura; Li, Min

2008-01-01

286

Thermal Remote Sensing of Urban Heat Islands: Greater Toronto Area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 20 years, numerous peer reviewed studies have used thermal remote sensing to map urban heat islands. This study examines assumptions made in previous research through comparisons of in situ air temperatures and remotely sensed estimates of surface temperatures. Landsat thermal data collected from 4 heat event days over the summers of2007-2008 are correlated with air temperatures from

Matthew Maloley

2010-01-01

287

2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

2011-01-01

288

RHODE ISLAND DIGITAL ORTHOPHOTO QUADRANGLE MOSAIC  

EPA Science Inventory

Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground resolution, quarter-quadrangle (3.75-minutes of latitude by 3.75-minutes of longitude) image cast on the Universal Tra...

289

Mapping Rhode Island's Educational Progress, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six years after passage of No Child Left Behind and midway to the nation's goal of having students on grade level or better in reading and math by 2014, more data than ever before has been collected about the academic performance of American students and schools. Information in this brochure charts student demographics, achievement-to-date and…

US Department of Education, 2008

2008-01-01

290

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...the restricted area without first obtaining the permission of the Warden, Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island. The...this section shall be enforced by the U.S. Coast Guard, the Warden of the Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal...

2013-07-01

291

19 CFR 122.142 - Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and a foreign area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 false Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and a foreign area. 122.142...REGULATIONS Flights to and From the U.S. Virgin Islands § 122.142 Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and a foreign area. (a)...

2009-04-01

292

The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

1993-08-01

293

GENERAL GEOLOGY OF THE MID-TERTIARY BLOCK 889 FIELD AREA, OFFSHORE MUSTANG ISLAND, TEXAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structural and stratigraphic architecture of the Block 889 field area, offshore Mustang Island, Texas, was defined by the integration of 3-D seismic, wireline logs, and engineering data. The area has produced 145 Bcf (billion cubic feet) of gas and 3 MMbbl (million barrels) of con- densate since the mid-1960's. Shale-withdrawal controlled the structural evolution of the area. Three growth

Ramón H. Treviño; Robert G. Loucks; L. Frank Brown; Randy L. Remington

294

The autocorrelation function for island areas on self-affine surfaces.  

PubMed

The spatial distribution of regions that lie above contours of constant height through a self-affine surface is studied as a function of the Hurst exponent H. If the surface represents a landscape, these regions correspond to islands. When the surface represents the height difference for contacting surfaces, the regions correspond to mechanical contacts in the common bearing area model. The autocorrelation function C(?r) is defined as the probability that points separated by ?r are both within islands. The scaling of C has important implications for the stiffness and conductance of mechanical contacts. We find that its Fourier transform C(q) scales as a power of the wavevector magnitude q: [Formula: see text] with ? = 2 + H rather than the value ? = 2 + 2H reported previously. An analytic argument for ? = 2 + H is presented using the distribution of areas contained in disconnected islands. PMID:21555839

Ramisetti, Srinivasa B; Campañá, Carlos; Anciaux, Guillaume; Molinari, Jean-Francois; Müser, Martin H; Robbins, Mark O

2011-06-01

295

50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Management Areas Table 1 of Appendix E to Part 622—Coordinates of the Puerto...the EEZ/Territorial boundary to Point C C (intersects with the EEZ/Territorial...16.9636? 64°57?38.817? E 17°30?00.000?...

2012-10-01

296

Use of arthropod rarity for area prioritisation: insights from the Azorean Islands.  

PubMed

We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at 'global' scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and 'regional' scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity.A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce. PMID:22479498

Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A V

2012-01-01

297

Use of Arthropod Rarity for Area Prioritisation: Insights from the Azorean Islands  

PubMed Central

We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at ‘global’ scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and ‘regional’ scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity. A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce.

Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, Francois; Borges, Paulo A. V.

2012-01-01

298

Fluid flow in the South Eugene Island area, offshore Louisiana: results of numerical simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical simulations of heat and fluid transport in the South Eugene Island (SEI) area, offshore Louisiana, suggest fluids migrate from deep, abnormally pressured sediments, along fault zones, and into overlying oil and gas reservoirs. In the simulations, fluid flow along the fault produces a narrow thermal anomaly around the fault. A negative thermal anomaly forms adjacent to the thermal maximum

Sheila J. Roberts

2001-01-01

299

Late Otiran\\/early Aranuian Vegetation in the Tongariro Area, Central North Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pollen analysis and charcoal identifications of a tephra sequence in the Ton gariro area, North Island, New Zealand, show that bctween 20000 and 14000 years B.P. there was a change from Nothofagus forest, grassland, and shrubland to podocarp-broadleaf forest. This implics a change to a warmer climate during that period.

M. S. MCGlone; W. W. Topping

1973-01-01

300

Investigations of reported plant and animal health effects in the Three Mile Island area. Regulatory report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of investigations into reported problems with plants and animals which may be related to the operation of and accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are presented. The kinds of problems reported are listed, and potential areas of concern (such as the release of radioactive gases and drift from cooling tower plumes) are discussed. Specific case

G. E. Gears; G. LaRoche; J. Cable; B. Jaroslow; D. Smith

1980-01-01

301

ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the Asian/Pacific Islander population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Census tigerlin...

302

Heat Island Effect in urban Areas and its Impact on the Energy Behaviour of Buildings  

Microsoft Academic Search

The net effect of the urban thermal process is to make the city temperatures generally higher than those of the surrounding suburb or rural areas. The phenomenon of heat islands is rather complex, both the modelling and the spot measurements approach providing only a partial description of it, as the energy balance differences that cause this effect depend on the

A. M. Papadopoulos; E.-A. Kalognomou

2003-01-01

303

THERMAL ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY EVALUATION FOR HEAT ISLAND COUNTERMEASURE IN DIFFERENT RESIDENTIAL AREAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various countermeasures to urban heat island applied in the residential areas are evaluated for thermal environ- ment improvement and year-round energy performance, using an urban canopy model coupled with a building energy model. The simulation shows that a combination of surface cooling measures and installation of heat pump water heater can lower the nighttime air temperature and reduce the annual

Kazuki Yamaguchi; Tomohiko Ihara; Yukihiro Kikegawa; Yutaka Genchi; Yasuyuki Endo

304

AIRBORNE HYPERSPECTRAL AND THERMAL INFORMATION FOR ASSESSING THE HEAT ISLAND IN URBAN AREAS OF JAPAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heat island phenomenon, caused by urbanization, is one of the growing problems in Japan. In this study, we have described the radiometric temperature of the ground surface observed by the airborne thermal sensor in the Hiroshima City. The obtained results showed that the river and forest areas had lower temperatures whereas the roads had the highest. The temperatures of

A. Ozawa; B. Babu Madhavan; H. Okada; K. K. Mishra; K. Tachibana; T. Sasagawa

305

Area contingency plan for Long Island Sound. Changes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This revision contains significant updates to sensitive areas throughout the COTP Long Island Sound Zone. The effort to update sensitive areas included collaboration with state agencies, coastal towns and cities, and local awareness organizations. Annex N has been added to incorporate responses to maritime fire fighting and has identified resources and personnel available for marine response throughout the zone. Additionally there are updated phone lists and a listing of pen and ink changes.

NONE

1997-08-07

306

50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart... Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300âAlaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012...

2013-10-01

307

Geochemical exploration of the three most significant geothermal areas of Lesbos Island, Greece  

SciTech Connect

Lesbos Island has several thermal manifestations linked to extensional active faults that act as channels for the ascent of deep thermal fluids. The present work describes detailed geochemical exploration aimed at evaluating the potential of the Lesbos Island geothermal resource. Exploration was carried out on the three sites (Kalloni-Stipsi, Petra-Arenos and Polichnitos) that have the most favourable hydrogeological and structural setting on the island. Hydrogeochemical data reveal the presence between Kalloni and Stipsi of a shallow thermal aquifer with temperatures below boiling point, which coincides with carbopn dioxide and temperature anomalies in the overlying groundwaters. All the thermal waters in the study area have fairly similar physico-chemical features.

Fytikas, M.; Kavouridis, T.; Leonis, C. (Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration, 70 Messoghion St., 115 27 Athens (GR)); Marini, L. (Geotermica Italiana srl, Lungarno Mediceo 16, 56100 Pisa (IT))

1989-01-01

308

Remote sensing and GIS based study of potential erosion and degradation areas on the island Fogo (Cape Verde Islands)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Island of Fogo (Cape Verde) is affected by processes of erosion and degradation, caused mainly by a high population growth and global change. With its small scaled climatic, floristic and geo-ecological differentiation, the island of Fogo is an optimal research space for understanding semiarid island ecosystems in the marginal tropics and their behaviour to erosion and degradation processes. For

Claas Olehowski; Simone Naumann; Alexander Siegmund

2009-01-01

309

Future change in wintertime urban heat island due to global climate change in Tokyo metropolitan area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the largest urban areas all over the world. This study investigates the change in urban heat island intensity of Tokyo metropolitan area in winter season by the effects of global climate change. We performed present and future climate simulations are conducted using a regional climate model (WRF) including an urban canopy sub-model (Kusaka et al., 2001). Future climate simulation was conducted using Pseudo-Global-Warming (PGW) method (Kimura and Kitoh, 2008) assuming the boundary conditions estimated by CMIP3 GCMs under the SRES scenarios. The PGW method is one of the useful methods for future downscaling and adopted for some studies on urban heat island (Kusaka et al., 2012) and winter climate (Hara et al., 2008) over Japan. The simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced during night, due to the global climate change.

Hara, M.; Adachi, S. A.; Kusaka, H.; Kimura, F.

2013-12-01

310

Insular Area energy vulnerability, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands. Technical Appendix 1  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to Section 1406 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 192-486). The Act directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to ``conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption,`` and to ``outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency.`` The Act defines the insular areas to be the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Palau in the Pacific. This report is the analysis of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. In the study, ``unique vulnerabilities`` were defined as susceptibility to: (1) more frequent or more likely interruptions of oil supplies compared to the mainland, and/or (2) disproportionately larger or more likely economic losses in the event of an oil supply disruption. In order to asses unique vulnerabilities, the study examined in the insular areas` experience during past global disruptions of oil supplies and during local emergencies caused by natural disasters. The effects of several possible future global disruptions and local emergencies were also analyzed. Analyses were based on historical data, simulations using energy and economic models, and interviews with officials in the insular governments and the energy industry.

Stern, M.; Willard, E.E.; Efferding, S. [Ensys Energy & Systems, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

1994-05-01

311

Temperature trends and Urban Heat Island intensity mapping of the Las Vegas valley area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modified urban climate regions that are warmer than rural areas at night are referred to as Urban Heat Islands or UHI. Islands of warmer air over a city can be 12 degrees Celsius greater than the surrounding cooler air. The exponential growth in Las Vegas for the last two decades provides an opportunity to detect gradual temperature changes influenced by an increasing presence of urban materials. This thesis compares ground based thermometric observations and satellite based remote sensing temperature observations to identify temperature trends and UHI areas caused by urban development. Analysis of temperature trends between 2000 and 2010 at ground weather stations has revealed a general cooling trend in the Las Vegas region. Results show that urban development accompanied by increased vegetation has a cooling effect in arid climates. Analysis of long term temperature trends at McCarran and Nellis weather stations show 2.4 K and 1.2 K rise in temperature over the last 60 years. The ground weather station temperature data is related to the land surface temperature images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper to estimate and evaluate urban heat island intensity for Las Vegas. Results show that spatial and temporal trends of temperature are related to the gradual change in urban landcover. UHI are mainly observed at the airport and in the industrial areas. This research provides useful insight into the temporal behavior of the Las Vegas area.

Black, Adam Leland

312

The Antithesist Vision of William Rhodes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perspectives concerning William Rhodes' philosophy and his 1975 predictions about the mental health system are offered. Rhodes characterized the traditional mental health system as one that suppresses individuality in the interests of social control. On the other hand, in innovative progressional institutions, power is shared by providers with…

Wood, Frank H.

1982-01-01

313

West and Rhode River pollution mitigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The West and Rhode Rivers cover 80 square kilometers of watershed and subestuary along the Chesapeake Bay. Key metrics for water quality were found to deviate substantially from desired threshold levels, indicating poor water quality in the subestuary [1]. The project's sponsor, the West and Rhode Riverkeeper, needed to identify and implement mitigation measures to improve water quality in the

Yashodha Bhavnani; Marcus Childress; Sahar Sadeghian; Safwat Zaman

2010-01-01

314

Biomineralization process occurring in iron mud of coastal seepage area of Zhoushan Island, Zhejiang province  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biomineralization process of iron oxidizing bacteria and its influence on accumulation of metals were investigated by\\u000a modern biological observation techniques (i.e., SEM and TEM) and geochemical methods, in coastal area of Zhoushan Island,\\u000a Zhejiang province where a thick ancient wood layers were buried, Results show that the iron mud samples mainly contain Leptothrix-like sheaths and Gallionella-like stalks, which are

ZiJun Wu; Nan Jia; LinXi Yuan; LiGuang Sun

2008-01-01

315

Re-evaluating the origins of late Pleistocene fire areas on Santa Rosa Island, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the close of the Pleistocene, fire regimes in North America changed significantly in response to climate change, megafaunal extinctions, anthropogenic burning and, possibly, even an extraterrestrial impact. On California's Channel Islands, researchers have long debated the nature of late Pleistocene "fire areas," discrete red zones in sedimentary deposits, interpreted by some as prehistoric mammoth-roasting pits created by humans. Further research found no evidence that these red zones were cultural in origin, and two hypotheses were advanced to explain their origin: natural fires and groundwater processes. Radiocarbon dating, X-ray diffraction analysis, and identification of charcoal from six red zones on Santa Rosa Island suggest that the studied features date between ~ 27,500 and 11,400 cal yr BP and resulted from burning or heating, not from groundwater processes. Our results show that fire was a component of late Pleistocene Channel Island ecology prior to and after human colonization of the islands, with no clear evidence for increased fire frequency coincident with Paleoindian settlement, extinction of pygmy mammoths, or a proposed Younger Dryas impact event.

Rick, Torben C.; Wah, John S.; Erlandson, Jon M.

2012-09-01

316

The impact of volcanic gases from Miyake island on the chemical constituents in precipitation in the Tokyo metropolitan area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volcano on Miyake Island first erupted in July 2000 and continuous emission of volcanic gas from the collapsed caldera has been observed from the middle of August 2000. The large volcanic emission of SO2 had a strong influence on Tokyo metropolitan area, which is located approximately 150 km north of Miyake Island. We measured major ions in precipitation and

Tomoaki Okuda; Tamami Iwase; Hideko Ueda; Yusuke Suda; Shigeru Tanaka; Yukiko Dokiya; Katsuhiko Fushimi; Morikazu Hosoe

2005-01-01

317

The Rock: A History of Alcatraz Island, 1847-1972. Historic Resource Study, Golden Gate National Recreation Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The historic resource study, completed by Erwin N. Thompson, details the history of Alcatraz Island from the early Spanish explorers to 1972 when the island became a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, with special concentration on the perio...

E. N. Thompson

1979-01-01

318

The influence of urban reconstruction in urban heat island effect: Cangxia area of Fuzhou City, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The urban development is usually accompanied with the re-planning and reconstruction of the old urban area, which is one of the key issues of the urban development program. Over the past decade, Fuzhou City of Fujian province, SE China, has speeded up its reconstruction progress. The Cangxia area, located in the southwestern of the city, was replaned and reconstructed to improve people's living conditions because the area was full of intensively-built squatter settlements. In order to study the thermal environmental changes of the Cangxia area before and after the reconstruction, three Landsat TM images of 1986, 1996 and 2006 were utilized to perform feature extractions of the thermal-related information of the area, such as the land surface temperature (LST), impervious surface area (ISA) and vegetation coverage. The quantitative analysis on the relationship between ISA and LST suggested a positive exponential relationship between the two factors. With the assistance of the Urban-Heat-Island Ratio Index (URI), the digital image processing on the three multi-temporal images revealed the spatial and temporal variations of the urban heat island (UHI) effect in the investigated area from 1986 to 2006. The results showed that after the launch of the reconstruction project of this squatter settlement-dominated area, the UHI effect in the area had been greatly mitigated in the past 20 years, since the URI value had been decreased from 0.648 in 1986 to 0.245 in 2006. This owes greatly to the significant decrease in high-density ISAs and the notable increase in vegetation covers. The reconstruction is of benefit to the UHI mitigation of the Cangxia area.

Tang, Fei; Xu, Hanqiu

2010-09-01

319

33 CFR 165.153 - Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection...Zone. 165.153 Section 165.153 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

2013-07-01

320

33 CFR 165.153 - Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection...Zone. 165.153 Section 165.153 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

2011-07-01

321

33 CFR 165.153 - Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection...Zone. 165.153 Section 165.153 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

2012-07-01

322

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1460 Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra...

2013-07-01

323

The Urban Heat Island Behavior of a Large Northern Latitude Metropolitan Area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban heat islands (UHIs) develop when urban and suburban areas experience elevated temperatures relative to their rural surroundings. The difference in temperature between the city core and its surroundings is proportional to the size of the city and can be related to differences in vegetation cover, the amount of development, building materials, and the infrastructure. Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of the outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. Temperatures in the urban center can be 2-5°C warmer during the daytime and as much as 10°C at night. Urban warming is responsible for excessive energy consumption, heat-related health effects, an increase in urban pollution, degradation of urban ecosystems, and changes in the local meteorology. To begin to address UHI mitigation strategies, a comprehensive spatial and temporal analysis of the behavior of urban heat islands is necessary. Because the influence of UHIs is most notable in wintertime, solutions to mitigate them are compounded because of societal resistance to modifying the landscape and urban structures to reduce already low wintertime temperatures. To better understand the UHI behavior of a large northern latitude city and to evaluate mitigation strategies that have the desired effect year round, we have embarked on a comprehensive four-year research program - Islands in the Sun - aimed at 1) analyzing the UHIs of the largest urban areas on the planet, 2) monitoring the UHI of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) and evaluating mitigation strategies for reducing urban warming, and 3) developing a numerical UHI model to quantify the effect of different mitigation strategies. Here we present results from an observational study of the TCMA, a 7,700 square kilometer urban and suburban region located in east central Minnesota that includes the two cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul. The TCMA is home to 2.8 million residents within a seven county area comprising an urban core and a surrounding suburban landscape. Annually, the TCMA has a modest 2-3°C UHI that is especially apparent in winter when the urban core can be up to 5-6°C warmer than the surrounding countryside. We present preliminary data from a dense network of temperature sensors located throughout the TCMA. We focus on the diurnal and seasonal behavior of the TCMA UHI with an emphasis on the contribution of different land use types on the UHI and the influence of wintertime temperature advection on less urbanized areas to the southeast of the TCMA. Finally, we offer evidence of the impact that the TCMA heat island has on energy consumption, human health, and the environment, and propose mitigation strategies that should be considered.

Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.; Hertel, W.

2011-12-01

324

Educating people about importance of photoprotection: results of campaign on the islands in Dubrovnik area.  

PubMed

After an increasing number of skin cancer cases and some skin cancer deaths among young people in Dubrovnik area had been noted, a field research was done in the period from 2003 to 2007. The examinations were done on the islands in Dubrovnik area (Korcula, Mljet, Lopud, Sipan, Kolocep and on the peninsula Peljesac). Research tasks were collecting information on sun-protection behaviors and attitudes and usage of sun protecting factor products, detection of the presence of skin cancer in the area and advising those diagnosed ill about further medical procedure, educating and informing local population as well as local physicians in the area with investigation results. In spite of wide media campaign, more then half of examined people did not use sun protective factor (SPF) products. It can be concluded that better education about damaging effects of ultraviolet radiations as well as further education how to properly protect its adverse effects is required. PMID:19140281

Bakija-Konsuo, Ana; Muli?, Rosanda

2008-10-01

325

Landsat TM-based analysis of land area and vegetation cover change on six selected Alabama and Mississippi barrier islands (1984-2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island are located 10-20 kilometers south of the Mississippi and Alabama coastlines. These six barrier islands serve as an important shield to southern areas of Mississippi and Alabama from tropical cyclone (hurricane) impacts such as storm surge and destructive waves. The islands are also home to a delicate ecosystem of many different types of flora and fauna. Over the course of the past three decades, all six islands have been subjected to several hurricane events. This, coupled with the natural state of the erosion, has led to the islands losing total land area and vegetation. This thesis research focuses on quantifying the vegetation loss and total land area loss on Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island during the time period from 1984 to 2011. A special focus is given to impacts of Hurricanes Georges, Ivan, Katrina, Gustav, and Ike which affected the northern Gulf Coast in 1998, 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively. This research utilizes Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper Imagery. Supervised classifications and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analyses are performed on each scene to analyze the total land area and vegetation cover of each island. The results of this research show the total extent of land and vegetation loss on each island from 1984 to 2011, and which islands are most vulnerable to erosion and vegetation loss. The results also reveal how all five hurricanes affected each individual island.

Winstanley, Hunter Clark

326

Regional maturation study in the King Christian Island area, arctic Canada  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of the Mesozoic succession in the vicinity of King Christian Island in central Sverdrup Basin was evaluated on the basis of maturation parameters and knowledge of the regional geology. The triassic Schei Point Group, which is the main source rock interval in Sverdrup Basin, is in the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation (Ro > 0.60%). The type of organic matter is mainly planktonic marine algae and bituminite, deposited in an offshore shelf setting. Rock-eval T{sub max} values are in the range 428--444 C, in general agreement with reflectance. Organic richness is indicated by the high hydrogen index (HI) values in the shales (in excess of 300 mg HC/gTOC). Less rich source rocks are found in the Jurassic-age Jameson Bay and Ringnes formations, in accordance with previous studies in the nearby Lougheed and Melville islands. Numerous oil and gas fields have been discovered in King Christian Island to date. Geology shows that the presence or absence of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons in the reservoirs is related to the development of a system of faults and fractures in the successions stratigraphically above the source rocks. These zones have acted as conduits for oil and gas migration and, ultimately, loss. The presence of bitumen staining and numerous populations of solid bitumen, interpreted as allochthonously derived, support the theory of hydrocarbon migration in the King Christian Island succession. Migration has taken place over a vertical distance of 800 m to 1500 m. Problems were encountered in measuring vitrinite reflectance, related mainly to the presence of cavings, bitumen staining, vitrinite typing, oxidation of organic matter, and effect of igneous intrusions. The thermal effect from igneous sills and dykes resulted in thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons to gaseous in certain areas. A zone of paleo-overpressure was identified near the contact between a thick sandstone unit and overlying shales exhibiting a kinky vitrinite reflectance profile.

Gentzis, T. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Goodarzi, F. [Natural Resources Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Mukhopadhyay, P.K. [Global Geoenergy Research Ltd., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1998-12-01

327

Floods of November 12, 1974 in the Charlotte Amalie area, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flood on St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, of November 12, 1974, was the largest recorded flood in the area from Fort Christian through Charlotte Amalie and Frenchtown to the end of Crown Bay. This flood has a recurrence interval of about 60 years. With the exception of a few narrow beaches, very little flooding occurred outside of the Charlotte Amalie area. The flood boundaries are controlled to a large extent by the prevailing channel and flood-plain conditions. Inundation from future floods may be affected by changes in channel conditions, alteration of waterway openings at roads, changes in runoff characteristics of the stream caused by increased urbanization, and other cultural developments. The areas inundated by the 1974 flood are shown on 2 maps. (Woodard-USGS)

Haire, W. J.; Johnson, K. G.

1977-01-01

328

Use of Precipitation and Groundwater Isotopes to Interpret Regional Hydrology on a Tropical Volcanic Island: Kilauea Volcano Area, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotope tracer methods were used to determineflow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are

M. A. Scholl; S. E. Ingebritsen; C. J. Janik; J. P. Kauahikaua

1996-01-01

329

Use of Precipitation and Groundwater Isotopes to Interpret Regional Hydrology on a Tropical Volcanic Island: Kilauea Volcano Area, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which

M. A. Scholl; S. E. Ingebritsen; C. J. Janik; J. P. Kauahikaua

1996-01-01

330

Use of precipitation and groundwater isotopes to interpret regional hydrology on a tropical volcanic island: Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which

M. A. Scholl; S. E. Ingebritsen; C. J. Janik; J. P. Kauahikaua

1996-01-01

331

Island Biogeography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This excel workbook demonstrates the principles of the MacArthur-Wilson theory of Island Biogeography. It allows the user to define the mainland species pool, area of the island, and distance of the island from the mainland. Graphical output included species richness equilibrium at varying island size and distance. The workbook also allows the user to calculate a species-area function for data entered into the data input page. Several datasets on island area and species richness are included for various types of islands and species. Variables and formulas are defined in the accompanying tutorial.

John Jungck (BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium;Biology); Jennifer Spangenberg (Beloit College;)

2005-12-16

332

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include\\u000a a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau,\\u000a Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired\\u000a from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2011-01-01

333

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2010-01-01

334

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2011-01-01

335

Research on the impact of impervious surface area on urban heat island in Jiangsu Province  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Land surface temperature (LST), vegetation index, and other surface characteristics that obtained from remote sensing data have been widely used to describe urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon, but through impervious surface area (ISA) to describe the phenomenon has only used in a few study areas in our country. In a high urbanization and high population density region like Jiangsu Province, a wide range of extraction of ISA to study its relationship with UHI is less. In this paper, we use multi-temporal remote sensing images as data sources, and extract ISA from it in a large-scale by using decision tree classifier (DTC) and linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA). Then combine the average surface temperature from the sixth band of Landsat TM by mono-window algorithm for spatial analysis, to assess the change of the urban heat island temperature amplitude and its relationship with the urban development density, size and ecological environment. Finally we use statistical methods to analyze the relationship between ISA, LST and UHI. The results show that ISA has a positive correlation with surface temperature. The ratio of ISA is higher and the difference value of the temperature is larger, thus the UHI will be more obvious.

Yang, Yingbao; Pan, Ping

2011-06-01

336

Geologic Map of the Upper Wolf Island Creek Watershed, Reidsville Area, Rockingham County, North Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map provides a foundation for hydrogeologic investigations in the Reidsville area of Rockingham County, north-central North Carolina. The 16-mi2 area within the Southeast Eden and Reidsville 7.5-min quadrangles includes the watershed of Wolf Island Creek and its tributary, Carroll Creek, upstream of their confluence. Layered metamorphic rocks in this area of the Milton terrane, here informally named the Chinqua-Penn metamorphic suite, include a heterogeneous mica gneiss and schist unit that contains interlayers and lenses of white-mica schist, felsic gneiss, amphibolite, and ultramafic rock; a felsic gneiss that contains interlayers of amphibolite, white-mica schist, and minor ultramafic lenses; and a migmatitic biotite gneiss. Crushed stone is produced from an active quarry in the felsic gneiss. Igneous intrusive rocks include a mafic-ultramafic assemblage that may have originated as mafic intrusive bodies containing ultramafic cumulates, a foliated two-mica granite informally named the granite of Reidsville, and unmetamorphosed Jurassic diabase dikes. The newly recognized Carroll Creek shear zone strikes roughly east-west and separates heterogeneous mica gneiss and schist to the north from structurally overlying felsic gneiss to the south. Regional amphibolite-facies metamorphism accompanied polyphase ductile deformation in the metamorphic rocks. Two phases of isoclinal to tight folding and related penetrative deformation, described as D1 and D2, were followed by phases of high-strain mylonitic deformation in shear zones and late gentle to open folding. Later brittle deformation produced minor faults, steep joints, foliation-parallel parting, and sheeting joints. The metamorphic and igneous rocks are mantled by saprolite and residual soil derived from weathering of the underlying bedrock, and unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium occupies the flood plains of Wolf Island Creek and its tributaries. The geologic map delineates lithologic and structural features that may act as barriers or conduits for ground-water flow. It provides a hydrogeologic framework for the upper Wolf Island Creek drainage basin, including coreholes and ground-water monitoring wells along two transects. Collaborative hydrogeologic investigations by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey are in progress to increase understanding of the influence of geological features on ground-water quality, availability, and transport in an area representative of large areas in the west-central Piedmont.

Horton, J. Wright., Jr.; Geddes, Donald J., Jr.

2006-01-01

337

Evolution of the urban heat island at a large coastal urban area of Mediterranean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urban heat islands (UHI) are in the focus of research interest during past decades, as they concern densely populated areas, thus having a great impact on health of citizens, but also on environment and economy of cities. The linkage between urban heat islands and climatic change is of particular importance, especially in areas where - according to future projections - significant warming is expected, as the urban effect amplifies regional warming. The study focuses on the city of Athens and concerns the temporal evolution on the mesoscale of UHI over the period 1975-2010. Although the study of the spatial distribution of the urban heat island in Athens has revealed large differences of the air temperature between the central zone of the city and surrounding rural stations (reaching up to 10 oC in certain cases), it is quite important to study the rates of UHI changes on the mesoscale and extract information on whether UHI is amplified, stabilized or has declined over time. It is mentioned that Athens has undergone dramatic changes during recent decades as regards land use/land cover map and population distribution. The knowledge of the rates of UHI changes will also reveal the 'true' rates of background warming which is observed in the area during the study period. Annual and seasonal values were calculated from daily average, maximum and minimum temperature at seven stations of different characteristics of the area of interest (urban/ suburban/ coastal/rural). From the comparison of the average air temperature between the rural and urban stations, it was found that the intensity of UHI increases by approximately +0.2 oC/decade on an annual basis over the study period, but the results are strongly dependent on the season. In summer and spring, the rate of UHI changes is more pronounced, amounting to +0.4 oC/decade (statistically significant at 0.05 CL). Moreover, it was found that the rate of change is higher in the maximum than in the minimum air temperature. It was also estimated that urban effect accounts almost for the half of the observed warming trends in the area, on an annual base.

Founda, D.; Pierros, F.; Nastos, P. T.; Petrakis, M.

2012-04-01

338

Sustainable ecotourism on Atlantic islands, with special reference to whale watching, Marine Protected Areas and sanctuaries, for cetaceans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecotourism in the Atlantic islands region is well-established and growing. Still, in the whale watching and marine tourism sector, many so-called ecotourism enterprises fail to achieve the minimum standards required to qualify as ecotourism. In the Atlantic islands area, approximately 1.7 million people a year go whale watching, with a total expenditure of US$133 million. In this region, the 90

Erich Hoyt

2005-01-01

339

Heat Island Effect  

MedlinePLUS

... to learn more. More Information on Urban Heat Islands Heat Island Basics Chapter from EPA’s Reducing Urban ... Island Video Segments What Is an Urban Heat Island? As urban areas develop, changes occur in their ...

340

A large, natural infection of sea lice on juvenile Pacific salmon in the Gulf Islands area of British Columbia, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

High levels of sea lice generally exceeding a prevalence of 60% were found on all species of juvenile Pacific salmon and on juvenile Pacific herring in the Gulf Islands area within the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia. Virtually all sea lice were Caligus clemensi and most stages were maturing or mature. There are no active fish farms in this area,

R. Beamish; J. Wade; W. Pennell; E. Gordon; S. Jones; C. Neville; K. Lange; R. Sweeting

2009-01-01

341

Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. We obtained 14C ages of 4690 +/- 270 BP (5000-5700 cal BP) and 5040 +/- 460 BP (5300-6300 cal BP) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lomas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacrustine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. Our 14C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in this region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

Farmer, J. D.; Farmer, M. C.; Berger, R.

1993-01-01

342

GIS-aided port area plane design on project for Dongluo island-port in Fuzhou  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Up to now, the site selection of deepwater port has become a hot issue in the construction and planning of many estuary port cities. At the same time, there are various schemes about the location of deepwater port in Fuzhou and different opinions on them. Under this background, a new project for Dongluo Island-Port has been put forward. Port engineering has distinct spatial attributes, so its design is closely related to geographic spatial location. According to common engineering technique standards of seaport's location and construction, this paper explores the port area plane design of the new project by spatial analysis means of GIS. Main technical processes include applying the ARC/INFO9.0 and ArcView3.2 software to build elevation data firstly, then overlay the feature coverage to the base map to implement spatial analysis, and obtain the design coverage for port area finally. Combining with technical criterions of port area plane design, the paper analyses the design effect and concludes that the berths arrangement accords with the demand of transport capacity and the items layout accords with the engineering technique criterions as well, therefore the port area plane design is technically feasible as a whole.

Yang, Wei; Zong, Yueguang; He, Jinliao

2008-10-01

343

1. WET SPOT NEAR NORTH PROJECT BOUNDARY, WHERE RHODES DITCH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. WET SPOT NEAR NORTH PROJECT BOUNDARY, WHERE RHODES DITCH RECEIVES WATER FROM A NATURAL DRAINAGE. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

344

PREDICTION OF URBAN HEAT ISLAND IN TOKYO METROPOLITAN AREA IN 2020  

Microsoft Academic Search

In large cities in Japan, as exemplified by Tokyo, temperature increases in summer due to urbanization, i.e. the urban heat island effect, are becoming very serious. If no countermeasures are taken, it is likely that urban heat islands will become ever more serious and prediction of the effect of future urbanization on urban heat islands is necessary. On the other

YOICHI KAWAMOTO; RYOZO OOKA

345

Simushir (January 15, 2009) and Samoa (September 30, 2009) tsunami recording in the area of South Kuril Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Institute of Marine Geology & Geophysics (the Far East Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences) carried out long wave measurements in the area of South Kuril Islands with the purpose of tsunami recording closely to the seismic active zone and study long wave spectra variability depending of weather conditions. Bottom pressure gauges were installed in several harbors of Shikotan Island, near Cape Lovtsov (north-eastern end of Kunashir Island), in the Kitoviy Bay (Iturup Island) and near Cape Van-der-Lind (Urup Island). Sakhalin Tsunami Center has a cable telemetry tsunami warning station in the Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island). Two tsunamis - a remote Samoa (September 30) and nearby Simushir tsunami (January 15) were recorded by different gauges in the area of South Kuril Islands and by telemetry station in Severo-Kurilsk. To examine spectral properties of long wave oscillations at each gauge, we calculated power spectral estimation using two different data segments (both 1 day length): the period preceding the tsunami event, we identified as "normal" and selected for analysis of the background signal; the "tsunami period" included tsunami caused oscillations. The spectral maxima at each station were different however they are mainly the same for each gauge for the two states ("normal" and "tsunami"). For example, well-expressed peaks with period 19 and 20 min were found in power spectra in Malokurilskaya Harbor and near Cape Van-der-Lind. Numerical modeling was used to examine spatial structure of eigen modes in different harbors and frequency-selective properties of the shelf of South Kuril islands. In the first case a peak with period 19 min is associated with zeroth resonance mode of harbor oscillations. In the case of Van-der-Lind gauge a peak with period 20 min is caused by shelf resonance effect. These examples show a great effect of local bottom topography on tsunami height on the coast

Shevchenko, Georgy; Chernov, Anton; Kovalev, Peter; Ivelskaya, Tatyana; Loskutov, Artem; Shishkin, Alexander

2010-05-01

346

Historic Resource Study: Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia and Historic Structure Report, Historical Data Section of the Dungeness Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present studies should fulfill the requirements of a historic resource study of Cumberland Island and of a historic structure report of the Dungeness area. It was decided for the sake of continuity that both studies should be combined under one cover ...

L. Torres

1977-01-01

347

Comparison of MSS and TM data for landcover classification in the Chesapeake Bay area: A preliminary report. [Taylor's Island, Maryland  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An area bordering the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay was selected for study and classified using unsupervised techniques applied to LANDSAT-2 MSS data and several band combinations of LANDSAT-4 TM data. The accuracies of these Level I land cover classifications were verified using the Taylor's Island USGS 7.5 minute topographic map which was photointerpreted, digitized and rasterized. The the Taylor's Island map, comparing the MSS and TM three band (2 3 4) classifications, the increased resolution of TM produced a small improvement in overall accuracy of 1% correct due primarily to a small improvement, and 1% and 3%, in areas such as water and woodland. This was expected as the MSS data typically produce high accuracies for categories which cover large contiguous areas. However, in the categories covering smaller areas within the map there was generally an improvement of at least 10%. Classification of the important residential category improved 12%, and wetlands were mapped with 11% greater accuracy.

Mulligan, P. J.; Gervin, J. C.; Lu, Y. C.

1985-01-01

348

UV nanoimprint lithography for the realization of large-area ordered SiGe/Si(001) island arrays  

SciTech Connect

We use UV nanoimprint lithography for the pit-patterning of silicon substrates. Ordered silicon-germanium islands are grown inside these pits by molecular-beam epitaxy on arrays of 3x3 mm{sup 2} and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. AFM-based statistics reveals an extremely uniform size distribution of the islands in the patterned areas. These results are confirmed by very narrow and uniform PL peaks recorded at various positions across the patterned arrays.

Lausecker, E.; Brehm, M.; Grydlik, M.; Hackl, F.; Fromherz, T.; Schaeffler, F.; Bauer, G. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Bergmair, I.; Muehlberger, M. [Functional Surfaces and Nanostructures, Profactor GmbH, 4407 Steyr-Gleink (Austria)

2011-04-04

349

Paleoenvironmental reconstructions of Nettilling Lake area (Baffin Island, Nunavut): A multi-proxy analysis.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paleoclimate and paleolimnological history of several Arctic regions remains poorly known. This is the case for the area around Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Nunavut), the largest lake of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. To reconstruct the past environmental history of this area, a highly innovative multi-proxy approach combining physical, magnetic, chemical and biological properties preserved in lake sediments was used. One particular goal of this study was to investigate the possible coupling between sedimentation processes observed in the lake and melt rates of nearby Penny Ice Cap. A 1-m long sediment core was retrieved from a small bay in the northeastern part of Nettilling Lake during the summer of 2010. This sampling area was chosen based on the hypothesis that incoming glacial meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap would leave a strong climate-modulated signal that would be reflected in the sedimentary sequence. The core was analyzed by both non-destructive (X-radiography (X-ray), microfluorescence-X (µ-XRF), magnetic susceptibility) and destructive (Loss On Ignition, grain size, water content, thin sections, diatoms) techniques. Radiometric AMS 14C and 210Pb/137Cs age determinations, as well as paleomagnetic measurements, were used to develop the core chronology, yielding an estimated bottom age of approximately 1365 AD. The sedimentation rate (0.15 cm.yr-1) in Nettilling Lake was found to be high compared to other Arctic lakes, due to inputs of highly turbid meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap with high suspended sediment loads. Significant correlations were found between geochemical profiles of elements linked to detrital inputs (Si, Ti, K, Ca) and melt rates from Penny Ice Cap since the 19th century. This suggests that variations in detrital elements in Nettilling Lake sediments might be used as an indirect indicator of regional climate fluctuations (e.g., summer temperatures) that determine glacier melt rates.

Beaudoin, Anne; Pienitz, Reinhard; Francus, Pierre; Zdanowicz, Christian; St-Onge, Guillaume

2014-05-01

350

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...the exclusive use of the U.S. Navy. No person...shall be enforced by Commander, Navy Region Northwest and...

2010-07-01

351

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...the exclusive use of the U.S. Navy. No person...shall be enforced by Commander, Navy Region Northwest and...

2013-07-01

352

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...the exclusive use of the U.S. Navy. No person...shall be enforced by Commander, Navy Region Northwest and...

2009-07-01

353

Plant succession and soil degradation in desertified areas (Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern Canary Islands constitute a region that is vulnerable to desertification processes, mainly due to its intensely arid climate and the action of man. Vegetation in the island of Fuerteventura has been profoundly transformed over the last few hundred years, and the greater part of the insular territory is presently covered by substitution brush.In this work, a study of

Antonio Rodríguez Rodríguez; Juan Luis Mora; Carmen Arbelo; Juan Bordon

2005-01-01

354

Thermal maturation in the Ellef Ringnes Island and surrounding area, Sverdrup Basin  

SciTech Connect

Determining thermal maturity studies in the Ellef Ringnes Island area was complicated by numerous factors, such as the presence of cavings, bitumen staining, and igneous intrusions. Cavings are a problem in certain intervals in Hoodoo H-37, Dome Bay P-36, and Helicopter J-12. Bitumen staining resulting in suppression of reflectance has occurred in the lower part of the Jameson Bay shales in Elve M-40. Thick sills resulted in increase of Ro to 4.0%, whereas thin sills had a minimal impact on reflectance increase. Other features observed include overpressuring caused by hydrocarbon generation in the Schei Point source rocks as well as in the Jameson and Ringnes Shales, and a kinky Ro profile caused by the presence of low-permeability gas-bearing reservoirs in the Heiberg sandstones in Jackson Bay G-16A. The presence of sapropelic coals with HI up to 329 mg HC/gTOC in Heiberg sandstones in Elve M-40 containing Botryococcus algae should also be noted.

Gentzis, T. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Goodarzi, F. [National Resources Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

1998-12-01

355

Coseismic uplift of holocene marine terraces in the pakarae river area, Eastern North Island, New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Holocene marine terraces along 15 km of the northeastern coast of North Island record episodic tectonic uplift. A maximum of seven terraces are arranged in staircase fashion and lie about 20 km above the subduction interface between the Pacific and Australian plates. The highest (T1) corresponds with the maximum of the Holocene marine transgression about 6700 14C yr B.P. Younger terraces are marine abrasion platforms overlain by thin beach deposits. Radiocarbon ages of marine shells from beach deposits indicate that uplift above marine conditions occurred ca. 6700(T1), 5500(T2), 3900(T3), 2500(4), 1600(T5), 1000(T6), and slightly younger than 600(T7) yr B.P. Uplift probably occurred coseismically. The maximum late Holocene uplift rate in the study area is 8 mm/yr. Altitudinal distribution of terraces suggests deformation exists as a ca. 20-km elongate dome, broken at the southern end by the Pakarae fault, which trends across the dome. Rupture on this fault has accompanied the growth of the dome but is not responsible for it. Bathymetric profiling suggests that an active fault, parallel to and about 5 km offshore, is probably responsible for the episodic coastal uplift.

Ota, Yoko; Hull, Alan G.; Berryman, Kelvin R.

1991-05-01

356

LIFE-FORMS OF MOSS SPECIES IN DEFROSTING AREAS OF KING GEORGE ISLAND, SOUTH SHETHLAND ISLANDS, ANTARCTICA FORMAS DE VIDA DE ESPÉCIES DE MUSGOS DE ÁREAS DE DEGELO DA ILHA REI GEORGE, ARQUIPÉLAGO SHETLANDS DO SUL, ANTÁRTICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The colonization form of moss species depends upon the genetic and environment conditions. The life-forms of moss species in the ice-free areas of the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, have been evaluated in the present work. The majority of the species occurs in tuft forms (59%), followed by cushions (31%). Few species occur in form of

Denise Pinheiro; Antonio Batista PEREIRA

357

The impact of volcanic gases from Miyake island on the chemical constituents in precipitation in the Tokyo metropolitan area.  

PubMed

The volcano on Miyake Island first erupted in July 2000 and continuous emission of volcanic gas from the collapsed caldera has been observed from the middle of August 2000. The large volcanic emission of SO2 had a strong influence on Tokyo metropolitan area, which is located approximately 150 km north of Miyake Island. We measured major ions in precipitation and dry deposition samples which had been collected at five sampling sites (Yokohama, Kashiwa, Fujisawa, Yokosuka, and Hachioji) in the Tokyo metropolitan area for 12 years since 1990. We have evaluated quantitatively the impact of the volcanic SO2 gas emitted from Miyake Island on the Tokyo metropolitan area by comparing depositional ionic constituents in the volcanic degassing period (from September 2000 to August 2001) with those in the normal period of the past 10 years (September 1990 to August 2000). nss-SO4(2-) concentrations in precipitation at the sampling sites in the Tokyo metropolitan area were 59.5-77.0 microeq/L during the degassing period, and 33.3-44.1 microeq/L during the normal period, respectively. The difference of nss-SO4(2-) concentrations between the two periods was statistically significant. In contrast, no significant differences were observed in the concentrations of the other major ions (NH4+, nss-Ca2+, Cl-, and NO3-) between the two periods. The impact of volcanic degassing from Miyake Island on the ionic concentrations in the precipitation of the Tokyo metropolitan area was seen only in the H+ and nss-SO4(2-) concentrations. The annual wet deposition amount of volcanic nss-SO4(2-) into the Tokyo metropolitan area has been quantitatively estimated. The annual wet deposition amounts were calculated as 701+/-277 Meq/year (22.4+/-8.9 kt SO2/year) on the total area of the Tokyo metropolitan area (14,000 km2). The wet deposition amount of nss-SO4(2-) corresponds to only 0.15% of the total annual amount of volcanic SO2 (15 Mt/year) emitted from Miyake Island from September 2000 to August 2001. This estimation is consistent with a previous study which reported that 0.3% of the atmospheric discharge of SO2 from the volcano in Mt. Etna in Sicily was deposited by precipitation to the surrounding area (1200 km2). The annual wet deposition amount of volcanic SO2 to the Tokyo metropolitan area was at the same order of the magnitude (37+/-15%) as the annual anthropogenic SO2 amount (60 kt/year) emitted from the Tokyo metropolitan area. PMID:15833251

Okuda, Tomoaki; Iwase, Tamami; Ueda, Hideko; Suda, Yusuke; Tanaka, Shigeru; Dokiya, Yukiko; Fushimi, Katsuhiko; Hosoe, Morikazu

2005-04-01

358

Greek Islands, Western Asia Minor as seen from STS-58  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This north-looking view shows the western margin of Turkey (right) and the Dodecanese Islands of Greece between the Aegean Sea (left) and the Sea of Crete (foreground). The largest island is Crete (foreground) with the semicircular island of Thira beyond. Thira is dominated by the volcanoe Santorini. Two airplane contrails appear between the Turkish mainland and the large island of Rhodes immediately offshore. The narrow straits of the Dardanelles, joining the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, can be detected top left.

1993-01-01

359

75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Street, Boston, MA. This will be the annual meeting of the Council. The agenda will include a presentation on citizen science activities on the islands, an update on the messaging project, elections of officers and other council...

2010-02-10

360

33 CFR 117.905 - Rhode Island [Reserved  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...with black figures not less than six inches high to indicate the vertical clearance under the closed draw at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridge that they are plainly visible to operators of vessels approaching the bridge...

2013-07-01

361

Clinical Assessment of Interviewable Rhode Island State Chronic Hospital Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social, physical, and psychological capabilities of patients in long-term care facilities were assessed in a three - stage clinical assessment survey initiated in May 1975. The survey included patients in continued treatment and acute hospital wards of tw...

C. C. Sherwood, S. Sherwood, J. N. Morris, J. W. McClain, D. S. Greer

1976-01-01

362

Online Learning: Addressing Challenges and Seizing Opportunities. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

America's K-12 education system faces three significant challenges: (1) increased global demands for skilled workers, (2) significant financial shortfalls, and (3) a looming teacher shortage. Independently, these factors present significant challenges for U.S. schools. In combination, they create a national imperative for swift action to create a…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2010

2010-01-01

363

77 FR 69648 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U...severity and magnitude to warrant a major disaster declaration under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42...

2012-11-20

364

Further Dosimetry Studies at Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center.  

SciTech Connect

The RINSC is a 2 mega-watt, light water and graphite moderated and cooled reactor that has a graphite thermal column built as a user facility for sample irradiation. Over the past decade, after the reactor conversion from a highly-enriched uranium core to a low-enriched one, flux and dose measurements and calculations had been performed in the thermal column to update the ex-core parameters and to predict the effect from in-core fuel burn-up and rearrangement. The most recent data from measurements and calculations that have been made at the RINSC thermal column since October of 2005 are reported.

Reciniello,R.N.; Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.-P.; Johnson, D.G.; Meddleton, M.; Tehan, T.N.

2008-05-05

365

Recent Trends in Bird Abundance on Rhode Island Salt Marshes  

EPA Science Inventory

Salt marsh habitat is under pressure from development on the landward side, and sea level rise from the seaward side. The resulting loss of habitat is potentially disastrous for salt marsh dependent species. To assess the population status of three species of salt marsh dependent...

366

The Reality of College Readiness, 2012. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Annually, ACT provides each state with "The Condition of College & Career Readiness," a report that details the college readiness of students who took the ACT[R] test. This report is a companion to "The Condition of College & Career Readiness." This paper traces the college enrollment, retention, re-enrollment, and migration patterns of the 2010…

ACT, Inc., 2012

2012-01-01

367

SURVEY OF METALS IN SEDIMENTS NEAR QUONSET POINT, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Elevated levels of silver, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead and zinc were observed in sediments collected from Narragansett Bay off Quonset Point during autumn of 1973. The probable source of the metals contamination was an electroplating facility ...

368

Use of precipitation and groundwater isotopes to interpret regional hydrology on a tropical volcanic island: Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for groundwater in the Kilauea volcano area of the Island of Hawaii. A network of up to 66 precipitation collectors was emplaced in the study area and sampled twice yearly for a 3-year period. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade wind, rain shadow, and high- elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in precipitation isotopes are controlled more by the frequency of storms than by seasonal temperature fluctuations. Results from this study suggest that (1) sampling network design must take into account areal variations in rainfall patterns on islands and in continental coastal areas and (2) isotope/elevation gradients on other tropical islands may be predictable on the basis of similar climatology. Groundwater was sampled yearly in coastal springs, wells, and a few high-elevation springs. Areal contrasts in groundwater stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic rift zones compartmentalize the regional groundwater system, isolating the groundwater south of Kilauea's summit and rift zones. Part of the Southwest Rift gone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for downrift flow in the springs and shallow wells sampled in the lower East Rift Zone.

Scholl, M. A.; Ingebritsen, S. E.; Janik, C. J.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

1996-01-01

369

Lagrangian transport in a microtidal coastal area: the Bay of Palma, island of Mallorca, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coastal transport in the Bay of Palma, a small region in the island of Mallorca, Spain, is characterized in terms of Lagrangian descriptors. The data sets used for this study are the output for two months (one in autumn and one in summer) of a high resolution numerical model, ROMS (Regional Ocean Model System), forced atmospherically and with a spatial resolution of 300 m. The two months were selected because of their different wind regime, which is the main driver of the sea dynamics in this area. Finite-size Lyapunov exponents (FSLEs) were used to locate semi-persistent Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and to understand the different flow regimes in the bay. The different wind directions and regularity in the two months have a clear impact on the surface bay dynamics, whereas only topographic features appear clearly in the bottom structures. The fluid interchange between the bay and the open ocean was studied by computing particle trajectories and residence time (RT) maps. The escape rate of particles out of the bay is qualitatively different, with a 32% greater escape rate of particles to the ocean in October than in July, owing to the different geometric characteristics of the flow. We show that LCSs separate regions with different transport properties by displaying spatial distributions of residence times on synoptic Lagrangian maps together with the location of the LCSs. Correlations between the time-dependent behavior of FSLE and RT are also investigated, showing a negative dependence when the stirring characterized by FSLE values moves particles in the direction of escape.

Hernández-Carrasco, I.; López, C.; Orfila, A.; Hernández-García, E.

2013-10-01

370

Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees ( Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs ( Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea originates from extra-regional sources in southern Iberia and northern Africa.

Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

2011-01-01

371

Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands).  

PubMed

The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees (Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs (Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea originates from extra-regional sources in southern Iberia and northern Africa. PMID:20333410

Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

2011-01-01

372

Phase fractionation and oil-condensate mass balance in the South Marsh Island Block 208–239 area, offshore Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phase fractionation can strongly deplete oil of its volatile compounds in a regular and characteristic fashion. This process has affected oils to a remarkably uniform extent throughout the 30×15km South Marsh Island 208–239 and Vermilion 30–31 area (including the Tiger Shoal, Starfak, Mound Point, Lighthouse Point, Amber, Trinity Shoal, and Aquamarine fields) just offshore Louisiana. Fractionation of the original “parent”

Steven Losh; Lawrence Cathles III

2010-01-01

373

EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Naval Live Oaks Area, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Florida, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, first-surface (FS) topography, and canopy-height (CH) datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Naval Live Oaks Area in Florida's Gulf Islands National Seashore, acquired June 30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations. For more information about similar projects, please visit the Decision Support for Coastal Science and Management website.

Nagle, David B.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Segura, Martha

2010-01-01

374

Stochastic Models for the Earth's Relief, the Shape and the Fractal Dimension of the Coastlines, and the Number-Area Rule for Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The degree of irregularity in oceanic coastlines and in vertical sections of the Earth, the distribution of the numbers of islands according to area, and the commonality of global shape between continents and islands, all suggest that the Earth's surface is statistically self-similar. The preferred parameter, one which increases with the degree of irregularity, is the fractal dimension, D, of

Benoit B. Mandelbrot

1975-01-01

375

Physical characteristics and quality of water from selected springs and wells in the Lincoln Point-Bird Island area, Utah Lake, Utah  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From February 1991 to October 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, investigated the hydrology of the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area in the southeast part of Utah Lake, Utah. The investigation included measurements of the discharge of selected springs and measurements of the physical and chemical characteristics of water from selected springs and wells in the LincolnPoint - Bird Island area. This report contains data for twenty-one distinct springs in the study area including two springs beneath the surface of Utah Lake at Bird Island. Data from this study, combined with data from previous studies, indicate that the location of springs in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area probably is controlled by fractures that are the result of faulting. Measured discharge of springs in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area ranged from less than 0.01 cubic foot per second to 0.84 cubic foot per second. Total discharge in the study area, including known unmeasured springs and seeps, is estimated to be about 5 cubic feet per second. Reported and measured temperatures of water from springs and wells in the Lincoln Point - Bird Island area ranged from 16.0 degrees Celsius to 36.5 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-solids con-centrations ranged from 444 milligrams per liter to 7,932 milligrams per liter, and pH ranged from 6.3 to 8.1. Physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water from the west side of Lincoln Point were virtually identical to the physical and chemical characteristics of water from the submerged Bird Island springs, indicating a similar source for the water. Water chemistry, isotope analyses, and geothermometer calculations indicate deep circulation of water discharging from the springs and indicate that the source of recharge for the springs at Lincoln Point and Bird Island does not appear to be localized in the LincolnPoint - Bird Island area.

Baskin, R. L.; Spangler, L. E.; Holmes, W. F.

1994-01-01

376

A strong species?area relationship for eukaryotic soil microbes: island size matters for ectomycorrhizal fungi  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the effects of habitat size and isolation have been successfully studied for macro- organisms, there is currently debate about their relative importance in explaining patterns of microbial species richness. In this study, we examine the species richness of a dominant group of eukaryotic soil microbes, ectomycorrhizal fungi, on tree islands of constant age and host composition that range in

Kabir G. Peay; Thomas D. Bruns; Peter G. Kennedy; Sarah E. Bergemann; Matteo Garbelotto

2007-01-01

377

Cancer incidence among residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1982–1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe Pennsylvania Department of Health established a registry of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Over 93% of the population present on the day of the accident within a 5-mile radius was enrolled and interviewed. We used the registry to investigate the potential cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure among the TMI population.

Yueh-Ying Han; Ada O. Youk; Howell Sasser; Evelyn O. Talbott

2011-01-01

378

Moving after the CrisisA Prospective Study of Three Mile Island Area Population Mobility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to determine the effect of the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) on residential mobility and population composition. The entire population living within five miles of TMI was registered shortly after the accident and traced one year later to identify movers. An estimated 15% of movers (about 2% of total residents) gave TMI as

Marilyn K. Goldhaber; Peter S. Houts; Renee Disabella

1983-01-01

379

Fluid migration in the Eugene Island block 330 area, offshore Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study funded by industry and the Department of Energy, the Global Basins Research Network has imaged fluid flow pathways that charged shallow, hydropressured, Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs in the Eugene Island 330 field, offshore Louisiana. Hydrocarbons appear to be derived from turbidite stacks within the salt withdrawal mini-basin buried deep within the geopressured zone. Fault zones, with pore pressure dependent

J. A. Nunn; S. J. Roberts; L. M. Cathles; R. N. Anderson

1996-01-01

380

Caldera resurgence as a possible cause of slope failure in volcanic areas: the Ischia island case history  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Slope instability in active volcanic areas is a factor of major hazard to be considered. Due to their rapid growth and deformation, active volcanoes experience gravitational disequilibrium and periodical structural failures. Depending on the geodynamic framework of a volcano, nature, style of activity and climatic conditions, slope instability occurs at different scales, from relatively small-volume mass movements to huge lahars and debris avalanches. Moreover, volcanoes located in coastal areas or islands, may experience lateral collapses with the potential to generate large tsunamis. Although there is very little literature on the relationships among caldera resurgence, volcanism and slope instability, recently also the caldera resurgence has been suggested as a possible cause of slope failure, as for the southern flank of the island of Ischia in the Southern Tyrrhenian sea (Italy). Ischia island gives a good opportunity to investigate such phenomena and related effects, as it is the only documented example of resurgent caldera in which, during uplift, volcanism and generation of mass movements have been very active and linked to each other in a sort of cyclical behaviour. The island of Ischia is one of the most impressive examples of resurgent calderas in the world. This caldera formed in response to a complex explosive eruption that, about 55 ka B.P., produced the Mt. Epomeo Green Tuff ignimbritic deposit. Starting from at least 30 ka B.P. the caldera floor has been uplifted of about 900 m, due to a resurgent phenomenon, which occurred through intermittent uplifting, likely triggered by the intrusion of new magma into the system, and tectonic quietness phases. During uplift, volcanism and generation of mass movements were very active. The resurgent area is composed of differentially displaced blocks and has a poligonal shape, resulting from reactivation of regional faults and activation of faults directly related to volcano-tectonism. The western sector is bordered by inward-dipping, high-angle reverse faults, cut by late outward-dipping normal faults due to gravitational readjustment of the slopes. The north-eastern and the south-western sides are bordered by vertical faults with right transtensive and left transpressive movements, respectively. The area located to the east of the most uplifted block is displaced by outward-dipping normal faults. Some giant landslides and their relationships with volcano-tectonism have been recognized at Ischia. Their deposits are intercalated with primary volcanics and minor landslide deposits in the eastern sector of the island. Within the northern and western sectors, historical earthquake-triggered landslides are well exposed, also due to lack of recent volcanic rocks. The largest landslide bodies seem to have a submarine counterpart, as evidenced by the hummocky topography of the seafloor in the offshore of the island. The recognized landslides vary from small lahars to large debris-avalanche, whose detachment areas are clearly conditioned by the geometry of the same structures that drove resurgence and fed volcanism. In conclusion, the results of a detailed stratigraphical, sedimentological and structural study carried out at Ischia, emphasize the intimate interplay among slope instability, resurgence dynamics, fault generation, seismicity and volcanism on the island.

de Vita, Sandro; Seta Marta, Della; Paola, Fredi; Enrica, Marotta; Giovanni, Orsi; Fabio, Sansivero

2010-05-01

381

8. RHODES DITCH: VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SHARP 'U' CONTOURED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. RHODES DITCH: VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING SHARP 'U' CONTOURED ABOVE SWALE. DITCH IS ALSO VISIBLE IN DISTANCE, RUNNING HORIZONTALLY ACROSS PHOTO, ON FAR HILLSIDE. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

382

Seasonal Occurrence and Distribution of Microbial Indicators and Pathogens in the Rhode River of Chesapeake Bay  

PubMed Central

The seasonal incidence and occurrence of indicator organisms and pathogens were studied at four sites in the Rhode River, a subestuary of Chesapeake Bay. The highest frequency of occurrence of total and fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci was in Muddy Creek, a marsh area receiving pasture land runoff. Second highest frequency of occurrence of these bacteria was in Cadle Creek, a populated area. Lowest measurements of these parameters were obtained at stations in the central portion of the Rhode River. No Salmonella spp. were detected by the methods employed in this study. However, it is concluded that if these organisms are present, the concentrations are ?1 organism per liter. The presence of Clostridium botulinum was detected in 12% of the samples tested.

Carney, J. F.; Carty, C. E.; Colwell, R. R.

1975-01-01

383

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

384

Rare earth elements in soils from selected areas on the Island of Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

Fifty soil samples for the wet, windward (east) side and dry, leeward (west) side of the Island of Hawaii were analyzed for La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Yb, and Lu by neutron activation/gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis. Data on concentrations in each sample are listed and analyzed statistically for soil samples collected from the western slope of Kohala Mountain, the western coastal plain of Mauna Kea, and the Northeastern coastal plain of Maunal Loa. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are two to six times greater in soils from the western, dry side of the island, and good statistical correlation is exhibited among the samples for pairs of individual REEs. In the organic-rich soils of the east side, correlations are poor but are markedly improved when sample weights are adjusted for weight due to organic matter and water in soil colloids. If the mean compositions of selected rock samples from the Hawaii Reference Suite are representative of the compositions of the parent materials, REEs in the soils are moderately enriched (up to two times, based on oven-dry weights). Rare earth element concentrations in the island's western soils are as much as two times greater than the mean REE values of common sedimentary rocks worldwide; however, they are well within the concentration ranges of soils of continental origin. The eastern soils tend to have less La and Ce, but similar amounts of the middle and heavy REEs.

Barnard, W.M.; Halbig, J.B.

1985-07-01

385

A comparative study on mesozooplankton abundance and diversity between a protected and an unprotected coastal area of Andaman Islands.  

PubMed

The study was carried out to understand the variability in phytoplankton production (Chlorophyll a) and mesozooplankton diversity from two different shallow coastal regions of south Andaman viz. Port Blair Bay (PBB), the only real urban area among the islands and Mahatma Gandhi Marine National Park, a Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Wandoor. Seasonal sampling was carried out during the Northeast monsoon (NEM-November 2005), Intermonsoon (IM-April 2006), and Southwest monsoon (SWM-August 2006). Significant (P?areas. Chl. a showed a steep increasing gradient from outer to the inner regions of the PBB. The number of zooplankton taxa recorded at both areas was quite similar, but marked differences were noticed in their relative contribution to the total abundance. Eventhough the Copepoda dominated at both the areas, the non-copepod taxa differed significantly between the regions. Dominance of carnivores such as siphonophores and chaetognaths were noticed at PBB, while filter feeders such as appendicularians and decapod larvae were more abundant at MPA. A total of 20 and 21 copepod families was recorded from PBB and MPA, respectively. Eleven species of chaetognaths were observed as common at both areas. Larval decapods were found to be predominant at MPA with 20 families; whereas, at PBB, only 12 families were recorded. In the light of the recent reports on various changes occurring in the coastal waters of the Andaman Islands, it is suspected that the difference in Chl. a as well as the mesozooplankton standing stock and community structure observed between the two study areas may be related to the various anthropogenic events influencing the coastal waters. PMID:24729177

Pillai, Honey U K; Jayalakshmy, K V; Biju, A; Jayalakshmi, K J; Paulinose, V T; Devi, C B L; Nair, V R; Revichandran, C; Menon, N R; Achuthankutty, C T; Panampunnayil, S U

2014-06-01

386

Degradation of marine ecosystems and decline of fishery resources in marine protected areas in the US Virgin Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The large number of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Caribbean (over 100) gives a misleading impression of the amount of protection the reefs and other marine resources in this region are receiving. This review synthesizes information on marine resources in two of the first MPAs established in the USA, namely Virgin Islands National Park (1962) and Buck Island Reef National Monument (1961), and provides compelling evidence that greater protection is needed, based on data from some of the longest running research projects on coral reefs, reef fish assemblages, and seagrass beds for the Caribbean. Most of the stresses affecting marine resources throughout the Caribbean (e.g. damage from boats, hurricanes and coral diseases) are also causing deterioration in these MPAs. Living coral cover has decreased and macroalgal cover has increased. Seagrass densities have decreased because of storms and anchor damage. Intensive fishing in the US Virgin Islands has caused loss of spawning aggregations and decreases in mean fish size and abundance. Groupers and snappers are far less abundant and herbivorous fishes comprise a greater proportion of samples than in the 1960s. Effects of intensive fishing are evident even within MPA boundaries. Although only traditional fishing with traps of 'conventional design' is allowed, commercial trap fishing is occurring. Visual samples of fishes inside and outside Virgin Islands National 'Park showed no significant differences in number of species, biomass, or mean size of fishes. Similarly, the number of fishes per trap was statistically similar inside and outside park waters. These MPAs have not been effective because an unprecedented combination of natural and human factors is assaulting the resources, some of the greatest damage is from stresses outside the control of park managers (e.g. hurricanes), and enforcement of the few regulations has been limited. Fully functioning MPAs which prohibit fishing and other extractive uses (e.g. no-take marine reserves) could reverse some of the degradation, allowing replenishment of the fishery resources and recovery of benthic habitats.

Rogers, C. S.; Beets, J.

2001-01-01

387

Urban heat island and air pollution--an emerging role for hospital respiratory admissions in an urban area.  

PubMed

The aim of the study discussed here was to determine the associations among the urban heat island (UHI), air quality, and hospital respiratory admissions in the warm center of an urban area. The authors collected and analyzed the data regarding air quality parameters, meteorological parameters, and the daily hospital respiratory admissions in the Taichung metropolis in the autumns of 2003 and 2004. By collecting the vertical meteorological parameters and air pollutant concentrations via the tethersonde balloon technique, the authors simulated convergence in Dali using The Air Pollution Model (TAPM) for the atmospheric conditions. The authors also examined the hypotheses with Duncan's Multiple Range test, and analyzed spatial patterns vis-à-vis air temperature, air quality, and hospital respiratory admissions with GIS. The results indicated that the UHI phenomenon-which generates convergence and then transports air pollutants to a metropolitan area-increases hospital respiratory admissions in the warm center of an urban area. PMID:20104832

Lai, Li-Wei; Cheng, Wan-Li

2010-01-01

388

Simulation of ground-water flow and potential contaminant transport at Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Island County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-dimensional finite-difference steady-state ground-water flow model was developed to simulate hydraulic conditions at the Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, near Oak Harbor, Washington. Remediation efforts were started in 1995 in an attempt to contain trichloroethene and other contaminants in the ground water. The model was developed as a tool to test the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat remediation efforts as well as alternative remediation strategies. The model utilized stratigraphic data from approximately 76 Navy and 19 private wells to define the geometry of the shallow, intermediate, and deep aquifers and the intervening confining layers. Initial aquifer parameters and recharge estimates from aquifer tests and published remedial investigation reports were used in the model and then adjusted until simulated water levels closely matched observed water-level data collected prior to the onset of remediation in 1995. The calibrated model was then modified to depict the remedial pump-and-treat system, in which contaminated ground water is extracted, treated, and returned to the ground surface for infiltration. The water levels simulated by the modified model were compared with observed water levels for the 1998 calendar year, during which time the pump-and-treat system was in nearly continuous operation and the ground-water system had equilibrated to steady-state conditions. Although artificial boundaries were used in the model, the choice of model boundary conditions was simulation in the area of primary concern surrounding the western contaminant plume and extraction wells. Particle tracking results indicate that the model can effectively simulate the advective transport of contaminants from the source area to the pumping wells and thus be used to test alternative remedial pumping strategies.

Simonds, F. William

2002-01-01

389

Density-independent survival of wild lake trout in the Apostle Islands area of Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) stock at Gull Island Shoal in western Lake Superior was one of only a few stocks of lean lake trout in the Great Lakes that survived overfishing and predation by the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Since the mid 1960s, the abundance of wild recruits measured at age 0 and the number of age-7 to -11 wild fish recruited to the fishable stock have increased. We used the Varley-Gradwell method to test for density-dependent survival between these life stages. Survival from age-0 to ages 7-11 was not affected by increasing density, which suggests that further increases in recruitment and stock size are still possible. We suggest that testing for the existence of density-dependent survival can be used to indicate when lake trout populations are rehabilitated.

Bronte, Charles R.; Schram, Stephen T.; Selgeby, James H.; Swanson, Bruce L.

1995-01-01

390

Geophysical reconnaissance of prospective geothermal areas on the Island of Hawaii using electrical methods  

SciTech Connect

Resistivity data from several areas were compiled, analyzed, and interpreted in terms of possible geologic models. On the basis of this analysis alone, two areas have been ruled out for possible geothermal exploitation, two have been interpreted to have a moderate-temperature resource, and two have been interpreted to have a high-temperature resource. The two areas which have been ruled out are the Keaau and South Point areas. The Kawaihae area and the lower northwest rift zone of Hualalai appear to have anomalous resistivity structures which suggest a moderate-temperature resource in each of these areas. Finally, specific areas in the lower southwest and lower east rift zones of Kilaauea have been outlined as locations where high-temperature fluids may exist at depth.

Kauahikaua, J.; Mattice, M.

1981-12-01

391

Total relative sea level rise at several coastal areas and island sites since the mid-20th century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When addressing the issue of coastal impacts of recent past and future sea level rise, what really does matter is the total relative sea level rise, i.e., the sum of the global mean rise plus the regional variability plus the local vertical land motion. Here we present results of the total sea level rise suffered by a number of continental coastlines and island sites since 1950. These are based on the use of an ensemble of 2-D past sea level reconstructions, long tide gauge records and GPS data where available. Our investigation concerns islands of the western and central tropical Pacific, the Carribean region and Indian Ocean, as well as continental coasts of south China, India and eastern Africa. We find that at some of the studied sites, the total relative sea level rise since 1950 has been significantly larger than the global mean rise (of 1.8 mm/yr over 1950-2010). This is the case of the Tuvalu and Tahiti islands in the tropical Pacific. At Tuvalu for example, where the rate of rise reached 5 mm/yr, the total relative sea level elevation amounts 30 cm since 1950. On the other hand, in the Carribean region (in particular the Lesser Antilles) the total sea level rise does not differ from the global mean rise. This is unlike the continental coastline of south China (south China Sea), a shallow shelf area, where the rate of total sea level rise is found about 40% higher than the global mean rise. In the Indian ocean we also report a rather wide range of total sea level rates depending on the region considered. The main factor causing the observed variations in total sea level rates is the low frequency regional variability that superimposes to the uniform global mean rise. As a result, at some sites the amplification can be quite significant, making these sites potentially more vulnerable to negative impacts of sea level rise.

Cazenave, A. A.; Palanisamy, H.; Peng, D.; Becker, M.; Meyssignac, B.

2012-12-01

392

Pond inlet, northern Baffin island: The structure of an Eskimo resource area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure and yield of hunting, trapping and fishing areas around Pond Inlet in northern Baffin Land are analyzed on the basis of interviews with local Eskimos. Despite the abandonment of outlying Eskimo camps and the concentration of population in the central settlement of Pond Inlet since the 1960's, virtually all the former hunting and fishing areas continue to be

Erhard Treude

1977-01-01

393

Long Island Sound Water Temperatures During the Last Two Thousand Years  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Long Island Sound (LIS), sometimes called the ``urban sea'', is a large estuary in the heavily populated coastal zone between New York City and the Connecticut - Rhode Island border. LIS has seen dramatic environmental shifts since colonial times, including major changes in aquatic food extraction, land use, contaminant and nutrient inputs, and climate change. Annual seasonal hypoxic\\/anoxic events,

C. E. Warren; J. C. Varekamp; E. Thomas

2010-01-01

394

Unauthorized forced entry into the protected area at Three Mile Island Unit 1 on February 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On February 7, 1993, at 6:53 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) an intruder drove into tile site owner-controlled area, through a gate into the protected area of Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station, Unit I (TMI-1) and crashed through a roll-up door on the Turbine Building. TMI Security reported this event to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Headquarters operations officer and declared a Security Emergency upon determining that the protected area of the plant had been compromised. At 7:23 a.m., the TMI-1 shift supervisor officially notified the NRC Headquarters operations officer that he had declared a Site Area Emergency effective at 7:05 a.m. Upon considering the possible significance to physical security and the regulatory questions that could result from the event, the NRC Executive Director for Operations established an incident investigation team to determine what happened and make appropriate findings and conclusions. In this report the team described the event and the response to the event, evaluated the regulatory requirements, and presented the team`s findings and conclusions.

Not Available

1993-04-01

395

Unauthorized forced entry into the protected area at Three Mile Island Unit 1 on February 7, 1993  

SciTech Connect

On February 7, 1993, at 6:53 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) an intruder drove into tile site owner-controlled area, through a gate into the protected area of Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station, Unit I (TMI-1) and crashed through a roll-up door on the Turbine Building. TMI Security reported this event to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Headquarters operations officer and declared a Security Emergency upon determining that the protected area of the plant had been compromised. At 7:23 a.m., the TMI-1 shift supervisor officially notified the NRC Headquarters operations officer that he had declared a Site Area Emergency effective at 7:05 a.m. Upon considering the possible significance to physical security and the regulatory questions that could result from the event, the NRC Executive Director for Operations established an incident investigation team to determine what happened and make appropriate findings and conclusions. In this report the team described the event and the response to the event, evaluated the regulatory requirements, and presented the team's findings and conclusions.

Not Available

1993-04-01

396

Fluid migration in the Eugene Island block 330 area, offshore Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

In a study funded by industry and the Department of Energy, the Global Basins Research Network has imaged fluid flow pathways that charged shallow, hydropressured, Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs in the Eugene Island 330 field, offshore Louisiana. Hydrocarbons appear to be derived from turbidite stacks within the salt withdrawal mini-basin buried deep within the geopressured zone. Fault zones, with pore pressure dependent permeability, provide conduits for episodic expulsion of fluids out of the geopressured zone. Imaging of present day fluid migration was accomplished using multiple three-dimensional seismic surveys done several years apart. Volume processing and attribute analysis algorithms are used to identify seismic amplitude interconnectivity and changes over time that result from active fluid migration. Pressures and temperatures are used to provide rate and timing constraints. Geochemical variability in reservoirs is attributed to mixing of oils. Using detailed hydrostratigraphic information constructed from seismic and well data, we have simulated the episodic expulsion of fluids from the geopressured zone along faults into individual thin sand layers in the overlying hydropressured zone. Our finite element model, Akcess.Basin[trademark], realistically simulates fluid flow, heat and solute transport and pore pressure dependent permeability of faults and strata. Our results documenting the existence of past and present migration events connecting shallow reservoirs to deep source rocks implies that large, heretofore undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves exist deep within the geopressured zone along the deep water continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Nunn, J.A. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)); Roberts, S.J. (Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)); Cathles, L.M. III (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Anderson, R.N. (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States))

1996-01-01

397

19 CFR 122.142 - Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and a foreign area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and...TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Flights to and From the U.S. Virgin Islands § 122.142 Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands...

2013-04-01

398

Acute coronary syndromes related to bio-climate in a Mediterranean area. The case of Ierapetra, Crete Island, Greece.  

PubMed

The occurrence of non-fatal acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is examined in relation with the local bioclimatic conditions in the Ierapetra area, in the southernmost part of Crete Island, Greece, during the period 2004-2007. Daily ACS counts and corresponding meteorological parameters, such as maximum and minimum air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were analyzed. Besides, the daily values of the human thermal index, physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) was evaluated. Pearson's ?(2) test and generalized linear models (GLM) with Poisson distribution were applied. The ACS syndromes present a multiple variation within the year, with the primary maximum in August and the secondary in May, while relative high ACS frequencies exist in early winter time. The impact of the weather variability on the ACS incidence is not statistically significant (C.L. 95%). PMID:22774800

Nastos, Panagiotis T; Giaouzaki, Katerina N; Kampanis, Nikos A; Matzarakis, Andreas

2013-01-01

399

How State Education Agencies in the Northeast and Islands Region Support Data-Driven Decisionmaking in Districts and Schools. Issues & Answers. REL 2009-No. 072. Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report examines the initiatives of state education agencies in the Northeast and Islands Region (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, and the Virgin Islands) to support data-driven decisionmaking in districts and schools and describes the service providers hired to support this work. Four…

LaPointe, Michelle A.; Brett, Jessica; Kagle, Melissa; Midouhas, Emily; Sanchez, Maria Teresa

2009-01-01

400

Evidence of Macroalgal Colonization on Newly Ice-Free Areas following Glacial Retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica  

PubMed Central

Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem.

Quartino, Maria Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

2013-01-01

401

Evidence of macroalgal colonization on newly ice-free areas following glacial retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica.  

PubMed

Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem. PMID:23484000

Quartino, María Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

2013-01-01

402

Cancer incidence among residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1982-1995  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Pennsylvania Department of Health established a registry of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Over 93% of the population present on the day of the accident within a 5-mile radius was enrolled and interviewed. We used the registry to investigate the potential cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure among the TMI population. Methods: Cancer incidence data among the TMI cohort were available from 1982 to 1995. Because more than 97% of the population were white and few cancer cases were reported for those younger than 18 years of age, we included whites of age 18 years and older (10,446 men and 11,048 women) for further analyses. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) per 0.1 m Sv and 95% confident interval (CI) of cancer by radiation-related exposures. The cancers of interest were all malignant neoplasms, cancer of bronchus, trachea, and lung, cancer of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues, leukemia, and female breast. Results: Among men and women, there was no evidence of an increased risk for all malignant neoplasms among the TMI cohort exposed to higher maximum and likely {gamma} radiation (RR=1.00, 95% CI=0.97, 1.01 and RR=0.99, 95% CI=0.94, 1.03, respectively) after adjusting for age, gender, education, smoking, and background radiation. Elevation in risk was noted for cancer of the bronchus, trachea, and lung in relation to higher background radiation exposure (RR=1.45, 95% CI=1.02-2.05 at 8.0-8.8 {mu}R/h compared to 5.2-7.2 {mu}R/h). An increased risk of leukemia was found among men exposed to higher maximum and likely {gamma} radiation related to TMI exposure during the ten days following the accident (RR=1.15, 95% CI=1.04, 1.29 and RR=1.36, 95% CI=1.08, 1.71, respectively). This relationship was not found in women. Conclusion: Increased cancer risks from low-level radiation exposure within the TMI cohort were small and mostly statistically non-significant. However, additional follow-up on this population is warranted, especially to explore the increased risk of leukemia found in men.

Han, Yueh-Ying, E-mail: hany2@upmc.edu [Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Youk, Ada O., E-mail: ayouk@pitt.edu [Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sasser, Howell, E-mail: howell_sasser@nymc.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States)] [Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Talbott, Evelyn O., E-mail: eot1@pitt.edu [Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2011-11-15

403

Mortality among the residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1979-1992.  

PubMed

The largest U.S. population exposed to low-level radioactivity released by an accident at a nuclear power plant is composed of residents near the Three Mile Island (TMI) Plant on 28 March 1979. This paper (a collaboration of The University of Pittsburgh and the Pennsylvania Department of Health) reports on the mortality experience of the 32,135 members in this cohort for 1979-1992. We analyzed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) using a local comparison population and performed relative risk regression modeling to assess overall mortality and specific cancer risks by confounding factors and radiation-related exposure variables. Total mortality was significantly elevated for both men and women (SMRs = 109 and 118, respectively). All heart disease accounted for 43.3% of total deaths and demonstrated elevated SMRs for heart disease of 113 and 130 for men and women, respectively; however, when controlling for confounders and natural background radiation, these elevations in heart disease were no longer evident. Overall cancer mortality was similar in this cohort as compared to the local population (male SMR = 100; female SMR = 101). In the relative risk modeling, there was a significant effect for all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue in males in relation to natural background exposure (p = 0.04). However, no trend was noted. We found a significant linear trend for female breast cancer risk in relation to increasing levels of TMI-related likely [gamma]-exposure (p = 0.02). Although such a relationship has been noted in other investigations, emissions from the TMI incident were significantly lower than in other documented studies. Therefore, it is unlikely that this observed increase is related to radiation exposure on the day of the accident. The mortality surveillance of this cohort does not provide consistent evidence that radioactivity released during the TMI accident has a significant impact on the mortality experience of this cohort to date. However, continued follow-up of these individuals will provide a more comprehensive description of the morbidity and mortality experience of the cohort. PMID:10856029

Talbott, E O; Youk, A O; McHugh, K P; Shire, J D; Zhang, A; Murphy, B P; Engberg, R A

2000-06-01

404

Geohydrology of the Bethpage-Hicksville-Levittown area, Long Island, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of groundwater levels and flow in east-central Nassau County, N.Y. , began in October 1985. The 11.4 sq-mile area encompasses parts of Bethpage, Hicksville, Levittown, Plainview, Plainedge, and Farmingdale. Approximately 1,200 ft of unconsolidated Cretaceous deposits and 50 to 100 ft of Pleistocene deposits overlie bedrock throughout the area. The unconsolidated deposits consist mostly of sand, gravel, silt, and clay and have good water-transmitting properties except where clay forms continuous layers that can impede groundwater flow. The area is mostly residential and industrial. Pumpage for public supply exceeds 10 million gal/day, most of which eventually discharges from the groundwater system to tidewater as sewage outflow. Industrial pumpage during summer exceeds 10 million gal/day, but most of the water is returned to the system through recharge basins. Groundwater levels in this area fluctuate seasonally in response to natural recharge, pumping, and use of recharge basins. (Author 's abstract)

Smolensky, D. A.; Feldman, S. M.

1988-01-01

405

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nautical miles; thence 313 degrees true to Pyramid Head Light. (2) The waters of...Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at Pyramid Head Light; extending in a direction...transmission with the Navy Observation Posts near Pyramid Cove prior to assuming that the...

2009-07-01

406

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...nautical miles; thence 313 degrees true to Pyramid Head Light. (2) The waters of...Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at Pyramid Head Light; extending in a direction...transmission with the Navy Observation Posts near Pyramid Cove prior to assuming that the...

2010-07-01

407

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...42â²40.0â³ N, 117°11â²06.5â³ W. (b) The regulation. (1) The restricted area shall not be open to swimming, fishing, water-skiing, mooring or anchorage. (2) Dragging, seining, other fishing operations, and...

2013-07-01

408

An Observational Study of the Urban Heat Island in the Greater Thessaloniki Area: Preliminary Results and Development of a Forecasting Service  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The present paper investigates the characteristics of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) in the Greater Thessaloniki Area (GTA). The study is carried out by using and analyzing hourly air temperature data covering the period from June through September 2008. It was found that the urban zone of the city is heated faster and more effectively than the suburban surroundings, especially in early morning hours. Two measuring sites were selected as representative of ``urban'' and ``suburban'' areas and the hourly air temperature differences were calculated and classified by magnitude. The analysis of the percentage of occurrences for each class revealed that the city of Thessaloniki is subject to a rather moderate UHI. It was also found that the heat island can be more clearly observed during overnight hours, reaching, however, its maximum magnitude in early morning hours. Last but not least, the current paper introduces the development of an Urban Heat Island Forecasting Service (UHI-FS).

Giannaros, T. M.; Melas, D.; Kontogianni, P.

2010-01-01

409

Insecticide resistance of Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus in Hainan Island, a malaria-endemic area of China  

PubMed Central

Background Malaria is one of the most important public health problems in Southeast Asia, including Hainan Island, China. Vector control is the main malaria control measure, and insecticide resistance is a major concern for the effectiveness of chemical insecticide control programs. The objective of this study is to determine the resistance status of the main malaria vector species to pyrethroids and other insecticides recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for indoor residual sprays. Methods The larvae and pupae of Anopheles mosquitoes were sampled from multiple sites in Hainan Island, and five sites yielded sufficient mosquitoes for insecticide susceptibility bioassays. Bioassays of female adult mosquitoes three days after emergence were conducted in the two most abundant species, Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus, using three insecticides (0.05% deltamethrin, 4% DDT, and 5% malathion) and following the WHO standard tube assay procedure. P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were measured. Mutations at the knockdown resistance (kdr) gene and the ace-1gene were detected by DNA sequencing and PCR-RFLP analysis, respectively. Results An. sinensis and An. vagus were the predominant Anopheles mosquito species. An. sinensis was found to be resistant to DDT and deltamethrin. An. vagus was susceptible to deltamethrin but resistant to DDT and malathion. Low kdr mutation (L1014F) frequency (<10%) was detected in An. sinensis, but no kdr mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Modest to high (45%-75%) ace-1 mutation frequency was found in An. sinensis populations, but no ace-1 mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Significantly higher P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase activities were detected in deltamethrin-resistant An. sinensis, and significantly higher P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were found in malathion-resistant An. vagus mosquitoes. Conclusions Multiple insecticide resistance was found in An. sinensis and An. vagus in Hainan Island, a malaria-endemic area of China. Cost-effective integrated vector control programs that go beyond synthetic insecticides are urgently needed.

2014-01-01

410

Characterising reef fish populations and habitats within and outside the US Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument: A lesson in marine protected area design  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Marine protected areas are an important tool for management of marine ecosystems. Despite their utility, ecological design criteria are often not considered or feasible to implement when establishing protected areas. In 2001, the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (VICRNM) in St John, US Virgin Islands was established by Executive Order. The VICRNM prohibits almost all extractive uses. Surveys of habitat and fishes inside and outside of the VICRNM were conducted in 2002-2004. Areas outside the VICRNM had significantly more hard corals, greater habitat complexity, and greater richness, abundance and biomass of reef fishes than areas within the VICRNM. The administrative process used to delineate the boundaries of the VICRNM did not include a robust ecological characterisation of the area. Because of reduced habitat complexity within the VICRNM, the enhancement of the marine ecosystem may not be fully realised or increases in economically important reef fishes may take longer to detect. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Monaco, M. E.; Friedlander, A. M.; Caldow, C.; Christensen, J. D.; Rogers, C.; Beets, J.; Miller, J.; Boulon, R.

2007-01-01

411

Repeat Measurements of Seismic Noise at the Waiotapu Geothermal Area, North Island, NZ  

SciTech Connect

The amplitudes of seismic ground noise were remeasured at 66 sites in the Waiotapu and Reporoa geothermal areas in 1995 to determine whether amplitudes had changed since the first survey in 1970. In both 1995 and 1970 high levels of seismic noise occurred in two localities, one at Waiotapu and one at Reporoa. The elevated levels of seismic noise at most sites are thought to be caused by surface or near-surface geothermal activity. At seven sites in the Waiotapu area seismic noise levels were almost the same in 1995 as in 1970, indicating no change in the intensity of the source of the geothermal seismic noise. At most other sites the 1995 seismic noise levels were different to those measured in 1970, although at sites with high levels of seismic noise the differences were usually less than at sites with low levels of seismic noise.

Whiteford, P.C.

1995-01-01

412

Heating and cooling degree day prediction within the London urban heat island area  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the London Site Specific Air Temperature prediction model, which comprises of a suite of artificial neural network (ANN) models to predict site-specific hourly air temperature within the Greater London Area (GLA). The model was developed using a back-propagation ANN model based on hourly air temperature measurements at 77 fixed temperature stations (FTS) and hourly meteorological data (off-site

M. Kolokotroni; Y. Zhang; R. Giridharan

2009-01-01

413

Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in particular for Tl, Rb, Zn, Mn, As, Pb, Se, Bi, Al. The highest concentrations were found both in soils and plants close to the most active fumarolic areas of Stefanos, Kaminakia and Polyvotes and also close to the Geothermal Drill (exploration well). Moreover, both soils and plants showed a good correlation between Cu-Zn, Cu-Pb, Bi-Pb, Ba-Sr, Bi-Tl, Ti-Al, Ni-Al, Tl-As, Te-Tl, Te-Se as well as REE's. From the comparison between Cistus sp. and Erica sp. we found a significant enrichment in the former respect to the latter, making Cistus sp. the most suitable plant for biomonitoring studies at Nisyros.

Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

2014-05-01

414

Seismic activity of Tokyo area and Philippine Sea plate under Japanese Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Japanese government has estimated the probability of earthquake occurrence with magnitude 7-class during the next 30 years as 70 %. This estimation is based on five earthquakes that occurred in this area in the late 120 years. However, it has been revealed that this region is lying on more complicated tectonic condition due to the two subducted plates and the various types of earthquakes which have been caused by. Therefore, it is necessary to classify these earthquakes into inter-plate earthquakes and intra-plate ones. Then, we have been constructing a seismic observation network since 5 years ago. Tokyo Metropolitan area is a densely populated region of about 40 million people. It is the center of Japan both in politics and in economy. So that human activities have been conducting quite busily, this region is unsuitable for seismic observation. Then, we have decided to make an ultra high dense seismic observation network. We named it the Metropolitan Seismometer Observation Network; MeSO-net. MeSO-net consists of 296 seismic stations. Minimum interval is about 2km and average interval is about 5km.We picked the P- and S-wave arrival times manually. We applied double-difference tomography method to the dataset and estimated the velocity structure. We depicted the plate boundaries from the newly developed velocity model. And, we referred to the locations of the repeating earthquakes, the distributions of normal hypocenters and the focal mechanisms. Our plate model became relatively flat and a little shallower than previous one.Seismicity of Metropolitan area after the M9 event was compared to the one before M9 event. The seismic activity is about 4 times as high as before the M9 event occurred. We examined spatial distribution of the activated seismicity with respect to the newly developed plate configuration. The activated events are located on upper boundaries and they have almost thrust type mechanisms. Recently, a slow slip event has occurred on October in 2011. This observation suggests that shear stresses on the plate boundaries have increased due to eastwards movement of the eastern Japan driven by post-seismic slip of the M9.0 Tohoku-oki event. The present study is supported by two Special Projects for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area and reducing vulnerability for urban mega earthquake disasters from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Nanjo, K.; Kasahara, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Tsuruoka, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Obara, K.; Hirata, N.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

2012-12-01

415

Comparison of impervious surface area and normalized difference vegetation index as indicators of surface urban heat island effects in Landsat imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and percent impervious surface as indicators of surface urban heat island effects in Landsat imagery by investigating the relationships between the land surface temperature (LST), percent impervious surface area (%ISA), and the NDVI. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data were used to estimate the LST from

Fei Yuan; Marvin E. Bauer

2007-01-01

416

Microseismicity in the Tararua—Wairarapa area: depth-varying stresses and shallow seismicity in the southern North Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results from previously unpublished microearthquake field studies in the Tararua-Wairarapa area during 1971–72 demonstrate important differences between crustal seismicity shallower than 20 km and intense, regionally extensive, underlying seismicity in the 20–40 km depth range. As earlier observed in the Marlborough region, and more recently in the southernmost North Island, composite focal mechanisms in the Tararua-Wairarapa area indicate markedly different

Walter J. Arabasz; M. A. Lowry

1980-01-01

417

The Sponge Community of a Subtidal Area with Hydrothermal Vents: Milos Island, Aegean Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sponges were sampled by SCUBA diving at six subtidal rocky sites, three of which were close to hydrothermal vents, a common feature on the sea-floor off the south-east coast of Milos. Twenty-five species (2 Calcarea and 23 Demospongiae) were found, few compared with the 589 recorded for the Mediterranean, but an important addition to the scant information on the sponge fauna of the Aegean Sea. The number of species found at vent sites was consistently higher than that found at non-vent sites, but no vent-obligate species could be identified. However, Geodia cydonium and three species of Cliona ( C. copiosa, C. nigricans and C. rhodensis) showed a tendency to colonize vent areas. The former might take advantage of increased silica availability, the latter of the enhanced deposition of carbonates near vents. Substratum cover by sponges (estimated from wire-framed photographs of 0·7 m 2), varied greatly both among and within sites, mostly according to slope. Most sponge species preferred vertical to overhanging, shaded substrata. Proximity to vents seemed to have little or no influence on sponge cover, notwithstanding a primary effect on species diversity.

Pansini, M.; Morri, C.; Bianchi, C. N.

2000-11-01

418

19 CFR 122.142 - Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands and a foreign area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flights between the U.S. Virgin Islands... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Flights to and From the U.S. Virgin Islands § 122.142 Flights between the U.S. Virgin...

2010-04-01

419

FEEDING AREAS OF ARCTIC TERNS (Sterna paradisaea) AND COMMON TERNS (Sterna hirundo) BREEDING ON MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND, NEW BRUNSWICK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Machias Seal Island (MSI) is a 9.5 ha, treeless island located at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy, 20 km south of Grand Manan. It is designated a Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) Migratory Bird Sanctuary and managed by CWS because it is the breeding grounds of a large number of seabirds, including both arctic and common terns. The Atlantic

Amie L. Black; Antony W. Diamond

2005-01-01

420

Earth-science studies of a nuclear test area in the Western Aleutian Islands, Alaska: an interim summary of results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent multi-disciplinary studies by the U. S. Geological Survey ; conducted on and near Amchitka Island in the Aleutians have contributed much to a ; better understanding of the geologic, hydrologic, and tectonic environment of the ; island as an underground nuclear test site. The work included geologic mapping, ; isotopic dating, deep drilling, geophysical surveys, hydrologic investigations, ; and

W. J. Carr; L. M. Gard; G. D. Bath; D. L. Healey

1971-01-01

421

75 FR 61993 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2120-AA66 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...description of the Class E airspace areas for Kwajalein Island, Bucholz AAF, Marshall Islands, RMI. The...

2010-10-07

422

[Reproduction of the Spanish sardine, Sardinella aurita (Clupeiformes: Clupeidae) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island, Venezuela].  

PubMed

Sex ratio, sexual maturity, fecundity and time of spawning of the Spanish sardine (Sardinella aurita) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island were determined through monthly samplings of commercial fisheries, from January 2004 to April 2005. A total of 3 736 individuals were examined. Sex ratio was 55.47% females and 44.53% males, with a 1:1.25 sexual proportion (chi2 = 44.454, p < 0.05). Length at first sexual maturity (L50) was 20 cm. Spawning of the species was confirmed to be partial and continuous throughout the year, with two peaks of intensity during the first and last quarters. Absolute fecundity ranged from 10,530 to 83,779 oocytes and it was proportional to body length (F = -100,900 + 6696.2 * L) and to body weight (F = 13,327 + 5666.3 * P). Relative fecundity ranged from 149 to 1020 oocytes/g and also was proportional to body length and weight. We concluded that the Spanish sardine exhibits two peaks of spawning activity per year with a very fluctuating partial fecundity which could possibly be explained by environmental variability. PMID:19419083

Gassman, Juan; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo W

2008-12-01

423

Ground Water in Kilauea Volcano and Adjacent Areas of Mauna Loa Volcano, Island of Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

About 1,000 million gallons of water per day moves toward or into ground-water bodies of Kilauea Volcano from the lavas of Mauna Loa Volcano. This movement continues only to the northern boundaries of the east and southwest rift zones of Kilauea, where a substantial quantity of ground water is deflected downslope to other ground-water bodies or to the ocean. In the western part of Kilauea, the kaoiki fault system, which parallels the southwest rift zone, may be the main barrier to ground-water movement. The diversion of the ground water is manifested in the western part of Kilauea by the presence of large springs at the shore end of the Kaoiki fault system, and in the eastern part by the apparently large flow of unheated basal ground water north of the east rift zone. Thus, recharge to ground water in the rift zones of Kilauea and to the areas to the south of the rift zones may be largely by local rainfall. Recharge from rainfall for all of Kilauea is about 1,250 million gallons per day. Beneath the upper slopes of the Kilauea rift zones, ground-water levels are 2,000 feet or more above mean sea level, or more than 1,000 feet below land surface. Ground-water levels are at these high altitudes because numerous and closely spaced dikes at depth in the upper slopes impound the ground water. In the lower slopes, because the number of dikes decreases toward the surface, the presence of a sufficient number of dikes capable of impounding ground water at altitudes substantially above sea level is unlikely. In surrounding basal ground-water reservoirs, fresh basal ground water floats on seawater and, through a transition zone of mixed freshwater and seawater, discharges into the sea. The hydraulic conductivity of the dike-free lavas ranges from about 3,000 to about 7,000 feet per day. The conductivity in the upper slopes of the rift ranges from about 5 to 30 feet per day and that of the lower slopes of the east rift zone was calculated at about 7,000 feet per day. The occurrence of heated basal water south of the lower east rift zone of Kilauea indicates the movement of a large quantity of geothermally heated ground water southward from the rift zone. There is little indication of similar movement of water from the upper slopes of the east rift zone, and there is no obvious movement of heated water from the lower east rift to the north because of the absence of heated ground water north of the rift zone. A broad range in temperature and chemical composition of geothermally modified ground water indicates several different sources. Four possible sources are (1) cold meteoric water, (2) cold seawater, (3) hydrothermal fluids of meteoric origin, and (4) hydrothermally modified seawater. The chloride-ion to magnesium-ion ratio of ground water indicates whether the water has been geothermally modified. A ratio greater than 15 to 1 generally denotes geothermally modified ground water.

Takasaki, Kiyoshi J.

1993-01-01

424

Island Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Island Information web site provides numerous facts and figures about the earth's islands. Island data is organized into the following categories: island superlatives, principal world islands and groups, 100 largest islands of the world, largest islands by continent, largest islands of selected countries, 35 largest islands of the United States, largest islands of selected U.S. states, 38 largest islands of Canada, largest islands of Canadian provinces, largest lake islands of the world, most populous islands of the world, most populous island countries, islands divided by international borders, tallest islands of the world, former and alternative names of islands, and island misinformation. All of the information within the web site is displayed in easy-to-read charts.

2001-10-07

425

A comparison of primary production models in an area of high mesoscale variability (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three types of primary productivity (PP) models were evaluated in a mesoscale area around the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica). Input variables were: phytoplankton carbon biomass, Chlorophyll a, sea water temperature, daily irradiance, among others, collected in situ during an oceanographic cruise (COUPLING, January 2010). Models of the first type were based on Chl a measurements: the widely used model VGPM (Behrenfeld and Falkowski, 1997) and a derived version developed for the Western Antarctic Peninsula (Dierssen et al., 2000). The second type included two models based on phytoplankton carbon biomass: one developed for the whole Southern Ocean (Arrigo et al., 2008) and one based on the Metabolic Theory of Ecology developed by López-Urrutia et al. (2006), being the first time that a model with these features is used for Antarctic waters. The third type was an updated version of the carbon-based model CbPM (first described by Behrenfeld et al. (2005)) based on the Chl a/carbon biomass ratio modulation. The degree of agreement among the results between the different types of models turned out to be low (> 30% of difference), but high within models of the same type (< 10% of difference). Biomass-based model predictions differed the most from those estimated by the other two types. The differences in PP estimates were primarily attributed to the different ways these models treat the phytoplankton assemblage, along with the difference in input variables. Among the five models evaluated, the output from the modified version of the CbPM showed the lowest bias (0.55) being the most realistic. It made a special attempt to detect the factors controlling phytoplankton physiological state, showing a nutrient limitation towards the Drake area similar to the one observed for the in situ PP values.

García-Muñoz, Cristina; López-Urrutia, Ángel; Lubián, Luis M.; García, Carlos M.; Hernández-León, Santiago

2013-10-01

426

Forecast of Urban Heat Island in Tokyo Metropolitan Area in 2020 Using a Meteorological Model Incorporating an Urban Canopy Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temperature increases in summer due to urbanization, i.e. the urban heat island effect, are becoming very serious in Japanese cities. On the other hand, three-dimensional meteorological meso-scale models are often used to determine the mechanisms of urban heat islands. However it is necessary to represent the properties of building canopies precisely in order to analyze the spatial and temporal distribution

Yoichi Kawamoto; Ryozo Ooka

427

Life cycle of a geyser discharge apron: Evidence from Waikite Geyser, Whakarewarewa geothermal area, North Island, New Zealand  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waikite, a geyser located in the Whakarewarewa geothermal area on the North Island, New Zealand, has a history of eruptive-dormancy cycles that have been attributed to natural and anthropogenic causes. The last cycle involved an active period from ~ 1932 to 1968/69 that was followed by a period of dormancy that continues today. Such cycles are important because they control the temporal development of the discharge apron. When the geyser is active, growth of the discharge apron is dictated by the precipitation of opal-A, which is controlled by factors such as discharge patterns, water chemistry, pH, temperature, rate of cooling, and the resident microbiota. With dormancy, conditions change radically because water no longer flows down the discharge apron. Instead, the discharge apron lapses into a phase of degradation that, on Waikite, is evident from (1) deflation of the apron surface, (2) blocks splaying off the apron margins along margin-parallel fractures, (3) tension fractures, (4) saucer-shaped collapse zones, (5) increasingly unstable surfaces resulting from subsurface opal-A dissolution, (6) fractures, from which steam and other gases emanate, and (7) incursion of native vegetation around the edge of the apron and on the distal parts of the discharge apron. When the geyser becomes active again, silica precipitation will resume and the discharge apron will once again accrete vertically and expand laterally. Analysis of the Waikite system shows that successions that develop on geyser discharge aprons are formed of unconformity-bounded packages of sinter that reflect the eruptive-dormancy history of the parent geyser.

Jones, Brian; Renaut, Robin W.; Owen, R. Bernhart

2011-05-01

428

Long-term follow-up of the residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1979-1998.  

PubMed

The Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident (1979) prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Health to initiate a cohort mortality study in the TMI accident area. This study is significant because of the long follow-up (1979-1998), large cohort size (32,135), and evidence from earlier reports indicating increased cancer risks. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated to assess the mortality experience of the cohort compared with a local population. Relative risk (RR) regression modeling was performed to assess cause-specific mortality associated with radiation-related exposure variables after adjustment for individual smoking and lifestyle factors. Overall cancer mortality in this cohort was similar to the local population [SMRs = 103.7 (male); 99.8 (female)]. RR modeling showed neither maximum gamma nor likely gamma exposure was a significant predictor of all malignant neoplasms; bronchus, trachea, and lung; or heart disease mortality after adjusting for known confounders. The RR estimates for maximum gamma exposure (less than or equal to 8, 8-19, 20-34, greater than or equal to 35 mrem) in relation to all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue (LHT) are significantly elevated (RRs = 1.00, 1.16, 2.54, 2.45, respectively) for males and are suggestive of a potential dose-response relationship, although the test for trend was not significant. An upward trend of RRs and SMRs for levels of maximum gamma exposure in relation to breast cancer in females (RRs = 1.00, 1.08, 1.13, 1.31; SMRs = 104.2, 113.2, 117.9) was also noted. Although the surveillance within the TMI cohort provides no consistent evidence that radioactivity released during the nuclear accident has had a significant impact on the overall mortality experience of these residents, several elevations persist, and certain potential dose-response relationships cannot be definitively excluded. PMID:12611664

Talbott, Evelyn O; Youk, Ada O; McHugh-Pemu, Kathleen P; Zborowski, Jeanne V

2003-03-01

429

Flow paths and mixing properties of groundwater using hydrogeochemistry and environmental tracers in the southwestern area of Jeju volcanic island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SummaryGroundwater from springs, test boreholes and domestic wells was investigated to assess the flow system of basaltic aquifers at base-flow conditions in the southwestern part of Jeju Island, South Korea. This study utilized hydrogeochemical parameters and environmental tracers of 18O, 2H, 3H and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which showed that well-connected flow paths exist between coastal springs regardless of flow rates. In contrast, test boreholes near the coastal springs exhibited various flow paths. Nitrate concentrations were much higher than baseline values in mountainous groundwater while those decreased in coastal areas (<50 m asl) despite stronger anthropogenic land uses. Cl- was seemingly contributed from nitrate contamination sources and seawater sources were minimal due to low-permeability layers near sea level. The water-stable isotopes indicated little evaporation and were comparable to the local meteoric water line during the rainy season, which was confirmed by deuterium excess values, demonstrating that effective infiltration primarily occurs during the rainy season. From the effects of altitude on ?18O, the mean recharge altitudes for both mountainous and coastal springs were estimated as 300-400 m, which implies longer flow paths for the coastal springs. The relationship of CFC-12-CFC-113 and that of CFC-12-3H concordantly indicated that the groundwater consists mainly of binary mixtures composed of 15-25-year-old young water and old water with ages greater than 60 years. Lower nitrate levels in the coastal springs were well represented by the mixing models. Recharge altitudes for coastal springs increased up to 700 m, assuming that old water corresponds to high-altitude recharge, using the binary mixing model. Integration of hydrochemical and environmental tracer characteristics revealed that pahoehoe lava flows and hydrovolcanic tuffs play key roles in controlling the groundwater occurrence and quality.

Koh, Dong-Chan; Ha, Kyoochul; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Yoon, Yoon-Yeol; Ko, Kyung-Seok

2012-04-01

430

Seroepidemiology of Toxocara Canis infection among primary schoolchildren in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands  

PubMed Central

Background Toxocariasis, which is predominantly caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection, is a common zoonotic parasitosis worldwide; however, the status of toxocariasis endemicity in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unknown. Methods A seroepidemiological investigation was conducted among 166 primary school children (PSC) aged 7–12 years from the capital area of the RMI. Western blots based the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES) was employed, and children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted at a titer of 1:64. Information regarding demographic characteristics of and environmental risk factors affecting these children was collected using a structured questionnaire. A logistic regression model was applied to conduct a multivariate analysis. Results The overall seropositive rate of T. canis infection was 86.75% (144/166). In the univariate analysis, PSC who exhibited a history of feeding dogs at home (OR?=?5.52, 95% CI?=?1.15–26.61, p?=?0.02) and whose parents were employed as nonskilled workers (OR?=?2.86, 95% CI?=?1.08–7.60, p?=?0.03) demonstrated a statistically elevated risk of contracting T. canis infections. Cleaning dog huts with gloves might prevent infection, but yielded nonsignificant effects. The multivariate analysis indicated that parental occupation was the critical risk factor in this study because its effect remained significant after adjusting for other variables; by contrast, the effect of dog feeding became nonsignificant because of other potential confounding factors. No associations were observed among gender, age, consuming raw meat or vegetables, drinking unboiled water, cleaning dog huts with gloves, or touching soil. Conclusions This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among PSC in the RMI. The high seroprevalence indicates the commonness of T. canis transmission and possible human risk. The fundamental information that the present study provides regarding T. canis epidemiology can facilitate developing strategies for disease prevention and control.

2014-01-01

431

Collection and analysis of remotely sensed data from the Rhode River Estuary Watershed. [ecological parameters of Chesapeake Bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA chose the watershed of Rhode River, a small sub-estuary of the Bay, as a representative test area for intensive studies of remote sensing, the results of which could be extrapolated to other estuarine watersheds around the Bay. A broad program of ecological research was already underway within the watershed, conducted by the Smithsonian Institution's Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies (CBCES) and cooperating universities. This research program offered a unique opportunity to explore potential applications for remote sensing techniques. This led to a joint NASA-CBCES project with two basic objectives: to evaluate remote sensing data for the interpretation of ecological parameters, and to provide essential data for ongoing research at the CBCES. A third objective, dependent upon realization of the first two, was to extrapolate photointerpretive expertise gained at the Rhode River watershed to other portions of the Chesapeake Bay.

Jenkins, D. W.

1972-01-01

432

Detection of Leishmania infantum cryptic infection in asymptomatic blood donors living in an endemic area (Eivissa, Balearic Islands, Spain) by different diagnostic methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extent of cryptic leishmaniasis in blood donors from a Spanish endemic area, (Eivissa Island) was studied using various immunological and parasitological methods. Sera from 656 blood donors were analysed: 16 (2.4%) were positive by ELISA and 50 (7.6%) by Western blot. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and buffy coat (BC) samples, were analyzed by culture and nested-PCR. DNA of

C Riera; R Fisa; M Udina; M Gállego; M Portus

2004-01-01

433

Areas contributing ground water to the Peconic Estuary, and ground-water budgets for the north and south forks and Shelter Island, eastern Suffolk County, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Peconic Estuary, at the eastern end of Long Island, has been plagued by a recurrent algal bloom, locally referred to as ?Brown Tide,? that has caused the severe decline of local marine resources. Although the factors that trigger Brown Tide blooms remain uncertain, groundwater discharge has previously been shown to affect surface-water quality in the western part of the estuary. A U.S. Geological Survey groundwater- flow model of the main body of Long Island indicates that a total of about 7.5 x 106 ft3/d (cubic feet per day) of freshwater discharges to the western part of the estuary, but the model does not include the ground-water flow systems on the North and South Forks and Shelter Island, which contribute significant amounts of freshwater to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. The need for information on freshwater discharge to the entire estuary prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate ground-water discharge from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island. Source areas that contribute ground water to the Peconic Estuary were delineated, and groundwater budgets for these areas were developed, to evaluate the distribution and magnitude of ground-water discharge to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. Contributing-area boundaries that were delineated coincide with the hydraulic boundaries of the fresh ground-water-flow systems of the North and South Forks and Shelter Island; these boundaries are of two types? external (saltwater bodies) and internal (groundwater divides). Hydrologic components that were evaluated include recharge from precipitation, public-supply withdrawal and return flow, and agricultural withdrawal. Values for each of these components were calculated or estimated for the individual freshwater flow subsystems that form each ground-water-budget area, then summed to obtain the total discharge of fresh ground water to tidewater. Ground-water discharge to the Peconic Estuary is about 3.8 x 106 ft3/d from the North Fork, 11 x 106 ft3/d from the South Fork, and 1.7 x 106 ft3/d from Shelter Island. The total contribution to the estuary from these areas is about 16 x 106 ft3/d?roughly twice the total contribution from the main body of Long Island. In contrast to the freshwater contribution from the main body of Long Island, which is concentrated near the head of the estuary, the contributions from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island are distributed along the east-west length of the estuary. Changes in water-table altitude and the resulting changes in total discharge to the Peconic Estuary were estimated from the relative changes in annual mean water level at observation wells. The 1985-95 interval included 7 years (1985-88, 1991- 92, 1995) of generally below-average water-table altitudes that presumably caused similar decreases in ground-water discharge to the estuary; intense Brown Tide blooms coincided with six of these years (1985-88, 1991, 1995), and localized blooms coincided with the remaining year (1992). Watertable altitudes in the remaining 4 years of the 1985-95 interval (1989-90, 1993-94) were nearly average or above average, and presumably produced comparably near-average or increased amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary; none of these years saw any widespread Brown Tide blooms. Fluctuations in the amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary appear to affect the occurrence of Brown Tide blooms, although the factors that trigger the blooms have not been determined.

Schubert, C. E.

1998-01-01

434

Characterization of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the dengue vector population established in urban areas of Fernando de Noronha, a Brazilian oceanic island.  

PubMed

Aedes aegypti has played a major role in the dramatic expansion of dengue worldwide. The failure of control programs in reducing the rhythm of global dengue expansion through vector control suggests the need for studies to support more appropriated control strategies. We report here the results of a longitudinal study on Ae. aegypti population dynamics through continuous egg sampling aiming to characterize the infestation of urban areas of a Brazilian oceanic island, Fernando de Noronha. The spatial and temporal distribution of the dengue vector population in urban areas of the island was described using a monitoring system (SMCP-Aedes) based on a 103-trap network for Aedes egg sampling, using GIS and spatial statistics analysis tools. Mean egg densities were estimated over a 29-month period starting in 2011 and producing monthly maps of mosquito abundance. The system detected continuous Ae. aegypti oviposition in most traps. The high global positive ovitrap index (POI=83.7% of 2815 events) indicated the frequent presence of blood-fed-egg laying females at every sampling station. Egg density (eggs/ovitrap/month) reached peak values of 297.3 (0 - 2020) in May and 295 (0 - 2140) in August 2012. The presence of a stable Ae. aegypti population established throughout the inhabited areas of the island was demonstrated. A strong association between egg abundance and rainfall with a 2-month lag was observed, which combined with a first-order autocorrelation observed in the series of egg counts can provide an important forecasting tool. This first description of the characteristics of the island infestation by the dengue vector provides baseline information to analyze relationships between the spatial distribution of the vector and dengue cases, and to the development of integrated vector control strategies. PMID:24832009

Regis, Lêda N; Acioli, Ridelane Veiga; Silveira, José Constantino; de Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; da Cunha, Mércia Cristiane Santana; Souza, Fátima; Batista, Carlos Alberto Vieira; Barbosa, Rosângela Maria Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria Fontes; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Souza, Wayner Vieira

2014-09-01

435

Mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) survey of areas on Dauphin Island, Alabama, in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topographic survey data of areas on Dauphin Island on the Alabama coast were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. This system is composed of a high frequency laser scanner in conjunction with an inertial measurement unit and a position and orientation computer to produce highly accurate topographic datasets. A global positioning system base station was set up on a nearby benchmark and logged vertical and horizontal position information during the survey for post-processing. Survey control points were also collected throughout the study area to determine residual errors. Data were collected 5 days after Hurricane Isaac made landfall in early September 2012 to document sediment deposits prior to clean-up efforts. Three data files in ASCII text format with the extension .xyz are included in this report, and each file is named according to both the acquisition date and the relative geographic location on Dauphin Island (for example, 20120903_Central.xyz). Metadata are also included for each of the files in both Extensible Markup Language with the extension .xml and ASCII text formats. These topographic data can be used to analyze the effects of storm surge on barrier island environments and also serve as a baseline dataset for future change detection analyses.

Kimbrow, Dustin R.

2014-01-01

436

The Jeju dataset: Three-dimensional interpretation of MT data from mid-mountain area of Jeju Island, Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetotelluric (MT) surveys have been performed along five lines in the Jeju volcanic island located at South Sea of Korea. The purposes of the MT surveys are to see if there still remains thermal regime and if there exist deeply extended fractures or an aquifer system beneath the mid-mountain region of Mt. Halla in Jeju. By performing Audio-frequency MT (AMT)

Tae Jong Lee; Myung Jin Nam; Seong Kon Lee; Yoonho Song; Toshihiro Uchida

2009-01-01

437

Three-dimensional travel time tomography of the gas hydrate area offshore Vancouver Island based on OBS data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation presents results from a complex seismic study using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) conducted at a site of deep sea gas hydrate occurrence. The site is located on the accretionary margin of the northern Cascadia subduction zone offshore Vancouver Island, Canada. The major objectives for this study were the construction of a 3-D velocity model around the Bullseye vent

Mikhail Mikhailovich Zykov

2006-01-01

438

1997 Economic Census of Outlying Areas: Virgin Islands: Construction Industries, Manufactures, Wholesale Trade, Retail Trade, and Service Industries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Census Bureau reports that the retail trade sector of the US Virgin Islands has grown by 20 percent since 1992, with sales reaching $1.1 billion in 1997. In 1997, jewelry stores sold a total of $248.7 million and hotels and motels reported receipts of $123.8 million.

439

Diomede Islands, Bering Straight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Diomede Islands consisting of the western island Big Diomede (also known as Imaqliq, Nunarbuk or Ratmanov Island), and the eastern island Little Diomede (also known as Krusenstern Island or Inaliq), are two rocky islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska. The islands are separated by an international border and the International Date Line which is approximately 1.5 km from each island; you can look from Alaska into tomorrow in Russia. At the closest land approach between the United States, which controls Little Diomede, and Russia, which controls Big Diomede, they are 3 km apart. Little Diomede Island constitutes the Alaskan City of Diomede, while Big Diomede Island is Russia's easternmost point. The first European to reach the islands was the Russian explorer Semyon Dezhnev in 1648. The text of the 1867 treaty finalizing the sale of Alaska uses the islands to designate the border between the two nations.

The image was acquired July 8, 2000, covers an area of 13.5 x 10.8 km, and is located at 65.8 degrees north latitude, 169 degrees west longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2008-01-01

440

Ratio as Determined from Uniaxial Strain Experiments on Mudstone Samples from the Eugene Island 330 Area, Offshore Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uniaxial strain experiments conducted on mudstone cores from overpressured horizons in Eugene Island Block 330 (Gulf of Mexico) reveal information about consolidation state, compaction behavior, and permeability. Maximum past effective stresses for two mudstone samples were experimentally derived and are within 200 psi of porosity-based estimates of in-situ stress. Laboratory measurements of stress ratio (K0 0.85) compare well with in-situ

Beth B. Stump; Peter B. Flemings

441

Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).  

PubMed

This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

2014-01-01

442

Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Garcia, Alicia; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Ortiz, Ramon

2014-01-01

443

Streamlined Island  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

2003-01-01

444

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO). South America and Selected Island Coastal Marine Areas, East Coast. Volume 1. Area 1-Georgetown, Area 2-Cayenne, Area 3-Amazon Delta, Area 4-Fortaleza NW, Area 5-Natal, Area 6-Recife, Area 7-Salvador, Area 8-Vitoria NE.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1977-01-01

445

Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004?M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill.

Flint, Paul L.; Schamber, J. L.; Trust, K. A.; Miles, A. K.; Henderson, J. D.; Wilson, B. W.

2012-01-01

446

Tempo-spatial variation of nutrient and chlorophyll- ? concentrations from summer to winter in the Zhangzi Island Area (Northern Yellow Sea)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nutrient and Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) concentrations were investigated monthly along three transects extending from a mariculture area to open waters around the Zhangzi Island area from July to December 2009. The objective of this study is to illustrate food availability to the bottom-sowed scallop Patinopecten yessoensis under the influences of the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM), freshwater input and feedbacks of cultivated scallops. Significant thermal stratification was present in open waters from July to October, and salinity decreased in July and August in surface layers in the mariculture area. Nutrient concentrations increased with depth in both areas in summer, but were similar through water column in November and December. On average, nutrient increased from summer to autumn in all components except ammonia. Nutrient concentrations lower than the minimum thresholds for phytoplankton growth were present only in upper layers in summer, but stoichiometric nitrogen limitation existed in the entire investigation period. Column-averaged Chl- a concentration was lower in open waters than in mariculture area in all months. It increased significantly in mariculture area in August and October, and was less variable in open waters. Our results show that nutrients limitation to phytoplankton growth is present mainly in upper layer in association with stratification caused by YSCWM in summer. Freshwater input and upwelling of nutrients accumulated in YSCWM can stimulate phytoplankton production in mariculture area. Farming activities may change stoichiometric nutrient ratios but have less influence on Chl- a concentration.

Yin, Jiehui; Zhao, Zengxia; Zhang, Guangtao; Wang, Shiwei; Wan, Aiyong

2013-09-01

447

Floating islands of Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turkey abounds in both natural as well as cultural richness. Especially the natural assets located in developing regions have an important role to play in the economic life of such areas. The floating islands are one of these assets and have become an important research subject lately. Turkey is considered as a heaven of floating islands. Almost all geographical regions

Ihsan Bulut

2011-01-01

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