Sample records for area rhode island

  1. The Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    The Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan: Managing Ocean Resources Through Coastal Fugate, Sue Kennedy, and Chip Young Monica Allard-Cox, Editor oceanSAMP #12;#12;The Rhode Island Ocean #12;Additional copies of this publication are available from the University of Rhode Island Coastal

  2. 33 CFR 165.T01-0868 - Regulated Navigation Area; Route 24 Bridge Construction, Sakonnet River, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Area; Route 24 Bridge Construction, Sakonnet River, Rhode Island. 165.T01-0868 Section 165.T01-0868 Navigation...Area; Route 24 Bridge Construction, Sakonnet River, Rhode Island. (a) Location. The following area is a...

  3. Rhode Island Transportation

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Rhode Island Transportation Fact Book Highlights Transportation Center #12;Transportation in Rhode Island University of Rhode Island Transportation Center 2 Road Conditions / Road Ownership Public Road Length by Ownership 2008 Road Conditions 2008 9% 17% 45% 18% 11% Rhode Island Road Condition (2008

  4. 77 FR 42651 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area, Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, Approximately 4 Nautical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 Disestablishment of Restricted Area, Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, Approximately 4 Nautical Miles Due South of Lands End in Newport, RI AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of...

  5. 77 FR 69648 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  6. 77 FR 68797 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...of an emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3355-EM), dated October...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  7. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  8. Rhode Island Critical Resource Atlas

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used to assist planners, scientists, geographers, and others to visualize data sets. This particular project created draws on data from the state of Rhode Island's Geographic Information System (RIGIS) database in order to assist land managers and other interested parties. The project was created with support from the Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension, and a number of other organizations. On the site, visitors can click on maps of forests and wetlands, land use patterns, groundwater resources, soil hydrology, and biodiversity. On the site's homepage, visitors can also use the "Towns" drop down menu to look at information for different cities throughout the state. Additionally, the "Watershed Atlas" area provides detailed maps of the twelve watersheds located in Rhode Island.

  9. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  10. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  11. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  12. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  13. 21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rhode Island. 808.89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs...Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89 Rhode Island. The following Rhode Island medical device requirements are...

  14. 75 FR 18516 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...of an emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from severe storms...

  15. 76 FR 61730 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4027-DR), dated September...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Tropical Storm...

  16. 75 FR 18521 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from severe storms...

  17. Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Clean Waters of Rhode Island Primary Investigators Harold Knickle Donald Gray #12;Final Report Clean Waters of Rhode Island By Harold Knickle and Donald Gray Department of Chemical Engineering University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 May 2007 #12;Abstract There were two thrusts

  18. 33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. (a) The...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  19. 33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. (a) The...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  20. 33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. (a) The...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  1. 33 CFR 334.82 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coasters Harbor Island, Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. 334.82...Naval Station Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, restricted area. (a) The...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  2. University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography. © Copyright 2002-2008 by University of Rhode Island by the University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography is warranted against defective components

  3. University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography. © Copyright 2002-2007 by University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate by the University of Rhode Island ­ Graduate School of Oceanography is warranted against defective components

  4. November 2011 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    November 2011 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for InState Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High School Attendance Guidance for Students and Families If you are a student, including an undocumented student, who currently attends or plans to attend the University of Rhode Island

  5. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher…

  6. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 43 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (including median household income,…

  7. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the fifth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 30 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

  8. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 49 indicators (6 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic…

  9. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the eighth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 53 indicators (3 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic diversity);…

  10. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count data book is the fourth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 28 indicators in five areas: (1) family and community; (2) economic well-being, including median household income, poverty rate, and percent of children in families receiving cash…

  11. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; And Others

    This Kids Count report examined statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters addressed the areas of: family and community; economic well-being; child health; safety; and education. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income;…

  12. Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This KIDS COUNT databook is the sixth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 37 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

  13. THE IMPACT OF FUNDED RESEARCH BY THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND ON THE RHODE ISLAND ECONOMY IN FY10

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    THE IMPACT OF FUNDED RESEARCH BY THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND ON THE RHODE ISLAND ECONOMY IN FY10 The contributions the University of Rhode Island makes to Rhode Island's economy continue to be highly significant the benefits provided by the University of Rhode Island have become increasingly critical to the economic

  14. 76 FR 60850 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August...emergency conditions in the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane...

  15. 75 FR 18554 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

  16. 75 FR 22872 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

  17. 76 FR 61131 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00008

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...Declaration 12850 and 12851] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00008 AGENCY...of a disaster for the State of Rhode Island dated 09/26/2011. Incident...Providence. Contiguous Counties: Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent....

  18. 75 FR 17178 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00006

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ...Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00006 AGENCY...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated...Economic Injury Loans Only): Rhode Island: Bristol. Connecticut: New...

  19. A Survey on Counting Networks Brown University, Rhode Island, USA

    E-print Network

    Busch, Konstantin "Costas"

    A Survey on Counting Networks C. BUSCH Brown University, Rhode Island, USA M. HERLIHY Brown University, Rhode Island, USA Abstract In the counting problem, asynchronous concurrent processes repeatedly

  20. Hydrologic, vegetation, and soil data collected in selected wetlands of the Big River Management area, Rhode Island, from 2008 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borenstein, Meredith S.; Golet, Francis C.; Armstrong, David S.; Breault, Robert F.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board planned to develop public water-supply wells in the Big River Management Area in Kent County, Rhode Island. Research in the United States and abroad indicates that groundwater withdrawal has the potential to affect wetland hydrology and related processes. In May 2008, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island formed a partnership to establish baseline conditions at selected Big River wetland study sites and to develop an approach for monitoring potential impacts once pumping begins. In 2008 and 2009, baseline data were collected on the hydrology, vegetation, and soil characteristics at five forested wetland study sites in the Big River Management Area. Four of the sites were located in areas of potential drawdown associated with the projected withdrawals. The fifth site was located outside the area of projected drawdown and served as a control site. The data collected during this study are presented in this report.

  1. Rhode Island Public Library Trustees Handbook. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacono, Frank P., Comp.

    2006-01-01

    Since the Office of Library and Information Services published the first Rhode Island trustees manual in 1980, Rhode Island public libraries have continued to respond to an ever increasing demand for service. In so doing, they consistently have taken advantage of new opportunities to provide this service more efficiently and effectively via…

  2. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND RENAISSANCE YEARBOOK

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND RENAISSANCE YEARBOOK 50 Lower College Road ­ Room 123 Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 401.874.5897 uriyearbook@gmail.com www.uri.edu/yearbook The URI Renaissance Yearbook Order to the URI Renaissance Yearbook. BOLDED years are $50 Other years are $25 All shipping and handling fees

  3. Office of the Secretary of State: Rhode Island State Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Far more than a collection of basic government documents, the Rhode Island State Library website is a nice resource for anyone seeking to learn more about the Ocean State. The materials here are divided into three main sections: "Research Tools", "Publications", and "Everything RI". In "Research Tools", users will find executive orders issued by the governor, annual reports, as well as state regulations and rules. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains some colorful historical documents, including the Rhode Island Royal Charter of 1663 and the state constitution. Finally, the "Everything RI" area contains documents that narrate the state's history, such as "State Symbols", "Famous Rhode Islanders", "Rhode Island Landmarks", and "City & Town Incorporation Dates". Just for reference, some of the notable persons from the Ocean State include George M. Cohan, Anne Hutchinson, and baseball legend Nap Lajoie.

  4. Hydrologic data for Block Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Emily

    1993-01-01

    This report was compiled as part of a study to assess the hydrogeology and the quality and quantity of fresh ground water on Block Island, Rhode Island. Hydrologic data were collected on Block Island during 1988-91. The data are pre- sented in illustrations and tables. Data collec- ted include precipitation, surfae-water, ground- water, lithologic, and well-construction and dis- charge information. Precipitation data include total monthly precipitation values from 11 rain gages and water-quality analyses of 14 precipi- tation samples from one station. Surface-water data include water-level measurements at 12 ponds, water-quality data for five ponds, and field specific-conductance measurements at 56 surface- water sites (streams, ponds, and springs). Ground- water data include water-level measurements at 159 wells, water-quality data at 150 wells, and field specific-conductance data at 52 wells. Lithologic logs for 375 wells and test borings, and construc- tion and location data for 570 wells, springs, and test borings are included. In addition, the data set contains data on water quality of water samples, collected by the Rhode Island Department of Health during 1976-91, from Fresh and Sands Ponds and from wells at the Block Island Water Company well field north of Sands Pond.

  5. The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2007 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2007 Annual Report The Rhode Island Department, Rhode Island 02908-5872 May 15, 2007 This document can be found on line in an electronic format (Adobe pdf) at: www.edc.uri.edu/rigis #12;The Rhode Island Geographic Information System PURPOSE: This report

  6. The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2006 Annual Report

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    The Rhode Island Geographic Information System 2006 Annual Report The Rhode Island Department of Administration Division of Information Technology-RIGIS Coordinator One Capitol Hill Providence, Rhode Island.edc.uri.edu/rigis #12;The Rhode Island Geographic Information System PURPOSE: This report provides a synopsis of GIS

  7. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for In State Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High School Attendance

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Eligibility for In State Tuition and Fees Based Upon Rhode Island High herein, which are all true and correct; and (b) That I currently live in the state of Rhode Island card that lists my address; (c) That I have lived in Rhode Island for three (3) or more years, have

  8. Executive Summary University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    Executive Summary March 2004 University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension Kingston, Rhode by the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension Kingston, RI NDWRCDP Project Number: WU-HT-00-30 National Loomis, David Dow, Art Gold, Diana Brennan, and Justin Jobin University of Rhode Island Cooperative

  9. 2005 -2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    2005 - 2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM The Rhode Providence, Rhode Island 02908-5872 As Reaffirmed by the RIGIS Executive Committee on March 13, 2007 #12;1 2005 - 2010 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE RHODE ISLAND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM EXECUTIVE

  10. Three Guidance Programs in Providence, Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chirico, John

    1985-01-01

    Describes three programs implemented in the Providence, Rhode Island, elementary schools to improve students' self-image. These include a guidance/puppetry program, student of the week awards, and a behavioral management system. (JAC)

  11. 3. AERIAL VIEW SOUTHWEST ON RHODE ISLAND AVENUE CORRIDOR FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW SOUTHWEST ON RHODE ISLAND AVENUE CORRIDOR FROM BEYOND THE HISTORIC BOUNDARY AT TWELFTH STREET, NE. (Photograph enlarged from a 4x5 negative.) - Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni Engineering University of Rhode Island Email: uht@ele.uri.edu Web: www.ele.uri.edu/¸uht March 10, 2000

  13. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni University of Rhode Island Email: uht@ele.uri.edu WWW: http://www.ele.uri.edu/¸uht June 24, 1997 Abstract

  14. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni Reduction Techniques'' Augustus K. Uht, University of Rhode Island Vijay Sindagi, Texas Instruments Sajee

  15. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni University of Rhode Island Email: uht@ele.uri.edu Web: www.ele.uri.edu/¸uht July 11, 1997 Abstract Disjoint

  16. 75 FR 19666 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12116 and 12117] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00007 AGENCY: Small Business Administration...disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04/08/2010....

  17. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni Effects of Branches'' Augustus K. Uht, University of Rhode Island Vijay Sindagi, Texas Instruments Sajee

  18. 78 FR 23278 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2013-0001] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4107-DR), dated March...that the damage in the State of Rhode Island resulting from a severe...

  19. INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS FILING FOR RHODE ISLAND RESIDENCY

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS FILING FOR RHODE ISLAND RESIDENCY 1. On the front purposes. You need to prove that your "domicile" is in Rhode Island and that you plan to remain a permanent resident of Rhode Island. Below is a list of items that would help. Please provide COPIES Deed or lease

  20. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni** *University of Rhode Island and **Northeastern University Abstract The Levo high ILP microarchitecture and EIA-9729839, the University of Rhode Island Office of the Provost, the Xilinx Corp., and the Mentor

  1. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni University of Rhode Island uht@ele.uri.edu www.ele.uri.edu/¸uht August 26, 1997 Abstract A new memory system of Rhode Island High­ILP Memory System ELE T.R. No. 0797­0002 ffl Disjoint­address caches, reducing address

  2. Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island Division of Research and Economic Development 6 Development FY1991 - FY2012 #12;Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island Division of Research FY1991 - FY2012 Totals in $Millions #12;Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island Division

  3. 75 FR 22873 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...Declaration 12116 and 12117] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00007 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04...Non-Profit organizations in the State of Rhode Island, dated 04/08/2010, is...

  4. Rare and Endemic Rhode Island Beetles by Derek S. Sikes

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    Rare and Endemic Rhode Island Beetles by Derek S. Sikes RINHewS 5(1):6-7 [April 1998] During History Survey's Biota of Rhode Island project, I came across five interesting records. Three of these records are beetle species that are technically endemic to Rhode Island, the fourth is a species known

  5. University of Rhode Island Advisory Committee on Disability Issues

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode Island Advisory Committee on Disability Issues Mission Statement (developed at the University of Rhode Island. The purposes of the committee are: a) To proactively advise administrators University of Rhode Island Strategic Plan: 2006-2009 Steps Toward Transformation ­ University wide Initiative

  6. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Research, Graduate Studies & Outreach

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND Research, Graduate Studies & Outreach research that benefits the state) nation and international community 2004/2005 #12;UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND IDeA Network of Biomedical in additional federal funding for biomedical research through this program to Rhode Island in recent years

  7. Rev. 01/2014 Rhode Island Inter-institutional

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Rev. 01/2014 Rhode Island Inter-institutional Exchange Program Explanation of Participation Full-time students matriculated at one of the public institutions of higher education in Rhode Island may enroll Session. Any matriculated University of Rhode Island undergraduate student not excluded above, who has

  8. University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Uht, Augustus K.

    University of Rhode Island Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Kelley Hall 4 East Alumni University of Rhode Island uht@ele.uri.edu www.ele.uri.edu/¸uht August 26, 1997 Abstract This document gives by the Intel Corporation and the NSF under grant No. MIP­9708183. 1 of 19 #12; University of Rhode Island Levo

  9. RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

  10. Healthy Mothers, Healthy Infants: Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    This Kids Count issue brief details the strides made in Rhode Island over the last 10 years to improve maternal and child health, focusing on efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. The brief notes that Rhode Island has made significant progress in several areas of maternal and infant care, most notably in access to insurance and early…

  11. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Rhode Island showed gains--improvements in reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for most racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income students, and boys and girls. Achievement gaps between students narrowed in most cases at grades 4 and 8.…

  12. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    These two Kids Count brief reports discuss issues related to the well-being of Rhode Island children. The first report identifies ways to measure the impact of state and federal welfare reform proposals on children who receive benefits through Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). Potential measures of success for welfare reform include…

  13. MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

  14. Circulation in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island Sound, and Adjacent Waters, with Emphasis on Subsurface Flows

    E-print Network

    Codiga, Daniel L.

    Circulation in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island Sound, and Adjacent Waters, with Emphasis on Subsurface Flows Daniel L. Codiga, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Presentation for Rhode Island Sea Grant Ronald C. Baird Symposium 2008 Abstract Subsurface flows

  15. The Flood of June 1998 in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Gene W.; Ries, Kernell G., III; Socolow, Roy S.

    1998-01-01

    More than 10 inches of rain fell on some areas of eastern Massachusetts and more than 7 inches fell on some areas of Rhode Island during and intense and prolonged rainstorm from June 12 through June 15, 1998. On some streams, the magnitude of the floods resulting from the rain would be exceeded, on average, only once every 50 years. Estimated property damage from the June 1998 floods totaled nearly 5 million dollars.

  16. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Breault, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance and water temperature. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2010 (October 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010). Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 monitoring stations by the USGS during WY 2010 as part of a long sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Waterquality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2010. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 39 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2010. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.7 to 27 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,500,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2010; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 11,000 to 66,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 18,000 to 110,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 20.2 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.06 mg/L as phosphorus, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 93 and 16 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 170 kg/d (73 kg/d/mi2), 11 g/d (5.3 g/d/mi2), 74 g/d (39 g/d/mi2), 340 g/d (170 g/d/mi2), 5,700 million colony forming units per day (CFUx106/d) (2,300 CFUx106/d/mi2), and 620 CFUx106/d (440 CFUx106/d/mi2), respectively.

  17. 77 FR 14715 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available Control...SIP) revisions submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...revisions demonstrate that the State of Rhode Island meets the requirements of...

  18. 75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

  19. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. 165.121 Section 165.121...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (a) Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile...

  20. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ...Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard...anchorage in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, and to add an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton...

  1. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. 165.121 Section 165.121...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (a) Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile...

  2. 75 FR 5898 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

  3. 76 FR 52656 - Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...Commission [Project No. 14211-000] Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...Applications On June 10, 2011, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...Central Falls, Providence County, Rhode Island. The sole purpose of a...

  4. 76 FR 16322 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

  5. 75 FR 8571 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ...Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of...determine that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 1997 8-hour ozone...determine that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone...

  6. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. 165.121 Section 165.121...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (a) Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile...

  7. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. 165.121 Section 165.121...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (a) Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile...

  8. 77 FR 30214 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ...Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze AGENCY: Environmental...is approving a revision to the Rhode Island State Implementation Plan (SIP...The revision was submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental...

  9. 78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ...Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee Notice is hereby...that a planning meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee to the Commission...September 18, 2013, at the Rhode Island Urban League, 246 Prairie...

  10. 77 FR 53883 - Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ...EL12-100-000] Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice...a formal complaint against the Rhode Island Public Utility Commission (Respondent...16, 2010, as directed by the Rhode Island General Assembly; which...

  11. 75 FR 64949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ...Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 1997 8-hour ozone...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone...

  12. 33 CFR 165.121 - Safety and Security Zones: High Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. 165.121 Section 165.121...Interest Vessels, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (a) Location. (1) All waters of Rhode Island Sound within a 1/2 mile...

  13. 78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ...Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island AGENCY...has been prepared for Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR...mitigation program at Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island....

  14. 77 FR 14691 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available Control Technology...SIP) revisions submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...revisions demonstrate that the State of Rhode Island meets the requirements of reasonably...

  15. 75 FR 31288 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of the 1997...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone nonattainment...suspension of the requirements for Rhode Island to submit an attainment...

  16. Serologic and Molecular Detection of Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis in Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MIN-TSUNG YEH; THOMAS N. MATHER; RICHARD T. COUGHLIN; CINDY GINGRICH-BAKER; JOHN W. SUMNER; ANDROBERT F. MASSUNG

    1997-01-01

    A new indirectfluorescent-antibody (IFA) assay with antigen produced in vitro in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 was used to identify the first recognized case of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Rhode Island. This IFA assay was used to detect granulocytic ehrlichiae in white-footed mice and in a dog inhabiting the area surrounding the patient's residence. Host-seekingIxodes scapularisticks found in

  17. Mapping of benthic enrichment patterns in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond M. Valente; Donald C. Rhoads; Joseph D. Germano; Victor J. Cabelli

    1992-01-01

    A synoptic reconnaissance survey was performed over a five-day period in August 1988 to assess benthic habitat quality throughout\\u000a Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, using REMOTS® sediment-profile photography and analysis in combination with measurements of the levels ofClostridium perfringens spores (a fecal indicator) in sediments. Three main areas of degraded benthic habitat quality related to either excessive\\u000a organic enrichment or physical

  18. University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Narragansett, Rhode Island, the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) of URI offers instruction leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography as well as in interdisciplinary and related areas such as atmospheric chemistry. Site includes information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, news, and publications. Outreach initiatives are numerous and are targeted at a wide audience.

  19. University of Rhode Island inAdvance June 19 , 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    of this year's Rick Ligi Team MVP Award. More... URI SMILE program founder named one of Rhode Island's Women "Women of the Year" by the Rhode Island Commission on Women. Englander was recognized as a result of her education in the fields of math, science, and engineering. More... Rhody Yard Sale raises record amount

  20. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  1. New England After 3 PM: Spotlight on Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report, the third installment in the "New England After 3 PM" series, discusses after-school programs and support in Rhode Island. The Afterschool Alliance worked with the Rhode Island Afterschool Plus Alliance to survey mayors and other officials in each of the state's 39 cities and towns. The survey, distributed via the Internet in April…

  2. Rhode Island School and District Accountability System. Technical Bulletin. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, the Rhode Island Department of Education introduced its revised accountability system that incorporated the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law, the Rhode Island Comprehensive Education Strategy (CES), and Article 31, which requires the state commissioner to make judgments about school performance on a regular…

  3. University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 22, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Association at the University have partnered with the China Earthquake Relief Committee of Rhode Island members of the Class of 2008, the University of Rhode Island's newest alumni. More... China Earthquake Relief Committee formed to help victims The Confucius Institute and Chinese Students and Scholars

  4. Rhode Island Medical Society v. Whitehouse.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    The United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island, on 30 August 1999, enjoined enforcement of Rhode Island's partial-birth abortion ban act. The act defined partial-birth abortion as "an abortion in which the person performing the abortion vaginally delivers a living human fetus before killing the infant and completing the delivery." The act also provided that a physician could perform an aborton on a viable fetus if necessary to save the mother's life only if "no other medical procedure would suffice for that purpose." The United States District Court found Rhode Island's statute to be constitutionally flawed in four respects. First, the court ruled that the definition of partial-birth abortion was unconstitutionally vague within the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution since it implicitly banned the legally protected D & E procedure along with the impermissible D & X procedure. Secondly, following the United States Supreme Court precedent, the court invalidated the statute because it lacked a provision that would permit a partial-birth abortion to preserve the mother's health. Thirdly, the court concluded that the section of the statute permitting a partial-birth abortion to save the mother's life was inadequate. Finally, the court found that the statute placed an undue burden on a woman's right to an abortion within the meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment. Its provision for a civil action against an abortion provider by the father of a fetus or by a minor's parents could involve third parties in the abortion decision against a woman's will. PMID:15584139

  5. Museum of Art-Rhode Island School of Design

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is the largest art museum in Rhode Island, and one of the largest in the United States. Founded in 1893, the Museum's collection, like its parent organization RISD, reflects the fact that after the Civil War Rhode Island was the most industrialized state in the country. As stated on the Museum's website, the region's prosperity was based on the manufacture of goods from silverware to steam engines, resulting in a desire to better educate the population in industrial design and fine art. Today, the Museum's collection consists of over 84,000 objects, with particular strengths in costume and textiles, 19th century American decorative arts, and photography. The Museum is also the home of the Aaron Siskind Center for the Study of Photography. On the website visitors can browse collection areas, explore the Grand Gallery, "A salon-style picture gallery displaying European paintings from the Renaissance through the early 19th century", listen to curators, and read about current exhibitions.

  6. Analysis of Rhode Island Coastal Wind Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, K. I.; Merrill, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Eleven wind profile data sets were collected at sites in Rhode Island between 2007 and the present, extending over periods from 6 to 20 months, with a mean of 14 months. The data was gathered from meteorological towers via anemometers and wind vanes at heights up to 60 m, or using SoDAR (Sonic Detection And Ranging) instruments at heights up to 200 m. Wind speeds are generally greater in the fall and winter, with minimum wind speeds occurring in the summer. Winds blow most frequently from the northwest in the winter and from the southwest in the summer. The power law describes wind speed with height in neutral static stability conditions; the fitted shear coefficient characterizes the distribution and is used in wind resource assessment. Marine sites exhibit higher wind speeds and lower shear than terrestrial sites, due to lower surface drag. In contrast, terrestrial sites experience more shear and greater temporal variability. The magnitude of diel and seasonal differences between marine and terrestrial locations will be discussed. The land-breeze sea-breeze cycle influences wind throughout the study area; the magnitude of this variation, along with azimuthal shear will be considered. In addition to the short-term profile data, we used several multi-decadal single height anemometer data sets. Wind estimates at hub height over an extended time period calculated using Measure Correlate Predict (MCP) algorithms will be discussed in the context of hypothesized temporal trends in the wind speeds. Utilization of such data for wind energy and other applications will be discussed.

  7. catalogUndergraduate and Graduate Catalog of the University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    catalogUndergraduate and Graduate Catalog of the University of Rhode Island 1998­99 Academic Year University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 401-874-1000 #12;4 THE UNIVERSITY To help achieve and scholarly and creative works. Its students in all their diversity--from Rhode Island, across the country

  8. Graduate School Certificate of Residence for Rhode Island Residents, New England

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    5 of Graduate School Certificate of Residence for Rhode Island Residents, New England Applicants of their military orders stationing them in rhode island. A military spouse must also provide a copy of a marriage for tuition purposes at the University of rhode island. For an applicant to be considered a Rhode Island

  9. University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 PRIOR APPROVAL FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDY

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 PRIOR APPROVAL FOR OFF-CAMPUS STUDY Rhode Island College or the Community College of Rhode Island). Take the catalog to the chairperson A SATISFACTORY GRADE IS EARNED (C or better at all institutions except Rhode Island College and the Community

  10. State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations State House, Room 224

    E-print Network

    State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations State House, Room 224 Providence, Rhode Island the nomination packages for three excellent candidates from Rhode Island: Theodore Platz, Francis Blount, Jr for the Program. In 2006, Mr. Platz formed the Rhode Island Monkfishermen's Association, and has continued

  11. Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators Mayrai Gindy Natacha Thomas Richard Madsen #12;FINAL REPORT Rhode Island Water Resources Center May 2007 Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Mayrai Gindy, University of Rhode

  12. US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

  13. THE FOOD HABITS OF FIVE CRAB SPECIES AT PETTAQUAMSCUTT RIVER, RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    -were examined from collections made in the Pettaquamscutt River. Rhode Island, during 1955-57. A car- nivorous powered by an 18 hp outboard motor (see Ropes [1968] for a description of the dredge). Intertidal areas river. All samples were taken during ebb tide and before low water because experience at Plum Island

  14. Recent marine podocopid Ostracoda of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Williams, R. B.

    1966-11-23

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS November 23, 1966 Paper 11 RECENT MARINE PODOCOPID OSTRACODA OF NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND By ROGER B. WILLIAMS Department of Geology, The University of Kansas ABSTRACT Forty-six Petterson... dredge samples from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been examined for marine podocopid ostracode specimens. Estimated data on salinity, tempera- ture, depth, and bottom sediment compiled from earlier published reports have no conclu- sive...

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Rhode Island Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's: A Rhode Island Consumer's Guide is to provide consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system will work for them based on their wind resource, the type and size of their sites, and their economics. The cover of this guide contains a Rhode Island wind resource map and information about state incentives and contacts for more information.

  16. Cultivating Systemic Capacity: The Rhode Island Tobacco Control Enhancement Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Florin; Carolyn Celebucki; John Stevenson; Jasmine Mena; Dawn Salago; Andrew White; Betty Harvey; Marianela Dougal

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the Rhode Island Tobacco Control Enhancement Project (TCEP), a state-university-community technical assistance system. TCEP was developed under the auspices of the Rhode Island Department of Health's Tobacco Control program and was designed to build capacity among nine community-based organizations to mount comprehensive tobacco control interventions in five diverse communities within the state. This paper: (1) provides a

  17. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

  18. Combined multibeam and bathymetry data from Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound: a regional perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Danforth, William W.; Blankenship, Mark R.; Clos, Andrew R.; Glomb, Kimberly A.; Lewit, Peter G.; Nadeau, Megan A.; Wood, Douglas A.; Parker, Castleton E.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research and management communities because of this area's ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Geologically interpreted digital terrain models from individual surveys provide important benthic environmental information, yet many applications of this information require a geographically broader perspective. For example, individual surveys are of limited use for the planning and construction of cross-sound infrastructure, such as cables and pipelines, or for the testing of regional circulation models. To address this need, we integrated 14 contiguous multibeam bathymetric datasets that were produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during charting operations into one digital terrain model that covers much of Block Island Sound and extends eastward across Rhode Island Sound. The new dataset, which covers over 1244 square kilometers, is adjusted to mean lower low water, gridded to 4-meter resolution, and provided in Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 19, North American Datum of 1983 and geographic World Geodetic Survey of 1984 projections. This resolution is adequate for sea-floor feature and process interpretation but is small enough to be queried and manipulated with standard Geographic Information System programs and to allow for future growth. Natural features visible in the data include boulder lag deposits of winnowed Pleistocene strata, sand-wave fields, and scour depressions that reflect the strength of oscillating tidal currents and scour by storm-induced waves. Bedform asymmetry allows interpretations of net sediment transport. Anthropogenic features visible in the data include shipwrecks and dredged channels. Together the merged data reveal a larger, more continuous perspective of bathymetric topography than previously available, providing a fundamental framework for research and resource management activities offshore of Rhode Island.

  19. Non-energy resources, Connecticut and Rhode Island coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, N.F.; Lewis, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Cores collected from Long Island Sound, Connecticut, were used to establish control on the geologic framework of the area. Lithologic and stratigraphic analyses verified the presence of the following units: (1) Cretaceous coastal plain, (2) Pleistocene glacial till, (3) late Pleistocene glacial lake, (4) late Pleistocene glacial outwash, and (5) Holocene fluvial, estuarine and marine deposits. Cores collected in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, were obtained from inferred, relict shoreline features and were analyzed for heavy mineral content. Concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 3.4%; no significant downcore changes were found. The results indicated that surficial sediments in areas of high-velocity tidal flow yield greater amounts of heavy minerals than do inferred placer deposits. During the second phase of the program of study, Connecticut and Rhode Island pooled resources to develop a study plan for the comprehensive quantification of all non-energy resources in the adjacent waters of the states. A literature and data survey was conducted to assess the occurrence, extent, and accessibility of these resources. Sand and gravel and heavy minerals were found in concentrations offering potential for resource exploitation. Constraints on exploitation include (1) water depth restrictions for the protection of shellfish beds and public beaches, (2) fishing activities, (3) military, commercial, and fishing vessel traffic, (4) seafloor cable routes and (5) dump sites. Deposits composed of Pleistocene glacial sediments and/or Holocene marine sediments in regions of little or no user conflict were identified as sites potentially suitable for resource exploitation. The study plan stated additional data needs (geophysical profiling and vibracore sampling) at these sites. Subsequent to these recommendations, high-resolution seismic profiles and sidescan sonographs were obtained from these sites. Seismic stratigraphic analyses confirm the presence of extensive deposits of potential economic value. ?? 1989.

  20. Effects of alternative instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options in the Big River Area, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Transient numerical ground-water-flow simulation and optimization techniques were used to evaluate potential effects of instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options and resultant streamflow depletions in the Big River Area, Rhode Island. The 35.7 square-mile (mi2) study area includes three river basins, the Big River Basin (30.9 mi2), the Carr River Basin (which drains to the Big River Basin and is 7.33 mi2 in area), the Mishnock River Basin (3.32 mi2), and a small area that drains directly to the Flat River Reservoir. The overall objective of the simulations was to determine the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn from the three basins when constrained by streamflow requirements at four locations in the study area and by maximum rates of withdrawal at 13 existing and hypothetical well sites. The instream-flow requirement for the outlet of each basin and the outfall of Lake Mishnock were the primary variables that limited the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. A requirement to meet seasonal ground-water-demand patterns also limits the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn by up to about 50 percent of the total withdrawals without the demand-pattern constraint. Minimum water-supply demands from a public water supplier in the Mishnock River Basin, however, did not have a substantial effect on withdrawals in the Big River Basin. Hypothetical dry-period instream-flow requirements and the effects of artificial recharge also affected the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. Results of simulations indicate that annual average ground-water withdrawal rates that range up to 16 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) can be withdrawn from the study area under simulated average hydrologic conditions depending on instream-flow criteria and water-supply demand patterns. Annual average withdrawals of 10 to 12 Mgal/d are possible for proposed demands of 3.4 Mgal/d in the Mishnock Basin, and for a constant annual instream-flow criterion of 0.5 cubic foot per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2) at the four streamflow-constraint locations. An average withdrawal rate of 10 Mgal/d can meet estimates of future (2020) water-supply needs of surrounding communities in Rhode Island. This withdrawal rate represents about 13 percent of the average 2002 daily withdrawal from the Scituate Reservoir (76 Mgal/d), the State?s largest water supply. Average annual withdrawal rates of 6 to 7 Mgal/d are possible for more stringent instream-flow criteria that might be used during dry-period hydrologic conditions. Two example scenarios of dry-period instream-flow constraints were evaluated: first, a minimum instream flow of 0.1 cubic foot per second at any of the four constraint locations; and second, a minimum instream flow of 10 percent of the minimum monthly streamflow estimate for each streamflow-constraint location during the period 1961?2000. The State of Rhode Island is currently (2004) considering methods for establishing instream-flow criteria for streams within the State. Twelve alternative annual, seasonal, or monthly instream-flow criteria that have been or are being considered for application in southeastern New England were used as hypothetical constraints on maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates in management-model calculations. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 5 to 16 Mgal/d under five alternative annual instream-flow criteria. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 0 to 13.6 Mgal/d under seven alternative seasonal or monthly instream-flow criteria. The effect of ground-water withdrawals on seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows under each criterion also were compared. Evaluation of management-model results indicates that a single annual instream-flowcriterion may be sufficient to preserve seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows and meet water-supply demands in the Big River Area, because withdrawals from wells in the Big

  1. 76 FR 60078 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ...FEMA-4027-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...notice of a major disaster declaration for State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4027-DR), dated September 3, 2011,...

  2. 77 FR 73486 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...FEMA-3355-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3355-EM), dated October 29, 2012,...

  3. 76 FR 58026 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ...FEMA-3334-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August 27, 2011,...

  4. 76 FR 79674 - Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...Commission [Docket No. EL12-16-000] Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint Take...Riggs (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Rhode Island Public Utility Commission (Respondent) alleging...

  5. 75 FR 26976 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ...FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

  6. 75 FR 22150 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ...FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

  7. Reading Across Rhode Island: One Book, One State, Many Successful Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvidson, Anne J.; Blanco, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    A new club in Rhode Island invited every Rhode Islander to read the same book and participate in the conversation on importance of reading. Narrative, analytical and various responses of students on reading "Wish You Well" are mentioned.

  8. 76 FR 60078 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ...FEMA-3334-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...the notice of an emergency declaration for State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August 27, 2011,...

  9. Probability Models for Complex Systems Sc.M. in Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 1994

    E-print Network

    Chi, Zhiyi

    , Providence, Rhode Island, 1994 Thesis Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree, Rhode Island May 1998 #12;Abstract of "Probability Models for Complex Systems," by Zhiyi Chi, Ph

  10. 75 FR 18517 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

  11. The Rhode Island Teacher-at-Sea (RITAS) Program is designed to establish sustainable partnerships between

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    The Rhode Island Teacher-at-Sea (RITAS) Program is designed to establish sustainable partnerships between ocean scientists and researchers and teachers who live and teach in Rhode Island. The Office of Marine Programs (OMP) at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography (URI

  12. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52

    E-print Network

    SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52 ( SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52 Since 19i|8, the Fish and Wildlife Service has carried on a biological of the United States. Much of the research was done in Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island, where

  13. This perspective aerial view of Newport, Rhode Island, drawn and published by

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    #12;Cover This perspective aerial view of Newport, Rhode Island, drawn and published by Galt & Hoy. Elleman, Andrew Forbes, and David Rosenberg, Editors NAVAL WAR COLLEGE PRESS Newport, Rhode Island THEUNITEDSTA TES NAV ALWARCOLLEGE VIR A IBUS M RI VICTORIA #12;Naval War College Newport, Rhode Island Center

  14. 75 FR 18522 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

  15. 75 FR 51836 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...March 29, 2010, for the State of Rhode Island due to the damage resulting...

  16. Denitrification Capacity in a Subterranean Estuary below a Rhode Island Fringing Salt Marsh

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    Denitrification Capacity in a Subterranean Estuary below a Rhode Island Fringing Salt Marsh KELLY Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, 105 Coastal Institute in Kingston, One Greenhouse Road, Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 2 Office of Student Programs, College of the Environment

  17. State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate

    E-print Network

    Simaan, Nabil

    State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate of the conditions below, you may claim exemption from Rhode Island withholding for 2013: a) Last year I had a right to a refund of all Rhode Island income tax withheld because I had no tax liability AND b) This year I expect

  18. State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate of the conditions below, you may claim exemption from Rhode Island withholding for 2012: a) Last year I had a right to a refund of all Rhode Island income tax withheld because I had no tax liability AND b) This year I expect

  19. The Rhode Island Beetle Fauna: Past, Present and Future by Derek S. Sikes

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    The Rhode Island Beetle Fauna: Past, Present and Future by Derek S. Sikes RINHewS 6(1):8-10 [April indicators. You might ask: what does this have to do with the Beetle Fauna of Rhode Island? Well, I temporarily in Cranston, Rhode Island, awaiting both matriculation to the University of Connecticut

  20. 77 FR 73487 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

  1. STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS Office of the Secretary of State

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS Office of the Secretary of State Corporations Division 148 W. River Street Providence, Rhode Island 02904-2615 DESIGNATION OF AGENT FOR NONRESIDENT, the undersigned landlord, who is not a resident of the State of Rhode Island, submits the following statement

  2. 77 FR 73489 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

  3. eSNAP: Guide University of Rhode Island: Sponsored Projects Review Page 1

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    eSNAP: Guide University of Rhode Island: Sponsored Projects Review Page 1 Table of Rhode Island: Sponsored Projects Review Page 2 1: Getting Started / Logging In Logging Into the Demo & Authority. #12;eSNAP: Guide University of Rhode Island: Sponsored Projects Review Page 4 2

  4. 75 FR 51832 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of...emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March...March 30, 2010, for the State of Rhode Island due to the damage resulting...

  5. EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER,

    E-print Network

    EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS Rhode Island lobster fishery. The use ofrectangular vents (42 x 152mm) resulted in a 79% decrease on the effects of 'Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Division of Fish and Wildlife, 150 Fowler

  6. Genotype diet interaction in Fayoumi and Rhode Island Red layers and their crosses

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Note Genotype diet interaction in Fayoumi and Rhode Island Red layers and their crosses M. ABOU Génétique factorielle, F 78350 Jouy-en-Josas Summary Fayoumi and Rhode Island Red (R.I.R.) layers words : Hen, Fayoumi, Rhode Island Red, egg production, feed, barley. Résumé Interaction génotype

  7. Potential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    Potential Water Use Conflicts Generated by Irrigated Agriculture in Rhode Island Arthur Gold the potential for conflict among residential and agricultural users of water in southern Rhode Island. The model in Rhode Island has risen from 200 acres in 1972 to over 2,500 acres in 1986, while potato acreage has

  8. 75 FR 19985 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

  9. MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1

    E-print Network

    MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1 MICHAEL J. FOGARTY, Homarus americanus, were tagged and released at five sites along the Rhode Island coast, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Wickford, R.I.; present address: Northeast

  10. Coleoptera of Rhode Island: An On-Line Checklist

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sikes, Derek S.

    A creative presentation of checklist data by graduate student Derek Sikes of the University of Connecticut, this site provides access to taxonomic information on the beetles of Rhode Island. Featuring a searchable (by Family or Species) database, the site also includes an introduction, a map of Rhode Island, and a selection of source references. Typical returns provide Family, Subfamily, Species, and Determiner name, with hyperlinks to Voucher source(s). The searchable database includes 96 expected and documented families, 2,413 expected and documented species, and 511 apparent new state records.

  11. Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

  12. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

  13. Analysis of Extreme Wave Climates in Rhode Island Waters South of

    E-print Network

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    a Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) for siting offshore wind farms in Rhode Island waters wind turbine support structures and foundations or for verifying the long-term stability propagation simulation analyses using STWAVE, a steady-state spectral wave model and forced by wave hindcast

  14. REACTOR DOSIMETRY STUDY OF THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.,; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC), located on the Narragansett Bay Campus of the University of Rhode Island, is a state-owned and US NRC-licensed nuclear facility constructed for educational and industrial applications. The main building of RINSC houses a two-megawatt (2 MW) thermal power critical reactor immersed in demineralized water within a shielded tank. As its original design in 1958 by the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission focused on the teaching and research use of the facility, only a minimum of 3.85 kg fissile uranium-235 was maintained in the fuel elements to allow the reactor to reach a critical state. In 1986 when RINSC was temporarily shutdown to start US DOE-directed core conversion project for national security reasons, all the U-Al based Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU, 93% uranium-235 in the total uranium) fuel elements were replaced by the newly developed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al based Low Enriched Uranium (LEU, {le}20% uranium-235 in the total uranium) elements. The reactor first went critical after the core conversion was achieved in 1993, and feasibility study on the core upgrade to accommodate Boron Neutron-Captured Therapy (BNCT) was completed in 2000 [3]. The 2-MW critical reactor at RINSC which includes six beam tubes, a thermal column, a gamma-ray experimental station and two pneumatic tubes has been extensive utilized as neutron-and-photon dual source for nuclear-specific research in areas of material science, fundamental physics, biochemistry, and radiation therapy. After the core conversion along with several major system upgrade (e.g. a new 3-MW cooling tower, a large secondary piping system, a set of digitized power-level instrument), the reactor has become more compact and thus more effective to generate high beam flux in both the in-core and ex-core regions for advance research. If not limited by the manpower and operating budget in recent years, the RINSC built ''in concrete'' structure and control systems should have been systematically upgraded to a 5 Mw power facility to further enhance its experimental capability while still maintaining its safe margin as designed.

  15. 33 CFR 334.78 - Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.78 Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south...

  16. 33 CFR 334.78 - Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.78 Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south...

  17. University of Rhode Island inAdvance December 21, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    on January 20. The Feinstein students use charts, maps, and rap in presentations about Providence Sixty Research and Education to promote healthy lifestyles for Rhode Islanders URI has established a Center for Wellness Research and Education designed to advance interdisciplinary health and wellness research

  18. University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 24, 2008

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 24, 2008 Volume 5, Issue 9 Alumni Golf Tournament coming (31 miles) race and a 20K (12.4 mile) race. Kazmierczak planned to race in both Olympic trials to compete in 20K trials in July. If successful, the URI junior will be one of the three-member team

  19. University of Rhode Island inAdvance February 2, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Watch on February 26. What does your chapter have planned? URI College of Pharmacy reaches out to help- game buffet on February 25. Register online today! Web chat update Read the transcript from our recent's Pharmacy Outreach Program has been providing Rhode Islanders with help deciphering the complexities

  20. Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    $5.2 Energy $4.4 INT $1.1 Other $1.1 EDUC $.8 NASA $.7 EPA $.6 #12;Annual Report FY2012 3.4 AwardsAnnual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island Division of Research and Economic Development 3 - FY2012 Totals in $Millions ARRA Awards Total Awards Non- ARRA #12;Annual Report FY2012 University

  1. Ted Sizer's Opening Remarks, Fall Forum 2000, Providence, Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sizer, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    This article presents Ted Sizer's opening remarks during the Fall Forum in 2000 at Providence, Rhode Island. In his opening remarks, Sizer reviews what the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is, and what it is not. CES, he contends, is not a fixed school design but rather, a set of ideas, ideas and conditions and convictions, called principles,…

  2. Rhode Island High School Diploma System Technical Assistance Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This Technical Assistance Bulletin is to be utilized by districts and schools to design and implement their components of the Rhode Island High School Diploma System (Diploma System) as required by the RI Board of Regents' "Regulations Regarding High School and Ensuring Literacy for Students Entering High School" (Regents' Regulations) issued in…

  3. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Rhode Island's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in…

  4. Rhode Island School and District Accountability System Technical Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    On January 8, 2002, the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was reauthorized as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). NCLB required states to establish a single accountability system that includes every school and district. Rhode Island proposed an accountability model incorporating NCLB requirements to the US Department of…

  5. Continuing Evolution: The Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horm, Diane M.; O'Keefe, Beverly; Diffendale, Charlotte; Cohen, Amy; Schennum, Ruth; Pucciarelli, Larry; Collins, Cheryl; Merrifield, Margaret; Nardone, Virginia; Martin, Marilyn; Bryan, Linda; DeRobbio, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This narrative chronicles the continued evolution and development of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute, an intensive 5-day inservice professional development program designed for educational leaders from various sectors of the early care and education field. The goal is to review the continued use of successful practices…

  6. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Rhode Island's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam…

  7. University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 2, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    and the only New England Land Grant university to join the nonprofit Hispanic Association of Colleges competition. More... Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities welcomes URI as first Rhode Island and Universities. This step by the University is expected to benefit and create new opportunities for Hispanic

  8. Dance Proficiency in Rhode Island: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Wendy; Sprague, Marty

    2007-01-01

    Rhode Island has recently mandated a new kind of arts requirement for high school graduation that involves proving proficiency in one of four art forms: music, visual art, theater, or dance. How the state came to mandate this law, how proficiency is currently defined and assessed in dance, and what effects the cuts in arts education funding will…

  9. Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    .1 612 643 710 634 660 638 744 710 679 654 0 200 400 600 800 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY Development FY2003 - FY2012 #12;Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island Division of Research and Economic Development 2.2 *FY2003 total includes proposal for IODP System Integration Contractor, $679

  10. Plan for Information Literacy at the University of Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhardt, Joanna; MacDonald, Mary; Rathemacher, Andree; Kelland, J. Laurence; Vocino, Michael

    The past 5 years have seen enormous change in the style of reference work that is done by librarians at the University of Rhode Island (URI) Library. Before the arrival of publicly accessible online databases and catalogs, there were clear lines regarding "doing reference" and teaching how to use the library. Now efforts are more directed toward…

  11. University of Rhode Island Adapted Aquatics Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scraba, Paula J.; Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    An overview is presented of the aquatics course, adapted for persons with disabilities, at the University of Rhode Island. A description of the course includes information on course requirements, objectives, content and learning activities, assignments, modules used in the course, and a course syllabus. A description of the course organization and…

  12. Accretion rates and sediment accumulation in Rhode Island salt marshes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Bricker-Urso; S. W. Nixon; J. K. Cochran; D. J. Hirschberg; C. Hunt

    1989-01-01

    In order to test the assumption that accretion rates of intertidal salt marshes are approximately equal to rates of sea-level\\u000a rise along the Rhode Island coast,210Pb analyses were carried out and accretion rates calculated using constant flux and constant activity models applied to sediment\\u000a cores collected from lowSpartina alterniflora marshes at four sites from the head to the mouth of

  13. Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island Date: 9/26/2011 Prepared byEdit, ArcEditor, ArcEurope, ArcExplorer, ArcExpress, ArcGIS, ArcGlobe, ArcGrid, ArcIMS, ARC/INFO, ArcInfo, ArcInfo Librarian, ArcInfo--Professional GIS, ArcInfo--The World's GIS, ArcLessons, ArcLocation, Arc

  14. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  15. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

  16. Eutrophication and management initiatives for the control of nutrient inputs to Rhode Island coastal lagoons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Virginia Lee; Stephen Olsen

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of developing eutrophic conditions in small temperate lagoons along the coast of Rhode Island suggests that\\u000a in such shallow, macrophyte based systems the response to nutrient enrichment differs from that described for plankton based\\u000a systems. The nitrogen loadings per unit area of the salt ponds are 240–770 mmol N per m2 per year. Instead of the high nutrient

  17. A Precipitation-Runoff Model for the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

    2007-01-01

    A Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model of the Blackstone River Basin was developed and calibrated to study the effects of changing land- and water-use patterns on water resources. The 474.5 mi2 Blackstone River Basin in southeastern Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is experiencing rapid population and commercial growth throughout much of its area. This growth and the corresponding changes in land-use patterns are increasing stress on water resources and raising concerns about the future availability of water to meet residential and commercial needs. Increased withdrawals and wastewater-return flows also could adversely affect aquatic habitat, water quality, and the recreational value of the streams in the basin. The Blackstone River Basin was represented by 19 hydrologic response units (HRUs): 17 types of pervious areas (PERLNDs) established from combinations of surficial geology, land-use categories, and the distribution of public water and public sewer systems, and two types of impervious areas (IMPLNDs). Wetlands were combined with open water and simulated as stream reaches that receive runoff from surrounding pervious and impervious areas. This approach was taken to achieve greater flexibility in calibrating evapotranspiration losses from wetlands during the growing season. The basin was segmented into 50 reaches (RCHRES) to represent junctions at tributaries, major lakes and reservoirs, and drainage areas to streamflow-gaging stations. Climatological, streamflow, water-withdrawal, and wastewater-return data were collected during the study to develop the HSPF model. Climatological data collected at Worcester Regional Airport in Worcester, Massachusetts and T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, were used for model calibration. A total of 15 streamflow-gaging stations were used in the calibration. Streamflow was measured at eight continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey cooperative streamflow-gaging network, and at seven partial-record stations installed in 2004 for this study. Because the model-calibration period preceded data collection at the partial-record stations, a continuous streamflow record was estimated at these stations by correlation with flows at nearby continuous-record stations to provide additional streamflow data for model calibration. Water-use information was compiled for 1996-2001 and included municipal and commercial/industrial withdrawals, private residential withdrawals, golf-course withdrawals, municipal wastewater-return flows, and on-site septic effluent return flows. Streamflow depletion was computed for all time-varying ground-water withdrawals prior to simulation. Water-use data were included in the model to represent the net effect of water use on simulated hydrographs. Consequently, the calibrated values of the hydrologic parameters better represent the hydrologic response of the basin to precipitation. The model was calibrated for 1997-2001 to coincide with the land-use and water-use data compiled for the study. Four long-term stations (Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island) that monitor flow at 3.3, 5.4, 19, and 88 percent of the total basin area, respectively, provided the primary model-calibration points. Hydrographs, scatter plots, and flow-duration curves of observed and simulated discharges, along with various model-fit statistics, indicated that the model performed well over a range of hydrologic conditions. For example, the total runoff volume for the calibration period simulated at the Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island streamflow-gaging stations differed from the observed runoff v

  18. 77 FR 279 - Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-670-000] Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based...supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC's application for market-based...

  19. 77 FR 280 - Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-674-000] Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial...supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC's application for...

  20. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems://jobs.uri.edu to view complete details for job posting # (6000145). The University of Rhode Island is an AA

  1. Genetic and phenotypic parameters of the components parts of egg weight in Fayoumi and Rhode Island Reds

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters of the components parts of egg weight in Fayoumi and Rhode Island high percentage of egg yolk and egg shell (MOSTAG!!R and KAMAR, ig6i), and the Rhode Island Red breed

  2. Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers (ESA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

  3. 75 FR 18522 - Rhode Island Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March 29, 2010, and...

  4. THE ``100 LOBSTERS'' PROJECT: A COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR HEALTH ASSESSMENTS OF LOBSTERS FROM RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    OF LOBSTERS FROM RHODE ISLAND JEFFREY D. SHIELDS,1 * KERSTEN N. WHEELER,1 JESSICA MOSS,1 BARBARA SOMERS2 Science, The College of William & Mary, PO Box 1346, Gloucester Point, VA 23062; 2 University of Rhode Island Fisheries Center, East Farm Rd., Bldg. 83, Kingston, RI 02881 ABSTRACT The emergence of epizootic

  5. 75 FR 26977 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March 29, 2010, and...

  6. The Nation's Report Card: State Reading 2002, Report for Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerry, Laura; Lutkus, Anthony

    This report provides selected results from the 2002 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) for Rhode Island's public-school students at grades 4 and 8. Since 1992, reading has been assessed in four different years at the state level (at grade 4 in 1992 and 1994, and at both grades 4 and 8 in 1998 and 2002). Rhode Island participated in…

  7. Survey of Risk Reduction and Pollution Prevention Practices in the Rhode Island Automotive Refinishing Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard T. Enander; David M. Gute; Richard Missaghian

    1998-01-01

    In 1996 a survey of pollution prevention, environmental control, and occupational health and safety practices was conducted in the Rhode Island automotive refinishing industry sector. In conjunction with project partners, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management developed a multidimensional survey instrument to identify risk reduction opportunities. Investigators sought to characterize the range of environmental and industrial hygiene controls employed

  8. The Good 5 CigarTHE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1971 Issue 35 www.ramcigar.com

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    The Good 5¢ CigarTHE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1971 Volume 58 Issue 35 www Editor Yesterday, University of Rhode Island President David M. Dooley became the first URI president visions for the university's future, Dooley played on the phrase "only in Rhode Island" in his inaugural

  9. This article was downloaded by: [University Of Rhode Island] On: 01 October 2012, At: 11:41

    E-print Network

    Baglama, James

    This article was downloaded by: [University Of Rhode Island] On: 01 October 2012, At: 11 of Mathematics, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA Version of record first published: 10 Nov 2008 at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA, USA; bDepartment of Mathematics, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

  10. Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P.G.; Parker, Castle E.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

  11. Real-Time CORBA Development at MITRE, NRaD, Tri-Paci c and Gregory Cooper cooper@cs.uri.edu University of Rhode Island, USA

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    @cs.uri.edu University of Rhode Island, USA Lisa Cingiser DiPippo cingiser@cs.uri.edu University of Rhode Island, USA Levon Esibov esibov@cs.uri.edu University of Rhode Island, USA Roman Ginis ginis@linus.mitre.org MITRE@cs.uri.edu University of Rhode Island and MITRE, USA Bhavani Thuraisingham thura@mitre.org MITRE Corporation, Bedford

  12. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  13. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  14. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  15. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  16. 33 CFR 334.81 - Narragansett Bay, East Passage, Coddington Cove, Naval Station Newport, naval restricted area...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. 334.81 Section 334.81...naval restricted area, Newport, Rhode Island. (a) The area. All of the navigable...Station Newport, USN, Newport, Rhode Island or his/her authorized...

  17. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    CIP2000 Academic Plan Title Level Plan Code Coll Area Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 17 3_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 1 4 11 2 5 14 19 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 10 3 4 1 14 4 18

  18. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    CIP2010 Academic Plan Title Level Plan Code Coll Area Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS Bacc EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 1 EL_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 5 12 2 5 15 20 040601 Landscape Architecture Bacc EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 1 1 13 1

  19. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    CIP2000 Academic Plan Title Level Plan Code Coll Area Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Total 010699 Envir Hort & Turf Mgmt - BS 5 EL_EHTM_BS ELSCI RDV 18 4_WCB_BS ELSCI RDV 1 1 8 7 1 9 9 18 040601 Landscape Architecture 5 EL_LDA_BLA ELSCI RDV 1 9 7 9 8 17 050201

  20. Offshore wind resource assessment with Standard Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT): A Rhode Island case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Alexander Robert

    Motivated by the current Rhode Island Ocean SAMP (Special Area Management Plan) project and the growing need in the foreseeable future, analysis tools for wind resource assessment are assembled into a toolkit that can be accessed from a GIS. The analysis is demonstrated by application to the ongoing wind resource assessment of Rhode Island's offshore waters by the Ocean SAMP. The tool is called Standard Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT). SWAT utilizes a method for integrating observations from the study area or numerical model outputs to assemble the spatial distribution of the offshore wind resource. Available power is inferred from direct measurements of wind speed, but the shape of the atmospheric boundary layer or wind speed profile must be parameterized in order to extrapolate measurements to heights other than that of the measurements. The vertical wind speed profile is modeled with the basic power law assuming a 1/7 exponent parameter representing near-neutral or more accurately timeaverage conditions. As an alternate estimate from year long multi-level observations at a meteorological tower is employed. The basis for the power analysis is the 2- parameter Weibull probability distribution, recognized as standard in modeling typical wind speed distributions. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the Weibull probability density function provides the expected power densities at observation sites. Application to Rhode Island's coastal waters yields an estimated Weibull shape parameter of roughly 2 for the offshore environment and a Weibull scale parameter that increases with distance from the coast. Estimates of power in the SAMP study area range from 525 to 850 W/m² at an elevation of 80 meters based on an observed profile in the SAMP study area. Like the Weibull scale parameter, annual mean wind power increases with distance offshore.

  1. Availability of ground water, upper Pawcatuck River basin, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, William Burrows; Hahn, Glenn Walter; Brackley, Richard A.

    1966-01-01

    The upper Pawcatuck River basin is a 70-square-mile area in southcentral Rhode Island consisting of broad, rolling hills and narrow valleys in the north and fiat-floored plains in the south. It is drained by the Pawcatuck River and its two major tributaries, the Usquepaug-Queen River and the Chipuxet River. Analysis of the water budget for the basin shows that approximately 94 mgd (million gallons per day) or about 63 percent of the precipitation flows out of the basin as streamflow. Of this amount, about 66 mgd is from ground-water seepage. Two ground-water reservoirs composed of glacial deposits of sand and gravel and capable of substantial yields are in the basin. The larger reservoir underlies the central part of the Usquepaug-Queen River valley. This reservoir ranges in width from 3,000 to 4,000 feet and is 32,000 feet long. A large part of the reservoir contains sand and gravel more than 100 feet thick, having a permeability of more than 1,000 gallons per day per square foot. The yield of this reservoir is estimated to be about 17 mgd. The smaller ground-water reservoir is in the Chipuxet River valley. It is about 4,000 feet wide and 16,000 feet long. A large part of this reservoir contains sand and gravel more than 150 feet thick having a permeability of more than 1,000 gallons per day per square foot. The yield of the Chipuxet reservoir is estimated to be about 8.6 mgd. Mineral content of water from both of the reservoirs is generally less than 200 parts per million of dissolved solids. However, in the Chipuxet groundwater reservoir the dissolved solids are somewhat higher, and the iron content is a problem. Only about 1.5 mgd of water is used in the basin. Most of it is used for public supplies and is obtained from wells not tapping the Usquepaug-Queen or Chipuxet ground-water reservoirs. Estimates of the 25 mgd of ground water potentially available are believed to be conservative, and substantially larger quantities may actually be available when development takes place.

  2. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  3. Promoting Independence in Rhode Island: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Rhode Island demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  4. Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT January 15, 2010 TO: The University Community FROM

  5. Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Carlotti Administration Bldg., Suite 001, Kingston, RI 02881 401-874-4576 THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT January 5, 2010 TO: The University Community FROM

  6. Population trends and habitat use of Harlequin Ducks in Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine M. Caron; Peter W. C. Paton

    2007-01-01

    To assess population trends of Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in Rhode Island (U.S.A.), we analyzed Christmas Bird Counts and other historical surveys and also conducted surveys during the winter of 2005-2006. We estimated sex and age ratios, evaluated the effects of tidal regime and time of day on survey precision, and quantified habitat use. The population in Rhode Island experienced

  7. Estimating the True Prevalence of Hepatitis C in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Kinnard, Elizabeth N.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Galárraga, Omar; Marshall, Brandon DL

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a large health, social, and economic burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the United States, the number of persons infected with HCV in Rhode Island (RI) is unknown. To inform the expansion of HCV-related public health efforts in RI, and because surveillance data are lacking and national surveys, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), likely underestimate true HCV prevalence, we reviewed published peer-reviewed and grey literature to more accurately estimate the prevalence of HCV in RI. The results of our review suggest that between 16,603 and 22,660 (1.7%–2.3%) persons in RI have ever been infected with HCV. Assuming a spontaneous clearance rate of 26%, we estimate that between 12,286 and 16,768 (1.2%–1.7%) have ever been or are currently chronically infected with HCV. Findings suggest the urgent need for improved HCV screening in RI, and that reducing morbidity and mortality from HCV will require a dramatic scale-up of testing, linkage to care, treatment and cure. PMID:24983016

  8. Marine Benthic Communities of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds and What they're Good For

    EPA Science Inventory

    The benthic invertebrates of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds include those adapted to near-shore habitats with variable temperature and salinity, mid-shelf species with narrower requirements, and boreal species that avoid elevated temperatures. Studies of benthic fauna in th...

  9. Using hydrogeochemical methods to evaluate complex quaternary subsurface stratigraphy Block Island, Rhode Island, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veeger, A.I.; Stone, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major problems in Hydrogeologic investigations of glaciated regions is the determination of complex stratigraphic relationships in the subsurface where insufficient information is available from drilling and geophysical records. In this paper, chemical characteristics of groundwater were used to identify stratigraphic changes in glacial deposits that were previously inferred on Block Island, Rhode Island, USA, an emergent remnant of the late Wisconsinan terminal moraine, located approximately 16 km south of the Rhode Island mainland. Two chemically distinct water types are recognized on the island: 1) high-iron, characterized by dissolved silica levels in excess of 20 mg/L, bicarbonate greater than 30 mg/L and dissolved iron ranging from 1-20 mg/L; and 2) low-iron, characterized by dissolved silica levels below 16 mg/L, bicarbonate less than 30 mg/L, and less than 0.3 mg/L dissolved iron. The spatial distribution of iron-bearing minerals and organic matter and the resulting redox conditions are believed to control the occurrence of highiron groundwater. The high-iron waters occur almost exclusively in the eastern half of the island and appear to coincide with the presence of allochthonous blocks of Cretaceous-age coastal-plain sediments that were incorporated into Pleistocene-age deposits derived from the Narragansett Bay-Buzzard's Bay lobe of the Late Wisconsinan Laurentide ice sheet. The low-iron waters occur in the western half of the island, where the occurrence of these Cretaceous-age blocks is rare and the sediments are attributed to a sublobe of the Hudson-Champlain lobe of the Late Wisconsinan ice sheet.

  10. Restoring the lobster stock near Rhode Island: the North Cape lobster restoration program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Cooper; M. Clancy

    2005-01-01

    In a winter storm in January 1996, the oil barge North Cape ran aground on Moonstone Beach in Rhode Island, spilling approximately 800,000 gallons of home heating oil into Block Island Sound and onto the shore. It is estimated that 9 million American lobsters from juveniles to adults were killed in the spill, along with several thousand birds, and millions

  11. Developing a Wintering Waterfowl Community Baseline for Environmental Monitoring of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2004, the Atlantic Ecology Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency?s Office of Research and Development began an annual winter waterfowl survey of Rhode Island?s Narragansett Bay. Herein, we explore the survey data gathered from 2004 to 2011 in order to establish ...

  12. The Rhode Island Hearing Assessment Program: Experience with statewide hearing screening (1993-1996)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty R. Vohr; Lisa M. Carty; Patricia E. Moore; Kristen Letourneau

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate key outcomes of a universal hearing screen\\/rescreen program for all births with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in all 8 maternity hospitals in the state of Rhode Island over a 4-year period.Study design: This was a retrospective analysis of the hearing screen\\/rescreen refer data collected prospectively for 53,121 survivors born in Rhode

  13. Race to the Top. Rhode Island Report. Year 2: School Year 2011-2012. [State-Specific Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This State-specific summary report serves as an assessment of Rhode Island's Year 2 Race to the Top implementation, highlighting successes and accomplishments, identifying challenges, and providing lessons learned from implementation from approximately September 2011 through September 2012. In Year 2, Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE)…

  14. The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Toward a Coherent System of Allocating State Aid to Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is clearly a challenging task. This paper presents the Rhode Island story on school funding reform. First, the paper begins with a short history of Rhode Island's school finance system and the key factors that called for school funding reform. Second, the paper discusses…

  15. Rev. 02/2013 If the student is unable to appear in person at the University of Rhode Island to verify his or her identity, the student must

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Rev. 02/2013 If the student is unable to appear in person at the University of Rhode Island of attending the University of Rhode Island for 2013, you must complete this form and forward it to the University of Rhode Island. Please complete

  16. Red cell exchange transfusion for babesiosis in Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Spaete, Joshua; Patrozou, Eleni; Rich, Josiah D; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    We report four cases of clinically severe tick borne babesiosis treated with chemotherapy and adjunctive red cell exchange (RCE) at two Rhode Island hospitals from 2004 to 2007. All RCE procedures were performed using a Cobe Spectra device and were well tolerated without complications. The volume of allogeneic red cells used in the exchange was determined using the algorithm in the apheresis device with the input variables of preprocedure hematocrit, weight, height, an assumed allogeneic red cell hematocrit of 55 and a desired post procedure hematocrit of 27. The preprocedure level of parasitemia varied between 2.4% and 24% and the postprocedure level of parasitemia between 0.4 and 5.5% with an average overall percent reduction in parasitemia of 74%. Retrospectively, application of a new formula to calculate red cell mass appeared to correlate better with the percent reduction in parasitemia. Previous reports of RCE in babesiosis were reviewed. The reported reduction in parasitemia varied from 50% to >90%. Although a preprocedure level of parasitemia of 10% is sometimes used as a threshold for RCE in clinically severe babesiosis, this threshold does not have a firm empirical basis. No postprocedure desired level of parasitemia is indicated nor the mass of allogeneic red cells needed to achieve such a level. We conclude that current estimates of the dose of allogeneic red cells used in RCE are probably inaccurate, advocate a new formula to estimate this dose and suggest that a 90% reduction in parasitemia should be the minimally desired target of RCE in babesiosis. PMID:19291782

  17. Hepatitis C Prevention and Needle Exchange Programs in Rhode Island: ENCORE.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Raynald; Kofman, Aaron; Larney, Sarah; Fitzgerald, Paul

    2014-07-01

    As Rhode Island's only needle exchange program, ENCORE (Education, Needle Exchange, Counseling, Outreach, and REferrals) serves a wide range of clients infected or at risk for infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Through its on-site and outreach platforms across Rhode Island, ENCORE is in a unique position to serve at-risk individuals who may not otherwise present for prevention, testing and care for HCV, as well as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this article, we discuss the role of needle exchange programs in preventing HCV transmission, and provide an overview of the history and current operations of ENCORE. PMID:24983019

  18. Bedrock geologic map of the Uxbridge quadrangle, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and Providence County, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the 7.5-minute Uxbridge quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Avalon zone. In this area, rocks of the Avalon zone lie within the core of the Milford antiform, south and east of the terrane-bounding Bloody Bluff fault zone. Permian pegmatite dikes and quartz veins occur throughout the quadrangle. The oldest metasedimentary rocks include the Blackstone Group, which represents a Neoproterozoic peri-Gondwanan marginal shelf sequence. The metasedimentary rocks are intruded by Neoproterozoic arc-related plutonic rocks of the Rhode Island batholith. This report presents mapping by G.J. Walsh. The complete report consists of a map, text pamphlet, and GIS database. The map and text pamphlet are available only as downloadable files (see frame at right). The GIS database is available for download in ESRI™ shapefile and Google Earth™ formats, and includes contacts of bedrock geologic units, faults, outcrops, structural geologic information, geochemical data, and photographs.

  19. Fiscal year 1986 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.P.C.

    1987-07-01

    Water resources projects included a detailed partitioning of nitrogen in soil solution, turf clipping, and soil organic for various fertilizer rates; a better method of managing lawn turf to minimize nitrate contamination of ground water was found. Extensive studies showed chloride concentration for river baseflows in Rhode Island lower than the current EPA standards and advisory limits. Both road density and the subsoil layer under the highway in swamp areas were found to affect the chloride concentration. A numerical model of two-phase (gasoline/groundwater) immiscible fluid flow through soil was developed to predict gasoline movement in aquifer and for optimizing the pumping rates in a clean-up process. Effects of alum coagulant dosage, mixing intensity, and mixing time on direct water filtration performance and its optimization in sand filters were investigated.

  20. Character, distribution, and ecological significance of storm wave-induced scour in Rhode Island Sound, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Parker, Castle E.

    2015-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys in 2008 and 2009, is coupled with USGS data from sampling and photographic stations to map the seabed morphology and composition of Rhode Island Sound along the US Atlantic coast, and to provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitats. Patchworks of scour depressions cover large areas on seaward-facing slopes and bathymetric highs in the sound. These depressions average 0.5-0.8 m deep and occur in water depths reaching as much as 42 m. They have relatively steep well-defined sides and coarser-grained floors, and vary strongly in shape, size, and configuration. Some individual scour depressions have apparently expanded to combine with adjacent depressions, forming larger eroded areas that commonly contain outliers of the original seafloor sediments. Where cobbles and scattered boulders are present on the depression floors, the muddy Holocene sands have been completely removed and the winnowed relict Pleistocene deposits exposed. Low tidal-current velocities and the lack of obstacle marks suggest that bidirectional tidal currents alone are not capable of forming these features. These depressions are formed and maintained under high-energy shelf conditions owing to repetitive cyclic loading imposed by high-amplitude, long-period, storm-driven waves that reduce the effective shear strength of the sediment, cause resuspension, and expose the suspended sediments to erosion by wind-driven and tidal currents. Because epifauna dominate on gravel floors of the depressions and infauna are prevalent in the finer-grained Holocene deposits, it is concluded that the resultant close juxtaposition of silty sand-, sand-, and gravel-dependent communities promotes regional faunal complexity. These findings expand on earlier interpretations, documenting how storm wave-induced scour produces sorted bedforms that control much of the benthic geologic and biologic diversity in Rhode Island Sound.

  1. The U.S. Geological Survey streamflow and observation-well network in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Socolow, Roy S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began systematic streamflow monitoring in Massachusetts nearly 100 years ago (1904) on the Connecticut River at Montague City. Since that time, hydrologic data collection has evolved into a monitoring network of 103 streamgage stations and 200 ground-water observation wells in Massachusetts and Rhode Island (2000 water year). Data from this network provide critical information for a variety of purposes to Federal, State, and local government agencies, engineering consultants, and the public. The uses of this information have been enhanced by the fact that about 70 percent of the streamgage stations and a small but increasing number of observation wells in Massachusetts and Rhode Island have been equipped with digital collection platforms that transmit data by satellite every 4 hours. Twenty-one of the telemetered streamgage stations are also equipped with precipitation recorders. The near real-time data provided by these stations, along with historical data collected at all stations, are available over the Internet at no charge. The monitoring network operated during the 2000 water year was summarized and evaluated with respect to spatial distribution, the current uses of the data, and the physical characteristics associated with the monitoring sites. This report provides maps that show locations and summary tables for active continuous record streamgage stations, discontinued streamgage stations, and observation wells in each of the 28 major basins identified by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs and five of the major Rhode Island basins. Metrics of record length, regulation, physiographic region and physical and land-cover characteristics indicate that the streamflow-monitoring network represents a wide range of drainage-area sizes, physiographic regions, and basin characteristics. Most streamgage stations are affected by regulation, which provides information for specific water-management purposes, but diminishes the usefulness of these stations for many types of hydrologic analysis. Only 26 of the 103 active streamgage stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Massachusetts and Rhode Island are unaffected by regulation; of these, 17 are in Massachusetts and 9 are in Rhode Island. The paucity of unregulated stations is particularly evident when the stations are grouped into five drainage-area size classes; the fact that about half of these size classes have no representative unregulated stations underscores the importance of establishing and maintaining stations that are unaffected by regulation. The observation-well network comprises 200 wells; 80 percent of these wells are finished in sand and gravel, 19 percent are finished in till, and 1 percent are finished in bedrock. About 6 percent of the wells are equipped with continuous data recorders, and about half of these are capable of transmitting data in near real time.

  2. Effect of Salinity on Common Reed (Phragmites australis) in a Restored Salt Marsh in Rhode Island

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tidal wetlands have undergone extensive degradation throughout the years because of interference with tidal flow from construction, dredging, and invasion of non-native plants such Phragmites australis. In 1956, a 4-lane highway was constructed in Galilee, Rhode Island, USA, cro...

  3. USING WINTER FLOUNDER GROWTH RATES TO ASSSESS HABITAT QUALITY IN RHODE ISLAND'S COASTAL LAGOONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used growth rates of juvenile winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus, to assess habitat quality in 3 of Rhode Island's coastal salt ponds that had differing levels of nutrients and human development. In each pond, 1 m2 cages were placed in vegetated and unvegetated habi...

  4. Rhode Island Teachers and Technology Initiative: Findings from the Pilot Implementation Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henriquez, Andres; Riconscente, Michelle

    This report summarizes findings from a survey of 183 of the 314 elementary, middle, and high school educators that participated in the pilot year implementation of the Rhode Island Teacher Training Initiative (RITTI). All RITTI educators received 60 hours of training over a 2-week period focused on using a variety of software applications,…

  5. NEKTON HABITAT QUALITY AT SHALLOW-WATER SITES IN TWO RHODE ISLAND COASTAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated nekton habitat quality at five shallow-water sites in two Rhode Island systems by comparing nekton densities and biomass, number of species, prey availability and feeding, and abundance of winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus. Nekton density and biomass wer...

  6. Planning a New Map Room for the University of Rhode Island Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongeau, Deborah; Stringer-Hye, Richard

    This report describes the planning and design process for the University of Rhode Island Library's new map room, which was undertaken as part of a library expansion and renovation program. The first of the report's three major sections describes how equipment was selected for the map room and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of three…

  7. EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA

    E-print Network

    Gold, Art

    EUTROPHICATION A J Gold, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA J T Sims, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA ß 2005, Elsevier Ltd. All Rights Reserved. Introduction Eutrophication describes in nutrient inputs. Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the nutrients that drive most eutrophication processes

  8. Mentoring in Early Childhood Professional Development: Evaluation of the Rhode Island Child Development Specialist Apprenticeship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttley, Clarissa M.; Horm, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    The Quality Child Care Initiative, the federal apprenticeship program applied to the field of early care and education, has been implemented in over 40 states. This federal initiative was designed to reduce turnover, increase wages, provide a more stable environment for children, and lower the concern of parents. Rhode Island received funding in…

  9. Sclerochronological records of temperature and growth from shells of Mercenaria mercenaria from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Jones; M. A. Arthur; D. J. Allard

    1989-01-01

    Annual internal growth increments in shells of hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) provide an accurate record of both growth history and some types of environmental change. These increments were used to determine age and growth rate of hard clams collected in 1984–1985 from ten sites in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA, and to assess geographic variation in growth within the bay.

  10. Rhode Island Pension Reform: Implications and Opportunities for Education. Education Sector Policy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriot-Hatfield, Jennie; Monahan, Amy; Rosenberg, Sarah; Tucker, Bill

    2011-01-01

    On August 24, 2010, the state of Rhode Island received some outstanding news. Its yearlong, bipartisan effort to develop new policies to spur educational improvement was about to pay off. The state, along with eight others and the District of Columbia, was named a winner of the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. The…

  11. Socioeconomic Correlates of Current and Regular Smoking among College Students in Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkin, Patrick F.; Tisch, Linda A.; Glicksman, Arvin S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine how sociodemographic variables, in particular socioeconomic status, correlate with current and regular smoking among college students in Rhode Island. Participants and Methods: Over a 4-year period (academic year 2000-2001 to 2003-2004), the authors examined sociodemographic correlates of…

  12. Lessons from the Classroom Level about Federal and State Accountability in Rhode Island and Illinois. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In the winter of 2008, the Center on Education Policy (CEP) released reports examining the impact of national and state accountability systems on curriculum, instruction, and student achievement in Rhode Island and Illinois. Using classroom observations and interviews with school administrators, instructional specialists, teachers, parents, and…

  13. State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Rhode Island State Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

  14. Continuity in the Rhode Island Writing Project: Keeping Teachers at the Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozbek, Susan; Roemer, Marjorie; Sanzen, Keith; Vander Does, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Presenters' Collaborative Network (PCN) was started in 2002 to support the creation of a corps of teacher-consultants who would lead workshops for the Rhode Island Writing Project (RIWP) at local schools and conferences. The PCN is a group of teachers, past participants from summer institutes or year-round embedded programs in schools that…

  15. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  16. Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Rhode Island related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

  17. Commuter Housing Office University of Rhode Island, 316 Memorial Union, Kingston, RI 02881

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    : __________ Rent per Month: ____________ (Note: You may enter RFS to indicate rent for services) Miles away fromCommuter Housing Office University of Rhode Island, 316 Memorial Union, Kingston, RI 02881 Phone of property? ( ) Yes ( ) No PART THREE: TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF LISTING Please read carefully and sign

  18. RISK ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY - PHASE III NAVAL CONSTRUCTION BATTALION CENTER - DAVISVILLE, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to etermine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. llen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was cl...

  19. Guidelines for Career Education 7-9 for Rhode Island: Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Univ., Kingston. Coll. of Resource Development.

    Guidelines for implementing an exploratory career education curriculum in agribusiness and natural resources for Rhode Island students in grades 7-9 are presented. Section 1 presents a rationale, general objectives, suggestions for teacher preparation, explanation and scoring of interest inventory and achievement test, and resource list…

  20. LINKING JUVENILE FISH AND THEIR HABITATS: AN EXAMPLE FROM NARRAGANSETT BAY ,RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used two methods and existing field survey data to link juvenile fish and their habitats. The first method used seine survey data collected monthly from July to October 1988-1996 at fixed stations in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Thirteen fish species making up 1% or more of...

  1. On March 21, 2013, the Faculty Senate of the University of Rhode Island approved the following Open Access Policy proposed by the Ad Hoc Committee on Open Access as recommended by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee.

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    On March 21, 2013, the Faculty Senate of the University of Rhode Island approved the following Open Executive Committee. University of Rhode Island Open-Access Policy The Faculty of the University of Rhode to the University of Rhode Island permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise

  2. Significance of fossiliferous Middle Cambrian rocks of Rhode Island to the history of the Avalonian microcontinent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Skehan; D. P. Murray; A. R. Palmer; A. T. Smith; E. S. Belt

    1978-01-01

    Middle Cambrian trilobites of Acado-Baltic affinities have been found in southern Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, in phyllites previously mapped as part of the Pennsylvanian stratigraphy of the Narragansett Basin. The trilobite-bearing phyllites form the basal unit of an approximately 1-km-thick sequence that has undergone four episodes of folding and cleavage formation. Three different trilobites are represented. Badulesia tenera (Hartt), which

  3. Characteristics of softwater streams in Rhode Island II. Composition and seasonal dynamics of macroalgal communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert G. Sheath; JoAnn M. Burkholder

    1985-01-01

    Forty stream segments in Rhode Island, U.S.A., were examined seasonally from June 1979 to March 1982. Thirty-nine species of macroalgae were collected, respresenting 25 genera. The composition of the lotic flora was 54% green algae, 31% red algae, 5% blue-green algae, 5% xanthophytes, 3% chrysophytes and 3% diatoms. The majority of these taxa (85%) were filamentous. From a biweekly examination

  4. Adaptação brasileira da University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) para usuários de substâncias ilícitas1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margareth da Silva Oliveira

    This study presents the validation of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) for illicit psychoactive substances users in Brasil. The sample was of 214 persons of the masculine (n=194) and feminine sex (n=20) between 13 and 44 years old (M=22,93; DP=7,94). The collection happened in Porto Alegre, in ambulatories for treatment of the chemical dependence (n=89), as much

  5. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

  6. Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-155-1979, Arcade Parking Garage, Providence, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, E.A.

    1989-08-01

    The Arcade Parking Garage, in Providence, Rhode Island, was evaluated for possible hazardous health conditions due to the presence of carbon monoxide fumes. The garage has nine parking levels, eight above ground. The building was constructed of reinforced poured concrete and the above ground parking spaces were open to the outside, allowing the free circulation of air. Environmental monitoring consisted of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide air sampling in a collection booth and in the office. The results of the short and long term air sampling indicated exposure to carbon monoxide ranging from 17 to 103 parts per million (ppm). Carbon-dioxide levels were measured at greater than 1000 ppm in the office area, indicating inadequate ventilation. The carbon dioxide levels were all well below the industrial standard of 5000 ppm, but were above the 1000 ppm indoor air quality guideline. Measurements for thermal comfort indicated temperatures were between 62 and 65 F, with relative humidities ranging from 28.3 to 43.7%. These thermal-comfort values were within the guidelines for human occupancy. The reported symptoms of the employees were consistent with carbon monoxide exposure. A potential health hazard existed due to carbon monoxide. Measures to minimize employee exposures are recommended.

  8. Estimation of water withdrawal and distribution, water use, and wastewater collection and return flow in Cumberland, Rhode Island, 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horn, M.A.; Craft, P.A.; Bratton, Lisa

    1994-01-01

    Water-use data collected in Rhode Island by different State agencies or maintained by different public suppliers and wastewater- treatment facilities need to be integrated if these data are to be used in making water- resource management decisions. Water-use data for the town of Cumberland, a small area in northeastern Rhode Island, were compiled and integrated to provide an example of how the procedure could be applied. Integration and reliability assessment of water-use data could be facilitated if public suppliers, wastewater- treatment facilities, and State agencies used a number of standardized procedures for data collection and computer storage. The total surface water and ground water withdrawn in the town of Cumberland during 1988 is estimated to be 15.39 million gallons per day, of which 11.20 million gallons per day was exported to other towns. Water use in Cumberland included 2.51 million gallons per day for domestic use, 0.68 million gallons per day for industrial use, 0.27 million gallons per day for commercial use, and 0.73 million gallons per day for other use, most of which were unmetered use. Disposal of waste- water in Cumberland included 2.03 million gallons per day returned to the hydrologic system and 1.73 million gallons per day exported from Cumberland for wastewater treatment. Consumptive use during 1988 is estimated to be 0.43 million gallons per day.

  9. Updating the 1:50.000 geological maps of Rhodes Island using remote sensing data and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsombos, Panagiotis I.; Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos G.; Photiades, Adonis; Psonis, Konstantinos

    2007-10-01

    The island of Rhodes represents an uplifted easternmost segment of the Hellenic forearc extending between Greece and Turkey, which is associated with the subduction of the African plate below the Aegean. Middle Miocene-Pleistocene sedimentary basins, are separated by a stack of Alpine nappes of the Hellenide orogen exposed in uplifted fault blocks such as Plattenkalk series (Attaviros Group), Gavrovo-Tripolitza series (Lindos Group), Pindos-Olonos series (Profitis Ilias Group) and several outcrops of Pelagonian series with ophiolitic mélanges. These pre-Neogene formations are dominated by low-grade metamorphic sediments, which were folded and faulted during several phases of the alpine orogeny. The Rhodes region was uplifted in the Middle Miocene after which subsidence and deposition of sediments took place in the Upper Pliocene and Lower Pleistocene. In this paper we present the combined use of remote sensing and GIS techniques for the geological mapping of Rhodes Island at a 1/50.000 scale. The geological formations, geotectonic units and the tectonic structure were recognized in situ and mapped. Interpretation of medium resolution satellite images (Landsat 7 ETM and Terra ASTER) has been carried out in order to detect the linear or not structures of the study area. The in situ mapping was enhanced with data from the digital processing of the satellite data. All the analogical and digital data were imported in a geodata base specially designed for geological data. After the necessary topological control and corrections the data were unified and processed in order to create the final layout at 1/50.000 scale.

  10. University of Rhode Island inAdvance November 9, 2006

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    to benefit student scholarship and grant programs. Tips on coping with holiday stress On December 9, the Ram Island's 39 cities and towns approved the higher education bond issue that will provide $65 million. More... College of Nursing opens White Hall Nursing Commons URI College of Nursing Dean Dayle Joseph

  11. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  12. Effect of Sea Level Rise on Groundwater Resources: A Case Study of Southwest Coastal Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossida, Maggie

    2010-05-01

    This study evaluates the effect of sea level rise, induced by the global warming, and the effect of pumping, on the groundwater resources of the coastal aquifer of the Quonochontaug Neck Area, in southwest Rhode Island, USA. A three dimensional groundwater model was built for the year 1999, using Visual MODFLOW software. The simulation was run in steady state, with the freshwater and saltwater bodies treated as immiscible fluids, and thus diffusion and dispersion were not taken into account. The interface between the freshwater and the denser saltwater was simulated as a sharp interface, using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation. The movement of the interface under different future scenarios was evaluated, and the possibility of saltwater intrusion into the public water supply wells of the area was assessed. The basic groundwater model of the area was build and calibrated to available observation data from monitoring wells for the year 1999. A sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the model's behavior. Future scenarios for the years 2020, 2050 and 2100 were simulated for different sea level rise rates and various pumping rates. The sea level rise rates varied from a local minimum, observed in the nearby Newport tidal gage, to the global maximum predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), while the pumping rates ranged from the current rate to maximum increased rate projected for the year 2100. The model concluded that the groundwater table responds to the sea level rise by increasing its head, and that the depth to the interface between the freshwater and the saltwater decreases. Increased pumping rates exacerbate those observations. Under some combined scenarios of sea level rise and pumping, the water supply wells can be threatened by the possibility of saltwater intrusion and contamination. Some adaptation strategies and suggestions were formulated as part of the conclusions of this study, and the limitations of the simulation were also evaluated.

  13. Modern sedimentary environments on the Rhode Island inner shelf, off the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Needell, S. W.; O'Hara, C. J.

    1982-01-01

    Analyses of side-scan sonar records along with previously published bathymetric, textural and subbottom data reveal the sedimentary environments on the inner Continental Shelf south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The bottom topography in this area is characterized by a broad central depression bordered by shallow, irregular sea floor on the north and east and by a discontinuous, curvilinear ridge on the south and west. Four distinct environments were identified: 1. (1) Pre-Mesozoic coastal rocks are exposed on the sea floor at isolated locations near the shore (waterdepths <32 m). These exposures have pronounced, irregular topographic relief and produce blotchy patterns on side-scan sonographs. 2. (2) Glacial moraine deposits form the discontinuous offshore ridge. These deposits have hummocky sea-floor relief, are covered by lag gravel and boudlers, and appear as predominantly black (strongly reflective) patterns on the side-scan records. 3. (3) Over most of the shallow, irregular bottom in the northeast, on the flanks of the morainal ridge, and atop bathymetric highs, the sea floor is characterized as a mosaic of light and dark patches and lineations. The dark (more reflective) zones are areas of coarse sands and megaripples (wavelengths = 0.8-1.2 m that either have no detectable relief or are slightly depressed relative to surrounding (light) areas of finer-grained sands. 4. (4) Smooth beds that produce nearly featureless patterns on the sonographs occupy the broad central bathymetric depression as well as smaller depressions north and east of Block Island. Within the broad depression, sonographs having practically no shading indicate a central zone of modern sandy silt, whereas records having moderate tonality define a peripheral belt of silty sand. The sedimentary environments that are outlined range from erosional or non-depositional (bedrock, glacial moraine) to depositional (featureless beds), and include areas that may reflect a combination of erosional and depositional processes (textural patchiness). The distribution and characteristics of the environments reveal the general post-glacial sedimentary history of this area and provide a guide to future utilization of the shelf surface. ?? 1982.

  14. Dual Enrollment in Rhode Island: Opportunities for State Policy. Report to the Statewide PK-16 Council by Jobs for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes Jobs for the Future's (JFF's) findings and recommendations to enhance dual enrollment in Rhode Island, reshaping the programs from a collection of locally autonomous high school enrichment activities to a comprehensive statewide system that provides college transition opportunities to a wide range of students. Rhode Island

  15. JaeHun Park and D. Randolph Watts Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, 215 South Ferry Road, Narragansett, RI 02882-1197; jpark@gso.uri.edu, rwatts@gso.uri.edu

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Jae­Hun Park and D. Randolph Watts Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, 215 Summary of bottom pressure (Pbot) data URI: University of Rhode Island, POL: Proudman Oceanography measurements spanning from 16o S to 37o N. One was deployed by University of Rhode Island and three by Proudman

  16. State Perspectives on Health Care Reform: Oregon, Hawaii, Tennessee, and Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Thome, Jean I.; Bianchi, Barbara; Bonnyman, Gordon; Greene, Clark; Leddy, Tricia

    1995-01-01

    The general consensus among States which have had their section 1115 demonstration projects approved is that there is no one best way to implement State health care reform. The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), however, wished to discern how States were accomplishing the task of implementing the demonstrations, and solicited responses from State representatives whose section 1115 demonstration waivers had been approved. The resulting article gives an overview of this implementation process from four State perspectives. Written by representatives from Oregon, Hawaii, Tennessee, and Rhode Island, the ideas presented here are indicative of the complex undertaking of State health care reform. PMID:10142573

  17. Tectonic significance of dikes of Westerly Granite, southeastern Connecticut and southwestern Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldsmith, R.

    1988-01-01

    Undeformed Early Permian Westerly Granite dikes cut gneisses of the southeastern New England Avalon zone along coastal southeastern Connecticut and adjacent Rhode Island. Most dikes dip southward at a low angle. The Westerly dikes were emplaced in relatively warm rock penecontemporaneously with the Narragansett Pier Granite during a narrow time interval shortly after cessation of pervasive Alleghanian ductile deformation but probably before final localized movement on major shear zones. The gentle dips indicate subhorizontal release at the end stage of the Alleghanian compressive event. Doming, intrusion of granite, and subsequent rapid uplift and cooling are attributed to the underplating of Avalonian crust by an African plate during the Alleghanian. -Author

  18. Numerical-simulation and conjunctive-management models of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt stream-aquifer system, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Dickerman, David C.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the development, application, and evaluation of numerical-simulation and conjunctive-management models of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt stream-aquifer system in central Rhode Island. Steady-state transient numerical models were developed to improve the understanding of the hydrologic budget of the system, the interaction of ground-water and surface-water components of the system, and the contributing areas and sources of water to supply wells in the system. The numerical models were developed and calibrated on the basis of hydrologic data collected during this and previous investigations. These data include lithologic information for the aquifer; hydraulic properties of aquifer and streambed materials; recharge to the aquifer; water levels measured in wells, ponds, and streambed piezometers; streamflow measurements for various streams within the system; and ground-water withdrawal rates from, and wastewater discharge to, the aquifer.

  19. Egg production, egg quality and crop content of Rhode Island Red hens grazing on natural tropical vegetation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Khaled Abouelezz Fouad; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald; Solorio-Sanchez, Javier Francisco

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this experiment was to study the suitability of the outdoor system for Rhode Island Red hens under the tropical conditions of southern Mexico. Twelve floor pens, each containing four birds, were divided randomly into two groups. The first group was raised indoors only, while each of the second group replicates had access to an outdoor area with natural-grown vegetation from 0800 to 1700 hours daily. Both groups fed ad libitum on a commercial layers diet. The results revealed no differences in body weight between treatments. The outdoor group recorded significantly higher egg laying rate (86.90 vs. 78.05 %), higher egg mass (50.66 vs. 45.30 g egg/hen/day), and higher feed intake (103.70 vs. 97.67 g/day) versus the indoor group. The outdoor group had eggs with darker yellow yolks (9.46 vs. 5.46), lower yolk, and higher albumen proportions (P < 0.05) versus the indoor group. The crop content of the outdoor hens consisted of 86.55 % concentrated feed, 6.30 % plant material, 2.27 % grit stones, 1.69 % snails and oyster shells, 1.25 % seeds, 0.95 % farm wastes, and 0.99 % insects, worms, and larvae. Of the outdoor hens, 43.1 % was observed to be in the range at each scanning time. The outdoor system in the tropics had beneficial effects on Rhode Island Red hen performance, and the hens utilized the outdoor area effectively and obtained various feed items. PMID:22820940

  20. University of Rhode Island inAdvance July 7, 2005

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    researcher, despite early season predictions that tick numbers could be lower this year. Thomas Mather activity, and nutrition -- areas in which the University has significant experience in programs and applied

  1. The interactive systems framework applied to the strategic prevention framework: the Rhode Island experience.

    PubMed

    Florin, Paul; Friend, Karen B; Buka, Stephen; Egan, Crystelle; Barovier, Linda; Amodei, Brenda

    2012-12-01

    The Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation (ISF) was introduced as a heuristic systems level model to help bridge the gap between research and practice (Wandersman et al., in Am J Commun Psychol 41:171-181, 2008). This model describes three interacting systems with distinct functions that (1) distill knowledge to develop innovations; (2) provide supportive training and technical assistance for dissemination to; (3) a prevention delivery system responsible for implementation in the field. The Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) is a major prevention innovation launched by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The SPF offers a structured, sequential, data-driven approach that explicitly targets environmental conditions in the community and aims for change in substance use and problems at the population level. This paper describes how the ISF was applied to the challenges of implementing the SPF in 14 Rhode Island communities, with a focus on the development of a new Training and Technical Assistance Resources Center to support SPF efforts. More specifically, we (1) describe each of the three ISF interacting systems as they evolved in Rhode Island; (2) articulate the lines of communication between the three systems; and (3) examine selected evaluation data to understand relationships between training and technical assistance and SPF implementation and outcomes. PMID:22674010

  2. Prevalence of eustrongylidosis in wading birds from colonies in California, Texas, and Rhode Island, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Custer, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) nestlings from colonies in Texas, Rhode Island, and California and Great Egret (Casmerodius albus) nestlings from Texas were examined for eustrongylidosis, or infection by the parasitic nematode Eustrongylides spp. In 31% (24/77) of all broods examined, at least one nestling was infected. Snowy Egret broods from Texas were more frequently (100%) infected than those from California (20%) or Rhode Island (10%), and the prevalence of eustrongylidosis in 5- and 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings was higher in the Texas colony than the other two. Within the Texas colony, the frequency of eustrongylidosis was greater for Snowy Egret (100%) and Great Egret (80%) broods than for Black-crowned Night-Heron broods (12.5%). Also in Texas, eustrongylidosis was more frequent in 5-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than 5-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron or Great Egret nestlings, and in 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than in 10-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron nestlings. Eustrongylides spp. caused perforations of the gastrointestinal tract and peritonitis, particularly in Snowy Egrets.

  3. Water use and availability in the Woonasquatucket and Moshassuck River basins, north-central Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimiroski, Mark T.; Wild, Emily C.

    2005-01-01

    The Woonasquatucket River Basin includes 51.0 square miles, and the Moshassuck River Basin includes 23.8 square miles in north-central Rhode Island. The study area comprises these two basins. The two basins border each other with the Moshassuck River Basin to the northeast of the Woonasquatucket River Basin. Seven towns are in the Woonasquatucket River Basin, and six towns are in the Moshassuck River Basin. To determine the water use and availability in the study area, water supply and discharge data were collected for these river basins for the 1995-99 period, and compared to estimated long-term water available. The study area is unique in the State of Rhode Island, because no withdrawals from major public suppliers were made during the study period. Withdrawals were, therefore, limited to self-supplied domestic use, two minor suppliers, and one self-supplied industrial user. Because no metered data were available, the summer water withdrawals were assumed to be the same as the estimates for the rest of the year. Seven major water suppliers distribute an average of 17.564 million gallons per day for use in the study area from sources outside of the study area. The withdrawals from minor water suppliers were 0.017 million gallons per day in the study area, all in the town of Smithfield in the Woonasquatucket River Basin. The remaining withdrawals in the study area were estimated to be 0.731 million gallons per day by self-supplied domestic, commercial, industrial, and agricultural users. Return flows in the study area included self-disposed water and disposal from permitted dischargers, including the Smithfield Sewage Treatment Plant. Return flows accounted for 4.116 million gallons per day in the study area. Most public-disposed water (15.195 million gallons per day) is collected by the Narragansett Bay Commission and is disposed outside of the basin in Narragansett Bay. The PART program, a computerized hydrograph-separation application, was used at one index stream-gaging station to determine water availability based on the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow, the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow criteria, and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow criteria. The index station selected was the Branch River at Forestdale, which is close to the study area and has a similar percentage of sand and gravel area. Water availability was estimated on the basis of baseflow contributions from sand and gravel deposits and till deposits at the index station. Flows were computed for June, July, August, and September 1957-2000, and a percentage of the total flow was determined to come from either sand and gravel deposits, or till, by using a regression equation. The base-flow contributions were converted to a flow per unit area at the station for the till and for the sand and gravel deposits and then applied to the deposits in the study area basins. These values were used to estimate the gross yield of base flow, as well as to subtract the two low flows (7-day, 10-year flow, and Aquatic Base Flow criteria). The results from the Branch River stream-gaging station were lowest in August at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentile for total flow with either flow criteria subtracted. The estimated August gross yield at the 50th percentile from the Woonasquatucket River Basin was 12.94 million gallons per day, and 5.91 million gallons per day from the Moshassuck River Basin. A ratio was calculated that is equal to total withdrawals divided by water availability. Water-availability flow scenarios at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles for the basins, which are based on total water available from base-flow contributions from till and sand and gravel deposits in the basins, were assessed. The ratios were the highest in July for the 50th percentile estimated gross yield minus Aquatic Base Flow (ABF) flow criteria, where withdrawals are close to the available water. Ratios are not presented if the available wat

  4. Seasonal refugia, shoreward thermal amplification, and metapopulation dynamics of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Costello; B. K. Sullivan; D. J. Gifford; D. Van Keuren; L. J. Sullivan

    2006-01-01

    The lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi occurs throughout Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during warm summer months but is often undetectable in the central portion of the bay during winter months. During 2 yr of weekly sampling, we found that M. leidyi populations in a shallow embayment, Greenwich Cove, either overwintered or were only briefly absent during winter. The Greenwich Cove population

  5. New Orleans on His Mind: A Rhode Island Choral Director Brings Katrina Victims Music--And Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Catherine Applefeld

    2009-01-01

    Westerly, Rhode Island, is a long way from New Orleans. But the physical distance has not stopped David DeAngelis, choral director at Westerly High School, from providing his students with one heck of a lesson: The opportunity to truly connect with others through music. Under DeAngelis' direction, Westerly's various vocal ensembles have held…

  6. Examining Readiness for Change: A Preliminary Evaluation of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment with Incarcerated Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Paul J.; Glaser, Brian A.; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Petrocelli, John V.

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe use and development of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (E. I. McConnaughy, J. O. Prochaska, & W. F. Velicer, 1983) and examine the psychometric properties of scores from incarcerated male adolescents. Cluster analysis revealed 3 unique profiles (Precontemplators, Participators, and Undifferentiated).…

  7. Debunking the Myths: An Evaluation of Opposition to the Arming of Campus Law Enforcement Officers in Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles P.; Wilson, Shirley A.

    2011-01-01

    In March 2010, a committee formed by the Rhode Island Board of Governors for Higher Education recommended the arming of police officers at the state's three institutions of higher learning. The issue of arming campus police personnel is one fraught with political, philosophical, social, perceptual, and personal tensions, yet it is crucial to the…

  8. Direct and correlated responses to divergent selection for residual food intake in Rhode island red laying hens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bordas; P. Merat

    1992-01-01

    1. Divergent selection was undertaken in a Rhode Island Red population for residual food intake, measured in males and females, using mass selection.2. In the absence of a control line, selection response during 14 generations was estimated by the within?year divergence between lines.3. The direct response in residual food intake was found to be significant in both sexes, the divergence

  9. The relation between pore water chemistry and benthic fluxes of nutrientsand manganese in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD J. MCCAFFREY; ALLEN C. MYERS; EARL DAVEY; GEORGE MORRISON; MICHAEL BENDER; NILE LUEDTKE; DOUGLAS CULLEN; PHILIP FROELICH; GARY KLINKHAMMER

    1980-01-01

    Ahs tract Benthic fluxes of dissolved nutrients and manganese from biologically disturbed, relatively unpolluted sediment in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been measured. Analyses of the vertical gradients of chemical species dissolved in port waters and the uptake of 22Na from the overlying water permits evaluation of the contribution of biological advection and molecular diffusion to the transport of dissolved

  10. Measured Mercury Contamination in Freshwater Fish in Rhode Island Compared with Predictions From a Regional Environmental Mercury Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Edible tissue of largemouth bass collected at 29 freshwater sites across the variable landscape of Rhode Island, USA showed a 27 fold range in total mercury concentrations [Hg], from 0.04 to 1.0 ppm (wet). Twenty-one variables, including water quality data and geographic informat...

  11. Ground-water flow and contaminant transport at a radioactive-materials processing site, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, Barbara J.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1997-01-01

    Liquid wastes from an enriched-uranium cold-scrap recovery plant at Wood River Junction, Rhode Island, were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds and trenches from 1966 through 1980. Leakage from the ponds and trenches resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water extending northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin.

  12. THE RELAXATION BETWEEN PORE WATER CHEMISTRY AND BENTHIC FLUXES OF NUTRIENTS AND MANGANESE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic fluxes of dissolved nutrients and manganese from biologically disturbed, relatively unpolluted sediment in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been measured. Analyses of the vertical gradients of chemical species dissolved in pore waters and the uptake of (22)Na from the...

  13. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND -COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILES, FASHION MERCHANDISING AND DESIGN CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND - COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILES, FASHION MERCHANDISING AND DESIGN CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET www.uri.edu/hss/tmd HS_TFMD_BS TEXTILES, FASHION MERCHANDISING 103 (3) Textile Products OR TMD 440 (3) Historic Textiles TMD 126 (3) Introduction to Design OR TMD

  14. Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Outbreak and Carriage Evaluation at a College - Rhode Island, 2015.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Heidi M; McNamara, Lucy A; Whaley, Melissa; Wang, Xin; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Kanadanian, Koren V; Kelleher, Catherine M; MacNeil, Jessica; Martin, Stacey W; Raines, Nathan; Sears, Steven; Vanner, Cynthia; Vuong, Jeni; Bandy, Utpala; Sicard, Kenneth; Patel, Manisha

    2015-06-12

    On February 2, 2015, the Rhode Island Department of Health was notified of a case of meningococcal disease in a male undergraduate student at Providence College. Three days later, a second case was reported in a male undergraduate with no contact with the first student, indicating an attack rate of 44 cases per 100,000 students, nearly 500 times higher than the national incidence of 0.15 cases per 100,000 among persons aged 17-22 years (Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, unpublished data, 2013). Both cases were caused by a rare outbreak strain of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (ST-9069); neither case was fatal. In response to the outbreak, potential contacts received antibiotic chemoprophylaxis, and a mass vaccination campaign with a recently licensed serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine was implemented. In collaboration with CDC, the first phase of a meningococcal carriage evaluation was undertaken. PMID:26068563

  15. Reporting of Real Time River Levels in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadoury, Russell A.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction In times of floods and droughts, immediate access to river level data is important to officials charged with the responsibilities of protecting lives and property by taking actions to diminish the adverse effects of the emergency. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with many Federal, State, and local agencies, is the Nation's principal collector of accurate and unbiased streamflow data, and thus is the agency emergency officials rely on to provide the needed river data. The USGS operates and maintains more than 7,000 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations on rivers in the United States; 84 of these stations are in Massachusetts and Rhode Island (see fig. 1). The river levels are recorded every 15 minutes at most of the stations; the river level data are then converted to streamflow data. Recorders equipped with telemetry (satellite radios or telephone modems) can provide almost immediate access to vital river levels.

  16. The Nuts and Bolts of Long-term Care In Rhode Island: Demographics, Services and Costs.

    PubMed

    Pelland, Kimberly; Mota, Teresa; Baier, Rosa R

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 8,000 people reside in Rhode Island's (RI's) 84 nursing homes at any single point in time. Many of these people are highly vulnerable because of illness or frailty. In this article, we describe the reasons that RI residents seek care from nursing homes, the associated costs (with a focus on Medicare and Medicaid payment), and different ways to assess nursing home quality. We also describe the home- and community-based services that can help people remain in the community. A resource list provides additional information for those seeking to better understand RI nursing homes and long-term care supports and services. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2015-03.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26056829

  17. Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

  18. The URI Office of the Provost, the College of Human Science and Services, the Program in Gerontology, and the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    in Gerontology, and the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center invite you to attend The URI Distinguished Visiting International Scholar and Malford Thewlis Lecture on Gerontology and Geriatrics GROWING OLDERWHAT

  19. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment for Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dump, Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island, Region 1: CERCLIS number RID981063258. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-06-25

    Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite is an area formerly occupied by a lacquer manufacturing industry located in Smithfield, Rhode Island. Drums of a nitrocellulose resin have been found onsite and were promptly disposed by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. This public health assessment is an evaluation of existing on and offsite environmental data, health outcome data, and addresses community health concerns related to the site. An evaluation of onsite sediment sampling data showed semi-volatile compound (SVOC) contamination in the wetland area near Stillwater River. However, human contact with sediment in this area is infrequent and is not expected to result in adverse health effects. There were no contaminants detected in onsite subsurface soil samples at levels of health concern. Sampling results from two privately owned wells used by the public that are located one half mile from Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite showed no groundwater contamination of health concern. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has classified the Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite as a No Apparent Public Health Hazard based on infrequent human contact with SVOCs detected in onsite sediment of the wetlands area near Stillwater River.

  20. Sea-floor geology in northwestern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Woods, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 69-square-kilometer area of northwestern Block Island Sound, are used with sediment samples, and still and video photography of the sea floor, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 43 stations within this area, to interpret the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. Features on the sea floor include boulders, sand waves, scour depressions, modern marine sediments, and trawl marks. Boulders, which are often several meters wide, are found in patches in the shallower depths and tend to be overgrown with sessile flora and fauna. They are lag deposits of winnowed glacial drift, and reflect high-energy environments characterized by processes associated with erosion and nondeposition. Sand waves and megaripples tend to have crests that either trend parallel to shore with 20- to 50-meter (m) wavelengths or trend perpendicular to shore with several-hundred-meter wavelengths. The sand waves reflect sediment transport directions perpendicular to shore by waves, and parallel to shore by tidal or wind-driven currents, respectively. Scour depressions, which are about 0.5 m lower than the surrounding sea floor, have floors of gravel and coarser sand than bounding modern marine sediments. These scour depressions, which are conspicuous in the sidescan-sonar data because of their more highly reflective coarser sediment floors, are likely formed by storm-generated, seaward-flowing currents and maintained by the turbulence in bottom currents caused by their coarse sediments. Areas of the sea floor with modern marine sediments tend to be relatively flat to current-rippled and sandy.

  1. Gazetteer of hydrologic characteristics of streams in Massachusetts; Taunton and Ten Mile River basins and coastal river basins of Mount Hope Bay, Narragansett Bay, and Rhode Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wandle, S.W.; Keezer, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The study area includes streams draining the Taunton River (562 square miles), the Tenmile River (53.1 square miles), and the minor streams flowing into Mount Hope Bay, Narragansett Bay, and Rhode Island Sound in southern Massachusetts, and adjacent areas of Rhode Island. Drainage areas, using the latest available 1:24 ,000 scale topographic maps, were computed for the first time for streams draining more than 3 square miles and were re-computed for data-collection sites. Streamflow characteristics, at 10 gaging stations were calculated using a new data base with daily flow records through 1981. These characteristics include annual and monthly flow statistics, duration of daily flow values, and the annual 7-day mean low flow at the 2-year and 10-year recurrence intervals. Seven-day low-flow statistics are presented for 44 partial-record sites and the procedures used to determine the hydrologic characteristics of a basin are summarized. Basin characteristics representing 14 commonly used indices to estimate various streamflows are presented for selected gaged streams. This gazetteer will aid in the planning and managing of water-resources related activities, and will provide a common data base for governmental agencies and the engineering and planning communities. (USGS)

  2. Effects of Water-Management Strategies on Water Resources in the Pawcatuck River Basin, Southwestern Rhode Island and Southeastern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Bent, Gardner C.; Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.; Scherer, J. Eric; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pawcatuck River Basin in southwestern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut is an important high-quality water resource for domestic and public supplies, irrigation, recreation, and the aquatic ecosystem. Concerns about the effects of water withdrawals on aquatic habitat in the basin have prompted local, State, and Federal agencies to explore water-management strategies that minimize the effects of withdrawals on the aquatic habitat. As part of this process, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Rhode Island Water Resources Board completed a study to assess the effects of current (2000-04) and potential water withdrawals on streamflows and groundwater levels using hydrologic simulation models developed for the basin. The major findings of the model simulations are: *Moving highly variable seasonal irrigation withdrawals from streams to groundwater wells away from streams reduces short-term fluctuations in streamflow and increases streamflow in the summer when flows are lowest. This occurs because of the inherent time lag between when water is withdrawn from the aquifer and when it affects streamflow. *A pumped well in the vicinity of small streams indicates that if withdrawals exceed available streamflow, groundwater levels drop substantially as a consequence of water lost from aquifer storage, which may reduce the time wetlands and vernal pools are saturated, affecting the animal and plant life that depend on these habitats. *The effects of pumping on water resources such as ponds, streams, and wetlands can be minimized by relocating pumping wells, implementing seasonal pumping schemes that utilize different wells and pumping rates, or both. *The effects of projected land-use change, mostly from forest to low- and medium density housing, indicate only minor changes in streamflow at the subbasin scale examined; however, at a local scale, high flows could increase, and low flows could decrease as a result of increased impervious area. In some instances, low flows could increase slightly as a result of decreased evapotranspiration from the loss of deeprooted vegetation (forest) associated with development. *In some subbasins where large areas of agricultural lands were converted to low- and medium-density housing, low flows increase because the consumptive domestic water use was projected to be less than consumptive agricultural water use. All agricultural water use was for irrigation purposes and was assumed to be lost from the basin through evapotranspiration.

  3. Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Wishner; B. Silver; F. Boudreaux-Bartels; L. Harlow; H. Knickle; H. Mederer; J. Peckham; C. Roheim; J. Trubatch; K. Webster

    2004-01-01

    The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative.

  4. Considering a Health Insurance Exchange: Lessons from the Rhode Island Experience. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deb Faulkner; Amy Lischko; Deborah Chollet

    2009-01-01

    A health insurance exchange transforms the way health insurance is packaged, subsidized (for low-income individuals and families), and purchased. This brief describes the process followed in Rhode Island to explore establishing a health insurance exchange-like organization, HealthHub RI, based on the Massachusetts model. The RI experience demonstrated the importance of clearly defining the goals of an exchange, as well as

  5. Cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey's stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadoury, R.A.; Smath, J.A.; Fontaine, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The report documents the results of a study of the cost-effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey 's continuous-record stream-gaging programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Data uses and funding sources were identified for 91 gaging stations being operated in Massachusetts are being operated to provide data for two special purpose hydrologic studies, and they are planned to be discontinued at the conclusion of the studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed on 63 continuous-record gaging stations in Massachusetts and 15 stations in Rhode Island, at budgets of $353,000 and $60,500, respectively. Current operations policies result in average standard errors per station of 12.3% in Massachusetts and 9.7% in Rhode Island. Minimum possible budgets to maintain the present numbers of gaging stations in the two States are estimated to be $340,000 and $59,000, with average errors per station of 12.8% and 10.0%, respectively. If the present budget levels were doubled, average standards errors per station would decrease to 8.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Further budget increases would not improve the standard errors significantly. (USGS)

  6. Integrated Assessment of Behavioral and Environmental Risk Factors for Lyme Disease Infection on Block Island, Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Peter J.; Niccolai, Linda; Steeves, Tanner; O’Keefe, Corrine Folsom; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject’s age and the density of shrub edges on the subject’s property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject’s age, shrub edge density (increase risk) and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk). Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections. PMID:24416278

  7. The effect of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island property sales price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelick, Susan Shim

    This dissertation uses the hedonic pricing model to study the impact of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island house sales prices. The first two manuscripts are on lake water quality and use RI house sales transactions from 1988--2012. The third studies wind turbines using RI house sales transactions from 2000--2013. The first study shows that good lake water quality increases lakefront property price premium. It also shows that environmental amenities, such as forests, substitute for lake amenity as the property's distance from the lake increases. The second lake water quality study incorporates time variables to examine how environmental amenity values change over time. The results show that property price premium associated with good lake water quality does not change as it is constant in proportion to housing prices with short term economic fluctuations. The third study shows that wind turbines have a negative and significant impact on housing prices. However, this is highly location specific and varies with neighborhood demographics. All three studies have policy implications which are discussed in detail in the manuscripts below.

  8. Health-Hazard Evaluation report HETA 84-496-1766, Applied Plastics, Slocum, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Stoekel, M.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In response to a request from the owners of Applied Plastics, Inc. (SIC-3079), Slocum, Rhode Island, an investigation was made of possible cases of polymer fume fever among workers complaining of fever, chills, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea, musculoskeletal pain and headache. Urinary fluoride levels measured in preshift samples ranged from 0.3 milligrams/gram (mg/g) to 1.5 mg/g and from 0.2 mg/g to 1.0 mg/g in postshift samples. Breathing-zone samples showed low levels of toluene and most had a trace amount of hexane equivalents. All levels of toxic substances were well below permissible exposure limits. The authors conclude that even though the environmental and medical studies did not demonstrate high exposure levels or absorption of fumes, workers did demonstrate sometimes incapacitating symptoms of polymer fume fever. Based on this, the authors recommend changes in work practices, improved ventilation, closer attention to no smoking policies, and improved personal hygiene.

  9. Distribution of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) in residential lawns on Prudence Island, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, M.C.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of nymphal Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in residential lawns was assessed by flagging on Prudence Island, RI. The number of ticks per sample was five times greater in lawns adjacent to woods than in lawns adjacent to other lawns. Relative tick abundance was negatively correlated with distance from the woods, but the decline was gradual. Spirochete prevalence in ticks did not differ among lawn types or at different distances from the woods. Therefore, barriers that keep people away from the wood edge probably lower the risk of acquiring Lyme disease, but there is still a risk. Even with physical barriers at lawn-wood edges, personal precautions to prevent tick bites should be followed.

  10. Carabid beetle diversity and distribution in Boston Harbor Islands national park area (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Robert L.; Rykken, Jessica; Farrell, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract As part of an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Boston Harbor Islands national park area, an inventory of carabid beetles on 13 islands was conducted. Intensive sampling on ten of the islands, using an assortment of passive traps and limited hand collecting, resulted in the capture of 6,194 specimens, comprising 128 species. Among these species were seven new state records for Massachusetts (Acupalpus nanellus, Amara aulica, Amara bifrons, Apenes lucidulus, Bradycellus tantillus, Harpalus rubripes and Laemostenus terricola terricola—the last also a new country record; in passing we report also new state records for Harpalus rubripes from New York and Pennsylvania, Amara ovata from Pennsylvania, and the first mainland New York records for Asaphidion curtum). For most islands, there was a clear relationship between species richness and island area. Two islands, however, Calf and Grape, had far more species than their relatively small size would predict. Freshwater marshes on these islands, along with a suite of hygrophilous species, suggested that habitat diversity plays an important role in island species richness. Introduced species (18) comprised 14.0% of the total observed species richness, compared to 5.5% (17 out of 306 species) documented for Rhode Island. We surmise that the higher proportion of introduced species on the islands is, in part, due to a higher proportion of disturbed and open habitats as well as high rates of human traffic. We predict that more active sampling in specialized habitats would bring the total carabid fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands closer to that of Rhode Island or eastern Massachusetts in richness and composition; however, isolation, human disturbance and traffic, and limited habitat diversity all contribute to reducing the species pool on the islands relative to that on the mainland. PMID:22371673

  11. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

  12. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  13. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  14. 76 FR 40248 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ...Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure...from the States of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. These submittals...the submittals from Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, with one...

  15. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  16. Proceedings of the ASME 2014 Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems September 8-10, 2014, Newport, Rhode Island, USA

    E-print Network

    2014 September 8-10, 2014, Newport, Rhode Island, USA SMASIS2014-7600 THERMOACOUSTIC MODELING (temper- ature) or Neumann (heat flux) boundary conditions. The gen- eral thermoacoustic model- certainty. Excellent correlations of thermoacoustic behavior is predicted by the model which provides

  17. ASM Materials Experience New England & ASM Materials Camp Boston 2012 Summary On May 7, 2012, the Boston, Central Massachusetts, Northern New England and Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    ASM Materials Experience New England & ASM Materials Camp Boston 2012 Summary On May 7, 2012, the Boston, Central Massachusetts, Northern New England and Rhode Island chapters of ASM International hosted the 7th annual ASM Materials Experience at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Open to high school

  18. Analysis of the non-market benefits of protecting salt pond water quality in southern Rhode Island: an application of the hedonic price and contingent valuation techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1984-01-01

    Rhode Island is confronted with conflicts between the private use of its coastal zone and the public use of continuous water bodies. Property ownership along its southern shore offers many highly valued environmental amenities and services. However, sewage derived from residential cesspools has been polluting the salt water ponds. Unless steps are taken, further reductions in water quality due to

  19. How State and Federal Accountability Policies Have Influenced Curriculum and Instruction in Three States: Common Findings from Rhode Island, Illinois, and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srikantaiah, Deepa

    2009-01-01

    This report takes an in-depth look at how classroom practices in Rhode Island, Illinois, and Washington State have been influenced by state accountability policies and the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). It examines how teachers and administrators have responded to increased accountability and pressure to meet state standards. Drawing from case…

  20. Forty Years of Excellence and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) Conference (40th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 9-12, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The NEAIR 2013 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Newport, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Aspiring to the Role of "Data Badass:" Some Thoughts on the Political Context of IR (Mark Freeman); (2) Data-Driven Internal Benchmarks and Successful Learning Outcomes (Mamta Saxena…

  1. The Economic Impact of Brown University on the City of Providence and on the State of Rhode Island. [1979-80].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEnany, Gina S.

    The impact of Brown University on the economic base of Providence, Rhode Island and on the state was studied. Data are based on 1978 university and public records and results of a 1976 university survey, adjusted by Consumer Price Indexes. A set of mathematical models was used to measure effects of the university on three major sections of the…

  2. Building Inclusive School-to-Work Systems. State Profiles: Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadsey, Janis; Leach, Lynda; Shelden, Debra

    This report contains profiles of eight states (Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont) that describe the states' efforts to include youth with disabilities in School-to-Work efforts. Data were gathered on each of the states through written records of state resources and grants, web site information,…

  3. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996: An Examination of Its Impact on Legal Immigrants and Refugees in Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serpa, Fernando A.

    This report describes a 1998 consultation conducted to examine the impact of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 on legal immigrants and refugees in Rhode Island. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act restricted access of documented immigrants to a wide range of government programs such as…

  4. Short Communication: Transmitted Drug Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology in Antiretroviral Naive HIV Type 1-Infected Patients in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Karen; Cartwright, Charles P.; Gillani, Fizza S.; Mintz, Orli; Zeller, Kimberly; Kantor, Rami

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance has important clinical and epidemiological consequences including earlier treatment failure and forward transmission of resistance strains in high-risk groups. To evaluate the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island, we collected genotypic, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from treatment-naive individuals presenting to the largest outpatient HIV clinic in the state from January 2007 to November 2007. Sequences from 35 treatment-naive individuals were available, 83% of whom were men who had sex with men (MSM). All sequences were HIV-1 subtype B. Drug resistance mutations were identified in 7/35 [20%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08–0.37] patients, six of whom had K103N. Two phylogenetic transmission clusters were found, involving 17% (6/35) of individuals, three in each cluster. We did not find an association between belonging to a cluster and age, gender, AIDS-defining illness, CD4 cell count, or viral load. Drug resistance mutations were more commonly observed in transmission clusters (p?=?0.08). Individuals in one cluster all had K103N and were MSM who had attended local bathhouses. Individuals forming clusters were significantly more likely to have visited a bathhouse compared to nonclusters (p?=?0.02). The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island is high, further justifying genotypic testing on presentation to care and prior to treatment initiation. Molecular epidemiological analysis and association of resistance with phylogenetic networks using data obtained for clinical purposes may serve as useful tools for the prevention of drug resistance transmission and for contact tracing. PMID:20954831

  5. A technique for estimating ground-water levels at sites in Rhode Island from observation-well data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolow, Roy S.; Frimpter, Michael H.; Turtora, Michael; Bell, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of future high, median, and low ground- water levels are needed for engineering and architectural design decisions and for appropriate selection of land uses. For example, the failure of individual underground sewage-disposal systems due to high ground-water levels can be prevented if accurate water-level estimates are available. Estimates of extreme or average conditions are needed because short duration preconstruction obser- vations are unlikely to be adequately represen- tative. Water-level records for 40 U.S. Geological Survey observation wells in Rhode Island were used to describe and interpret water-level fluctuations. The maximum annual range of water levels average about 6 feet in sand and gravel and 11 feet in till. These data were used to develop equations for estimating future high, median, and low water levels on the basis of any one measurement at a site and records of water levels at observation wells used as indexes. The estimating technique relies on several assumptions about temporal and spatial variations: (1) Water levels will vary in the future as they have in the past, (2) Water levels fluctuate seasonally (3) Ground-water fluctuations are dependent on site geology, and (4) Water levels throughout Rhode Island are subject to similar precipitation and climate. Comparison of 6,697 estimates of high, median, and low water levels (depth to water level exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time, respectively) with the actual measured levels exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time at 14 sites unaffected by pumping and unknown reasons, yielded mean squared errors ranging from 0.34 to 1.53 square feet, 0.30 to 1.22 square feet, and 0.32 to 2.55 square feet, respectively. (USGS)

  6. 50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas E Appendix...FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt. 622...Appendix E to Part 622—Caribbean Island/Island Group Management...

  7. 50 CFR Appendix E to Part 622 - Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Caribbean Island/Island Group Management Areas E Appendix...FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt. 622...Appendix E to Part 622—Caribbean Island/Island Group Management...

  8. Distribution of salinity in ground water from the interpretation of borehole-geophysical logs and salinity data, Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Brandon, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of salinity in ground water at Calf Pasture Point, a small coastal peninsula bounded by Narragansett Bay on the east and Allen Harbor on the west, in Davisville, Rhode Island, was interpreted from borehole-geophysical data and previously collected salinity data to help identify potential flowpaths of contaminated ground water to surface-water bodies. The surficial material at this 40-acre site, which ranges in thickness from about 30 to 85 feet, is composed of an upper sand unit, a silt unit, and a till unit overlying bedrock. Borehole-geophysical data indicate that fresh ground water is present in all surficial units in the northern and northwestern part of the site. In the central and eastern parts of the site, where most of the current land surface is composed of dredged fill placed in a small saltwater embayment, brackish and saline ground water predominate. Fresh ground water moving into this area from upgradient and recharge to this extended land surface from precipitation is diluting the saline groundwater in the upper sand and till units, and to a lesser extent in the silt unit. In this area, the freshwater-flow system is slowly expanding towards Narragansett Bay and the entrance channel to Allen Harbor.

  9. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Rhode Island's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 435 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 440 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

  10. The Rhode Island ICU collaborative: a model for reducing central line-associated bloodstream infection and ventilator-associated pneumonia statewide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vera A DePalo; Lynn McNicoll; Margaret Cornell; Jean Marie Rocha; Laura Adams; Peter J Pronovost

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundImplementing bundles of best practices has been shown to provide patients with recommended care and reduce medical errors. Rhode Island's (RI) hospital leaders, quality organisations and insurers discussed the results of a quality improvement initiative in Michigan, the Keystone project, and explored the possibility of replicating these results statewide in RI.DesignHospital executives and intensive care unit (ICU) staff, RI's quality

  11. Assessment of Habitat and Streamflow Requirements for Habitat Protection, Usquepaug-Queen River, Rhode Island, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Parker, Gene W.

    2003-01-01

    The relations among stream habitat and hydrologic conditions were investigated in the Usquepaug?Queen River Basin in southern Rhode Island. Habitats were assessed at 13 sites on the mainstem and tributaries from July 1999 to September 2000. Channel types are predominantly low-gradient glides, pools, and runs that have a sand and gravel streambed and a forest or shrub riparian zone. Along the stream margins,overhanging brush, undercut banks supported by roots, and downed trees create cover; within the channel, submerged aquatic vegetation and woody debris create cover. These habitat features decrease in quality and availability with declining streamflows, and features along stream margins generally become unavailable once streamflows drop to the point at which water recedes from the stream banks. Riffles are less common, but were identified as critical habitat areas because they are among the first to exhibit habitat losses or become unavailable during low-flow periods. Stream-temperature data were collected at eight sites during summer 2000 to indicate the suitability of those reaches for cold-water fish communities. Data indicate stream temperatures provide suitable habitat for cold-water species in the Fisherville and Locke Brook tributaries and in the mainstem Queen River downstream of the confluence with Fisherville Brook. Stream temperatures in the Usquepaug River downstream from Glen Rock Reservoir are about 6?F warmer than in the Queen River upstream from the impoundment. These warmer temperatures may make habitat in the Usquepaug River marginal for cold-water species. Fish-community composition was determined from samples collected at seven sites on tributaries and at three sites on the mainstem Usquepaug?Queen River. Classification of the fish into habitat-use groups and comparison to target fish communities developed for the Quinebaug and Ipswich Rivers indicated that the sampled reaches of the Usquepaug?Queen River contained most of the riverine fish species that would have been expected to occur in this area. Streamflow records from the gaging station Usquepaug River near Usquepaug were used to (1) determine streamflow requirements for habitat protection by use of the Tennant method, and (2) define a flow regime that mimics the river's natural flow regime by use of the Range of Variability Approach. The Tennant streamflow requirement, defined as 30 percent of the mean annual flow, was 0.64 cubic feet per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2). This requirement should be considered an initial estimate because flows measured at the Usquepaug River gaging station are reduced by water withdrawals upstream from the gage. The streamflow requirements may need to be revised once a watershed-scale precipitationrunoff model of the Usquepaug River is complete and a simulation of streamflows without water withdrawals has been determined. Streamflow requirements for habitat protection were also determined at seven riffle sites by use of the Wetted-Perimeter and R2Cross methods. Two of these sites were on the mainstem Usquepaug River, one was on the mainstem Queen River, and four were on tributaries and the headwaters of the Queen River. Median streamflow requirements for habitat protection for these sites were 0.41 (ft3/s)/mi2, determined by the Wetted-Perimeter method and 0.72 ft3/s/mi2, determined by the R2Cross method.

  12. Effects of Road Density and Road-Salt Application Practices on Sodium and Chloride Loads to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, M. C.; Nimiroski, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Scituate Reservoir drainage basin is the drinking-water source area for two thirds of the population of Rhode Island. The effects of road density and road-salt-application practices on sodium and chloride concentrations in streams in the drainage basin were examined using concentration data collected at intervals of one to six months from January 1982 through June 2000 at 32 stream sites distributed throughout the basin. Median concentrations of sodium and chloride for individual streams during the period of data collection were related to 1995 road densities (road miles per square mile of subbasin) for roads maintained by the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (State-maintained roads) and for roads maintained by the four municipalities in the drainage basin (locally maintained roads). Nearly 60 percent of the variation in median stream sodium and chloride concentrations was accounted for by the variation in density of State-maintained roads (R2= 0.595, p < 0.0001). In contrast, no correlations could be identified between median concentrations of sodium and chloride in streams and the densities of locally maintained roads in the subbasins (R2 = 0.001, p = 0.8771). Also, there was no difference in the relations between median stream sodium concentrations and subbasin road densities for data collected before and after a 1990 State-mandated reduction in the rate of application of sodium during winter deicing of State-maintained roads. Analysis of data on sources of sodium and chloride in the Scituate Reservoir drainage basin during water year 2000 (October 1999 through September 2000) indicates that, while the lengths and densities of locally maintained roads were greater than those of State-maintained roads in most subbasins, the total amount of sodium applied during water year 2000 was nearly three times greater for State-maintained roads than for locally maintained roads. This would be expected, given that State-maintained roads carry more traffic at higher speeds than do locally maintained roads. In addition, the State-maintained roads tend to have more efficient drainage systems that quickly transport runoff directly to the streams. The lack of effect of the reduced sodium application rate on the relation between median stream sodium concentration and density of State-maintained roads may be due to inaccurate monitoring of application rates or to mobilization of sodium previously applied and stored in drainage basin soils. Thus, the amounts of sodium and chloride transported by tributary streams to the Scituate Reservoir depend more on the type of roads and other conditions in the tributary subbasins than on the actual length or density of the roads.

  13. Marine ecological risk assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1. Final report, Sep 88-Jun 89

    SciTech Connect

    Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Cobb, D.J.; Gleason, T.R.; Pesch, G.G.

    1991-05-01

    The Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) in Davisville, Rhode Island, has been the subject of a joint ecological research program by the Navy and Environmental Protection Agency. Allen Harbor, a small embayment of Narragansett Bay adjacent to NCBC, was used to develop research and monitoring methods for ecological risk assessment. Two sites on the National Priorities List were of particular concern: (1) a 15-acre landfill used from 1946 to 1972 for the disposal of such wastes as solvents, PCB-contaminated oils, preservatives, sewage sludge, chromic acid, and construction rubble; and (2) a cement-lined pit that from 1960 to 1974 was the depository of calcium hypochlorite, chloride, and decontaminating solution. Phase I of the study characterizes the ecology, natural resources, sediment, and water quality. A preliminary ecological risk assessment is developed. Exposure to and the effects of contamination are measured at both subtidal and intertidal stations. A T-shaped transect of stations projecting from the mouth of the harbor into Narragansett Bay proper is established to determine if measurable levels of contaminants and effects are reaching the Bay. A series of mid-Narragansett Bay stations provide a reference for comparing effects within Allen Harbor.

  14. The North Cape oil spill: hydrocarbons in Rhode Island coastal waters and Point Judith Pond

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Reddy; J. G. Quinn

    2001-01-01

    On 19 January 1996, the North Cape oil barge ran aground near Moonstone Beach, RI, and spilled over 2700 metric tons of No. 2 fuel oil during a severe winter storm. High winds and rough seas drove the oil into the water column, and the oil spread throughout Block Island Sound and into several coastal salt ponds. Over 50 water

  15. Preliminary study of sources and processes of enrichment of manganese in water from University of Rhode Island supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvey, William Dudley; Johnston, Herbert E.

    1977-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved manganese have increased from 0.0 to as much as 3.3 mg/liter over a period of years in closely spaced University of Rhode Island supply wells. The wells tap stratified glacial deposits and derive part of their water from infiltration from a nearby river-pond system. The principal sources of the manganese seem to be coatings of oxides and other forms of manganese on granular aquifer materials and organic-rich sediments on the bottom of the pond and river. Chemical analyses of water from an observation well screened from 3 to 5 feet below the pond bottom indicate that infiltration of water through organic-rich sediments on the pond bottom is the likely cause of manganese enrichment in the well supplies. After passing through the organic layer, the water contains concentrations of manganese as high as 1.2 mg/liter. Manganese in water in concentrations that do not cause unpleasant taste is not regarded to be toxicologically significant. However, concentrations in excess of a few tenths of a milligram per liter are undesirable in public supplies and in many industrial supplies. Brown and others (21970) note that waters containing manganese in concentrations less than 0.1 mg/liter seldom prove troublesome, but that those containing more than 0.5 mg/liter may form objectionable deposits on cooked food, laundry, and plumbing fixtures. The U.S. Public health Service (1962) recommends that the concentrations of manganese in drinking and culinary water not exceed 0.05 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. The nutritional effect of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves as feed supplement on Rhode Island Red hen egg production and quality.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elezz Fouad Mohammed, Khaled; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald; Solorio-Sanchez, Javier Francisco

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves (MOL) as feed supplement on the performance and egg quality of Rhode Island Red (RIR) hens under the tropical conditions of Yucatan, Mexico. Forty-eight RIR hens were allocated in 12 floor pen replicates each with four birds. Thereafter, the replicates were divided into three groups which were corresponded to ad libitum feed (control), ad libitum feed supplemented with MOL T1 (AL + MOL) and restricted feed amount (20% lower than control) with MOL T2 (RCD + MOL), respectively. T1 (AL + MOL) had higher egg laying rate (71.4% versus 66.6%), higher daily egg mass production (45.4 versus 41.9 g/day), lower feed intake (121.3 versus 127.5 g/day) and better feed conversion ratio (2.8 versus 3.2 g feed:g egg) versus control. T2 / (RCD + MOL) had lower values of body weight, egg laying rate, egg weight and egg mass, and recorded better feed conversion ratio than the control group. The control group recorded a higher percentage of pecked eggs versus T1 and T2 (6.5% versus 1.2% and 2.0 %). Similar intake of MOL (3.1 and 3.4 g DM/day) was recorded in T1 (AL + MOL) and T2 (RCD + MOL). Yolk color was improved significantly in T1 (AL + MOL) than both control and T2 (RCD + MOL), while T2 (RCD + MOL) had eggs with lower yolk and higher albumen percentages than the other two ad libitum groups. The results suggest that MOL could be used successfully as sustainable tropical feed resource for RIR hens. PMID:22207478

  17. Improving size, lymph node metastatic rate, breast conservation, and mortality of invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island women, a well-screened population.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Natalie G; Cady, Blake; Fulton, John P; Law, Calvin; Chung, Maureen A

    2012-10-01

    The beneficial impact of screening mammography on breast cancer outcome continues to be debated as demonstrated by guidelines published by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. A previous report from Rhode Island, which has a very high rate of mammographic screening, demonstrated significant improvements in invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality through 2001. This report updates data through 2008 to determine whether previous favorable trends continued. Rhode Island Cancer Registry data regarding invasive breast cancer presentation and mortality in 17,522 female residents diagnosed between 1987 and 2008, inclusive, were analyzed for demographic and pathological factors. Data were analyzed by four time periods: 1987-1992, 1993-1998, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008 and overall. Statistically significant improvements occurred over the four successive time periods, in mean cancer size (23.7, 20.9, 19.6, and 19.3 mm, p < 0.0001), pathologic grade (Grade I: 12, 15, 19, and 17 %; Grade III 57, 41, 36, and 35 %, p < 0.0001), breast conserving surgery (38, 56, 67, and 71 %, p < 0.0001) and mortality (37.3, 31.4, 25.1, and 22.6 per 100,000/year, p < 0.0001). The results showed that high screening rates favorably impacted presentation of and mortality from invasive breast cancer in Rhode Island. From 1987 to 2008, there has been a 39 % decline in breast cancer mortality considering 5 year periods (37.3 vs. 22.6 deaths per 100,000) and 41 % comparing the period from 1990 to 2008, which may exceed the goal of 50 % mortality reduction by 2015 established by the American Cancer Society. PMID:22933028

  18. Age, sex, and road-use patterns of motor vehicular trauma in Rhode Island: A population-based hospital emergency department study

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, I.R.H.; Lieberman, E.S.; Hollinshead, W.H.; Putnam, S.L.; Thode, H.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA) Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (USA) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Population-based hospital emergency department data on motor vehicle traffic trauma in Rhode Island, 1984-85, are analyzed by age, sex, and road-use status. Annualized rates of overall and severe trauma were 1,195 cases (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1,164, 1,225) and 102 cases (95% CI = 94, 111) per 100,000 population, respectively. Overall and severe rates peaked at ages 15-24 years. Male rate excesses were most pronounced for motorcycle and pedal cycle trauma.

  19. 75 FR 44179 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...see 40 CFR Section 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...for so long as the area continues to attain...ozone NAAQS. 40 CFR 51.918. Complete...rule (see 40 CFR 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBURBAN LAND USE ON HABITAT AND BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF COASTAL RHODE ISLAND STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our watershed ecosystems. The...

  1. LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, NAD RHODE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem compo...

  2. Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.; Myers, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Common tern cIutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, .from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends .found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

  3. Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Common tern (Sterna hirundinae ) clutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

  4. Hypoxic Events in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during the Summer of 2001

    E-print Network

    Oviatt, Candace

    to significantly affect marine species in these areas. Vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen typically exhibited, dissolved oxygen (DO) is depleted. If mixing or photosynthesis do not replenish the DO in these waters the summer of 2001 using a towed sensor, vertical casts at fixed stations, and continuous monitoring buoys

  5. The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

  6. The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

  7. Spanish-speaking Americans. Ethnic Heritage Studies Program of Rhode Island, Appendix C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navascues, Michael, Comp.

    Reading materials by Spanish-speaking Americans, which constitute curricular materials for secondary school and college ethnic studies programs, are presented. The selection includes five stories and a poem in Spanish and an essay and autobiographical narrative in English. The writers of the materials represent the following areas: Columbia,…

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

  9. Natural and human causes of a flash flood in a small catchment (Rhodes Island, Greece) based on atmospheric forcing and runoff modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karalis, Sotirios; Katsafados, Petros; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Tsanakas, Konstantinos; Valkanou, Kanella

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the natural (hydro-meteorological and geomorphological) and human induced factors responsible for a flash flood event that occurred on November 22nd, 2013 in a small ungauged catchment (covering an area of about 24km2) of Rhodes Island, Greece. The flash flooding killed four people and caused over â¬10 million worth of damages located mainly around the Kremasti village. In this study the reconstruction of this extreme hydro-meteorological event is attempted by using detailed spatiotemporal rainfall information, a physically based hydrological model (LISEM) and the 1D hydraulic model HEC-RAS. Furthermore, the human impacts, which are responsible for extreme flood discharge within the drainage basin, are recorded and mapped. The major meteorological feature of this event is associated with the passage of a cold front over SE Aegean Sea. The destructive flash flood was triggered by the extreme precipitation (almost 100 mm in 4 hours was recorded at the meteorological stations closest to the flooded area). An advanced nowcasting method is applied in order to provide high spatiotemporal distribution of the precipitation over the catchment area. OpenLisem (Limbourg Soil Erosion Model) is used as a runoff model for exploring the response of the catchment. It is a freeware raster model (based on PCRaster) that simulates the surface water and sediment balance for every gridcell. It is event based and has fine spatial and temporal resolution. The model is designed to simulate the effects of detailed land use changes or conservation measures on runoff, flooding and erosion during heavy rainstorms. Since OpenLISEM provides a detailed simulation of runoff processes, it is very demanding on input data (it requires a minimum of 24 maps depending on the input options). The PCRaster GIS functionality was used to derive the necessary data from the basic maps (DEM, land unit map and map of impermeable areas). The sources for the basic maps include geological, hydrogeological, and land-cover maps, as well as recent detailed orthophotomaps. After the hydrograph was derived from OpenLISEM, the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is employed in order to route it through the Kremasti stream channel. This procedure served as a model validation since it provided the ability to compare the models' results against the 'high water' marks on the bridge and discuss issues such as surface roughness coefficient.

  10. Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, K.; Silver, B.; Boudreaux-Bartels, F.; Harlow, L.; Knickle, H.; Mederer, H.; Peckham, J.; Roheim, C.; Trubatch, J.; Webster, K.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative. The 5 goals are (1) to increase the numbers of women STEM faculty, (2) to provide faculty development opportunities, (3) to improve networks of professional and social support, (4) to assess the academic work environment for all faculty, and (5) to implement long-term changes throughout the university that promote a supportive work environment for women STEM faculty. Accomplishments during the first year include (1) hiring several ADVANCE Assistant Professors, (2) developing workshops on critical skills for junior faculty (grant writing, negotiations, mentoring), (3) initiating a series of lunch meetings where pertinent topical and work-family issues are discussed informally, (4) awarding small Incentive grants for research and other projects that enhance the careers of women STEM faculty, (5) developing and modifying university policies on family leave and dual career couple recruitment, (6) developing and implementing quantitative and qualitative assessment tools for baseline and ongoing campus-wide work climate surveys within the context of a theoretical model for change, and (7) offering directed self-study workshops for entire departments using a trained facilitator. The ADVANCE Assistant Professor position, unique to URI's program, allows a new hire to spend the first 2-3 years developing a research program without teaching obligations. ADVANCE pays their salary during this time, at which point they transition to a regular faculty position. During this first of five years of NSF funding, the ADVANCE program has been met with campus wide enthusiasm and interest from both faculty and administration. Further, the program has the potential for invigorating not only STEM departments, but also the wider university, in offering innovative and engaging workshops and policies, as well as providing an opportunity for ongoing self-study through bi-annual surveys across the university.

  11. A Qualitative Study Among Injection Drug Using Women in Rhode Island: Attitudes Toward Testing, Treatment, and Vaccination for Hepatitis and HIV

    PubMed Central

    LALLY, MICHELLE A.; MONTSTREAM-QUAS, SYDNEY A.; TANAKA, SARA; TEDESCHI, SARA K.; MORROW, KATHLEEN M.

    2012-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C virus infection are serious and prevalent health conditions among many women who inject drugs. Qualitative interviews with 20 injection drug using women at a short term drug treatment center in Rhode Island revealed six primary barriers and facilitators for testing and receiving results and treatment for hepatitis and HIV, as well as for hepatitis vaccination. The primary barriers were prioritization of drug use; low level of diseases-pecific knowledge; stigmatization; accessibility of testing, results and treatment; and psychological factors. The primary facilitator was interest in promoting one’s health. Our findings indicate that injection drug using women experience multiple barriers to HIV and hepatitis testing, results, treatment and vaccination. Methods for improving the motivators for health, facilitating infectious disease prevention, and decreasing unnecessary disease complications of injection drug using women need to be utilized. These methods should include strategies that minimize stigma and facilitate accessibility of health care. PMID:18095839

  12. Timing of Late Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene tectonic events in Rhodes (Greece) inferred from magneto-biostratigraphy and

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Timing of Late Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene tectonic events in Rhodes (Greece) inferred from sequences on the island of Rhodes (Aegean fore-arc, Greece). Here, we present an integrated isotopic; Pliocene; Pleistocene; Rhodes; Greece; Mediterranean Sea 1. Introduction The island of Rhodes (Greece

  13. Practice-based evidence informs environmental health policy and regulation: a case study of residential lead-soil contamination in Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Marcella Remer; Burdon, Andrea; Boekelheide, Kim

    2014-01-15

    Prior to 1978, the exteriors of Rhode Island's municipal water towers were painted with lead-containing paint. Over time, this lead-containing paint either flaked-off or was mechanically removed and deposited on adjacent residential properties. Residents challenged inconsistencies across state agencies and federal requirements for collecting and analyzing soil samples. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the efficacy of Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) soil sampling regulations in determining the extent of lead contamination on residential properties using real world data. Researchers interviewed key government personnel, reviewed written accounts of events and regulations, and extracted and compiled lead data from environmental soil sampling on 31 residential properties adjacent to six municipal water towers. Data were available for 498 core samples. Approximately 26% of the residential properties had lead soil concentrations >1000 mg/kg. Overall, lead concentration was inversely related to distance from the water tower. Analysis indicated that surface samples alone were insufficient to classify a property as "lead safe". Potential for misclassification using RIDOH regulations was 13%. For properties deemed initially "lead free", the total number of samples was too few to analyze. Post-remediation lead-soil concentrations suggest the extent of lead contamination may have been deeper than initially determined. Additional data would improve the ability to draw more meaningful and generalized conclusions. Inconsistencies among regulatory agencies responsible for environmental health obfuscate transparency and erode the public's trust in the regulatory process. Recommendations for improvement include congruency across departmental regulations and specific modifications to lead-soil sampling regulations reflective of lowered CDC reference blood lead value for children 1 to 5 years old (5 ?g/dL). While scientific research informed the initial development of these environmental health policies and regulations, practice-based evidence did not support their efficacy in context of real world practice. PMID:24055667

  14. Estimated water use and availability in the lower Blackstone River basin, northern Rhode Island and south-central Massachusetts, 1995-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barolw, Lora K.

    2003-01-01

    The Blackstone River basin includes approximately 475 square miles in northern Rhode Island and south-central Massachusetts. The study area (198 square miles) comprises six subbasins of the lower Blackstone River basin. The estimated population for the study period 1995?99 was 149,651 persons. Water-use data including withdrawals, use, and return flows for the study area were collected. Withdrawals averaged 29.869 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) with an estimated 12.327 Mgal/d exported and an estimated 2.852 Mgal/d imported; this resulted in a net export of 9.475 Mgal/d. Public-supply withdrawals were 22.694 Mgal/d and self-supply withdrawals were 7.170 Mgal/d, which is about 24 percent of total withdrawals. Two users withdrew 4.418 Mgal/d of the 7.170 Mgal/d of self-supply withdrawals. Total water use averaged 20.388 Mgal/d. The largest aggregate water use was for domestic supply (10.113 Mgal/d, 50 percent of total water use), followed by industrial water use (4.127 Mgal/d, 20 percent), commercial water use (4.026 Mgal/d, 20 percent), non-account water use (1.866 Mgal/d, 9 percent) and agricultural water use (0.252 Mgal/d, 1 percent). Wastewater disposal averaged 15.219 Mgal/d with 10.395 Mgal/d or 68 percent disposed at National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls for municipal wastewater-treatment facilities. The remaining 4.824 Mgal/d or 32 percent was self-disposed, 1.164 Mgal/d of which was disposed through commercial and industrial NPDES outfalls. Water availability (base flow plus safe-yield estimates minus streamflow criteria) was estimated for the low-flow period, which included June, July, August, and September. The median base flow for the low-flow period from 1957 to 1999 was estimated at 0.62 Mgal/d per square mile for sand and gravel deposits and 0.19 Mgal/d per square mile for till deposits. Safe-yield estimates for public-supply reservoirs totaled 20.2 Mgal/d. When the 7-day, 10-year low flow (7Q10) was subtracted from base flow, an estimated median rate of 50.5 Mgal/d of water was available for the basin during August, the lowest base-flow month. In addition, basin-wide water-availability estimates were calculated with and without streamflow criteria for each month of the low-flow period at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of base flow. These water availability estimates ranged from 42.3 to 181.7 Mgal/d in June; 20.2 to 96.7 Mgal/d in July; 20.2 to 85.4 Mgal/d in August, and 20.2 to 97.5 Mgal/d in September. Base flow was less than the Aquatic Base Flow (ABF), minimum flow considered adequate to protect aquatic fauna, from July through September at the 25th percentile and in August and September at the 50th percentile. A basin-stress ratio, which is equal to total withdrawals divided by water availability, was also calculated. The basin-stress ratio for August at the 50th percentile of base flow minus the 7Q10 was 0.68 for the study area. For individual subbasins, the ratio ranged from 0.13 in the Chepachet River subbasin to 0.95 in the Abbot Run subbasin. In addition, basin-stress ratios with and without streamflow criteria for all four months of the low-flow period were calculated at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of base flow. These values ranged from 0.19 to 0.83 in June, 0.36 to 1.50 in July, 0.40 to 1.14 in August, and 0.31 to 0.78 in September. Ratios could not be calculated by using the ABF at the 50th and 25th percentiles in August and September because the estimated base flow was less than the ABF. The depletion of the Blackstone River flows by Cumberland Water Department Manville well no. 1 in Rhode Island was estimated with the computer program STRMDEPL and specified daily pumping rates. STRMDEPL uses analytical solutions to calculate time-varying rates of streamflow depletion caused by pumping at wells. Results show that streamflow depletions were about 97 percent of average daily pumping rates for 1995 through 1999. Relative streamflow depletions for

  15. Simulation of Hydrologic-System Responses to Ground-Water Withdrawals in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Stream-Aquifer System, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Ostiguy, Lance J.

    2007-01-01

    A numerical-modeling study was done to better understand hydrologic-system responses to ground-water withdrawals in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt (HAP) stream-aquifer system of Rhode Island. System responses were determined by use of steady-state and transient numerical ground-water-flow models. These models were initially developed in the late 1990s as part of a larger study of the stream-aquifer system. The models were modified to incorporate new data made available since the original study and to meet the objectives of this study. Changes made to the models did not result in substantial changes to simulated ground-water levels, hydrologic budgets, or streamflows compared to those calculated by the original steady-state and transient models. Responses of the hydrologic system are described primarily by changes in simulated streamflows and ground-water levels throughout the basin and by changes to flow conditions in the aquifer in three wetland areas immediately east of the Lafayette State Fish Hatchery, which lies within the Annaquatucket River Basin in the town of North Kingstown. Ground water is withdrawn from the HAP aquifer at 14 large-capacity production wells, at an industrial well, and at 3 wells operated by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management at the fish hatchery. A fourth well has been proposed for the hatchery and an additional production well is under development by the town of North Kingstown. The primary streams of interest in the study area are the Hunt, Annaquatucket, and Pettaquamscutt Rivers and Queens Fort Brook. Total model-calculated streamflow depletions in these rivers and brook resulting from withdrawals at the production, industrial, and fish-hatchery wells pumping at average annual 2003 rates are about 4.8 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) for the Hunt River, 3.3 ft3/s for the Annaquatucket River, 0.5 ft3/s for the Pettaquamscutt River, and 0.5 ft3/s for Queens Fort Brook. The actual amount of streamflow reduction in the Annaquatucket River caused by pumping actually is less, 1.1 ft3/s, because ground water that is pumped at the fish-hatchery wells (2.2 ft3/s) is returned to the Annaquatucket River after use at the hatchery. One of the primary goals of the study was to evaluate the response of the hydrologic system to simulated withdrawals at the proposed well at the fish hatchery. Withdrawal rates at the proposed well would range from zero during April through September of each year to a maximum of 260 gallons per minute [about 0.4 million gallons per day (Mgal/d)] in March of each year. The average annual withdrawal rate at the fish hatchery resulting from the addition of the proposed well would increase by only 0.13 ft3/s, or about 5 percent of the 2003 withdrawal rate. The increased pumping rate at the hatchery would further reduce the average annual flow in Queens Fort Brook by less than 0.05 ft3/s and in the Annaquatucket River by about 0.1 ft3/s (which includes some model error). A new production well in the Annaquatucket River Basin is under development by the town of North Kingstown. A simulated pumping rate of 1.0 Mgal/d (1.6 ft3/s) at this new well resulted in additional streamflow depletions, compared to those calculated for the 2003 withdrawal conditions, of 0.8 and 0.2 ft3/s in the Annaquatucket and Pettaquamscutt Rivers, respectively. The source of water for about 30 percent of the well's pumping rate, or about 0.5 ft3/s, is derived from ground-water inflow from the Chipuxet River Basin across a natural ground-water drainage divide that separates the Annaquatucket and Chipuxet River Basins; the remaining 0.1 ft3/s of simulated pumping consists of reduced evapotranspiration from the water table. Model-calculated changes in water levels in the aquifer for the various withdrawal conditions simulated in this study indicate that ground-water-level declines caused by pumping are generally less than 5 feet (ft). However, ground-water-level declines of as

  16. Cleaning up hazardous waste disposal sites in the coastal zone: A review of the federal and state legal requirements for remediation at Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.

    1992-04-01

    In many coastal areas past hazardous waste disposal practices have created current pollution problems. Cleanup and restoration of these sites poses significant technical, social, political, and legal questions. The wide diversity of coastal areas and the complexity of various federal, state, and local laws and regulations makes it necessary to focus this review on the specific requirements pertaining to a hazardous waste site investigation being conducted by the Navy at the Naval Construction Battalion Center Davisville, located adjacent to Allen Harbor in Narragansett Bay, RI. The cleanup requirements specified by the Comprehensive Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Contingency Plan (NCP) are reviewed in the context of other federal and state laws and regulations including the Glean Water Act (CWA), Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), natural resource protection (fisheries, endangered species, migratory birds, etc.), federal facility agreements (FFA) and Rhode Island statutes which define applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remediation. The cleanup requirements common to all coastal disposal sites, the relationship between cleanup and other coastal zone management issues, and the need for development of an effective policy strategy for coastal cleanup projects are presented and discussed.

  17. Hydrostratigraphy of Tree Island Cores from Water Conservation Area 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNeill, Donald F.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2003-01-01

    Cores and borehole-geophysical logs collected on and around two tree islands in Water Conservation Area 3 have been examined to develop a stratigraphic framework for these ecosystems. Especially important is the potential for the exchange of ground water and surface water within these features. The hydrostratigraphic results from this study document the lithologic nature of the foundation of the tree islands, the distribution of porous intervals, the potential for paleotopographic influence on their formation, and the importance of low-permeability, subaerial-exposure horizons on the vertical exchange of ground water and surface water. Figure 1. Location of Tree Islands 3AS3 and 3BS1. [larger image] Results from this hydrostratigraphic study indicate that subtle differences occur in lithofacies and topography between the on-island and off-island subsurface geologic records. Specifics are described herein. Firstly, at both tree-island sites, the top of the limestone bedrock is slightly elevated beneath the head of the tree islands relative to the off-island core sites and the tail of the tree islands, which suggests that bedrock 'highs' acted as 'seeds' for the development of the tree islands of this study and possibly many others. Secondly, examination of the recovered core and the caliper logs tentatively suggest that the elevated limestone beneath the tree islands may have a preferentially more porous framework relative to limestone beneath the adjacent areas, possibly providing a ground-water-to-surface-water connection that sustains the tree island system. Finally, because the elevation of the top of the limestone bedrock at the head of Tree Island 3AS3 is slightly higher than the surrounding upper surface of the peat, and because the wetland peats have a lower hydraulic conductivity than the limestone bedrock (Miami Limestone and Fort Thompson Formation), it is possible that there is a head difference between surface water of the wetlands and the ground water in underlying limestone bedrock.

  18. Training family medicine residents to build and remodel a patient centered medical home in Rhode Island: a team based approach to PCMH education.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rabin; Furey, Christopher; Goldberg, Arnold; Ashley, David; Anandarajah, Gowri

    2015-04-01

    Primary Care practices in the United States are undergoing rapid transformation into Patient Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs), prompting a need to train resident physicians in this new model of primary care. However, few PCMH curricula are described or evaluated in the literature. We describe the development and implementation of an innovative, month-long, team-based, block rotation, integrated into the Brown Family Medicine Residency Program, within the context of statewide PCMH practice transformation in Rhode Island. The PCMH resident team (first-, second- and third-year residents) gain PCMH skills, with progressive levels of responsibility through residency. In addition to traditional supervised direct outpatient care, learning activities include: active participation in PCMH transformation projects, population health level patient management, quality improvement activities, interdisciplinary teamwork, chronic disease management (including leading group medical visits), and PCMH specific didactics paired with weekly projects. This new clinical block rotation and team holds promise as a model to train residents for future PCMH primary care practices. PMID:25830172

  19. Quantitative PCR assay to determine prevalence and intensity of MSX (Haplosporidium nelsoni) in North Carolina and Rhode Island oysters Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Ami E; Ford, Susan E; Gauthier, Julie D; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2012-12-27

    The continuing challenges to the management of both wild and cultured eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica populations resulting from protozoan parasites has stimulated interest in the development of molecular assays for their detection and quantification. For Haplosporidium nelsoni, the causative agent of multinucleated sphere unknown (MSX) disease, diagnostic evaluations depend extensively on traditional but laborious histological approaches and more recently on rapid and sensitive (but not quantitative) end-point polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Here, we describe the development and application of a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for H. nelsoni using an Applied Biosystems TaqMan® assay designed with minor groove binder (MGB) probes. The assay was highly sensitive, detecting as few as 20 copies of cloned target DNA. Histologically evaluated parasite density was significantly correlated with the quantification cycle (Cq), regardless of whether quantification was categorical (r2 = 0.696, p < 0.0001) or quantitative (r2 = 0.797, p < 0.0001). Application in field studies conducted in North Carolina, USA (7 locations), revealed widespread occurrence of the parasite with moderate to high intensities noted in some locations. In Rhode Island, USA, application of the assay on oysters from 2 locations resulted in no positives. PMID:23269385

  20. 78 FR 67300 - Anchorage Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ...Regulations: Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; Restricted Anchorage Areas...restricted anchorage areas of San Nicolas Island, California. At the request of the United...the restricted anchorage at San Nicolas Island will accurately reflect the needs...

  1. 76 FR 45007 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  2. 76 FR 2195 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  3. 75 FR 11999 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  4. 75 FR 76523 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. 76 FR 37198 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  6. 75 FR 62632 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  7. 76 FR 32022 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  8. 75 FR 18955 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  9. 76 FR 10943 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  10. 75 FR 25318 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. 75 FR 33896 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine). AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  12. 75 FR 7541 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ...Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  13. 76 FR 22168 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ...of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

  14. Distribution of selected volatile organic compounds determined with water-to-vapor diffusion samplers at the interface between ground water and surface water, Centredale Manor site, North Providence, Rhode Island, September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Lyford, Forest P.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds are present in soils and ground water at the Centredale Manor Superfund Site in North Providence, Rhode Island. In September 1999, water-to-vapor diffusion samplers were placed in the bottom sediments of waterways adjacent to the site to identify possible contaminated ground-water discharge areas. The approximate12-acre site is a narrow stretch of land between the eastern bank of the Woonasquatucket River, downstream from the U.S. Route 44 bridge and a former mill raceway. The samplers were placed along a 2,250-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River, in the former mill raceway several hundred feet to the east and parallel to the river, and in a cross channel between the river and former mill raceway. Volatile organic compounds were detected in 84 of the 104 water-to-vapor diffusion samplers retrieved. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloro-ethylene were the principal volatile organic compounds detected. The highest vapor concentrations measured for these two chemicals were from diffusion samplers located along an approximate 100-foot reach of the Woonasquatucket River about 500 feet downstream of the bridge; here trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations ranged from about 2,000 to 180,000 and 1,600 to 1,400,000 parts per billion by volume, respectively. Upstream and downstream from this reach and along the former mill raceway, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene vapor concentrations from the diffusion samples were generally less than 100 parts per billion by volume. Along the lower reaches of the river and mill raceway, however, and in the cross channel, vapor concentrations of trichloroethylene exceeded 100 parts per billion by volume and tetrachloroethylene exceeded 1,000 parts per billion by volume in several diffusion samples. Although diffusion sample vapor concentrations are higher than water concentrations in surface waters and in ground water, and they should only be interpreted qualitatively as relative values, these values provide important information as to potential discharge areas of contaminants.

  15. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  16. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  17. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  18. 9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

  19. 7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN...OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order...means the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area....

  1. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area. 334...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  2. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  3. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

  4. Preliminary study of bioerosion in the deep-water coral Lophelia , Pleistocene, Rhodes, Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G. Bromley

    Samples of Lophelia were taken at two localities in the Lindos Bay Clay (Lower Pleistocene) of the Rhodes Formation on the Dodecanese Island\\u000a of Rhodes. At a coastal exposure at Vasphi, northeast Rhodes, about 200 fragments of Lophelia were collected in situ from the clay and surface preservation of these is consequently particularly fine. The second collection of material was

  5. Social survey of Three Mile Island area residents. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Brunn; J. H. Jr Johnson; D. J. Zeigler

    1979-01-01

    Recognizing that there is concern among government officials, utility company officials, engineers, physical, social, and behavioral scientists, and the general public about the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident, the overall objective of this report is to examine how the accident affected TMI area residents. This final report is a detailed analysis and description of the summary results published

  6. Long Island Sound area contingency plan. Change 3

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Contained in this revision are: Updated Marine Firefighting annex; Updated Hazardous Material response annex; Comprehensive update of resource phone numbers; Listing of State Historic Protection Officers (SHPO`s); Response techniques and listing of facilities which handle Group V Oils; and Substantial update to the Sensitive Areas on Long Island.

  7. MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL Page 1 MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL Page 1 MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL MRL Office of the Chancellor 202 Chapman Hall@uwm.edu Curriculum Vitae #12;MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL Page 2 MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL MRL Office of the Chancellor 202 ..........................................................................................................44 #12;MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL Page 3 MICHAEL RHODES LOVELL MRL Office of the Chancellor 202 Chapman

  8. The history of Cu, Pb, and Zn inputs to Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island as recorded by salt-marsh sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, S.B. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration, Silver Spring, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The distribution of metals with depth in sediment cores sampled from industrialized estuaries can reveal long-term trends in loadings to the waterbody. Salt marsh cores were sampled from five locations from the head to the mouth of Narragansett Bay and from one location from a marsh inside a lagoon on the coast of Block Island Sound with the intent of reconstructing historical loadings of Pb, Cu, and Zn to this estuary. Concentrations of Fe and Mn were measured as indicators of redox conditions of the sediment column. Chronologies were developed using accretion rates determined previsly from [sup 210]Pb analyses of the same cores. Excess metal inventories and enrichment over pre-industrial concentrations were greater in upper bay cores reflecting the location of sources at the head of the estuary. The bay cores were similar with respect to the distributions of Cu, Pb, and Zn. Concentrations of all metals began to increase over background levels at depths corresponding approximately to the year 1900. Most of the cores showed peak concentrations of Cu and Pb in the early 1950s and 1970s. Distributions of Zn were more variable among cores, showing peaks in the early 1920s in some cores and in the 1950s and 1970s in others. In general, the observed distributions in the bay cores are consistent with estimated long-term trends in loadings from atmospheric and sewage sources. The metal distributions in the lagoon core appear to reflect atmospheric loadings. However, there are features in some cores that are not explainable using the estimated trends in source inputs. There also is not a 1:1 correspondence between changes in sediment metal concentrations and changes in loadings. It is likely that this method of reconstruction would benefit from a more detailed characterization of sources, but comparison of sediment and historical records do show that attempts to reduce loadings to the bay have been successful. 56 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Rhode Island Higher Education Library Integrated Network (HELIN). Final Report. Task Force on Bibliographic and Authority Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocino, Michael; And Others

    The final report from the Higher Education Library Integrated Network (HELIN)'s Task Force on Bibliographic and Authority Control begins with a statement of the charge to the task force. It then summarizes its activities in each of five areas: (1) documentation of local authority control (cataloging) practices; (2) consultation with vendors of…

  10. University of Rhode Island Count of First Majors for Undergraduate Degree-seeking Students Registered in Fall 2003

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    .0% 4 Architecture 73 0.7% 5 Area and Ethnic Studies 14 0.1% 9 Communications / Communications 15, 2003 Level CIP2000 AcadProg AcadPlan Description Old Code Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Men Women Non-deg AS AS_NON_NON AS Non-matriculating 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1

  11. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  12. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  13. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  14. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

  17. 2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Sitz

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  19. Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island.

    PubMed

    Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004-2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed. PMID:22451785

  20. Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island

    PubMed Central

    Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A.Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004–2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed. PMID:22451785

  1. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

  5. General Achievement Trends: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. Rhode Island After 3PM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children--more than a quarter of children--are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their…

  7. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  8. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

  9. 33 CFR 334.85 - New York Harbor, adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...performing work for Naval Station New York, Staten Island, New York....

  10. 33 CFR 334.85 - New York Harbor, adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...performing work for Naval Station New York, Staten Island, New York....

  11. 33 CFR 334.85 - New York Harbor, adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area...performing work for Naval Station New York, Staten Island, New York....

  12. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  13. 33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile...

  16. 33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval...

  17. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  18. Establishment, management, and maintenance of the phoenix islands protected area.

    PubMed

    Rotjan, Randi; Jamieson, Regen; Carr, Ben; Kaufman, Les; Mangubhai, Sangeeta; Obura, David; Pierce, Ray; Rimon, Betarim; Ris, Bud; Sandin, Stuart; Shelley, Peter; Sumaila, U Rashid; Taei, Sue; Tausig, Heather; Teroroko, Tukabu; Thorrold, Simon; Wikgren, Brooke; Toatu, Teuea; Stone, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The Republic of Kiribati's Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the equatorial central Pacific, is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site on earth. Created in 2008, it was the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) of its kind (at the time of inception, the largest in the world) and includes eight low-lying islands, shallow coral reefs, submerged shallow and deep seamounts and extensive open-ocean and ocean floor habitat. Due to their isolation, the shallow reef habitats have been protected de facto from severe exploitation, though the surrounding waters have been continually fished for large pelagics and whales over many decades. PIPA was created under a partnership between the Government of Kiribati and the international non-governmental organizations-Conservation International and the New England Aquarium. PIPA has a unique conservation strategy as the first marine MPA to use a conservation contract mechanism with a corresponding Conservation Trust established to be both a sustainable financing mechanism and a check-and-balance to the oversight and maintenance of the MPA. As PIPA moves forward with its management objectives, it is well positioned to be a global model for large MPA design and implementation in similar contexts. The islands and shallow reefs have already shown benefits from protection, though the pending full closure of PIPA (and assessments thereof) will be critical for determining success of the MPA as a refuge for open-ocean pelagic and deep-sea marine life. As global ocean resources are continually being extracted to support a growing global population, PIPA's closure is both timely and of global significance. PMID:25358303

  19. 33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...restricted). The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicholas Island,...

  20. RADIOCARBON AGES OF DEPOSITS IN VOLCANIC SEQUENCES OF THE COLORADAS AREA, ISLAND, MEXICO

    E-print Network

    Farmer, Jack D.

    NO.2, RADIOCARBON AGES OF DEPOSITS IN VOLCANIC SEQUENCES OF THE COLORADAS AREA, ISLAND, MEXICO JACK. INTRODUCTION Socorro Island, located 460 km southwest of San Lucas and 650 west of Manzanillo, Mexico, lies of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Coloradas, a broad, gently terrain comprising

  1. The roles of island area per se and habitat diversity in the species-area relationships of four Lesser Antillean faunal groups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert E. Ricklefs; Irby J. Lovette

    1999-01-01

    Summary 1. We analysed the relationships between species richness, island area, and habitat diversity for birds, bats, butterflies, and reptiles and amphibians on 19 islands in the Lesser Antilles. Habitat diversity was quantified by Simpson's index based on the total areas of five vegetation types on each island. Island area varied over two orders of magnitude (13-1510km2) and habitat diversity

  2. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

  3. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

  4. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

  5. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

  6. 50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section...Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area...and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. 334.1460...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. (a) The...zone is subject to use as a target area for bombing and...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. 334.1460...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. (a) The...zone is subject to use as a target area for bombing and...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. 334.1460...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. (a) The...zone is subject to use as a target area for bombing and...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  17. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  19. 50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

  20. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

  1. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  2. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

  3. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  4. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

  5. 50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

  6. Joint Field Hearing on H.R. 6: Elementary and Secondary Education Act Reauthorization. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the House Committee on Education and Labor and the Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts, and Humanities of the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (Providence, Rhode Island, October 4, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities.

    This document presents, as part of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, witness testimony and prepared statements on the subject of professional development in the elementary and secondary school systems. Witnesses included Rhode Island (RI) elementary and secondary school principals and teachers, officials from the…

  7. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea 10 Figure... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...679—Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea...

  10. 50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

  11. 50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

  12. 50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

  13. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The...Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  14. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The...Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  15. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The...Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  16. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The...Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  17. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340...Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The...Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be...

  18. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone...The regulations. (1) No aerial bombing practice will take place in the...

  19. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone...The regulations. (1) No aerial bombing practice will take place in the...

  20. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone...The regulations. (1) No aerial bombing practice will take place in the...

  1. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone...The regulations. (1) No aerial bombing practice will take place in the...

  2. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334...off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone...The regulations. (1) No aerial bombing practice will take place in the...

  3. Genetic control of resistance to subgroup A and subgroup C tumour viruses in Rhode Island Red fowl: evidence for linkage between the tumour virus a (tva) and tumour virus c (tvc) loci.

    PubMed

    Dren, C N; Pani, P K

    1977-04-01

    A study, using the Rhode Island Red (RIR) strain of fowl maintained at Houghton Poultry Research Station, was made to investigate the genetic control of cellular response to infection with viruses of subgroups A and C. Family matings within the RIR strain and test-crosses between the RIR parents and White Leghorn (WL) parents of known ararcrcr genotype were set up to ascertain linkage between the tumour virus a (tva) and tumour virus c (tvc) loci. The results confirmed that in this RIR strain, the two loci, tva and tvc, control the cellular response to viruses of subgroups A and C, respectively, as reported in other breeds of fowl (WL and New Hampshire). As in WL fowl, the two loci are linked. The linkage value of 0-22 in the male sex agreed well with that reported in the WL male sex, indicating that the two loci are located in the same sites in homologous chromosomes in the two breeds. However, in the RIR strain, no sex difference in crossing over between the two linked loci was found, contrary to that reported in WL fowl where the absence of crossing over between the two loci was observed in the heterogametic female sex. PMID:192840

  4. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2015-01-01

    At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 18 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was less than 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.128 mg/L as phosphate, and median concentrations of total coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were 330 and 15 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 100 kilograms per day (kg/d; 50 kilograms per day per square mile [kg/d/mi2]), 10 grams per day (g/d; 5.1 grams per day per square mile [g/d/mi2]), 73 g/d (28 g/d/mi2), 720 g/d (320 g/d/mi2), 21,000 colony-forming units per day (CFU×106/d; 8,700 CFU×106/d/mi2), and 1,000 CFU×106/d (510 CFU×106/d/mi2), respectively.

  5. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ...Description 300 Russian waters. Those waters inside the Russian 200 mile limit as...Southern Part) and NOAA chart INT 814...the limits of the EEZ and Russian economic...

  8. 78 FR 70854 - Amendment of Restricted Area R-7201 Farallon De Medinilla Island; Mariana Islands, GU

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ...INFORMATION: Background Based on a NOAA survey in 2010, it was determined that Farallon De Medinilla Island (FDM) was not plotted properly on the NOAA charts. As a result, the datum for charting the FDM inset on NOAA Chart 81086 was corrected based...

  9. A TROPICAL GARDEN FLORA, PLANTS CULTIVATED IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS AND OTHER TROPICAL AREAS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pemberton, R.W. A Tropical Garden Flora, Plants Cultivated in the Hawaiian Islands and Other Tropical Areas. Economic Botany This is an invited book review of an important new reference book on plants cultivated in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. This is the long awaited update of ...

  10. 33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

  11. From concept to practice: using the School Health Index to create healthy school environments in Rhode Island elementary schools. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  12. Public health assessment for Newport Naval Education/Training Center Middletown, Newport County, Rhode Island, Region 1. CERCLIS No. RI6170085470. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-06

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Naval Education and Training Center (NETC) is an indeterminate public health hazard. Five areas at NETC are being investigated under the remedial investigation/feasibility study: McAllister Point Landfill, Melville North Landfill, Tank Farm Four, Tank Farm Five, and the Old Fire Fighting Training Area. Contaminants of concern have been detected in groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil, and sediment at NETC. Contaminants of concern in that area include metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Potential pathways of exposure to contaminated surface soil and sediment were identified. In addition, there could be future exposure to contaminated groundwater and subsurface soil in areas, such as Melville North Landfill, that are scheduled for development. The food chain is also a potentially complete pathway. The extent of contamination of shellfish must be further characterized before the health implications of exposure to those potential pathways can be evaluated. Contaminants of concern identified in the potential pathways include metals, PAHs, PCBs, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides.

  13. The Geyser Bight geothermal area, Umnak Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Juneau, AK (United States)); Nye, C.J. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States) Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Turner, D.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, AK (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs in Alaska, and is the only site in the state with geysers. Heat for the geothermal system is derived from crustal magma associated with Mt. Recheshnoi volcano. Successive injections of magma have probably heated the crust to near its minimum melting point and produced the only high-SiO[sub 2] rhyolites in the oceanic part of the Aleutian arc. At least two hydrothermal reservoirs are postulated to underlie the geothermal area and have temperatures of 165 and 200 C, respectively, as estimated by geothermometry. Sulfate-water isotope geothermometers suggest a deeper reservoir with a temperature of 265 C. The thermal spring waters have relatively low concentrations of Cl (600 ppm) but are rich in B (60 ppm) and As (6 ppm). The As/Cl ratio is among the highest reported for geothermal waters. 41 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Use of Arthropod Rarity for Area Prioritisation: Insights from the Azorean Islands

    PubMed Central

    Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A. V.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at ‘global’ scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and ‘regional’ scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity. A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce. PMID:22479498

  15. Investigations of reported plant and animal health effects in the Three Mile Island area. Regulatory report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. Gears; G. LaRoche; J. Cable; B. Jaroslow; D. Smith

    1980-01-01

    The results of investigations into reported problems with plants and animals which may be related to the operation of and accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are presented. The kinds of problems reported are listed, and potential areas of concern (such as the release of radioactive gases and drift from cooling tower plumes) are discussed. Specific case

  16. Heat Island Effect in urban Areas and its Impact on the Energy Behaviour of Buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Papadopoulos; E.-A. Kalognomou

    2003-01-01

    The net effect of the urban thermal process is to make the city temperatures generally higher than those of the surrounding suburb or rural areas. The phenomenon of heat islands is rather complex, both the modelling and the spot measurements approach providing only a partial description of it, as the energy balance differences that cause this effect depend on the

  17. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife...of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012 [74 FR...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife...of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012 [74 FR...

  19. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife...of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012 [74 FR...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife...of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012 [74 FR...

  1. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife...of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas ER04NO09.012 [74 FR...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

  4. Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Emergency 315 315 26 Rhodes Hall Ross Heart Hospital James Cancer Hospital Martha Morehouse holidays. Information current as of 8/8/14. Subject to change without notice. Updates posted at ttm.m. James Cancer Hospital 7:10 a.m. Rhodes Hall 7:13 a.m. Ross Heart Hospital 7:15 a.m. Martha Morehouse

  5. Future change in wintertime urban heat island due to global climate change in Tokyo metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, M.; Adachi, S. A.; Kusaka, H.; Kimura, F.

    2013-12-01

    Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the largest urban areas all over the world. This study investigates the change in urban heat island intensity of Tokyo metropolitan area in winter season by the effects of global climate change. We performed present and future climate simulations are conducted using a regional climate model (WRF) including an urban canopy sub-model (Kusaka et al., 2001). Future climate simulation was conducted using Pseudo-Global-Warming (PGW) method (Kimura and Kitoh, 2008) assuming the boundary conditions estimated by CMIP3 GCMs under the SRES scenarios. The PGW method is one of the useful methods for future downscaling and adopted for some studies on urban heat island (Kusaka et al., 2012) and winter climate (Hara et al., 2008) over Japan. The simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced during night, due to the global climate change.

  6. AIDS Education: The Rhode Island Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Larry K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The impact of a state-mandated acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education program was evaluated using a sample of 2,709 adolescents. The modest changes observed after the program emphasize that the dissemination of AIDS information by public schools is only the first step in changing adolescent behavior as a means of AIDS prevention and…

  7. RHODE ISLAND DIGITAL ORTHOPHOTO QUADRANGLE MOSAIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground resolution, quarter-quadrangle (3.75-minutes of latitude by 3.75-minutes of longitude) image cast on the Universal Tra...

  8. September 9, 2010 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    . a recognition of the need to engage in life-long learning; J. a knowledge of contemporary issues; K. an ability) Total 1. ABET Outcome I Essay 10% (Sep 30) -- 10% I 2. ABET Outcome F Essay 10% (Oct 28) -- 10% I 3. Log Disability Services for Stu- dents, Office of Student Life, 330 Memorial Union, 874-2098. ABET Program

  9. January 7, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

    E-print Network

    Vetter, Frederick J.

    Engineering BME 207 Introduction to Biomechanics Spring 2014 Anthropometric Data Table 1: Normalized Mass Movement, 3rd edition (John Wiley & Sons 2005) - 1 - #12;BME 207 - Anthropometric Data January 7, 2014.546 Adapted from RL Huston, Principles of Biomechanics (CRC Press 2009) - 2 - #12;BME 207 - Anthropometric

  10. OF RHODE ISLAND Office of International

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    an application with the United States Citizens and Immigration Services for an H-1 B Temporary Worker. Hiring are advised to secure the assistance of an immigration attorney (external to URI) to complete the process representative. If there is no bargaining unit, a paper notice, posted for ten days in at least two "conspicuous

  11. Animal Behavior University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Markert, Jeffrey Alan

    1 2 Jan 27 Bird songs: Proximate and ultimate causes Chapter 2 3 Jan 29 Development - Genes x March 3 Anti-predator behavior: Theories Chapter 6 12 March 5 Optimal foraging theory Chapter 7 13 March 10 Habitat selection; Migration; Territoriality Chapter 8 14 March 12 Communication and honesty

  12. Mapping Rhode Island's Educational Progress, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Six years after passage of No Child Left Behind and midway to the nation's goal of having students on grade level or better in reading and math by 2014, more data than ever before has been collected about the academic performance of American students and schools. Information in this brochure charts student demographics, achievement-to-date and…

  13. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This year the Center on Education Policy analyzed data on the achievement of different groups of students in two distinct ways. First, it looked at grade 4 test results to determine whether the performance of various groups improved at three achievement levels--basic and above, proficient and above, and advanced. Second, it looked at gaps between…

  14. 2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher…

  15. AIDS Education: The Rhode Island Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry K. Brown; Vincent J. Barone; Gregory K. Fritz; Pedro Cebollero; Jack H. Nassau

    1991-01-01

    AIDS prevention, by public school education, is designed to change knowledge, attitudes, and future behavior. This study evaluated the impact of a state-mandated educational program on a sample of 2709 adolescents. Changes from pre to posttest were evaluated using standardized change scores and comparisons between the experimental and a delayed education control group were made. The experimental group, but not

  16. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    .20 of the Graduate Student Manual (GSM 9.20). Regulations governing work taken in non-degree status are given in GSM 3.32, transfer credit in GSM 7.20 and credit by examination in GSM 7.30. The PROGRAM CREDIT section

  17. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    African & African Amer St - BA 5 AS_AAF_BA AS HUM 1 1 1 1 2 3 050207 Women's Studies BOA 5 AS 090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 2 0 2 2 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 7 19 2 8 21 29 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 7 1 3 1 10 11 110101 Computer

  18. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    & African Amer St - BOA 5 AS_AAF_BA AS HUM 1 1 0 1 050207 Women's Studies BOA 5 AS_WSTD_BA AS SOC 1 1 1 1 2 090101 Communication Studies - BOA 5 AS_CMST_BA AS HUM 5 2 1 1 4 2 70 82 6 9 86 96 182 090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 1 0 1 1 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 9 28 2 2 11 31 42

  19. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 1 0 1 1 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 12 9 3 12 13 25 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 5 3 0 8 8 110101 Computer Science 131202 Elementary Education - BOA 5 HS_ELED_BA HSS HSS 4 40 1 1 5 41 46 131205 Secondary Education - BA 5

  20. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    AND MGMT 05 RD249BOS 2 2 0 2 030201 MARINE AFFAIRS 05 AS062BOA 22 11 3 2 25 13 38 030201 SOIL & WATER RES STUDIES 05 AS068BOA 1 1 0 1 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 4 0 4 4 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOA 1 1 1 38 45 7 4 46 51 97 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 12 15 1 3 13 18 31 110101 COMPUTER SCIENCE

  1. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    BLA RD RDV 8 6 8 6 14 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 5 AS089BOA AS SOC 1 0 1 1 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 5 AS087BOA AS HUM 1 8 1 1 1 1 7 49 82 10 7 69 99 168 090101 APPLD COMMUNICATIONS 5 XD814BGS XD CCE 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 090401 JOURNALISM 5 AS075BOA AS HUM 6 6 2 3 8 9 17 090902 PUBLIC RELATIONS 5 AS076BOA

  2. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    's Studies BOA 5 AS_WSTD_BA AS SOC 2 1 0 3 3 090101 Communication Studies - BA 5 AS_CMST_BA AS HUM 2 5 5 2 1 5 55 94 3 7 66 113 179 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 2 8 18 1 2 9 22 31 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 1 6 1 6 7 110101 Computer Science BOA 5 AS_CSC_BA AS PHY 1 1 5 1 6 2 8

  3. UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    255BOS 1 1 0 1 040601 LANDSCAPE ARCHITEC 05 RD229BLA 10 3 1 11 3 14 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 1 0 1 1 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOS 6 1 0 7 7 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 1 1 05 AS075BOA 1 9 9 1 10 10 20 090501 PUBLIC RELATIONS 05 AS076BOA 1 0 1 1 110101 COMPUTER SCIENCE 05

  4. UNIVERISTY OF RHODE ISLAND DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    8 8 16 050107 LATIN AMERIC STUDIES 05 AS068BOA 1 1 0 1 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 2 0 2 2 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 1 2 1 1 1 45 70 4 7 52 80 132 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 1 1 9 11 1 11 12 131202 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 05 HS518BOA 1 1 36 3 1 40 41 131205 SECONDARY EDUCATION 05 HS514BOS 1 1 1 11

  5. University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    LANDSCAPE ARCHITEC 05 RD229BLA 4 4 1 5 4 9 9 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 2 0 2 2 10 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOS 1 6 1 6 7 11 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 2 3 1 3 4 51 88 7 4 61 102 163 12 090101 APPLD COMMUNICATIONS 05 XD814BGS 1 1 0 2 2 13 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 1 2 13 11 1 1

  6. Affirmative Action Process University of Rhode Island

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    ..................................................................................21 Recommendations for the Interrelationship of Human Resource Administration and the Affirmative......................................................................................................................41 Appendix A..................................................................................................................................43 Appendix B

  7. University of Rhode Island Transportation Center

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    Transfer: availability of research results to potential users in a form that can be directly implemented. In 2006, however, the URITC's accomplishments further solidified relationships with industry partners

  8. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl...

  9. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl...

  10. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

  11. 50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

  12. Factors affecting phytoplankton distribution and production in the Elephant Island area, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Helbling, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    During the austral summer of four years, 1990 to 1993, studies on phytoplankton were performed in the Elephant Island area as one component of the US Antarctica Marine Living Resources program. In addition to continuous measurements (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, beam attenuation) made on ship's intake water, a profiling CTD-rosette unit was used to obtain water column characteristics (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, attenuation of solar radiation, beam attenuation) from the surface to 750m depth and also water samples from at least 10 depths for chemical and biological analyses. The sampling grid consisted of an average of 70 stations, all of which were occupied two times each year. The Elephant Island area is a transition zone between the rich coastal areas, where phytoplankton can develop dense blooms, and pelagic waters where the phytoplankton biomass is in general very low. A frontal zone was usually found to the north of Elephant Island and over the continental slope, and high phytoplankton biomass was in general associated with this frontal region. Although the location of this frontal system showed seasonal movement in a north-south direction, it seems to be a consistent feature from year to year. There seems to be considerable year-to-year variability in physical (water temperatures and salinity) and phytoplankton characteristics within the study area, in regard to both distributional patterns in surface waters and to profile characteristics in the upper 100m of the water column. With shallow upper mixed layer depths of less than 50 m, phytoplankton can attain relatively high concentrations. Optimum light conditions for growth occurred when the mixed layer was less than 55% of the euphotic zone. As the area around Elephant Island is characterized by relatively strong and frequent winds, the depth of the upper mixed layer at many stations approached the depth of the euphotic zone, with the result that growth of phytoplankton was light limited.

  13. The geology and geophysics of the High Island South Area, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Silver, Kenneth Edward

    1991-01-01

    ACTIVITY. SALT RIDGE SYSTEMS. BASIN EVOLUTION. Page 1 . . 2 . . . . . 6 12 12 . . . . 12 15 18 23 25 . . . . . 25 . . . . . . 27 . . 28 33 . . . , . . 34 36 38 . . 40 . . 42 . . . . . 44 . . . . . 50 51 . . . . . . 55 . . . . . 62... evolution of the High Island South Area (HISA). Information generated from the data set include structure, isochron, seismic facies, net sand, and paleobathymetric maps keyed to five seismic intervals. These intervals are bounded by the acoustic basement...

  14. A groundwater hypothesis for the origin of ?fire areas? on the Northern Channel Islands, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, John; Wenner, Adrian M.; Noble, Elmer; Daily, Marla

    1986-09-01

    Pleistocene areas of red sediments and carbonized vegetation on the Northern Channel Islands, California, have in the past been interpreted as caused by fires of either natural or human origin. Some are associated with darkened mammoth and bird fossils, and these fossils have been considered as having been burned by early man. Reevaluation of these so-called "fire areas" indicates that the above phenomena are the result of low-temperature (?100°C), nonheating processes occurring in groundwater. Evidence for this conclusion is derived from field observations on fossil carbonized vegetation, and the geology of the areas. Additional evidence derives from experiments on the red sediments and fossil wood, X-ray diffraction analyses, magnetic analyses, studies on the clay minerals smectite and illite, and the demonstration that fossil mammoth bone contains sufficient Fe and Mn to account for their discoloration. Much of the carbonization of vegetation probably occurred in water rather than in fire. Radiocarbon dates from the islands will probably need to be reevaluated. These data provide evidence contrary to the concept of the occurrence of significant fires, either natural or set by early man, on the Northern Channel Islands.

  15. 24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island from the northeast. Complex under construction includes shop building (large rectangle at north end of island, and firing pier (at far right). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  16. Miocene sand distribution of the South Marsh Island and the Vermillion area, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jingoo

    1997-01-01

    MIOCENE SAND DISTRIBUTION OF THE SOUTH MARSH ISLAND AND THE VERMILION AREA, OFFSHORE LOUISIANA, GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by JINGOO KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... 1997 Major Subject: Oceanography ABSTRACT Miocene Sand Distribution of the South Marsh Island and the Vermilion Area, Offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico. (August 1997) Jingoo Kim, B. S. , Yonsei University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joel S...

  17. Numerical simulation of the 2002 Northern Rhodes Slide (Greece) and evaluation of the generated tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaniboni, Filippo; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Small landslides are very common along the submarine margins, due to steep slopes and continuous material deposition that increment mass instability and supply collapse occurrences, even without earthquake triggering. This kind of events can have relevant consequences when occurring close to the coast, because they are characterized by sudden change of velocity and relevant speed achievement, reflecting into high tsunamigenic potential. This is the case for example of the slide of Rhodes Island (Greece), named Northern Rhodes Slide (NRS), where unusual 3-4 m waves were registered on 24 March 2002, provoking some damage in the coastal stretch of the city of Rhodes (Papadopoulos et al., 2007). The event was not associated with earthquake occurrence, and eyewitnesses supported the hypothesis of a non-seismic source for the tsunami, placed 1 km offshore. Subsequent marine geophysical surveys (Sakellariou et al., 2002) evidenced the presence of several detachment niches at about 300-400 m depth along the northern steep slope, one of which can be considered responsible of the observed tsunami, fitting with the previously mentioned supposition. In this work, that is carried out in the frame of the European funded project NearToWarn, we evaluated the tsunami effects due to the NRS by means of numerical modelling: after having reconstructed the sliding body basing on morphological assumptions (obtaining an esteemed volume of 33 million m3), we simulated the sliding motion through the in-house built code UBO-BLOCK1, adopting a Lagrangian approach and splitting the sliding mass into a "chain" of interacting blocks. This provides the complete dynamics of the landslide, including the shape changes that relevantly influence the tsunami generation. After the application of an intermediate code, accounting for the slide impulse filtering through the water depth, the tsunami propagation in the sea around the island of Rhodes and up to near coasts of Turkey was simulated via the code UBO-TSUFD: this solves numerically the Navier-Stokes equation in the shallow water approximation, adopting a finite difference technique. It was then possible to estimate the most affected coastal stretches and to assess the effects of the NRS generated tsunami, comparing the computed wave heights with the observations. Papadopoulos G.A., Daskalaki E., Fokaefs A. (2007) Tsunamis generated by coastal and submarine landslides in the Mediterranean Sea. In: Lykousis V., Sakellariou D., Locat J. (eds.), Submarine Mass Movements and their Consequences, 415-422, Springer. Sakellariou D., Lykousis V., Rousakis G., Georgiou P. (2002). Slope failure and associated coastal erosion in tectonically active areas: The coastal zone of Rhodes city (Rhodos island) Greece. In: A. Yilmaz (ed.): Oceanography of Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea, 978-985, Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference Oct. 13-16, TUBITAK Publ., Ankara, Turkey.

  18. Educating people about importance of photoprotection: results of campaign on the islands in Dubrovnik area.

    PubMed

    Bakija-Konsuo, Ana; Muli?, Rosanda

    2008-10-01

    After an increasing number of skin cancer cases and some skin cancer deaths among young people in Dubrovnik area had been noted, a field research was done in the period from 2003 to 2007. The examinations were done on the islands in Dubrovnik area (Korcula, Mljet, Lopud, Sipan, Kolocep and on the peninsula Peljesac). Research tasks were collecting information on sun-protection behaviors and attitudes and usage of sun protecting factor products, detection of the presence of skin cancer in the area and advising those diagnosed ill about further medical procedure, educating and informing local population as well as local physicians in the area with investigation results. In spite of wide media campaign, more then half of examined people did not use sun protective factor (SPF) products. It can be concluded that better education about damaging effects of ultraviolet radiations as well as further education how to properly protect its adverse effects is required. PMID:19140281

  19. The Urban Heat Island Behavior of a Large Northern Latitude Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.; Hertel, W.

    2011-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) develop when urban and suburban areas experience elevated temperatures relative to their rural surroundings. The difference in temperature between the city core and its surroundings is proportional to the size of the city and can be related to differences in vegetation cover, the amount of development, building materials, and the infrastructure. Most cities in the United States are warming at twice the rate of the outlying rural areas and the planet as a whole. Temperatures in the urban center can be 2-5°C warmer during the daytime and as much as 10°C at night. Urban warming is responsible for excessive energy consumption, heat-related health effects, an increase in urban pollution, degradation of urban ecosystems, and changes in the local meteorology. To begin to address UHI mitigation strategies, a comprehensive spatial and temporal analysis of the behavior of urban heat islands is necessary. Because the influence of UHIs is most notable in wintertime, solutions to mitigate them are compounded because of societal resistance to modifying the landscape and urban structures to reduce already low wintertime temperatures. To better understand the UHI behavior of a large northern latitude city and to evaluate mitigation strategies that have the desired effect year round, we have embarked on a comprehensive four-year research program - Islands in the Sun - aimed at 1) analyzing the UHIs of the largest urban areas on the planet, 2) monitoring the UHI of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) and evaluating mitigation strategies for reducing urban warming, and 3) developing a numerical UHI model to quantify the effect of different mitigation strategies. Here we present results from an observational study of the TCMA, a 7,700 square kilometer urban and suburban region located in east central Minnesota that includes the two cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul. The TCMA is home to 2.8 million residents within a seven county area comprising an urban core and a surrounding suburban landscape. Annually, the TCMA has a modest 2-3°C UHI that is especially apparent in winter when the urban core can be up to 5-6°C warmer than the surrounding countryside. We present preliminary data from a dense network of temperature sensors located throughout the TCMA. We focus on the diurnal and seasonal behavior of the TCMA UHI with an emphasis on the contribution of different land use types on the UHI and the influence of wintertime temperature advection on less urbanized areas to the southeast of the TCMA. Finally, we offer evidence of the impact that the TCMA heat island has on energy consumption, human health, and the environment, and propose mitigation strategies that should be considered.

  20. Geologists Search for Evidence of Ancient Beach Deposits and Uplifted Shorelines on Simeonof Island

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys dig into coastal bluffs of Simeonof Island in search of evidence for ancient beach deposits and tectonically uplifted shorelines....