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1

Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

2013-04-01

2

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2012-07-01

3

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...AQCR 120 X Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2011-07-01

4

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Rhode Island—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...AQCR 120 X Rhode Island—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2010-07-01

5

Variations in Growth of Tautog in Nursery Areas in Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Coastal Ponds  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, the growth of juvenile tautogs Tautoga onitis in Narragansett Bay (Gaspee Point, Mount Hope Bay, and Rose Island) and Rhode Island coastal ponds (Point Judith and Charleston ponds) was evaluated by means of otolith microstructure. The widths of the daily increments in otoliths in the region that represents the postsettlement period (20–50 d) of tautogs collected

Ivan Mateo; Edward G. Durbin; David A. Bengtson; Daisy Durant

2011-01-01

6

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examined statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters addressed the areas of: family and community; economic well-being; child health; safety; and education. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income;…

Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; And Others

7

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the eighth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 53 indicators (3 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic diversity);…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

8

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book is the fourth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 28 indicators in five areas: (1) family and community; (2) economic well-being, including median household income, poverty rate, and percent of children in families receiving cash…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

9

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 49 indicators (6 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

10

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 43 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (including median household income,…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

11

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the fifth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 30 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

12

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the sixth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 37 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

13

Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the UNC Recovery Systems Facility, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Recovery Systems Facility located near Wood River Junction, Rhode Island. At the time of the survey (August 1979) materials were being processed at the facility. Gamma ray data were collected over a 3.28 km/sup 2/ area centered on the facility by flying north-south lines spaced 60 m apart. Processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were consistent with those expected from normal background emitters, except directly over the UNC Facility. Average exposure rates 1 m above the ground, as calculated from the aerial data, are presented in the form of an isopleth map. No ground sample data were taken at the time of the aerial survey.

Bluitt, C.M.

1981-05-01

14

Office of the Secretary of State: Rhode Island State Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Far more than a collection of basic government documents, the Rhode Island State Library website is a nice resource for anyone seeking to learn more about the Ocean State. The materials here are divided into three main sections: "Research Tools", "Publications", and "Everything RI". In "Research Tools", users will find executive orders issued by the governor, annual reports, as well as state regulations and rules. Moving on, the "Publications" area contains some colorful historical documents, including the Rhode Island Royal Charter of 1663 and the state constitution. Finally, the "Everything RI" area contains documents that narrate the state's history, such as "State Symbols", "Famous Rhode Islanders", "Rhode Island Landmarks", and "City & Town Incorporation Dates". Just for reference, some of the notable persons from the Ocean State include George M. Cohan, Anne Hutchinson, and baseball legend Nap Lajoie.

15

75 FR 18394 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2010-04-12

16

75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2010-02-05

17

77 FR 52595 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2012-08-30

18

78 FR 51043 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2013-08-20

19

76 FR 16322 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2011-03-23

20

75 FR 20514 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2010-04-20

21

78 FR 24333 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2013-04-25

22

78 FR 28149 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2013-05-14

23

75 FR 5898 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2010-02-05

24

Water conservation for Rhode Island lawns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1989, water professionals in Rhode Island developed a program for home lawn irrigation scheduling that adapted an agricultural soil moisture model for use on home lawns. The key to the program, which emphasized supplemental watering only, was a \\

Alyson McCann; Arthur J. Gold; Kathleen Mallon; Josef Gorres

1994-01-01

25

Three Guidance Programs in Providence, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes three programs implemented in the Providence, Rhode Island, elementary schools to improve students' self-image. These include a guidance/puppetry program, student of the week awards, and a behavioral management system. (JAC)

Chirico, John

1985-01-01

26

200607 Catalog University of Rhode Island  

E-print Network

; inside photos by Joe Giblin, Nora Lewis, and Mike Salerno. The University of Rhode Island is committed Produced by the URI Publications Office, Division of University Advancement. Cover photo by Nora Lewis

Rhode Island, University of

27

Delineation and Prediction Uncertainty of Areas Contributing Recharge to Selected Well Fields in Wetland and Coastal Settings, Southern Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Areas contributing recharge to four well fields in two study sites in southern Rhode Island were delineated on the basis of steady-state groundwater-flow models representing average hydrologic conditions. The wells are screened in sand and gravel deposits in wetland and coastal settings. The groundwater-flow models were calibrated by inverse modeling using nonlinear regression. Summary statistics from nonlinear regression were used to evaluate the uncertainty associated with the predicted areas contributing recharge to the well fields. In South Kingstown, two United Water Rhode Island well fields are in Mink Brook watershed and near Worden Pond and extensive wetlands. Wetland deposits of peat near the well fields generally range in thickness from 5 to 8 feet. Analysis of water-level drawdowns in a piezometer screened beneath the peat during a 20-day pumping period indicated vertical leakage and a vertical hydraulic conductivity for the peat of roughly 0.01 ft/d. The simulated area contributing recharge for average withdrawals of 2,138 gallons per minute during 2003-07 extended to groundwater divides in mostly till and morainal deposits, and it encompassed 2.30 square miles. Most of a sand and gravel mining operation between the well fields was in the simulated contributing area. For the maximum pumping capacity (5,100 gallons per minute), the simulated area contributing recharge expanded to 5.54 square miles. The well fields intercepted most of the precipitation recharge in Mink Brook watershed and in an adjacent small watershed, and simulated streams ceased to flow. The simulated contributing area to the well fields included an area beneath Worden Pond and a remote, isolated area in upland till on the opposite side of Worden Pond from the well fields. About 12 percent of the pumped water was derived from Worden Pond. In Charlestown, the Central Beach Fire District and the East Beach Water Association well fields are on a small (0.85 square mile) peninsula in a coastal setting. The wells are screened in a coarse-grained, ice-proximal part of a morphosequence with saturated thicknesses generally less than 30 feet on the peninsula. The simulated area contributing recharge for the average withdrawal (16 gallons per minute) during 2003-07 was 0.018 square mile. The contributing area extended southwestward from the well fields to a simulated groundwater mound; it underlay part of a small nearby wetland, and it included isolated areas on the side of the wetland opposite the well fields. For the maximum pumping rate (230 gallons per minute), the simulated area contributing recharge (0.26 square mile) expanded in all directions; it included a till area on the peninsula, and it underlay part of a nearby pond. Because the well fields are screened in a thin aquifer, simulated groundwater traveltimes from recharge locations to the discharging wells were short: 94 percent of the traveltimes were 10 years or less, and the median traveltime was 1.3 years. Model-prediction uncertainty was evaluated using a Monte Carlo analysis; the parameter variance-covariance matrix from nonlinear regression was used to create parameter sets for the analysis. Important parameters for model prediction that could not be estimated by nonlinear regression were incorporated into the variance-covariance matrix. For the South Kingstown study site, observations provided enough information to constrain the uncertainty of these parameters within realistic ranges, but for the Charlestown study site, prior information on parameters was required. Thus, the uncertainty analysis for the South Kingstown study site was an outcome of calibrating the model to available observations, but the Charlestown study site was also dependent on information provided by the modeler. A water budget and model-fit statistical criteria were used to assess parameter sets so that prediction uncertainty was not overestimated. For the scenarios using maximum pumping rates at both study

Friesz, Paul J.

2010-01-01

28

Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts area contingency plan, updated through change 4  

SciTech Connect

Change 4 updates the Area Contingency Plan, which describes the strategy for a coordinated Federal, State, and Local response to a discharge of oil or a release of a hazardous substance from a vessel, offshore facility, or onshore facility operating within the boundaries of the area of responsibility for Captain of the Port, Providence.

NONE

1998-03-27

29

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Rhode Island showed gains--improvements in reading and math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for most racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income students, and boys and girls. Achievement gaps between students narrowed in most cases at grades 4 and 8.…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

30

MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

31

77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic...material, is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available...Subjects in 33 CFR Part 334 Danger zones, Navigation (water...334 as follows: PART 334--DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA...

2012-04-04

32

University of Rhode Island inAdvance November 9, 2006  

E-print Network

, mark your calendars Our 2007 Young Alumni Weekend will be held February 16- 18, 2007. Among, offered by Rhode Island casts overwhelming yes vote for new College of Pharmacy Thirty-eight of Rhode, it was apparent that the people of Rhode Island recognized the quality of the programs offered by the University

Rhode Island, University of

33

RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

34

78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island AGENCY...has been prepared for Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR...mitigation program at Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island....

2013-06-28

35

University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Narragansett, Rhode Island, the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) of URI offers instruction leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography as well as in interdisciplinary and related areas such as atmospheric chemistry. Site includes information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, news, and publications. Outreach initiatives are numerous and are targeted at a wide audience.

36

Policy and Procedures, University of Rhode Island Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A guide to policies and procedures of the University of Rhode Island Foundation is presented. Attention is directed to the following concerns: fund-raising policies, the act incorporating the University of Rhode Island Foundation, by-laws, dual signature system, nominating committee responsibilities and procedures, policy and guidelines for the…

Leslie, James W.

37

Rare and Endemic Rhode Island Beetles by Derek S. Sikes  

E-print Network

Rare and Endemic Rhode Island Beetles by Derek S. Sikes RINHewS 5(1):6-7 [April 1998] During the process of compiling a list of beetle species for the forthcoming Invertebrate volume of the RI Natural of these records are beetle species that are technically endemic to Rhode Island, the fourth is a species known

Sikes, Derek S.

38

Museum of Art-Rhode Island School of Design  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is the largest art museum in Rhode Island, and one of the largest in the United States. Founded in 1893, the Museum's collection, like its parent organization RISD, reflects the fact that after the Civil War Rhode Island was the most industrialized state in the country. As stated on the Museum's website, the region's prosperity was based on the manufacture of goods from silverware to steam engines, resulting in a desire to better educate the population in industrial design and fine art. Today, the Museum's collection consists of over 84,000 objects, with particular strengths in costume and textiles, 19th century American decorative arts, and photography. The Museum is also the home of the Aaron Siskind Center for the Study of Photography. On the website visitors can browse collection areas, explore the Grand Gallery, "A salon-style picture gallery displaying European paintings from the Renaissance through the early 19th century", listen to curators, and read about current exhibitions.

39

US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01

40

Multicenter pediatric emergency medicine research and Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Multicenter clinical research studies are often needed to address issues of generalizability, conditions with low incidence, adequate statistical power, and potential study bias. While pediatric research networks began work in the 1950s, and Rhode Island physicians have contributed to many of these studies, pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) collaboratives are relative newcomers. Since the mid-1990s, Rhode Island pediatricians have contributed to multicenter studies of diabetic ketoacidosis, bronchiolitis, asthma, quality of PEM care, meningitis, brief interventions for substance use disorders, point-of-care ultrasound, and pre-hospital triage protocols. In 2011, Rhode Island Hospital joined the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network, the first federally funded pediatric emergency medicine network of its kind. Its mission is to perform high quality, high impact PEM research. Since joining the network, Rhode Island Hospital has quickly become a productive and valued member of the network, portending a bright future for multicenter PEM research in the Ocean State. PMID:24400311

Chun, Thomas H

2014-01-01

41

3. View from roof of the Rhode Island Normal School, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View from roof of the Rhode Island Normal School, looking southeast towards downtown. - Downtown Providence, Roughley bounded by Woonasquatucket River, Providence River, Interstate Highway 195, & Interstate Highway 95, Providence, Providence County, RI

42

Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

2011-01-01

43

Effects of alternative instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options in the Big River Area, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Transient numerical ground-water-flow simulation and optimization techniques were used to evaluate potential effects of instream-flow criteria and water-supply demands on ground-water development options and resultant streamflow depletions in the Big River Area, Rhode Island. The 35.7 square-mile (mi2) study area includes three river basins, the Big River Basin (30.9 mi2), the Carr River Basin (which drains to the Big River Basin and is 7.33 mi2 in area), the Mishnock River Basin (3.32 mi2), and a small area that drains directly to the Flat River Reservoir. The overall objective of the simulations was to determine the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn from the three basins when constrained by streamflow requirements at four locations in the study area and by maximum rates of withdrawal at 13 existing and hypothetical well sites. The instream-flow requirement for the outlet of each basin and the outfall of Lake Mishnock were the primary variables that limited the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. A requirement to meet seasonal ground-water-demand patterns also limits the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn by up to about 50 percent of the total withdrawals without the demand-pattern constraint. Minimum water-supply demands from a public water supplier in the Mishnock River Basin, however, did not have a substantial effect on withdrawals in the Big River Basin. Hypothetical dry-period instream-flow requirements and the effects of artificial recharge also affected the amount of ground water that could be withdrawn. Results of simulations indicate that annual average ground-water withdrawal rates that range up to 16 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) can be withdrawn from the study area under simulated average hydrologic conditions depending on instream-flow criteria and water-supply demand patterns. Annual average withdrawals of 10 to 12 Mgal/d are possible for proposed demands of 3.4 Mgal/d in the Mishnock Basin, and for a constant annual instream-flow criterion of 0.5 cubic foot per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2) at the four streamflow-constraint locations. An average withdrawal rate of 10 Mgal/d can meet estimates of future (2020) water-supply needs of surrounding communities in Rhode Island. This withdrawal rate represents about 13 percent of the average 2002 daily withdrawal from the Scituate Reservoir (76 Mgal/d), the State?s largest water supply. Average annual withdrawal rates of 6 to 7 Mgal/d are possible for more stringent instream-flow criteria that might be used during dry-period hydrologic conditions. Two example scenarios of dry-period instream-flow constraints were evaluated: first, a minimum instream flow of 0.1 cubic foot per second at any of the four constraint locations; and second, a minimum instream flow of 10 percent of the minimum monthly streamflow estimate for each streamflow-constraint location during the period 1961?2000. The State of Rhode Island is currently (2004) considering methods for establishing instream-flow criteria for streams within the State. Twelve alternative annual, seasonal, or monthly instream-flow criteria that have been or are being considered for application in southeastern New England were used as hypothetical constraints on maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates in management-model calculations. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 5 to 16 Mgal/d under five alternative annual instream-flow criteria. Maximum ground-water-withdrawal rates ranged from 0 to 13.6 Mgal/d under seven alternative seasonal or monthly instream-flow criteria. The effect of ground-water withdrawals on seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows under each criterion also were compared. Evaluation of management-model results indicates that a single annual instream-flowcriterion may be sufficient to preserve seasonal variations in monthly average streamflows and meet water-supply demands in the Big River Area, because withdrawals from wells in the Big

Granato, Gregory E.; Barlow, Paul M.

2005-01-01

44

77 FR 14715 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...approve four State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RI DEM). These revisions demonstrate that the State of Rhode Island meets the requirements of reasonably available control...

2012-03-13

45

Evaluating prediction uncertainty of areas contributing recharge to well fields of multiple water suppliers in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt River Basins, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Three river basins in central Rhode Island-the Hunt River, the Annaquatucket River, and the Pettaquamscutt River-contain 15 production wells clustered in 4 pumping centers from which drinking water is withdrawn. These high-capacity production wells, operated by three water suppliers, are screened in coarse-grained deposits of glacial origin. The risk of contaminating water withdrawn by these well centers may be reduced if the areas contributing recharge to the well centers are delineated and these areas protected from land uses that may affect the water quality. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began an investigation in 2009 to improve the understanding of groundwater flow and delineate areas contributing recharge to the well centers as part of an effort to protect the source of water to these well centers. A groundwater-flow model was calibrated by inverse modeling using nonlinear regression to obtain the optimal set of parameter values, which provide a single, best representation of the area contributing recharge to a well center. Summary statistics from the calibrated model were used to evaluate the uncertainty associated with the predicted areas contributing recharge to the well centers. This uncertainty analysis was done so that the contributing areas to the well centers would not be underestimated, thereby leaving the well centers inadequately protected. The analysis led to contributing areas expressed as a probability distribution (probabilistic contributing areas) that differ from a single or deterministic contributing area. Groundwater flow was simulated in the surficial deposits and the underlying bedrock in the 47-square-mile study area. Observations (165 groundwater levels and 7 base flows) provided sufficient information to estimate parameters representing recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the glacial deposits and hydraulic conductance of streambeds. The calibrated value for recharge to valley-fill deposits was 27.3 inches per year (in/yr) and to upland till deposits was 18.7 in/yr. Calibrated values for horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the valley-fill deposits ranged from 20 to 480 feet per day (ft/d) and of the upland till deposits was 16.2 ft/d. Calibrated values of streambed hydraulic conductance ranged from 10,000 to 52,000 feet squared per day. Values of recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the valley-fill deposits were the most precisely estimated, whereas the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of till deposits was the least precisely estimated. Simulated areas contributing recharge to the well centers on the basis of the calibrated model ranged from 0.19 to 1.12 square miles (mi2) and covered a total area of 2.79 mi2 for average well center withdrawal rates during 2004-08 (235 to 1,858 gallons per minute (gal/min)). Simulated areas contributing recharge for the maximum well center pumping capacities (800 to 8,500 gal/min) ranged from 0.37 to 3.53 mi2 and covered a total area of 7.99 mi2 in the modeled area. Simulated areas contributing recharge extend upgradient of the well centers to upland till and to groundwater divides. Some areas contributing recharge include small, isolated areas remote from the well centers. Relatively short groundwater traveltimes from recharging locations to discharging wells indicated the wells are vulnerable to contamination from land-surface activities: median traveltimes ranged from 2.9 to 5.0 years for the well centers, and 78 to 93 percent of the traveltimes were 10 years or less for the well centers. Land cover in the areas contributing recharge includes a substantial amount of urban land use for the two well centers in the Hunt River Basin, agriculture and sand and gravel mining uses for the well center in the Annaquatucket River Basin, and, for the well center in the Pettaquamscutt River Basin, land use is primarily undeveloped. Model-prediction uncertainty was evaluated using a Monte Carlo analysis. The parameter variance-covariance matrix from nonlinear regression was used to cre

Friesz, Paul J.

2012-01-01

46

Coleoptera of Rhode Island: An On-Line Checklist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A creative presentation of checklist data by graduate student Derek Sikes of the University of Connecticut, this site provides access to taxonomic information on the beetles of Rhode Island. Featuring a searchable (by Family or Species) database, the site also includes an introduction, a map of Rhode Island, and a selection of source references. Typical returns provide Family, Subfamily, Species, and Determiner name, with hyperlinks to Voucher source(s). The searchable database includes 96 expected and documented families, 2,413 expected and documented species, and 511 apparent new state records.

Sikes, Derek S.

1999-01-01

47

Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

2013-01-01

48

University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 8, 2008  

E-print Network

Brain Injury The University of Rhode Island's Gateway Café, located in the Independence Square Facility in Warwick. Enjoy your favorite game with fellow alumni and friends, and help support student scholarships as student speaker at the 2008 Commencement, which will be held on Sunday, May 18. Founding member

Rhode Island, University of

49

University of Rhode Island Adapted Aquatics Program Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview is presented of the aquatics course, adapted for persons with disabilities, at the University of Rhode Island. A description of the course includes information on course requirements, objectives, content and learning activities, assignments, modules used in the course, and a course syllabus. A description of the course organization and…

Scraba, Paula J.; Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

50

Community College of Rhode Island: Annual Report, 1990-91.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report on the students, programs, faculty and staff, and finances of the Community College of Rhode Island includes both a narrative highlighting major changes and accomplishments, and a statistical presentation. The narrative section of the report begins with the president's message, followed by information on the following points of…

Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

51

77 FR 69915 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective Date: 11/10/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-11-21

52

Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Rhode Island's Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rhode Island is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

2011-01-01

53

Community College of Rhode Island: Annual Report, 1989-90.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A narrative account of the achievements of the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI) during the 1989-90 academic year is presented in this annual report, along with historical and current data on enrollments, programs, staff, and finances. Following an essay by the college president, Edward J. Liston, on the highlights of the past year, a…

Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

54

Ted Sizer's Opening Remarks, Fall Forum 2000, Providence, Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents Ted Sizer's opening remarks during the Fall Forum in 2000 at Providence, Rhode Island. In his opening remarks, Sizer reviews what the Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) is, and what it is not. CES, he contends, is not a fixed school design but rather, a set of ideas, ideas and conditions and convictions, called principles,…

Sizer, Theodore

2009-01-01

55

The Hmong Resettlement Study Site Report: Providence, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on the resettlement of Hmong refugees in Providence, Rhode Island: what their employment experiences have been, which resettlement efforts have been successful, and how current resettlement efforts could be altered to improve the Hmong's long-term adjustment. The report is part of a larger, national project on Hmong…

Finck, John

56

EVALUATION OF POLLUTION ABATEMENT ALTERNATIVES: PICILLO PROPERTY, COVENTRY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes the second phase of a two-phase investigation undertaken by the MITRE Corp. to determine the nature and severity of ground and surface water contamination at the Picillo property in Coventry, Rhode Island and to make recommendations for permanent abatement o...

57

University of Rhode Island Nursing Transfer Information Sheet  

E-print Network

to Nursing Profession Professionalism Written Communication Skills The secondary criteria are typicallyUniversity of Rhode Island Nursing Transfer Information Sheet 2/6/2014:DJS As a transfer student 15 ADMISSION Due to program sequencing in Nursing, we do not admit to the junior year. The University

Rhode Island, University of

58

University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 25, 2006  

E-print Network

to be shipwrecks," said Rod Mather, a URI associate professor of maritime history and underwater archaeology who in Newport Harbor Marine archaeologists from the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project and the University the archaeology and geology of the Aegean and Black seas. The expedition's primary focus is to study the seafloor

Rhode Island, University of

59

University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 26, 2005  

E-print Network

a "College with a Conscience" The University of Rhode Island has been recognized as among the nation's best forthcoming book, Colleges with a Conscience: 81 Great Schools with Outstanding Community Involvement (Random the honor at the Association for Women in Psychology's national conference held in Tampa, Fla., earlier

Rhode Island, University of

60

Unviersity of Rhode Island Library Reference Sources in Gerontology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty-two sources in gerontology, located at the University of Rhode Island Library, are listed in this annotated bibliography as well as some interdisciplinary sources. This bibliography contains material published as recently as 1996 and includes annotations of an "Older Americans Almanac," bibliographies, a biographical dictionary, the…

Morrison, Catherine E.

61

Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marine science at the University of Rhode Island (URI) is an orientation, a direction. It is not an isolated activity of one department or even of one college. URI has a commitment to a total effort in marine science that is expressed in the cooperation, and, indeed, the interdependence of departments and personnel in many aspects of marine…

Napoli, James J.

62

University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 22, 2008  

E-print Network

and Lyme disease prevention The University of Rhode Island and the Tick Encounter Resource Center in the Leaves, a documentary film about ticks and Lyme disease, will premiere at the University. The film is a collaboration between entomology professor Thomas Mather, director of the Center for Vector- Borne Disease

Rhode Island, University of

63

Offshore wind farm siting procedures applied offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2008, the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) has been leading a Rhode Island Ocean Area Management Plan (RIOSAMP) in partnership with the University of Rhode Island, resulting in an extensive multidisciplinary analysis of the Rhode Island offshore environment and its suitability for siting an offshore wind farm. As part of the RIOSAMP project, a standard siting optimization approach was first developed based on a siting index defined as the ratio of costs associated with the wind farm deployment to the available wind resource. This index, combined within a marine spatial planning approach to address ecological and societal constraints, provided an initial macro-siting tool (Spaulding et al., 2010). The multiple GIS layers required in this approach and the absence of theoretical support to optimize the resulting zoning, led to an extension of the initial optimization approach into a more comprehensive macro-siting optimization tool, integrating societal and ecological constraints into the siting tool, the Wind Farm Siting Index (WIFSI) (Grilli et al, 2012). The projects led to the definition of several favorable development areas including a Renewable Energy Zone (REZ) off of Block Island, in State Waters. Deep Water Wind Inc. (DWW) plans to install and commission five 6 MW direct drive Siemens lattice jacket turbines in the REZ area, by 2014. In this thesis two major steps are accomplished to refine and expand the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool. First the macro-siting tool is expanded to include a model simulating the exclusionary zones defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. Second a micro-siting model is developed, optimizing the relative position of each turbine within a wind farm area. The micro-siting objective is to minimize, (1) the loss in power due to the loss of wind resource in the wake of the turbines (wake "effect"), and (2) the cable costs that inter-connect the turbines and connecting the farm to the land. The REZ area is chosen as test site for the algorithm, and an optimal layout for the 5 turbines is found and discussed. Similarly the FAA tool is applied to the Block Island airport demonstrating the complexity of the FAA exclusionary area, and defining the limits of the exclusionary areas. The FAA regulation model is a geometric model in which all major (FAA) regulations within RI and the RI topography are embedded. The user specifies the dimension of the proposed turbines and an airport of interest, and a map of exclusionary zones specific to the turbine height and rules applying to the airport is generated. The model is validated for the entire state of Rhode Island. The micro-siting model finds the optimum placement of each turbine for a given number of turbines within an area. It includes the aerodynamic constraints (loss in wind speed within the wake of a turbine) associated to the deployment of arrays of turbines and the cable interconnection cost. It is combined with the technical, ecological, and social constraints used in the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool to provide a comprehensive micro-siting tool. In the optimization algorithm, a simple wake model and turbine-clustering algorithm are combined with the WIFSI in an objective function; the objective function is optimized with a genetic algorithm (GA).

O'Reilly, Christopher M.

64

Sources of geologic and hydrologic information pertinent to ground-water resources in Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes sources of geologic and hydrologic information useful to water managers and others involved in the investigation, appraisal, development, and protection of ground-water resources in Rhode Island. The geographic scope of the report includes Rhode Island and small adjoining areas of Massachusetts and Connecticut, where drainage basins are shared with these States. The information summarized is found in maps and reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and published by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by the State of Rhode Island. Information sources are presented in maps and tables. Reference maps show drainage divides, town lines, and the 7.5-minute grid of latitude and longitude for the State. Maps show availability of surficial geologic maps, bedrock geologic maps, and ground-water studies by 7.5-minute quadrangle, and show availability of ground-water studies by drainage basin, subbasin, and special study area. Sources of geologic and hydrologic information for the thirty-seven 7.5-minute quadrangles covering Rhode Island have been compiled based on the following information categories: surficial geology, bedrock geology, subsurface materials, altitude of bedrock surface, water-table altitudes, water-table contours, saturated thickness, hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, drainage divides, recharge areas, ground-water reservoirs, induced infiltration, and ground-water quality. A table for each of the 37 quadrangles lists the major categories of information available for that quadrangle, provides references to the publications in which the information can be found, and indicates the format, scale, and other pertinent attributes of the information. A table organized by report series gives full citations for publications prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey pertaining to the geology and hydrology of Rhode Island. To facilitate location of information for particular municipalities, a table lists cities and towns in the State and the quadrangles that cover each municipality.

Trench, Elaine C.

1995-01-01

65

Prevention and control of hepatitis C in rhode island.  

PubMed

Concern about the morbidity and mortality of hepatitis C infection is increasing. Persons born from 1945 to 1965 are most significantly affected, with the majority unaware of their infection, and will otherwise go untreated. Up to three-fourths of hepatitis C-related deaths occur in this population of "baby boomers." Since 2007, mortality from hepatitis C has exceeded that from HIV, nationally and in Rhode Island. New treatment options for hepatitis C emphasize the potential for cure of hepatitis C that is distinct from HIV. Financial resources and integration of hepatitis C partners and services in Rhode Island will be instrumental in reducing hepatitis C infections and increasing the number of cases cured. We describe public health investments in the past, present, and future to implement strategies for effectively addressing hepatitis C in the state. PMID:24983017

Alexander-Scott, Nicole E; Lemire, Angela; Larson, H Elsa; Bandy, Utpala

2014-07-01

66

Arbovirus surveillance in Rhode Island: assessing potential ecologic and climatic correlates.  

PubMed

During 1995-2000, mosquitoes were collected from sites throughout Rhode Island and tested for the presence of arboviruses. Mosquito trapping was done weekly from June to October with CO2-baited light traps. In all, 186,537 mosquitoes belonging to 7 different genera were collected, of which Coquillettidia perturbans was most abundant. A total of 6,434 pools were processed for arbovirus isolation, from which 193 arboviral isolations were made. These included 109 Highlands J, 71 eastern equine encephalomyelitis, 1 California encephalitis serogroup, 2 Jamestown Canyon, 3 Cache Valley, and 9 Flanders viruses. Our isolations of Flanders virus represent the 1st reported occurrence of this virus in Rhode Island. After the 1999 sudden occurrence of the West Nile virus (WN) in the New York City area, a dead-bird surveillance program was started to test for this virus. Although no isolations of WN were made from mosquitoes, 87 virus isolations were made from a total of 330 wild birds tested. All the WN-infected birds were either American crows or blue jays. Isolation of WN from dead birds marked the 1st documented appearance of this virus in Rhode Island. Significant interannual variation of arbovirus activity in Rhode Island prompted us to examine if climate-associated factors such as rainfall and temperature correlate with virus activity. Total rainfall amounts from May to June were higher than normal in 1996 and 1998. These years showed significantly higher arbovirus activity. Deviations from normal temperature showed low correlation with arbovirus activity during the 6-year study period. Therefore, precipitation appeared to be more important than temperature in predicting arbovirus activity in Rhode Island. PMID:14524538

Takeda, Tsutomu; Whitehouse, Chris A; Brewer, Michael; Gettman, Alan D; Mather, Thomas N

2003-09-01

67

Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island  

E-print Network

Enterprise GIS System Architecture Prepared for: State of Rhode Island Date: 9/26/2011 Prepared byEdit, ArcEditor, ArcEurope, ArcExplorer, ArcExpress, ArcGIS, ArcGlobe, ArcGrid, ArcIMS, ARC/INFO, ArcInfo, ArcInfo Librarian, ArcInfo--Professional GIS, ArcInfo--The World's GIS, ArcLessons, ArcLocation, Arc

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

68

Recent marine podocopid Ostracoda of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

E-print Network

dredge samples from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been examined for marine podocopid ostracode specimens. Estimated data on salinity, tempera- ture, depth, and bottom sediment compiled from earlier published reports have no conclu- sive... fathometer readings with USC & GS Chart No. 353 of Narragansett Bay (revised January 25, 1960). A total of 63 stations were occupied, sta- tions 1 to 26 on the first cruise, stations 27 to 45 on the second, and stations 46 to 63 on the third. Forty...

Williams, R. B.

1966-11-23

69

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

2011-10-01

70

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National Wildlife Refuge A. Migratory Game Bird Hunting. [Reserved] B. Upland Game Hunting. [Reserved] C. Big Game Hunting. [Reserved] D. Sport Fishing. Anglers may surf fish in...

2010-10-01

71

Assessment of drug abuser treatment needs in Rhode Island.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Rhode Island's Division of Substance Abuse asked us to assess the State's drug treatment needs and make recommendations regarding its treatment system for the next three years. METHODS. We used a statewide telephone drug use survey of 5,176 households supplemented by drug-related hospital discharges, Division of Drug Control statistics, and interviews with providers, state officials, and out-of-state experts. Drug abuse was measured with items from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Abusers were asked if they were receiving or wanted to receive treatment. RESULTS. Survey responses, used to estimate the unmet need for drug treatment, indicated a need to triple drug treatment services. Regression models using survey data indicated that the treatment network was overly centralized in the Providence area. Interviews with state officials, clinicians, and out-of-state experts provided material for recommendations on reimbursement policy, treatment mix, quality assurance, and cost containment. CONCLUSIONS. The RI Department of Health's certificate-of-need program adopted our overall recommendation for tripling the drug treatment system as its guideline in evaluating proposals for new treatment facilities. With State funding of a new adolescent center and expansion of outpatient slots in the private sector, this recommendation has now been fully implemented. PMID:1847277

McAuliffe, W E; Breer, P; Ahmadifar, N W; Spino, C

1991-01-01

72

Electrical wiring configurations and childhood leukemia in Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

The study of the relationship between childhood leukemia and electric power line configurations in the greater Denver, Colorado, area by Wertheimer and Leeper (Am J Epidemiol 109: 273-284, 1979) was repeated in Rhode Island, focusing on leukemia (age at onset, 0-20 years; year of onset, 1964-1978). The addresses of 119 leukemia patients and 240 controls were studied by mapping power lines within 50 yards (45.72 m) of each residence. The shortest distance between each power line and the point of the residence closest to it was found; the number and types of wires in each power line were noted. Exposure weights were assigned each type of wire using Wertheimer and Leeper's median field strength reading for each. Assuming that the strength of the field decreases with the square of the distance from its source, and that fields generated by different wires grouped in the same power line are simply additive, a summary value of relative exposure was calculated for each address. Quartile exposure values for controls were used to group patient exposures. Contrary to Wertheimer and Leeper's results, no relationship was found between leukemia and electric power line configurations.

Fulton, J.P.; Cobb, S.; Preble, L.; Leone, L.; Forman, E.

1980-03-01

73

Using Hydrogeochemical Methods To Evaluate Complex Quaternary Subsurface Stratigraphy Block Island, Rhode Island, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the major problems in hydrogeologic investigations of glaciated regions is the determination of complex stratigraphic relationships in the subsurface where insufficient information is available from drilling and geophysical records. In this paper, chemical characteristics of groundwater were used to identify stratigraphic changes in glacial deposits that were previously inferred on Block Island, Rhode Island, USA, an emergent remnant

Anne I. Veeger; Byron D. Stone

1996-01-01

74

A Precipitation-Runoff Model for the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model of the Blackstone River Basin was developed and calibrated to study the effects of changing land- and water-use patterns on water resources. The 474.5 mi2 Blackstone River Basin in southeastern Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is experiencing rapid population and commercial growth throughout much of its area. This growth and the corresponding changes in land-use patterns are increasing stress on water resources and raising concerns about the future availability of water to meet residential and commercial needs. Increased withdrawals and wastewater-return flows also could adversely affect aquatic habitat, water quality, and the recreational value of the streams in the basin. The Blackstone River Basin was represented by 19 hydrologic response units (HRUs): 17 types of pervious areas (PERLNDs) established from combinations of surficial geology, land-use categories, and the distribution of public water and public sewer systems, and two types of impervious areas (IMPLNDs). Wetlands were combined with open water and simulated as stream reaches that receive runoff from surrounding pervious and impervious areas. This approach was taken to achieve greater flexibility in calibrating evapotranspiration losses from wetlands during the growing season. The basin was segmented into 50 reaches (RCHRES) to represent junctions at tributaries, major lakes and reservoirs, and drainage areas to streamflow-gaging stations. Climatological, streamflow, water-withdrawal, and wastewater-return data were collected during the study to develop the HSPF model. Climatological data collected at Worcester Regional Airport in Worcester, Massachusetts and T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island, were used for model calibration. A total of 15 streamflow-gaging stations were used in the calibration. Streamflow was measured at eight continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey cooperative streamflow-gaging network, and at seven partial-record stations installed in 2004 for this study. Because the model-calibration period preceded data collection at the partial-record stations, a continuous streamflow record was estimated at these stations by correlation with flows at nearby continuous-record stations to provide additional streamflow data for model calibration. Water-use information was compiled for 1996-2001 and included municipal and commercial/industrial withdrawals, private residential withdrawals, golf-course withdrawals, municipal wastewater-return flows, and on-site septic effluent return flows. Streamflow depletion was computed for all time-varying ground-water withdrawals prior to simulation. Water-use data were included in the model to represent the net effect of water use on simulated hydrographs. Consequently, the calibrated values of the hydrologic parameters better represent the hydrologic response of the basin to precipitation. The model was calibrated for 1997-2001 to coincide with the land-use and water-use data compiled for the study. Four long-term stations (Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island) that monitor flow at 3.3, 5.4, 19, and 88 percent of the total basin area, respectively, provided the primary model-calibration points. Hydrographs, scatter plots, and flow-duration curves of observed and simulated discharges, along with various model-fit statistics, indicated that the model performed well over a range of hydrologic conditions. For example, the total runoff volume for the calibration period simulated at the Nipmuc River near Harrisville, Rhode Island; Quinsigamond River at North Grafton, Massachusetts; Branch River at Forestdale, Rhode Island; and Blackstone River at Woonsocket, Rhode Island streamflow-gaging stations differed from the observed runoff v

Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.

2007-01-01

75

Risk assessment pilot study. Phase 3. Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Final draft report  

SciTech Connect

To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to determine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. Allen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was closed to shellfishing by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management because of suspected hazardous waste contamination from a landfill and disposal area adjacent to the harbor. NCBC Davisville was added to the National Priority List in November 1989. Between 1946 and 1972, the 15-acre landfill received a wide variety of wastes, including sewage sludge, solvents, paints, chromic acid, PCB-contaminated waste oils, preservatives, blasting grit, and other municipal and industrial wastes generated at NCBC Davisville and at the Naval Air Station Quonset Point. Another site, also adjacent to Allen Harbor on Calf Pasture Point, was used for disposal of calcium hypochlorite decontaminating solution and chlorides.

Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Rogers, B.A.; Benyi, S.; Cayula, S.

1993-12-01

76

EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER,  

E-print Network

EFFECTS OF TRAP VENTING ON GEAR SELECTIVITY IN THE INSHORE RHODE ISLAND AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS devices in lobster traps has proven effective in allowingthe release of sublegal-sized American lobster Rhode Island lobster fishery. The use ofrectangular vents (42 x 152mm) resulted in a 79% decrease

77

Risk assessment pilot study. Phase 3. Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Final draft report  

Microsoft Academic Search

To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to determine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. Allen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was closed to shellfishing by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management because of suspected hazardous waste contamination from a

W. R. Munns; C. Mueller; B. A. Rogers; S. Benyi; S. Cayula

1993-01-01

78

A Standards-Based Guide for Social Studies Programs in Rhode Island Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rhode Island state social studies curriculum for history, geography, civics, economics, and the behavioral sciences should promote civic responsibility and active civic participation. Rhode Island recommends that teachers and administrators use national social studies content standards rather than support the development of their own state…

Cheek, Dennis, Ed.; Fogle, Faith, Ed.

79

Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P.G.; Parker, C.E.

2013-01-01

80

Rhode Island Consumer Education Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This consumer curriculum guide is divided into 10 component areas: basic economics in the marketplace, credit, consumer law/protection, banking skills, comparison shopping, advertising, responsible budgeting, insurance, taxes, and conservation of energy and resources. Each component is accompanied by a goal statement that identifies key concepts…

Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

81

Update on concussion management for the rhode island clinician.  

PubMed

Concussions are common injuries with increasing diagnostic incidence. The 4th International Conference on Concussion in Sport, held in November 2012 in Zurich, revised consensus statements regarding the definition of a concussion, diagnostic criteria, and management. Return-to-play guidelines require a graded return to activity in which concussed athletes remain symptom-free. In order to improve awareness pertaining to concussion diagnosis and management, legislation has now been enacted in all fifty states. Rhode Island enacted into law the School and Youth Programs Concussion Act in 2010, which increases awareness of concussions for athletes, coaches, teachers, school nurses and parents/guardians through written information and mandatory training for coaches. Athletes must be removed from practice/competition and cannot return until a physician has evaluated and cleared them. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2015-02.asp, free with no login]. PMID:25649096

Waryasz, Gregory R; Tambone, Robert; Kriz, Peter

2014-01-01

82

SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52  

E-print Network

SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS, 1950-52 ( SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORTKay, Secretary, Fish and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE IN RHODE larval abundance in the Western half of Greenwi ch Bay in 1952 2\\\\ #12;SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF CLAM LARVAE

83

Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

1984-01-01

84

78 FR 63435 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RI DEM) Office of Air Resources, on January 18, 2011. They are primarily...taking action on certain other SIP revisions contained in RI DEM's January 18, 2011 submittal. DATES: Written comments...

2013-10-24

85

Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

Not Available

1981-07-01

86

Feasibility of crumb rubber use for asphalt pavement construction in Rhode Island. Final research report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the research project, entitled `Viable Use of Crumb Rubber for Highway Construction in Rhode Island.` This study dealt with the investigation of the means by which the State of Rhode Island can effectively comply with the mandate of the Section 1038 of the 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) to use recycled rubber in asphalt pavements. More specifically, this laboratory investigation characterized Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) with Crumb Rubber Modifiers (CRM).

Lee, K.W.; Kovacs, W.D.; Marcus, A.S.; Madapati, R.R.

1995-12-15

87

Population trends and habitat use of Harlequin Ducks in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess population trends of Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) in Rhode Island (U.S.A.), we analyzed Christmas Bird Counts and other historical surveys and also conducted surveys during the winter of 2005-2006. We estimated sex and age ratios, evaluated the effects of tidal regime and time of day on survey precision, and quantified habitat use. The population in Rhode Island experienced

Christine M. Caron; Peter W. C. Paton

2007-01-01

88

Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center at the University of Rhode Island  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Rhode Island, the Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center (DFCSC) "supports state, national, and international public welfare through education, research, training, and service in forensic investigations and securing information systems." The website provides access to news from the fields of digital forensics and cyber security, along with working papers, materials on ongoing research projects, and academic programs. In the "Resources" area, visitors can look over information from the Department of Homeland Security, along with a collection of free cyber security tools. In the "Academics" area, visitors can learn about the Center's academic degree and certificate programs. Finally, the "Research" area contains their technical reports and student theses on a diverse set of topics.

2012-06-15

89

Marine Benthic Communities of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds and What they're Good For  

EPA Science Inventory

The benthic invertebrates of Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds include those adapted to near-shore habitats with variable temperature and salinity, mid-shelf species with narrower requirements, and boreal species that avoid elevated temperatures. Studies of benthic fauna in th...

90

University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography  

E-print Network

electronic medium or machine readable form without prior consent, in writing, from the University of Rhode Microsoft, MS-DOS and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY

Rhode Island, University of

91

"Into Your Hands His Life and Liberty...." A Collection of Significant Cases from the Rhode Island Courts. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Six cases from Rhode Island court history are presented in this document. The cases, dating from the time of Roger Williams to the 1970s, examine religious freedom, personal freedom, treason, robbery, murder, and drug possession. Each case is summarized and questions are supplied to help students understand crime and punishment in Rhode Island. A…

Leonard, Donald E.; Mattson, John O., Ed.

92

Population Status of the Seaside Sparrow in Rhode Island: A 25-Year Assessment  

EPA Science Inventory

The Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) is currently listed as a species of ?special concern? in Rhode Island and has been designated as a ?watch list? species in the Partners in Flight North American Landbird Conservation Plan. To assess the population status of breeding Seas...

93

Overview of Project Year 2000 in Rhode Island Public Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monthly report documents the accomplishments of the Year 2000 project in Rhode Island's public higher education. It reviews computer problems related to the Year 2000 date change, noting the basic technical solution necessary to avoid disruption to higher education, and summarizes Executive Order 99-1, issued in January 1999, requiring all…

Rhode Island State Board of Governors for Higher Education, Providence.

94

Planning a New Map Room for the University of Rhode Island Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the planning and design process for the University of Rhode Island Library's new map room, which was undertaken as part of a library expansion and renovation program. The first of the report's three major sections describes how equipment was selected for the map room and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of three…

Mongeau, Deborah; Stringer-Hye, Richard

95

METAL SURVEY OF THE MARINE CLAM 'PITAR MORRHUANA' COLLECTED NEAR A RHODE ISLAND (USA) ELECTROPLATING PLANT  

EPA Science Inventory

Benthic fauna were collected from 17 stations in mid-Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during September 1973 from the vicinity of the recently-closed Quonset Point electroplating facility. Despite repeated sampling, most of the 14 species of molluscs taken, including the widgeon cl...

96

77 FR 30214 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (RI DEM) on August 7, 2009. This revision addresses the requirements...planning period from 2008 through 2018. It was submitted by the RI DEM on August 7, 2009. Specifically, EPA proposed to approve...

2012-05-22

97

Use of a Fish Index to Assess Habitat Quality in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed an estuarine index of biotic integrity to assess habitat quality in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Fish were collected at 18 fixed stations with a 61-m × 3.05-m beach seine once per month in July and August from 1988 to 1999. Stations were designated high or low quality depending on the total nitrogen concentration, number of low dissolved oxygen

Lesa Meng; Christopher D. Orphanides; J. Christopher Powell

2002-01-01

98

Investing in Low-Wage Workers: Lessons from Family Child Care in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While child care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the country, most employment in this field is precarious and low-wage. Investing in Low-Wage Workers profiles the Day Care Justice Co-op, a group of largely Latina and African American women living and working in some of Rhode Island's poorest communities. Determined to improve family…

Roder, Anne; Seavey, Dorie

2006-01-01

99

REDUCED FOREST COVER AND CHANGES IN BREEDING BIRD SPECIES COMPOSITION IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

This study was conducted to assess the relationship of land use/cover, riparian vegetation, and avian populations. Our objective was to compare the vegetation structure in riparian corridors with the composition of breeding bird populations in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds alo...

100

THE ``100 LOBSTERS'' PROJECT: A COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR HEALTH ASSESSMENTS OF LOBSTERS FROM RHODE ISLAND  

E-print Network

THE ``100 LOBSTERS'' PROJECT: A COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR HEALTH ASSESSMENTS OF LOBSTERS FROM RHODE ISLAND JEFFREY D. SHIELDS,1 * KERSTEN N. WHEELER,1 JESSICA MOSS,1 BARBARA SOMERS2 shell disease in the American lobster (Homarus americanus) has been devastating to the fishing industry

101

MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1  

E-print Network

MOVEMENTS OF TAGGED AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS, OFF RHODE ISLAND1 MICHAEL J. FOGARTY? DAVID v. D. BORDEN, 3 AND HOWARD J. RUSSELL' ABSTRACT In 1974 and 1975 a total of3,063 American lobster movement patterns. Lobster movements at inshore locations were generally localized; the mean distance

102

US EPA WINTER FLOUNDER PROJECTS AND OTHER WORK IN RHODE ISLAND SALT PONDS  

EPA Science Inventory

We will briefly summarize selected EPA research in Rhode Island's salt ponds from 2000 through 2003. In one project, during the summer of 2000, we used a 1.75 m2 drop sampler to quantify populations of juvenile flatfishes and other small nekton in Ninigret Pond. Mean abundance ...

103

Socioeconomic Correlates of Current and Regular Smoking among College Students in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine how sociodemographic variables, in particular socioeconomic status, correlate with current and regular smoking among college students in Rhode Island. Participants and Methods: Over a 4-year period (academic year 2000-2001 to 2003-2004), the authors examined sociodemographic correlates of…

Clarkin, Patrick F.; Tisch, Linda A.; Glicksman, Arvin S.

2008-01-01

104

Associations between diet and health behavior: Results from the 1992 Rhode Island Behavioral Risk Factor Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1992 Rhode Island Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used to assess self-reported health behaviors of consumers of finfish and raw shellfish. We hypothesized that consumers of finfish, foods considered to be healthy, were more likely than nonconsumers of finfish to partake in health-promoting behaviors. Similarly, we postulated that consumers of raw molluscan shellfish, foods linked to an elevated

Sean F. Altekruse; Babagaleh B. Timbo; Marcia L. Headrick; Karl C. Klontz

1995-01-01

105

Community College of Rhode Island: Annual Report 25, 1988-89.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview is provided of the 25-year history of the Community College of Rhode Island (CCRI). The narrative section of the report begins with a message from CCRI's president concerning institutional priorities for the next five years. Subsequent sections of the narrative focus on: (1) the history and expansion of the college; (2) 1988…

Abood, Nancy V.; And Others

106

Evaluation of the 2000 and 2001 Rhode Island early childhood summer institutes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the theoretical basis and methods for the process and outcome evaluations of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institutes held in 2000 and 2001. The article also discusses the evaluation results that demonstrated the institutes were received as high?quality inservice professional development programs in which participants made significant knowledge gains. Additionally, the influence of the evaluations on

Leah A. Whynacht; Suzan Morris; Diane M. Horm

2004-01-01

107

The Design of the Rhode Island School Funding Formula: Developing New Strategies on Equity and Accountability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reforming the way a state distributes its funding to local school districts is a challenging task. Too often, state leaders embrace major school funding reform only when they are directed by court decisions. In this seemingly contentious policy domain, the Rhode Island General Assembly defied the odds--working in a recessionary climate and in the…

Wong, Kenneth K.

2013-01-01

108

RISK ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY - PHASE III NAVAL CONSTRUCTION BATTALION CENTER - DAVISVILLE, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to etermine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. llen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was cl...

109

USING A FISH INDEX TO ASSESS HABITAT QUALITY IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

We developed an estuarine index of biotic integrity to assess habitat quality in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Fish were collected at 18 fixed stations with a 61-m x 3.05-m beach seine once per month in July and August from 1988 to 1999. Stations were designated high or low qua...

110

A COMAPRISON OF MERCURY IN MINK AND FISHER IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Comparison of total mercury concentrations and nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values in muscle tissue and stomach contents of mink (Mustela vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti) from Rhode Island in 2000- 2003 showed results which appeared to reflect dietary differences betwee...

111

75 FR 57188 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...implementation of the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) requirements in 40 CFR part 268 because...FR 16862, April 24, 2006 (other than LDR requirements): Rules 2.2 C, 2.2...the Federal Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) rules. See Rhode Island's Rule...

2010-09-20

112

Effect of Salinity on Common Reed (Phragmites australis) in a Restored Salt Marsh in Rhode Island  

EPA Science Inventory

Tidal wetlands have undergone extensive degradation throughout the years because of interference with tidal flow from construction, dredging, and invasion of non-native plants such Phragmites australis. In 1956, a 4-lane highway was constructed in Galilee, Rhode Island, USA, cro...

113

The Rhode Island "Washington": Meaning Making in Social Studies through Art History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rhode Island State House in Providence is an imposing structure. It is also an architecturally significant one. Built of white Georgia marble between 1895 and 1904, it has one of only four self-supporting marble covered domes found in the world. It was placed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Looking around, one encounters…

Piro, Joseph M.

2005-01-01

114

Comprehensive School Counseling in Rhode Island: Access to Services and Student Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored relationships among school counseling practices, secondary school demographics, and student outcomes in the state of Rhode Island during a 2-year period. The results showed strong and consistent correlations between increased amounts of school counseling services and positive student outcomes. Schools with higher percentages of…

Dimmitt, Carey; Wilkerson, Belinda

2012-01-01

115

Rhode Island Pension Reform: Implications and Opportunities for Education. Education Sector Policy Briefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On August 24, 2010, the state of Rhode Island received some outstanding news. Its yearlong, bipartisan effort to develop new policies to spur educational improvement was about to pay off. The state, along with eight others and the District of Columbia, was named a winner of the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. The…

Herriot-Hatfield, Jennie; Monahan, Amy; Rosenberg, Sarah; Tucker, Bill

2011-01-01

116

The Rhode Island Beetle Fauna: Past, Present and Future by Derek S. Sikes  

E-print Network

The Rhode Island Beetle Fauna: Past, Present and Future by Derek S. Sikes RINHewS 6(1):8-10 [April beetles... It really almost makes me long to begin collecting again. --Charles Darwin Taxonomists, more so of the Coleoptera, or beetles, I am no exception. During my training in the study of the beetles I was always aware

Sikes, Derek S.

117

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND -COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILE MARKETING CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND - COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES TEXTILE MARKETING CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET www.uri.edu/hss/tmd HS_TXMK_ BS TEXTILE MARKETING (TXMK)...... 120 credits Name: Entering Business Requirements (37 credits) Textile Requirements (29 credits) BUS 201 Financial Accounting (3) ECN

Rhode Island, University of

118

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Progress on Teacher Quality, 2007. Rhode Island State Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" examines what is arguably the single most powerful authority over the teaching profession: state government. This Rhode Island edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the first of what will be an annual look at the status of state policies impacting the…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2007

2007-01-01

119

Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Rhode Island related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

2013-01-01

120

The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

2012-01-01

121

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND -COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM CURRICULUM PLANNING SHEET  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND - COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCE AND SERVICES EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION Engagement in Early Childhood Settings ___________________ *EDC 312 (3) Psychology of Learning to the ECE Certificate Program) EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Rhode Island, University of

122

Impact of Immigration on the Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Rhode Island?  

PubMed Central

While foreign-born persons constitute only 11% of the population in the state of Rhode Island, they account for more than 65% of incident tuberculosis (TB) annually. We investigated the molecular-epidemiological differences between foreign-born and U.S.-born TB patients to estimate the degree of recent transmission and identify predictors of clustering. A total of 288 isolates collected from culture-confirmed TB cases in Rhode Island between 1995 and 2004 were fingerprinted by spoligotyping and 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. Of the 288 fingerprinted isolates, 109 (37.8%) belonged to 36 genetic clusters. Our findings demonstrate that U.S.-born patients, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific islanders, and uninsured patients were significantly more likely to be clustered. Recent transmission among the foreign-born population was restricted and occurred mostly locally, within populations originating from the same region. Nevertheless, TB transmission between the foreign-born and U.S.-born population should not be neglected, since 80% of the mixed clusters of foreign- and U.S.-born persons arose from a foreign-born source case. We conclude that timely access to routine screening and treatment for latent TB infection for immigrants is vital for disease elimination in Rhode Island. PMID:21159930

Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Kwara, Awewura; Martin, Melissa; Gillani, Fizza S.; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mutungi, Peninnah; Crellin, Joyce; Obaro, Stephen; Gosciminski, Michael; Carter, E. Jane; Rastogi, Nalin

2011-01-01

123

HIV prevention needs among street-based male sex workers in Providence, Rhode Island.  

PubMed

We examined data derived from a needs assessment of the personal and social characteristics and HIV risk behavior of street-based male sex workers, in Providence, Rhode Island, who engage in transactional sexual intercourse with other men. Substance use, injected drugs, needle sharing, and psychosocial distress were highly prevalent among the sample. History of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse was associated with increased risk of condomless anal sexual intercourse with paying male clients. PMID:25211761

Landers, Stewart; Closson, Elizabeth F; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Holcomb, Richard; Spurlock, Shannon; Mimiaga, Matthew J

2014-11-01

124

Socioeconomic Correlates of Current and Regular Smoking Among College Students in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine how sociodemographic variables, in particular socioeconomic status, correlate with current and regular smoking among college students in Rhode Island. Participants and Methods: Over a 4-year period (academic year 2000-2001 to 2003-2004), the authors examined sociodemographic correlates of cigarette use among 3,984 students aged 17 to 24 years from 10 colleges and

Patrick F. Clarkin; Linda A. Tisch; Arvin S. Glicksman

2008-01-01

125

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was

Tehan

2000-01-01

126

Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 1: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Primary results are summarized for a three-part study involving the effects of connecting a MOD-OA wind turbine generator to an isolated diesel power system. The MOD-OA installation considered was the third of four experimental nominal 200 kW wind turbines connected to various utilities under the Federal Wind Energy Program and was characterized by the highest wind energy penetration levels of four sites. The study analyses address: fuel displacement, dynamic interaction, and three modes of reactive power control. These analyses all have as their basis the results of the data acquisition program conducted on Block Island, Rhode Island.

Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

1984-01-01

127

Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

1980-01-01

128

Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

2011-01-01

129

Conundrums in childhood asthma severity, control, and health care use: Puerto Rico versus Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Background The lifetime prevalence of self-reported asthma among Puerto Ricans is very high, with increased asthma hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and mortality rates. Differences in asthma severity between the mainland and island, however, remain largely unknown. Objective We sought to characterize differences in asthma severity and control among 4 groups: (1) Island Puerto Ricans, (2) Rhode Island (RI) Puerto Ricans, (3) RI Dominicans, and (4) RI whites. Methods Eight hundred five children aged 7 to 15 years completed a diagnostic clinic session, including a formal interview, physical examination, spirometry, and allergy testing. Using a visual grid adapted from the Global Initiative for Asthma, asthma specialists practicing in each site determined an asthma severity rating. A corresponding level of asthma control was determined by using a computer algorithm. Results Island Puerto Ricans had significantly milder asthma severity compared with RI Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and whites (P < .001). Island Puerto Ricans were not significantly different from RI whites in asthma control. RI Puerto Ricans showed a trend toward less control compared with island Puerto Ricans (P = .061). RI Dominicans had the lowest rate of controlled asthma. Paradoxically, island Puerto Ricans had more emergency department visits in the past 12 months (P < .001) compared with the 3 RI groups. Conclusions Potential explanations for the paradoxic finding of milder asthma in island Puerto Ricans in the face of high health care use are discussed. Difficulties in determining guideline-based composite ratings for severity versus control are explored in the context of disparate groups. PMID:19615729

Esteban, Cynthia A.; Klein, Robert B.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Fritz, Gregory K.; Seifer, Ronald; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Santana, Jose Rodriguez; Colon, Angel; Alvarez, Maria; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Ortega, Alexander N.; Martinez-Nieves, Brenda; Canino, Glorisa

2012-01-01

130

Rhode Island Water Supply System Management Plan Database (WSSMP-Version 1.0)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Rhode Island, the availability of water of sufficient quality and quantity to meet current and future environmental and economic needs is vital to life and the State's economy. Water suppliers, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board (RIWRB), and other State agencies responsible for water resources in Rhode Island need information about available resources, the water-supply infrastructure, and water use patterns. These decision makers need historical, current, and future water-resource information. In 1997, the State of Rhode Island formalized a system of Water Supply System Management Plans (WSSMPs) to characterize and document relevant water-supply information. All major water suppliers (those that obtain, transport, purchase, or sell more than 50 million gallons of water per year) are required to prepare, maintain, and carry out WSSMPs. An electronic database for this WSSMP information has been deemed necessary by the RIWRB for water suppliers and State agencies to consistently document, maintain, and interpret the information in these plans. Availability of WSSMP data in standard formats will allow water suppliers and State agencies to improve the understanding of water-supply systems and to plan for future needs or water-supply emergencies. In 2002, however, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a law that classifies some of the WSSMP information as confidential to protect the water-supply infrastructure from potential terrorist threats. Therefore the WSSMP database was designed for an implementation method that will balance security concerns with the information needs of the RIWRB, suppliers, other State agencies, and the public. A WSSMP database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the RIWRB. The database was designed to catalog WSSMP information in a format that would accommodate synthesis of current and future information about Rhode Island's water-supply infrastructure. This report documents the design and implementation of the WSSMP database. All WSSMP information in the database is, ultimately, linked to the individual water suppliers and to a WSSMP 'cycle' (which is currently a 5-year planning cycle for compiling WSSMP information). The database file contains 172 tables - 47 data tables, 61 association tables, 61 domain tables, and 3 example import-link tables. This database is currently implemented in the Microsoft Access database software because it is widely used within and outside of government and is familiar to many existing and potential customers. Design documentation facilitates current use and potential modification for future use of the database. Information within the structure of the WSSMP database file (WSSMPv01.mdb), a data dictionary file (WSSMPDD1.pdf), a detailed database-design diagram (WSSMPPL1.pdf), and this database-design report (OFR2004-1231.pdf) documents the design of the database. This report includes a discussion of each WSSMP data structure with an accompanying database-design diagram. Appendix 1 of this report is an index of the diagrams in the report and on the plate; this index is organized by table name in alphabetical order. Each of these products is included in digital format on the enclosed CD-ROM to facilitate use or modification of the database.

Granato, Gregory E.

2004-01-01

131

The brave new world of GEC evaluation: the experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center.  

PubMed

In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these efforts, and the modifications to assessment that ensued in response to the increased accountability requirements. The evaluation focused on RIGEC's series of continuing education, day-long workshops for health and social service professionals, the completion of all seven of which leads to a Certificate in Interdisciplinary Practice in Geriatrics. PMID:22816974

Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

2012-01-01

132

Assessing BMP Performance Using Microtox Toxicity Analysis - Rhode Island  

EPA Science Inventory

Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been shown to be effective in reducing runoff and pollutants from urban areas and thus provide a mechanism to improve downstream water quality. Currently, BMP performance regarding water quality improvement is assessed through measuring each...

133

Responding to opioid overdose in rhode island: where the medical community has gone and where we need to go.  

PubMed

The number of opioid overdose events in Rhode Island has increased dramatically/catastrophically in the last decade; Rhode Island now has one of the highest per capita overdose death rates in the country. Healthcare professionals have an important role to play in the reduction of unintentional opioid overdose events. This article explores the medical community's response to the local opioid overdose epidemic and proposes strategies to create a more collaborative and comprehensive response. We emphasize the need for improvements in preventing, identifying and treating opioid addiction, providing overdose education and ensuring access to the rescue medicine naloxone. PMID:25271657

Green, Traci C; Bratberg, Jef; Dauria, Emily F; Rich, Josiah D

2014-10-01

134

Residential market for fuelwood in Rhode Island: demand, supply, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

Fuelwood consumption in Rhode Island has tripled since the 1973 oil shortage as a result of household substitution of wood for relatively more expensive heating fuels. A telephone survey of 515 randomly selected households in Rhode Island determined the incidence of wood-burning (25%), the quantities of wood households consumed, their reasons for burning wood, the manner in which they obtained the wood, etc. Households were hypothesized to behave like cost-minimizing firms in producing heat from the lowest-cost combination of inputs (wood and stove efficiency). It was further hypothesized that households process their own firewood as an alternative to purchasing it where the opportunity cost of household labor is less than the commercial value added, thus freeing household income for other uses. These hypotheses were put into testable form as a four-level econometric model containing (1) the discrete household decision to participate in wood heat production, (2) the determination of the cost-minimizing vector of inputs given heat output and relative input prices, (3) the discrete household decision to harvest its own wood and, (4) the determination of how much wood to harvest, how much household labor to invest in wood processing, and the implicit price of fuelwood. Both these hypotheses were well validated via econometric testing.

Mackenzie, J.

1985-01-01

135

Prevalence of eustrongylidosis in wading birds from colonies in California, Texas, and Rhode Island, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) nestlings from colonies in Texas, Rhode Island, and California and Great Egret (Casmerodius albus) nestlings from Texas were examined for eustrongylidosis, or infection by the parasitic nematode Eustrongylides spp. In 31% (24/77) of all broods examined, at least one nestling was infected. Snowy Egret broods from Texas were more frequently (100%) infected than those from California (20%) or Rhode Island (10%), and the prevalence of eustrongylidosis in 5- and 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings was higher in the Texas colony than the other two. Within the Texas colony, the frequency of eustrongylidosis was greater for Snowy Egret (100%) and Great Egret (80%) broods than for Black-crowned Night-Heron broods (12.5%). Also in Texas, eustrongylidosis was more frequent in 5-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than 5-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron or Great Egret nestlings, and in 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than in 10-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron nestlings. Eustrongylides spp. caused perforations of the gastrointestinal tract and peritonitis, particularly in Snowy Egrets.

Franson, J.C.; Custer, T.W.

1994-01-01

136

Applicability of ACT Scores to the Prediction of Success in Business, Mathematics, and Science Courses at Rhode Island Junior College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine whether a relationship existed between ACT composite scores and academic success in courses in Accounting I, Quantitative Business Analysis I, and Physical Science at Rhode Island Junior College, random samples of ACT scores of about 70 students in each course were studied. To establish predictability, correlation techniques were…

Decker, Dwight F.; And Others

137

THE RELAXATION BETWEEN PORE WATER CHEMISTRY AND BENTHIC FLUXES OF NUTRIENTS AND MANGANESE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Benthic fluxes of dissolved nutrients and manganese from biologically disturbed, relatively unpolluted sediment in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been measured. Analyses of the vertical gradients of chemical species dissolved in pore waters and the uptake of (22)Na from the...

138

76 FR 51383 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...BOEM-2011-0049] Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf...Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the OCS Offshore Rhode Island...lessee to propose the construction of a wind energy project(s) on the OCS...

2011-08-18

139

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

Tehan, Terry

2000-09-27

140

Sea-floor geology in northwestern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data, collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in a 69-square-kilometer area of northwestern Block Island Sound, are used with sediment samples, and still and video photography of the sea floor, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at 43 stations within this area, to interpret the sea-floor features and sedimentary environments. Features on the sea floor include boulders, sand waves, scour depressions, modern marine sediments, and trawl marks. Boulders, which are often several meters wide, are found in patches in the shallower depths and tend to be overgrown with sessile flora and fauna. They are lag deposits of winnowed glacial drift, and reflect high-energy environments characterized by processes associated with erosion and nondeposition. Sand waves and megaripples tend to have crests that either trend parallel to shore with 20- to 50-meter (m) wavelengths or trend perpendicular to shore with several-hundred-meter wavelengths. The sand waves reflect sediment transport directions perpendicular to shore by waves, and parallel to shore by tidal or wind-driven currents, respectively. Scour depressions, which are about 0.5 m lower than the surrounding sea floor, have floors of gravel and coarser sand than bounding modern marine sediments. These scour depressions, which are conspicuous in the sidescan-sonar data because of their more highly reflective coarser sediment floors, are likely formed by storm-generated, seaward-flowing currents and maintained by the turbulence in bottom currents caused by their coarse sediments. Areas of the sea floor with modern marine sediments tend to be relatively flat to current-rippled and sandy.

McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Woods, D.A.

2014-01-01

141

The URI Office of the Provost, the College of Human Science and Services, the Program in Gerontology, and the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center  

E-print Network

in Gerontology, and the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center invite you to attend The URI Distinguished Visiting International Scholar and Malford Thewlis Lecture on Gerontology and Geriatrics GROWING OLDERWHAT

Rhode Island, University of

142

Availability of ground water in the lower Pawcatuck River basin, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The lower Pawcatuck River basin in southwestern Rhode Island is an area of about 169 square miles underlain by crystalline bedrock over which lies a relatively thin mantle of glacial till and stratified drift. Stratified drift, consisting dominantly of sand and gravel, occurs in irregularly shaped linear deposits that are generally less than a mile wide and less than 125 feet thick; these deposits are found along the Pawcatuck River, its tributaries, and abandoned preglacial channels. Deposits of stratified sand and gravel constitute the principal aquifer in the lower Pawcatuck basin and the only one capable of sustaining yields of 100 gallons per minute or more to individual wells. Water available for development in this aquifer consists of water in storage--potential ground-water runoff to streams--plus infiltration that can be induced from streams. Minimum annual ground-water runoff from the sand and gravel aquifer is calculated to be at least 1.17 cubic feet per second per square mile, or 0.76 million gallons per day per square mile. Potential recharge by induced infiltration is estimated to range from about 250 to 600 gallons per day per linear foot of streambed for the principal streams. In most areas, induced infiltration from streams constitutes the major source of water potentially available for development by wells. Because subsurface hydraulic connection in the sand and gravel aquifer is poor in several places, the deposits are conveniently divisible into several ground-water reservoirs. The potential yield from five of the most promising ground-water reservoirs is evaluated by means of mathematical models. Results indicate that continuous withdrawals ranging from 1.3 to 10.3 million gallons per day, and totaling 31 million gallons per day, are obtainable from these reservoirs. Larger yields may be recovered by different well placement, spacing, construction and development, pumping practice, and so forth. Withdrawals at the rates indicated will reduce streamflow downstream from pumping centers but generally will not result in streams going dry, provided the water is returned to the basin. Export of water from the basin will require careful consideration of the effects of such withdrawals on low streamflow. Export from the Pawcatuck basin of 27 million gallons per day, estimated to be available from ground-water reservoirs in the upper Pawcatuck basin, in addition to 37.5 million gallons per day available in the lower Pawcatuck basin, will markedly reduce low streamflow. The 90-percent duration flow of the Pawcatuck River at Westerly would be reduced from 75 million gallons per day to perhaps as little as 21 million gallons per day. The chemical quality of water from both the sand and gravel aquifer and associated streams is suitable for most purposes. The water is soft, slightly acidic, and typically has a dissolved-solids content of less than 75 milligrams per liter. Some treatment may be required locally for removal of iron and manganese to meet recommended standards of the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water.

Gonthier, Joseph B.; Johnston, Herbert E.; Malmberg, Glenn T.

1974-01-01

143

Thermal neutron measurements of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center reactor after conversion to a compact low enriched uranium core  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center reactor, a 2 MW light water research reactor, was converted from a highly enriched uranium core to a more compact low enriched uranium core in 1993. Thermal neutron flux measurements of the instrumented beamports indicate increased thermal flux and a large improvement in the thermal to epithermal ratio. Measurements of irradiation facilities indicate an increased thermal flux, and more potential irradiation positions are now available.

Crow, M. L.; Jeng, U.; Nunes, A. C.; Malik, S. S.; Lin, D.; Bai, S.; Tehan, T.; Jacob, N.; Johnson, D. G.; Simoneau, W. A.; DiMeglio, A. F.

1995-02-01

144

Note: Bemisia tabaci biotype B associated with tomato yellow leaf curl disease epidemics on rhodes Island, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2006 an outbreak of tomato yellow leaf curl disease occurred in tomato crops on Rhodes Island, Greece. Diseased plants\\u000a were found to be infested with the B biotype of theBemisia tabaci (Gennadius) complex and greenhouse and open-field-grown tomato crops were infected withTomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) introduced from the Middle East. This is the first report of TYLCV

L. C. Papayiannis; J. K. Brown; M. Hadjistylli; N. I. Katis

2008-01-01

145

Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative.

K. Wishner; B. Silver; F. Boudreaux-Bartels; L. Harlow; H. Knickle; H. Mederer; J. Peckham; C. Roheim; J. Trubatch; K. Webster

2004-01-01

146

Access to and use of asthma health services among Latino children: the Rhode Island-Puerto Rico asthma center study.  

PubMed

This study determines asthma-related health care access and utilization patterns for Latino children of Puerto Rican and Dominican origin residing in Rhode Island (RI) and Latino children residing in Puerto Rico (Island). Data included 804 families of children with persistent asthma recruited from clinics. Island children were less likely to receive regular asthma care and care from a consistent provider and more likely to have been to the emergency department and hospitalized for asthma than RI children. Island children were 2.33 times more likely to have used the emergency department for asthma compared with RI non-Latino White (NLW) children. Latino children residing in both Island and RI were less likely to have used specialty care and more likely to have had a physician visit for asthma in the past year than RI NLW children. The differences might reflect the effects of the different delivery systems on pediatric health care utilization and asthma management. PMID:21536604

Jandasek, Barbara; Ortega, Alexander N; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Fritz, Gregory K; Kopel, Sheryl J; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B; Canino, Glorisa

2011-12-01

147

Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

1987-01-01

148

The effect of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island property sales price  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation uses the hedonic pricing model to study the impact of lake water quality and wind turbines on Rhode Island house sales prices. The first two manuscripts are on lake water quality and use RI house sales transactions from 1988--2012. The third studies wind turbines using RI house sales transactions from 2000--2013. The first study shows that good lake water quality increases lakefront property price premium. It also shows that environmental amenities, such as forests, substitute for lake amenity as the property's distance from the lake increases. The second lake water quality study incorporates time variables to examine how environmental amenity values change over time. The results show that property price premium associated with good lake water quality does not change as it is constant in proportion to housing prices with short term economic fluctuations. The third study shows that wind turbines have a negative and significant impact on housing prices. However, this is highly location specific and varies with neighborhood demographics. All three studies have policy implications which are discussed in detail in the manuscripts below.

Gorelick, Susan Shim

149

Marine ecological-risk assessment pilot study for Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Professional paper  

SciTech Connect

An ecological risk assessment framework was applied to characterize aquatic risks associated with hazardous waste disposal at Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island. An initial screening phase (I) assessed exposure and related that exposure to toxicological endpoints for bivalves, amphipods, sea urchins, and biomarker assays. Results showed little evidence of major contamination in sediments or tissues except for relatively high levels of polychlorinated biphenols (PBC), butyltins compounds (TBT), and fecal coliforms observed in Allen Harbor. Effects were detected in mussel physiology, sea urchin fertilization and development, biomarker responses, and soft shell clam histology. Possible sources of contamination and toxicity from the landfill leachate, surface runoff, and recreational boating were examined using a temporaland spatial sampling scheme. Chemical and toxicological information obtained implicated all three sources as affecting Allen Harbor water quality. Laboratory bioassays of landfill exposure media, employing a variety of marine species using acute and chronic endpoints, are being used to provide data for the development of an exposure-response model for risk to the marine environment. The model will define current risk and provide an interpretive framework for long-term monitoring.

Johnston, R.K.; Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Nelson, W.G.; Pesch, G.G.

1992-01-01

150

Correlates of Partner-Specific Condom Use Intentions Among Incarcerated Women in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

CONTEXT Few studies of incarcerated women have examined potential associations between risky sexual behavior and relationship context factors; thus, little is known about the correlates of intentions to use condoms with main and casual partners among this underserved population. METHODS A sample of 221 women incarcerated in a Rhode Island Department of Corrections facility in 2002–2003 were interviewed. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess associations between selected demographic, psychosocial and behavioral variables and participants’ reported intentions to use condoms with main and casual sexual partners in the first six months after their release. RESULTS Condom use at last sex with a main partner, sexually transmitted disease (STD) history, no strong desire to currently be pregnant, belief that others influence one’s health and perceived STD risk were positively associated with women’s intention to use condoms with main partners. Pregnancy history was negatively associated with intention to use condoms with a main partner. Condom use at last sex with a casual partner was positively associated with intention to use condoms with casual partners, whereas binge drinking and believing in the role of chance in determining one’s health were negatively associated with intention to use condoms with casual partners. CONCLUSIONS Whether incarcerated women define a partner as main or casual may influence their decisions about the need to protect themselves by using condoms. Programs that focus on the importance of condom use with all partners could greatly benefit incarcerated women and the communities to which they return. PMID:15888401

Rosengard, Cynthia; Clarke, Jennifer G.; DaSilva, Kristen; Hebert, Megan; Rose, Jennifer; Stein, Michael D.

2005-01-01

151

Distribution of Ixodes dammini (Acari: Ixodidae) in residential lawns on Prudence Island, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of nymphal Ixodes dammini Spielman, Clifford, Piesman & Corwin in residential lawns was assessed by flagging on Prudence Island, RI. The number of ticks per sample was five times greater in lawns adjacent to woods than in lawns adjacent to other lawns. Relative tick abundance was negatively correlated with distance from the woods, but the decline was gradual. Spirochete prevalence in ticks did not differ among lawn types or at different distances from the woods. Therefore, barriers that keep people away from the wood edge probably lower the risk of acquiring Lyme disease, but there is still a risk. Even with physical barriers at lawn-wood edges, personal precautions to prevent tick bites should be followed.

Carroll, M.C.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Hyland, K.E.

1992-01-01

152

Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

Not Available

2013-12-01

153

National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

Not Available

2014-03-01

154

Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community  

SciTech Connect

Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

2014-03-01

155

Electric-hydraulic conductivity correlation in fractured crystalline bedrock: Central Landfill, Rhode Island, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Remote sensing and geoelectrical methods were used to find water-bearing fractures in the Scituate granite under the Central Landfill of Rhode Island. These studies were necessary to evaluate the integrity of the sanitary landfill and for planning safe landfill extensions. The most useful results were obtained with fracture trace analysis using Landsat and SLAR imagery in combination with ground-based resistivity measurements using Schlumberger vertical electrical soundings based on the assumption of horizontally layered strata. Test borings and packer tests confirmed, in the presence of a lineament and low bedrock resistivity, the probable existence of high bedrock fracture density and high average hydraulic conductivity. However, not every lineament was found to be associated with high fracture density and high hydraulic conductivity. Lineaments alone are not a reliable basis for characterising a landfill site as being affected by fractured bedrock. Horizontal fractures were found in borings located away from lineaments. High values of hydraulic conductivity were correlated with low bedrock resistivities. Bedrock resistivities between 60 and 700 ? m were associated with average hydraulic conductivities between 4 and 60 cm/day. In some cases very low resistivities were confined to the upper part of the bedrock where the hydraulic conductivity was very large. These types of fractures apparently become narrower in aperture with depth. Bedrock zones having resistivities greater than 1000 ? m showed, without exception, no flow to the test wells. Plots of bedrock resistivity versus the average hydraulic conductivity indicate that the resistivity decreases with increasing hydraulic conductivity. This relationship is inverse to that found in most unconsolidated sediments and is useful for estimating the hydraulic conductivity in groundwater surveys in fractured bedrock. In appropriate settings such as the Central Landfill site in New England, this electric-hydraulic correlation relationship, supplemented by lineament trace analysis, can be used effectively to estimate the hydraulic conductivity in bedrock from only a limited number of resistivity depth soundings and test wells.

Frohlich, Reinhard K.; Fisher, John J.; Summerly, E.

1996-10-01

156

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30

157

76 FR 40248 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure...from the States of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. These submittals...the submittals from Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, with one...

2011-07-08

158

Suicide Patterns and Association With Predictors Among Rhode Island Public High School Students: A Latent Class Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We analyzed Rhode Island's 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data to investigate suicide patterns and their association with suicide risk predictors among public high school students. Methods. We used latent class regression analysis of Rhode Island's 2007 YRBS data (from a random sample of 2210 public high school students) to model latent classes of suicide risk and identify predictors of latent class membership. Results. Four latent classes of suicide risk were modeled and predictors were associated with each: class 1 (emotionally healthy, 74%); class 2 (considered and planned suicide, 14%) was associated with being female, having low grades, being gay/lesbian/bisexual/unsure, feeling unsafe at school, having experienced forced sexual intercourse, and self-perceived overweight; class 3 (attempted suicide, 6%) was associated with speaking a language other than English at home, being gay/lesbian/bisexual/unsure, feeling unsafe at school, and forced sexual intercourse; and class 4 (planned and attempted suicide, 6%) was associated with the previously mentioned predictors and with being in 9th or 10th grade and currently smoking. Conclusions. A single model characterized and quantified 4 patterns of suicide risk among adolescents and identified predictors for 3 at-risk classes. Interventions for high-risk youths may help prevent adolescent suicides. PMID:20634452

Perry, Donald Kent; Hesser, Jana Earl

2010-01-01

159

Carabid beetle diversity and distribution in Boston Harbor Islands national park area (Coleoptera, Carabidae)  

PubMed Central

Abstract As part of an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Boston Harbor Islands national park area, an inventory of carabid beetles on 13 islands was conducted. Intensive sampling on ten of the islands, using an assortment of passive traps and limited hand collecting, resulted in the capture of 6,194 specimens, comprising 128 species. Among these species were seven new state records for Massachusetts (Acupalpus nanellus, Amara aulica, Amara bifrons, Apenes lucidulus, Bradycellus tantillus, Harpalus rubripes and Laemostenus terricola terricola—the last also a new country record; in passing we report also new state records for Harpalus rubripes from New York and Pennsylvania, Amara ovata from Pennsylvania, and the first mainland New York records for Asaphidion curtum). For most islands, there was a clear relationship between species richness and island area. Two islands, however, Calf and Grape, had far more species than their relatively small size would predict. Freshwater marshes on these islands, along with a suite of hygrophilous species, suggested that habitat diversity plays an important role in island species richness. Introduced species (18) comprised 14.0% of the total observed species richness, compared to 5.5% (17 out of 306 species) documented for Rhode Island. We surmise that the higher proportion of introduced species on the islands is, in part, due to a higher proportion of disturbed and open habitats as well as high rates of human traffic. We predict that more active sampling in specialized habitats would bring the total carabid fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands closer to that of Rhode Island or eastern Massachusetts in richness and composition; however, isolation, human disturbance and traffic, and limited habitat diversity all contribute to reducing the species pool on the islands relative to that on the mainland. PMID:22371673

Davidson, Robert L.; Rykken, Jessica; Farrell, Brian

2011-01-01

160

Dear Student(s) and/or Parent(s): All full-time students and international students at the University of Rhode Island are required  

E-print Network

at the University of Rhode Island are required to be covered by a health insurance plan. In order to effectively,636 for the University- sponsored STUDENT INJURY AND SICKNESS INSURANCE PLAN on their tuition bill. This charge can on the insurance/insurance waiver link to download enrollment form. The insurance is underwritten by Monumental

Rhode Island, University of

161

Building a Culture of Evidence: IR Support, Initiative & Leadership. Proceedings of the Annual NEAIR Conference (35th, Providence, Rhode Island, November 1-4, 2008)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The NEAIR 2008 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Providence, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: The Mission Engagement Index as a Measure of Progress on Mission Goals (Ellen M. Boylan); (2) Building, Sustaining, and Developing Research University…

Thomas, Bonnie, Ed.

2008-01-01

162

Forty Years of Excellence and Beyond. Proceedings of the Annual North East Association for Institutional Research (NEAIR) Conference (40th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 9-12, 2013)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The NEAIR 2013 Conference Proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the Newport, Rhode Island, conference. Papers in this document include: (1) Aspiring to the Role of "Data Badass:" Some Thoughts on the Political Context of IR (Mark Freeman); (2) Data-Driven Internal Benchmarks and Successful Learning Outcomes (Mamta Saxena…

Parker, Tiffany, Ed.

2013-01-01

163

Short Communication: Transmitted Drug Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology in Antiretroviral Naive HIV Type 1-Infected Patients in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Abstract Transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance has important clinical and epidemiological consequences including earlier treatment failure and forward transmission of resistance strains in high-risk groups. To evaluate the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island, we collected genotypic, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from treatment-naive individuals presenting to the largest outpatient HIV clinic in the state from January 2007 to November 2007. Sequences from 35 treatment-naive individuals were available, 83% of whom were men who had sex with men (MSM). All sequences were HIV-1 subtype B. Drug resistance mutations were identified in 7/35 [20%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08–0.37] patients, six of whom had K103N. Two phylogenetic transmission clusters were found, involving 17% (6/35) of individuals, three in each cluster. We did not find an association between belonging to a cluster and age, gender, AIDS-defining illness, CD4 cell count, or viral load. Drug resistance mutations were more commonly observed in transmission clusters (p?=?0.08). Individuals in one cluster all had K103N and were MSM who had attended local bathhouses. Individuals forming clusters were significantly more likely to have visited a bathhouse compared to nonclusters (p?=?0.02). The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island is high, further justifying genotypic testing on presentation to care and prior to treatment initiation. Molecular epidemiological analysis and association of resistance with phylogenetic networks using data obtained for clinical purposes may serve as useful tools for the prevention of drug resistance transmission and for contact tracing. PMID:20954831

Tashima, Karen; Cartwright, Charles P.; Gillani, Fizza S.; Mintz, Orli; Zeller, Kimberly; Kantor, Rami

2011-01-01

164

PROCESSING, PRODUCTS, AND FOOD SAFETY Differences in Carcass and Meat Characteristics Between Chicken Indigenous to Northern Thailand (Black-Boned and Thai Native) and Imported Extensive Breeds (Bresse and Rhode Island Red)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of 4 geno- types of chicken, all suitable for extensive fattening, on carcass and meat quality using 320 chickens divided into 4 equally sized groups. The comparison included 2 indig- enous chicken strains from Thailand, Black-boned and Thai native (Thai), and 2 imported chicken breeds, Bresse and Rhode Island Red (Rhode, a layer breed). The

S. Jaturasitha; T. Srikanchai; M. Kreuzer; M. Wicke

165

Assessment of Habitat and Streamflow Requirements for Habitat Protection, Usquepaug-Queen River, Rhode Island, 1999-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The relations among stream habitat and hydrologic conditions were investigated in the Usquepaug?Queen River Basin in southern Rhode Island. Habitats were assessed at 13 sites on the mainstem and tributaries from July 1999 to September 2000. Channel types are predominantly low-gradient glides, pools, and runs that have a sand and gravel streambed and a forest or shrub riparian zone. Along the stream margins,overhanging brush, undercut banks supported by roots, and downed trees create cover; within the channel, submerged aquatic vegetation and woody debris create cover. These habitat features decrease in quality and availability with declining streamflows, and features along stream margins generally become unavailable once streamflows drop to the point at which water recedes from the stream banks. Riffles are less common, but were identified as critical habitat areas because they are among the first to exhibit habitat losses or become unavailable during low-flow periods. Stream-temperature data were collected at eight sites during summer 2000 to indicate the suitability of those reaches for cold-water fish communities. Data indicate stream temperatures provide suitable habitat for cold-water species in the Fisherville and Locke Brook tributaries and in the mainstem Queen River downstream of the confluence with Fisherville Brook. Stream temperatures in the Usquepaug River downstream from Glen Rock Reservoir are about 6?F warmer than in the Queen River upstream from the impoundment. These warmer temperatures may make habitat in the Usquepaug River marginal for cold-water species. Fish-community composition was determined from samples collected at seven sites on tributaries and at three sites on the mainstem Usquepaug?Queen River. Classification of the fish into habitat-use groups and comparison to target fish communities developed for the Quinebaug and Ipswich Rivers indicated that the sampled reaches of the Usquepaug?Queen River contained most of the riverine fish species that would have been expected to occur in this area. Streamflow records from the gaging station Usquepaug River near Usquepaug were used to (1) determine streamflow requirements for habitat protection by use of the Tennant method, and (2) define a flow regime that mimics the river's natural flow regime by use of the Range of Variability Approach. The Tennant streamflow requirement, defined as 30 percent of the mean annual flow, was 0.64 cubic feet per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2). This requirement should be considered an initial estimate because flows measured at the Usquepaug River gaging station are reduced by water withdrawals upstream from the gage. The streamflow requirements may need to be revised once a watershed-scale precipitationrunoff model of the Usquepaug River is complete and a simulation of streamflows without water withdrawals has been determined. Streamflow requirements for habitat protection were also determined at seven riffle sites by use of the Wetted-Perimeter and R2Cross methods. Two of these sites were on the mainstem Usquepaug River, one was on the mainstem Queen River, and four were on tributaries and the headwaters of the Queen River. Median streamflow requirements for habitat protection for these sites were 0.41 (ft3/s)/mi2, determined by the Wetted-Perimeter method and 0.72 ft3/s/mi2, determined by the R2Cross method.

Armstrong, David S.; Parker, Gene W.

2003-01-01

166

Distribution of salinity in ground water from the interpretation of borehole-geophysical logs and salinity data, Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of salinity in ground water at Calf Pasture Point, a small coastal peninsula bounded by Narragansett Bay on the east and Allen Harbor on the west, in Davisville, Rhode Island, was interpreted from borehole-geophysical data and previously collected salinity data to help identify potential flowpaths of contaminated ground water to surface-water bodies. The surficial material at this 40-acre site, which ranges in thickness from about 30 to 85 feet, is composed of an upper sand unit, a silt unit, and a till unit overlying bedrock. Borehole-geophysical data indicate that fresh ground water is present in all surficial units in the northern and northwestern part of the site. In the central and eastern parts of the site, where most of the current land surface is composed of dredged fill placed in a small saltwater embayment, brackish and saline ground water predominate. Fresh ground water moving into this area from upgradient and recharge to this extended land surface from precipitation is diluting the saline groundwater in the upper sand and till units, and to a lesser extent in the silt unit. In this area, the freshwater-flow system is slowly expanding towards Narragansett Bay and the entrance channel to Allen Harbor.

Church, Peter E.; Brandon, William C.

1999-01-01

167

State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles Rhode Island's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 435 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 440 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

Center on Education Policy, 2011

2011-01-01

168

Patterns of trauma induced by motorboat and ferry propellers as illustrated by three known cases from Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Understanding patterns of trauma is important to determining cause and manner of death. A thorough evaluation of taphonomy, trauma, and bone fracture mechanisms is necessary to reconstruct the circumstances of the death. This study examines the skeletal trauma caused by boat propeller strikes in terms of wound characteristics and location based on three cases from Rhode Island. These case studies review the traumatic characteristics caused by propeller injuries and highlight the anatomic regions most likely to sustain skeletal trauma. With this information, investigators may be able to identify propeller trauma even in severely decomposed remains. The discussion of boat propeller trauma also raises issues regarding how forensic anthropologists and forensic pathologists classify trauma (specifically blunt force vs. sharp) and highlights semantic issues arising in trauma classification. The study also discusses why these propeller cases should be classified as blunt trauma rather than sharp or chop/hack trauma. Ultimately, the authors urge consistency and communication between pathologist and forensic anthropologists performing trauma analyses. PMID:22583137

Semeraro, Dominique; Passalacqua, Nicholas V; Symes, Steven; Gilson, Thomas

2012-11-01

169

Preliminary study of sources and processes of enrichment of manganese in water from University of Rhode Island supply wells  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of dissolved manganese have increased from 0.0 to as much as 3.3 mg/liter over a period of years in closely spaced University of Rhode Island supply wells. The wells tap stratified glacial deposits and derive part of their water from infiltration from a nearby river-pond system. The principal sources of the manganese seem to be coatings of oxides and other forms of manganese on granular aquifer materials and organic-rich sediments on the bottom of the pond and river. Chemical analyses of water from an observation well screened from 3 to 5 feet below the pond bottom indicate that infiltration of water through organic-rich sediments on the pond bottom is the likely cause of manganese enrichment in the well supplies. After passing through the organic layer, the water contains concentrations of manganese as high as 1.2 mg/liter. Manganese in water in concentrations that do not cause unpleasant taste is not regarded to be toxicologically significant. However, concentrations in excess of a few tenths of a milligram per liter are undesirable in public supplies and in many industrial supplies. Brown and others (21970) note that waters containing manganese in concentrations less than 0.1 mg/liter seldom prove troublesome, but that those containing more than 0.5 mg/liter may form objectionable deposits on cooked food, laundry, and plumbing fixtures. The U.S. Public health Service (1962) recommends that the concentrations of manganese in drinking and culinary water not exceed 0.05 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

Silvey, William Dudley; Johnston, Herbert E.

1977-01-01

170

Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years to Assess the Burden of Disease and Injury in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Objectives Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) measure the burden of disease and injury in a population. We tested the feasibility of calculating DALYs to assess the burden of disease and injury in Rhode Island (RI). Methods We computed DALYs for the 2008 RI population using methods developed by the World Health Organization, Harvard University, and the World Bank. DALYs are a composite measure that sum years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature mortality with years lived with disability (YLDs). We calculated crude mortality, YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs for 90 major health conditions for RI and stratified them by gender and age. Calculations for YLLs and YLDs were based on five-year averages. We compared our results with U.S. and Los Angeles County, California, estimates. Results A DALYs ranking produces a different picture of RI's disease and injury burden than does mortality-based ranking. Of 90 major health conditions assessed for RI, six of the top 10 causes for mortality and DALYs were the same, but were ranked differently: ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer dementia and other dementias, trachea/bronchus/lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes mellitus. These six conditions accounted for 59% of deaths but only 35% of DALYs. Causes and rank orders for DALYs differed between males and females and among age groups. Conclusions Including nonfatal health conditions in an assessment of population health provides a different picture than traditional mortality-based assessments. This study demonstrates the feasibility and constraints of using DALYs to assess the burden of disease and injury at the state level. PMID:22547860

Jiang, Yongwen; Hesser, Jana Earl

2012-01-01

171

STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTING AND RESTORING RHODE ISLAND'S WATERSHEDS ON MULTIPLE SCALES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Clean Water Act has traditionally preserved the quality and quantity of a region's water by focusing resources on areas with known or anticipated problems. USEPA Region 1 is taking the supplemental, longer-range approach of protecting areas of New England where natural resour...

172

COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS  

EPA Science Inventory

Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

173

LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, NAD RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem compo...

174

Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Common tern (Sterna hirundinae ) clutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.

1986-01-01

175

Reproductive success and heavy metal contamination in Rhode Island common terns  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Common tern cIutch size, reproductive success and growth of young recorded from an abandoned barge on the Providence River, an area of heavy metal contamination, were equal to, or greater than, .from less contaminated areas. Concentrations of copper and zinc were higher in livers of nestling terns from the Providence River than from other, less contaminated, areas. However, concentrations of magnesium, manganese, and iron and the frequency of nickel were equal, or lower, at Providence than other, less contaminated, locations. Among-colony trends in residues of copper, zinc and nickel in prey samples were similar to trends .found in nestling livers. Uric acid concentrations in nestling blood were twice as high in the Providence River than another colony and may have resulted from moderate levels of chromium in the diet.

Custer, T.W.; Franson, J.C.; Moore, J.F.; Myers, J.E.

1986-01-01

176

Denitrification Capacity in a Subterranean Estuary below a Rhode Island Fringing Salt Marsh  

E-print Network

ADDY1, *, ARTHUR GOLD1 , BARBARA NOWICKI2 , JAMES MCKENNA3 , MARK STOLT1 , and PETER GROFFMAN4 1 of the world's coastline where sand deposits exist (Burnett et al. 2001). In these areas the subterranean estuary is a saturated zone of perme- able mineral deposits with flow responding to changes in pressure

Gold, Art

177

ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

178

RHODE ISLAND SSURGO SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This data set is a digital soil survey and is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The information was collected by digitizing maps, by compiling information onto a planimetric correct base and digitizing, or by revis...

179

Practice-based evidence informs environmental health policy and regulation: a case study of residential lead-soil contamination in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Prior to 1978, the exteriors of Rhode Island's municipal water towers were painted with lead-containing paint. Over time, this lead-containing paint either flaked-off or was mechanically removed and deposited on adjacent residential properties. Residents challenged inconsistencies across state agencies and federal requirements for collecting and analyzing soil samples. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the efficacy of Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH) soil sampling regulations in determining the extent of lead contamination on residential properties using real world data. Researchers interviewed key government personnel, reviewed written accounts of events and regulations, and extracted and compiled lead data from environmental soil sampling on 31 residential properties adjacent to six municipal water towers. Data were available for 498 core samples. Approximately 26% of the residential properties had lead soil concentrations >1000 mg/kg. Overall, lead concentration was inversely related to distance from the water tower. Analysis indicated that surface samples alone were insufficient to classify a property as "lead safe". Potential for misclassification using RIDOH regulations was 13%. For properties deemed initially "lead free", the total number of samples was too few to analyze. Post-remediation lead-soil concentrations suggest the extent of lead contamination may have been deeper than initially determined. Additional data would improve the ability to draw more meaningful and generalized conclusions. Inconsistencies among regulatory agencies responsible for environmental health obfuscate transparency and erode the public's trust in the regulatory process. Recommendations for improvement include congruency across departmental regulations and specific modifications to lead-soil sampling regulations reflective of lowered CDC reference blood lead value for children 1 to 5 years old (5 ?g/dL). While scientific research informed the initial development of these environmental health policies and regulations, practice-based evidence did not support their efficacy in context of real world practice. PMID:24055667

Thompson, Marcella Remer; Burdon, Andrea; Boekelheide, Kim

2014-01-15

180

Long Island sound area contingency plan  

SciTech Connect

The Area Contingency Plan (ACP) describes the strategy for a coordinated Federal, State, and local response to a discharge or substantial threat of discharge of oil or a release of a hazardous substance from a vessel, offshore facility, or onshore facility operating within the boundaries of the area of responsibility for Captain of the Port, Long Island Sound. This plan addresses response on an average most probable discharge, a maximum most probable discharge, and a worst case discharge including discharges from fire or explosion. Planning for these three scenarios covers the expected range of spills likely to occur in this area. For purpose of this plan, the spill scenarios are based on the best historical data available.

NONE

1995-06-03

181

Simulation of Hydrologic-System Responses to Ground-Water Withdrawals in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Stream-Aquifer System, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A numerical-modeling study was done to better understand hydrologic-system responses to ground-water withdrawals in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt (HAP) stream-aquifer system of Rhode Island. System responses were determined by use of steady-state and transient numerical ground-water-flow models. These models were initially developed in the late 1990s as part of a larger study of the stream-aquifer system. The models were modified to incorporate new data made available since the original study and to meet the objectives of this study. Changes made to the models did not result in substantial changes to simulated ground-water levels, hydrologic budgets, or streamflows compared to those calculated by the original steady-state and transient models. Responses of the hydrologic system are described primarily by changes in simulated streamflows and ground-water levels throughout the basin and by changes to flow conditions in the aquifer in three wetland areas immediately east of the Lafayette State Fish Hatchery, which lies within the Annaquatucket River Basin in the town of North Kingstown. Ground water is withdrawn from the HAP aquifer at 14 large-capacity production wells, at an industrial well, and at 3 wells operated by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management at the fish hatchery. A fourth well has been proposed for the hatchery and an additional production well is under development by the town of North Kingstown. The primary streams of interest in the study area are the Hunt, Annaquatucket, and Pettaquamscutt Rivers and Queens Fort Brook. Total model-calculated streamflow depletions in these rivers and brook resulting from withdrawals at the production, industrial, and fish-hatchery wells pumping at average annual 2003 rates are about 4.8 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) for the Hunt River, 3.3 ft3/s for the Annaquatucket River, 0.5 ft3/s for the Pettaquamscutt River, and 0.5 ft3/s for Queens Fort Brook. The actual amount of streamflow reduction in the Annaquatucket River caused by pumping actually is less, 1.1 ft3/s, because ground water that is pumped at the fish-hatchery wells (2.2 ft3/s) is returned to the Annaquatucket River after use at the hatchery. One of the primary goals of the study was to evaluate the response of the hydrologic system to simulated withdrawals at the proposed well at the fish hatchery. Withdrawal rates at the proposed well would range from zero during April through September of each year to a maximum of 260 gallons per minute [about 0.4 million gallons per day (Mgal/d)] in March of each year. The average annual withdrawal rate at the fish hatchery resulting from the addition of the proposed well would increase by only 0.13 ft3/s, or about 5 percent of the 2003 withdrawal rate. The increased pumping rate at the hatchery would further reduce the average annual flow in Queens Fort Brook by less than 0.05 ft3/s and in the Annaquatucket River by about 0.1 ft3/s (which includes some model error). A new production well in the Annaquatucket River Basin is under development by the town of North Kingstown. A simulated pumping rate of 1.0 Mgal/d (1.6 ft3/s) at this new well resulted in additional streamflow depletions, compared to those calculated for the 2003 withdrawal conditions, of 0.8 and 0.2 ft3/s in the Annaquatucket and Pettaquamscutt Rivers, respectively. The source of water for about 30 percent of the well's pumping rate, or about 0.5 ft3/s, is derived from ground-water inflow from the Chipuxet River Basin across a natural ground-water drainage divide that separates the Annaquatucket and Chipuxet River Basins; the remaining 0.1 ft3/s of simulated pumping consists of reduced evapotranspiration from the water table. Model-calculated changes in water levels in the aquifer for the various withdrawal conditions simulated in this study indicate that ground-water-level declines caused by pumping are generally less than 5 feet (ft). However, ground-water-level declines of as

Barlow, Paul M.; Ostiguy, Lance J.

2007-01-01

182

Policy implications of protected area discourse in the Pacific islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The words taboo, conservation area, reserve, protected area, and marine protected area (MPA) are used to refer to the community-based closures of the Pacific islands. Diverse definition and interpretation have led to confusion and debate, particularly as the Pacific islands engage with international protected area policies and partners. This case study from the Republic of Vanuatu traces the introduction, evolution

C. Y. Bartlett; T. Maltali; G. Petro; P. Valentine

2010-01-01

183

Estimating soil erosion in Natura 2000 areas located on three semi-arid Mediterranean Islands.  

PubMed

A major initiative in Europe is the protection of its biodiversity. To accomplish this, specific areas from all countries of the European Union are protected by the establishment of the "Natura 2000" network. One of the major threats to these areas and in general to ecosystems is soil erosion. The objective of this study was to quantitatively estimate surface soil losses for three of these protected areas that are located on semi-arid islands of the Mediterranean. One Natura 2000 area was selected from each of the following islands: Sicily in Italy, Cyprus and Rhodes in Greece. To estimate soil losses, Gerlach troughs were used. These troughs were established on slopes that ranged from 35-40% in four different vegetation types: i) Quercus ilex and Quercus rotundifolia forests, ii) Pinus brutia forests, iii) "Phrygana" shrublands and iv) vineyards. The shrublands had the highest soil losses (270 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)) that were 5-13 times more than the other three vegetation types. Soil losses in these shrublands should be considered a major concern. However, the other vegetation types also had high soil losses (21-50 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Conclusively, in order to enhance and conserve the biodiversity of these Natura 2000 areas protective management measures should be taken into consideration to decrease soil losses. PMID:23033694

Zaimes, George N; Emmanouloudis, Dimitris; Iakovoglou, Valasia

2012-03-01

184

Hydrostratigraphy of Tree Island Cores from Water Conservation Area 3  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cores and borehole-geophysical logs collected on and around two tree islands in Water Conservation Area 3 have been examined to develop a stratigraphic framework for these ecosystems. Especially important is the potential for the exchange of ground water and surface water within these features. The hydrostratigraphic results from this study document the lithologic nature of the foundation of the tree islands, the distribution of porous intervals, the potential for paleotopographic influence on their formation, and the importance of low-permeability, subaerial-exposure horizons on the vertical exchange of ground water and surface water. Figure 1. Location of Tree Islands 3AS3 and 3BS1. [larger image] Results from this hydrostratigraphic study indicate that subtle differences occur in lithofacies and topography between the on-island and off-island subsurface geologic records. Specifics are described herein. Firstly, at both tree-island sites, the top of the limestone bedrock is slightly elevated beneath the head of the tree islands relative to the off-island core sites and the tail of the tree islands, which suggests that bedrock 'highs' acted as 'seeds' for the development of the tree islands of this study and possibly many others. Secondly, examination of the recovered core and the caliper logs tentatively suggest that the elevated limestone beneath the tree islands may have a preferentially more porous framework relative to limestone beneath the adjacent areas, possibly providing a ground-water-to-surface-water connection that sustains the tree island system. Finally, because the elevation of the top of the limestone bedrock at the head of Tree Island 3AS3 is slightly higher than the surrounding upper surface of the peat, and because the wetland peats have a lower hydraulic conductivity than the limestone bedrock (Miami Limestone and Fort Thompson Formation), it is possible that there is a head difference between surface water of the wetlands and the ground water in underlying limestone bedrock.

McNeill, Donald F.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

2003-01-01

185

75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of...Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of meeting...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held...information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce...

2010-02-10

186

77 FR 70183 - Notice of Meeting for Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council AGENCY...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will...submit written comments may contact the Designated Federal...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bruce Jacobson, Superintendent...Islands National Recreation Area, at (617)...

2012-11-23

187

75 FR 52023 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of...Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of meeting...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held...information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce...

2010-08-24

188

33 CFR 334.293 - Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area. 334...REGULATIONS § 334.293 Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area....

2011-07-01

189

33 CFR 334.293 - Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area. 334...REGULATIONS § 334.293 Elizabeth River, Craney Island Refueling Pier Restricted Area, Portsmouth VA; naval restricted area....

2010-07-01

190

2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

Greg Sitz

2011-08-12

191

9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.3 Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...

2011-01-01

192

7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA...AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2010-01-01

193

7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA...AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2013-01-01

194

7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA...AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2012-01-01

195

7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.  

...MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA...AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2014-01-01

196

7 CFR 929.4 - Production area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA...AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan,...

2011-01-01

197

Long Island Sound area contingency plan. Change 3  

SciTech Connect

Contained in this revision are: Updated Marine Firefighting annex; Updated Hazardous Material response annex; Comprehensive update of resource phone numbers; Listing of State Historic Protection Officers (SHPO`s); Response techniques and listing of facilities which handle Group V Oils; and Substantial update to the Sensitive Areas on Long Island.

NONE

1998-12-31

198

WHAT'S NEWS @ Rhode Island College  

E-print Network

fictional place, seen from the Mirador deSan Nicolás (Saint Nicholas Viewpoint), takes your breath away to Ferdinand and Isabella, the Catholic king and queen, mak- ing Spain an entirely Catholic country. By living

Rhode Island, University of

199

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2012-07-01

200

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2013-07-01

201

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2010-07-01

202

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2014-07-01

203

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2011-07-01

204

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2014-07-01

205

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2010-07-01

206

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2013-07-01

207

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2011-07-01

208

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2012-07-01

209

76 FR 53941 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of...Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held...information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce Jacobson...MA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Bruce...

2011-08-30

210

50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area  

... St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude...

2014-10-01

211

Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island  

PubMed Central

Abstract Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004–2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed. PMID:22451785

Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A.Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

2012-01-01

212

50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

2012-10-01

213

50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Northern Bering Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.011 [73 FR 43371,...

2010-10-01

214

50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

2013-10-01

215

50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife...Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) ER06OC10.048 [75 FR...

2011-10-01

216

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

2011-07-01

217

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

2010-07-01

218

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

2012-07-01

219

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

2013-07-01

220

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas...Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other...

2011-07-01

221

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

...Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas...Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other...

2014-07-01

222

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas...Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other...

2013-07-01

223

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas...Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other...

2010-07-01

224

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Closed waters, islands and other areas...Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... § 13.1178 Closed waters, islands and other...

2012-07-01

225

33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

2010-07-01

226

33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

2013-07-01

227

33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.  

...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

2014-07-01

228

Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

1990-10-01

229

Groundwater flow in a relatively old oceanic volcanic island: the Betancuria area, Fuerteventura Island, Canary Islands, Spain.  

PubMed

The island of Fuerteventura is the oldest of the Canary Islands' volcanic archipelago. It is constituted by volcanic submarine and subaerial activity and intrusive Miocene events, with some residual later volcanism and Quaternary volcanic deposits that have favored groundwater recharge. The climate is arid, with an average rainfall that barely attains 60 mm/year in the coast and up to 200 mm/year in the highlands. The aquifer recharge is small but significant; it is brackish due to large airborne atmospheric salinity, between 7 and 15 gm(-2)year(-1) of chloride deposition, and high evapo-concentration in the soil. The average recharge is estimated to be less than about 5 mm/year at low altitude and up to 10 mm/year in the highlands, and up to 20 mm/year associated to recent lava fields. Hydrochemical and water isotopic studies, supported by water table data and well and borehole descriptions, contribute a preliminary conceptual model of groundwater flow and water origin in the Betancuria area, the central area of the island. In general, water from springs and shallow wells tends to be naturally brackish and of recent origin. Deep saline groundwater is found and is explained as remnants of very old marine water trapped in isolated features in the very low permeability intrusive rocks. Preliminary radiocarbon dating indicates that this deep groundwater has an apparent age of less than 5000 years BP but it is the result of mixing recent water recharge with very old deep groundwater. Most of the groundwater flow occurs through the old raised volcanic shield of submarine and subaerial formations and later Miocene subaerial basalts. Groundwater transit time through the unsaturated zone is of a few decades, which allows the consideration of long-term quasi-steady state recharge. Transit times are up to a few centuries through the saturated old volcanics and up to several millennia in the intrusive formations, where isolated pockets of very old water may exist. PMID:25108255

Herrera, Christian; Custodio, Emilio

2014-10-15

230

Establishment, management, and maintenance of the phoenix islands protected area.  

PubMed

The Republic of Kiribati's Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the equatorial central Pacific, is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site on earth. Created in 2008, it was the first Marine Protected Area (MPA) of its kind (at the time of inception, the largest in the world) and includes eight low-lying islands, shallow coral reefs, submerged shallow and deep seamounts and extensive open-ocean and ocean floor habitat. Due to their isolation, the shallow reef habitats have been protected de facto from severe exploitation, though the surrounding waters have been continually fished for large pelagics and whales over many decades. PIPA was created under a partnership between the Government of Kiribati and the international non-governmental organizations-Conservation International and the New England Aquarium. PIPA has a unique conservation strategy as the first marine MPA to use a conservation contract mechanism with a corresponding Conservation Trust established to be both a sustainable financing mechanism and a check-and-balance to the oversight and maintenance of the MPA. As PIPA moves forward with its management objectives, it is well positioned to be a global model for large MPA design and implementation in similar contexts. The islands and shallow reefs have already shown benefits from protection, though the pending full closure of PIPA (and assessments thereof) will be critical for determining success of the MPA as a refuge for open-ocean pelagic and deep-sea marine life. As global ocean resources are continually being extracted to support a growing global population, PIPA's closure is both timely and of global significance. PMID:25358303

Rotjan, Randi; Jamieson, Regen; Carr, Ben; Kaufman, Les; Mangubhai, Sangeeta; Obura, David; Pierce, Ray; Rimon, Betarim; Ris, Bud; Sandin, Stuart; Shelley, Peter; Sumaila, U Rashid; Taei, Sue; Tausig, Heather; Teroroko, Tukabu; Thorrold, Simon; Wikgren, Brooke; Toatu, Teuea; Stone, Greg

2014-01-01

231

Foraging areas of king penguins from Macquarie Island in relation to a marine protected area.  

PubMed

Twenty-three king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) from Macquarie Island were tracked by satellite during the late incubation period in 1998-1999 to determine the overlap of the foraging zone of king penguins with an area to be declared a marine protected area (MPA) near the island. While all penguins left the colony in an easterly direction and traveled clockwise back to the island, three penguins foraged in the northern parts of the general foraging area and stayed north of 56 degrees S. The remaining 20 penguins ventured south and most crossed 59 degrees S before returning to the island. The total foraging area was estimated to be 156,000 km2 with 36,500 km2 being most important (where penguins spent > 150 hr in total). North-foraging penguins reached on average 331 +/- 24 km from the colony compared to 530 +/- 76 km for the south-foraging penguins. The latter traveled an average total distance of 1313 +/- 176 km, while the northern foragers averaged 963 +/- 166 km. Not only did the penguins spend the majority of their foraging time within the boundaries of the proposed MPA, they also foraged chiefly within the boundaries of a highly protected zone. Thus, the MPA is likely to encompass the foraging zone of king penguins, at least during incubation. PMID:12180180

Wienecke, Barbara; Robertson, Graham

2002-05-01

232

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2011-07-01

233

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

...2014-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2014-07-01

234

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2012-07-01

235

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2010-07-01

236

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2013-07-01

237

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean, around San Nicholas Island, Calif...restricted). The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicholas Island,...

2014-07-01

238

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife...Pt. 679, Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

2014-10-01

239

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

2010-10-01

240

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

2013-10-01

241

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

2011-10-01

242

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas 23 Table 23 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Table 23 Table 23 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas Area No. Name Latitude...

2012-10-01

243

Providence 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island: data report (abbreviated)  

SciTech Connect

Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Providence 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 318 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 180 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from 1.2 to 61.7 ppM with an average of 4.5 ppM. A group of high uranium concentrations was found in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. These sites also had high concentrations of thorium and rare-earth elements that indicate the presence of a sand with a high proportion of heavy minerals.

Cook, J.R.

1980-11-01

244

7 CFR 1001.2 - Northeast marketing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and District of Columbia All of the States of Connecticut...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and the District of Columbia. Maryland Counties All...

2013-01-01

245

7 CFR 1001.2 - Northeast marketing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and District of Columbia All of the States of Connecticut...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and the District of Columbia. Maryland Counties All...

2012-01-01

246

7 CFR 1001.2 - Northeast marketing area.  

...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and District of Columbia All of the States of Connecticut...Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont and the District of Columbia. Maryland Counties All...

2014-01-01

247

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2012-10-01

248

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2014-10-01

249

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2013-10-01

250

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2010-10-01

251

50 CFR Figure 8 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area 8 Figure 8 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries...Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 679—Aleutian Islands Chinook Salmon Savings Area ER30AU10.000 [75 FR 53069, Aug. 30,...

2011-10-01

252

50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

2011-10-01

253

50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

2010-10-01

254

50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

2012-10-01

255

50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

2013-10-01

256

50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1720.00W...

2010-10-01

257

50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

2013-10-01

258

50 CFR Table 46 to Part 679 - St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area 46 Table 46 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 46 Table 46 to Part 679—St. Matthew Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 171 45.00...

2011-10-01

259

50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and...679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 16824.00W...

2012-10-01

260

Attenuation of seismic waves in the Jan Mayen island area  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis of the attenuation of seismic waves as measured by the quality factorQc (for coda waves) has been performed for the volcanic Jan Mayen island in the Norwegian Sea, using earthquakes near the Jan\\u000a Mayen Fracture Zone and local seismic stations on the Jan Mayen island.Qc values of the order of 100 at a frequency of 1 Hz are

J. Havskov; L. B. Kvamme; H. Bungum

1986-01-01

261

50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

2010-10-01

262

50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

2012-10-01

263

50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

2013-10-01

264

50 CFR Table 44 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 44 Table 44 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area Longitude Latitude 1651.54W...

2011-10-01

265

Species-area and species-distance relationships of terrestrial mammals in the Thousand Island Region  

Microsoft Academic Search

The species-area and species-distance relationships of terrestrial mammals in the Thousand Island Region of the St. Lawrence River are totally consistent with the basic predictions of the equilibrium theory of island biogeography. The power model provides the best fit for the species-area relationship, and the z-value of 0.305 does not differ significantly from Preston's canonical value (0.26). Distance (D) is

Mark V. Lomolino

1982-01-01

266

Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Sicily Island, Louisiana (Sicily Island area levee project)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Samples consisting of composited core material were collected from five areas by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide data on the impact of proposed channel excavation and levee construction in the Sicily Island area, Louisiana. Samples of receiving water from the five areas, selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material of the levee fill material, also were collected. Chemical and physical analyses were performed on samples of core material and native water and on elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water mixtures. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (USGS)

Demcheck, Dennis K.; Dupuy, Alton J.

1980-01-01

267

An assessment of the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas in the San Juan Islands, Washington, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tuya, F. C., Soboil, M. L., and Kido, J. 2000. An assessment of the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas in the San Juan Islands, Washington, USA. - ICES Journal of Marine Science, 57: 1218-1226. Marine protected areas (MPAs) can serve as effective sites for sheltering targeted populations. Furthermore, populations can experience increased abundance and body size in such areas. In

Fernando C. Tuya; Mark L. Soboil; Janine Kido

2000-01-01

268

January 7, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND  

E-print Network

; Fundamentals of Biomechanics: Equilibrium, Motion, and Deformation, third edition (Springer 2012). Sec- ond edition (1999) is fine, but lectures and homework are based on the third edition. Prerequisites: MTH 142, PHY 204, and BIO 121 (may be concurrent) Grade Quizzes 5% Grade scale: 90-100% A Distribution: Exam 1

Vetter, Frederick J.

269

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

255BOS 1 1 0 1 040601 LANDSCAPE ARCHITEC 05 RD229BLA 10 3 1 11 3 14 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 1 0 1 1 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOS 6 1 0 7 7 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 1 1 05 AS075BOA 1 9 9 1 10 10 20 090501 PUBLIC RELATIONS 05 AS076BOA 1 0 1 1 110101 COMPUTER SCIENCE 05

Rhode Island, University of

270

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

African & African Amer St - BA 5 AS_AAF_BA AS HUM 1 1 1 1 2 3 050207 Women's Studies BOA 5 AS 090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 2 0 2 2 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 7 19 2 8 21 29 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 7 1 3 1 10 11 110101 Computer

Rhode Island, University of

271

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

AND MGMT 05 RD249BOS 2 2 0 2 030201 MARINE AFFAIRS 05 AS062BOA 22 11 3 2 25 13 38 030201 SOIL & WATER RES STUDIES 05 AS068BOA 1 1 0 1 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 4 0 4 4 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOA 1 1 1 38 45 7 4 46 51 97 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 12 15 1 3 13 18 31 110101 COMPUTER SCIENCE

Rhode Island, University of

272

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

BLA RD RDV 8 6 8 6 14 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 5 AS089BOA AS SOC 1 0 1 1 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 5 AS087BOA AS HUM 1 8 1 1 1 1 7 49 82 10 7 69 99 168 090101 APPLD COMMUNICATIONS 5 XD814BGS XD CCE 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 090401 JOURNALISM 5 AS075BOA AS HUM 6 6 2 3 8 9 17 090902 PUBLIC RELATIONS 5 AS076BOA

Rhode Island, University of

273

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 1 0 1 1 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 12 9 3 12 13 25 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 5 3 0 8 8 110101 Computer Science 131202 Elementary Education - BOA 5 HS_ELED_BA HSS HSS 4 40 1 1 5 41 46 131205 Secondary Education - BA 5

Rhode Island, University of

274

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

LANDSCAPE ARCHITEC 05 RD229BLA 4 4 1 5 4 9 9 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 2 0 2 2 10 080101 TEXTILE MARKETING 05 HS545BOS 1 6 1 6 7 11 090101 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 2 3 1 3 4 51 88 7 4 61 102 163 12 090101 APPLD COMMUNICATIONS 05 XD814BGS 1 1 0 2 2 13 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 1 2 13 11 1 1

Rhode Island, University of

275

UNIVERISTY OF RHODE ISLAND DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

8 8 16 050107 LATIN AMERIC STUDIES 05 AS068BOA 1 1 0 1 050207 WOMEN'S STUDIES 05 AS089BOA 2 0 2 2 COMMUNICATION STUDIES 05 AS087BOA 1 2 1 1 1 45 70 4 7 52 80 132 090401 JOURNALISM 05 AS075BOA 1 1 9 11 1 11 12 131202 ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 05 HS518BOA 1 1 36 3 1 40 41 131205 SECONDARY EDUCATION 05 HS514BOS 1 1 1 11

Rhode Island, University of

276

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

& African Amer St - BOA 5 AS_AAF_BA AS HUM 1 1 0 1 050207 Women's Studies BOA 5 AS_WSTD_BA AS SOC 1 1 1 1 2 090101 Communication Studies - BOA 5 AS_CMST_BA AS HUM 5 2 1 1 4 2 70 82 6 9 86 96 182 090101 Applied Communications BGS 5 XD_ACM_BGS CCE CCE 1 0 1 1 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 1 9 28 2 2 11 31 42

Rhode Island, University of

277

University of Rhode Island DEGREES CONFERRED  

E-print Network

's Studies BOA 5 AS_WSTD_BA AS SOC 2 1 0 3 3 090101 Communication Studies - BA 5 AS_CMST_BA AS HUM 2 5 5 2 1 5 55 94 3 7 66 113 179 090401 Journalism BOA 5 AS_JOUR_BA AS HUM 2 8 18 1 2 9 22 31 090902 Public Relations BOA 5 AS_PBRL_BA AS HUM 1 6 1 6 7 110101 Computer Science BOA 5 AS_CSC_BA AS PHY 1 1 5 1 6 2 8

Rhode Island, University of

278

January 7, 2014 UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND  

E-print Network

Engineering BME 207 Introduction to Biomechanics Spring 2014 Anthropometric Data Table 1: Normalized Mass Movement, 3rd edition (John Wiley & Sons 2005) - 1 - #12;BME 207 - Anthropometric Data January 7, 2014.546 Adapted from RL Huston, Principles of Biomechanics (CRC Press 2009) - 2 - #12;BME 207 - Anthropometric

Vetter, Frederick J.

279

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the refuge...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the...

2014-10-01

280

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the refuge...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the...

2013-10-01

281

50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the refuge...license and all required stamps, a valid government-issued photo identification, and a valid hunting permit issued by the...

2012-10-01

282

Union Wadding Artist Complex: Pawtucket, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decline of art education in our school systems is potentially robbing today’s youth of the opportunity for creative expres­sion. Without this outlet for personal expression, the student population stands to lose an educational experience that is no less important than academics, such as mathematics and sci­ence. The Union Wadding Artist Complex seeks to provide an environment for students in

Jennifer Turcotte

2012-01-01

283

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2011-07-01

284

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2014-07-01

285

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2013-07-01

286

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2010-07-01

287

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2012-07-01

288

78 FR 70854 - Amendment of Restricted Area R-7201 Farallon De Medinilla Island; Mariana Islands, GU  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...longitude coordinate for R-7201 to take into account...action amends Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations...description of restricted area R-7201, Farallon De Medinilla...as follows: * * * * * R-7201 Farallon De Medinilla...11-26-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

2013-11-27

289

Supporting Information Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene on Cu  

E-print Network

Supporting Information Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene on Cu Using extracted from AFM images as a function of the oxidation and annealing treatment. fAR designates as received5: Terminated size of graphene grain after 2 hours of continuous growth on f300 (Cu foil oxidized

Geohegan, David B.

290

ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the Asian/Pacific Islander population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Census tigerlin...

291

Thermal Maturation in the Ellef Ringnes Island and Surrounding Area, Sverdrup Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determining thermal maturity studies in the Ellef Ringnes Island area was complicated by numerous factors, such as the presence of cavings, bitumen staining, and igneous intrusions. Cavings are a problem in certain intervals in Hoodoo H-37, Dome Bay P-36, and Helicopter J-12. Bitumen staining resulting in suppression of reflectance has occurred in the lower part of the Jameson Bay shales

THOMAS GENTZIS; FARIBORZ GOODARZI

1998-01-01

292

Reification of emergent urban areas in a land-use simulation model in Reunion Island  

E-print Network

Reification of emergent urban areas in a land-use simulation model in Reunion Island Daniel David1 for users and developers of simulation models. But the potential reification of these phenomena raises many that such a reification can be considered as an effective way to refine simulation models in which direct modifications

Boyer, Edmond

293

Area contingency plan for Long Island Sound. Changes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This revision contains significant updates to sensitive areas throughout the COTP Long Island Sound Zone. The effort to update sensitive areas included collaboration with state agencies, coastal towns and cities, and local awareness organizations. Annex N has been added to incorporate responses to maritime fire fighting and has identified resources and personnel available for marine response throughout the zone. Additionally there are updated phone lists and a listing of pen and ink changes.

NONE

1997-08-07

294

50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

2010-10-01

295

50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

2013-10-01

296

50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

2012-10-01

297

50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part 679 Wildlife and...Part 679—Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012 [73 FR 43372,...

2011-10-01

298

Remote sensing and GIS based study of potential erosion and degradation areas on the island Fogo (Cape Verde Islands)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Island of Fogo (Cape Verde) is affected by processes of erosion and degradation, caused mainly by a high population growth and global change. With its small scaled climatic, floristic and geo-ecological differentiation, the island of Fogo is an optimal research space for understanding semiarid island ecosystems in the marginal tropics and their behaviour to erosion and degradation processes. For

Claas Olehowski; Simone Naumann; Alexander Siegmund

2009-01-01

299

Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area  

SciTech Connect

A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

1993-07-01

300

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

2013-10-01

301

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

2012-10-01

302

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

2010-10-01

303

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing 24 Table...679—Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing...

2011-10-01

304

Identification of a geographic area characterized by extreme longevity in the Sardinia island: the AKEA study.  

PubMed

High prevalence and low female/male ratio for validated centenarians are observed in Sardinia and these findings appear to be thus far unique to this island. Moreover a specific region on the island is characterized by exceptional male longevity. We calculated the extreme longevity index (ELI), defined as the percentage of persons born in Sardinia between 1880 and 1900, who became centenarians. A gaussian smoothing method was used in order to identify the so-called 'Blue Zone', where longevity is concentrated in the central-eastern part of the island and covers all the mountainous areas of central Sardinia. The estimated life expectancy in the 'Blue Zone' is longer than in the remaining territory of the island especially for men and the male to female ratio among centenarians born in this area is 1.35 compared to 2.43 in the rest of Sardinia. The specific mechanism by which persons living in this territory were more likely to reach extreme longevity remains unknown but it is interesting to note that most of the 'longevity hot spots' identified in various regions of the world over the years have been located in mountainous geographical areas even if none of these longevity regions have been fully validated. An alternative and interesting hypothesis is that the high rate of inbreeding determined by frequent marriages between consanguineous individuals and low immigration rates have progressively decreased the variability of the genetic pool and facilitated the emergence of genetic characteristics that protect individuals from diseases that are major causes of mortality particularly in older individuals. Given the exceptionally high prevalence of male centenarians in the 'Blue Zone', it is reasonable to assume that either the environmental characteristics or the genetic factors, or both, exert their favorable effect more strongly in men than in women. Thus, the mechanism involved may be modulated by the hormonal milieu, or may be associated with genes located in the sex chromosomes. PMID:15489066

Poulain, Michel; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Grasland, Claude; Carru, Ciriaco; Ferrucci, Luigi; Baggio, Giovannella; Franceschi, Claudio; Deiana, Luca

2004-09-01

305

Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key  

E-print Network

Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key #12;Soil SampleSoil Sample LocationsLocationsLocationsLocations #12;Soil ElevationSoil Elevation (Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry) 1.5 ft NAD881.5 ft

Florida, University of

306

Effects and Risk Evaluation of Oil Spillage in the Sea Areas of Changxing Island  

PubMed Central

This paper evaluated the oil spillage risk in the waters near the island of Changxing in Dalian (China) based on the established risk assessment index. Four wind regimes (windless, northerly wind, westerly wind and southerly wind) were selected as weather conditions for the dynamic prediction of oil drift. If an oil spill occurs near the Koumen (a place near the island of Changxing), the forecast and evaluation are conducted based on a three-dimensional mathematical model of oil spillage, and the results obtained show the scope of the affected area when winds from various directions are applied. The oil spillage would, under various conditions, flow into the northern and western sea area of Changxing Island Bay, namely the Dalian harbor seal National Nature Reserve, and create adverse effects on the marine ecological environment. The rationality of combining the established oil spillage risk comprehensive index system with model prediction is further confirmed. Finally, preventive measures and quick fixes are presented in the case of accidental oil spillages. The most effective method to reduce environment risk is to adopt reasonable preventive measures and quick fixes. PMID:25153473

Wang, Hanxi; Xu, Jianling; Zhao, Wenkui; Zhang, Jiquan

2014-01-01

307

183BEETLES OF BLOCK ISLAND BEETLES OF BLOCK ISLAND: RARE SPECIES  

E-print Network

183BEETLES OF BLOCK ISLAND BEETLES OF BLOCK ISLAND: RARE SPECIES THAT ONCE OCCURRED ON THE MAINLAND of the Rhode Is- land beetle fauna. In addition to the federally listed American Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus americanus), the Island is also home to the only population of the Clay Banks Tiger Beetle (Cicindela

Sikes, Derek S.

308

Landsat TM-based analysis of land area and vegetation cover change on six selected Alabama and Mississippi barrier islands (1984-2011)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island are located 10-20 kilometers south of the Mississippi and Alabama coastlines. These six barrier islands serve as an important shield to southern areas of Mississippi and Alabama from tropical cyclone (hurricane) impacts such as storm surge and destructive waves. The islands are also home to a delicate ecosystem of many different types of flora and fauna. Over the course of the past three decades, all six islands have been subjected to several hurricane events. This, coupled with the natural state of the erosion, has led to the islands losing total land area and vegetation. This thesis research focuses on quantifying the vegetation loss and total land area loss on Cat Island, West Ship Island, East Ship Island, Horn Island, Petit Bois Island, and Dauphin Island during the time period from 1984 to 2011. A special focus is given to impacts of Hurricanes Georges, Ivan, Katrina, Gustav, and Ike which affected the northern Gulf Coast in 1998, 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively. This research utilizes Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper Imagery. Supervised classifications and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analyses are performed on each scene to analyze the total land area and vegetation cover of each island. The results of this research show the total extent of land and vegetation loss on each island from 1984 to 2011, and which islands are most vulnerable to erosion and vegetation loss. The results also reveal how all five hurricanes affected each individual island.

Winstanley, Hunter Clark

309

Geologists Search for Evidence of Ancient Beach Deposits and Uplifted Shorelines on Simeonof Island  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys dig into coastal bluffs of Simeonof Island in search of evidence for ancient beach deposits and tectonically uplifted shorelines....

2014-04-29

310

Island Biogeography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This excel workbook demonstrates the principles of the MacArthur-Wilson theory of Island Biogeography. It allows the user to define the mainland species pool, area of the island, and distance of the island from the mainland. Graphical output included species richness equilibrium at varying island size and distance. The workbook also allows the user to calculate a species-area function for data entered into the data input page. Several datasets on island area and species richness are included for various types of islands and species. Variables and formulas are defined in the accompanying tutorial.

John Jungck (BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium; Biology)

2005-12-16

311

Areas contributing recharge to production wells and effects of climate change on the groundwater system in the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Climate projections for the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins from downscaled output from general circulation models indicate that mean annual temperature might increase by 4.7 degrees Fahrenheit and 8.0 degrees Fahrenheit by the late 21st century (2070–99) compared with the late 20th century (1970–99) under scenarios of lower and higher emissions of greenhouse gases, respectively. By the late 21st century, winter and spring precipitation is projected to increase by 12 to 17 percent, summer precipitation to increase by about the same as mean annual precipitation (8 percent), and fall precipitation to decrease by 5 percent for both emission scenarios compared with

Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet R.

2015-01-01

312

Regional maturation study in the King Christian Island area, arctic Canada  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of the Mesozoic succession in the vicinity of King Christian Island in central Sverdrup Basin was evaluated on the basis of maturation parameters and knowledge of the regional geology. The triassic Schei Point Group, which is the main source rock interval in Sverdrup Basin, is in the mature stage of hydrocarbon generation (Ro > 0.60%). The type of organic matter is mainly planktonic marine algae and bituminite, deposited in an offshore shelf setting. Rock-eval T{sub max} values are in the range 428--444 C, in general agreement with reflectance. Organic richness is indicated by the high hydrogen index (HI) values in the shales (in excess of 300 mg HC/gTOC). Less rich source rocks are found in the Jurassic-age Jameson Bay and Ringnes formations, in accordance with previous studies in the nearby Lougheed and Melville islands. Numerous oil and gas fields have been discovered in King Christian Island to date. Geology shows that the presence or absence of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons in the reservoirs is related to the development of a system of faults and fractures in the successions stratigraphically above the source rocks. These zones have acted as conduits for oil and gas migration and, ultimately, loss. The presence of bitumen staining and numerous populations of solid bitumen, interpreted as allochthonously derived, support the theory of hydrocarbon migration in the King Christian Island succession. Migration has taken place over a vertical distance of 800 m to 1500 m. Problems were encountered in measuring vitrinite reflectance, related mainly to the presence of cavings, bitumen staining, vitrinite typing, oxidation of organic matter, and effect of igneous intrusions. The thermal effect from igneous sills and dykes resulted in thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons to gaseous in certain areas. A zone of paleo-overpressure was identified near the contact between a thick sandstone unit and overlying shales exhibiting a kinky vitrinite reflectance profile.

Gentzis, T. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, Alberta (Canada); Goodarzi, F. [Natural Resources Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Mukhopadhyay, P.K. [Global Geoenergy Research Ltd., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1998-12-01

313

Floods of November 12, 1974 in the Charlotte Amalie area, St Thomas, US Virgin Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flood on St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, of November 12, 1974, was the largest recorded flood in the area from Fort Christian through Charlotte Amalie and Frenchtown to the end of Crown Bay. This flood has a recurrence interval of about 60 years. With the exception of a few narrow beaches, very little flooding occurred outside of the Charlotte Amalie area. The flood boundaries are controlled to a large extent by the prevailing channel and flood-plain conditions. Inundation from future floods may be affected by changes in channel conditions, alteration of waterway openings at roads, changes in runoff characteristics of the stream caused by increased urbanization, and other cultural developments. The areas inundated by the 1974 flood are shown on 2 maps. (Woodard-USGS)

Haire, W.J.; Johnson, K.G.

1977-01-01

314

Biogeographic and ecological regulation of disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre virus in island mice is related to island area, precipitation, and predator richness  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The relative roles of top-down and bottom-up forces in affecting disease prevalence in wild hosts is important for understanding disease dynamics and human disease risk. We found that the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the agent of a severe disease in humans (hantavirus pulmonary syndrome), in island deer mice from the eight California Channel Islands was greater with increased precipitation (a measure of productivity), greater island area, and fewer species of rodent predators. In finding a strong signal of the ecological forces affecting SNV prevalence, our work highlights the need for future work to understand the relative importance of average rodent density, population fluctuations, behavior, and specialist predators as they affect SNV prevalence. In addition to illustrating the importance of both bottom-up and top-down limitation of disease prevalence, our results suggest that predator richness may have important bearing on the risk of exposure to animal-borne diseases that affect humans.

Orrock, John L.; Allan, Brian F.; Drost, Charles A.

2011-01-01

315

Remote sensing and GIS based study of potential erosion and degradation areas on the island Fogo (Cape Verde Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Island of Fogo (Cape Verde) is affected by processes of erosion and degradation, caused mainly by a high population growth and global change. With its small scaled climatic, floristic and geo-ecological differentiation, the island of Fogo is an optimal research space for understanding semiarid island ecosystems in the marginal tropics and their behaviour to erosion and degradation processes. For that reason, a change detection analysis over the past two decades is generated, showing the level and direction of land cover and land use change. Two satellite images from 1984 and 2007 will classified by a Maximum Likelihood approach. In a further step, an image of 1974 will be also integrated in this change detection analysis, enlarging the study over the last three decades.

Olehowski, Claas; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

2009-09-01

316

Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. The authors obtained [sup 14]C ages of 4690 [plus minus] 270 Bp (5000-5700 cal Bp) and 5040 [plus minus] 460 Bp (53090-6300 cal Bp) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lonas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacustrine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. These [sup 14]C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in the region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

Farmer, J.D. (NASA-Ames Research Center, MS-239-4, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Farmer, M.C. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Anthropology); Berger, R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Depts. of Geography and Anthropology and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences)

1993-01-01

317

Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico.  

PubMed

Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. We obtained 14C ages of 4690 +/- 270 BP (5000-5700 cal BP) and 5040 +/- 460 BP (5300-6300 cal BP) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lomas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacrustine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. Our 14C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in this region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring. PMID:11539414

Farmer, J D; Farmer, M C; Berger, R

1993-01-01

318

Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. We obtained 14C ages of 4690 +/- 270 BP (5000-5700 cal BP) and 5040 +/- 460 BP (5300-6300 cal BP) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lomas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacrustine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. Our 14C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in this region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

Farmer, J. D.; Farmer, M. C.; Berger, R.

1993-01-01

319

Influences of water depth and substrate nitrogen on leaf surface area and maximum bed extension in Nymphaea odorata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships among water depth, substrate nitrogen, and leaf surface area in the floating-leaved macrophyte Nymphaea odorata Aiton (fragrant waterlily) were studied in seven ponds in Rhode Island, USA. Beds of N. odorata in ponds that varied three- to seven-fold in depth, total area, water-column phosphorus and nitrogen, transparency, and chlorophyll content grew to strikingly similar water depth maxima (1.9–2.2 m;

M. Sinden-Hempstead; K. T. Killingbeck

1996-01-01

320

Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Groundwater in the Western Coastal Area in Jeju Volcanic Island, Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Residents in Jeju volcanic island use most part of water resources from groundwater. Actually, in the island, there exist no perennial streams or rivers due to extremely high infiltration rate of water into surface soils and rocks (basalt and trachyte). In the western part of Jeju Island, high pumping rate of wells caused great drawdown especially during drought period. By this current trend, great decline of groundwater level as well as seawater intrusion is predictable. According to drill data from 13 wells for monitoring seawater intrusion installed in the western part of the island by the authority of Jeju Special Governed Island, the geology of the western area is composed of five units: lava sequence (hyaloclastic breccia, acicular feldspar basalt, olivine basalt, aphanitic feldspar basalt, augite feldspar basalt, and porphyritic feldspar basalt), sedimentary layer (containing gravel and sand) intercalated in lava sequences, Seoguipo Formation (gravels, unconsolidated sands, shell fossils, and sandy mudstone), trachyandesite and tuff occurring in Seoguipo Formation, and U Formation. Geophysical well logging on the five monitoring wells (Panpo (PP), Kosan (KS), Shindo (SD), Ilgwa (IG), and Hamo (HM)), resulted in approximately 20~40 cps (counts per second) of natural gamma intensity in lava sequence. High gamma intensity of approximately 60 cps is noticeble in the sedimentary layer intercalated in lava sequence, and in Seoguipo Formation, especially clay minerals. Electric conductivity (EC) on PP, KS and IG wells showed 100~400 ?S/cm with fresh water range. However, EC on SD and HM wells increased up to around 20,000~10,000 ?S/cm with depth, which indicates variation from freshwater to salt water. Pumping tests were performed on nine monitoring wells in the range of 900~2,300m3/d and with an average discharge rate of 1,371m3/d. Among them, data from only five monitoring wells were used for pumping test analysis, since the other four wells were highly affected by tide. Transmissivity was estimated using transmissivity (T) ~ specific capacity (Q/s) relationsip: T = 0.99(Q/s)0.89/ proposed by Hamm et al. (2005). T estimates ranged from 21.9 to 2664.3m2/d, and Q/s estimates ranged from 32.4 to 7,143m2/d. The average drawdown is 12.9 m, between 0.1 and 40 m, presenting a wide variation of drawdown on different monitoring wells. From drill data, geophysical logs, and pumping tests, it is concluded that main aquifers develops in jointed parts in lava sequence, especially hyaloclastic breccia, and gravels and unconsolidated sands in Seoguipo Formation. Keywords: transmissivity, specific capacity, geophygical log, pumping test, Jeju volcainc Island Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by of the 21st Century Frontier R&D Program (project no. 3-4-3 of the Sustainable Water Resources Research Center) and by the 2nd stage of the BK21 Project, Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea.

Lee, S.; Hamm, S.; Lee, J.; Koh, G.; Hwang, S.

2008-12-01

321

Marine fouling in offshore areas east of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on results of the investigation of marine biofouling on offshore structures east of Hainan Island in the northern South China Sea. Two buoy investigation stations were deployed in Qiongdong (W1, 68 n miles offshore) and southern Qiongdong (J2, 23 n miles offshore) waters, respectively. At both sites, water depths were more than 100 meters. Test panels on iron frames were placed at 1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 m below the seawater surface, and exposed for 8 months from October 1989 to June 1990. The results indicated that hydroids, gooseneck barnacles and oysters were the most important fouling species in these offshore areas. Acorn barnacles were mainly found at Station J2. The maximum fouling accumulations were observed in near surface waters. Substantial reduction of biomass and species diversity occurred with increasing depth and distance from shore. Sources of fouling organisms and influences of environmental factors on the species distributions are discussed in this paper.

Yan, Tao; Yan, Wen-Xia; Dong, Yu; Wang, Hua-Jie; Yan, Yan; Liang, Guan-He

1999-09-01

322

Marine biofouling in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study on the characteristics of fouling communities in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea, was conducted at four sites there. At each station, test panels on iron frames were hung on the mooring system at different depths. Data on biofouling were mainly obtained by examination of the fouled test panels. Organisms attached to buoys and anchors were scraped off and examined also. The results showed that the thickness and biomass of marine growth that increased the fluid loading on offshore installations depended to a large extent on hard foulers, i. e. mollusks and acorn barnacles. Algae, hydroids, stalked barnacles and bryozoans were important fouling species. The occurrence frequency and biomass of acorn barnacles decreased with increasing distance from the shore.

Yan, Tao; Yan, Wen-Xia; Liang, Guan-He; Dong, Yu; Wang, Hua-Jie; Yan, Yan

2000-06-01

323

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 161, 2004, pp. 983993. Printed in Great Britain. Microbial silicification in Iodine Pool, Waimangu geothermal area, North Island,  

E-print Network

. 983 Microbial silicification in Iodine Pool, Waimangu geothermal area, North Island, New Zealand spring pools. Iodine Pool, located in the Waimangu geothermal area on the North Island of New Zealand be treated with caution. Keywords: New Zealand, Waimangu geothermal area, silicification, microbes, hot

Konhauser, Kurt

324

Geologists in Search of Tsunami Deposits on Simeonof Island  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Scientists from the USGS, University of Rhode Island, and the Alaska Dept of Geological and Geophysical Surveys use a hand-driven corer to sample soils and marsh sediment on Simeonof Island as part of an investigation to investigate evidence for earthquakes and tsunamis in the Shumagin Islands....

2014-04-29

325

HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

326

Spatiotemporal dynamics of ecological variation of waterbird habitats in Dongtan area of Chongming Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on Landsat TM images, we explored the pattern of variation of suitable waterbird habitats from 1990 to 2008 in the Dongtan area of Chongming Island at the Changjiang (Yangtze) River mouth. By applying our highly accurate indicator model ( R=0.999, P<0.01), we quantified the variations of fluctuation intensity for local waterbird habitats during 1990-2008, and for the main waterbird groups (Anatidae, Charadriidae, Ardeidae and Laridae) from 2006 to 2008, to evaluate the impact of habitat quantity change on the waterbird habitat status and the population dynamics of the different waterbird groups. The results show that the aquaculture ponds (AP) and the Scirpus mariqueter zone (SMZ) underwent drastic habitat changes during certain periods (AP: 1997-2000, 2000-2003, 2005-2008; SMZ: 1997-2000), and the fluctuation intensity differed among habitat types in the order AP>SMZ>TSH (total suitable habitat)>BSA (bare mud flat and shallow water area). The abandonment of tracts of aquaculture ponds in Dongtan in mid-2006 brought about an intensive population fluctuation, caused by rapidly changing habitat with the population expanding to adjacent areas. At present, Anatidae and Ardeidae are threatened in the Dongtan area with declining populations because of their very "picky" habitat requirements (i.e., high reliance on AP). The Charadriidae experienced enormous population declines in the late 1990s, however, they have since recovered to normal levels as habitat change has stabilized. Our findings suggest that the current challenges for habitat management are the protection and stabilization of AP and SMZ habitats.

Fan, Xuezhong; Zhang, Liquan

2012-05-01

327

50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

50 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? 13 ? 2012-10-01 ? 2012-10-01 ? false ? Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ? 10 ? Figure 10 to Part 679 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

2012-10-01

328

50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

50 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? 11 ? 2011-10-01 ? 2011-10-01 ? false ? Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ? 10 ? Figure 10 to Part 679 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

2011-10-01

329

50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea  

50 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? 13 ? 2014-10-01 ? 2014-10-01 ? false ? Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ? 10 ? Figure 10 to Part 679 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

2014-10-01

330

50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

50 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? 9 ? 2010-10-01 ? 2010-10-01 ? false ? Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ? 10 ? Figure 10 to Part 679 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

2010-10-01

331

50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 679 - Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

50 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? 13 ? 2013-10-01 ? 2013-10-01 ? false ? Pribilof Islands Area Habitat Conservation Zone in the Bering Sea ? 10 ? Figure 10 to Part 679 ? Wildlife and Fisheries ? FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

2013-10-01

332

Comparison of MSS and TM Data for Landcover Classification in the Chesapeake Bay Area: a Preliminary Report. [Taylor's Island, Maryland  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An area bordering the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay was selected for study and classified using unsupervised techniques applied to LANDSAT-2 MSS data and several band combinations of LANDSAT-4 TM data. The accuracies of these Level I land cover classifications were verified using the Taylor's Island USGS 7.5 minute topographic map which was photointerpreted, digitized and rasterized. The the Taylor's Island map, comparing the MSS and TM three band (2 3 4) classifications, the increased resolution of TM produced a small improvement in overall accuracy of 1% correct due primarily to a small improvement, and 1% and 3%, in areas such as water and woodland. This was expected as the MSS data typically produce high accuracies for categories which cover large contiguous areas. However, in the categories covering smaller areas within the map there was generally an improvement of at least 10%. Classification of the important residential category improved 12%, and wetlands were mapped with 11% greater accuracy.

Mulligan, P. J.; Gervin, J. C.; Lu, Y. C.

1985-01-01

333

UV nanoimprint lithography for the realization of large-area ordered SiGe/Si(001) island arrays  

SciTech Connect

We use UV nanoimprint lithography for the pit-patterning of silicon substrates. Ordered silicon-germanium islands are grown inside these pits by molecular-beam epitaxy on arrays of 3x3 mm{sup 2} and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. AFM-based statistics reveals an extremely uniform size distribution of the islands in the patterned areas. These results are confirmed by very narrow and uniform PL peaks recorded at various positions across the patterned arrays.

Lausecker, E.; Brehm, M.; Grydlik, M.; Hackl, F.; Fromherz, T.; Schaeffler, F.; Bauer, G. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, 4040 Linz (Austria); Bergmair, I.; Muehlberger, M. [Functional Surfaces and Nanostructures, Profactor GmbH, 4407 Steyr-Gleink (Austria)

2011-04-04

334

Paleoenvironmental reconstructions of Nettilling Lake area (Baffin Island, Nunavut): A multi-proxy analysis.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paleoclimate and paleolimnological history of several Arctic regions remains poorly known. This is the case for the area around Nettilling Lake (Baffin Island, Nunavut), the largest lake of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. To reconstruct the past environmental history of this area, a highly innovative multi-proxy approach combining physical, magnetic, chemical and biological properties preserved in lake sediments was used. One particular goal of this study was to investigate the possible coupling between sedimentation processes observed in the lake and melt rates of nearby Penny Ice Cap. A 1-m long sediment core was retrieved from a small bay in the northeastern part of Nettilling Lake during the summer of 2010. This sampling area was chosen based on the hypothesis that incoming glacial meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap would leave a strong climate-modulated signal that would be reflected in the sedimentary sequence. The core was analyzed by both non-destructive (X-radiography (X-ray), microfluorescence-X (µ-XRF), magnetic susceptibility) and destructive (Loss On Ignition, grain size, water content, thin sections, diatoms) techniques. Radiometric AMS 14C and 210Pb/137Cs age determinations, as well as paleomagnetic measurements, were used to develop the core chronology, yielding an estimated bottom age of approximately 1365 AD. The sedimentation rate (0.15 cm.yr-1) in Nettilling Lake was found to be high compared to other Arctic lakes, due to inputs of highly turbid meltwaters from Penny Ice Cap with high suspended sediment loads. Significant correlations were found between geochemical profiles of elements linked to detrital inputs (Si, Ti, K, Ca) and melt rates from Penny Ice Cap since the 19th century. This suggests that variations in detrital elements in Nettilling Lake sediments might be used as an indirect indicator of regional climate fluctuations (e.g., summer temperatures) that determine glacier melt rates.

Beaudoin, Anne; Pienitz, Reinhard; Francus, Pierre; Zdanowicz, Christian; St-Onge, Guillaume

2014-05-01

335

Survey of Vegetated Areas and Muskox Populations in East-Central Ellesmere Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of 1981-84 summer helicopter surveys and ground reconnaissance of east-central Ellesmere Island are presented. This was the first systematic ecological survey to be conducted in this region of the Canadian High Arctic. Central Ellesmere Island is dominated by two large ice fields separated by the deglaciated Sverdmp Pass (79\\

G. HENRY; B. FREEDMAN

336

Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu  

SciTech Connect

We describe a two-step approach for suppressing nucleation of graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition. In the first step, as received Cu foils are oxidized in air at temperatures up to 500 C to remove surface impurities and to induce the regrowth of Cu grains during subsequent annealing in H2 flow at 1040 C prior to graphene growth. In the second step, transient reactant cooling is performed by using a brief Ar pulse at the onset of growth to induce collisional deactivation of the carbon growth species. The combination of these two steps results in a three orders of magnitude reduction in the graphene nucleation density, enabling the growth of millimeter-size single crystal graphene grains. A kinetic model shows that suppressing nucleation promotes a cooperative island growth mode that favors the formation of large area single crystal graphene, and it is accompanied by a roughly 3 orders of magnitude increase in the reactive sticking probability of methane compared to that in random nucleation growth.

Regmi, Murari [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rouleau, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Eastman, Jeffrey [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Eres, Gyula [ORNL

2014-01-01

337

Seismic hazard assessment in central Ionian Islands area (Greece) based on stress release models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The long-term probabilistic seismic hazard of central Ionian Islands (Greece) is studied through the application of stress release models. In order to identify statistically distinct regions, the study area is divided into two subareas, namely Kefalonia and Lefkada, on the basis of seismotectonic properties. Previous results evidenced the existence of stress transfer and interaction between the Kefalonia and Lefkada fault segments. For the consideration of stress transfer and interaction, the linked stress release model is applied. A new model is proposed, where the hazard rate function in terms of X( t) has the form of the Weibull distribution. The fitted models are evaluated through residual analysis and the best of them is selected through the Akaike information criterion. Based on AIC, the results demonstrate that the simple stress release model fits the Ionian data better than the non-homogeneous Poisson and the Weibull models. Finally, the thinning simulation method is applied in order to produce simulated data and proceed to forecasting.

Votsi, Irene; Tsaklidis, George M.; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria E.

2011-08-01

338

Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees ( Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs ( Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea originates from extra-regional sources in southern Iberia and northern Africa.

Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

2011-01-01

339

Using soil island plantings as dispersal vectors in large area copper tailings reforestation  

SciTech Connect

The Wenatchee National Forest undertook the reforestation of the 80 acre (35 ha) Holden copper mine tailings of Washington State in 1989 by using 20, one-fourth acre, triangular shaped soil islands as a source of plant propagules targeted for gravel-covered tailings surfaces. The islands were constructed of soil and surface litter transported from a nearby gravel pit, and planted with four species of conifer seedlings, the shrub Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) and eight species of grasses. Conifer and alder seedlings were also planted in graveled covered tailings with amendments. Since reproductive status of the conifers would not occur for several years, this propagule vector hypothesis was tested by measuring the distances traveled onto the tailings surface by grass seeds. The number of grass shoots established in four treatment blocks in target plots downwind from the soil island source plantings was also determined. After 36 months, grass seed had migrated to a distance of 32 feet (11 m) from the soil island source. Grass shoots were present within 10 feet (3 m) downwind of the soil island, the most frequent being Mountain brome (Bromus marginatus). Among the tree species, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Sitka alder grew an average of 6 inches (15--16 cm) after 40 months on the soil islands but somewhat less on the tailing surface. By the third growing season, the only tree species in reproductive condition on the tailings was alder. The soil-island technique is successful for grass dispersal and may have potential for conifer and alder migration.

Scherer, G.; Everett, R. [Dept. of Agriculture, Wenatchee, WA (United States). Forestry Science Lab.

1998-12-31

340

EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Naval Live Oaks Area, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Florida, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, first-surface (FS) topography, and canopy-height (CH) datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Naval Live Oaks Area in Florida's Gulf Islands National Seashore, acquired June 30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is used routinely to create maps that represent submerged or sub-aerial topography. Specialized filtering algorithms have been implemented to determine the 'bare earth' under vegetation from a point cloud of last return elevations. For more information about similar projects, please visit the Decision Support for Coastal Science and Management website.

Nagle, David B.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Segura, Martha

2010-01-01

341

NONTARGET ARTHROPODS CAPTURED IN CUE-LURE-BAITED BUCKET TRAPS AT AREA-WIDE PEST MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION SITES IN KAMUELA AND KULA, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Seventy and 2,371 specimens or about 1.1 and 34.4 individuals per day were captured in melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), cue-lure monitoring/suppression traps at two area-wide integrated pest management implementation sites in Kula (Maui Island) and Kamuela (Hawaii Island), respectively...

342

The Electromagnetically Sustained Rhodes Piano Media Arts & Technology (MAT)  

E-print Network

The Electromagnetically Sustained Rhodes Piano Greg Shear Media Arts & Technology (MAT) University Santa Barbara, CA 93106 matt@create.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT The Electromagnetically Sustained Rhodes Piano in the high-gain signal path. Keywords Rhodes, keyboard, electromagnetic, sustain, augmented in- strument

California at Santa Barbara, University of

343

A Case Study in the Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs): the Islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, were both mapped along their leeward coasts for dominant coral community and other benthic cover in the early 1980s. This mapping effort offers a unique baseline for comparing changes in the benthic community of the two islands since that time, particularly given the marked differences between the two islands. Bonaire is well-protected and completely surrounded by a marine protected area (MPA), which includes two no-diving marine reserves; additionally, Bonaire's population is only around 15,000. In contrast, the island of Curacao is home to 140,000 inhabitants and marine protection is limited, with a reef area of 600 ha established as a "paper" park (i.e., little enforcement). Video transects collected by SCUBA over the reefs were collected on Bonaire in January of 2008; when compared to data from 1985, coral cover had declined in the shallowest portion of the reef (< 5 m) and was mostly the result of declines in Acropora spp., whereas head corals increased. Transects closest to the no-diving marine reserves showed higher coral cover and diversity than transects located farther from the reserves. Satellite remote sensing techniques were used to create landscape-scale reef maps along the leeward coasts of both islands, which could differentiate areas of high hard coral cover (> 20%), predominantly sand (> 50%) and areas where hard coral and sand were mixed with soft corals, sea whips and marine plants. These modern maps (2007-09) were groundtruthed using the video data collected on Bonaire for accuracy and then compared to the early 1980s maps of the reefs on both islands. Bonaire experienced declines in coral cover overall and the remaining coral was increasingly patchy; however, changes in patch characteristics were not significant over the time period, but status as a marine reserve and the sheltering of the shoreline did appear to buffer against coral loss. Surprisingly, the island of Curacao did not experience a decline in total coral cover, but did become increasingly patchy, significantly more so than Bonaire. The Curacao Underwater Park afforded no additional protection against coral loss or fragmentation than an adjacent unprotected area of reef. The difference between the two islands in coral loss versus fragmentation has the potential for a unique natural experiment to study the effects of habitat fragmentation in the absence of overall habitat loss at the landscape scale. The Bonaire National Marine Park could benefit by restricting visitors to its most frequented dive sites by increasing the cost of entry into a tiered pay system, thus generating more income for education and management of the park, as well as deterring some divers from these overused sites. Satellite remote sensing-derived maps are useful for rapid reef mapping and can be utilized for comparison to ancillary maps created by more traditional methods. Satellite-derived maps can only distinguish benthic habitats coarsely (3-4 habitat classes) and are only as reliable as their source data, they benefit greatly from fieldwork to determine depth, geographic location, and benthic habitat cover in real time.

Relles, Noelle J.

344

76 FR 32950 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Economic Census of Island Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...information collection instrument...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract...Economic Census statistics for the island...Warehousing, Information; Finance...Scientific, and Technical Services...census. The information collected...produce basic statistics by kind of...Census. The collection of data...

2011-06-07

345

Staging and Wintering Areas of Snow Geese Nesting on Howe Island, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

From July 1980 to July 1990, leg bands were put on 4556 adults, subadults, and goslings from the lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) colony (~1000 nesting birds) on Howe Island, near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. In addition, 1431 neck bands were put on 1714 of the leg-banded adults and subadults. During the period from September 1980 through May 1991, 3244

STEPHEN R. JOHNSON

346

Fluid migration in the Eugene Island block 330 area, offshore Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study funded by industry and the Department of Energy, the Global Basins Research Network has imaged fluid flow pathways that charged shallow, hydropressured, Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs in the Eugene Island 330 field, offshore Louisiana. Hydrocarbons appear to be derived from turbidite stacks within the salt withdrawal mini-basin buried deep within the geopressured zone. Fault zones, with pore pressure dependent

J. A. Nunn; S. J. Roberts; L. M. Cathles; R. N. Anderson

1996-01-01

347

Groundwater flow in a volcanic-sedimentary coastal aquifer: Telde area, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Groundwater conditions in a 75- km2 coastal area around the town of Telde in eastern Gran Canaria island have been studied. Pliocene to Recent volcanic materials are found, with an intercalated detrital formation (LPDF), which is a characteristic of the area. Groundwater development has become intensive since the 1950s, mostly for intensive agricultural irrigation and municipal water supply. The LPDF is one order of magnitude more transmissive and permeable than the underlying Phonolitic Formation when median values are compared (150 and 15 m2 day-1 5 and 0.5 m day-1, respectively). These two formations are highly heterogeneous and the ranges of expected well productivities partly overlap. The overlying recent basalts constituted a good aquifer several decades ago but now are mostly drained, except in the southern areas. Average values of drainable porosity (specific yield) seem to be about 0.03 to 0.04, or higher. Groundwater development has produced a conspicuous strip where the watertable has been drawn down as much as 40 m in 20 years, although the inland watertable elevation is much less affected. Groundwater reserve depletion contributes only about 5% of ed water, and more than 60% of this is transmitted from inland areas. Groundwater discharge into the sea may still be significant, perhaps 30% of total inflow to the area is discharged to the sea although this value is very uncertain. Les conditions de gisement de l'eau souterraine d'une région de 75 km2 de la côte Est de l'île de la Grande Canarie (archipel des Canaries), dans le secteur de Telde, ont été étudiées, en utilisant seulement les données fournies par les puits d'exploitation existants. Les matériaux volcaniques, d'âge Pliocène à sub-actuel, sont séparés par une formation détritique (FDLP), qui constitue la principale singularité de cette région. L'exploitation de l'eau souterraine est devenue intensive à partir de 1950, principalement pour des besoins d'irrigation (agriculture intensive) et d'alimentation en eau des zones urbaines. La comparaison des valeurs médianes montre que la FDLP est d'un ordre de grandeur plus transmissive et perméable que les formations volcaniques phonolitiques au-dessous (respectivement 150 et 15 m2/jour 5 et 0,5 m/jour). Néanmoins, ces deux formations sont très hétérogènes et les deux gammes de valeurs de productivité des puits se recouvrent. Les Basaltes récents au-dessus qui constituaient, il y a encore quelques décades, un bon aquifère, sont presque entièrement desaturés à l'heure actuelle, a exception faite de la partie sud. Les valeurs moyennes de porosité drainable (efficace) sont de l'ordre de 0,03 à 0,04, voire localement plus élevées. L'exploitation des eaux souterraines a induit de forts rebattements au long d'une zone littorale (d'environ 40 m au cours des 20 dernières années), alors que la surface piézométrique est moins affectée en amont vers le centre de l'île. La diminution de la réserve des eaux souterraines dans la zone étudiée représente seulement 5% des volumes d'eau extraits. Plus de 60% proviennent du centre de l'île. Les écoulements vers la mer peuvent être significatifs, (environ 30% des entrées totales) bien que cette estimation soit sujeté à une très forte incertitude. Se ha llevado a cabo un estudio detallado de una zona costera de 75 km2 situada en la costa del Municipio de Telde, al Este de la isla de Gran Canaria, en el Archipiélago Canario. En ella se encuentran materiales volcánicos de edad Pliocena a Reciente, con una formación detrítica intercalada (FDLP), que constituye la máxima singularidad del área. La explotación de las aguas subterráneas ha sido intensiva a partir de la década de 1950, fundamentalmente para el riego de cultivos intensivos y para el suministro a la población. Comparando las medianas de los valores de transmisividad y permeabilidad entre la FDLP y la Formación Fonolítica que está debajo (140 a 15 m2/día y 5 a 0,5 m/día respectivamente) se comprueba que la primera es un orden de magnitud más transmisiva y

Cabrera, M. C.; Custodio, E.

348

Lawyers and Leadership Deborah L. Rhode  

E-print Network

Lawyers and Leadership Deborah L. Rhode Director, Center on the Legal Profession, E.W. McFarland Professor of Law Stanford University Most lawyers come to the subject of leadership with well- founded "Leadership lite" includes classics such as If Aristotle Ran General Motors, and Leadership Secrets from

Kammen, Daniel M.

349

University of Rhode Island inAdvance January 18, 2007  

E-print Network

leads February chat URI alumnus and U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations on Terrorism: The World of Special Operations. Atlantic City, CVS chief makes $2.5 million gift to URI Tom Ryan

Rhode Island, University of

350

University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 1, 2007  

E-print Network

horizons? Coming up this spring are two exciting travel opportunities sponsored by the Alumni Association... University graduates first gerontological nurse practitioner During two-plus decades as a nurse, Donna's program to prepare nurses as gerontological nurse practitioners, she jumped right in. Last December, she

Rhode Island, University of

351

University of Rhode Island College of Arts and Sciences  

E-print Network

and Race in America #12;HIS 352 Topics in the History of Women and Gender HIS/AAF 359 History of Slavery in the administration of law; and the law as an instrument of social change. Such questions are central to liberal in America HIS/AAF 366 Twentieth Century Black Politics and Protest PHL 210 Women and Moral Rights PHL 217

Rhode Island, University of

352

75 FR 18521 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assistance Numbers (CFDA) are to be used for reporting and drawing funds: 97.030, Community Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment...

2010-04-12

353

University of Rhode Island inAdvance March 13, 2008  

E-print Network

's Council for Development speed networking event. "Ask the Pharmacist" chat Read the transcript of our recent Web chat with Dr. Kristina Ward '94 of URI-ABC6's "Ask the Pharmacist" feature. Dr. Ward, who is Cry Elmina, a book-length poem written for performance in a readers' theater format. More... URI

Rhode Island, University of

354

Further Dosimetry Studies at Rhode Island Nuclear Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The RINSC is a 2 mega-watt, light water cooled and graphite moderated reactor that has a graphite thermal column built as a user facility for sample irradiation. Over the past decade, after the reactor conversion from a highly-enriched uranium core to a low-enriched one, flux and dose measurements and calculations had been performed in the thermal column to update the ex-core parameters and to predict the effect from in-core fuel burn-up and rearrangement. The most recent data from measurements and calculations that have been made at the RINSC thermal column since October of 2005 are reported. Results of additional tests performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory against a calibrated neutron source indicate that, in the range from 5 mSv to 35 mSv, the neutron dose measured by the TLD dosimeters was about 5% to 10% higher than the delivered dose.

Reciniello, R. N.; Holden, N. E.; Hu, J.-P.; Johnson, D. G.; Middleton, M.; Tehan, T. N.

2009-08-01

355

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF OCEANOGRAPHY UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND  

E-print Network

Sounder Data Report Ulleung Basin of Japan/East Sea June 1999 to July 2001 128.5°E 129°E 129.5°E 130°E 130.4.2 Basin Average . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2

Rhode Island, University of

356

Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island  

E-print Network

.1 $9.2 $9.3 $9.8 $10.6 $10.7 $12.2 $14.0 $14.7 $15.7 $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 $14 $16 $18 FY2004 FY2005,692.27 $218,075.78 $140,875.04 $153,642.33 $111,772.92 $111,964.87 $169,713.41 $159,561.14 NASA $348

Rhode Island, University of

357

Annual Report FY2012 University of Rhode Island  

E-print Network

.3$86 TOTAL $2.4 ARRA $105 TOTAL $24.4 ARRA $95.8 TOTAL $1.7 ARRA $0 $20 $40 $60 $80 $100 $120 FY2002 FY2003 $5.2 Energy $4.4 INT $1.1 Other $1.1 EDUC $.8 NASA $.7 EPA $.6 #12;Annual Report FY2012 3.4 Awards

Rhode Island, University of

358

University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 24, 2008  

E-print Network

; continuous open bidding recruitment; and academic achievement. The Interfraternity Council was recognized for conference attendees, co-sponsored by URI's Music Department," says prize-winning poet Peter Covino

Rhode Island, University of

359

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...control and regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations than...828 as they affect a particular coal exploration or surface mining operation by publication of a notice to that effect in the Federal...

2011-07-01

360

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...control and regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations than...828 as they affect a particular coal exploration or surface mining operation by publication of a notice to that effect in the Federal...

2010-07-01

361

University of Rhode Island inAdvance May 12, 2005  

E-print Network

president for administration. More... Journalism students chronicle a "Day in the Life of URI" Thanks to 14, and Charlotte) and four that earned NIT berths (Boston University, Houston, Saint Joseph's, and Temple) last

Rhode Island, University of

362

Refreshments will be served University of Rhode Island English Department  

E-print Network

Awards Day Celebration Friday, April 25, 2014 at 3:00 pm Swan Auditorium, Swan Hall The Nancy Potter Gibbons - "Shoeless" The Nancy Potter Poetry Contest Winners Undergraduate Division First Place: Madeleine

Rhode Island, University of

363

33 CFR 117.905 - Rhode Island [Reserved  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...with black figures not less than six inches high to indicate the vertical clearance under the closed draw at all stages of the tide. The gages shall be so placed on the bridge that they are plainly visible to operators of vessels approaching the bridge...

2013-07-01

364

University of Rhode Island inAdvance January 17, 2008  

E-print Network

of biomedical sciences at the College of Pharmacy, has found for the first time evidence of Alzheimer. "This is the first evidence of promotion of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in a primate makes strong case for link between childhood lead exposure, Alzheimer's disease Nasser Zawia, professor

Rhode Island, University of

365

University of Rhode Island inAdvance February 16, 2006  

E-print Network

-25. Highlights include the Blue & White Ball held on February 24 at Newport's Hotel Viking and the URI/Xavier men to "Decadence in the Desert," a free reception on February 23, at the Fox Sports Grill in Scottsdale, Arizona, his legacy continues Nelson C. White, URI's oldest alumus, died this month at 102. He graduated from

Rhode Island, University of

366

University of Rhode Island inAdvance October 12, 2006  

E-print Network

enthusiastic geology students traveled to Utah, Wyoming, and Montana in late August for a field trip that Lewis and Clark would have envied. Accompanied by eight geology faculty and staff members, and Roy Bergstrom around the Chad Brown housing project in Providence where Catalina Martinez grew up. Today, as expedition

Rhode Island, University of

367

Revised: January 17, 2013 The University of Rhode Island  

E-print Network

; protocol implementation; data collection, entry, and analysis; and manuscript preparation. This work involves using computer statistical and graphics programs, preparing blood samples, and researching

Rhode Island, University of

368

University of Rhode Island inAdvance September 15, 2005  

E-print Network

and driving, according to a new survey released recently by Common Ground, a university-based substance abuse prevention program. Alcohol-impaired driving is the leading cause of death among U.S. college students. More

Rhode Island, University of

369

University of Rhode Island inAdvance July 7, 2005  

E-print Network

.m. Complimentary hors d'oeuvres and desserts will be served. RSVP online by September 2, or contact the Alumni on Tuesday, August 23, for Pride in URI Night at McCoy Stadium -- always a great evening of baseball, food

Rhode Island, University of

370

University of Rhode Island inAdvance September 1, 2005  

E-print Network

and enjoy complimentary hors d'oeuvres and desserts. R.S.V.P. online, or email alumni@advance.uri.edu. Pride Nursing Dean Dayle Joseph. This special evening of fun, food, music and dancing, will feature a silent

Rhode Island, University of

371

University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 13, 2006  

E-print Network

to carry oxygen and has high concentrations of beneficial stem cells," said Mercer. More... Engineering in URI's College of Nursing. More... Women's Council increases women's influence at URI The Women's Council for Development was launched in 2005 as a means of encouraging women to play a more active role

Rhode Island, University of

372

University of Rhode Island inAdvance January 3, 2008  

E-print Network

in explosives and pyrotechnics. "A major portion of chemistry is identifying and characterizing compounds. It of New Year's resolutions, consider one of the great travel URI adds new chemistry major with forensics component Students can now choose to major in chemistry with a specialization in forensics. The new 130

Rhode Island, University of

373

University of Rhode Island inAdvance July 3, 2008  

E-print Network

Balloon Festival, an authentic New England lobster bake, skating at Boss Ice Arena, and lots more. Talent recipients for 2008 are William Flynn '75, president and CEO of Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings; John King '85, CNN chief national correspondent; Clarice Odhiambo '88, founder of Africa Center for Engineering

Rhode Island, University of

374

University of Rhode Island inAdvance October 26, 2006  

E-print Network

their living quarters in the new North Woods Complex. During the Columbus Day weekend, 238 students moved into the first new housing facility on the Kingston Campus since 1971. Building A of the North Woods Complex reportedly haunted the house that Lambda http://advance.uri.edu/inadvance/default.htm (1 of 2)11/2/06 11

Rhode Island, University of

375

University of Rhode Island inAdvance April 10, 2008  

E-print Network

and juniors) from seven urban schools signed a contract with the University's Guaranteed Admissions Program/Talent professor's book focuses on FDR's press secretary Linda Lotridge Levin of Providence, professor and chair: The Story of Stephen T. Early, America's First Modern Press Secretary, recently published by Prometheus

Rhode Island, University of

376

The Condition of College and Career Readiness, 2011: Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Annually, ACT provides a snapshot of the college and career readiness of ACT-tested high school graduates. This report is offered as a service to inform policymakers and practitioners about selected indicators of effectiveness and how that translates into readiness. It is designed to stimulate discussion, inquiry, and action. This report for the…

ACT, Inc., 2011

2011-01-01

377

University of Rhode Island inAdvance December 7, 2006  

E-print Network

edition now! Winter Gala Get out your dancing shoes and register now for our 16th annual Winter Gala for the URI grad in your life? A personalized brick to be placed on the Quad in the URI Century Walk is a gift other groups. Fashion merchandising students styled and dressed the student models, who went through

Rhode Island, University of

378

University of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode IslandUniversity of Rhode Island Graduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of OceanographyGraduate School of Oceanography  

E-print Network

to any electronic medium or machine readable form without prior consent, in writing, from the University Microsoft, MS-DOS and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY

Rhode Island, University of

379

University of Rhode Island inAdvance December 20, 2007  

E-print Network

.m. More... Artificial jellyfish, explosives sensor, seabed battery among projects being developed When of widely-distributed underwater sensors, they imagined attaching the sensors to artificial jellyfish with URI oceanographers and a Providence College expert in jellyfish locomotion to explore this novel idea

Rhode Island, University of

380

University of Rhode Island inAdvance November 21, 2007  

E-print Network

-Borne Disease in support of the Center's public health education program for preventing tick bites and Lyme at reducing the risk of contracting Lyme disease. The gift is part of the Making a Difference campaign. More disease. The Apple Pickers Foundation made the contribution after meeting with URI Entomology Professor

Rhode Island, University of

381

University of Rhode Island inAdvance January 19, 2006  

E-print Network

's Hotel Viking and the URI/ Xavier men's basketball game and pre- game buffet on February 25. Register of new law to crack down on human trafficking After years of working on issues related to human House ceremony where President George W. Bush signed a new law that cracks down on human trafficking

Rhode Island, University of

382

University of Rhode Island inAdvance August 30, 2007  

E-print Network

the 50-year silence between Taiwan and the mainland. More... URI grad student named Switzer Fellow a Switzer Environmental Fellowship, one of the nation's most prestigious awards for graduate students

Rhode Island, University of

383

University of Rhode Island inAdvance September 28, 2006  

E-print Network

. We hope you will be part of this special inaugural event. More... Students help build Katrina house In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the URI Clearinghouse for Volunteers swung into action traffic to evacuate residents and visitors, directing them to shelters and other resources, and ensuring

Rhode Island, University of

384

Recent Trends in Bird Abundance on Rhode Island Salt Marshes  

EPA Science Inventory

Salt marsh habitat is under pressure from development on the landward side, and sea level rise from the seaward side. The resulting loss of habitat is potentially disastrous for salt marsh dependent species. To assess the population status of three species of salt marsh dependent...

385

A comparative study on mesozooplankton abundance and diversity between a protected and an unprotected coastal area of Andaman Islands.  

PubMed

The study was carried out to understand the variability in phytoplankton production (Chlorophyll a) and mesozooplankton diversity from two different shallow coastal regions of south Andaman viz. Port Blair Bay (PBB), the only real urban area among the islands and Mahatma Gandhi Marine National Park, a Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Wandoor. Seasonal sampling was carried out during the Northeast monsoon (NEM--November 2005), Intermonsoon (IM--April 2006), and Southwest monsoon (SWM--August 2006). Significant (P < 0.05) seasonal variation was observed in the environmental variables at both the regions. Higher average chlorophyll a (Chl. a) and mesozooplankton standing stock were observed at PBB compared to MPA, but the seasonal variation observed was marginal at both the study areas. Chl. a showed a steep increasing gradient from outer to the inner regions of the PBB. The number of zooplankton taxa recorded at both areas was quite similar, but marked differences were noticed in their relative contribution to the total abundance. Eventhough the Copepoda dominated at both the areas, the non-copepod taxa differed significantly between the regions. Dominance of carnivores such as siphonophores and chaetognaths were noticed at PBB, while filter feeders such as appendicularians and decapod larvae were more abundant at MPA. A total of 20 and 21 copepod families was recorded from PBB and MPA, respectively. Eleven species of chaetognaths were observed as common at both areas. Larval decapods were found to be predominant at MPA with 20 families; whereas, at PBB, only 12 families were recorded. In the light of the recent reports on various changes occurring in the coastal waters of the Andaman Islands, it is suspected that the difference in Chl. a as well as the mesozooplankton standing stock and community structure observed between the two study areas may be related to the various anthropogenic events influencing the coastal waters. PMID:24729177

Pillai, Honey U K; Jayalakshmy, K V; Biju, A; Jayalakshmi, K J; Paulinose, V T; Devi, C B L; Nair, V R; Revichandran, C; Menon, N R; Achuthankutty, C T; Panampunnayil, S U

2014-06-01

386

Interaction of waves, currents and tides, and wave-energy impact on the beach area of Sylt Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Erosion due to waves is an important and actual problem for most coastal areas of the North Sea. The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of wave action on the coastline of Sylt Island. From a 2-year time series (November 1999 to October 2001) of hydrological and wave parameters generated with a coupled wave-current modelling system, a period comprising storm ‘Anatol’ (3-4 December 1999) is used to investigate the effects of waves on currents and water levels and the input of wave energy into the coastline. The wave-induced stress causes an increase of the current velocity of 1 m/s over sand and an additional drift along the coast of about 20 cm/s. This produces a water level increase of more than 20 cm in parts of the tidal basin. The model system also calculates the wave energy input into the coastline. Scenario runs for December 1999 with a water level increase of 50 cm and wind velocity increased by 10% show that the input of the wave energy into the west coast of Sylt Island increases by 30% compared to present conditions. With regard to the forecasted near-future (Woth et al., Ocean Dyn 56:3-15, 2006) increase of strong storm surges, the scenario results indicate an increased risk of coastal erosion in the surf zone of Sylt Island.

Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Eppel, Dieter P.; Kapitza, Hartmut

2009-06-01

387

Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada  

SciTech Connect

In 2000, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) embarked on an initiative to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (shade trees, reflective roofs and pavements) in reducing cooling energy use in buildings, lowering the ambient air temperature and improve air quality. This report summarizes the efforts of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the impacts of HIR measures on building cooling- and heating-energy use. We discuss our efforts to calculate annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of HIR strategies in the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area. The analysis is focused on three major building types that offer most saving potentials: residence, office and retail store. Using an hourly building energy simulation model, we quantify the energy saving potentials of (1) using cool roofs on individual buildings [direct effect], (2) planting deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building [direct effect], (3) planting coniferous wind-shielding vegetation near building [direct effect], (4) ambient cooling by a large-scale program of urban reforestation with reflective building roofs and pavements [indirect effect], (5) and the combined direct and indirect effects. Results show potential annual energy savings of over $11M (with uniform residential and commercial electricity and gas prices of $0.084/kWh and $5.54/GJ) could be realized by ratepayers from the combined direct and indirect effects of HIR strategies. Of that total, about 88 percent was from the direct impact roughly divided equally among reflective roofs, shade trees and wind-shielding, and the remainder (12 percent) from the indirect impact of the cooler ambient air temperature. The residential sector accounts for over half (59 percent) of the total, offices 13 percent and retail stores 28 percent. Savings from cool roofs were about 20 percent, shade trees 30 percent, wind shielding of tree 37 percent, and indirect effect 12 percent. These results are highly sensitive to the price of gas. Assuming a residential gas price of $10.84/GJ (gas price during December 2001), the net annual savings are reduced to about $10M; about 78 percent resulted from wind-shielding, 16 percent from shading by trees, and 5 percent from cool roofs. Potential annual electricity savings were estimated at about 150GWh or over $12M, of that about 75 percent accrued from roofs and shade trees and only 2 percent from wind shielding. The indirect effect was 23 percent. Potential peak-power avoidance was estimated at 250MW with about 74 percent attributed to the direct impacts (roofs about 24 percent, shade trees 51 percent and wind-shielding a small negative percent) and the remainder (26 percent) to the indirect impact. The greatest part of avoided peak power (about 83 percent) was because of the effects of the residences and the rest shared by offices (7 percent) and retail stores (9 percent).

Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

2001-11-30

388

Degradation of marine ecosystems and decline of fishery resources in marine protected areas in the US Virgin Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The large number of marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Caribbean (over 100) gives a misleading impression of the amount of protection the reefs and other marine resources in this region are receiving. This review synthesizes information on marine resources in two of the first MPAs established in the USA, namely Virgin Islands National Park (1962) and Buck Island Reef National Monument (1961), and provides compelling evidence that greater protection is needed, based on data from some of the longest running research projects on coral reefs, reef fish assemblages, and seagrass beds for the Caribbean. Most of the stresses affecting marine resources throughout the Caribbean (e.g. damage from boats, hurricanes and coral diseases) are also causing deterioration in these MPAs. Living coral cover has decreased and macroalgal cover has increased. Seagrass densities have decreased because of storms and anchor damage. Intensive fishing in the US Virgin Islands has caused loss of spawning aggregations and decreases in mean fish size and abundance. Groupers and snappers are far less abundant and herbivorous fishes comprise a greater proportion of samples than in the 1960s. Effects of intensive fishing are evident even within MPA boundaries. Although only traditional fishing with traps of 'conventional design' is allowed, commercial trap fishing is occurring. Visual samples of fishes inside and outside Virgin Islands National 'Park showed no significant differences in number of species, biomass, or mean size of fishes. Similarly, the number of fishes per trap was statistically similar inside and outside park waters. These MPAs have not been effective because an unprecedented combination of natural and human factors is assaulting the resources, some of the greatest damage is from stresses outside the control of park managers (e.g. hurricanes), and enforcement of the few regulations has been limited. Fully functioning MPAs which prohibit fishing and other extractive uses (e.g. no-take marine reserves) could reverse some of the degradation, allowing replenishment of the fishery resources and recovery of benthic habitats.

Rogers, C.S.; Beets, J.

2001-01-01

389

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the...These areas are used for various surface and air gunnery and...

2012-07-01

390

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the...These areas are used for various surface and air gunnery and...

2010-07-01

391

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

...ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the...These areas are used for various surface and air gunnery and...

2014-07-01

392

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the...These areas are used for various surface and air gunnery and...

2013-07-01

393

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...bombardment areas. (a) The danger zones. (1) The waters of the...These areas are used for various surface and air gunnery and...

2011-07-01

394

Simulation of ground-water flow and potential contaminant transport at Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Island County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-dimensional finite-difference steady-state ground-water flow model was developed to simulate hydraulic conditions at the Area 6 Landfill, Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, near Oak Harbor, Washington. Remediation efforts were started in 1995 in an attempt to contain trichloroethene and other contaminants in the ground water. The model was developed as a tool to test the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat remediation efforts as well as alternative remediation strategies. The model utilized stratigraphic data from approximately 76 Navy and 19 private wells to define the geometry of the shallow, intermediate, and deep aquifers and the intervening confining layers. Initial aquifer parameters and recharge estimates from aquifer tests and published remedial investigation reports were used in the model and then adjusted until simulated water levels closely matched observed water-level data collected prior to the onset of remediation in 1995. The calibrated model was then modified to depict the remedial pump-and-treat system, in which contaminated ground water is extracted, treated, and returned to the ground surface for infiltration. The water levels simulated by the modified model were compared with observed water levels for the 1998 calendar year, during which time the pump-and-treat system was in nearly continuous operation and the ground-water system had equilibrated to steady-state conditions. Although artificial boundaries were used in the model, the choice of model boundary conditions was simulation in the area of primary concern surrounding the western contaminant plume and extraction wells. Particle tracking results indicate that the model can effectively simulate the advective transport of contaminants from the source area to the pumping wells and thus be used to test alternative remedial pumping strategies.

Simonds, F. William

2002-01-01

395

The behavior of gold in unaltered island arc tholeiitic rocks from Izu-Oshima, Fuji, and Osoreyama volcanic areas, Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High Au concentrations (4-25 ppb) in titanomagnetite concentrates from basalts and basaltic andesites of the Izu-Oshima and Fuji volcanic areas in the East Japan arc indicate that Au is strongly partitioned into titanomagnetite relative to the bulk rock. The concentration of An in volcanic rocks increases during the early stages of fractional crystallization, dominated by olivine, pyroxenes, and plagioclase, but decreases with subsequent fractional crystallization involving titanomagnetite. A delay in titanomagnetite formation during fractional crystallization subsequently results in comparatively high concentrations of Au in island arc tholeftes. Wide variations in the Au concentration are observed in rocks derived from primary magmas across a single volcanic area, and these can be positively correlated with the concentrations of incompatible elements such as Rb and Zr. These features are inherited from a S-depleted mantle source, since variable degrees of partial melting do not significantly affect the Au concentrations of the primary magmas.

Togashi, Shigeko; Terashima, Shigeru

1997-02-01

396

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

397

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2014-07-01

398

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2011-07-01

399

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2010-07-01

400

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2012-07-01

401

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific...Kwajalein Test Site will coordinate safe passage of surface shipping through the area. (2) All ships...

2013-07-01

402

Geophysical reconnaissance of prospective geothermal areas on the island of Hawaii using electrical methods  

SciTech Connect

Resistivity data from several areas were compiled, analyzed, and interpreted in terms of possible geologic models. On the basis of this analysis alone, two areas have been ruled out for possible geothermal exploitation, two have been interpreted to have a moderate-temperature resource, and two have been interpreted to have a high-temperature resource. The two areas which have been ruled out are the Keaau and South Point areas. The Kawaihae area and the lower northwest rift zone of Hualalai appear to have anomalous resistivity structures, which suggest a moderate-temperature resource in each of these areas. Finally, specific areas in the lower southwest and lower east rift zones of Kilauea have been outlined as locations where high-temperature fluids may exist at depth.

Kauahikaua, J.; Mattice, M.

1981-07-01

403

LIS - Lampedusa Island Spectrometer - for atmospheric compounds observations in the Mediterranean area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The LIS (Lampedusa Island Spectrometer) is an instrument for the measurements of solar radiation scattered along the vertical direction in the UV-Visible spectral regions. By means of DOAS methodology application, the vertical contents of atmospheric compounds as NO2 and ozone, are calculated. LIS will be installed at the Lampedusa Island Climatic Station (35.50' N, 12.54' E) with the aim to monitor the physical and the chemical processes of air masses exchange between tropical and mid-latitudes regions. The heart of the spectrometer is the monochromator, where the luminous bundle is decomposed in its wavelengths thanks to a holographic spherical diffraction grating of 1200 grooves/mm (with spectral dispersion of 2.4 nm/mm at 300 nm, and spectral resolution of 0,5 nm). This last is moved by a stepper motor allowing inquiring the spectral range from 250 to 800 nm, in successive windows of 60 nm each. The Optical Mechanic Unit (OMU) comprises, beyond to the monochromator, the incoming radiation input. This can be positioned for external radiation or internal calibration lamps measurements by means of another stepper motor. Furthermore, a series of mechanical and electrical device as the filter wheel, 2 calibration lamps (HG and QJ), optical diodes and temperature sensors are utilized to optimize the performance of the instrument and to ensure the goodness of the measurements. The Electronic Control Unit (ECU) is located under the OMU and is composed by a monoboard computer, steppers and CCD driver devices. Its main tasks are the measurements and the storage of the collected data by means of LISDAS (LIS Data Acquisition Software). The first results for NO2 vertical column obtained during the LIS testing phase are presented. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:The author Daniele Bortoli was financially supported by the Subprograma Ciência e Tecnologia do 3° Quadro Comunitário de Apoio.

Bortoli, D.; Giovanelli, G.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

2003-04-01

404

Surface evolution of faceted islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ge islands were grown on Si(0 0 1) by ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputter epitaxy and their surface was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. The facets composing the island surface were identified and their area was measured as a function of island size. Three kinds of islands were observed: pyramids, dome shaped islands and large dislocated islands. A statistical analysis revealed that domes do not ripen in a self-similar way. The main facets composing the surface of dislocated islands were identified.

Rastelli, Armando; von Känel, Hans

2002-09-01

405

A Sharp Continent-Ocean Transition in the Area of the Canary Islands: Evidence From Upper Mantle and Lower Crustal Xenoliths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our present information on passive margins rests almost exclusively on seismic and density data. An important exception is the west Iberia margin where petrological and geochemical information on crustal and mantle rocks have been made available through drilling experiments. In order to increase our information about, and understanding of, passive margins and their mode of formation, more information on crustal and mantle rocks along different types of passive margins are needed. In the area of the Canary Islands such information has been obtained through the study of mantle and deep crustal xenoliths brought to the surface by basaltic magmas. In-situ laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS mineral analyses have enabled us to "see through" the effects of the Canary Islands event and obtain robust information about the original (pre-Canarian) chemical character of the crust and upper mantle on which these islands are built. Our studies show that the lithosphere beneath the Canary Islands originated as highly refractory N-MORB type oceanic mantle overlain by highly refractory N-MORB crust. Both the lithospheric mantle and lower crust have been metasomatized to different degrees by a variety of fluid and melts. The enriched material is commonly concentrated along grain boundaries and cracks through mineral grains, suggesting that the metasomatism is relatively recent, and is thus associated with the Canary Islands magmatism. The original, strongly depleted trace element patterns and the low 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios typical of the oceanic lithosphere are preserved in the minerals in the least metasomatized rocks (e.g. LaN/LuN<0.1 in orthopyroxene and 87Sr/86Sr=0.7027-0.7029 in clinopyroxene in mantle xenoliths). The compositions of the most depleted gabbro samples from the different islands are closely similar, implying that there was no significant change in chemistry during the early stages of formation of the Atlantic oceanic crust in this area. Strongly depleted gabbros similar to those collected in Fuerteventura have also been retrieved in the MARK area along the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Furthermore, we have found no evidence of continental material that might reflect attenuated continental lithosphere in this area. The easternmost Canary Islands, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, appear to overlap the lower part of the continental slope of Africa. The presence of normal oceanic lithosphere beneath these islands implies that the continent-ocean transition in the Canary Islands area must be relatively sharp, in contrast to the passive non-volcanic margin further north along the coast of Morocco, along the Iberia peninsula, and in many other areas. Our data also contradict the hypothesis that a mantle plume was present in this area during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean.

Neumann, E.; Vannucci, R.; Tiepolo, M.; Griffin, W. L.; Pearson, N. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

2005-05-01

406

78 FR 70005 - Naval Base Ventura County, San Nicolas Island, California; Restricted Area  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...area to realign subsections (designated Alpha, Bravo and Charlie) within the restricted...focus of the restricted area is section Alpha, current operations are primarily focused...separation at the east end between sections Alpha and Charlie. There is also an error...

2013-11-22

407

Determinants of Visitor Pro-Environmental Intentions on Two Small Greek Islands: Is Ecotourism Possible at Coastal Protected Areas?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass `seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors.

Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

2012-07-01

408

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17,1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its notice of intent (Fed. Regis. 575433) of February 14,1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Groundwater quality inside and outside the lower east rift zone (LERZ) of Kilauea is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. The degree of mixing between meteoric water, sea water, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the LERZ also is discussed. Finally, groundwater pathways and use in the Puna District are discussed. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey publications and open-file reports.

Staub, W.P.

1994-06-01

409

Monitoring the effect of urban green areas on the heat island in Athens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of urban green areas in the microclimatic conditions of cities, during summer, is investigated in this paper through\\u000a monitoring campaigns carried out at the National garden, at the city centre of Athens. Two types of investigations were carried\\u000a out: i) a microscopic one that investigated the thermal conditions inside the Garden and the immediate surrounding urban area\\u000a and

I. Zoulia; M. Santamouris; A. Dimoudi

2009-01-01

410

Culturing a plant microbiome community at the cross-Rhodes  

E-print Network

Meetings Culturing a plant microbiome community at the cross-Rhodes 28th New Phytologist Symposium: Functions and ecology of the plant microbiome, Rhodes, Greece, May 2012 Plants live in close association and endophytic microbial communi- ties; Genetic control and selection of plant microbiomes; and Characterization

Dangl, Jeff

411

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Officer in Charge, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as he/she may designate. (Sec. 3012, 70A Stat. 157; 10...

2011-07-01

412

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Officer in Charge, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as he/she may designate. (Sec. 3012, 70A Stat. 157; 10...

2010-07-01

413

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Officer in Charge, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as he/she may designate. (Sec. 3012, 70A Stat. 157; 10...

2013-07-01

414

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

...The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Officer in Charge, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as he/she may designate. (Sec. 3012, 70A Stat. 157; 10...

2014-07-01

415

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Officer in Charge, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 96860-7625, and such agencies as he/she may designate. (Sec. 3012, 70A Stat. 157; 10...

2012-07-01

416

Geohydrology of the Bethpage-Hicksville-Levittown area, Long Island, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of groundwater levels and flow in east-central Nassau County, N.Y. , began in October 1985. The 11.4 sq-mile area encompasses parts of Bethpage, Hicksville, Levittown, Plainview, Plainedge, and Farmingdale. Approximately 1,200 ft of unconsolidated Cretaceous deposits and 50 to 100 ft of Pleistocene deposits overlie bedrock throughout the area. The unconsolidated deposits consist mostly of sand, gravel, silt, and clay and have good water-transmitting properties except where clay forms continuous layers that can impede groundwater flow. The area is mostly residential and industrial. Pumpage for public supply exceeds 10 million gal/day, most of which eventually discharges from the groundwater system to tidewater as sewage outflow. Industrial pumpage during summer exceeds 10 million gal/day, but most of the water is returned to the system through recharge basins. Groundwater levels in this area fluctuate seasonally in response to natural recharge, pumping, and use of recharge basins. (Author 's abstract)

Smolensky, D.A.; Feldman, S.M.

1988-01-01

417

Rhyolitic tephra marker beds in the Tongariro area, North Island, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Tongariro area 13 rhyolitic tephras erupted from Okataina, Maroa, and Taupo Volcanic Centres over the last 20 000 years are interbedded with local andesitic tephras. The order of succession of the 13 tephras is established by stratigraphy, and is confirmed by their mineralogical composition and by chemical analysis of their titanomagnetites. Seven of the rhyolitic tephras have been

W. W. Topping; B. P. Kohn

1973-01-01

418

Insecticide resistance of Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus in Hainan Island, a malaria-endemic area of China  

PubMed Central

Background Malaria is one of the most important public health problems in Southeast Asia, including Hainan Island, China. Vector control is the main malaria control measure, and insecticide resistance is a major concern for the effectiveness of chemical insecticide control programs. The objective of this study is to determine the resistance status of the main malaria vector species to pyrethroids and other insecticides recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for indoor residual sprays. Methods The larvae and pupae of Anopheles mosquitoes were sampled from multiple sites in Hainan Island, and five sites yielded sufficient mosquitoes for insecticide susceptibility bioassays. Bioassays of female adult mosquitoes three days after emergence were conducted in the two most abundant species, Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus, using three insecticides (0.05% deltamethrin, 4% DDT, and 5% malathion) and following the WHO standard tube assay procedure. P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were measured. Mutations at the knockdown resistance (kdr) gene and the ace-1gene were detected by DNA sequencing and PCR-RFLP analysis, respectively. Results An. sinensis and An. vagus were the predominant Anopheles mosquito species. An. sinensis was found to be resistant to DDT and deltamethrin. An. vagus was susceptible to deltamethrin but resistant to DDT and malathion. Low kdr mutation (L1014F) frequency (<10%) was detected in An. sinensis, but no kdr mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Modest to high (45%-75%) ace-1 mutation frequency was found in An. sinensis populations, but no ace-1 mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Significantly higher P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase activities were detected in deltamethrin-resistant An. sinensis, and significantly higher P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were found in malathion-resistant An. vagus mosquitoes. Conclusions Multiple insecticide resistance was found in An. sinensis and An. vagus in Hainan Island, a malaria-endemic area of China. Cost-effective integrated vector control programs that go beyond synthetic insecticides are urgently needed. PMID:24589247

2014-01-01

419

Biogeographic and Ecological Regulation of Disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre Virus in Island Mice Is Related to Island Area, Precipitation, and Predator Richness.  

E-print Network

Biogeographic and Ecological Regulation of Disease: Prevalence of Sin Nombre Virus in Island Mice naturalist may 2011 Notes and Comments Biogeographic and Ecological Regulation of Disease: Prevalence of Sin: The relative roles of top-down and bottom-up forces in affecting disease prevalence in wild hosts is important

Allan, Brian

420

Hydrology of the Babylon-Islip area, Suffolk County, Long Island, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The report area comprises 270 square miles, and includes most of the Towns of Babylon and Islip, and parts of the Towns of Huntington, Smithtown, and Brookhaven, in southwestern Suffolk County, New York. Almost all the water used in the area is obtained from wells screened in permeable zones of the ground-water reservoir which consists of unconsolidated deposits of gravel, sand, silt, and clay as much as 1,800 feet thick. The ground-water reservoir contains three principal aquifers. From the surface down these are (a) surficial deposits of sand and gravel of Pleistocene age, (b) sands of the Magothy (?) Formation of Cretaceous age, and (c) the Lloyd Sand Member of the Raritan Formation of Cretaceous age. At present only the upper two aquifers are tapped by wells. Natural replenishment of the ground-water reservoir in the area takes place entirely by infiltration of precipitation and averages about 215 mgd (million gallons per day). Average ground-water runoff to streams above tidewater is 114 mgd, and it is estimated that an additional 54 mgd is discharged into tidal reaches of streams. Ground-water evapotranspiration is computed to be about 10 mgd and submarine outflow from the area is estimated to be 18 mgd. The average streamflow of the area above tidewater is 120 mgd. Because of the permeable soils and low relief, direct runoff is only about 5 percent of the average streamflow. Streams are perennial along their middle and lower reaches and exhibit well-sustained low flows. Flooding rarely occurs although continued urbanization may result in minor flooding problems as additional storm sewers are constructed. Water in most of the area is generally of good quality; however, it may be contaminated locally. Some streams and parts of the water-table aquifer contain low concentrations of synthetic detergents and other dissolved constituents from domestic and industrial wastes. Salty water occurs in parts of the water-table aquifer in the area under and bordering Great South Bay and under the barrier beaches. Present information, however, indicates that submarine outflow in the artesian aquifers is sufficient to maintain the fresh water-salt water interface some distance seaward of the barrier beaches. Ground-water withdrawals in 1960 averaged 39 mgd, most of which was returned to the ground through cesspools, leaching beds, and recharge wells; pumpage did not appreciably affect the natural water balance of the groundwater reservoir. If withdrawals continue to be artificially recharged, pumpage can be increased at least fivefold before consumptive losses materially reduce ground-water levels. However, if the area were completely sewered in the future, an adequate supply of ground water for a substantially increased population could not be obtained without (a) reducing the amount of ground water in storage in the reservoir or (b) recharging treated-sewage effluent.

Pluhowski, Edward J.; Kantrowitz, Irwin H.

1964-01-01

421

Repeat Measurements of Seismic Noise at the Waiotapu Geothermal Area, North Island, NZ  

SciTech Connect

The amplitudes of seismic ground noise were remeasured at 66 sites in the Waiotapu and Reporoa geothermal areas in 1995 to determine whether amplitudes had changed since the first survey in 1970. In both 1995 and 1970 high levels of seismic noise occurred in two localities, one at Waiotapu and one at Reporoa. The elevated levels of seismic noise at most sites are thought to be caused by surface or near-surface geothermal activity. At seven sites in the Waiotapu area seismic noise levels were almost the same in 1995 as in 1970, indicating no change in the intensity of the source of the geothermal seismic noise. At most other sites the 1995 seismic noise levels were different to those measured in 1970, although at sites with high levels of seismic noise the differences were usually less than at sites with low levels of seismic noise.

Whiteford, P.C.

1995-01-01

422

A Limnological Survey of the Ablation Point Area, Alexander Island, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ice-free area around Ablation Point (70^circ 49' S, 68^circ 25' W) is of particular limnological interest. Numerous ponds and pools lie on coastal moraines and large, permanently ice-covered lakes lie in the valleys. Two of the lakes are unusual in that they are in contact with seawater from George VI Sound which is covered by an ice shelf, 100-500

R. B. Heywood

1977-01-01

423

Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in particular for Tl, Rb, Zn, Mn, As, Pb, Se, Bi, Al. The highest concentrations were found both in soils and plants close to the most active fumarolic areas of Stefanos, Kaminakia and Polyvotes and also close to the Geothermal Drill (exploration well). Moreover, both soils and plants showed a good correlation between Cu-Zn, Cu-Pb, Bi-Pb, Ba-Sr, Bi-Tl, Ti-Al, Ni-Al, Tl-As, Te-Tl, Te-Se as well as REE's. From the comparison between Cistus sp. and Erica sp. we found a significant enrichment in the former respect to the latter, making Cistus sp. the most suitable plant for biomonitoring studies at Nisyros.

Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

2014-05-01

424

Keywords. Area selection; Falkland Islands; Islas Malvinas; Namibia; place prioritization; reserve network design J. Biosci. | Vol. 27 | No. 4 | Suppl. 2 | July 2002 | 339346 | Indian Academy of Sciences  

E-print Network

is to prioritize places on the basis of their bio- diversity value and to devise management strategies to conserve an explicit framework for systematic conservation planning has emerged (Mar- gules and Pressey 2000339 Keywords. Area selection; Falkland Islands; Islas Malvinas; Namibia; place prioritization

Sarkar, Sahotra

425

Origin and migration of wild and escaped farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in oceanic areas north of the Faroe Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hansen, L. P., and Jacobsen, J. A. 2003. Origin and migration of wild and escaped farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in oceanic areas north of the Faroe Islands. - ICES Journal of Marine Science, 60: 110-119. We examined the distribution, migration and origin of wild and escaped farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., in the northeast Atlantic ocean north

Lars P. Hansen; Jan Arge Jacobsen

2003-01-01

426

Biological productivity regime and associated N cycling in the vicinity of Kerguelen Island area, Southern Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although the Southern Ocean is considered a High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll area (HNLC), massive and recurrent blooms are observed over and downstream the Kerguelen Plateau. This mosaic of blooms is triggered by a higher iron supply resulting from the interaction between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the local bathymetry. Net primary production, N-uptake (NO3- and NH4+), and nitrification rates were measured at 8 stations in austral spring 2011 (October-November) during the KEOPS2 cruise in the Kerguelen area. Iron fertilization stimulates primary production, with integrated net primary production and growth rates much higher in the fertilized areas (up to 315 mmol C m-2 d-1 and up to 0.31 d-1, respectively) compared to the HNLC reference site (12 mmol C m-2 d-1 and 0.06 d-1, respectively). Primary production is mainly sustained by nitrate uptake, with f ratio (corresponding to NO3- uptake/(NO3- uptake + NH4+ uptake)) lying in the upper end of the observations for the Southern Ocean (up to 0.9). Unexpectedly, we report unprecedented rates of nitrification (up to ~3 mmol C m-2 d-1, with ~90% of them <1 mmol C m-2 d-1). It appears that nitrate is assimilated in the upper part of the mixed layer (coinciding with the euphotic layer) and regenerated in the lower parts. We suggest that such high contribution of nitrification to nitrate assimilation is driven by (i) a deep mixed layer, extending well below the euphotic layer, allowing nitrifiers to compete with phytoplankton for the assimilation of ammonium, (ii) extremely high rates of primary production for the Southern Ocean, stimulating the release of dissolved organic matter, and (iii) an efficient food web, allowing the reprocessing of organic N and the retention of nitrogen into the dissolved phase through ammonium, the substrate for nitrification.

Cavagna, A. J.; Fripiat, F.; Elskens, M.; Dehairs, F.; Mangion, P.; Chirurgien, L.; Closset, I.; Lasbleiz, M.; Flores-Leiva, L.; Cardinal, D.; Leblanc, K.; Fernandez, C.; Lefèvre, D.; Oriol, L.; Blain, S.; Quéguiner, B.

2014-12-01

427

33 CFR 165.153 - Regulated Navigation Area: Long Island Sound Marine Inspection and Captain of the Port Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...addressed to Captain of the Port, Long Island Sound, 120 Woodward Ave., New Haven, CT 06512. (4) All vessels operating...addressed to Captain of the Port, Long Island Sound, 120 Woodward Ave., New Haven, CT 06512. (5) Vessels over 1,600...

2010-07-01

428

[Reproduction of the Spanish sardine, Sardinella aurita (Clupeiformes: Clupeidae) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island, Venezuela].  

PubMed

Sex ratio, sexual maturity, fecundity and time of spawning of the Spanish sardine (Sardinella aurita) from the south-eastern area of Margarita Island were determined through monthly samplings of commercial fisheries, from January 2004 to April 2005. A total of 3 736 individuals were examined. Sex ratio was 55.47% females and 44.53% males, with a 1:1.25 sexual proportion (chi2 = 44.454, p < 0.05). Length at first sexual maturity (L50) was 20 cm. Spawning of the species was confirmed to be partial and continuous throughout the year, with two peaks of intensity during the first and last quarters. Absolute fecundity ranged from 10,530 to 83,779 oocytes and it was proportional to body length (F = -100,900 + 6696.2 * L) and to body weight (F = 13,327 + 5666.3 * P). Relative fecundity ranged from 149 to 1020 oocytes/g and also was proportional to body length and weight. We concluded that the Spanish sardine exhibits two peaks of spawning activity per year with a very fluctuating partial fecundity which could possibly be explained by environmental variability. PMID:19419083

Gassman, Juan; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo W

2008-12-01

429

Metagenomic profiles of free-living archaea, bacteria and small eukaryotes in coastal areas of Sichang island, Thailand  

PubMed Central

Background Tha Wang and Tham Phang coasts, though situated at similar oceanographic positions on Sichang island, Chonburi province, Thailand, are different in bay geography and amount of municipal disturbances. These affect the marine ecosystems. The study used metagenomics combined with 16S and 18S rDNA pyrosequencing to identify types and distributions of archaea, bacteria, fungi and small eukaryotes of sizes ranges 0.45 and ~30 ?m. Results Following the open bay geography and minimal municipal sewages, Tham Phang coast showed the cleaner water properties, described by color, salinity, pH, conductivity and percent dissolved oxygen. The 16S and 18S rDNA metagenomic profiles for Tha Wang and Tham Phang coasts revealed many differences, highlighting by low Lennon and Yue & Clayton theta similarity indices (66.03-73.03% for 16S rDNA profiles, 2.85-25.38% for 18S rDNA profiles). For 16S rDNA, the percent compositions of species belonging to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Gammatimonadetes, Tenericutes, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, Chlamydiae, Euryarchaeota, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Thermotogae and Aquificae were higher or distinctly present in Tha Wang. In Tham Phang, except Actinobacteria, the fewer number of prokaryotic species existed. For 18S rDNA, fungi represented 74.745% of the species in Tha Wang, whereas only 6.728% in Tham Phang. Basidiomycota (71.157%) and Ascomycota (3.060%) were the major phyla in Tha Wang. Indeed, Tha Wang-to-Tham Phang percent composition ratios for fungi Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were 1264.701 and 25.422, respectively. In Tham Phang, Brachiopoda (lamp shells) and Mollusca (snails) accounted for 80.380% of the 18S rDNA species detected, and their proportions were approximately tenfold greater than those in Tha Wang. Overall, coastal Tham Phang comprised abundant animal species. Conclusions Tha Wang contained numerous archaea, bacteria and fungi, many of which could synthesize useful biotechnology gas and enzymes that could also function in high-saline and high-temperature conditions. Tham Phang contained less abundant archaea, bacteria and fungi, and the majority of the extracted metagenomes belonged to animal kingdom. Many microorganisms in Tham Phang were essential for nutrient-recycling and pharmaceuticals, for instances, Streptomyces, Pennicilium and Saccharomyces. Together, the study provided metagenomic profiles of free-living prokaryotes and eukaryotes in coastal areas of Sichang island. PMID:23282134

2012-01-01

430

Distribution of fallout and environmental radionuclides in ice-free areas of King George Island (Western Antarctica)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change is progressing at a rate which is several times the global average in Western Antarctica. The Antarctic Peninsula region has experienced a rise of ca. 3°C for surface air temperature over the last 50 years; and 87% of 244 glaciers along the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have retreated in the last 50 years. Examining the impacts of climate change in Antarctic landscapes, in particular in the soils at the foot of retreating glaciers, can provide a better understanding of the future impacts of climate change on landscape dynamics (including land degradation and resulting changes in land, water and ecosystem quality) in the higher mountainous cold regions of the world. In this paper, results of an exploratory assessment of soil movement and identification of sediment sources and sediment sinks by investigating the distribution of fallout (FRN's) and environmental radionuclides (ERN's) in ice-free areas of King George Island (Western Antarctica) are discussed. This assessment has been carried in the context of an Instituto Antártico Chileno project, and supported by the IAEA Technical Cooperation, studying land degradation in the cold regions of South America. To this purpose soil profiles were sampled at depth increments at three different control sites. In addition, topsoil (0-1 cm depth) samples were collected from areas identified as potential soil sources and from others identified as sinks of sediments. The soil profiles at the control sites showed distinctive patterns in the depth distribution of the FRN's and ERN's. The 137Cs and 210Pbex activity mass concentration (Bq kg-1) were highest in the topsoil and penetration depth was less than 8 and 25 cm, respectively. The depth distribution of 226Ra and 232Th in the soil profiles was quite homogeneous and greater variation was found for 40K and 238U, possibly related to differences in the mineralogical composition of soils. Average mass activity values of 137Cs and 210Pbex at the source areas were significantly lower than those found at sink areas, suggesting that processes of soil movement are relatively important. The knowledge gained with this research provided baseline information to establish future sampling strategies intended to ensure minimal intervention in the environment. Furthermore, the values of the areal activity density (Bq m-2) of 137Cs, 210Pbex and 7Be in soils and sediments proved the potential for using FRN's to study the redistribution of soil and sediments associated to the process of glacier retreat.

Castillo, Alejandra; Schuller, Paulina; Dercon, Gerd; Nguyen, Minh-Long; Navas, Ana; Ramírez, Paola; López, César

2013-04-01

431

The Astronomical Inscription from Keskintos, Rhodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Greek astronomical inscription from about 100 B.C. found near Lardos, Rhodes in the late 19th century contains a table of numbers associated with various kinds of periodic behaviour of the planets. The inscription might have accompanied a votive object, perhaps representing the heavenly bodies in some manner. The underlying conception of celestial phenomena is significantly different from the tradition propagated by Ptolemy's Almagest. A long common period is assumed in which all periodicities of all planets are supposed to repeat exactly. This period was constructed as a product of the smallest whole factors, 2, 3, and 5. The relationships subsisting among many of the numbers in the inscription also reflect an assumption that small whole numbers underly the apparent complexity of planetary motion.

Jones, A.

432

Seroepidemiology of Toxocara Canis infection among primary schoolchildren in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands  

PubMed Central

Background Toxocariasis, which is predominantly caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) infection, is a common zoonotic parasitosis worldwide; however, the status of toxocariasis endemicity in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unknown. Methods A seroepidemiological investigation was conducted among 166 primary school children (PSC) aged 7–12 years from the capital area of the RMI. Western blots based the excretory-secretory antigens of larval T. canis (TcES) was employed, and children were considered seropositive if their serum reacted with TcES when diluted at a titer of 1:64. Information regarding demographic characteristics of and environmental risk factors affecting these children was collected using a structured questionnaire. A logistic regression model was applied to conduct a multivariate analysis. Results The overall seropositive rate of T. canis infection was 86.75% (144/166). In the univariate analysis, PSC who exhibited a history of feeding dogs at home (OR?=?5.52, 95% CI?=?1.15–26.61, p?=?0.02) and whose parents were employed as nonskilled workers (OR?=?2.86, 95% CI?=?1.08–7.60, p?=?0.03) demonstrated a statistically elevated risk of contracting T. canis infections. Cleaning dog huts with gloves might prevent infection, but yielded nonsignificant effects. The multivariate analysis indicated that parental occupation was the critical risk factor in this study because its effect remained significant after adjusting for other variables; by contrast, the effect of dog feeding became nonsignificant because of other potential confounding factors. No associations were observed among gender, age, consuming raw meat or vegetables, drinking unboiled water, cleaning dog huts with gloves, or touching soil. Conclusions This is the first serological investigation of T. canis infection among PSC in the RMI. The high seroprevalence indicates the commonness of T. canis transmission and possible human risk. The fundamental information that the present study provides regarding T. canis epidemiology can facilitate developing strategies for disease prevention and control. PMID:24886153

2014-01-01

433

Areas contributing ground water to the Peconic Estuary, and ground-water budgets for the north and south forks and Shelter Island, eastern Suffolk County, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Peconic Estuary, at the eastern end of Long Island, has been plagued by a recurrent algal bloom, locally referred to as ?Brown Tide,? that has caused the severe decline of local marine resources. Although the factors that trigger Brown Tide blooms remain uncertain, groundwater discharge has previously been shown to affect surface-water quality in the western part of the estuary. A U.S. Geological Survey groundwater- flow model of the main body of Long Island indicates that a total of about 7.5 x 106 ft3/d (cubic feet per day) of freshwater discharges to the western part of the estuary, but the model does not include the ground-water flow systems on the North and South Forks and Shelter Island, which contribute significant amounts of freshwater to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. The need for information on freshwater discharge to the entire estuary prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate ground-water discharge from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island. Source areas that contribute ground water to the Peconic Estuary were delineated, and groundwater budgets for these areas were developed, to evaluate the distribution and magnitude of ground-water discharge to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. Contributing-area boundaries that were delineated coincide with the hydraulic boundaries of the fresh ground-water-flow systems of the North and South Forks and Shelter Island; these boundaries are of two types? external (saltwater bodies) and internal (groundwater divides). Hydrologic components that were evaluated include recharge from precipitation, public-supply withdrawal and return flow, and agricultural withdrawal. Values for each of these components were calculated or estimated for the individual freshwater flow subsystems that form each ground-water-budget area, then summed to obtain the total discharge of fresh ground water to tidewater. Ground-water discharge to the Peconic Estuary is about 3.8 x 106 ft3/d from the North Fork, 11 x 106 ft3/d from the South Fork, and 1.7 x 106 ft3/d from Shelter Island. The total contribution to the estuary from these areas is about 16 x 106 ft3/d?roughly twice the total contribution from the main body of Long Island. In contrast to the freshwater contribution from the main body of Long Island, which is concentrated near the head of the estuary, the contributions from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island are distributed along the east-west length of the estuary. Changes in water-table altitude and the resulting changes in total discharge to the Peconic Estuary were estimated from the relative changes in annual mean water level at observation wells. The 1985-95 interval included 7 years (1985-88, 1991- 92, 1995) of generally below-average water-table altitudes that presumably caused similar decreases in ground-water discharge to the estuary; intense Brown Tide blooms coincided with six of these years (1985-88, 1991, 1995), and localized blooms coincided with the remaining year (1992). Watertable altitudes in the remaining 4 years of the 1985-95 interval (1989-90, 1993-94) were nearly average or above average, and presumably produced comparably near-average or increased amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary; none of these years saw any widespread Brown Tide blooms. Fluctuations in the amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary appear to affect the occurrence of Brown Tide blooms, although the factors that trigger the blooms have not been determined.

Schubert, C.E.

1998-01-01

434

Characterization of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the dengue vector population established in urban areas of Fernando de Noronha, a Brazilian oceanic island.  

PubMed

Aedes aegypti has played a major role in the dramatic expansion of dengue worldwide. The failure of control programs in reducing the rhythm of global dengue expansion through vector control suggests the need for studies to support more appropriated control strategies. We report here the results of a longitudinal study on Ae. aegypti population dynamics through continuous egg sampling aiming to characterize the infestation of urban areas of a Brazilian oceanic island, Fernando de Noronha. The spatial and temporal distribution of the dengue vector population in urban areas of the island was described using a monitoring system (SMCP-Aedes) based on a 103-trap network for Aedes egg sampling, using GIS and spatial statistics analysis tools. Mean egg densities were estimated over a 29-month period starting in 2011 and producing monthly maps of mosquito abundance. The system detected continuous Ae. aegypti oviposition in most traps. The high global positive ovitrap index (POI=83.7% of 2815 events) indicated the frequent presence of blood-fed-egg laying females at every sampling station. Egg density (eggs/ovitrap/month) reached peak values of 297.3 (0 - 2020) in May and 295 (0 - 2140) in August 2012. The presence of a stable Ae. aegypti population established throughout the inhabited areas of the island was demonstrated. A strong association between egg abundance and rainfall with a 2-month lag was observed, which combined with a first-order autocorrelation observed in the series of egg counts can provide an important forecasting tool. This first description of the characteristics of the island infestation by the dengue vector provides baseline information to analyze relationships between the spatial distribution of the vector and dengue cases, and to the development of integrated vector control strategies. PMID:24832009

Regis, Lêda N; Acioli, Ridelane Veiga; Silveira, José Constantino; de Melo-Santos, Maria Alice Varjal; da Cunha, Mércia Cristiane Santana; Souza, Fátima; Batista, Carlos Alberto Vieira; Barbosa, Rosângela Maria Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria Fontes; Ayres, Constância Flávia Junqueira; Monteiro, Antonio Miguel Vieira; Souza, Wayner Vieira

2014-09-01

435

Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island  

E-print Network

created species­area curves from previously published lizard species richness and island area data. We islands. Keywords Lizards, spatial subsidies, small island effect, species­area curve, species richness species richness to deviate from species­area predictions, especially on small islands. Next, we examine

Wait, D. Alexander

436

Mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) survey of areas on Dauphin Island, Alabama, in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topographic survey data of areas on Dauphin Island on the Alabama coast were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. This system is composed of a high frequency laser scanner in conjunction with an inertial measurement unit and a position and orientation computer to produce highly accurate topographic datasets. A global positioning system base station was set up on a nearby benchmark and logged vertical and horizontal position information during the survey for post-processing. Survey control points were also collected throughout the study area to determine residual errors. Data were collected 5 days after Hurricane Isaac made landfall in early September 2012 to document sediment deposits prior to clean-up efforts. Three data files in ASCII text format with the extension .xyz are included in this report, and each file is named according to both the acquisition date and the relative geographic location on Dauphin Island (for example, 20120903_Central.xyz). Metadata are also included for each of the files in both Extensible Markup Language with the extension .xml and ASCII text formats. These topographic data can be used to analyze the effects of storm surge on barrier island environments and also serve as a baseline dataset for future change detection analyses.

Kimbrow, Dustin R.

2014-01-01

437

First survey of sessile communities on subtidal rocks in an area with hydrothermal vents: Milos Island, Aegean Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major epibenthic communities on subtidal rocks of Palaeochori Bay and the marine tract on the southern coast of Milos Island (Greece) were described down to 44 m depth. Six sites were investigated by snorkelling and SCUBA diving. Samples, photographs and video images were also taken to integrate information. Three out of the six sites were close to hydrothermal vents,

Silvia Cocito; C. Nike Bianchi; Carla Morri; Andrea Peirano

2000-01-01

438

1997 Economic Census of Outlying Areas: Virgin Islands: Construction Industries, Manufactures, Wholesale Trade, Retail Trade, and Service Industries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Census Bureau reports that the retail trade sector of the US Virgin Islands has grown by 20 percent since 1992, with sales reaching $1.1 billion in 1997. In 1997, jewelry stores sold a total of $248.7 million and hotels and motels reported receipts of $123.8 million.

439

Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world’s largest no-take marine protected area  

PubMed Central

The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000 km2, with more than 60 000 km2 shallow limestone platform and reefs. This has doubled the global cover of such MPAs.It contains 25–50% of the Indian Ocean reef area remaining in excellent condition, as well as the world’s largest contiguous undamaged reef area. It has suffered from warming episodes, but after the most severe mortality event of 1998, coral cover was restored after 10 years.Coral reef fishes are orders of magnitude more abundant than in other Indian Ocean locations, regardless of whether the latter are fished or protected.Coral diseases are extremely low, and no invasive marine species are known.Genetically, Chagos marine species are part of the Western Indian Ocean, and Chagos serves as a ‘stepping-stone’ in the ocean.The no-take MPA extends to the 200 nm boundary, and. includes 86 unfished seamounts and 243 deep knolls as well as encompassing important pelagic species.On the larger islands, native plants, coconut crabs, bird and turtle colonies were largely destroyed in plantation times, but several smaller islands are in relatively undamaged state.There are now 10 ‘important bird areas’, coconut crab density is high and numbers of green and hawksbill turtles are recovering.Diego Garcia atoll contains a military facility; this atoll contains one Ramsar site and several ‘strict nature reserves’. Pollutant monitoring shows it to be the least polluted inhabited atoll in the world. Today, strict environmental regulations are enforced.Shoreline erosion is significant in many places. Its economic cost in the inhabited part of Diego Garcia is very high, but all islands are vulnerable.Chagos is ideally situated for several monitoring programmes, and use is increasingly being made of the archipelago for this purpose. PMID:25505830

SHEPPARD, C. R. C.; ATEWEBERHAN, M.; BOWEN, B. W.; CARR, P.; CHEN, C. A.; CLUBBE, C.; CRAIG, M. T.; EBINGHAUS, R.; EBLE, J.; FITZSIMMONS, N.; GAITHER, M. R.; GAN, C-H.; GOLLOCK, M.; GUZMAN, N.; GRAHAM, N. A. J.; HARRIS, A.; JONES, R.; KESHAVMURTHY, S.; KOLDEWEY, H.; LUNDIN, C. G.; MORTIMER, J. A.; OBURA, D.; PFEIFFER, M.; PRICE, A. R. G.; PURKIS, S.; RAINES, P.; READMAN, J. W.; RIEGL, B.; ROGERS, A.; SCHLEYER, M.; SEAWARD, M. R. D; SHEPPARD, A. L. S.; TAMELANDER, J.; TURNER, J. R.; VISRAM, S.; VOGLER, C.; VOGT, S.; WOLSCHKE, H.; YANG, J. M-C.; YANG, S-Y.; YESSON, C.

2014-01-01

440

Streamlined Island  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

2003-01-01

441

Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).  

PubMed

This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

2014-01-01

442

Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

2014-01-01

443

Effects of the 1998 Drought on the Freshwater Lens in the Laura Area, Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lower than average rainfall during late 1997 and early 1998 in Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, caused a drought and severe drinking-water shortage. Majuro depends on a public rainfall catchment system, which uses an airport runway and storage reservoirs. The storage reservoirs can supply water for about 30 to 50 days without replenishment. In February 1998, after a few months with less than one inch of rainfall per month, a drought-related disaster was declared. Reverse-osmosis water-purification systems were brought to Majuro to help alleviate the water shortage. Concurrent with the water-purification program, ground water from a freshwater lens in the Laura area of the atoll was pumped at increased rates. Of the total consumed water during this period, ground water from Laura supplied between 90 percent (March 1998) and 64 percent (May 1998) of the drinking water. Due to public concern, a study was initiated to determine the effects of the drought on the freshwater lens. The areal extent of the freshwater lens is about 350 acres. A monitoring-well network, consisting of multiple wells driven to varying depths at 11 sites, was installed to determine the thickness of the freshwater lens. Similar locations relative to an earlier study were chosen so that the data from this study could be compared to 1984-85 data. At the end of the drought in June 1998, the freshwater near the middle of the lens was about 45 feet thick; and at the north and south ends, the freshwater was about 25 to 38 feet thick, respectively. Monitoring of the freshwater lens was continued through the wet season following the drought. The lens increased in thickness by 1 to 8 feet after 7 months of rainfall. Greater increases in lens thickness were measured on the lagoon side than on the ocean side of the freshwater lens. Lens thickness during August 1998, and seasonal variation of lens thickness in 1998, were compared to data collected in 1984-85. Comparison of lens thickness from the different years yielded an inconsistent result; the lens was not uniformly thicker in 1984-85 despite more rainfall and little or no pumpage during this time. Seasonal variation in 1998-99 was greater than seasonal variation in 1984-85 due to differences in seasonal rainfall and pumpage. The change in lens thickness suggested by the comparison between 1998-99 and 1984-85 data was complicated by effects due to different well locations, different wells, and assumed small-scale variability in the thickness of fine and coarse calcareous sediments. This result suggests that a monitoring program that uses the same wells through time is needed to adequately describe long-term variability in lens thickness.

Presley, Todd K.

2005-01-01

444

Island Natural Science School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared for students in grade six attending the Island Natural Science School, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, this booklet offers information and suggests activities in the areas of ecology, conservation, natural resources, and outdoor recreation. Introductory material describes island lore, its formation and significant features, followed by units of…

Toronto Board of Education (Ontario).

445

Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004?M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill.

Flint, Paul L.; Schamber, J.L.; Trust, K.A.; Miles, A.K.; Henderson, J.D.; Wilson, B.W.

2012-01-01

446

Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska.  

PubMed

We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004 M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill. PMID:22933448

Flint, Paul L; Schamber, Jason L; Trust, Kimberly A; Miles, A Keith; Henderson, John D; Wilson, Barry W

2012-12-01

447

The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

Bowers, Denise E.

2012-01-01

448

Protected areas in the Atlantic facing the hazards of micro-plastic pollution: first diagnosis of three islands in the Canary Current.  

PubMed

Coastal zones and the biosphere as a whole show signs of cumulative degradation due to the use and disposal of plastics. To better understand the manifestation of plastic pollution in the Atlantic Ocean, we partnered with local communities to determine the concentrations of micro-plastics in 125 beaches on three islands in the Canary Current: Lanzarote, La Graciosa, and Fuerteventura. We found that, in spite of being located in highly-protected natural areas, all beaches in our study area are exceedingly vulnerable to micro-plastic pollution, with pollution levels reaching concentrations greater than 100 g of plastic in 1l of sediment. This paper contributes to ongoing efforts to develop solutions to plastic pollution by addressing the questions: (i) Where does this pollution come from?; (ii) How much plastic pollution is in the world's oceans and coastal zones?; (iii) What are the consequences for the biosphere?; and (iv) What are possible solutions? PMID:24433999

Baztan, Juan; Carrasco, Ana; Chouinard, Omer; Cleaud, Muriel; Gabaldon, Jesús E; Huck, Thierry; Jaffrès, Lionel; Jorgensen, Bethany; Miguelez, Aquilino; Paillard, Christine; Vanderlinden, Jean-Paul

2014-03-15

449

50 CFR Figure 21 to Part 679 - Nunivak Island, Etolin Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area  

...Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area 21 Figure 21 to Part...Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...Strait, and Kuskokwim Bay Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.012...

2014-10-01

450

33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...area with all practicable speed. (7) All projectiles, bombs and rockets will be fired to land within the prohibited area...Navy will not be responsible for damages by such projectiles, bombs, or rockets to nets, traps, buoys, pots,...

2013-07-01

451

33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...area with all practicable speed. (7) All projectiles, bombs and rockets will be fired to land within the prohibited area...Navy will not be responsible for damages by such projectiles, bombs, or rockets to nets, traps, buoys, pots,...

2012-07-01

452

33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...area with all practicable speed. (7) All projectiles, bombs and rockets will be fired to land within the prohibited area...Navy will not be responsible for damages by such projectiles, bombs, or rockets to nets, traps, buoys, pots,...

2010-07-01

453

33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.  

...area with all practicable speed. (7) All projectiles, bombs and rockets will be fired to land within the prohibited area...Navy will not be responsible for damages by such projectiles, bombs, or rockets to nets, traps, buoys, pots,...

2014-07-01

454

33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...area with all practicable speed. (7) All projectiles, bombs and rockets will be fired to land within the prohibited area...Navy will not be responsible for damages by such projectiles, bombs, or rockets to nets, traps, buoys, pots,...

2011-07-01

455

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Resaca...regulations. (1) The danger zone is subject...such times, no person or surface vessels, except those...enter or remain within the danger area. Prior to...

2013-07-01

456

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Resaca...regulations. (1) The danger zone is subject...such times, no person or surface vessels, except those...enter or remain within the danger area. Prior to...

2012-07-01

457

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Resaca...regulations. (1) The danger zone is subject...such times, no person or surface vessels, except those...enter or remain within the danger area. Prior to...

2010-07-01

458

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

...area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Resaca...regulations. (1) The danger zone is subject...such times, no person or surface vessels, except those...enter or remain within the danger area. Prior to...

2014-07-01

459

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...area. (a) The danger zone. From Punta Resaca...regulations. (1) The danger zone is subject...such times, no person or surface vessels, except those...enter or remain within the danger area. Prior to...

2011-07-01

460

Modeling Catastrophic Barrier Island Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Barrier islands, thin strips of sand lying parallel to the mainland coastline, along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts appear to have maintained their form for thousands of years in the face of rising sea level. The mechanisms that allow barrier islands to remain robust are transport of sediment from the ocean side of barriers to the top and backside during storms, termed island overwash, and the growth and alongshore propagation of tidal deltas near barrier island inlets. Dynamically these processes provide the necessary feedbacks to maintain a barrier island in an attractor that withstands rising sea level within a phase space of barrier island geometrical characteristics. Current barrier island configurations along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts exist among a wide range of storm climate and underlying geologic conditions and therefore the environment that forces overwash and tidal delta dynamics varies considerably. It has been suggested that barrier islands in certain locations such as those between Avon and Buxton (losing 76% of island width since 1852) and Chandeleur islands (losing 85% of its surface area since 2005) along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, respectively, may be subject to a catastrophic shift in barrier island attractor states - more numerous inlets cutting barriers in some locations and the complete disappearance of barrier islands in other locations. In contrast to common models for barrier islands that neglect storm dynamics and often only consider cross-shore response, we use an alongshore extended model for barrier island dynamics including beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms to explore the response of barrier islands to a wide range of environmental forcing. Results will be presented that show how barrier island attractor states are altered with variations in the rate of sea level rise, storminess, and underlying geology. We will also investigate the conditions necessary for a barrier island attractor similar to those found along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts to become unstable.

Whitley, J. W.; McNamara, D.

2012-12-01

461

Use of Species\\/Area Equations to Estimate Potential Species Richness of Bats on Inadequately Surveyed Mountain Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Species richness of bats on selected mountains in southeastern Arizona was compared by regression to the area of montane habitat in each of these mountains. The resulting equation was then compared to similar equations generated from species-area curves that have been reported for birds in the Great Basin and small non-flying mammals in the Madrean Archipelago. Data from which these

Ronnie Sidner; Russell Davis

462

Rongelap Resettlement Support-Preliminary Report Part 1 - In-Situ Gamma Spectrometric Measurements around the Service and Village Area on Rongelap Island  

SciTech Connect

The combined remedial measures of limited soil removal and addition of coral fill have been very effective in reducing the external {sup 137}Cs exposure in and around the proposed service and village area on Rongelap Island. The average effective dose for a year's occupancy within the village has been reduced from about 19 to 0.6 mrem y{sup -1}, and is below the target level of 1 mrem y{sup -1} recommended to RALGOV. Some additional actions could be taken to reduce the external dose around specific sites but on the basis of the data presented in this report, it appears that the resettlement contractor has met the basic requirements for this phase of the project.

Hamilton, T; Kehl, S; Brunk, J; Gouveia, F; Robison, W

2001-04-01

463

Cholinesterase inhibitors from Sargassum and Gracilaria gracilis: seaweeds inhabiting South Indian coastal areas (Hare Island, Gulf of Mannar).  

PubMed

Dementia is a chronic progressive mental disorder, which adversely affects memory, thinking, comprehension, calculation and language. Some of the commonest forms of dementia are Alzheimer's disease, Parkinsonism, Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Myasthenia gravis. All these disorders are related to abnormalities in the central cholinergic system, which shows a decline in acetylcholine level. Cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors are one of the novel strategies used for the symptomatic treatment of neurological disorders like dementia. In the course of screening new ChE inhibitors from marine sources, about 11 seaweeds, which have wide pharmaceutical applications, were collected from Hare Island, Gulf of Mannar, Tamilnadu, India. Methanolic extracts of the seaweeds were assessed for ChE inhibitory activity under in vitro conditions. Kinetic parameters IC(50), K(i) and V(max) were also analysed. The results showed that 3/11 seaweeds showed 50% inhibition for both ChEs (using acetylthiocholine iodide and butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate) at concentrations of 2 mg mL(-1) (Gracilaria gracilis, Sargassum, Cladophora fasicularis for ChE with acetylthiocholine iodide as substrate and Gracilaria gracilis, Gracilaria edulis, Sargassum for ChE with butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate) and 4/11 showed no inhibitory activity. Inhibitory activity of seaweed extracts was compared with standard drug donepezil. Enzyme kinetic analysis showed that algal extracts exhibited mixed type inhibition (partially non-competitive inhibition). PMID:19296376

Natarajan, Suganthy; Shanmugiahthevar, Karutha Pandian; Kasi, Pandima Devi

2009-01-01

464

33 CFR 334.85 - New York Harbor, adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Commercial vessels at anchor will be permitted to swing into the seaward portion of the restricted area while at anchor and during the tide changes. (c) Enforcement. The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval...

2010-07-01

465

33 CFR 334.85 - New York Harbor, adjacent to the Stapleton Naval Station, Staten Island, New York; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Commercial vessels at anchor will be permitted to swing into the seaward portion of the restricted area while at anchor and during the tide changes. (c) Enforcement. The regulations in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval...

2012-07-01

466

33 CFR 334.1080 - San Francisco Bay adjacent to northeast corner of Treasure Island; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...a) The area. Beginning at the intersection of Pier 21 and the bulkhead line, thence northwesterly along...true, 520 yards; thence 152° true, 500 yards to Pier 21; thence along the pier to the point of beginning. (b) The...

2011-07-01

467

Nitrogen in ground water and surface water from sewered and unsewered areas, Nassau County, Long Island, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data on nitrogen in groundwater and surface waters in the sewered and unsewered parts of Nassau County were analyzed to evaluate the principal sources of nitrogen and to determine what factors significantly affect its concentration in the upper glacial aquifer and the underlying Magothy aquifer. Nitrate data for water samples collected during 1952-76 show that: (1) median nitrate concentration of water in the sewered part of the entire thickness of the upper glacial aquifer is not significantly different (at the 0.95 confidence limit, N = 1400) from that in the unsewered area, (2) median nitrate concentrations in the upper 3 meters of the upper glacial aquifer are significantly lower (at the 0.90 confidence limit, N = 15) in the sewered area than in the unsewered area, (3) in the sewered area, water from 8 of 10 wells in the upper glacial aquifer shows significantly decreasing nitrate concentration with time, (4) total nitrogen concentrations in streams draining the sewered area are significantly lower than in those draining the unsewered area, (5) from more than 2,000 nitrate analyses of water in the Magothy aquifer collected from 1952-76, it was found that nitrate is present at all depths but that nitrate concentrations decrease with depth, and (6) although water from most Magothy wells having long-term nitrate records shows no significant change in nitrate concentration with time, where the change is significant, nitrate is increasing. (USGS)

Ragone, Stephen E.; Katz, B.G.; Kimmel, G.E.; Lindner, J.B.

1980-01-01

468

Effects of sea-level rise and pumpage elimination on saltwater intrusion in the Hilton Head Island area, South Carolina, 2004-2104  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Saltwater intrusion of the Upper Floridan aquifer has been observed in the Hilton Head area, South Carolina since the late 1970s and currently affects freshwater supply. Rising sea level in the Hilton Head Island area may contribute to the occurrence of and affect the rate of saltwater intrusion into the Upper Floridan aquifer by increasing the hydraulic gradient and by inundating an increasing area with saltwater, which may then migrate downward into geologic units that presently contain freshwater. Rising sea level may offset any beneficial results from reductions in groundwater pumpage, and thus needs to be considered in groundwater-management decisions. A variable-density groundwater flow and transport model was modified from a previously existing model to simulate the effects of sea-level rise in the Hilton Head Island area. Specifically, the model was used to (1) simulate trends of saltwater intrusion from predevelopment to the present day (1885-2004) and evaluate the conceptual model, (2) project these trends from the present day into the future based on different potential rates of sea-level change, and (3) evaluate the relative influences of pumpage and sea-level rise on saltwater intrusion. Four scenarios were simulated for 2004-2104: (1) continuation of the estimated sea-level rise rate over the last century, (2) a doubling of the sea-level rise, (3) a cessation of sea-level rise, and (4) continuation of the rate over the last century coupled with an elimination of all pumpage. Results show that, if present-day (year 2004) pumping conditions are maintained, the extent of saltwater in the Upper Floridan aquifer will increase, whether or not sea level continues to rise. Furthermore, if all pumpage is eliminated and sea level continues to rise, the simulated saltwater extent in the Upper Floridan aquifer is reduced. These results indicate that pumpage is a strong driving force for simulated saltwater intrusion, more so than sea-level rise at current rates. However, results must be considered in light of limitations in the model, including, but not limited to uncertainty in field data, the conceptual model, the physical properties and representation of the hydrogeologic framework, and boundary and initial conditions, as well as uncertainty in future conditions, such as the rate of sea-level rise.

Payne, Dorothy F.

2010-01-01

469

Health Care Access and Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome Among Elders Living in High-Altitude Areas of the Mediterranean Islands: The MEDIS Study  

PubMed Central

AIM: The aim of the present work was to evaluate the relationships between sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle characteristics and the presence of metabolic syndrome, among high and low altitude living elderly individuals without known CVD. METHODS: During 2005-2011, 1959 elderly (aged 65 to 100 years) individuals from 13 Mediterranean islands were enrolled. Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors were assessed using standard procedures. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the (Adult Treatment Panel) ATP III criteria. Mountainous areas were defined those more than 400 meters in height. RESULTS: For the present analysis 713 men and 596 women were studied; the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 29% (24% in men, 35% in women, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 55% in the elders living in mountainous areas, as compared with 26% among those living at sea-level (p = 0.01). Similarly, the prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity were higher in high altitude as compared with low altitude areas (all p-values < 0.01). After adjusting for various confounders, elders living in high altitude areas were 3.06-times more likely to have the metabolic syndrome than those living at sea-level (OR = 3.06, 95%CI 2.02-4.65). However, when the annual number of visits to health care centers was taken into account, the effect of altitude of living was not associated with the presence of the syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable proportion of mountainous living elderly had the metabolic syndrome. Public health actions need to be taken to reduce the burden of cardiometabolic disorders by enabling better access to health care, especially in remote mountainous rural areas. PMID:22580728

Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Chalkias, Christos; Morena, Marianthi; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Zeimbekis, Akis; Gotsis, Efthimios; Metallinos, George; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Lionis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

2011-01-01

470

Urban Heat Islands  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students learn about the urban heat island effect by investigating which areas of their schoolyard have higher temperatures - trees, grass, asphalt, and other materials. Based on their results, they hypothesize how concentrations of surfaces that absorb heat might affect the temperature in cities - the urban heat island effect. Then they analyze data about the history of Los Angeles heat waves and look for patterns in the Los Angeles climate data and explore patterns.

Lisa Gardiner

471

Insights into deglaciation of the largest ice-free area in the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) from quantitative analysis of the drainage system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative geomorphic analysis of the drainage system on Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, has been carried out in order to study the relief evolution, glacial history and possible neotectonic influence on the largest ice-free area of the South Shetlands archipelago. Aerial photographs, SAR data from RADARSAT-2 satellite, field work, a digital elevation model and GIS spatial analysis have been used to identify, map and study the existing drainage basins. A series of morphometric parameters have been studied in 30 selected basins in order to characterize their shape as well as the drainage network. Results in morphometric parameters reveal elongation trends in the shape of basins and a limited hierarchical network, common of a youthful stage of landscape evolution models. Several morphometric indexes (hypsometric integral, hypsometric curves, SL index, transverse topographical drainage basin asymmetry-T-Factor) have been used to study possible controls on drainage development. Results have been discussed in relation to relief and drainage evolution linked to the spatial distribution of lithological units and structural framework. T-Factor shows an apparently disorganized pattern and absence of tectonic influence. However, there are local values of second order basin asymmetry directions and magnitudes, which could reflect a succession of master rills through time, related to the changes in water supply during the deglaciation history of Byers Peninsula. Hypsometric values and curves of basins are also mainly related to a young stage of landscape evolution. Analysis of hypsometric integrals together with T-Factor index has allowed us to establish a possible deglaciation model on Byers Peninsula, which successfully explains the results. Areas of different landscape evolution stage are linked in space and support the hypothesis of local glacial centers during the ice cover retreat process. SL index results do not show the same pattern in results, which could be due to differences between incision and lateral shifting ratios. Quantitative geomorphic analysis indicates that during the deglaciation of Byers Peninsula, at least three areas acted as local glacial centers (NW, central and Rotch Dome area). Changes in index results clearly show a different behavior between two areas; distal areas and proximal areas close to the glacial centers. Morphometric indexes have demonstrated their being useful tools to provide information on the glacial history in recently deglaciated Antarctic areas.

Mink, Sandra; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Maestro, Adolfo; Garrote, Julio; Ortega, José A.; Serrano, Enrique; Durán, Juan José; Schmid, Thomas

2014-11-01

472

A study of lagoonal and estuarine processes in the area of Merritt Island encompassing the space center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to determine the marine biology and dynamic oceanographic properties of the Indian River in Florida. One of the major areas of concentration involved the compilation of a taxonomic list of marine animals in the river. An important conclusion of the study is that diversity of the benthic community is substantially higher than expected. The effect of major climatic factors on the diversity and structure of the benthic community is analyzed.

1974-01-01

473

Initiation of a Species Recovery Plan for the Critically Endangered Endemic Roti Snake-Neck Turtle (Chelodina mccordi Rhodin, 1994), Roti Island, Indonesia. Phase 1. Population Status, Systematic Relationships, and Preliminary Protected Areas Assessments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project represents the first phase of a new initiative that will lead to a comprehensive conservation program for the long-term survival of the Critically Endangered endemic Roti snake-neck turtle ( Chelodina mccordi Rhodin, 1994). This isolated species occurs only on the tiny (1200 sq. km) island of Roti, Indonesia, where it is limited in its distribution to an area

ANDERS G. J. RHODIN; DJOKO T. I SKANDAR; GERALD KUCHLING; ARTHUR GEORGES; NANCY FITZSIMMONS

474

Holocene temperature records from the East China sea mud area southwest of the Cheju Island reconstructed by the U{37/K'} and TEX86 paleothermometers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As an important marginal sea under the influences of both the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio, the East China Sea (ECS) environment is sensitive to both continental and oceanic forcing. Paleoenvironmental records are essential for understanding the long-term environmental evolution of the ECS and adjacent areas. However, paleo-temperature records from the ECS shelf are currently very limited. In this study, the U{37/K'} and TEX86 paleothermometers were used to reconstruct surface and subsurface temperature changes of the mud area southwest of the Cheju Island (Site F10B) in the ECS during the Holocene. The results indicate that temperature changes of F10B during the early Holocene (11.6-6.2 kyr) are associated with global climate change. During the period of 6.2-2.5 kyr, the similar variability trends of smoothing average of ?T (the difference between surface and subsurface temperature) of Site F10B and the strength of the Kuroshio suggest that the Kuroshio influence on the site started around 6.2 kyr when the Kuroshio entered the Yellow Sea and continued to 2.5 kyr. During the late Holocene (2.5-1.45 kyr), apparent decreases of U{37/K'} sea surface temperature (SST) and ?T imply that the direct influence of the Kuroshio was reduced while cold eddy induced by the Kuroshio gradually controlled hydrological conditions of this region around 2.5 kyr.

Xing, Lei; Jiang, Yiqing; Yuan, Zineng; Zhang, Hailong; Li, Li; Zhou, Liping; Zhao, Meixun

2013-12-01

475

Biomarker records of phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes during the last 14000 years in the mud area southwest off Cheju Island, East China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ecological environment in the East China Sea (ECS) and the Yellow Sea (YS) has changed significantly due to sea-level rising and the Kuroshio incursion since the last deglaciation. In this study, biomarker records of core F10B from the mud area southwest off Cheju Island (MSWCI) were generated to evaluate phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in response to environmental evolution during the last 14 kyr. The contents of diatom, dinoflagellate and haptophyte biomarkers (brassicasterol, dinosterol and C37 alkenones) display similar trends, with increasing phytoplankton productivity during the last 14 kyr due to the increased influences of the Kuroshio, and especially due to the eddy-induced upwelling during the late Holocene. On the other hand, the contents of terrestrial biomarkers (C28 +C30 +C32 n-alkanols) and terrestrial organic matter (TOM) proxies (TMBR' and BIT) all reveal decreasing TOM input into the area around the sampling site for the 14 kyr, mostly due to sea-level rising. Phytoplankton biomarker ratios reveal a shift from a haptophyte-dominated community at 6.2-2.5 kyr BP to a diatom-dominated community at 2.5-1.45 kyr BP, likely caused by a stronger cold eddy circulation system at 2.5-1.45 kyr BP in the MSWCI.

Yuan, Zineng; Xing, Lei; Li, Li; Zhang, Hailong; Xiang, Rong; Zhao, Meixun

2013-12-01

476

Plant Ethnoveterinary Practices in Two Pyrenean Territories of Catalonia (Iberian Peninsula) and in Two Areas of the Balearic Islands and Comparison with Ethnobotanical Uses in Human Medicine  

PubMed Central

This paper presents the results of an ethnobotanical study centred in veterinarian uses in two Catalan Pyrenean regions (Alt Empordà -AE- and High River Ter Valley -AT-, Iberian peninsula) and two Balearic Islands areas (Formentera -FO- and northeastern Mallorca -MA-). In the areas studied, 97 plant species have been claimed to be useful for veterinary purposes. A total of 306 veterinary use reports have been gathered and analysed. The ten most reported plants are Tanacetum parthenium (24 use reports), Parietaria officinalis (15), Ranunculus parnassifolius (14), Meum athamanticum (13), Olea europaea (13), Quercus ilex (12), Ruta chalepensis (12), Sambucus nigra (10) and Thymus vulgaris (10). According to comprehensive reviews, a high number of novelties for plant ethnoveterinary are contributed: 34 species and one subspecies, 11 genera, and three families have not been reported in previous works in this field, and 21 species had only been mentioned once. Several ethnoveterinary uses are coincidental with those in human medicine. Although ethnoveterinary practices are less relevant than in the past in the territories considered, as in all industrialised countries, the knowledge on plant properties and applications is still rich and constitutes a large pool of evidence for phytotherapy, both in domestic animals and humans. PMID:22829861

Carrió, Esperança; Rigat, Montse; Garnatje, Teresa; Mayans, Marina; Parada, Montse; Vallès, Joan

2012-01-01

477

Island Biogeography Gillian Brooks  

E-print Network

SpeciesArea Curve H.C. Watson (1859) Arrhenius(1921) S = cAz Gleason (1922) log(S) = log(c) + zlog(A) Is the relationship between species and area linear? Island Biogeography Theory ­ (1963 with increase in species richness? #12;Both immigration and extinction lines are curved. (?) Any assumptions

Jodice, Patrick

478

78 FR 30870 - Nomination of Existing Marine Protected Areas to the National System of Marine Protected Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Bird Rock (Catalina Island) State Marine Conservation Area Blue Cavern (Catalina Island) State Marine Conservation Area Bolsa...Special Closure A-1 Santa Barbara Island State Marine Reserve Scorpion (Santa Cruz Island) State Marine Reserve Sea Lion Gulch...

2013-05-23

479

Galapagos Islands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

2002-01-01

480

Mapping Staten Island  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Staten Island has been in the news recently due to the severity of the damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy. For those wishing to know more about the history of this venerable community, this website is a gem. Mapping Staten Island is part of an in situ exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York that looks at the geography and history of Staten Island. The exhibit examines the borough's historical transformation through maps, government documents, and newspapers. By clicking on the Explore the Maps section, visitors can use a graphic interface that overlays dozens of historic maps, including an 1845 land use map and a 1781 chart and harbor map of the area, on the contemporary geography of Staten Island. Also, visitors can use the scroll bar near the bottom of the page to look at the maps in a chronological fashion.

481

Heat Island Effect  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For people living in and around cities, heat islands are of growing concern. This phenomenon describes urban and suburban temperatures that are 2 to 10 degrees F (1 to 6 degrees C) hotter than nearby rural areas. Elevated temperatures can impact communities by increasing peak energy demand, air conditioning costs, air pollution levels, and heat-related illness and mortality. The materials available here describe the basic causes of the heat island effect, and what can be done to mitigate some of the impacts. There is also an overview of the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP), an initiative being conducted in five cities in the U.S. to adopt and evaluate heat island reduction strategies and programs.

482

Akpatok Island  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Akpatok Island lies in Ungava Bay in northern Quebec, Canada. Accessible only by air, Akpatok Island rises out of the water as sheer cliffs that soar 500 to 800 feet (150 to 243 m) above the sea surface. The island is an important sanctuary for cliff-nesting seabirds. Numerous ice floes around the island attract walrus and whales, making Akpatok a traditional hunting ground for native Inuit people. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 22, 2001. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

2002-01-01

483

Species Diversity within a Community of the Curcurbit Fruit Flies Bactrocera cucurbitae, Dacus ciliatus, and Dacus demmerezi Roosting in Corn Borders Near Cucurbit Production Areas of Reunion Island  

PubMed Central

In order to better control fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) attacking Cucurbitaceae on Reunion Island (21°6 S/ 55°36 E), biological characteristics (seasonal fluctuation, relative abundance, sex ratio) of communities roosting in corn borders were investigated. The study was conducted in austral summer across a range of altitudes (750–1150 m) corresponding to the main areas of cucurbit cropping. Living adults were recorded roosting on corn planted within or around cucurbit fields. Results showed a high variability in seasonal fluctuation of populations according to local conditions. Bactrocera Cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae) was the least abundant species (27%) compared to Dacus ciliatus Loew (36%) and Dacus demmerezi Bezzi (37%). Relative abundance of B. Cucurbitae was lowest (< 18%) in high altitude sites (above 1000 m), where D. demmerezi was the most prevalent species (> 56%). Dacus ciliatus showed variable relative abundance (from 18 to 51%) depending on the experimental design (varying in location and in year). Sex ratio was also very variable from one species to another and from one experimental design to another. PMID:22958393

Deguine, J.-P.; Atiama-Nurbel, T.; Douraguia, E.; Chiroleu, F.; Quilici, S.

2012-01-01

484

Toxoplasma gondii infection: seroprevalence and associated risk factors among primary school children in the capital area of the Republic of the Marshall Islands.  

PubMed

Although Toxoplasma gondii infection is commonly prevalent in the tropical/subtropical regions, the prevalence of toxoplasmosis in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) remains unclear. A seroepidemiological survey was undertaken for investigating T. gondii infection in primary school children (PSC) using the latex agglutination (LA) test in the capital area of RMI. Information on demographic characteristics and environmental risk factors was collected via a structured questionnaire. Logistic regression model was applied for multivariate analysis. The overall infection rate of T. gondii was found to be 54.8%. Significant gender differences were found at different urbanization levels. PSC with LA titers of ? 1:1,024, indicating high responders, were found to be younger age group than others (8.7 years vs. 10.3 years, P = 0.003); moreover, infection rates among both age groups as well as high responders showed a decreasing trend with age. Multivariate analysis revealed that residing in urban rather than suburban settings was associated with increased risk of infection (P = 0.04). No associations were found between raw meat consumption, drinking unboiled water, and cleaning of cat hutch using gloves. This is the first serological survey of T. gondii infection among PSC in RMI and could help in the development of strategies in the future for disease prevention and control of T. gondii transmission. PMID:25241697

Fu, Chung-Jung; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Lin, Huei-Shan; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Liu, Yung-Ching; Langinlur, Mailynn K; Lu, Min-Yun; Hsiao, Wesley Wei-Wen; Fan, Chia-Kwung

2014-01-01

485

Species diversity within a community of the curcurbit fruit flies Bactrocera cucurbitae, Dacus ciliatus, and Dacus demmerezi roosting in corn borders near cucurbit production areas of Reunion Island.  

PubMed

In order to better control fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) attacking Cucurbitaceae on Reunion Island (21°6 S/ 55°36 E), biological characteristics (seasonal fluctuation, relative abundance, sex ratio) of communities roosting in corn borders were investigated. The study was conducted in austral summer across a range of altitudes (750-1150 m) corresponding to the main areas of cucurbit cropping. Living adults were recorded roosting on corn planted within or around cucurbit fields. Results showed a high variability in seasonal fluctuation of populations according to local conditions. Bactrocera Cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae) was the least abundant species (27%) compared to Dacus ciliatus Loew (36%) and Dacus demmerezi Bezzi (37%). Relative abundance of B. Cucurbitae was lowest (< 18%) in high altitude sites (above 1000 m), where D. demmerezi was the most prevalent species (> 56%). Dacus ciliatus showed variable relative abundance (from 18 to 51%) depending on the experimental design (varying in location and in year). Sex ratio was also very variable from one species to another and from one experimental design to another. PMID:22958393

Deguine, J-P; Atiama-Nurbel, T; Douraguia, E; Chiroleu, F; Quilici, S

2012-01-01

486

The influence of environmental characteristics on fish larvae spatial patterns related to a marine protected area: The Medes islands (NW Mediterranean)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We assessed the linkages between environmental variables and the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of larval abundance of coastal fish assemblages within and outside the Medes Islands marine protected area (MPA; NW Mediterranean) to explore possible fisheries effects such as larvae export of the latter. We analyzed small-scale fish larvae distribution of 28 representative taxa from the rocky fish assemblage and combined the former in different groups with the help of cluster analysis. Further we assessed the influence of selected abiotic variables on group and species distributions using Generalized Additive Models (GAM's). We found a high level of variability in the response of larvae groups and species to environmental variables over the two studied periods (spring and summer); depth and habitat of the adults being the most important factors. In addition, distance to the MPA was found as an important variable in defining the location of larvae of strictly coastal species. Our results provided evidence of larval export of three commercial species affected by the MPA ( Epinephelus marginatus, Pagellus erythrinus and Scorpaena porcus). Thus our study contributes to the few empirical assessments of larvae export from MPAs and adds to the understanding of the functioning of MPAs as fisheries management tools. Nevertheless, in the future integrated assessments of fisheries effects of MPAs are required that measure the effect of larvae and biomass export on increased fishing yield while taking into account fishing effort dynamics.

López-Sanz, Àngel; Stelzenmüller, Vanessa; Maynou, Francesc; Sabatés, Ana

2011-05-01

487

Seasonal variation in size estimates of Aedes albopictus population based on standard mark-release-recapture experiments in an urban area on Reunion Island.  

PubMed

The implementation of the sterile insect technique for area-wide vector control requires that natural population density be accurately estimated to determine both the appropriate time to treat and the adequate number of sterile males for release. Herein, we used mark-release-recapture (MRR) to derive seasonal abundance estimates of Aedes albopictus population sizes within a delimited geographical area in Reunion Island. Population size of Ae. albopictus was estimated through four mark-release-recapture experiments carried out separately in different seasons. Marked males and females were released each time, and recaptured using BG sentinel traps for six consecutive days. Data were used to estimate the population size using a conceptual model that incorporates the variation in daily mortality rates. The likely influence of environmental factors on the magnitude of catches and on population fluctuation was analyzed. A total of 2827 mosquitoes (1914 males and 913 females) were marked and released on four occasions during dry and wet seasons. After release, 138 males (7.21%) and 86 females (9.41%) of the marked specimens were recaptured in subsequent samplings. The effectiveness of the daily captures of wild and released mosquitoes was significantly influenced by meteorological conditions such as temperature, rainfall, wind speed and light intensity. The estimates of Ae. albopictus population size obtained with our model estimator ranged from 298 to 1238 males and 604 to 2208 females per ha, with seasonal variability - higher population size in the humid season. The presented results will be essential in designing more effective sterile male release strategies for long-term suppression of wild Ae. albopictus populations. PMID:25592432

Gouagna, Louis Clément; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Fontenille, Didier; Dumont, Yves; Boyer, Sébastien

2015-03-01

488

Island Hopping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At some institutions, it may feel as though faculty live on one island and advancement staff on another. The islands form part of an archipelago, and they exchange ambassadors and send emissaries occasionally, but interactions are limited. It may even seem as though the two groups speak different languages, deal in different currencies, and abide…

Bennett, Gayle

2009-01-01

489

75 FR 61993 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...10-AWP-14] RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands...System from the legal description of the Class E airspace areas for Kwajalein Island, Bucholz...corrects the legal descriptions for the Class E airspace areas in the vicinity of the...

2010-10-07

490

Earthquake Hazard Parameters in Crete Island and its Surrounding Area Inferred from Bayes Statistics: An Integration of Morphology of the Seismically Active Structures and Seismological Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

- The study addresses the evaluation of earthquake hazard parameters such as maximum regional magnitude (Mmax) and the slope of Gutenberg-Richter law ? (where b=? log e) for the Hellenic Wadati-Benioff zone and the overriding lithospheric plate in the area of Crete and its surroundings. The seismicity of the area is divided in a cellular (1.0° × 1.0°) manner allowing analysis of the localized earthquake hazard parameters and graphical representation of their spatial variation. Our approach incorporates the recently updated earthquake catalogue for Greece and the adjacent areas, the consideration of the morphology of the deep seismically active structures in the studied area and use of a probabilistic procedure for estimating the earthquake hazard parameters.One of the main inconsistencies in the earthquake hazard assessment is the estimation of the maximum magnitude and the related uncertaint y. The Bayesian approach, applied in the present, is a straightforward technique for evaluating the earthquake hazard parameters and is based on the following assumptions: Poissonian character of seismic events flow, a frequency-magnitude law of Gutenberg-Richter's type with cutoff maximal value for estimated parameter and a seismic catalogue, having a rather sizeable number of events (i.e., 50 events at least per cell). For five cells in which the number of events is less than 50, an effort is made to produce synthetic data. The re-assessed parameters obtained from the synthetic data show no significant difference and the real data (of the five cells) are finally taken into account although the estimated uncertainty is high.For four random cells we constructed hazard curves showing the probabilities that a certain magnitude M will be exceeded in one year and the return periods (in years) that are expected for a given magnitude. These are particularly useful for the mapping of earthquake hazard in regions of either low or high seismic activity, as is Crete and the adjacent area.The obtained results show that the W and E parts of both subducting and overriding plates differ in the spatial distribution of all the estimated earthquake hazard parameters. The Mmax distribution indicates strong coupling between the western portions of the interacting plates (Mmax > 6.3) to the south of 36°N. The smaller values of Mmax (Mmax < 6.3) estimated in the SE part of the studied area indicate weak coupling between the eastern portions of the subducting and overriding plates.Values of b > 1.0 are found to the south and east of Crete for the Wadati-Benioff zone, and over the central part of the island and the area to the northeast of it (cell 11) for the continental wedge, which suggests nonuniform stress field and/or heterogeneous material.

Tsapanos, T. M.; Christova, C. V.

491

Vulnerability of Rhode Island Salt Marshes to Sea Level Rise and Poor Water Quality  

EPA Science Inventory

Across the northeastern Unites States, salt marshes are losing ground. Edges are eroding, tidal channel networks are expanding, and new ponds are forming and expanding within salt marshes. This leaves shorelines - and in some cases houses - more vulnerable to nor'easters and tr...

492

Regulatory capture and the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission toward a new regulatory theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regulators operate in a constantly changing environment characterized by new technologies, increased competition in regulated fields, and heightened environmental awareness. In such an environment, they must maintain a balance between the customers` interest in low rates for safe and reliable utility service, and the need to maintain solvent utilities that have the ability to attract capital at a reasonable cost.

D. W. Hartley; E. C. Leduc

1995-01-01

493

78 FR 63383 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island: Prevention of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Department of Environmental Management (RI DEM) Office of Air Resources, on January 18...certain other SIP revisions contained in RI DEM's January 18, 2011 submittal. DATES...NAAQS). The regulatory revisions that RI DEM submitted on January 18, 2011...

2013-10-24

494

Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01

495

SHALLOW HABITATS IN TWO RHODE ISLAND SYSTEMS: I. PATTERNS OF FAUNAL BIOMASS AND DENSITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Shallow aquatic habitats are particularly vulnerable to human impacts. To understand the resource value of these habitats, we quantified density and biomass of fishes and invertebrates in an estuarine cove (Coggeshall Cove, RI) and in a coastal lagoon (Ninigret Pond, RI). We samp...

496

Understanding the "How" of Quality Improvement: Lessons from the Rhode Island Program Quality Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past 10 years, afterschool and youth development programming has moved from providing childcare for working parents to being an integral component of the learning day, supporting the academic, social, and emotional development of young people. An important part of that transition has been a growing emphasis on improving program quality.…

Devaney, Elizabeth; Smith, Charles; Wong, Kenneth

2012-01-01

497

University of Rhode Island Count of Majors for Students Registered in Fall 1998 (including double majors)  

E-print Network

SCIENCES AS010BOS 1 1 1 1 2 4 1 5 41 56 3 5 48 73 121 400501 CHEMISTRY AS021BOA 1 1 1 6 4 2 10 5 15 400501 21 270101 MATHEMATICS AS031BOA 1 14 14 1 1 15 16 31 270101 MATHEMATICS AS031BOS 2 1 14 5 1 17 6 23 230301 COMP. LIT STUDIES AS041BOA 4 3 1 2 5 5 10 400801 PHYSICS AS047BOA 2 5 1 1 8 1 9 400801 PHYSICS AS

Rhode Island, University of

498

76 FR 52656 - Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...permission. The proposed project would consist of the following: (1) The existing 10-foot-high, 156-foot-long granite masonry Elizabeth Webbing Dam with proposed 12-inch-high flashboards; (2) an existing 26-acre impoundment with a normal...

2011-08-23

499

Assessment of Pollution Prevention Opportunities for Mercury in Rhode Island Health Related Industries.  

E-print Network

species of fish, eating wildlife. In May of 1998 a Mercury Action Plan was drafted that included 45 containing cleaning supplies. The lists are part of a mass database for the entire mercury pollution and Pollution Prevention in Hospitals Workshop on April 20, 1999. 5. Will continue updating the mass database

Rhode Island, University of

500

A Rhode Island High School-University Partnership: Urban Students' Perceptions of College Readiness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nearly one third of U.S. students will fail to graduate from high school this year and another one-third will graduate without the skills needed to be successful after high school. These statistics are even more alarming for minority and low income students, with fewer than 10% of low income minority students going on to earn bachelors' degrees…

Callahan, Colleen A.

2010-01-01