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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI AGENCY...restricted area located in the waters of Rhode Island Sound, 4 nautical miles due south of Lands End in Newport, Rhode Island. The restricted area was...

2012-04-04

2

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island. 81.340 Section 81.340 Protection...Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.340 Rhode Island. Rhode IslandâTSP Designated area Does not meet...

2010-07-01

3

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rhode Island. 81.340 Section 81.340 Protection...Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.340 Rhode Island. Rhode IslandâTSP Designated area Does not meet...

2012-07-01

4

40 CFR 81.340 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Environment 17 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Rhode Island. 81.340 Section 81.340 Protection...Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.340 Rhode Island. Rhode IslandâTSP Designated area Does not meet...

2009-07-01

5

Nurse Practitioner in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of the future role of the nurse practitioner in Rhode Island is reported. The study was conducted by the Rhode Island Health Science Education Council under contract to the Rhode Island Department of Education, in response to a resolution of the 1...

1976-01-01

6

Rhode Island Critical Resource Atlas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geographic Information System (GIS) technology is used to assist planners, scientists, geographers, and others to visualize data sets. This particular project created draws on data from the state of Rhode Island's Geographic Information System (RIGIS) database in order to assist land managers and other interested parties. The project was created with support from the Environmental Protection Agency, the University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension, and a number of other organizations. On the site, visitors can click on maps of forests and wetlands, land use patterns, groundwater resources, soil hydrology, and biodiversity. On the site's homepage, visitors can also use the "Towns" drop down menu to look at information for different cities throughout the state. Additionally, the "Watershed Atlas" area provides detailed maps of the twelve watersheds located in Rhode Island.

7

Rhode Island's Health 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the fourth annual report on the health conditions and health expenditures of the people of Rhode Island and is the only such report to be issued by any State in the Nation. Topics covered include population trends, health status (natality, mortali...

1979-01-01

8

77 FR 69648 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-4089-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...damage in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane Sandy...

2012-11-20

9

75 FR 18516 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...declaration of an emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March...conditions in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from severe storms...

2010-04-12

10

77 FR 68797 - Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-3355-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Emergency and Related Determinations...declaration of an emergency for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3355-EM), dated October...conditions in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Hurricane Sandy...

2012-11-16

11

75 FR 18521 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...damage in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from severe storms...

2010-04-12

12

76 FR 61730 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-4027-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4027-DR), dated September...damage in certain areas of the State of Rhode Island resulting from Tropical Storm...

2011-10-05

13

Coordinating Human Services Delivery in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses some theoretical aspects of service delivery coordination in Rhode Island, examines coordination projects undertaken by other States, presents an overview of coordination efforts in Rhode Island, evaluates results of a special survey...

G. J. Beiser

1979-01-01

14

Numerical simulation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Big River Management Area, central Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Rhode Island Water Resources Board is considering use of groundwater resources from the Big River Management Area in central Rhode Island because increasing water demands in Rhode Island may exceed the capacity of current sources. Previous water-resources investigations in this glacially derived, valley-fill aquifer system have focused primarily on the effects of potential groundwater-pumping scenarios on streamflow depletion; however, the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands have not been assessed, and such assessments are a requirement of the State’s permitting process to develop a water supply in this area. A need for an assessment of the potential effects of pumping on wetlands in the Big River Management Area led to a cooperative agreement in 2008 between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island. This partnership was formed with the goal of developing methods for characterizing wetland vegetation, soil type, and hydrologic conditions, and monitoring and modeling water levels for pre- and post-water-supply development to assess potential effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands. This report describes the hydrogeology of the area and the numerical simulations that were used to analyze the interaction between groundwater and surface water in response to simulated groundwater withdrawals. The results of this analysis suggest that, given the hydrogeologic conditions in the Big River Management Area, a standard 5-day aquifer test may not be sufficient to determine the effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wetlands. Model simulations showed water levels beneath Reynolds Swamp declined by about 0.1 foot after 5 days of continuous pumping, but continued to decline by an additional 4 to 6 feet as pumping times were increased from a 5-day simulation period to a simulation period representative of long-term average monthly conditions. This continued decline in water levels with increased pumping time is related to the shift from the primary source of water to the pumped wells being derived from aquifer storage during the early-time (5 days) simulation to being derived more from induced infiltration from the flooded portion of the Big River (southernmost extent of the Flat River Reservoir) during the months of March through October or from captured groundwater discharge to this portion of the Big River when the downstream Flat River Reservoir is drained for weed control during the months of November through February, as was the case for the long-term monthly conditions.

Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.

2013-01-01

15

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT databook is the fifth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 30 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

16

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 43 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (including median household income,…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

17

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT databook is the sixth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 37 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

18

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the fifth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 30 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

19

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the sixth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 37 indicators in 5 areas: (1) family and community (covering child population and children in single-parent families); (2) economic well-being (covering median household income, cost of…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

20

Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook, 2003.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT databook is the eighth annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 53 indicators (3 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

21

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT databook is the seventh annual profile examining statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. The statistical portrait is based on 49 indicators (6 new indicators in this databook) in 5 areas: (1) family and community (including child population, children in single parent families, and racial and ethnic…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

22

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Factbook, 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count report examined statewide trends in the well-being of Rhode Island's children. Five chapters addressed the areas of: family and community; economic well-being; child health; safety; and education. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of well-being: (1) children in single parent families; (2) median household income;…

Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.; And Others

23

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Rhode Island Federal program. 939.700 Section 939...OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.700 Rhode Island Federal program. (a) This part...

2009-07-01

24

30 CFR 939.700 - Rhode Island Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island Federal program. 939.700 Section 939...OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.700 Rhode Island Federal program. (a) This part...

2010-07-01

25

75 FR 17178 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00006  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00006 AGENCY...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): Rhode Island: Bristol. Connecticut: New...

2010-04-05

26

Rhode Island Jurisdictions Enrolled in the Draft Voluntary ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Rhode Island Jurisdictions Enrolled in the Draft Voluntary National Retail Food Regulatory Program Standards. ... October 2012. Rhode Island. ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/guidanceregulation/retailfoodprotection

27

Rhode Island Election Tickets: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhode Island was the first English colony in America to issue printed election ballots, with the first issued in the mid-1740s. This survey of Rhode Island election tickets, while not exhaustive, is representative of the use of tickets in elections spanning a period of over 150 years and documents state and local politics, political factions and election results from the

Russell J. DeSimone; Daniel C. Schofield

2007-01-01

28

Marine Recreational Fishing in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine recreational fishing in Rhode Island is a very important part of the economy in the Ocean State. A major tourist attraction, as well as a strong local interest, recreational fishing draws approximately 350,000 people to Rhode Island's waters each year for a total of 1.2 million fishing trips. More than 45 percent of these anglers are from out of

Erik Williams; Tony Corey

29

Professional Development for Rhode Island School Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the results of a survey of Rhode Island school administrators (n=523) and open-ended interviews of administrators (n=28) that would provide information for the design of leadership and staff development activities as part of Rhode Island's LEAD project--an attempt to improve the leadership capacity of school administrators.…

Turley, James; Brittingham, Barbara E.

30

Sex Trafficking and Decriminalized Prostitution in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhode Island is the only state in the United States where prostitution is decriminalized indoors. Since decriminalization in 1980, the sex industry has expanded and Rhode Island has become a destination for commercial sex in New England. Rhode Island is one of only three states that have not had a human trafficking prosecution. Rhode Island has had no prosecutions of

Melanie Shapiro

2009-01-01

31

Estimated Water Use and Availability in the East Narragansett Bay Study Area, Rhode Island, 1995-99.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Water availability became a concern in Rhode Island during a drought in 1999, and further investigation was needed to assess the current demands on the hydrologic system from withdrawals during periods of little to no precipitation. The low ground-water l...

E. C. Wild

2007-01-01

32

Geology of Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In preparing the present treatise and the accompanying geologic map of Massachusetts and Rhode Island (PI. X, in pocket) I have endeavored to use all the material available. The matter has been greatly condensed, for the detailed geology of a considerable part of the area will be described in a number of forthcoming folios of the Geologic Atlas of the United States. The Holyoke folio, published in 1898, covered the major part of the Triassic rocks in Massachusetts, but as those rocks have since been more thoroughly studied they are here treated in greater detail to bring their discussion up to date.

Emerson, Benjamin Kendall

1917-01-01

33

Water conservation for Rhode Island lawns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1989, water professionals in Rhode Island developed a program for home lawn irrigation scheduling that adapted an agricultural soil moisture model for use on home lawns. The key to the program, which emphasized supplemental watering only, was a \\

Alyson McCann; Arthur J. Gold; Kathleen Mallon; Josef Gorres

1994-01-01

34

Three Guidance Programs in Providence, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes three programs implemented in the Providence, Rhode Island, elementary schools to improve students' self-image. These include a guidance/puppetry program, student of the week awards, and a behavioral management system. (JAC)

Chirico, John

1985-01-01

35

Maintenance Dredging, Bullocks Point Cove, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of maintenance dredging of channels, and mooring and turning basins in Bullocks Point Cove, Providence River, Rhode Island. Dredging, and turbidity created by the proposal might produce localized, short-term damages to the marine biot...

1972-01-01

36

Outpatient Mental Health Benefits in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the last several years considerable attention has been devoted to the need for public policies to influence the availability of outpatient mental health insurance coverage in Rhode Island. A number of experts have expressed opinions on this issue a...

1983-01-01

37

Children's Mental Health Services in Rhode Island. Rhode Island KIDS COUNT Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Rhode Island KIDS COUNT issue brief, one of a series presenting an in-depth look at issues affecting the health, safety, education, and economic well-being of children, focuses on children's mental health services in the state. The brief reports that mental health services for children in Rhode Island are fragmented, with inadequate capacity…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

38

Rhode Island Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report, FY 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Rhode Island Water Resources Center has supported one information transfer project, 'Clean Drinking Water in Rhode Island,' and two research projects, 'Long-term, State-wide Analysis of the Relationship Between Water Quality and Demographic Changes in...

2008-01-01

39

78 FR 21492 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13528 and 13529] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00012 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4107-DR), dated 03/22/2013....

2013-04-10

40

75 FR 19666 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00007  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12116 and 12117] Rhode Island Disaster RI-00007 AGENCY: Small Business Administration...a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04/08/2010....

2010-04-15

41

3. AERIAL VIEW SOUTHWEST ON RHODE ISLAND AVENUE CORRIDOR FROM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. AERIAL VIEW SOUTHWEST ON RHODE ISLAND AVENUE CORRIDOR FROM BEYOND THE HISTORIC BOUNDARY AT TWELFTH STREET, NE. (Photograph enlarged from a 4x5 negative.) - Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

42

Sea-floor geology in central Rhode Island Sound south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study the sea floor along the northeastern coast of the United States. NOAA collected multibeam-echosounder data during hydrographic survey H11995 in a 63-square-kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island. The USGS collected sediment samples, bottom video, and still photographs from 27 stations in this study area to verify an interpretation of the bathymetric data. Collected data are used to map areas of scour depressions and erosional outliers, megaripples, boulders, and relatively undisturbed modern marine sediments. In general, much of the eastern part of the study area, a submerged segment of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, is bouldery. Bottom photography shows boulders are generally encrusted with hydrozoans, algae, and anemone. Scour depressions, presumably formed by long-period storm waves, and erosional outliers of Holocene sediments dominate the western part of the study area and several large areas in the east. The scour depressions tend to have coarser grained sediment than intervening erosional outliers. The coarseness likely creates turbulence in the water over these areas, which prevents fine-grained sediment deposition. Several small areas of megaripples are visible in the bathymetry data in the west. Other sandy areas are typically rippled, with burrows, worm tubes, and starfish present.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Ackerman, S. D.; Worley, C. R.; Nadeau, M. A.; Van Hoy, M. V.

2012-01-01

43

78 FR 23278 - Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-4107-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2013-0001] Rhode Island; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4107-DR), dated March...determined that the damage in the State of Rhode Island resulting from a severe winter...

2013-04-18

44

75 FR 18554 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...Presidential disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

2010-04-12

45

75 FR 22872 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disaster Declaration 12098 and 12099] Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00006 AGENCY...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 03...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island, dated 03/29/2010 is...

2010-04-30

46

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Rhode Island. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

47

MERCURY IN MINK IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Tissues of mink (Mustela vison) collected from Rhode Island sites during winters of 1999-2002 were analyzed for mercury and stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon to determine the extent of Hg contamination in these aquatic dependent wildlife, and to evaluate whether stable isoto...

48

RI State Profile. Rhode Island: New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper provides information about Rhode Island's New England Common Assessments Program (NCAP), a comprehensive test. Its purpose is to measure each student's overall proficiency for graduation in the six core academic areas. In 2008, the Board of Regents in Rhode Island established new regulations for high school diplomas. Beginning with the…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

49

76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Rhode Island, and to add an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island...safest area in which to anchor offshore when waiting to enter Narragansett...Standards The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA...conditions of imminent peril to personnel and then only for such...

2011-03-21

50

Water conservation for Rhode Island lawns  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, water professionals in Rhode Island developed a program for home lawn irrigation scheduling that adapted an agricultural soil moisture model for use on home lawns. The key to the program, which emphasized supplemental watering only, was a water factor'' that was developed from daily simulation models for lawns on two soil textures. The program was pilot-tested in 1990 and ran statewide in the 1991 growing season. The simulation model relied on a single weather station for moisture data. Analysis of rainfall amounts suggested that computerized irrigation scheduling for home lawns requires spatially data. Variability in factors such as rooting depth and soil composition caused additional concern about the accuracy of the recommendations. It was concluded the computerized farm-based irrigation scheduling programs for the Northeast cannot be easily adapted to home lawn water management over a broad area. Instead, emphasis should be placed on linking sprinkler calibrations rates to soil types. Low-maintenance landscaping also should be encouraged in suburban areas.

McCann, A.; Gold, A.J.; Mallon, K.; Gorres, J. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources)

1994-04-01

51

Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2011 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2011. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 37 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2011. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.5 to about 21 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kg (kilograms) of sodium and 2,600,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2011; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 9,800 to 53,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 90,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 20.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L), median nitrite concentration was 0.002 mg/L as nitrogen (N), median nitrate concentration was 0.01 mg/L as N, median orthophosphate concentration was 0.07 mg/L as phosphorus, and median concentrations of total coliform and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were 33 and 23 colony forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100mL), respectively. The medians of the median daily loads (and yields) of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, and total coliform and E. coli bacteria were 230 kilograms per day (kg/d) (80 kilograms per day per square mile (kg/d/mi2)); 10 grams per day (g/d) (6.3 grams per day per square mile (g/d/mi2)); 110 g/d (29 g/d/mi2); 610 g/d (270 g/d/mi2); 4,600 million colony forming units per day (CFUx106/d) (2,500 CFUx106/d/mi2); and 1,800 CFUx106/d (810 CFUx106/d/mi2), respectively.

Smith, Kirk P.

2013-01-01

52

Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Western Rhode Island Sound, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of a high-resolution, seismic-reflection, and sidescan-sonar survey conducted in western Rhode Island Sound south of Narragansett Bay (fig. 1 inset) by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1980. The study defines the geologic framework of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between lat. 41 deg 09' and 41 deg 32'N and long. 71 deg 07' and 71 deg 37'W. A total of 580 kilometers (km) of seismic-reflection profiles and 580 km of sidescan sonographs was collected aboard the RV Neecho. Trackline spacing was 1 to 2 km at the mouth of Narragansett Bay, and dip lines were 2 km apart with widely spaced strike lines in Rhode Island Sound (fig. 1). The maps in this report adjoin those for eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts, of O'Hara and Oldale (1980).

Needell, Sally W.; O'Hara, Charles J.; Knebel, Harley J.

1983-01-01

53

33 CFR 334.78 - Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.78 Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately... (a) The area. The open waters of Rhode Island Sound approximately 4.0...

2009-07-01

54

33 CFR 334.78 - Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately 4.0 nautical miles due south of Lands End in...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.78 Rhode Island Sound, Atlantic Ocean, approximately... (a) The area. The open waters of Rhode Island Sound approximately 4.0...

2010-07-01

55

40 CFR 282.89 - Rhode Island State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhode Island State-Administered Program... Approved State Programs § 282.89 Rhode Island State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Rhode Island is approved to administer...

2010-07-01

56

75 FR 5898 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...cranberries produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2010-02-05

57

75 FR 31288 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone nonattainment...the suspension of the requirements for Rhode Island to submit an attainment...

2010-06-03

58

75 FR 20514 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...cranberries produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2010-04-20

59

77 FR 30214 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze AGENCY: Environmental...SUMMARY: EPA is approving a revision to the Rhode Island State Implementation Plan (SIP...2018. The revision was submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental...

2012-05-22

60

40 CFR 282.89 - Rhode Island State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Rhode Island State-Administered Program... Approved State Programs § 282.89 Rhode Island State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Rhode Island is approved to administer...

2009-07-01

61

40 CFR 282.89 - Rhode Island State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rhode Island State-Administered Program... Approved State Programs § 282.89 Rhode Island State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Rhode Island is approved to administer...

2012-07-01

62

40 CFR 52.2081 - EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. 52.2081 Section...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Rhode Island § 52.2081 EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. The...

2010-07-01

63

40 CFR 52.2081 - EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-07-01 false EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. 52.2081 Section...PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Rhode Island § 52.2081 EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations. The...

2009-07-01

64

78 FR 24333 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2013-04-25

65

77 FR 43514 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...explosives anchorage in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, and adding an offshore anchorage in Rhode Island Sound south of Brenton Point,...

2012-07-25

66

76 FR 16322 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...cranberries in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...cranberries in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2011-03-23

67

77 FR 52595 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...cranberries produced in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2012-08-30

68

75 FR 18394 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey,...

2010-04-12

69

76 FR 52656 - Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Project No. 14211-000] Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...Competing Applications On June 10, 2011, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...in Central Falls, Providence County, Rhode Island. The sole purpose of a...

2011-08-23

70

77 FR 14715 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available Control Technology...Plan (SIP) revisions submitted by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management...revisions demonstrate that the State of Rhode Island meets the requirements of...

2012-03-13

71

75 FR 64949 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of Attainment of...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 1997 8-hour ozone nonattainment...determining that the Providence (All of Rhode Island) moderate 8-hour ozone...

2010-10-21

72

77 FR 37653 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers for Arizona, Maryland and Rhode Island...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...MEP) Centers for Arizona, Maryland and Rhode Island; Availability of Funds AGENCY...establish MEP centers in Arizona, Maryland and Rhode Island. DATES: All proposals, paper...separate locations, Arizona, Maryland, and Rhode Island. These MEP centers will...

2012-06-22

73

University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Narragansett, Rhode Island, the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO) of URI offers instruction leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in biological, chemical, physical, and geological oceanography as well as in interdisciplinary and related areas such as atmospheric chemistry. Site includes information on graduate programs, undergraduate opportunities, faculty, facilities, news, and publications. Outreach initiatives are numerous and are targeted at a wide audience.

74

Rhode Island Flood Plain Management Services; Bench Reference Mark Catalogue Portsmouth, Newport and Warwick, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study, which developed a catalog of bench and reference marks for several communities in Rhode Island, was conducted by the Long Range Planning Branch, Planning Directorate, New England Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the request of the Rho...

C. L. Hatfield

1994-01-01

75

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Providence Quadrangle, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Criteria for this evaluation were developed by the National Uranium Re...

R. C. Zollinger R. P. Blauvelt R. T. Chew

1982-01-01

76

Policy and Procedures, University of Rhode Island Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A guide to policies and procedures of the University of Rhode Island Foundation is presented. Attention is directed to the following concerns: fund-raising policies, the act incorporating the University of Rhode Island Foundation, by-laws, dual signature system, nominating committee responsibilities and procedures, policy and guidelines for the…

Leslie, James W.

77

Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers  

EPA Science Inventory

Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

78

One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility  

SciTech Connect

Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

Malloy, M.G.

1997-11-01

79

Rhode Island Department of Health Capacity Development Program Report. Assisting and Improving Rhode Island's Public Water Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mission of the Rhode Island Department of HEALTH is to prevent disease and to protect and to promote the health and safety of the people of Rhode Island. As a result HEALTH is committed to striving for safe and healthy lives in safe and healthy commun...

2002-01-01

80

Michigan, Rhode Island tackle employee benefits  

SciTech Connect

In separate cases concerning post-retirement employee benefits other than pensions (PBOPs), regulators in Michigan and Rhode Island have shifted to accrual accounting for utilities to conform with Financial Accounting Standard No. 106, issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board. In Michigan, the Public Service Commission ordered utilities to follow FAS 106 but told telecommunications carriers to look to the Federal Communications Commission for guidance. It allowed utilities to defer any additional costs related to FAS 106 for up to three years, or at least until the next rate case that is begun within the three year deferral period. It noted that rate recognition of FAS 106 costs would help utilities prefund the expense, and that growth on investment of recovered funds would tend to lower the overall cost of providing post-retirement benefits. In Rhode Island, the Public Utilities Commission allowed utilities to change from pay-as-you-go to accrual funding, but limited rate recovery to only the tax-deductible amount of the expense, citing uncertainty over the actuarial assumptions that must be used to calculate the FAS 106 liability. It denied arguments that PBOPs funding below the full FAS 106 level would adversely affect financial integrity. But utilities that opt to switch to accrual funding will be allowed each year to file a single-issue rate case to recover the tax-deductible amount. Meanwhile, utilities must place the funds in IRS-approved trusts, to maximize tax deductibility and provide tax-free benefits to retirees.

Not Available

1993-02-01

81

US hydropower resource assessment for Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Rhode Island.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

1995-07-01

82

77 FR 67857 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective Date: 11/03/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-11-14

83

77 FR 69915 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/03/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective Date: 11/10/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-11-21

84

Evaluation of the Rhode Island Sexual Assault Response Team (SART).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sexual Assault and Trauma Resource Center (SATRC) of Rhode Island contracted with BOTEC Analysis Corporation with funding from the National Institute of Justice to undertake an evaluation of the principal legal effects on clients of the Sexual Assault...

D. Wilson A. Klein

2005-01-01

85

Fiscal Year 1988 Program Report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aq...

C. P. C. Poon

1989-01-01

86

Cultivating Systemic Capacity: The Rhode Island Tobacco Control Enhancement Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the Rhode Island Tobacco Control Enhancement Project (TCEP), a state-university-community technical assistance system. TCEP was developed under the auspices of the Rhode Island Department of Health's Tobacco Control program and was designed to build capacity among nine community-based organizations to mount comprehensive tobacco control interventions in five diverse communities within the state. This paper: (1) provides a

Paul Florin; Carolyn Celebucki; John Stevenson; Jasmine Mena; Dawn Salago; Andrew White; Betty Harvey; Marianela Dougal

2006-01-01

87

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Rhode Island Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's: A Rhode Island Consumer's Guide is to provide consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system will work for them based on their wind resource, the type and size of their sites, and their economics. The cover of this guide contains a Rhode Island wind resource map and information about state incentives and contacts for more information.

Not Available

2003-06-01

88

Developing and Applying a Transportation Model for Aquidneck Island, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research project focuses on Aquidneck Island in the State of Rhode Island. The research project has two primary objectives. First, the project builds the foundation for coordinated transportation and land use planning on Aquidneck Island using TransC...

F. Atash K. Woodward J. Boyce S. Eisenbeiser

2004-01-01

89

Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

2011-01-01

90

Non-energy resources, Connecticut and Rhode Island coastal waters  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cores collected from Long Island Sound, Connecticut, were used to establish control on the geologic framework of the area. Lithologic and stratigraphic analyses verified the presence of the following units: (1) Cretaceous coastal plain, (2) Pleistocene glacial till, (3) late Pleistocene glacial lake, (4) late Pleistocene glacial outwash, and (5) Holocene fluvial, estuarine and marine deposits. Cores collected in Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, were obtained from inferred, relict shoreline features and were analyzed for heavy mineral content. Concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 3.4%; no significant downcore changes were found. The results indicated that surficial sediments in areas of high-velocity tidal flow yield greater amounts of heavy minerals than do inferred placer deposits. During the second phase of the program of study, Connecticut and Rhode Island pooled resources to develop a study plan for the comprehensive quantification of all non-energy resources in the adjacent waters of the states. A literature and data survey was conducted to assess the occurrence, extent, and accessibility of these resources. Sand and gravel and heavy minerals were found in concentrations offering potential for resource exploitation. Constraints on exploitation include (1) water depth restrictions for the protection of shellfish beds and public beaches, (2) fishing activities, (3) military, commercial, and fishing vessel traffic, (4) seafloor cable routes and (5) dump sites. Deposits composed of Pleistocene glacial sediments and/or Holocene marine sediments in regions of little or no user conflict were identified as sites potentially suitable for resource exploitation. The study plan stated additional data needs (geophysical profiling and vibracore sampling) at these sites. Subsequent to these recommendations, high-resolution seismic profiles and sidescan sonographs were obtained from these sites. Seismic stratigraphic analyses confirm the presence of extensive deposits of potential economic value. ?? 1989.

Neff, N. F.; Lewis, R. S.

1989-01-01

91

The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the implementation and initial evaluation of the nation`s first statewide conservation and load management program, the Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program (RISLP). Rhode Island`s program is unique because it is a voluntary collaborative effort and because three utilities use a single delivery mechanism for their programs. The Rhode Island Statewide Lighting Program is a unique attempt to improve the efficiency of electricity use in the commercial/industrial sector on a statewide basis. The cooperative nature of program design and implementation has strengthened communication among the participants. The process evaluation showed that both the participants and the customers are satisfied with the program. The program has had a significant effect on customer behavior.

Pierce, B.; Bjoerkqvist, O.

1992-02-01

92

76 FR 79674 - Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Docket No. EL12-16-000] Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint Take...Benjamin Riggs (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against Rhode Island Public Utility Commission (Respondent) alleging...

2011-12-22

93

Health Hazard Evaluatuon Report HETA 81-004-975, Weatherking Products, Inc., East Greenwich, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On September 24, 1980, NIOSH received a request for technical assistance from the Rhode Island Department of Health to aid in the evaluation of radiofrequency (RF) radiation exposures at Weatherking Products, Incorporated, East Greenwich, Rhode Island. On...

W. Murray W. Parr W. Straub

1981-01-01

94

77 FR 73487 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-4089-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

2012-12-10

95

75 FR 19985 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

2010-04-16

96

75 FR 51836 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 6 to Notice of...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...declared on March 29, 2010, for the State of Rhode Island due to the damage resulting...

2010-08-23

97

77 FR 53883 - Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice of Complaint  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EL12-100-000] Benjamin Riggs v. Rhode Island Public Utility Commission; Notice...filed a formal complaint against the Rhode Island Public Utility Commission (Respondent...on August 16, 2010, as directed by the Rhode Island General Assembly; which...

2012-09-04

98

75 FR 18522 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

2010-04-12

99

78 FR 54621 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee Notice is hereby...FACA), that a planning meeting of the Rhode Island Advisory Committee to the Commission...Wednesday, September 18, 2013, at the Rhode Island Urban League, 246 Prairie...

2013-09-05

100

75 FR 51832 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of...emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March...declared on March 30, 2010, for the State of Rhode Island due to the damage resulting...

2010-08-23

101

78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick, Rhode Island. The Re-Evaluation and ROD...

2013-06-28

102

77 FR 73489 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-4089-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated November...major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island is hereby amended to include...

2012-12-10

103

Coleoptera of Rhode Island: An On-Line Checklist  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A creative presentation of checklist data by graduate student Derek Sikes of the University of Connecticut, this site provides access to taxonomic information on the beetles of Rhode Island. Featuring a searchable (by Family or Species) database, the site also includes an introduction, a map of Rhode Island, and a selection of source references. Typical returns provide Family, Subfamily, Species, and Determiner name, with hyperlinks to Voucher source(s). The searchable database includes 96 expected and documented families, 2,413 expected and documented species, and 511 apparent new state records.

Sikes, Derek S.

1999-01-01

104

78 FR 4967 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/ 14/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective Date: 01/14/2013. Physical Loan...

2013-01-23

105

77 FR 70203 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4089-DR), dated 11/14/ 2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/26/2012 through 10/31/2012. Effective Date: 11/14/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-11-23

106

Results of the 1983 Rhode Island Physician Smoking Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the newsletter is to report the results of the 1983 Rhode Island physician smoking survey. The survey format allowed for a detailed analysis of physician smoking patterns based on sex, age, and medical specialty. Physician smoking rates wil...

1986-01-01

107

Fiscal Year 1988 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aquifers throughout the state. Current and anticipated state water problems are contamination and clean up of aquifers to protect the valuable groundwater resources; protection of watersheds by controlling non-point

Poon

1989-01-01

108

Rhode Island Child and Family Services Review. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document presents the findings of the Child and Family Services Review (CFSR) for the State of Rhode Island. The CFSR assesses State performance on seven child welfare outcomes pertaining to childrens safety, permanency, and well being and on seven s...

2004-01-01

109

Unviersity of Rhode Island Library Reference Sources in Gerontology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirty-two sources in gerontology, located at the University of Rhode Island Library, are listed in this annotated bibliography as well as some interdisciplinary sources. This bibliography contains material published as recently as 1996 and includes annotations of an "Older Americans Almanac," bibliographies, a biographical dictionary, the…

Morrison, Catherine E.

110

The Rhode Island Medical Emergency Distribution System (MEDS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The State of Rhode Island conducted an exercise to obtain and dispense a large volume of emergency medical supplies in response to a mass casualty incident. The exercise was conducted in stages that included requesting supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile and distributing the supplies around the state. The lessons learned included how to better structure an exercise, what types

Greg Banner

2004-01-01

111

The Rhode Island Medical Marijuana Program: An Exploratory Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

On January 3, 2006, the Rhode Island General Assembly enacted legislation that mandated the Department of Health (DOH) to implement a program to register qualified patients and their caregivers to allow possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana for personal use for statutorily defined illnesses and debilitating conditions. This exploratory program evaluation used the Conceptual Model of Nursing and

Charles R. Alexandre

2010-01-01

112

76 FR 61131 - Rhode Island Disaster #RI-00008  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Rhode Island dated 09/26/2011. Incident: Hurricane Irene. Incident Period: 08/27/2011 through 08/29/2011. Effective Date: 09/26/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/25/2011. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

2011-10-03

113

Inpatient Obstetric and Pediatric Services in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is in two parts. The first part analyzes inpatient obstetric care in Rhode Island. The report discusses the capacity of the system, the efficiency of the system, caesarean births and the regionalization of care for distressed newborns. Part tw...

D. W. Rinaldo

1983-01-01

114

Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Marine science at the University of Rhode Island (URI) is an orientation, a direction. It is not an isolated activity of one department or even of one college. URI has a commitment to a total effort in marine science that is expressed in the cooperation, and, indeed, the interdependence of departments and personnel in many aspects of marine…

Napoli, James J.

115

Church repair swarms and earthquakes in Rhodes Island, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of inscriptions dating repairs and reconstruction of churches in Rhodes Island, SE Hellenic Arc, revealed two clear peaks in their time-frequency diagram. The most recent one is related to post-seismic recovery following the destructive earthquakes of 1856 and 1863. The older peak, covering the period 1718–1760, evident also in the nearby Karpathos Island, is partly related to the 1741

S. Stiros; S. Papageorgiou; V. Kontogianni; P. Psimoulis

2006-01-01

116

Accommodations and the Performance of All Students on Rhode Island's Performance Assessment. State Assessment Series, Rhode Island Report 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides analysis and discussion of the 1996 Rhode Island State Assessment Program performance for grade 4 in mathematics, writing, and health education. It addresses the effects of accommodations and the inclusion of all students in these state assessments, examining some of the characteristics of tests administered to students with…

Elliott, Judy; Bielinski, John; Thurlow, Martha; DeVito, Pat; Hedlund, Ellen

117

Sources of geologic and hydrologic information pertinent to ground-water resources in Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes sources of geologic and hydrologic information useful to water managers and others involved in the investigation, appraisal, development, and protection of ground-water resources in Rhode Island. The geographic scope of the report includes Rhode Island and small adjoining areas of Massachusetts and Connecticut, where drainage basins are shared with these States. The information summarized is found in maps and reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and published by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by the State of Rhode Island. Information sources are presented in maps and tables. Reference maps show drainage divides, town lines, and the 7.5-minute grid of latitude and longitude for the State. Maps show availability of surficial geologic maps, bedrock geologic maps, and ground-water studies by 7.5-minute quadrangle, and show availability of ground-water studies by drainage basin, subbasin, and special study area. Sources of geologic and hydrologic information for the thirty-seven 7.5-minute quadrangles covering Rhode Island have been compiled based on the following information categories: surficial geology, bedrock geology, subsurface materials, altitude of bedrock surface, water-table altitudes, water-table contours, saturated thickness, hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, drainage divides, recharge areas, ground-water reservoirs, induced infiltration, and ground-water quality. A table for each of the 37 quadrangles lists the major categories of information available for that quadrangle, provides references to the publications in which the information can be found, and indicates the format, scale, and other pertinent attributes of the information. A table organized by report series gives full citations for publications prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey pertaining to the geology and hydrology of Rhode Island. To facilitate location of information for particular municipalities, a table lists cities and towns in the State and the quadrangles that cover each municipality.

Trench, Elaine C.

1995-01-01

118

Agreement between Rhode Island Board of Governors and University of Rhode Island Chapter, American Association of University Professors, 1983-1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collective bargaining agreement between Rhode Island Board of Governors and University of Rhode Island Chapter (710 members) of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1983-June 30, 1985 is presented. Items covered in the agreement include: definitions and AAUP recognition, management rights,…

Rhode Island Univ., Kingston.

119

Agreement between Rhode Island Board of Governors and University of Rhode Island Chapter American Association of University Professors, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collective bargaining agreement between the Rhode Island Board of Governors and the University of Rhode Island Chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) covering the period July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987 is presented. Items covered in the agreement are: unit recognition, management rights, nondiscrimination, the…

Rhode Island Univ., Kingston.

120

Accretion rates and sediment accumulation in Rhode Island salt marshes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to test the assumption that accretion rates of intertidal salt marshes are approximately equal to rates of sea-level\\u000a rise along the Rhode Island coast,210Pb analyses were carried out and accretion rates calculated using constant flux and constant activity models applied to sediment\\u000a cores collected from lowSpartina alterniflora marshes at four sites from the head to the mouth of

S. Bricker-Urso; S. W. Nixon; J. K. Cochran; D. J. Hirschberg; C. Hunt

1989-01-01

121

75 FR 22873 - Rhode Island Disaster Number RI-00007  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated 04/08/2010. Incident: Severe storms and flooding. Incident Period: 03/12/2010 through 04/12/2010. Effective Date: 04/12/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 06/07/2010. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

2010-04-30

122

Balancing Ground-Water Withdrawals and Streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water withdrawn for water supply reduces streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin in Rhode Island. These reductions may adversely affect aquatic habitats. A hydrologic model was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, Town of North Kingstown, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, and Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation to aid water-resource planning in the basin. Results of the model provide information that helps water suppliers and natural-resource managers evaluate strategies for balancing ground-water development and streamflow reductions in the basin.

Barlow, Paul M.; Dickerman, David C.

2001-01-01

123

Serologic and molecular detection of granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Rhode Island.  

PubMed Central

A new indirect fluorescent-antibody (IFA) assay with antigen produced in vitro in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 was used to identify the first recognized case of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis in Rhode Island. This IFA assay was used to detect granulocytic ehrlichiae in white-footed mice and in a dog inhabiting the area surrounding the patient's residence. Host-seeking Ixodes scapularis ticks found in the same habitat also were infected. I. scapularis ticks collected from other locations were fed on dogs and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the competency of these species as hosts of granulocytotropic Ehrlichia. Tick-induced infections of dogs were confirmed by serologic testing, tissue culture isolation, and PCR amplification, whereas several rabbits seroconverted but were PCR and culture negative. PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA sequencing of the PCR products or culture isolation was used to confirm granulocytic Ehrlichia infections in humans, dogs, white-footed mice, and ticks.

Yeh, M T; Mather, T N; Coughlin, R T; Gingrich-Baker, C; Sumner, J W; Massung, R F

1997-01-01

124

Hearts and Minds: The Political and Military Effectiveness of the Rhode Island Militia in the American Revolution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The lessons for tomorrow may sometimes be found in yesterday's mistakes. This paper analyzes the political and military effectiveness of the Rhode Island militia during the Revolutionary War. Through careful study of the roots of Rhode Island and its mili...

G. A. Trogdon

1992-01-01

125

Risk assessment pilot study. Phase 3. Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Final draft report  

SciTech Connect

To undertake a marine ecological risk assessment at the Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island to determine the effect of hazardous waste disposal on Allen Harbor and Narragansett Bay. Allen Harbor, located in Narragansett Bay at NCBC Davisville, was closed to shellfishing by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management because of suspected hazardous waste contamination from a landfill and disposal area adjacent to the harbor. NCBC Davisville was added to the National Priority List in November 1989. Between 1946 and 1972, the 15-acre landfill received a wide variety of wastes, including sewage sludge, solvents, paints, chromic acid, PCB-contaminated waste oils, preservatives, blasting grit, and other municipal and industrial wastes generated at NCBC Davisville and at the Naval Air Station Quonset Point. Another site, also adjacent to Allen Harbor on Calf Pasture Point, was used for disposal of calcium hypochlorite decontaminating solution and chlorides.

Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Rogers, B.A.; Benyi, S.; Cayula, S.

1993-12-01

126

The Rhode Island Medical Emergency Distribution System (MEDS).  

PubMed

The State of Rhode Island conducted an exercise to obtain and dispense a large volume of emergency medical supplies in response to a mass casualty incident. The exercise was conducted in stages that included requesting supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile and distributing the supplies around the state. The lessons learned included how to better structure an exercise, what types of problems were encountered with requesting and distributing supplies, how to better work with members of the private medical community who are not involved in disaster planning, and how to become aware of the needs of special population groups. PMID:15133456

Banner, Greg

127

A Standards-Based Guide for Social Studies Programs in Rhode Island Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rhode Island state social studies curriculum for history, geography, civics, economics, and the behavioral sciences should promote civic responsibility and active civic participation. Rhode Island recommends that teachers and administrators use national social studies content standards rather than support the development of their own state…

Cheek, Dennis, Ed.; Fogle, Faith, Ed.

128

75 FR 26976 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...amends the notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

2010-05-13

129

Assessment of the Efficiency of Hospital Utilization at Rhode Island Hospital.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to assist the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Rhode Island Hospital (RIH) to assess the appropriateness of hospital bed use at RIH. The primary objective of the study was to estimate the percent of inappropriate adu...

1982-01-01

130

77 FR 73486 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3355-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...amends the notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3355-EM), dated October 29, 2012,...

2012-12-10

131

76 FR 60078 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-4027-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for State of Rhode Island (FEMA-4027-DR), dated September 3, 2011,...

2011-09-28

132

76 FR 60078 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3334-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...notice amends the notice of an emergency declaration for State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August 27, 2011, and...

2011-09-28

133

75 FR 18517 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...amends the notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

2010-04-12

134

75 FR 26977 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March 29, 2010, and...

2010-05-13

135

75 FR 18522 - Rhode Island Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March 29, 2010, and...

2010-04-12

136

75 FR 22151 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-1894-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-1894-DR), dated March 29, 2010, and...

2010-04-27

137

Freshwater Fish Assemblage Patterns in Rhode Island Streams and Rivers (ESA)  

EPA Science Inventory

Patterns in fish assemblages in streams and rivers can inform watershed and water management, yet these patterns are not well characterized for the U.S. state of Rhode Island. Here we relate freshwater fish data collected by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Managemen...

138

75 FR 22150 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3311-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...amends the notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3311-EM), dated March 30, 2010, and...

2010-04-27

139

76 FR 58026 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FEMA-3334-EM; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Rhode Island; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration...amends the notice of an emergency declaration for the State of Rhode Island (FEMA-3334-EM), dated August 27, 2011, and...

2011-09-19

140

In Rhode Island, an Unusual Marriage of Engineering and Languages Lures Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Students in the University of Rhode Island's International Engineering Program (IEP) spend a semester studying at an overseas university and another six months interning at a company abroad; at the end of five years, they earn two degrees, in engineering and a foreign language. Despite the extra academic demands, nearly a third of Rhode Island's…

Fischer, Karin

2012-01-01

141

The Paper Trail: Paper Use and Disposal at the University of Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Rhode Island has a well-established recycling program, however, the university community does not make full and proper use of the services and facilities provided. This project will specifically look at the use and disposal of paper products that are used for business and educational purposes at the University of Rhode Island and the effects these practices have

Katherine Modzelewski

2007-01-01

142

Assessing the Feasibility of Wind Power Production for the University of Rhode Island’s Bay Campus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Governor Carcieri and the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources (OER) set a goal for Rhode Island to be powered by 15% renewable energy resources. It was determined that wind power was the only utility scale means of renewable energy production abundant enough to satisfy this initiative. In January of 2006 the RI WINDS program was established and Applied Technology

Kenneth A. Critz

2009-01-01

143

Annual Housing Survey: 1976. Housing Characteristics for Selected Metropolitan Areas: Providence-Pawtucket-Warwick, Rhode Island-Massachusetts. Standard Metrpolitan Statistical Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Statistics are presented on neighborhood and housing and household characteristics obtained from the 1976 - 1977 annual housing survey conducted in the Providence - Pawtucket - Warwick, R.I. - Mass., region, 1 of 20 standard metropolitan statistical areas...

E. E. Beach J. S. Maynard E. D. Montfort

1978-01-01

144

Sea-floor geology in northeastern Block Island Sound, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Multibeam-echosounder and sidescan-sonar data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in northeastern Block Island Sound, combined with sediment samples and bottom photography collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, are used to interpret sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in this 52-square-kilometer-area offshore Rhode Island. Boulders, which are often overgrown with sessile fauna and flora, are mostly in water depths shallower than 20 meters. They are probably part of the southern flank of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown-Buzzards Bay moraine, deposited about 18,000 years ago. Scour depressions, areas of the sea floor with a coarser grained, rippled surface lying about 0.5 meter below the finer grained, surrounding sea floor, along with erosional outliers within the depressions are in a band near shore and also offshore in deep parts of the study area. Textural and bathymetric differences between areas of scour depressions and the surrounding sea floor or erosional outliers stand out in the sidescan-sonar imagery with sharp tonal contrasts. Also visible in the sidescan-sonar imagery are broad, low-profile bedforms with coarser grained troughs and finer grained crests.

McMullen, Kate Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Lewit, P. G.; Parker, C. E.

2013-01-01

145

Spatial Patterns of Productivity in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rhode Island is upgrading its sewage treatment plants to reduce the input of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to Narragansett Bay. Although Narragansett Bay is a nitrogen-limited ecosystem, consensus has not been reached on how the reduction in DIN will alter patterns of primary production. An accurate understanding of spatial productivity patterns is essential for effective estuarine management. In order to understand productivity patterns, estuarine scientists have traditionally used chlorophyll a (Chl. a) abundance as a productivity proxy. However, Chl. a in the water column is very dependent on immediate water column conditions and is not stable in the sediment. Chlorophyll degradation products (collectively referred to as chlorins) are stable biomarkers and their abundance can indicate past levels of Chl. a. We analyzed surface sediments from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island using the chlorin paleoproductivity proxy. Surface sediments have the added advantage of integrating over longer time scales (yearly-decadal) and can be more indicative of production patterns than water column Chl. a. Small sample size (0.25g) allows for high-resolution stratigraphy. Samples were injected (20 ?L injection loop) into an HPLC with a fluorescence detector operating in off-column mode (?ex=407 nm and (?em=662 nm). Preliminary results suggest a decrease in productivity between the upper and lower portions of Narragansett Bay. Our results will help characterize this shift in productivity patterns.

Koweek, D. A.; Prell, W. L.; Alexandre, M. R.

2008-12-01

146

Rhode Island Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education. Regulations Governing the Education of Children with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains regulations of the Rhode Island Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education governing the education of children with disabilities. Statutory language is provided that addresses the following areas: (1) purposes of the legislation; (2) definitions of terms used in the statutory language; (3) local education agency…

Rhode Island State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Providence.

147

Sidescan-Sonar Imagery, Multibeam Bathymetry, and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Rhode Island Sound, off Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology in estuaries and sounds along the northeastern coast of the United States. This report interprets the area covered by NOAA Survey H11320, about 72 km? of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound (RIS), located about 8 km south of Sakonnet Point, Rhode Island (fig. 1). Previous work in RIS includes studies of both sea-floor processes and subsurface geologic framework. McMaster (1960) mapped surficial sediment samples in Narragansett Bay and RIS and McMaster and others (1968) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in Block Island Sound and RIS. O'Hara and Oldale (1980) collected seismic-reflection profiles, sidescan-sonar data, and vibracores in eastern RIS (fig. 2). They interpreted the geologic history, assessed sand and gravel resources, and evaluated the mining impact of these resources. McMaster's (1960) interpretation of the surficial sediment within this study area consisted of sand with several isolated areas of gravel. Several other sediment samples were previously obtained within the study area: three National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) dredge samples from 1942 consisted of sand and one National Ocean Service (NOS) sample from 1939 was rocky (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). The purpose of this report is to define the sea-floor morphology and sedimentary environments and interpret processes occurring on the sea floor using sidescan-sonar imagery, multibeam bathymetry, and historic seismic-reflection profiles.

McMullen, Katherine Y.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Twomey, Erin R.; Danforth, William W.; Haupt, Todd A.; Crocker, James M.

2007-01-01

148

The Rhode Island medical marijuana program: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

On January 3, 2006, the Rhode Island General Assembly enacted legislation that mandated the Department of Health (DOH) to implement a program to register qualified patients and their caregivers to allow possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana for personal use for statutorily defined illnesses and debilitating conditions. This study was designed to describe the formulation and implementation of the program; identify stakeholder expectations and perceptions of the program; identify patient's expectations prior to enrollment; and identify patient's perceived experience of the enrollment process. The study findings indicated that 309 different practitioners had certified 980 patients was an indication of a level of program effectiveness meeting patient needs; that there was no indication that patients had been arrested or prosecuted for participating in the program; and that despite ongoing concerns with consistent access to marijuana, patients were pleased that the program existed. PMID:21511683

Alexandre, Charles R

2011-04-20

149

Fiscal Year 1988 program report: Rhode Island Water Resources Center  

SciTech Connect

The State of Rhode Island is active in water resources planning, development, and management activities which include legislation, upgrading of wastewater treatment facilities, upgrading and implementing pretreatment programs, protecting watersheds and aquifers throughout the state. Current and anticipated state water problems are contamination and clean up of aquifers to protect the valuable groundwater resources; protection of watersheds by controlling non-point source pollution; development of pretreatment technologies; and deterioring groundwater quality from landfill leachate or drainage from septic tank leaching field. Seven projects were included covering the following subjects: (1) Radon and its nuclei parents in bedrocks; (2) Model for natural flushing of aquifer; (3) Microbial treatment of heavy metals; (4) Vegetative uptake of nitrate; (5) Microbial process in vegetative buffer strips; (6) Leachate characterization in landfills; and (7) Electrochemical treatment of heavy metals and cyanide.

Poon, C.P.C.

1989-07-01

150

Offshore wind resource assessment with Standard Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT): A Rhode Island case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the current Rhode Island Ocean SAMP (Special Area Management Plan) project and the growing need in the foreseeable future, analysis tools for wind resource assessment are assembled into a toolkit that can be accessed from a GIS. The analysis is demonstrated by application to the ongoing wind resource assessment of Rhode Island's offshore waters by the Ocean SAMP. The tool is called Standard Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT). SWAT utilizes a method for integrating observations from the study area or numerical model outputs to assemble the spatial distribution of the offshore wind resource. Available power is inferred from direct measurements of wind speed, but the shape of the atmospheric boundary layer or wind speed profile must be parameterized in order to extrapolate measurements to heights other than that of the measurements. The vertical wind speed profile is modeled with the basic power law assuming a 1/7 exponent parameter representing near-neutral or more accurately timeaverage conditions. As an alternate estimate from year long multi-level observations at a meteorological tower is employed. The basis for the power analysis is the 2- parameter Weibull probability distribution, recognized as standard in modeling typical wind speed distributions. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the Weibull probability density function provides the expected power densities at observation sites. Application to Rhode Island's coastal waters yields an estimated Weibull shape parameter of roughly 2 for the offshore environment and a Weibull scale parameter that increases with distance from the coast. Estimates of power in the SAMP study area range from 525 to 850 W/m² at an elevation of 80 meters based on an observed profile in the SAMP study area. Like the Weibull scale parameter, annual mean wind power increases with distance offshore.

Crosby, Alexander Robert

151

Hydrogeology and Simulated Ground-Water Flow in the Salt Pond Region of Southern Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Salt Pond region of southern Rhode Island extends from Westerly to Narragansett Bay and forms the natural boundary between the Atlantic Ocean and the shallow, highly permeable freshwater aquifer of the South Coastal Basin. Large inputs of fresh ground...

A. Hougham J. P. Masterson J. R. Sorenson J. R. Stone S. B. Moran

2006-01-01

152

77 FR 11798 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...August 7, 2009, that addresses regional haze for the first planning period from 2008...also referred to as the ``regional haze program''). States are required...

2012-02-28

153

Chemical Analysis Support: Limited Analysis of Bristol, Rhode Island Well Water Samples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Well water samples collected from Bristol, Rhode Island were analyzed for volatile, acid, base/neutral and pesticide/PCB priority pollutants by the Federal Register Methods. Detection limits for the methods were determined following the May, 1980, USATHAM...

K. Beltis C. Jones L. Sadowski

1982-01-01

154

Marine Ecological Risk Assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) in Davisville, Rhode Island, has been the subject of a joint ecological research program by the Navy and Environmental Protection Agency. Allen Harbor, a small embayment of Narragansett Bay adjacent to NCBC, ...

C. Mueller D. J. Cobb G. G. Pesch T. R. Gleason W. R. Munns

1991-01-01

155

The Use of the European Wing Trawl for Herring, Rhode Island, 1968-69.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The European vinge or wing trawl was used in fishing trials conducted off the Rhode Island coast. Despite initial handling difficulties the trawl proved to be a suitable means of catching herring, Clupea harengus, for small draggers. (Author)

D. B. Thomson

1969-01-01

156

Comments Received on the May 10, 1976 Draft. Rhode Island 93-641 State Administration Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Public reaction to Rhode Island's proposal for State administration of the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-641) responsibilities and functions is documented. A draft of the administrative proposal was distributed to...

1976-01-01

157

Promoting Independence in Rhode Island: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Rhode Island demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

D& R International

2001-10-10

158

Marine Ecological Risk Assessment Pilot Study for Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An ecological risk assessment framework was applied to characterize aquatic risks associated with hazardous waste disposal at Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island. An initial screening phase (I) assessed exposure and related...

C. Mueller G. G. Pesch R. K. Johnston W. G. Nelson W. R. Munns

1992-01-01

159

Climate Change and Rhode Island's Coasts: Past, Present, and Future, 2012.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

With more precipitation, storminess, and flooding, and more extreme heat days, climate change effects are already being felt throughout Rhode Island. Sea level rise and erosion are happening along the states coastline. This document describes the changes ...

C. Lord L. Heffner P. Rubinoff R. Williams V. Lee

2012-01-01

160

Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

Not Available

1981-07-01

161

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 88-346-2030, Graphic Creations, Inc., Warren, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the management of Graphic Creations, Inc. (SIC-2752), Warren, Rhode Island, an evaluation was made of employee exposures to hydroquinone (123319) and printing press cleaning solvents which contained benzene (71432). The print...

E. A. Kaiser K. P. McManus

1990-01-01

162

Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Central Rhode Island Sound  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology of areas along the northeastern coast of the United States. During 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE conducted Hydrographic Survey H11321 in Rhode Island Sound. This sidescan-sonar and bathymetry survey covers an area of 93 km? located 12 km southeast of Brenton Point, RI in water depths of 28-39 m (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to delineate sea floor features and sedimentary environments of this area in central Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11321 and seismic-reflection data from a previous USGS field study (Needell and others, 1983a). This is important for the study of benthic habitats and provides a framework for future research. Prior work in this area includes the mapping of surface sediments and surficial geology. McMaster (1960) collected sediment samples from Rhode Island Sound and Narragansett Bay and mapped our study area as having a sandy sea floor. In addition, one sample of sand from the National Ocean Service (NOS) Hydrographic Database came from a location in the northeast part of our study area in 1939 (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). McMaster and others (1968) used seismic-reflection profiles to map the locations of a cuesta of Cretaceous sediments crossing Rhode Island Sound and post-Cretaceous drainage channels. Knebel and others (1982) identified sedimentary environments in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan sonographs. Needell and others (1983b) studied the Quaternary geology and mapped the structure, sedimentary environments, and geologic hazards in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection data. Sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11320, which overlaps the far eastern edge of our study area, was interpreted to consist of basins surrounded by a moraine and bathymetric highs composed of till with areas of rocks, sand waves, hummocks, glaciolacustrine erosional outliers, small scarps and elongate hills (fig. 1; McMullen and others, 2007). Some of those features extend into this study area.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Denny, J. F.; Haupt, T. A.; Crocker, J. M.

2008-01-01

163

Quaternary geology of the Rhode Island inner shelf  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Five sedimentary units and three erosional unconformities identified in high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles reveal the stratigraphic framework and Quaternary history of the inner continental shelf south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Late Tertiary to early Pleistocene rivers eroded the pre-Mesozoic bedrock and the Upper Cretaceous to lower Tertiary coastal plain and continental shelf strata to form a lowland and cuesta having a north-facing escarpment. The lowland and landward flanks of the cuesta were modified by glaciers during Pleistocene time and subsequently were overlain by drift and end moraine deposits of the late Wisconsinan ice advance. During deglaciation, freshwater lakes formed between the retreating ice and end moraines. Prior to sea-level rise, the drift and older deposits were cut by streams flowing south and southwestward toward Block Island Sound. As sea level rose, postglacial valleys were partly filled by fluvial, freshwater-peat, estuarine and salt-marsh deposits. Transgressing seas eroded the sea floor, exposing bedrock and coastal plain outcrops, and deposited marine sediments. ?? 1983.

Needell, S. W.; O'Hara, C. J.; Knebel, H. J.

1983-01-01

164

Survey of risk reduction and pollution prevention practices in the Rhode Island automotive refinishing industry.  

PubMed

In 1996 a survey of pollution prevention, environmental control, and occupational health and safety practices was conducted in the Rhode Island automotive refinishing industry sector. In conjunction with project partners, the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management developed a multidimensional survey instrument to identify risk reduction opportunities. Investigators sought to characterize the range of environmental and industrial hygiene control employed by Rhode Island facilities for the purposes of focusing state technical and compliance assistance efforts. Data were collected on a diverse range of subject areas including work force demographics; source reduction; potential health hazards; worker protection and safety; solid and hazardous waste management; and air pollution control. Nearly one-half of the shops employ three or fewer people, and in many cases, spray painters double as body repair technicians thereby increasing their potential exposure to workplace contaminants. While nearly all of the shops reported that they use spray painting booths, only 38% own booths the more effective downdraft design. Based on the self-reported data, recently promulgated state air pollution control regulations (requiring the use of compliant coatings, enclosed or modified spray gun cleaners, and high-volume, low-pressure, spray guns) appear to be effective at motivating companies toward source reduction. A range of risk reduction opportunities were identified as input material changes, technology changes, and improved operating practices. Better methods of risk communication; a professional licensing requirement; and targeted training, compliance, and technical assistance would help to achieve greater levels of risk reduction in this mature, high-hazard industry. PMID:9697296

Enander, R T; Gute, D M; Missaghian, R

1998-07-01

165

Modeling of an MTBE plume at Pascoag, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical groundwater flow and mass transport model was developed to predict the extent of impact from methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) release on a down-gradient drinking water well field. An MTBE incident in Pascoag, Rhode Island, was used as a case study and the plume’s past and future development was simulated using scenario analysis. The numerical code used was GeoSys/Rockflow, which permits a coupled flow and transport simulation as one object, thus alleviating the need for simulating the MTBE fate with separate flow and transport codes. The numerical model was built on available hydrogeological and chemical data as well as on GIS information of the site. By comparing the simulated results with observed field data, it was found that the model could provide reliable results even when the simulated aquifer was simplified to a two-dimensional flow and transport domain. Finally, the calibrated model was used for exploring a location that may be suitable for a new well field. Despite the model limitations associated with uncertainties of data and simplifying assumptions, numerical modeling of this MTBE contaminated site proved a useful tool and provided guidance for future municipal well field operation strategies and aquifer remediation alternatives.

Myrttinen, A.; Boving, T.; Kolditz, O.

2009-05-01

166

Importance of denitrification and nitrous oxide production in the nitrogen dynamics and ecology of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Denitrification (Nâ flux) measurements were made in sediment cores collected from three stations in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, during various times throughout a year. Denitrification rates ranged from approximately 10 ..mu..g-at m⁻² h⁻¹ at 2°C in sediments from the relatively polluted site in the Providence River area to 115 ..mu..g-at m⁻² h⁻¹ in October collected sediments (15°C) from both the

Seitzinger

1982-01-01

167

Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center at the University of Rhode Island  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Rhode Island, the Digital Forensics and Cyber Security Center (DFCSC) "supports state, national, and international public welfare through education, research, training, and service in forensic investigations and securing information systems." The website provides access to news from the fields of digital forensics and cyber security, along with working papers, materials on ongoing research projects, and academic programs. In the "Resources" area, visitors can look over information from the Department of Homeland Security, along with a collection of free cyber security tools. In the "Academics" area, visitors can learn about the Center's academic degree and certificate programs. Finally, the "Research" area contains their technical reports and student theses on a diverse set of topics.

2012-06-15

168

77 FR 279 - Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-670-000] Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC ; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based...supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Rhode Island LFG Genco LLC's application for market-based...

2012-01-04

169

77 FR 280 - Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-674-000] Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based...supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Rhode Island Engine Genco LLC's application for market-based...

2012-01-04

170

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive

Robert G. Lucas; Zachary T. Taylor; Vrushali V. Mendon; Supriya Goel

2012-01-01

171

Sea-floor character and sedimentary processes of Block Island Sound, offshore Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 634 square kilometers of sea floor in Block Island Sound. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic surveys H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139, these combined acoustic data and the sea-floor sediment sampling and photography stations subsequently occupied to verify them during U.S. Geological Survey cruise 2011-006-FA (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, wind farms and fisheries) along the Rhode Island inner continental shelf.

Poppe, L. J.; Danforth, W. W.; McMullen, K. Y.; Blankenship, M. A.; Glomb, K. A.; Wright, D. B.; Smith, S. M.

2012-01-01

172

Sociodemographic and Health-Related Risk Factors Associated with Tooth Loss Among Adults in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Introduction Oral health is an integral component of overall health and well-being. Very little Rhode Island state-level information exists on the determinants of tooth loss. The objective of this study was to systematically identify sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, health conditions and disabilities, and dental insurance coverage associated with tooth loss among noninstitutionalized adults in Rhode Island. Methods We analyzed Rhode Island’s 2008 and 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data in 2011. The survey had 4 response categories for tooth loss: none, 1 to 5, 6 or more but not all, and all. We used multinomial logistic regression models to assess the relationship between 4 risk factor domains and tooth loss. Results An estimated 57.6% of Rhode Island adults had all their teeth, 28.9% had 1 to 5 missing teeth, 8.9% had 6 to 31 missing teeth, and 4.6% were edentulous. Respondents who had low income, low education, unhealthy behaviors (ie, were former or current smokers and did not engage in physical activity), chronic conditions (ie, diabetes and obesity) or disabilities, and no dental insurance coverage were more likely to have fewer teeth compared with their referent groups. However, the association of these variables with tooth loss was not uniform by age group. Conclusion Adults who report risky health behaviors or impaired health may be considered target subpopulations for prevention of tooth loss and promotion of good oral health.

Okoro, Catherine A.; Oh, Junhie; Fuller, Deborah L.

2013-01-01

173

Childhood Lead Poisoning: Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that childhood lead poisoning is one of the most common preventable pediatric health problems, this report examines lead poisoning as a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible and as a housing problem directly related to a shortage of safe, affordable housing. The report details screening rates in Rhode…

Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

174

Possible correlation of Precambrian rocks of Newport, Rhode Island, with those of Anglesey, Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bedded succession in Newport, Rhode Island, consists of the metavolcanic Price's Neck formation and the older metasedimentary Newport formation. The Newport formation consists of turbidites, sandstone and conglomerate, slate, phyllite, bedded ash, and olistostromes. The Price's Neck formation consists of agglomeratic breccia, conglomerate, coarse to fine tuff, and graded tuffite merging into tuffaceous sedimentary rock. Both sequences have been

Nicholas Rast; James W. Skehan

1981-01-01

175

The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

2012-01-01

176

ALP: Alternate Learning Project; Overview of a Model High School in Providence, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alternate Learning Project (ALP) is a community based public high school in Providence, Rhode Island. The ALP student population participates in a program offering individualized basic skills instruction, college preparatory courses, career exploration activities, and a broad arts curriculum. Throughout, the emphasis is on continuous…

Kenyon, Charles B.

177

Relationships between Juvenile Winter Flounder and Multiple-Scale Habitat Variation in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid random sampling method was used to relate densities of juvenile winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus to multiple scales of habitat variation in Narragansett Bay and two nearby coastal lagoons in Rhode Island. We used a 1-m beam trawl with attached video camera, continuous global positioning system track overlay, and continuous recording YSI sonde to sample 163 sites in June

Lesa Meng; Giancarlo Cicchetti; Steve Raciti

2005-01-01

178

A COMAPRISON OF MERCURY IN MINK AND FISHER IN RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Comparison of total mercury concentrations and nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values in muscle tissue and stomach contents of mink (Mustela vison) and fisher (Martes pennanti) from Rhode Island in 2000- 2003 showed results which appeared to reflect dietary differences betwee...

179

Trouble from the tropics: challenges in managing malaria in rhode island.  

PubMed

The authors present a case of severe falciparum malaria diagnosed in a traveler after he returned to Rhode Island from a visit to the Dominican Republic. They then review aspects of the case pertinent to our local practice environment that make diagnosis and management especially challenging. PMID:23641463

Dworkin, Jonathan; Janvier, Marjorie; Treaba, Diana; Gardner, Adrian

2013-05-01

180

Population Status of the Seaside Sparrow in Rhode Island: A 25-Year Assessment  

EPA Science Inventory

The Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) is currently listed as a species of â??special concernâ?? in Rhode Island and has been designated as a â??watch listâ?? species in the Partners in Flight North American Landbird Conservation Plan. To assess the population status of breeding Seas...

181

Industry in the Southern Thames Street Neighborhood of Newport, Rhode Island, 1820 -1920  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the study of Industry in the Southern Thames Street Neighborhood of Newport, Rhode Island from 1820 -1920 we by necessity must touch, even if ever so slightly, on the history of industry in Newport, not just the District, both before and after that time period. We must try to understand what life was like for the residents of the

Daniel P Titus

2003-01-01

182

Evaluation of a Universally-Free School Breakfast Program Demonstration Project: Central Falls, Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In early 1994, Central Falls, Rhode Island's Kids First, a collaborative partnership between the Central Falls School Department and local community leaders, launched a pilot universally-free school breakfast program (UF-SBP) called "Operation Breakfast." One of the goals of Operation Breakfast was to improve SBP participation; school breakfast…

Cook, John T.; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Kelly, Gayle Leitch

183

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN JUVENILE WINTER FLOUNDER AND MULTIPLE-SCALE HABITAT VARIATION IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

A rapid random-sampling method was used to relate densities of juvenile winter flounder to multiple scales of habitat variation in Narragansett Bay and two nearby coastal lagoons in Rhode Island. We used a 1-m beam trawl with attached video camera, continuous GPS track overlay, ...

184

The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

2012-01-01

185

Investing in Low-Wage Workers: Lessons from Family Child Care in Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While child care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the country, most employment in this field is precarious and low-wage. Investing in Low-Wage Workers profiles the Day Care Justice Co-op, a group of largely Latina and African American women living and working in some of Rhode Island's poorest communities. Determined to improve family…

Roder, Anne; Seavey, Dorie

2006-01-01

186

USING A FISH INDEX TO ASSESS HABITAT QUALITY IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

We developed an estuarine index of biotic integrity to assess habitat quality in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Fish were collected at 18 fixed stations with a 61-m x 3.05-m beach seine once per month in July and August from 1988 to 1999. Stations were designated high or low qua...

187

Emigration Behavior of Spotted Salamanders on Golf Courses in Southern Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few studies have investigated the emigration behavior of adult ambystomatid salamanders in fragmented landscapes. We assessed the emigration behavior of 30 Spotted Salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) by implanting transmitters in 2003. Study sites, all in southern Rhode Island, included an active golf course, a golf course under construction, and a closed-canopy forest that served as a control site. Max- imum dispersal

Katherine E. Montieth; Peter W. C. Paton

2006-01-01

188

Rhode Island/Southeastern Massachusetts Jewelry, Electroplating and Metal Finishing Industries Environmental Assistance Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a summary of the findings of an 18 month study funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration, the Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths of America, Inc., and the Rhode Island Department of Economic Developm...

1981-01-01

189

Pavement evaluation and management system for Rhode Island. Phase 1: Feasibility and implementation recommendations. Volume 1: Summary findings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility and implementation for pavement evaluation and management (PEMS) for the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (RIDOT) are presented. A process is outlined whereby network level PEMS activities can be adequately implemented in the future. Cost and time estimates are presented considering the current manpower, cost, and time constraints particular to RIDOT. Recommendations are made concerning the four primary areas of pavement evaluation measurements; visual condition surveys, deflection measurements, roughness measurements, and skid resistance measurements. Recommendations are also made concerning the collection of additional related data such as traffic.

Carmichael, R. F., III; Hudson, W. R.

1982-09-01

190

Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Western Rhode Island Sound  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working together to interpret sea-floor geology along the northeastern coast of the United States. In 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE completed survey H11322, a sidescan-sonar and bathymetric survey that covers about 60 square kilometers of the sea floor in western Rhode Island Sound. This report interprets sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA survey H11322 to delineate sea-floor features and sedimentary environments in the study area. Paleozoic bedrock and Cretaceous Coastal Plain sediments in Rhode Island Sound underlie Pleistocene glacial drift that affects the distribution of surficial Holocene marine and transgressional sediments. The study area has three bathymetric highs separated by a channel system. Features and patterns in the sidescan-sonar imagery include low, moderate, and high backscatter; sand waves; scarps; erosional outliers; boulders; trawl marks; and dredge spoils. Four sedimentary environments in the study area, based on backscatter and bathymetric features, include those characterized by erosion or nondeposition, coarse-grained bedload transport, sorting and reworking, and deposition. Environments characterized by erosion or nondeposition and coarse-grained bedload transport are located in shallower areas and environments characterized by deposition are located in deeper areas; environments characterized by sorting and reworking processes are generally located at moderate depths.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Haupt, T. A.; Crocker, J. M.

2009-01-01

191

Numerical-Simulation and Conjunctive-Management Models of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Stream-Aquifer System, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Numerical-simulation and optimization techniques were used to evaluate alternatives for the conjunctive management of ground- and surface-water resources of the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt stream-aquifer system in central Rhode Island. Ground-water ...

P. M. Barlow D. C. Dickerman

2001-01-01

192

Recommendations for Assessment, Introduction, Use, and Evaluation of Advanced Medical Technologies and Therapeutic Interventions in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to make recommendations to the Rhode Island Department of Health regarding assessment of the state of the art, introduction, use, and evaluation of advanced medical technologies and advanced therapeutic interventions in the s...

1984-01-01

193

Rhode Island Statewide Origin-Destination Update Study. Task 10. Summary of Work Accomplished and Study Recommendations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report concerns the final task in a series of ten undertaken to fulfill the requirements of a program to obtain updated travel information for the Rhode Island statewide comprehensive transportation and land use planning program. The major purposes of...

1970-01-01

194

Impact of Immigration on the Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Rhode Island?  

PubMed Central

While foreign-born persons constitute only 11% of the population in the state of Rhode Island, they account for more than 65% of incident tuberculosis (TB) annually. We investigated the molecular-epidemiological differences between foreign-born and U.S.-born TB patients to estimate the degree of recent transmission and identify predictors of clustering. A total of 288 isolates collected from culture-confirmed TB cases in Rhode Island between 1995 and 2004 were fingerprinted by spoligotyping and 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. Of the 288 fingerprinted isolates, 109 (37.8%) belonged to 36 genetic clusters. Our findings demonstrate that U.S.-born patients, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific islanders, and uninsured patients were significantly more likely to be clustered. Recent transmission among the foreign-born population was restricted and occurred mostly locally, within populations originating from the same region. Nevertheless, TB transmission between the foreign-born and U.S.-born population should not be neglected, since 80% of the mixed clusters of foreign- and U.S.-born persons arose from a foreign-born source case. We conclude that timely access to routine screening and treatment for latent TB infection for immigrants is vital for disease elimination in Rhode Island.

Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Kwara, Awewura; Martin, Melissa; Gillani, Fizza S.; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mutungi, Peninnah; Crellin, Joyce; Obaro, Stephen; Gosciminski, Michael; Carter, E. Jane; Rastogi, Nalin

2011-01-01

195

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Elementary School Children in Rhode Island: Associated Psychosocial Factors and Medications Used  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was undertaken to explore psychosocial factors associated with referral for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) evaluation or ADHD diagnosis among elementary school children in Rhode Island, as well as to examine the extent of drug therapy among this population. A survey was distributed to parents\\/guardians of 2,800 3rdto 5th-grade public school students in 4 Rhode Island school districts.

Ephat H. Harel; William D. Brown

2003-01-01

196

Digital seismic-reflection data from western Rhode Island Sound, 1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel Neecho. Data from this survey were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center's Data Library. Due to recent interest in the geology of Rhode Island Sound and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from this cruise were scanned and converted to Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (LORAN-C) time delays to latitudes and longitudes, which are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Soderberg, N. K.

2009-01-01

197

"It's been a long road to acceptance": midwives in Rhode Island, 1970-2000.  

PubMed

A resurgence of midwifery came to Rhode Island in the 1970s. Midwives acted as modern health care professionals to conserve a traditional woman-centered birth, but the battle was long and arduous, from Dr. Ellen Stone attempting to eliminate midwives in the state in 1912 to doctors using the death of 2 home birth infants in the 1980s to undermine the growing presence of professional nurse-midwives in the state. Midwives prevailed when the state legislature passed measures in 1988 and 1990 increasing the power and authority of midwives, and when a federal grant in 1993 allowed the University of Rhode Island to open the first training program for nurse-midwives in the state. PMID:24032236

Caron, Simone M

2014-01-01

198

Gentility and Gender Roles Within the 18th-Century Merchant Class of Newport, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Capt. Thomas Richardson household rose to prominence in Newport, Rhode Island during the community’s golden age of prosperity in the 18th century when Newport quickly became one of the leading seaports in the New World. However, all prosperity halted due to the hardships and damage Newport suffered during the American Revolutionary War. Much of the city’s property and economic

Nicki Hise

2010-01-01

199

Disparities in Pregnancy Healthcare Utilization Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women in Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low healthcare utilization is a prime contributor to adverse health outcomes in both the general population and the Hispanic\\u000a community. This study compares background characteristics and rates of prenatal and postpartum health care utilization between\\u000a Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Using the Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2002–2008,\\u000a we assess rates of prenatal and postpartum healthcare utilization

Erica Bromley; Anthony Nunes; Maureen G. Phipps

200

The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was

Tehan

2000-01-01

201

Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of ground water in Tiverton, Rhode Island, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ground water samples from several private wells serving individual homes in Tiverton, Rhode Island were analyzed for petroleum contamination over a 19-month period. The hydrocarbon concentrations initially ranged from 68 to 2350 ppb and then gradually decreased to lower values, ranging from 6 to 1650 ppb, at the end of the study. Samples from the well with the highest hydrocarbon concentration (2350 to 1650 ppb) were investigated in some detail because this was considered a possible source of the petroleum contamination in the area. These studies indicated that most of the hydrocarbons were in the dissolved phase (<1.0 ?m) of the ground water and that it contained large amounts of naphthalene, methyl and dimethyl naphthalenes, and ethyl naphthalenes. In addition, the qualitative distribution of hydrocarbons changed as the concentration decreased over the course of the investigation. There appeared to be preferential loss of the more volatile and easily degraded components relative to the higher molecular weight and more refractory hydrocarbons. Some of the wells at this location are contaminated with at least two different petroleum products, i.e. gasoline and fuel oil. The exact nature and source of the contaminant is not known; it may be spilled or leaking petroleum products, or other materials containing petroleum hydrocarbons (e.g. commercial or industrial cleaning solutions). Based on differences in the qualitative distribution of components, some of the wells contain hydrocarbons that have been environmentally altered or that originate from a source other than the most contaminated well

Zheng, Jinshu; Quinn, James G.

1988-12-01

202

Maps Showing Geology and Shallow Structure of Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents results of marine studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1975 and 1976 in eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vineyard Sound (fig. 1) located off the southeastern coast of Massachusetts. The study was made in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the New England Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It covered an area of the Atlantic Inner Continental Shelf between latitude 41 deg 12' and 41 deg 33'N, and between longitude 70 deg 37' and 71 deg 15'W (see index map). Major objectives included assessment of sand and gravel resources, environmental impact evaluation both of offshore mining of these resources and of offshore disposal of solid waste and dredge spoil material, identification and mapping of the offshore geology, and determination of the geologic history of this part of the Inner Shelf. A total of 670 kilometers (km) of closely spaced high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, 224 km of side-scan sonar data, and 16 cores totaling 90 meters (m) of recovered sediment, were collected during the investigation. This report is companion to geologic maps published for Cape Cod Bay (Oldale and O'Hara, 1975) and Buzzards Bay, Mass. (Robb and Oldale, 1977).

O'Hara, Charles J.; Oldale, Robert N.

1980-01-01

203

Effects of Road Density and Road-Salt Application Practices on Sodium and Chloride Loads to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Scituate Reservoir drainage basin is the drinking-water source area for two thirds of the population of Rhode Island. The effects of road density and road-salt-application practices on sodium and chloride concentrations in streams in the drainage basin were examined using concentration data collected at intervals of one to six months from January 1982 through June 2000 at 32 stream

M. C. Waldron; M. Nimiroski

2001-01-01

204

Effect of Sea Level Rise on Groundwater Resources: A Case Study of Southwest Coastal Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study evaluates the effect of sea level rise, induced by the global warming, and the effect of pumping, on the groundwater resources of the coastal aquifer of the Quonochontaug Neck Area, in southwest Rhode Island, USA. A three dimensional groundwater model was built for the year 1999, using Visual MODFLOW software. The simulation was run in steady state, with the freshwater and saltwater bodies treated as immiscible fluids, and thus diffusion and dispersion were not taken into account. The interface between the freshwater and the denser saltwater was simulated as a sharp interface, using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation. The movement of the interface under different future scenarios was evaluated, and the possibility of saltwater intrusion into the public water supply wells of the area was assessed. The basic groundwater model of the area was build and calibrated to available observation data from monitoring wells for the year 1999. A sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the model's behavior. Future scenarios for the years 2020, 2050 and 2100 were simulated for different sea level rise rates and various pumping rates. The sea level rise rates varied from a local minimum, observed in the nearby Newport tidal gage, to the global maximum predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), while the pumping rates ranged from the current rate to maximum increased rate projected for the year 2100. The model concluded that the groundwater table responds to the sea level rise by increasing its head, and that the depth to the interface between the freshwater and the saltwater decreases. Increased pumping rates exacerbate those observations. Under some combined scenarios of sea level rise and pumping, the water supply wells can be threatened by the possibility of saltwater intrusion and contamination. Some adaptation strategies and suggestions were formulated as part of the conclusions of this study, and the limitations of the simulation were also evaluated.

Kossida, Maggie

2010-05-01

205

Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D., Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

2011-01-01

206

Modern sedimentary environments on the Rhode Island inner shelf, off the eastern United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analyses of side-scan sonar records along with previously published bathymetric, textural and subbottom data reveal the sedimentary environments on the inner Continental Shelf south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The bottom topography in this area is characterized by a broad central depression bordered by shallow, irregular sea floor on the north and east and by a discontinuous, curvilinear ridge on the south and west. Four distinct environments were identified: 1. (1) Pre-Mesozoic coastal rocks are exposed on the sea floor at isolated locations near the shore (waterdepths <32 m). These exposures have pronounced, irregular topographic relief and produce blotchy patterns on side-scan sonographs. 2. (2) Glacial moraine deposits form the discontinuous offshore ridge. These deposits have hummocky sea-floor relief, are covered by lag gravel and boudlers, and appear as predominantly black (strongly reflective) patterns on the side-scan records. 3. (3) Over most of the shallow, irregular bottom in the northeast, on the flanks of the morainal ridge, and atop bathymetric highs, the sea floor is characterized as a mosaic of light and dark patches and lineations. The dark (more reflective) zones are areas of coarse sands and megaripples (wavelengths = 0.8-1.2 m that either have no detectable relief or are slightly depressed relative to surrounding (light) areas of finer-grained sands. 4. (4) Smooth beds that produce nearly featureless patterns on the sonographs occupy the broad central bathymetric depression as well as smaller depressions north and east of Block Island. Within the broad depression, sonographs having practically no shading indicate a central zone of modern sandy silt, whereas records having moderate tonality define a peripheral belt of silty sand. The sedimentary environments that are outlined range from erosional or non-depositional (bedrock, glacial moraine) to depositional (featureless beds), and include areas that may reflect a combination of erosional and depositional processes (textural patchiness). The distribution and characteristics of the environments reveal the general post-glacial sedimentary history of this area and provide a guide to future utilization of the shelf surface. ?? 1982.

Knebel, H. J.; Needell, S. W.; O'Hara, C. J.

1982-01-01

207

Possible correlation of Precambrian rocks of Newport, Rhode Island, with those of Anglesey, Wales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bedded succession in Newport, Rhode Island, consists of the metavolcanic Price's Neck formation and the older metasedimentary Newport formation. The Newport formation consists of turbidites, sandstone and conglomerate, slate, phyllite, bedded ash, and olistostromes. The Price's Neck formation consists of agglomeratic breccia, conglomerate, coarse to fine tuff, and graded tuffite merging into tuffaceous sedimentary rock. Both sequences have been affected by two principal fold-generating deformations. The Price's Neck formation was first folded into upright to overturned folds (F1), whereas the Newport formation was folded into overturned to recumbent folds. In the Price's Neck formation, the F1 folds trend east-west to north-northeast-south-southwest, Whereas the F2 folds trend approximately east-west. In the main outcrop area the F1 folds in the Newport formation are dominantly north-south trending, are strongly overturned toward the east, and in the west are recumbent and subisoclinal to isoclinal. The second deformation produced a low-lying cleavage and relatively small folds that verge toward the east. The difference in the style of folding is attributed to ductility contrast between the rocks of the two stratigraphic sequences. The Newport granite, which intrudes the Price's Neck and Newport formations, has a metamorphic aureole. The granite was emplaced prior to the F2 movements but after the F1 movements. The succession therefore is late Precambrian in age, because the granite is about 600 m.y. old. The deformation of the sediments may be attributed to the “Avalonian orogeny” that is manifested in Anglesey, Wales, and northern France as the Cadomian. There are strong similarities between Anglesey and Newport in lithologies, stratigraphic succession, and plutonic history.

Rast, Nicholas; Skehan, James W.

1981-12-01

208

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01

209

Evaluation of microbiological water quality in the Pettaquamscutt River (Rhode Island, USA) using chemical, molecular and culture-dependent methods.  

PubMed

We evaluated microbiological water quality in the Pettaquamscutt River (Rhode Island, USA), an estuarine river. Fecal coliform (FC) and enterococci (FE) bacteria, presence of Bifidobacterium adolescentis DNA (indicating human fecal contamination), and optical brightener (OB) fluorescence (associated with laundry detergents) were determined for 14 stations from May to September 2010. Six stations had high counts of FE and FC, and the presence of B. adolescentis DNA and high OB fluorescence indicated human fecal contamination - four had septic systems as likely sources of contamination; the others were in sewered areas. The ability of FC and FE to indicate human fecal contamination was assessed against a positive B. adolescentis test. FC and FE had false positive rates of 25% and 17%, respectively, and false negatives of 44% for FC and 63% for FE. Inclusion of molecular and chemical indicators should improve tracking of human fecal contamination sources in the river. PMID:21570698

Atoyan, Janet A; Herron, Elizabeth M; Amador, José A

2011-05-13

210

The interactive systems framework applied to the strategic prevention framework: the Rhode Island experience.  

PubMed

The Interactive Systems Framework for Dissemination and Implementation (ISF) was introduced as a heuristic systems level model to help bridge the gap between research and practice (Wandersman et al., in Am J Commun Psychol 41:171-181, 2008). This model describes three interacting systems with distinct functions that (1) distill knowledge to develop innovations; (2) provide supportive training and technical assistance for dissemination to; (3) a prevention delivery system responsible for implementation in the field. The Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) is a major prevention innovation launched by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The SPF offers a structured, sequential, data-driven approach that explicitly targets environmental conditions in the community and aims for change in substance use and problems at the population level. This paper describes how the ISF was applied to the challenges of implementing the SPF in 14 Rhode Island communities, with a focus on the development of a new Training and Technical Assistance Resources Center to support SPF efforts. More specifically, we (1) describe each of the three ISF interacting systems as they evolved in Rhode Island; (2) articulate the lines of communication between the three systems; and (3) examine selected evaluation data to understand relationships between training and technical assistance and SPF implementation and outcomes. PMID:22674010

Florin, Paul; Friend, Karen B; Buka, Stephen; Egan, Crystelle; Barovier, Linda; Amodei, Brenda

2012-12-01

211

Residential market for fuelwood in Rhode Island: demand, supply, and policy implications  

SciTech Connect

Fuelwood consumption in Rhode Island has tripled since the 1973 oil shortage as a result of household substitution of wood for relatively more expensive heating fuels. A telephone survey of 515 randomly selected households in Rhode Island determined the incidence of wood-burning (25%), the quantities of wood households consumed, their reasons for burning wood, the manner in which they obtained the wood, etc. Households were hypothesized to behave like cost-minimizing firms in producing heat from the lowest-cost combination of inputs (wood and stove efficiency). It was further hypothesized that households process their own firewood as an alternative to purchasing it where the opportunity cost of household labor is less than the commercial value added, thus freeing household income for other uses. These hypotheses were put into testable form as a four-level econometric model containing (1) the discrete household decision to participate in wood heat production, (2) the determination of the cost-minimizing vector of inputs given heat output and relative input prices, (3) the discrete household decision to harvest its own wood and, (4) the determination of how much wood to harvest, how much household labor to invest in wood processing, and the implicit price of fuelwood. Both these hypotheses were well validated via econometric testing.

Mackenzie, J.

1985-01-01

212

The Casino Theatre at Newport, Rhode Island, the Summer Colonists' Playhouse: Reality, Grandeur, Memories 1881-1960  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Gordon Bennett., owner of the New York Herald, was the visionary founder of the Casino Theatre at Newport, Rhode Island. The Casino, a complex located on fashionable Bellevue Avenue, was recognized as the first complete resort facility in America. The theatre was an integral part of this complex. Between 1879 and 1881, this showcase was designed by the New

Marialyn E Riley

2001-01-01

213

Energy Conservation Measures for the Charles E. Shea Senior High School, Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Public Service Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presented is a study of energy conservation opportunities in a Rhode Island high school. With the aid of an infrared camera system, researchers documented heat losses that were not evident to the naked eye. Each infrared thermogram obtained showed one or more types of heat loss and identified the specific sections of the building where the…

New England Innovation Group, Providence, RI.

214

Comparative Assessment of Fertility and Hatchability of Barred Plymouth Rock, White Leghorn, Rhode Island Red and White Rock Hen  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 Abstract: A total of 3000 eggs; 750 eggs from each breed namely Barred Plymouth Rock (BPR),White Leghorn (WLH), Rhode Island Red (RIR) and White Rock (WR) were collected in 3 batches following AI from individually caged hens and were hatched to compare hatching parameters among breeds. The different hatchability traits of hen of different breeds; BPR, WLH, RIR and

2002-01-01

215

Measured Mercury Contamination in Freshwater Fish in Rhode Island Compared with Predictions From a Regional Environmental Mercury Model  

EPA Science Inventory

Edible tissue of largemouth bass collected at 29 freshwater sites across the variable landscape of Rhode Island, USA showed a 27 fold range in total mercury concentrations [Hg], from 0.04 to 1.0 ppm (wet). Twenty-one variables, including water quality data and geographic informat...

216

Caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's Disease: Cultural differences in perceived caregiver burden in Guatemala and Rhode Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this study is to illustrate cultural differences in the amount of perceived burden for primary caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's Disease. Caregivers in Guatemala and Rhode Island were given a questionnaire exploring: caregiver well-being, available supports, traditional ideology, and perceived burden. The data indicate that Guatemalans have less institutional and more informal supports available, as compared with

Rachel H. Salguero; Robert Kohn; Luis F. Salguero; Charles A. Marotta

1998-01-01

217

Symposium on Certificate of Need for Home Health Care, held at Providence, Rhode Island on August 14, 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Transcripts of papers given at a 1979 Symposium on home health care in Rhode Island are presented. The goal of the symposium was to present possible regulations and provisions for certificate-of-need procedures regarding home health care. The participants...

1979-01-01

218

THE RELAXATION BETWEEN PORE WATER CHEMISTRY AND BENTHIC FLUXES OF NUTRIENTS AND MANGANESE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Benthic fluxes of dissolved nutrients and manganese from biologically disturbed, relatively unpolluted sediment in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, have been measured. Analyses of the vertical gradients of chemical species dissolved in pore waters and the uptake of (22)Na from the...

219

New Orleans on His Mind: A Rhode Island Choral Director Brings Katrina Victims Music--And Hope  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Westerly, Rhode Island, is a long way from New Orleans. But the physical distance has not stopped David DeAngelis, choral director at Westerly High School, from providing his students with one heck of a lesson: The opportunity to truly connect with others through music. Under DeAngelis' direction, Westerly's various vocal ensembles have held…

Olson, Catherine Applefeld

2009-01-01

220

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PRODUCTION POTENTIAL AND EGG CHARACTERISTICS OF LYALLPUR SILVER BLACK, FAYOUMI AND RHODE ISLAND RED BREEDS OF POULTRY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison of production potential and egg characteristics of birds of Lyallpur Silver Black (LSB). Fayoumi (FAY) and Rhode Island Red (RIR) breeds was conducted. Ninety nine birds, 33 from each breed (30 females and 3 males), were used as experimental birds. The birds of each breed were divided into three experimental units (10 females + 1 male), making a

N. AKHTAR; S. MAHMOOD; M. HASSAN; F. YASMEEN

221

Backpack needle exchange: background, design, and pilot testing of a program in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Many individuals who inject drugs do not access existing needle and syringe exchange programs. The ability to obtain clean needles from needle exchanges is limited by operational difficulties, the hours of operation, the location of the programs, and a lack of transportation. Providing multiple points of access to clean needles, including mobile exchange sites, may be necessary to prevent the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus and other blood-borne viruses. A novel backpack needle exchange outreach model was implemented in Providence, Rhode Island. Backpack exchange participants completed surveys similar to those done by clients of Providence's storefront needle exchange. Backpack exchangers were significantly more likely to be Hispanic and inject more frequently than those who utilized the fixed site. Backpack exchange is a feasible method for providing needle exchange services and referrals to hard-to-reach injectors. PMID:18956524

Hebert, Megan R; Caviness, Celeste M; Bowman, Sarah E; Chowdhury, Sutopa P; Loberti, Paul G; Stein, Michael D

2008-01-01

222

The evaluation of symptomatic carotid artery disease. A survey of specialty practices in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Severe, symptomatic carotid artery disease is most often diagnosed by conventional cerebral angiography. Noninvasive tests are commonly used to identify candidates for angiography and endarterectomy. The purpose of this study, a mail and telephone survey of academic and community neurologists, neurosurgeons, and vascular surgeons in Rhode Island in 1994, was to determine which noninvasive tests physicians used to evaluate these patients and how the test results were used to select patients for angiography. One hundred (86%) of a possible 116 responses were collected. Seventy-six percent of physicians chose carotid duplex ultrasound as the first diagnostic test, a percentage significantly higher than that for any other test (p < 0.0001). Fourteen percent chose angiography without a prior screening test; 3% chose magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) prior to angiography, 6% chose carotid duplex ultrasound plus MRA prior to angiography, and 1% chose MRA without angiography. The specific noninvasive test results required for angiography referral were surprisingly variable, both within and across the three physician specialties. Vascular surgeons and neurosurgeons were more likely to choose angiography without prior screening tests than were neurologists. In conclusion, the majority of specialty physicians in the state of Rhode Island chose carotid ultrasound as the screening test of choice for the evaluation of a potential endarterectomy candidate. Few responding physicians chose MRA in combination with carotid duplex ultrasound prior to angiography, or MRA prior to angiography or MRA alone. Awareness of the actual practice patterns of specialists may lead to programs of education for physicians to improve practice and patient outcome through more refined use of diagnostic tests prior to angiography or endarterectomy. PMID:8704296

Bragoni, M; Feldmann, E; Wilterdink, J

1996-07-01

223

65 FR 31173 - Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Rhode Island Senior Citizens; Notice of Availability...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Program Announcement 00088] Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Rhode...a grant program entitled ``Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for Rhode...is committed to achieving the health promotion and disease prevention...

2000-05-16

224

Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

McMullen, K. Y.; Poppe, L. J.; Soderberg, N. K.

2009-01-01

225

Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment for Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dump, Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island, Region 1: CERCLIS number RID981063258. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite is an area formerly occupied by a lacquer manufacturing industry located in Smithfield, Rhode Island. Drums of a nitrocellulose resin have been found onsite and were promptly disposed by the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. This public health assessment is an evaluation of existing on and offsite environmental data, health outcome data, and addresses community health concerns related to the site. An evaluation of onsite sediment sampling data showed semi-volatile compound (SVOC) contamination in the wetland area near Stillwater River. However, human contact with sediment in this area is infrequent and is not expected to result in adverse health effects. There were no contaminants detected in onsite subsurface soil samples at levels of health concern. Sampling results from two privately owned wells used by the public that are located one half mile from Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite showed no groundwater contamination of health concern. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has classified the Smithfield Chemical Industrial Dumpsite as a No Apparent Public Health Hazard based on infrequent human contact with SVOCs detected in onsite sediment of the wetlands area near Stillwater River.

NONE

1999-06-25

226

The North Cape oil spill: hydrocarbons in Rhode Island coastal waters and Point Judith Pond.  

PubMed

On 19 January 1996, the North Cape oil barge ran aground near Moonstone Beach, RI, and spilled over 2700 metric tons of No. 2 fuel oil during a severe winter storm. High winds and rough seas drove the oil into the water column, and the oil spread throughout Block Island Sound and into several coastal salt ponds. Over 50 water samples were collected from Point Judith Pond (PJP) and the southern coast of Rhode Island for four months after the spill and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs). These analyses revealed that at least 60 km2 of coastal waters were impacted from the spill. Maximum concentrations of sigmaPAHs and TPHs were 115 and 3940 microg l(-1), respectively. The percentage of sigmaPAHs relative to the TPHs for all samples varied from 0.2 to 43%, showing that there was no clear relationship between sigmaPAHs and TPHs for the whole dataset and likely resulting from spatial and temporal partitioning over the course of the spill. However, within the dataset, there were stronger correlations for distinct samples collected at similar locations and times. In PJP, water column concentrations of individual PAHs decreased at rates of 0.08-0.24 day(-1) and lower-molecular weight PAHs were removed faster than higher-molecular weight PAHs. PMID:11763148

Reddy, C M; Quinn, J G

2001-12-01

227

Effects of Water-Management Strategies on Water Resources in the Pawcatuck River Basin, Southwestern Rhode Island and Southeastern Connecticut  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pawcatuck River Basin in southwestern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut is an important high-quality water resource for domestic and public supplies, irrigation, recreation, and the aquatic ecosystem. Concerns about the effects of water withdrawals on aquatic habitat in the basin have prompted local, State, and Federal agencies to explore water-management strategies that minimize the effects of withdrawals on the aquatic habitat. As part of this process, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Rhode Island Water Resources Board completed a study to assess the effects of current (2000-04) and potential water withdrawals on streamflows and groundwater levels using hydrologic simulation models developed for the basin. The major findings of the model simulations are: *Moving highly variable seasonal irrigation withdrawals from streams to groundwater wells away from streams reduces short-term fluctuations in streamflow and increases streamflow in the summer when flows are lowest. This occurs because of the inherent time lag between when water is withdrawn from the aquifer and when it affects streamflow. *A pumped well in the vicinity of small streams indicates that if withdrawals exceed available streamflow, groundwater levels drop substantially as a consequence of water lost from aquifer storage, which may reduce the time wetlands and vernal pools are saturated, affecting the animal and plant life that depend on these habitats. *The effects of pumping on water resources such as ponds, streams, and wetlands can be minimized by relocating pumping wells, implementing seasonal pumping schemes that utilize different wells and pumping rates, or both. *The effects of projected land-use change, mostly from forest to low- and medium density housing, indicate only minor changes in streamflow at the subbasin scale examined; however, at a local scale, high flows could increase, and low flows could decrease as a result of increased impervious area. In some instances, low flows could increase slightly as a result of decreased evapotranspiration from the loss of deeprooted vegetation (forest) associated with development. *In some subbasins where large areas of agricultural lands were converted to low- and medium-density housing, low flows increase because the consumptive domestic water use was projected to be less than consumptive agricultural water use. All agricultural water use was for irrigation purposes and was assumed to be lost from the basin through evapotranspiration.

Breault, Robert F.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Bent, Gardner C.; Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.; Scherer, J. Eric; Crawley, Kathleen M.

2009-01-01

228

The Predictive Validity of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Questionnaire in a Heroin-Addicted Polysubstance Abuse Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the predictive utility of the stages-of-change scales of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA; E. A. McConnaughy, J. O. Prochaska, & W. F. Velicer, 1983) questionnaire in a heroin-addicted polysubstance-abusing treatment sample. Ninety-six participants completed the URICA at the beginning of a 29-week treatment period that required thrice-weekly urine drug

Melinda J. Henderson; Karen K. Saules; Luke W. Galen

2004-01-01

229

Genetic Diversity and Temporal Variation in the Cyanophage Community Infecting Marine Synechococcus Species in Rhode Island's Coastal Waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cyanophage community in Rhode Island's coastal waters is genetically diverse and dynamic. Cyano- phage abundance ranged from over 104 phage ml1 in the summer months to less then 102 phage ml1 during the winter months. Thirty-six distinct cyanomyovirus g20 genotypes were identified over a 3-year sampling period; however, only one to nine g20 genotypes were detected at any one

Marcia F. Marston; Jennifer L. Sallee

2003-01-01

230

Characteristics of softwater streams in Rhode Island. III. Distribution of macrophytic vegetation in a small drainage basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Wood River watershed, a small well-defined drainage basin in Rhode Island was monitored seasonally for all macrophytic\\u000a vegetation and various physical variables. Twenty-four segments, 20 m in length were sampled. Mean stream depth, width and\\u000a current velocity increased by 3 to 8 fold from 1st- to 4th-order segments. Light penetration was positively correlated with\\u000a the above variables (p <

Robert G. Sheath; JoAnn M. Burkholder; Julie A. Hambrook; Amy M. Hogeland; Elizabeth Hoy; Michael E. Kane; Mary O. Morison; Alan D. Steinman; Kathryn L. Van Alstyne

1986-01-01

231

Low-temperature water-rock interactions in bedrock aquifers of southern Rhode Island: Results of laboratory simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nature of low-temperature chemical reactions occurring in bedrock aquifers of southern Rhode Island was investigated in the laboratory using flow-through columns. Crushed samples of Narragansett Pier Granite (NPG), Scituate Granite Gneiss (SGG), Hope Valley Alaskite Gneiss (HVAG) and Ten Rod Granite Gneiss (TRGG) were placed in flow-through columns. Water was circulated through the columns at a 3 ml\\/min and

A. I. Veeger; K. L. Moulton

1993-01-01

232

The Relationship of Physicochemical Data, Macroinvertebrate Assemblages, and Land use in Rhode Island Wadeable Streams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of streams to support aquatic organisms is inextricably connected to the physical structure and chemical conditions of the immediate environment. Our objective was to study the relationships among physical and chemical attributes, habitat, and the benthic macroinvertebrates from wadeable streams in Rhode Island subwatersheds along a gradient of residential land use. We used the U.S. EPA Rapid Bioassessment Protocols to measure biological, physicochemical, and habitat effects at stream sites. A Geographic Information System was used to delineate the subwatersheds and document land use surrounding the sampled stream reaches. By using principle components analysis of chemical metrics and the individual metrics for habitat assessment, we found patterns among the sites correlated with land use. Results showed that sites with low residential land use had high stream flow, high dissolved oxygen, and high habitat scores with low temperature and total dissolved solids. Sites with increased residential land use showed the opposite trends. The species composition of benthic macroinvertebrates changed from mostly insect taxa (sensitive species) to noninsect taxa (tolerant species) with increasing levels of residential land use. Thus, altered habitat associated with land use was highly correlated with degraded physicochemical conditions that affected the species composition of aquatic organisms.

Lussier, S. M.; Dasilva, S.; Charpentier, M.; Heltshe, J.; Cormier, S. M.; Klemm, D. J.

2005-05-01

233

The Changing Face of HIV in Pregnancy in Rhode Island 2004-2009  

PubMed Central

Meeting the needs of HIV-infected pregnant women requires understanding their backgrounds and potential barriers to care and safe pregnancy. Foreign-born women are more likely to have language, educational, and economic barriers to care, but may be even more likely to choose to keep a pregnancy. Data from HIV-infected pregnant women and their children in Rhode Island were analyzed to identify trends in demographics, viral control, terminations, miscarriages, timing of diagnosis, and adherence to followup. Between January 2004 and December 2009, 76 HIV-infected women became pregnant, with a total of 95 pregnancies. Seventy-nine percent of the women knew their HIV status prior to becoming pregnant. Fifty-four percent of the women were foreign-born and 38 percent of the 16 women who chose to terminate their pregnancies were foreign-born. While the number of HIV-infected women becoming pregnant has increased only slightly, the proportion that are foreign-born has been rising, from 41 percent between 2004 and 2005 to 57.5 percent between 2006 and 2009. A growing number of women are having multiple pregnancies after their HIV diagnosis, due to the strength of their desire for childbearing and the perception that HIV is a controllable illness that does not preclude the creation of a family.

Firth, Jacqueline; Wang, Chia-Ching; Gillani, Fizza; Alexander, Nicole; Dufort, Elizabeth; Rana, Aadia; Cu-Uvin, Susan

2012-01-01

234

A Statewide Intervention Reduces BMI in Adults: Shape Up Rhode Island Results  

PubMed Central

Given the epidemic of obesity, approaches to weight loss that can be applied on a community, state, or national level are needed. We report results from Shape Up Rhode Island 2007 (SURI), a state-wide Internet based program involving team-based competition to increase physical activity and achieve weight loss. A total of 4,717 adults (84% female; mean BMI = 29.6 kg/m2) enrolled in the 16 week weight loss competition of SURI and 3311 completed at least 12 weeks. Completers reported losing 3.2 ± 3.4 kg, and 30% achieved a clinically significant weight loss of 5% or more. Although modest, these weight losses shifted the BMI distribution from a mean BMI of 29.4 to 28.2 kg/m2 and reduced the population that was obese from 39% to 31%. More conservative intent-to-treat analyses and analysis of 132 participants with objective weights still showed a significant reduction in BMI of ?0.8 units. These findings suggest that state-wide weight loss campaigns can produce modest weight losses in large numbers of participants. These data provide a bench-mark that can be used for comparisons with other state-wide campaigns. Research on ways to improve such campaigns is needed.

Wing, Rena R.; Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Crane, Melissa M.; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad; Gorin, Amy A.

2013-01-01

235

Evaluation of Possible Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Survey of Rhode Island Physicians  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with undiagnosed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are often evaluated initially by primary care physicians (PCPs). Despite the frequency with which PCPs evaluate chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea, little is known about how they approach these symptoms. Objectives To determine the diagnostic practices and referral patterns of PCPs when confronting a patient with potential IBD. Methods We conducted a mail survey of PCPs practicing in Rhode Island. Clinical vignettes describing patients with chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea were presented. Respondents were asked to indicate how they would evaluate these scenarios and when they would refer to a specialist. Results 432 PCPs were surveyed; 35.6% responded. Wide variation in PCPs’ definitions of chronic abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea was found, with only 26% and 51 % of physicians, respectively, defining these symptoms to be chronic per standard definitions. Laboratory testing was found to vary significantly with practice type (p<0.01 for 2 patient groups). Patient age influenced the ordering of diagnostic imaging (p<0.0001), while patient gender did not. Conclusions There is significant variability among PCPs in the threshold after which common gastrointestinal symptoms become chronic as well as in their diagnostic evaluation of these symptoms. This variability may lead to a lag in the diagnosis of IBD and influence patient outcomes.

Saha, Sumona; Lam, Manuel; Roberson, Erica; Shah, Samir; LeLeiko, Neal S.; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Bright, Renee; Flowers, Nicole; Merrick, Marjorie

2013-01-01

236

Quantifying the shelter rabbit population: an analysis of Massachusetts and Rhode Island animal shelters.  

PubMed

Scholarly work on the nonhuman animal shelter population has widely focused on cats and dogs. As a result, little is known about the population dynamics of domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in shelters. The records from 4 companion animal shelters in Massachusetts and Rhode Island were analyzed to describe these dynamics. A majority of the rabbits at the 4 shelters were surrendered by their caregivers, were between 1 and 6 years old, and were unaltered at the time of intake. The most common reasons for surrender were the caregivers' inability to care for the rabbits or a lack of interest in doing so. Over half of the total rabbit population was subsequently adopted and the overall live release rate (percentage of rabbits leaving the shelter alive) was 75.54%. In some cases, the use of a foster care system was correlated with a decrease in the euthanasia rate. The results from this study will help the sheltering field clarify the scope of the problem of homeless rabbits. PMID:23009621

Cook, Amelia J; McCobb, Emily

2012-01-01

237

Benthic diatoms and sulfide fluctuations: Upper basin of Pettaquamscutt River, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine if seasonal anoxia affects the community composition and abundance of benthic diatoms in an estuarine basin. Subtidal benthic diatoms were collected monthly at 1-m water depth intervals from 2 to 7 m in an estuarine basin of Pettaquamscutt River, Rhode Island, during 1981. Water samples were collected at the same depths to measure temperature, salinity, oxygen and sulfide levels. The basin became stratified above 7 m in June and the interface between oxic and anoxic waters remained at 5 or 5·5 m until December when it rose to above 4 m. Motile, biraphid diatoms dominated on the muddy sediments and live cell counts of these were insignificant below 5·5 m. At shallower depths, abundance was seasonally bimodal. In the spring, a peak began in April at 3 m (later in the season with increasing depth) and a smaller fall peak began in October at 4 and 5 m (later at shallower depths). Highest standing crop in August was at 5·5 m when 1% PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) was at 4 m. The position of the interface between oxic and anoxic waters after stratification of the water column affected both abundance and species composition of benthic diatoms within 1·5 m above it. Navicula gregaria Donkin and N. ammophila Grunow dominated the spring and summer assemblages at all depths, but after September N. gregaria vanished from the basin below 3 m. In fall and winter, distinctly different populations were present at 4-5·5 m and at 2 m. The assemblage at 4 m and below consisted of sulfide-tolerant species of Navicula. Healthy populations of Navicula ammophila Grunow, N. pseudocrassirostris Hustedt, and N. peregrina (Ehrenberg) Kützing together reached 138 × 10 3 cells cm -2 at less than 1% light levels and up to 88 ?M sulfide.

Kennett, D. M.; Hargraves, P. E.

1985-10-01

238

Disparities in pregnancy healthcare utilization between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women in Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Low healthcare utilization is a prime contributor to adverse health outcomes in both the general population and the Hispanic community. This study compares background characteristics and rates of prenatal and postpartum health care utilization between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women. Using the Rhode Island Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), 2002-2008, we assess rates of prenatal and postpartum healthcare utilization relevant to maternal and neonatal care. Associations between maternal ethnicity and adequacy of health care utilization were quantified using survey weighted multivariable logistic regression. Compared with non-Hispanic white women, Hispanic women were younger (less than 24 years, 43.8% vs. 25.2%), had less education (less than 12 years of education, 38.2% vs. 10.6%), lower annual income levels (incomes less than $19,999, 72.2% vs. 21.7%), and lower insurance rates before pregnancy (47.8% uninsured vs. 12.8%). Hispanic women had higher odds of having delayed prenatal care (AOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.27-2.65) or inadequate prenatal care (AOR 2.01, 95% CI 1.61-2.50), and their children had higher odds of not having a 1-week check-up (AOR 1.73, 95% CI 1.21-2.47) or any well-baby care (AOR 3.44, 95% CI 1.65-7.10). Disparities in inadequate prenatal care and not having any well-baby care remained significant after adjusting collectively for age, marital status, education, income, and insurance status of mother and newborn. Although many previously uninsured women became insured during pregnancy, disparities in healthcare utilization remained. Interventions focusing on reducing barriers to access prior to and during pregnancy should consider potential structural, informational, and educational barriers. PMID:21769588

Bromley, Erica; Nunes, Anthony; Phipps, Maureen G

2012-11-01

239

Clinical characteristics and four-year outcomes of patients in the Rhode Island Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Registry.  

PubMed

The aim was to establish a registry of patients with a diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) to help learn more about the characteristics, treatment strategies, and natural history of this disease. Data for patients with TC diagnosed from July 2004 to April 2008 at 2 major hospitals in Rhode Island were obtained. A data set was created that included baseline demographics and characteristics, hospital, course, and clinical outcomes. TC was diagnosed in 70 patients during the study period. Postmenopausal women comprised 95% of the cohort. Six patients presented with cardiogenic shock, 9 required intubation, 3 experienced sustained ventricular arrhythmias, and 1 patient died of cardiac causes. Average ejection fraction was 37% at cardiac catheterization. Troponin-I was increased in all except 1 patient. Follow-up echocardiography showed full recovery of wall motion abnormalities, with an average ejection fraction of 59%. Most patients were treated using standard cardiovascular medications for acute coronary syndrome, and 43% were discharged on warfarin therapy because of severe apical wall motion abnormalities. Univariate analysis suggested that long-term use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors before the onset of TC was protective against cardiogenic shock, sustained ventricular arrhythmia, and death. Consecutive cases grouped into different seasons showed a statistically significant spike in the occurrence of TC during the summer months. In conclusion, the acute phase of this condition may lead to critical illness and death, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor may have a protective effect. Overall long-term prognosis and recovery of left ventricular function were excellent. PMID:19327433

Regnante, Richard A; Zuzek, Ryan W; Weinsier, Steven B; Latif, Syed R; Linsky, Russell A; Ahmed, Hanna N; Sadiq, Immad

2009-02-07

240

Concentrations and source apportionment of PM10 and associated major and trace elements in the Rhodes Island, Greece.  

PubMed

Ambient concentrations of PM(10) and associated major and trace elements were measured over the cold and the warm season of 2007 at two sites located in the Rhodes Island (Greece), in Eastern Mediterranean, aimed at source apportionment by Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor modeling. Source chemical profiles, necessary in CMB modeling, were obtained for a variety of emission sources that could possibly affect the study area, including sea spray, geological material, soot emissions from the nearby oil-fuelled thermal power plant, and other anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular traffic, residential oil combustion, wood burning, and uncontrolled open-air burning of agricultural biomass and municipal waste. Source apportionment of PM(10) and elemental components was carried out by employing an advanced CMB version, the Robotic Chemical Mass Balance model (RCMB). Vehicular emissions were found to be major PM(10) contributor accounting, on average, for 36.8% and 31.7% during the cold period, and for 40.9% and 39.2% in the warm period at the two sites, respectively. The second largest source of ambient PM(10), with minor seasonal variation, was secondary sulfates (mainly ammonium and calcium sulfates), with total average contribution around 16.5% and 18% at the two sites. Soil dust was also a remarkable source contributing around 22% in the warm period, whereas only around 10% in the cold season. Soot emitted from the thermal power plant was found to be negligible contributor to ambient PM(10) (<1%), however it appeared to appreciably contribute to the ambient V and Ni (11.3% and 5.1%, respectively) at one of the sites during the warm period, when electricity production is intensified. Trajectory analysis did not indicate any transport of Sahara dust; on the contrary, long range transport of soil dust from arid continental regions of Minor Asia and of biomass burning aerosol from the countries surrounding the Black Sea was considered possible. PMID:22705902

Argyropoulos, Georgios; Manoli, Evangelia; Kouras, Athanasios; Samara, Constantini

2012-06-15

241

76 FR 40248 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure...from the States of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. These submittals...the submittals from Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, with one...

2011-07-08

242

Analysis of the non-market benefits of protecting salt pond water quality in southern Rhode Island: an application of the hedonic price and contingent valuation techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rhode Island is confronted with conflicts between the private use of its coastal zone and the public use of continuous water bodies. Property ownership along its southern shore offers many highly valued environmental amenities and services. However, sewage derived from residential cesspools has been polluting the salt water ponds. Unless steps are taken, further reductions in water quality due to

1984-01-01

243

The response of benthic macrofauna to anthropogenic stress in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island: A review of human stressors and assessment of community conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present state of knowledge regarding the input of anthropogenic pollutants into Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island was reviewed and benthic infaunal communities present at four depositional environments within the upper Bay were characterized. Inter-station differences in species composition and abundance of these assemblages were examined in relation to established pollution gradients.Using diversity curves and multivariate statistics, evidence of significant anthropogenic

Christopher J. Calabretta; Candace A. Oviatt

2008-01-01

244

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996: An Examination of Its Impact on Legal Immigrants and Refugees in Rhode Island.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes a 1998 consultation conducted to examine the impact of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 on legal immigrants and refugees in Rhode Island. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act restricted access of documented immigrants to a wide range of government programs such as…

Serpa, Fernando A.

245

Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of mercury in striped bass ( Morone saxatilis) and tautog ( Tautoga onitis) from the Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of mercury in two marine finfish species, striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and tautog (Tautoga onitis), collected from the Narragansett Bay (Rhode Island, USA). For each of these target fish, white muscle tissue was analyzed for total mercury (Hg) and results were evaluated relative to fish age, body size, and Hg content of preferred

Maria N. Piraino; David L. Taylor

2009-01-01

246

Departmental Web Sites: Best Practices for Improving Student Recruitment--A Report of the Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this report was to identify best practices in the design and content of college and university academic department Web sites that have been shown to enhance the recruitment of prospective students. The Admissions Advisory Committee at the University of Rhode Island conducted a literature review on the importance of college,…

Online Submission, 2010

2010-01-01

247

Profiles from the Health Statistics Center. Series 7: Community Health Profiles; Number 1: Rhode Island Community Health Profiles, 1976 Edition. Volume 2: Census Tracts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Health profiles are presented for each of Rhode Island's 185 census tracts. The profiles in this volume were derived from the following data sets: 1970 census data, 1970-1974 vital statistics natality and mortality data, 1970-1974 communicable disease dat...

1976-01-01

248

Stage of Change in Self-Management of Chronic Diseases: Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (C-URICA) Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) Scale has been widely used to assess the readiness to change with regard to various health-related behaviors. The present study aimed to develop a Chinese version of the URICA (C-URICA) for measuring the readiness to change of Chinese participants with chronic diseases. Participants: A group of participants (N = 101; 87

Sam C. C. Chan; Chetwyn C. H. Chan; Andrew M. H. Siu; Peter K. K. Poon

2007-01-01

249

Carabid beetle diversity and distribution in Boston Harbor Islands national park area (Coleoptera, Carabidae).  

PubMed

As part of an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Boston Harbor Islands national park area, an inventory of carabid beetles on 13 islands was conducted. Intensive sampling on ten of the islands, using an assortment of passive traps and limited hand collecting, resulted in the capture of 6,194 specimens, comprising 128 species. Among these species were seven new state records for Massachusetts (Acupalpus nanellus,Amara aulica,Amara bifrons, Apenes lucidulus, Bradycellus tantillus, Harpalus rubripes and Laemostenus terricola terricola-the last also a new country record; in passing we report also new state records for Harpalus rubripes from New York and Pennsylvania, Amara ovata from Pennsylvania, and the first mainland New York records for Asaphidion curtum). For most islands, there was a clear relationship between species richness and island area. Two islands, however, Calf and Grape, had far more species than their relatively small size would predict. Freshwater marshes on these islands, along with a suite of hygrophilous species, suggested that habitat diversity plays an important role in island species richness. Introduced species (18) comprised 14.0% of the total observed species richness, compared to 5.5% (17 out of 306 species) documented for Rhode Island. We surmise that the higher proportion of introduced species on the islands is, in part, due to a higher proportion of disturbed and open habitats as well as high rates of human traffic. We predict that more active sampling in specialized habitats would bring the total carabid fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands closer to that of Rhode Island or eastern Massachusetts in richness and composition; however, isolation, human disturbance and traffic, and limited habitat diversity all contribute to reducing the species pool on the islands relative to that on the mainland. PMID:22371673

Davidson, Robert L; Rykken, Jessica; Farrell, Brian

2011-11-16

250

An Evaluation of a Routine Opt-Out Rapid HIV Testing Program in a Rhode Island Jail  

PubMed Central

There is an increased prevalence of HIV among incarcerated populations. We conducted a rapid HIV testing pilot program using oral specimens at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections jail. 1364 detainees were offered rapid testing upon jail entrance and 98% completed testing. Twelve detainees had reactive rapid tests, one of which was a new HIV diagnosis. To evaluate the program qualitatively, we conducted key informant interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders. There was overwhelming support for the oral fluid rapid HIV test. Correctional staff reported improved inmate processing due to the elimination of phlebotomy required with conventional HIV testing. Delivering negative rapid HIV test results in real-time during the jail intake process remained a challenge but completion of confirmatory testing among those with reactive rapid tests was possible. Rapid HIV testing using oral specimens in the RIDOC jail was feasible and preferred by correctional staff.

Beckwith, Curt G.; Bazerman, Lauri; Cornwall, Alexandra H.; Patry, Emily; Poshkus, Michael; Fu, Jeannia; Nunn, Amy

2013-01-01

251

The predictive validity of the university of rhode island change assessment questionnaire in a heroin-addicted polysubstance abuse sample.  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the predictive utility of the stages-of-change scales of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA; E. A. McConnaughy, J. O. Prochaska, & W. F. Velicer, 1983) questionnaire in a heroin-addicted polysubstance-abusing treatment sample. Ninety-six participants completed the URICA at the beginning of a 29-week treatment period that required thrice-weekly urine drug screens. Multivariate multiple regression analysis indicated that after controlling for demographic variables, substance abuse severity, and treatment assignment, the stages-of- change scales added significant variance to the prediction of heroin- and cocaine-free urine samples. The Maintenance scale was positively related to cocaine-free urines and length in treatment. The implications of these findings for treatment and for measuring readiness among individuals using multiple substances while taking maintenance medications are discussed. PMID:15238052

Henderson, Melinda J; Saules, Karen K; Galen, Luke W

2004-06-01

252

PROCESSING, PRODUCTS, AND FOOD SAFETY Differences in Carcass and Meat Characteristics Between Chicken Indigenous to Northern Thailand (Black-Boned and Thai Native) and Imported Extensive Breeds (Bresse and Rhode Island Red)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of 4 geno- types of chicken, all suitable for extensive fattening, on carcass and meat quality using 320 chickens divided into 4 equally sized groups. The comparison included 2 indig- enous chicken strains from Thailand, Black-boned and Thai native (Thai), and 2 imported chicken breeds, Bresse and Rhode Island Red (Rhode, a layer breed). The

S. Jaturasitha; T. Srikanchai; M. Kreuzer; M. Wicke

253

Short Communication: Transmitted Drug Resistance and Molecular Epidemiology in Antiretroviral Naive HIV Type 1-Infected Patients in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Abstract Transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance has important clinical and epidemiological consequences including earlier treatment failure and forward transmission of resistance strains in high-risk groups. To evaluate the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island, we collected genotypic, demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from treatment-naive individuals presenting to the largest outpatient HIV clinic in the state from January 2007 to November 2007. Sequences from 35 treatment-naive individuals were available, 83% of whom were men who had sex with men (MSM). All sequences were HIV-1 subtype B. Drug resistance mutations were identified in 7/35 [20%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08–0.37] patients, six of whom had K103N. Two phylogenetic transmission clusters were found, involving 17% (6/35) of individuals, three in each cluster. We did not find an association between belonging to a cluster and age, gender, AIDS-defining illness, CD4 cell count, or viral load. Drug resistance mutations were more commonly observed in transmission clusters (p?=?0.08). Individuals in one cluster all had K103N and were MSM who had attended local bathhouses. Individuals forming clusters were significantly more likely to have visited a bathhouse compared to nonclusters (p?=?0.02). The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in Rhode Island is high, further justifying genotypic testing on presentation to care and prior to treatment initiation. Molecular epidemiological analysis and association of resistance with phylogenetic networks using data obtained for clinical purposes may serve as useful tools for the prevention of drug resistance transmission and for contact tracing.

Tashima, Karen; Cartwright, Charles P.; Gillani, Fizza S.; Mintz, Orli; Zeller, Kimberly; Kantor, Rami

2011-01-01

254

Estimated water use and availability in the Pawcatuck Basin, southern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut, 1995-99  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1988, the Pawcatuck Basin (302.4 square miles) in southern Rhode Island (245.3 square miles) and southeastern Connecticut (57.12 square miles) was defined as a sole-source aquifer for 14 towns in southern Rhode Island and 4 towns in southeastern Connecticut. To determine water use and availability, the six subbasins in the Pawcatuck Basin were delineated on the basis of the surface- and ground-water system drainage areas. From 1995 through 1999, five major water suppliers in the basin withdrew an average of 6.768 million gallons per day from the aquifers. The estimated water withdrawals from minor water suppliers during the study period were 0.099 million gallons per day. Self-supplied domestic, industrial, commercial, and agricultural withdrawals from the basin averaged 4.386 million gallons per day. Water use in the basin averaged 7.401 million gallons per day. The average return flow in the basin was 7.855 million gallons per day, which included effluent from permitted facilities and self-disposed water users. The PART program, a computerized hydrograph-separation application, was used for five selected index stream-gaging stations to determine water availability on the basis of the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles of the total base flow, the base flow minus the 7-day, 10-year flow criteria, and the base flow minus the Aquatic Base Flow criteria at the index stations. The differences in the surface- and ground-water system drainage areas in the summer were applied to the water availability calculated at the index stations and subbasins. The base-flow contributions from sand and gravel deposits at the index stations were computed for June, July, August, and September, and applied to the percentage of surficial deposits at each index station. The base-flow contributions were converted to a per unit area at the station for the till, and for the sand and gravel deposits, and applied to the subbasins. The statistics used to estimate the gross yield of base flow, as well as subtracting out the two low-flow criteria, resulted in various water-availability values at each index station, which were present in the subbasin after applying the per unit area rates from the index station. The results from the Chipuxet and Arcadia stream-gaging stations were lowest in September at the 75th and 25th percentiles, and August flows were lowest for the summer at the 50th percentile. For the other three index stations, September flows were the lowest for the summer. Because water withdrawals and use are greater during the summer than other times of the year, water availability in June, July, August, and September was assessed and compared to water withdrawals in the basin and subbasins. The ratios were calculated by using the water-availability flow scenarios at the 75th, 50th, and 25th percentiles for the subbasins, which are based on total water available from base-flow contributions from till deposits and sand and gravel deposits in the subbasins. For the study period, the withdrawals in August were higher than the other summer months. The ratios were close to one in August for the estimated gross yield and 7-day, 10-year flow criterion, and were close to one in September for the estimated Aquatic Base Flow criterion water-availability scenarios in the Pawcatuck Basin. The closer the ratio is to one, the closer the withdrawals are to the estimated water available, and the net water available decreases. To determine the effects of streamflow depletion from continuous water withdrawals, the program STRMDEPL was used to simulate public wells and well fields at a constant pumping rate based on the 1999 summer average for each withdrawal, over a period of 180 days. The streamflow depletion was 86, 95, 93, 96, and 98 percent at 30 days for Kingston wells 1 and 2, Westerly well fields 1 and 2, and well 3, respectively. A long-term hydrologic budget was calculated for the Pawcatuck Basin to identify and assess the basin and subbasin in

Wild, Emily C.; Nimiroski, Mark T.

2004-01-01

255

Rhode Island's got the Blues. But the state's Blues plan isn't the only one drawing fire over its reserves, executive perks and compensation.  

PubMed

It's been a strained few months at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Rhode Island. Outrage over corporate excess led to a flurry of reforms at the insurer, headed by Chairman Frank Montanaro, left, including banning loans to employees and dropping lavish perks. Other Blues have been catching flak for their burgeoning bottom lines, but executives say they need ample reserves since that's their only capital. PMID:15164487

Benko, Laura B

2004-05-17

256

Assemblages of Dragonfly Species that Emerged from Small Wetlands Along an Urbanization Gradient Within the State of Rhode Island, from May to October 2004.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dragonfly exuviae were collected during six visits to 21 small wetlands, from mid-May through mid-October 2004. The 21 palustrine wetlands range from highly anthropogenic sites in greater Providence, to small, natural ponds in rural Rhode Island. Exuviae were identified to species in the laboratory. Dragonfly communities are analyzed for assemblage patterns. Land-use in surrounding wetland buffers, along with water quality measurements, are evaluated for landscape and environmental factors which affect species distributions.

Aliberti, M. A.

2005-05-01

257

Distribution of salinity in ground water from the interpretation of borehole-geophysical logs and salinity data, Calf Pasture Point, Davisville, Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The distribution of salinity in ground water at Calf Pasture Point, a small coastal peninsula bounded by Narragansett Bay on the east and Allen Harbor on the west, in Davisville, Rhode Island, was interpreted from borehole-geophysical data and previously collected salinity data to help identify potential flowpaths of contaminated ground water to surface-water bodies. The surficial material at this 40-acre site, which ranges in thickness from about 30 to 85 feet, is composed of an upper sand unit, a silt unit, and a till unit overlying bedrock. Borehole-geophysical data indicate that fresh ground water is present in all surficial units in the northern and northwestern part of the site. In the central and eastern parts of the site, where most of the current land surface is composed of dredged fill placed in a small saltwater embayment, brackish and saline ground water predominate. Fresh ground water moving into this area from upgradient and recharge to this extended land surface from precipitation is diluting the saline groundwater in the upper sand and till units, and to a lesser extent in the silt unit. In this area, the freshwater-flow system is slowly expanding towards Narragansett Bay and the entrance channel to Allen Harbor.

Church, Peter E.; Brandon, William C.

1999-01-01

258

Effects of Road Density and Road-Salt Application Practices on Sodium and Chloride Loads to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Scituate Reservoir drainage basin is the drinking-water source area for two thirds of the population of Rhode Island. The effects of road density and road-salt-application practices on sodium and chloride concentrations in streams in the drainage basin were examined using concentration data collected at intervals of one to six months from January 1982 through June 2000 at 32 stream sites distributed throughout the basin. Median concentrations of sodium and chloride for individual streams during the period of data collection were related to 1995 road densities (road miles per square mile of subbasin) for roads maintained by the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (State-maintained roads) and for roads maintained by the four municipalities in the drainage basin (locally maintained roads). Nearly 60 percent of the variation in median stream sodium and chloride concentrations was accounted for by the variation in density of State-maintained roads (R2= 0.595, p < 0.0001). In contrast, no correlations could be identified between median concentrations of sodium and chloride in streams and the densities of locally maintained roads in the subbasins (R2 = 0.001, p = 0.8771). Also, there was no difference in the relations between median stream sodium concentrations and subbasin road densities for data collected before and after a 1990 State-mandated reduction in the rate of application of sodium during winter deicing of State-maintained roads. Analysis of data on sources of sodium and chloride in the Scituate Reservoir drainage basin during water year 2000 (October 1999 through September 2000) indicates that, while the lengths and densities of locally maintained roads were greater than those of State-maintained roads in most subbasins, the total amount of sodium applied during water year 2000 was nearly three times greater for State-maintained roads than for locally maintained roads. This would be expected, given that State-maintained roads carry more traffic at higher speeds than do locally maintained roads. In addition, the State-maintained roads tend to have more efficient drainage systems that quickly transport runoff directly to the streams. The lack of effect of the reduced sodium application rate on the relation between median stream sodium concentration and density of State-maintained roads may be due to inaccurate monitoring of application rates or to mobilization of sodium previously applied and stored in drainage basin soils. Thus, the amounts of sodium and chloride transported by tributary streams to the Scituate Reservoir depend more on the type of roads and other conditions in the tributary subbasins than on the actual length or density of the roads.

Waldron, M. C.; Nimiroski, M.

2001-05-01

259

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Davis Liquid Waste Site, Smithfield, Rhode Island (first remedial action), September 1987. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Davis Liquid Waste site is located in a rural section of the Town of Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. The 15-acre site, bounded on the north and south by wetlands and swamp areas, is within one-half mile of 38 homes. Throughout the 1970s, the site served as a disposal location for various hazardous liquid and chemical wastes including: paint and metal sludge; oily wastes; solvents; acids; caustics; pesticides; phenols; halogens; metals; fly ash; and, laboratory pharmaceuticals. Liquid wastes were accepted at the site in drums and bulk tank trucks and were dumped directly into unlined lagoons and seepage pits. The dumping has resulted in soil, surface and ground water contamination that still persists. Periodically the semi-solid lagoon materials were excavated and dumped in several onsite locations and covered with available site soil. Other site operations included the collection of junked vehicles, machine parts, metal recycling, and tire shredding. In 1977 the discovery of offsite well contamination prompted the State Superior Court to prohibit dumping of hazardous substances on the Davis property.

Not Available

1987-09-29

260

Marine ecological risk assessment at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, Rhode Island. Phase 1. Final report, Sep 88-Jun 89  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) in Davisville, Rhode Island, has been the subject of a joint ecological research program by the Navy and Environmental Protection Agency. Allen Harbor, a small embayment of Narragansett Bay adjacent to NCBC, was used to develop research and monitoring methods for ecological risk assessment. Two sites on the National Priorities List were of particular concern: (1) a 15-acre landfill used from 1946 to 1972 for the disposal of such wastes as solvents, PCB-contaminated oils, preservatives, sewage sludge, chromic acid, and construction rubble; and (2) a cement-lined pit that from 1960 to 1974 was the depository of calcium hypochlorite, chloride, and decontaminating solution. Phase I of the study characterizes the ecology, natural resources, sediment, and water quality. A preliminary ecological risk assessment is developed. Exposure to and the effects of contamination are measured at both subtidal and intertidal stations. A T-shaped transect of stations projecting from the mouth of the harbor into Narragansett Bay proper is established to determine if measurable levels of contaminants and effects are reaching the Bay. A series of mid-Narragansett Bay stations provide a reference for comparing effects within Allen Harbor.

Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Cobb, D.J.; Gleason, T.R.; Pesch, G.G.

1991-05-01

261

Patterns of trauma induced by motorboat and ferry propellers as illustrated by three known cases from Rhode Island.  

PubMed

Understanding patterns of trauma is important to determining cause and manner of death. A thorough evaluation of taphonomy, trauma, and bone fracture mechanisms is necessary to reconstruct the circumstances of the death. This study examines the skeletal trauma caused by boat propeller strikes in terms of wound characteristics and location based on three cases from Rhode Island. These case studies review the traumatic characteristics caused by propeller injuries and highlight the anatomic regions most likely to sustain skeletal trauma. With this information, investigators may be able to identify propeller trauma even in severely decomposed remains. The discussion of boat propeller trauma also raises issues regarding how forensic anthropologists and forensic pathologists classify trauma (specifically blunt force vs. sharp) and highlights semantic issues arising in trauma classification. The study also discusses why these propeller cases should be classified as blunt trauma rather than sharp or chop/hack trauma. Ultimately, the authors urge consistency and communication between pathologist and forensic anthropologists performing trauma analyses. PMID:22583137

Semeraro, Dominique; Passalacqua, Nicholas V; Symes, Steven; Gilson, Thomas

2012-05-14

262

Differences in carcass and meat characteristics between chicken indigenous to northern Thailand (Black-boned and Thai native) and imported extensive breeds (Bresse and Rhode Island red).  

PubMed

This study examined the effects of 4 genotypes of chicken, all suitable for extensive fattening, on carcass and meat quality using 320 chickens divided into 4 equally sized groups. The comparison included 2 indigenous chicken strains from Thailand, Black-boned and Thai native (Thai), and 2 imported chicken breeds, Bresse and Rhode Island Red (Rhode, a layer breed). The animals were fed until 16 wk of age. Breast (pectoralis major) and thigh (biceps femoris) muscles were studied in detail. Chickens of the imported breeds were heavier at slaughter than indigenous strains, especially Black-boned chickens. Proportions of retail cuts with bones were similar among genotypes, whereas deboned breast meat and lean:bone ratio were lowest in the layer breed (Rhode). The meat of the Black-boned chickens was darker than that of the other genotypes. Thai and Rhode chickens had a particularly yellow skin. The ratio of red and intermediate to white fibers was higher in the thigh muscle, and the diameter of all muscle fiber types in both muscles was smaller in the indigenous compared with the imported breeds. The meat of the 2 indigenous Thai strains had lower contents of fat and cholesterol compared with that of the imported breeds, especially relative to the Rhode chickens (thigh meat). The meat of the indigenous origins, especially of the Thai chickens, was higher in shear force and collagen content (thigh only) than meat of the imported breeds. The meat lipids of the Thai chickens had particularly high proportions of n-3 fatty acids and a favorably low n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio compared with the other genotypes. In conclusion, meat of indigenous chickens has some unique features and seems to have more advantages over imported breeds than disadvantages, especially when determined for a niche market serving consumers who prefer chewy, low-fat chicken meat. PMID:18079466

Jaturasitha, S; Srikanchai, T; Kreuzer, M; Wicke, M

2008-01-01

263

Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years to Assess the Burden of Disease and Injury in Rhode Island  

PubMed Central

Objectives Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) measure the burden of disease and injury in a population. We tested the feasibility of calculating DALYs to assess the burden of disease and injury in Rhode Island (RI). Methods We computed DALYs for the 2008 RI population using methods developed by the World Health Organization, Harvard University, and the World Bank. DALYs are a composite measure that sum years of life lost (YLLs) due to premature mortality with years lived with disability (YLDs). We calculated crude mortality, YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs for 90 major health conditions for RI and stratified them by gender and age. Calculations for YLLs and YLDs were based on five-year averages. We compared our results with U.S. and Los Angeles County, California, estimates. Results A DALYs ranking produces a different picture of RI's disease and injury burden than does mortality-based ranking. Of 90 major health conditions assessed for RI, six of the top 10 causes for mortality and DALYs were the same, but were ranked differently: ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer dementia and other dementias, trachea/bronchus/lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes mellitus. These six conditions accounted for 59% of deaths but only 35% of DALYs. Causes and rank orders for DALYs differed between males and females and among age groups. Conclusions Including nonfatal health conditions in an assessment of population health provides a different picture than traditional mortality-based assessments. This study demonstrates the feasibility and constraints of using DALYs to assess the burden of disease and injury at the state level.

Jiang, Yongwen; Hesser, Jana Earl

2012-01-01

264

The nutritional effect of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves as feed supplement on Rhode Island Red hen egg production and quality.  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the potential of Moringa oleifera fresh leaves (MOL) as feed supplement on the performance and egg quality of Rhode Island Red (RIR) hens under the tropical conditions of Yucatan, Mexico. Forty-eight RIR hens were allocated in 12 floor pen replicates each with four birds. Thereafter, the replicates were divided into three groups which were corresponded to ad libitum feed (control), ad libitum feed supplemented with MOL T1 (AL + MOL) and restricted feed amount (20% lower than control) with MOL T2 (RCD + MOL), respectively. T1 (AL + MOL) had higher egg laying rate (71.4% versus 66.6%), higher daily egg mass production (45.4 versus 41.9 g/day), lower feed intake (121.3 versus 127.5 g/day) and better feed conversion ratio (2.8 versus 3.2 g feed:g egg) versus control. T2 / (RCD + MOL) had lower values of body weight, egg laying rate, egg weight and egg mass, and recorded better feed conversion ratio than the control group. The control group recorded a higher percentage of pecked eggs versus T1 and T2 (6.5% versus 1.2% and 2.0 %). Similar intake of MOL (3.1 and 3.4 g DM/day) was recorded in T1 (AL + MOL) and T2 (RCD + MOL). Yolk color was improved significantly in T1 (AL + MOL) than both control and T2 (RCD + MOL), while T2 (RCD + MOL) had eggs with lower yolk and higher albumen percentages than the other two ad libitum groups. The results suggest that MOL could be used successfully as sustainable tropical feed resource for RIR hens. PMID:22207478

Abou-Elezz Fouad Mohammed, Khaled; Sarmiento-Franco, Luis; Santos-Ricalde, Ronald; Solorio-Sanchez, Javier Francisco

2011-12-30

265

75 FR 44179 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Determination of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...see 40 CFR Section 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...for so long as the area continues to attain...ozone NAAQS. 40 CFR 51.918. Complete...rule (see 40 CFR 51.902(a)), EPA...determine that this area has attained the...

2010-07-28

266

Effects of feeding different levels of cooked and sun dried fish offal on carcass traits of growing Rhode Island Red chicks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fourteen days old Rhode Island Red chicks were used to evaluate effects of processed fish offal (fishmeal) on DM intake (DMI),\\u000a body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR = DMI\\/BWG) and carcass traits. Ten chicks were assigned to each of 3 replicates\\u000a of 6 diets (T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, containing 0, 3.32, 6.64, 9.96, 13.28 and 16.6%

Tegene Negesse; Asrat Tera

2010-01-01

267

STRATEGIES FOR PROTECTING AND RESTORING RHODE ISLAND'S WATERSHEDS ON MULTIPLE SCALES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Clean Water Act has traditionally preserved the quality and quantity of a region's water by focusing resources on areas with known or anticipated problems. USEPA Region 1 is taking the supplemental, longer-range approach of protecting areas of New England where natural resour...

268

THE INFLUENCE OF SUBURBAN LAND USE ON HABITAT AND BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF COASTAL RHODE ISLAND STREAMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our watershed ecosystems. The...

269

COMPARISON OF GENKENSIA DEMISSA (DILLWYN) POPULATIONS IN RHODE ISLAND FRINGE MARSHES WITH VARYING NITROGEN LOADS  

EPA Science Inventory

Increased residential development in coastal watersheds has led to increases in anthropogenic nitrogen inputs into estuaries. Sessile bivalves are good candidate organisms to examine animal condition in nutrient-enriched areas because they contribute significantly to energy flow...

270

LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, NAD RHODE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem compo...

271

Harvesting Rock and Jonah Crabs in Rhode Island: Some Technical and Economic Aspects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A significant increase in fishing effort between Nova Scotia and Cape Hatteras over the last decade had led to a major decline in the stocks of the traditional species of fish and shellfish harvest in that area. Total fishing effort in New England waters ...

A. Marchant A. Holmsen

1975-01-01

272

Spanish-speaking Americans. Ethnic Heritage Studies Program of Rhode Island, Appendix C.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reading materials by Spanish-speaking Americans, which constitute curricular materials for secondary school and college ethnic studies programs, are presented. The selection includes five stories and a poem in Spanish and an essay and autobiographical narrative in English. The writers of the materials represent the following areas: Columbia,…

Navascues, Michael, Comp.

273

ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND PROTECTION STRATEGIES AT MULTIPLE SCALES IN RHODE ISLAND WATERSHEDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Public concerns for the environment are often the basis for environmental regulations. The Clean Water Act seeks to ensure that water quality and quantity fully support aquatic life and human health. The legislative requirements help focus limited resources on areas where problem...

274

Imprint of the Past: Ecological History of Greenwich Bay, Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Because environmental problems are often caused by an accumulation of impacts over several decades or even centuries, it is necessary to look at the environmental history of an area to understand what happened and why, before solutions can be devised. Thi...

C. E. Pesch E. J. Shumchenia M. A. Charpentier M. C. Pelletier

2012-01-01

275

The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 8, Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

2011-01-01

276

The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 4, Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

2011-01-01

277

The influence of suburban land use on habitat and biotic integrity of coastal Rhode Island streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Watershed land use in suburban areas can affect stream biota through degradation of instream habitat, water quality, and riparian\\u000a vegetation. By monitoring stream biotic communities in various geographic regions, we can better understand and conserve our\\u000a watershed ecosystems. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between watershed land use and the integrity\\u000a of benthic invertebrate communities in

Suzanne M. Lussier; Sara N. da Silva; Michael Charpentier; James F. Heltshe; Susan M. Cormier; Donald J. Klemm; Marnita Chintala; Saro Jayaraman

2008-01-01

278

Patterns of health-related quality of life and patterns associated with health risks among Rhode Island adults  

PubMed Central

Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important consideration in assessing the impact of chronic disease on individuals as well as in populations. HRQOL is often assessed using multiple indicators. The authors sought to determine if multiple indicators of HRQOL could be used to characterize patterns of HRQOL in a population, and if so, to examine the association between such patterns and demographic, health risk and health condition covariates. Methods Data from Rhode Island's 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used for this analysis. The BRFSS is a population-based random-digit-dialed telephone survey of adults ages 18 and older. In 2004 RI's BRFSS interviewed 3,999 respondents. A latent class regression (LCR) model, using 9 BRFSS HRQOL indicators, was used to determine latent classes of HRQOL for RI adults and to model the relationship between latent class membership and covariates. Results RI adults were categorized into four latent classes of HRQOL. Class 1 (76%) was characterized by good physical and mental HRQOL; Class 2 (9%) was characterized as having physically related poor HRQOL; Class 3 (11%) was characterized as having mentally related poor HRQOL; and Class 4 (4%) as having both physically and mentally related poor HRQOL. Class 2 was associated with older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, or with having asthma or diabetes. Class 3 was associated with being female, current smoking, or having asthma or disability. Class 4 was associated with almost all the same predictors of Classes 2 and 3, i.e. older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, current smoking, with having asthma or diabetes, or with low income. Conclusion Using a LCR model, the authors found 4 distinct patterns of HRQOL among RI adults. The largest class was associated with good HRQOL; three smaller classes were associated with poor HRQOL. We identified the characteristics of subgroups at higher-risk for each of the three classes of poor HRQOL. Focusing interventions on the high-risk populations may be one approach to improving HRQOL in RI.

Jiang, Yongwen; Hesser, Jana Earl

2008-01-01

279

Economic Impact of Block Island Race Week.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Block Island, an area of 11 square miles lies 15 miles off the Rhode Island Coast. Biennially since 1965, the Storm Trysail Club of New York has sponsored a week of yacht races at Block Island. The event, which takes place in the third week of June, comes...

J. F. Farrell

1973-01-01

280

Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Rhode Island. Preliminary background report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rhode Island statutes vest in the Public Utility Commission and the Division of Public Utilities the exclusive power and authority to regulate public utility companies in that state. Both bodies have been established within the Department of Business Regulation but are independent of the Department's director and are not under his jurisdiction. The jurisdiction to regulate utilities is shared

D. A. Feurer; C. L. Weaver; K. C. Gallagher; D. Hejna; K. J. Rielley

1980-01-01

281

A Qualitative Study Among Injection Drug Using Women in Rhode Island: Attitudes Toward Testing, Treatment, and Vaccination for Hepatitis and HIV  

PubMed Central

HIV and hepatitis C virus infection are serious and prevalent health conditions among many women who inject drugs. Qualitative interviews with 20 injection drug using women at a short term drug treatment center in Rhode Island revealed six primary barriers and facilitators for testing and receiving results and treatment for hepatitis and HIV, as well as for hepatitis vaccination. The primary barriers were prioritization of drug use; low level of diseases-pecific knowledge; stigmatization; accessibility of testing, results and treatment; and psychological factors. The primary facilitator was interest in promoting one’s health. Our findings indicate that injection drug using women experience multiple barriers to HIV and hepatitis testing, results, treatment and vaccination. Methods for improving the motivators for health, facilitating infectious disease prevention, and decreasing unnecessary disease complications of injection drug using women need to be utilized. These methods should include strategies that minimize stigma and facilitate accessibility of health care.

LALLY, MICHELLE A.; MONTSTREAM-QUAS, SYDNEY A.; TANAKA, SARA; TEDESCHI, SARA K.; MORROW, KATHLEEN M.

2012-01-01

282

Comparative mortality and predation in relation to egg production traits of Rhode Island Red, Black Australorp and Hyblack laying hens in scavenging production systems of rural Malawi.  

PubMed

1. Black Australorp (BA), Rhode Island Red (RIR), and Hyblack (HB) birds were used in farm and field scavenging systems in Malawi, to study mortality through disease and predation in relation to laying performance. 2. Predation was higher in BA than HB. 3. Mortality through disease was higher in RIR than BA and HB. 4. Crossbred HB birds show the lowest combination of mortality and predation, suggesting a heterosis effect. 5. Mortality did not differ on farms and in field environments, suggesting an inability to improve biosecurity in farm conditions. 6. There was a positive relationship between eggshell strength and mortality. Calcium depletion from the birds' bones, limiting foraging and escaping ability may be the explanation, which ultimately increases susceptibility to disease and predation. PMID:23281749

Mata, F; Mwakifuna, B

2012-01-01

283

Simulation of the Effects of Water Withdrawals, Wastewater Return Flows, and Land-Use Change on Streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow in many parts of the Blackstone River Basin in south-central Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is altered by water-supply withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change associated with a growing population. Simulations from a previously developed and calibrated Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model for the basin were used to evaluate the effects of water withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change on streamflow. Most of the simulations were done for recent (1996?2001) conditions and potential buildout conditions in the future when all available land is developed to provide a long-range assessment of the effects of possible future human activities on water resources in the basin. The effects of land-use change were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term (1960?2004) simulations with (1) undeveloped land use, (2) 1995?1999 land use, and (3) potential buildout land use at selected sites across the basin. Flow-duration curves for these land-use scenarios were similar, indicating that land-use change, as represented in the HSPF model, had little effect on flow in the major tributary streams and rivers in the basin. However, land-use change?particularly increased effective impervious area?could potentially have greater effects on the hydrology, water quality, and aquatic habitat of the smaller streams in the basin. The effects of water withdrawals and wastewater-return flows were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term simulations with (1) no withdrawals and return flows, (2) actual (measured) 1996?2001 withdrawals and wastewater-return flows, and (3) potential withdrawals and wastewater-return flows at buildout. Overall, the results indicated that water use had a much larger effect on streamflow than did land use, and that the location and magnitude of wastewater-return flows were important for lessening the effects of withdrawals on streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin. Ratios of long-term (1960?2004) simulated flows with 1996?2001 water use (representing the net effect of withdrawals and wastewater-return flows) to long-term simulated flows with no water use indicated that, for many reaches, 1996?2001 water use did not deplete flows at the 90-percent flow duration substantially compared to flows unaffected by water use. Flows generally were more severely depleted in the reaches that include surface-water supplies for the larger cities in the basin (Kettle and Tatnuck Brooks, Worcester, Mass. water supply; Quinsigamond River, Shrewsbury, Mass. water supply; Crookfall Brook, Woonsocket, R.I. water supply; and Abbott Run, Pawtucket, R.I. water supply). These reaches did not have substantial wastewater-return flows that could offset the effects of the withdrawals. In contrast, wastewater-return flows from the Upper Blackstone Wastewater Treatment Facility in Millbury, Mass. increased flows at the 90-percent flow duration in the main stem of the Blackstone River compared to no-water-use conditions. Under the assumptions used to develop the buildout scenario, nearly all of the new water withdrawals were returned to the Blackstone River Basin at municipal wastewater-treatment plants or on-site septic systems. Consequently, buildout generally had small effects on simulated low flows in the Blackstone River and most of the major tributary streams compared to flows with 1996?2001 water use. To evaluate the effects of water use on flows in the rivers and major tributary streams in the Rhode Island part of the basin in greater detail, the magnitudes of water withdrawals and wastewater-return flows in relation to simulated streamflow were calculated as unique ratios for individual HSPF subbasins, total contributing areas to HSPF subbasins, and total contributing areas to the major tributary streams. For recent conditions (1996?2001 withdrawals and 1995?1999 land use), ratios of average summer (June through September) withdrawals to the l

Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

2007-01-01

284

Long Island sound area contingency plan  

SciTech Connect

The Area Contingency Plan (ACP) describes the strategy for a coordinated Federal, State, and local response to a discharge or substantial threat of discharge of oil or a release of a hazardous substance from a vessel, offshore facility, or onshore facility operating within the boundaries of the area of responsibility for Captain of the Port, Long Island Sound. This plan addresses response on an average most probable discharge, a maximum most probable discharge, and a worst case discharge including discharges from fire or explosion. Planning for these three scenarios covers the expected range of spills likely to occur in this area. For purpose of this plan, the spill scenarios are based on the best historical data available.

NONE

1995-06-03

285

Gravity Anomalies in the Galapagos Islands Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In a recent report Case et al, (1973) presented a free-air gravity map of the Galapagos Islands based on 32 gravity stations on the islands. They state that the Galapagos Islands are associated with an east-west trending 'residual negative anomaly' superi...

A. B. Watts J. R. Cochran

1973-01-01

286

Long-term monitoring of the Rhode Island shoreline: Understanding beach cycles, headland and barrier change, and the effects of accelerated sea-level rise  

SciTech Connect

The 33 km long microtidal shoreline of southern Rhode Island is a natural shoreline laboratory that is being used to track the effects of storm-fairweather cycles and extreme storm events, and to model the effects of accelerated sea-level rise due to global warming on barriers and headlands. Thirty years of beach profile monitoring (10 stations) indicates seasonality at some stations, mixed on-off seasonality at some stations, mixed on-off seasonality at others, and five and ten year patterns of variation at most locations. The last ten year cycle reached peak accretion in 1988 with berm widening, eolian dune deposition, and the development of a temporary storage feature termed the backshore reservoir. Most beaches and associated barrier or headland cores have had a net loss of sediment since 1988, with erosion and removal of backshore reservoir material. Mapping from vertical aerial photos indicates that erosional retreat of barriers ranges from 0.4--1.0 m[center dot]yr[sup [minus]1] (1939--85), and headlands from 0.2--0.9 m[center dot]yr[sup [minus]1], accomplished during sou'easter storm cycles and major hurricanes. Field mapping of barrier and headland changes after storm events (5--20 year storms) indicates that frontal erosion combined with washover sand accumulation have been underestimated as agents of change, particularly on headlands. The authors have modified the standard FEMA/NAS storm erosion configuration to better forward-model the effects on the shoreline resulting from projected sea-level rise due to global warming. They presently use an isostatic subsidence of 15 cm [center dot] 100 yr[sup [minus]1] based on Newport, RI gauge records, and accelerated eustatic sea-level rise based on IPCC (1990) predictions that give 1.0--1.45 m rise by 2,100.

Boothroyd, J.C. (Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States). Dept. of Geology); Galagan, C.W. (Applied Science Associates, Inc., Narragansett, RI (United States)); Newcomer, D.E. (Baker Environmental, Princeton, NJ (United States)); Graves, S.M. (The Earth Time Project, Ketchum, ID (United States))

1993-03-01

287

Effects of feeding different levels of cooked and sun dried fish offal on carcass traits of growing Rhode Island Red chicks.  

PubMed

Fourteen days old Rhode Island Red chicks were used to evaluate effects of processed fish offal (fishmeal) on DM intake (DMI), body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR = DMI/BWG) and carcass traits. Ten chicks were assigned to each of 3 replicates of 6 diets (T(1), T(2), T(3), T(4), T(5), T(6), containing 0, 3.32, 6.64, 9.96, 13.28 and 16.6% fishmeal, respectively, having 18.44-19.82% CP). After 77 days of ad-lib feeding, 3 male and 3 female chicks per treatment were fasted overnight, killed and body parts weighed. T(1) had lowest but T(6) highest (p < or = 0.001) daily intakes of 68.5 and 77.0 g DM head(-1), 13.3 and 14.8 g CP head(-1) and 231 and 243 kcal ME head(-1), respectively. BWG (10.7 g head(-1) d(-1)), FCR (6.79), weights of carcass (569 g), breast (160 g) and total edible (676 g) and dressing % (66%) of T(1) (0% fishmeal) was smaller (p < or = 0.001) than those of fishmeal groups {12.8 to 13.5 g head(-1) d(-1); 5.83 to 6.35 g; 671 to 729 g; 196 to 219 g; 807 to 876 g and 67 to 68%, respectively}. Best results of BWG, FCR and carcass traits were obtained at 9.96% fishmeal inclusion level; however acceptable results could be obtained up to 12.5%. PMID:19548104

Negesse, Tegene; Tera, Asrat

2009-06-23

288

Guam: 2002. 2002 Economic Census of Island Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data from the 2002 Economic Census of Islands Areas are published for the first time on the basis of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). NAICS replaces the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) System used in 1997 and earlier cen...

2005-01-01

289

195. GWMP ADJACENT TO THEODORE ROOSEVELT ISLAND PARKING AREA LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

195. GWMP ADJACENT TO THEODORE ROOSEVELT ISLAND PARKING AREA LOOKING NORTH BEFORE RECONFIGURATION. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

290

Species interactions-area relationships: biological invasions and network structure in relation to island area  

PubMed Central

The relationship between species number and island area is a fundamental rule in ecology. However, the extent to which interactions with exotic species and how the structure of species interactions is related to island area remain unexplored. Here, I document the relationship between island area and (i) interactions with exotic species and (ii) network structure of species interactions in the context of mutualistic interactions between ants and extrafloral nectary-bearing plants on the oceanic Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan. Pooled data contained 122 interactions among 19 plant (including five exotic) and 23 ant (including 20 exotic) species. Of the observed interactions, 82.8 per cent involved at least one exotic species, ranging from 68.2 to 86.4 per cent among islands. The number of links including exotic species increased in proportion to island area, although the number of links excluding exotic species did not. These results indicate that the number of interactions with exotic species increased in proportion to island area. Connectance, or the proportion of interactions actually observed among all possible interactions, decreased with island area. Nestedness, an asymmetry index in the species interaction network, also decreased with island area. Therefore, island area affects both the number of interactions with exotic species and the network structure.

Sugiura, Shinji

2010-01-01

291

75 FR 39331 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-07-08

292

75 FR 62632 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-10-12

293

76 FR 2195 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2011-01-12

294

76 FR 32022 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2011-06-02

295

75 FR 18955 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-04-13

296

76 FR 45007 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2011-07-27

297

76 FR 10943 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2011-02-28

298

75 FR 7541 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-02-19

299

75 FR 4139 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-01-26

300

75 FR 33896 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine). AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-06-15

301

76 FR 37198 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2011-06-24

302

75 FR 55403 - Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service Open Meeting of the Area 1 Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (Including the States of New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of...

2010-09-10

303

Rhode Island After 3PM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children--more than a quarter of children--are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their…

Afterschool Alliance, 2009

2009-01-01

304

Social survey of Three Mile Island area residents. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recognizing that there is concern among government officials, utility company officials, engineers, physical, social, and behavioral scientists, and the general public about the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident, the overall objective of this report is to examine how the accident affected TMI area residents. This final report is a detailed analysis and description of the summary results published

S. D. Brunn; J. H. Jr Johnson; D. J. Zeigler

1979-01-01

305

Species number, area and habitat diversity in the Galapagos Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galapagos vascular plant species are divided into two groups, showing preferences for dry and wet habitats. This division is based on the results of a phytosociological study and is not influenced by such factors as island area, elevation, climate or soil types. The different distribution patterns of the dry and wet species are discussed and it is concluded that

Henk van der Werff

1983-01-01

306

33 CFR 334.938 - Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. 334.938 Section 334.938 Navigation...Correctional Institution, Terminal Island, San Pedro Bay, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters...

2013-07-01

307

Vegetation Pattern and Process in Tree Islands of the Southern Everglades and Adjacent Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tree islands of the Everglades area of southern Florida, including adjacent interior and coastal areas, are classified based on species composition and environmental factors controlling tree island distribution and structure. Tree islands occur on various substrates within surrounding habitats that may be freshwater or coastal wetlands, or rockland pine forest of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. Eight tree island groupings

Thomas V. Armentano; David T. Jones; Michael S. Ross

308

76 FR 53941 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council...Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service, Department...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council...Summer season review; park update; and public...implementation of a management plan and the...

2011-08-30

309

76 FR 3654 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Interior, National Park Service, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council...elections of officers; park update; and, public...implementation of a management plan and the...

2011-01-20

310

75 FR 52023 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Interior, National Park Service, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council...scoping session about a park pet policy, a brainstorming...implementation of a management plan and the...

2010-08-24

311

75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Interior, National Park Service, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council...council business, a park update, and public...implementation of a management plan and the...

2010-02-10

312

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. 334.950 Section 334...REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The danger...

2013-07-01

313

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing...

2013-07-01

314

Terrestrial slugs (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) in the NATURA 2000 areas of Cyprus island.  

PubMed

Terrestrial slugs of the Island of Cyprus were recently studied in the framework of a study of the whole terrestrial malacofauna of the island. The present work was carried out in the Natura 2000 conservation areas of the island in 155 sampling sites over three years (2004-2007). Museum collections as well as literature references were included. In total six species are present in the Natura 2000 areas of the island, belonging to three families: Limacidae, Agriolimacidae and Milacidae. One of the species, Milax riedeli, is a new record for the island. The distribution of the species across the island and in the surrounding areas is discussed. PMID:22451785

Vardinoyannis, Katerina; Demetropoulos, Simon; Mylonas, Moissis; A Triantis, Kostas; Makris, Christodoulos; Georgiou, Gabriel; Wiktor, Andrzej; Demetropoulos, Andreas

2012-03-09

315

33 CFR 334.980 - Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif., naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.980 Pacific Ocean; around San Nicolas Island, Calif...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean around San Nicolas Island,...

2013-07-01

316

33 CFR 110.220 - Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage areas...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.220 Pacific Ocean at San Nicolas Island, Calif.; restricted anchorage...

2013-07-01

317

33 CFR 334.1430 - Apra Inner Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apra Inner Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted area. 334.1430 Section 334.1430 Navigation...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1430 Apra Inner Harbor, Island of Guam; restricted area. (a) The restricted area. The waters...

2013-07-01

318

33 CFR 334.865 - Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. 334.865 Section 334.865 Navigation...334.865 Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area beginning at...

2013-07-01

319

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The...

2009-07-01

320

33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The...

2010-07-01

321

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area....

2013-07-01

322

Geochemistry of manganese nodules from offshore areas of Mariana Islands and Johnston Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The manganese nodules near the Mariana Islands generally range from 2 to 4 cm in diameter and some samples have porous surfaces. The nodules near Johnston Island are larger in size (5–8 cm in diameter) and more compact than the Mariana nodules. The major FeMn minerals found in Mariana Islands samples are todorokite, birnessite and akaganeite (?-FeOOH) while, in the

Ju-chin Chen; Yung-chang Yao

1995-01-01

323

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. 334.1460...Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area. (a) The...zone is subject to use as a target area for bombing and...

2009-07-01

324

77 FR 70183 - Notice of Meeting for Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a summer review of park operations, activation...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, at (617) 223-8669...Director of National Park Service pursuant to...implementation of a management plan and the operations...Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. Dated:...

2012-11-23

325

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...a) The area. The waters of Port Townsend Bay bounded by a line commencing on the north shore of...

2009-07-01

326

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...a) The area. The waters of Port Townsend Bay bounded by a line commencing on the north shore of...

2010-07-01

327

33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval...a) The area. The waters of Port Townsend Bay bounded by a line commencing on the north shore of...

2013-07-01

328

33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1400 Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii...The area. That portion of the Pacific Ocean lying offshore of Oahu between Ewa...

2013-07-01

329

Seasonal variation of air kerma in the “Vulcano Porto” area (Aeolian Islands, Italy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air kerma was measured in the “Vulcano Porto” area of the Vulcano Island, belonging to the Aeolian Islands, in the Mediterranean Sea. Measurements were carried out using thermoluminescence dosimeters. The relationship between observed dose values and source lithology has been assessed. Data show a seasonal variation due to weather conditions but also probably related to features of the soils, making

S Bellia; S Basile; M Brai; S Hauser; P Puccio; S Rizzo

2001-01-01

330

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif...REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif...waters between the northern and southern boundaries of the area known...118°38â²38â³ W. The southern boundary is defined by...

2009-07-01

331

33 CFR 334.921 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif...REGULATIONS § 334.921 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, Calif...waters between the northern and southern boundaries of the area known...118°38â²38â³ W. The southern boundary is defined by...

2010-07-01

332

Fluid geochemistry of the Chios geothermal area, Chios Island, Greece  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two separate aquifers have been identified in Chios Island. The first one, Nenita, is found in the southern part of the island and the other one, Aghiasmata and Aghia Markela, in the northern part, which is characterized by high salinity waters. Chemical and isotopic contents were used for the investigation of the origin and evolution of thermal water in sedimentary and volcanic rocks, for the estimation of the mixing process between meteoric and seawater involved in the deep geothermal systems and for the evaluation of the deep aquifer temperature. The hot borehole and spring waters discharging in Chios Island, Greece, change in composition from earth alkaline bicarbonate-type to alkaline-type chloride. The chemical and physical characteristics of bicarbonate well waters show interaction between meteoric waters and Neocene rocks. In general, for these waters as their mineralization increases the Mg2+ contents increase. The deuterium and oxygen contents of these water samples indicate a meteoric origin. The Na+ and Cl- ions dominate the chemistry of the thermal waters of Aghia Eleni spring. This thermal water appears to be a mixture of seawater and ground water. The marine contribution for this sample is 80 89%. The chemical and isotopic data of the thermal Cl-rich water springs of the northern part of the island, Aghiasmata and Aghia Markela, suggest that they are fed by thermal water mixed with local groundwater and seawater respectively. The parent geothermal liquid is either a mixture mad up of local groundwater (˜40%) and arc-type magmatic water (˜60%), that did not exchange oxygen isotopes, or a mixture constituted by local groundwater (˜70%) and seawater (˜30%), which experienced a significant oxygen isotope exchange. Assessments from chemical and isotopic geothermometer applied on the thermal waters springs suggest the probable existence of a deep geothermal reservoir of middle high enthalpy (220 °C) in the northern (Aghiasmata and Aghia Markela) part of the island and low enthalpy (80 °C) in the southern part (Nenita Patrika Thimiana) of the island.

Dotsika, E.; Leontiadis, I.; Poutoukis, D.; Cioni, R.; Raco, B.

2006-06-01

333

Seafloor magnetotelluric soundings in the Mariana Island Arc area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two seafloor magnetotelluric soundings have been performed in the Mariana Island arc and subduction area, the first (station 1) in the Mariana Trough near International Phase of Oceanic Drilling (IPOD) hole 454 (position 18° 01'N, 144° 32'E, depth 3770 m), the second (station 2) in the fore arc basin near IPOD hole 458 (position 18° 06'N, 146° 45'E, depth 3602 m). The electrical conductivity beneath the postulated spreading zone of the Mariana Trough appears to be unexpectedly low in the upper 40 km, increasing slowly and monotonically downward, to 1 S m-1 at 700 km. It does not display any significant feature such as lithosphere-asthenosphere or phase transition boundaries. The character of this profile differs considerably from those obtained near the Pacific Rise, suggesting deep as well as shallow structures, generally cooler, and implying less active magmatic processes. Cooler structures may in turn contribute in part to the greater depth versus age of the Mariana Trough compared to that of the main oceanic basins. No indication of the existence of extensive magma concentration of the kind detected on the Pacific Rise at 21°N is recognizable in the magnetic data. This fact, however, may simply result from the distance between station 1 and the spreading axis (˜30 km). A cautious speculation on the cause of the implied overall low conductivity values is presented. The MT sounding from the fore arc basin points to (1) very high conductance in the upper zone (0-10 km), accountable for by the sediment blanket, (2) moderate to high conductance in the fore arc upper mantle wedge below, possibly indicative of a moderately high temperature (composition and hydration by water subducted with sediments may also play a role, (3) a large cross section (300-400 km) of unusually little conducting materials, believed to represent the sinking slab and the cooled down environment adjacent to it, and (4) a 20-fold conductivity increase around 420 km depth, sustained over 300 km, followed by a rapid conductivity rise and the crossing of the 1 S m-1 conductivity value toward the great depth of 800 km.

Filloux, J. H.

334

Proposed Rice Lake and Mille Lacs Islands, Wilderness Areas, Minnesota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposal recommends that 1,406 acres of the Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Aitkin County, Minnesota and .6 acre Mille Lacs National Wildlife Refuge (two small islands) in Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, be designated as wilderness within the Nation...

1973-01-01

335

Estimation of water withdrawal and distribution, water use, and wastewater collection and return flow in Cumberland, Rhode Island, 1988. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the report is to demonstrate integration of water-use data collected by different State agencies or maintained by different public suppliers and wastewater-treatment facilities. The report presents a brief discussion of data compilation, organization and computer storage, and analysis. A detailed description of the methods used and the resulting water-use data are presented on withdrawal, distribution, use, wastewater collection, return flow, and import of water into and export of water out of Cumberland. At the end of each section, an overview provides a discussion of how water that is withdrawn, distributed, used, collected, and returned in the study area affects the availability and distribution of water resources.

Horn, M.A.; Craft, P.A.; Bratton, L.

1994-12-31

336

Ground-water hydrology of the Mormon Island Crane Meadows Wildlife Area near Grand Island, Hall County, Nebraska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Platte River in south-central Nebraska flows generally eastward in a broad, flat valley. The river banks and many areas adjacent to the river support thick stands of cottonwood and willow trees. Brush, grass, pasture land, and cultivated fields occupy most of the remaining area. This is the habitat for many types of wildlife that live in the area or stop over in the area during annual migrations. Both sandhill cranes and whooping cranes are part of the annual migration. There is concern that water-management changes, such as surface-water diversions or ground-water withdrawals for irrigation, may alter the hydrologic environment of the wetland areas and be harmful to the wildlife habitat. In order to determine what affect changes in water management might have on ground-water levels in the wetland areas, detailed data were collected from Crane Meadows Wildlife Area, which is on an island in the Platte River near Grand Island, Nebr. Ground-water levels beneath the island respond to changes in river stage, to recharge from snowmelt and precipitation, and to evapotranspiration by riparian vegetation and from areas where the water table is close to the land surface. The data show that ground-water levels respond rapidly to changes in river stage--usually within 24 hours for distances up to 2,500 feet from the edge of the river. Thus changes in river stage due to changes in surface-water diversions will not have a long-term effect on ground-water levels. Changes in ground-water withdrawals will have the double effect of changing ground-water levels due to changes in drawdown and due to changes in river stage caused by the effects of pumping on river flow. These effects will develop slowly and be long lasting. (USGS)

Hurr, T. R.

1981-01-01

337

50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 679 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Islands Statistical and Reporting Areas ER15NO99.000 b. Coordinates...boundary of the Chukchi Sea, area 400, and east of 170°00... 53°18.95ⲠN, 167°51.06ⲠW. 519 South of...44.73ⲠW. 521 The area bounded by straight lines...

2011-10-01

338

Rhode Island: Attorney General Patrick C. Lynch  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... been manufactured in the United States, it was shipped back into the country in a manner that did not satisfy the refrigeration storage conditions ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety

339

Rhode Island: Governor Donald L. Carcieri  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... of anti-counterfeiting technologies, but these technologies have not ... It does not change the law, and it does ... goal to ensure that any changes do not ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety

340

21 CFR 808.89 - Rhode Island.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...89 Section 808.89 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS...of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.89...of the act, and the Food and Drug...

2013-04-01

341

2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

2011-01-01

342

Aerial Radiological Survey of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station and Surrounding Area, Middletown, Pennsylvania.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An aerial radiological survey was performed over the area surrounding the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station during October 26 to 30, 1982. The survey covered an 82-square-kilometer area centered on the nuclear plant and encompassed the communities of Midd...

D. P. Colton

1983-01-01

343

The sustainability of island destinations: Tourism area life cycle and teleological perspectives. The case of Tenerife  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tourist destinations are in a state of continuous change. This development is more intense in the case of island destinations due to their geographic limitations. This paper considers the use of the tourism area life cycle model [Butler, R.W. (1980). The concept of a tourism area cycle of evolution: Implications for the management of resources. Canadian Geographer, 24, 5–12.] alongside

Juan Ramón Oreja Rodríguez; Eduardo Parra-López; Vanessa Yanes-Estévez

2008-01-01

344

A TROPICAL GARDEN FLORA, PLANTS CULTIVATED IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS AND OTHER TROPICAL AREAS.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pemberton, R.W. A Tropical Garden Flora, Plants Cultivated in the Hawaiian Islands and Other Tropical Areas. Economic Botany This is an invited book review of an important new reference book on plants cultivated in the tropical and subtropical areas of the world. This is the long awaited update of ...

345

9 CFR 72.3 - Areas quarantined in the Virgin Islands of the United States, the Northern Mariana Islands, the...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of Guam. 72.3 Section 72.3 Animals and...Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Island of Guam. The entire Territories of the Virgin...of the United States and the Island of Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and...

2013-01-01

346

33 CFR 334.920 - Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...AREA REGULATIONS § 334.920 Pacific Ocean off the east coast of San Clemente Island...The area. The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area extending easterly from...

2013-07-01

347

Capture zone area distributions for homogeneous nucleation and growth of islands during deposition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The size distribution of islands formed by homogeneous nucleation and growth during deposition is known to encode information about the nucleation mechanism. The same was recently proposed for the distribution, g(A), of areas, A, of capture zones (CZ) surrounding islands [1], where most atoms landing within a CZ aggregate with the associated island. We have developed a precise theory for g(A) whose evolution is driven by the nucleation of new islands [2]. g(A) has a complicated form controlled by details of the spatial aspects of nucleation. However, it is reasonably approximated by a Generalized Gamma distribution, g(A) ˜ A^? exp[-cA^n]. For compact 2D islands, one has n ˜ 1.5, and ? ˜ 3(i+2)/2 for critical size i. Here, ? follows from analysis of the creation of new small capture zones between nearby pairs of islands, and n from analysis of the likelihood that a new CZ overlaps an existing large CZ. [4pt] [1] Pimpinelli & Einstein, PRL 99 (2007) 226102; 104 (2010) 149602;[0pt] [2] Li, Han & Evans, PRL 104 (2010) 149601.

Evans, Jim; Han, Yong; Li, Maozhi

2011-03-01

348

The autocorrelation function for island areas on self-affine surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial distribution of regions that lie above contours of constant height through a self-affine surface is studied as a function of the Hurst exponent H. If the surface represents a landscape, these regions correspond to islands. When the surface represents the height difference for contacting surfaces, the regions correspond to mechanical contacts in the common bearing area model. The autocorrelation function C(?r) is defined as the probability that points separated by ?r are both within islands. The scaling of C has important implications for the stiffness and conductance of mechanical contacts. We find that its Fourier transform \\tilde {C}(q) scales as a power of the wavevector magnitude q: \\tilde {C}(q) \\propto q^{-\\mu } with ? = 2 + H rather than the value ? = 2 + 2H reported previously. An analytic argument for ? = 2 + H is presented using the distribution of areas contained in disconnected islands.

Ramisetti, Srinivasa B.; Campañá, Carlos; Anciaux, Guillaume; Molinari, Jean-Francois; Müser, Martin H.; Robbins, Mark O.

2011-06-01

349

Stratigraphic framework maps of the nearshore area of southern Long Island from Fire Island to Montauk Point, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The maps presented in this report (depth to Coastal Plain unconformity, Quaternary sediment thickness, paleochannel thickness, and modern sand thickness) are helpful for determining sand-resource availability for beach nourishment programs and understanding the influence that the inner-shelf framework of southern Long Island has on coastal processes and evolution. The maps showing structure of the Coastal Plain unconformity and thickness of overlying Quaternary sediment delineate the framework of the coastal region. The map showing the distribution and thickness of paleochannel fill indicates areas not suitable as sources for beach nourishment, assuming the channels contain muddy estuarine deposits. The areas between channels are Pleistocene glacial deposits and probably consist of coarse sediment that may be suitable for beach nourishment. These coarser-grained glacial deposits are the source for modern sand deposits. The modern sands have been reworked primarily from glacial deposits and a Cretaceous outcrop off Watch Hill. These reworked deposits provide well-sorted clean sand that have and will provide nourishment for southern Long Island beaches.

Foster, David S.; Swift, B. Ann; Schwab, William C.

1999-01-01

350

Use of arthropod rarity for area prioritisation: insights from the Azorean Islands.  

PubMed

We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at 'global' scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and 'regional' scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity.A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce. PMID:22479498

Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, François; Borges, Paulo A V

2012-03-30

351

Use of Arthropod Rarity for Area Prioritisation: Insights from the Azorean Islands  

PubMed Central

We investigated the conservation concern of Azorean forest fragments and the entire Terceira Island surface using arthropod species vulnerability as defined by the Kattan index, which is based on species rarity. Species rarity was evaluated according to geographical distribution (endemic vs. non endemic species), habitat specialization (distribution across biotopes) and population size (individuals collected in standardized samples). Geographical rarity was considered at ‘global’ scale (species endemic to the Azorean islands) and ‘regional’ scale (single island endemics). Measures of species vulnerability were combined into two indices of conservation concern for each forest fragment: (1) the Biodiversity Conservation Concern index, BCC, which reflects the average rarity score of the species present in a site, and (2) one proposed here and termed Biodiversity Conservation Weight, BCW, which reflects the sum of rarity scores of the same species assemblage. BCW was preferable to prioritise the areas with highest number of vulnerable species, whereas BCC helped the identification of areas with few, but highly threatened species due to a combination of different types of rarity. A novel approach is introduced in which BCC and BCW indices were also adapted to deal with probabilities of occurrence instead of presence/absence data. The new probabilistic indices, termed pBCC and pBCW, were applied to Terceira Island for which we modelled species distributions to reconstruct species occurrence with different degree of probability also in areas from which data were not available. The application of the probabilistic indices revealed that some island sectors occupied by secondary vegetation, and hence not included in the current set of protected areas, may in fact host some rare species. This result suggests that protecting marginal non-natural areas which are however reservoirs of vulnerable species may also be important, especially when areas with well preserved primary habitats are scarce.

Fattorini, Simone; Cardoso, Pedro; Rigal, Francois; Borges, Paulo A. V.

2012-01-01

352

Diurnal Variation of Precipitable Water over a Mountainous Area of Sumatra Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor at Koto Tabang, a mountainous area of Sumatra Island, Indonesia, are studied by analyzing the GPS-derived precipitable water, radiosonde data, and surface meteorological observation data. A permanent GPS receiving station was established at Koto Tabang in March of 2001. Radiosonde soundings were carried out at 3-h intervals to study the atmospheric water and energy

Peiming Wu; Jun-Ichi Hamada; Shuichi Mori; Yudi I. Tauhid; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Fujio Kimura

2003-01-01

353

Investigations of reported plant and animal health effects in the Three Mile Island area. Regulatory report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of investigations into reported problems with plants and animals which may be related to the operation of and accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are presented. The kinds of problems reported are listed, and potential areas of concern (such as the release of radioactive gases and drift from cooling tower plumes) are discussed. Specific case

G. E. Gears; G. LaRoche; J. Cable; B. Jaroslow; D. Smith

1980-01-01

354

INVESTIGATIONS OF REPORTED PLANT AND ANIMAL HEALTH EFFECTS IN THE THREE MILE ISLAND AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

The results of investigations into reported problems with plants and animals which may be related to the operation of and accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are presented. The kinds of problems reported are listed, and potential areas of concern (such as the ...

355

50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure...E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300âAlaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas...

2010-10-01

356

Numerical simulation of the 2002 Northern Rhodes Slide (Greece) and evaluation of the generated tsunami  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small landslides are very common along the submarine margins, due to steep slopes and continuous material deposition that increment mass instability and supply collapse occurrences, even without earthquake triggering. This kind of events can have relevant consequences when occurring close to the coast, because they are characterized by sudden change of velocity and relevant speed achievement, reflecting into high tsunamigenic potential. This is the case for example of the slide of Rhodes Island (Greece), named Northern Rhodes Slide (NRS), where unusual 3-4 m waves were registered on 24 March 2002, provoking some damage in the coastal stretch of the city of Rhodes (Papadopoulos et al., 2007). The event was not associated with earthquake occurrence, and eyewitnesses supported the hypothesis of a non-seismic source for the tsunami, placed 1 km offshore. Subsequent marine geophysical surveys (Sakellariou et al., 2002) evidenced the presence of several detachment niches at about 300-400 m depth along the northern steep slope, one of which can be considered responsible of the observed tsunami, fitting with the previously mentioned supposition. In this work, that is carried out in the frame of the European funded project NearToWarn, we evaluated the tsunami effects due to the NRS by means of numerical modelling: after having reconstructed the sliding body basing on morphological assumptions (obtaining an esteemed volume of 33 million m3), we simulated the sliding motion through the in-house built code UBO-BLOCK1, adopting a Lagrangian approach and splitting the sliding mass into a "chain" of interacting blocks. This provides the complete dynamics of the landslide, including the shape changes that relevantly influence the tsunami generation. After the application of an intermediate code, accounting for the slide impulse filtering through the water depth, the tsunami propagation in the sea around the island of Rhodes and up to near coasts of Turkey was simulated via the code UBO-TSUFD: this solves numerically the Navier-Stokes equation in the shallow water approximation, adopting a finite difference technique. It was then possible to estimate the most affected coastal stretches and to assess the effects of the NRS generated tsunami, comparing the computed wave heights with the observations. Papadopoulos G.A., Daskalaki E., Fokaefs A. (2007) Tsunamis generated by coastal and submarine landslides in the Mediterranean Sea. In: Lykousis V., Sakellariou D., Locat J. (eds.), Submarine Mass Movements and their Consequences, 415-422, Springer. Sakellariou D., Lykousis V., Rousakis G., Georgiou P. (2002). Slope failure and associated coastal erosion in tectonically active areas: The coastal zone of Rhodes city (Rhodos island) Greece. In: A. Yilmaz (ed.): Oceanography of Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea, 978-985, Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference Oct. 13-16, TUBITAK Publ., Ankara, Turkey.

Zaniboni, Filippo; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

2013-04-01

357

Geochemical exploration of the three most significant geothermal areas of Lesbos Island, Greece  

SciTech Connect

Lesbos Island has several thermal manifestations linked to extensional active faults that act as channels for the ascent of deep thermal fluids. The present work describes detailed geochemical exploration aimed at evaluating the potential of the Lesbos Island geothermal resource. Exploration was carried out on the three sites (Kalloni-Stipsi, Petra-Arenos and Polichnitos) that have the most favourable hydrogeological and structural setting on the island. Hydrogeochemical data reveal the presence between Kalloni and Stipsi of a shallow thermal aquifer with temperatures below boiling point, which coincides with carbopn dioxide and temperature anomalies in the overlying groundwaters. All the thermal waters in the study area have fairly similar physico-chemical features.

Fytikas, M.; Kavouridis, T.; Leonis, C. (Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration, 70 Messoghion St., 115 27 Athens (GR)); Marini, L. (Geotermica Italiana srl, Lungarno Mediceo 16, 56100 Pisa (IT))

1989-01-01

358

Monitoring river discharge with remotely sensed imagery using river island area as an indicator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

River discharge is an important parameter in understanding water cycles, and consistent long-term discharge records are necessary for related research. In practice, discharge records based on in situ measurement are often limited because of technological, economic, and institutional obstacles. Satellite remote sensing provides an attractive alternative way to measure river discharge by constructing an empirical rating curve between the parameter provided by remote sensing techniques and simultaneous ground discharge data. River width is a popular parameter for constructing the empirical curve, since change in river discharge can be represented by a change in river width. In some rectangular channels, however, river width does not change significantly with river discharge, so an alternative parameter is necessary. We analyze a novel technique using river island area as an indicator of discharge. A river island often has a flat terrain, and its area decreases with higher discharge. This technique is validated by three river islands in the Yangtze River in China. All 61 remotely sensed images acquired by the HuanJing (HJ) satellites from 2009 to 2010 were correlated with corresponding in situ discharge of the nearby Zhicheng hydrological station. The performance of fitted curves for inferring river discharge is validated using 36 HJ images taken in 2011, and the influence of remotely sensed imagery and river islands is discussed. All three river islands can be used as indicators of river discharge, although their performances are much different. For the river island with the best result, the mean accuracy of the estimates is less than 10% of the observed discharge, and all relative errors are within 20%, validating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

Ling, Feng; Cai, Xiaobin; Li, Wenbo; Xiao, Fei; Li, Xiaodong; Du, Yun

2012-01-01

359

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO). West African and Selected Island Coastal Marine Areas. Volume 1. Area 1, Azores. Area 2, Madeira Islands. Area 3, Casablanca SW. Area 4, Canary Islands. Area 5, Central Spanish Sahara. Area 6, Cape Blanc. Area 7, Cape Verde Islands. Area 8, Dakar.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1976-01-01

360

Factors affecting phytoplankton distribution and production in the Elephant Island area, Antarctica  

SciTech Connect

During the austral summer of four years, 1990 to 1993, studies on phytoplankton were performed in the Elephant Island area as one component of the US Antarctica Marine Living Resources program. In addition to continuous measurements (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, beam attenuation) made on ship's intake water, a profiling CTD-rosette unit was used to obtain water column characteristics (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, attenuation of solar radiation, beam attenuation) from the surface to 750m depth and also water samples from at least 10 depths for chemical and biological analyses. The sampling grid consisted of an average of 70 stations, all of which were occupied two times each year. The Elephant Island area is a transition zone between the rich coastal areas, where phytoplankton can develop dense blooms, and pelagic waters where the phytoplankton biomass is in general very low. A frontal zone was usually found to the north of Elephant Island and over the continental slope, and high phytoplankton biomass was in general associated with this frontal region. Although the location of this frontal system showed seasonal movement in a north-south direction, it seems to be a consistent feature from year to year. There seems to be considerable year-to-year variability in physical (water temperatures and salinity) and phytoplankton characteristics within the study area, in regard to both distributional patterns in surface waters and to profile characteristics in the upper 100m of the water column. With shallow upper mixed layer depths of less than 50 m, phytoplankton can attain relatively high concentrations. Optimum light conditions for growth occurred when the mixed layer was less than 55% of the euphotic zone. As the area around Elephant Island is characterized by relatively strong and frequent winds, the depth of the upper mixed layer at many stations approached the depth of the euphotic zone, with the result that growth of phytoplankton was light limited.

Helbling, E.W.

1993-01-01

361

Insular Area energy vulnerability, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands. Technical Appendix 1  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared in response to Section 1406 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 192-486). The Act directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to ``conduct a study of the implications of the unique vulnerabilities of the insular areas to an oil supply disruption,`` and to ``outline how the insular areas shall gain access to vital oil supplies during times of national emergency.`` The Act defines the insular areas to be the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in the Caribbean, and Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and Palau in the Pacific. This report is the analysis of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. In the study, ``unique vulnerabilities`` were defined as susceptibility to: (1) more frequent or more likely interruptions of oil supplies compared to the mainland, and/or (2) disproportionately larger or more likely economic losses in the event of an oil supply disruption. In order to asses unique vulnerabilities, the study examined in the insular areas` experience during past global disruptions of oil supplies and during local emergencies caused by natural disasters. The effects of several possible future global disruptions and local emergencies were also analyzed. Analyses were based on historical data, simulations using energy and economic models, and interviews with officials in the insular governments and the energy industry.

Stern, M.; Willard, E.E.; Efferding, S. [Ensys Energy & Systems, Inc., Flemington, NJ (United States)

1994-05-01

362

Access to Dental Care for Children in Rhode Island. Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home, and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who are low income or uninsured. Noting that dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common preventable chronic childhood disease, this Kids Count issue brief considers the extent to…

Katz, Linda; Fontes, Janice; Ross, Maureen; Lawrence, Robin; Andrews, John; Kernan, Sharon; Leddy, Tricia; O'Bara, Joan; Young, John

363

Mission hazard assessment for STARS Mission 1 (M1) in the Marshall Islands area  

SciTech Connect

A mission hazard assessment has been performed for the Strategic Target System Mission 1 (known as STARS M1) for hazards due to potential debris impact in the Marshall Islands area. The work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories as a result of discussion with Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) safety officers. The STARS M1 rocket will be launched from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), Hawaii, and deliver two payloads to within the viewing range of sensors located on the Kwajalein Atoll. The purpose of this work has been to estimate upper bounds for expected casualty rates and impact probability or the Marshall Islands areas which adjoin the STARS M1 instantaneous impact point (IIP) trace. This report documents the methodology and results of the analysis.

Outka, D.E.; LaFarge, R.A.

1993-07-01

364

HYBRID APPROACH FOR DESIGNING SUSTAINABLE POWER GENERATION SYSTEM IN OFF-GRID ISLAND AREA  

Microsoft Academic Search

For power generation in off-grid island area, hybrid approach with micro-grids is a good solution. Using a combination of photovoltaic modules, micro-hydro, solar thermal, diesel generator, storage devices and power conditioning systems can develop hybrid power system. The work as a whole is included resource assessment techniques, load analysis for an assumed load curve and optimisation of the different components

Saiful ISLAM; Johan DRIESEN; Ronnie BELMANS

365

Artificial island for installing oil drilling equipment in ice covered sea areas  

SciTech Connect

An artificial island for installing oil drilling equipment in ice covered sea areas, comprising barricades against ice which surround oil drilling equipment installed in ice covered seawater and whose respective top portions are projected above the surface of the sea-water, means provided at the bottom portions of the barricades so as to fix them to the sea-bottom, and inclined ice breaking walls provided at the outer sides of the barricades.

Oshima, M.; Yashima, N.

1982-04-27

366

Marine biofouling in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study on the characteristics of fouling communities in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea,\\u000a was conducted at four sites there. At each station, test panels on iron frames were hung on the mooring system at different\\u000a depths. Data on biofouling were mainly obtained by examination of the fouled test panels. Organisms attached to buoys and

Tao Yan; Wen-Xia Yan; Guan-He Liang; Yu Dong; Hua-Jie Wang; Yan Yan

2000-01-01

367

Seismic hazard assessment in central Ionian Islands area (Greece) based on stress release models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The long-term probabilistic seismic hazard of central Ionian Islands (Greece) is studied through the application of stress\\u000a release models. In order to identify statistically distinct regions, the study area is divided into two subareas, namely Kefalonia\\u000a and Lefkada, on the basis of seismotectonic properties. Previous results evidenced the existence of stress transfer and interaction\\u000a between the Kefalonia and Lefkada fault

Irene Votsi; George M. Tsaklidis; Eleftheria E. Papadimitriou

2011-01-01

368

Coconut Crabs as a Target for Promoting the Establishment of Marine Protected Areas on Green Island, Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following guidelines issued by the 5th World Parks Congress in 2003, Green Island, a tiny island located off the southeastern coast of Taiwan, was chosen by the Taiwan authorities as one of the leading sites for establishing a Marine Protected Area (MPA). We chose the coconut crab, Birgus latro, a species that has nearly vanished in Taiwan, as a \\

Chang-Po Chen; Shu-Ting Lin; Fang-Lin Wang

369

33 CFR 334.1460 - Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing and gunnery target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island; bombing...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1460 Atlantic Ocean and Vieques Sound, in vicinity of Culebra Island;...

2013-07-01

370

24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. Aerial photograph dated 22 April 1942, showing Gould Island from the northeast. Complex under construction includes shop building (large rectangle at north end of island, and firing pier (at far right). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

371

Intensity and delimitation of the night Urban Surface Heat Island over the Paris metropolitan area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Urban Heat Island is one of the main factors of the urban climate. Known for a long time, it corresponds to a temperature differential between urban and rural areas surrounding and was defined firstly from the temperatures measured in the conventional network weather stations or by mobile measurements. In the present study, we used the daily night MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product at 1 km resolution and during the years 2002-2011 in order to investigate the Urban Surface Heat Island (USHI) over the Paris metropolitan area (around 14 millions inhabitants, about 150 km from east to west and a little less from north to south). We calculated and used LST anomalies for the selected nights (clear sky) to overcome the seasonal and daily variations. The objective of this study is to propose a delimitation of USHI and study the relationship between the observed data points in the 9 weather stations of Météo France network and the surface temperatures of the satellite MODIS pixels. The different synthetic images, obtained from the mean, median of all the dates selected and a principal component analysis (PCA), show clearly high surface temperatures over dense urban areas and a strong decrease (around 9°C) from the center of Paris to about 30 km. Beyond the assessment of its intensity, the night USHI is defined by the Pettitt test performed on transects in all directions and shows logically the influence of topography and land use (dense urban areas vs. forest or agricultural areas).

Madelin, M.; Beltrando, G.; Sakhy, A.

2012-04-01

372

REMOTE SENSING OF IMPERVIOUS SURFACE AREA FOR IMPROVED HYDROLOGIC MODELING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impervious surface area (ISA), one of the consequences of urban development, has been used as an important indicator for environmental impacts of urbanization. In this study, we extracted ISA information for the state of Rhode Island, USA from 1-m spatial resolution true-color digital orthophotography data by an object-based classification. As the importance of ISA in the watersheds hydrology, we developed

Y. Zhou; Y. Q. Wang

373

British Combat Service Support during the Falkland Islands War: Considerations for Providing Operational Sustainment to Remote Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study analyzes British combat service support at the operational level during the 1982 Falkland Islands War and discusses important considerations for providing operational sustainment to remote areas. It begins with a brief discussion of the rapid d...

K. L. Privratsky

1986-01-01

374

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands Area During 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands area during 1979 are provided. The data presented are (1) tidal data, (2) times of moonrise and moonset, and (3) times of lunar phases. (Author)

R. de Violini

1979-01-01

375

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands Area during 1983.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands area during 1983 are provided. The data presented are (1) tidal data, (2) times of moonrise and moonset, and (3) times of lunar phases.

R. W. Dixon

1982-01-01

376

Educating people about importance of photoprotection: results of campaign on the islands in Dubrovnik area.  

PubMed

After an increasing number of skin cancer cases and some skin cancer deaths among young people in Dubrovnik area had been noted, a field research was done in the period from 2003 to 2007. The examinations were done on the islands in Dubrovnik area (Korcula, Mljet, Lopud, Sipan, Kolocep and on the peninsula Peljesac). Research tasks were collecting information on sun-protection behaviors and attitudes and usage of sun protecting factor products, detection of the presence of skin cancer in the area and advising those diagnosed ill about further medical procedure, educating and informing local population as well as local physicians in the area with investigation results. In spite of wide media campaign, more then half of examined people did not use sun protective factor (SPF) products. It can be concluded that better education about damaging effects of ultraviolet radiations as well as further education how to properly protect its adverse effects is required. PMID:19140281

Bakija-Konsuo, Ana; Muli?, Rosanda

2008-10-01

377

ALS surveys to monitor an active volcanic area: the case of Stromboli Island (Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Airborne laser scanning is today the most effective data acquisition technology for the production of high resolution, high quality DTMs (Digital Terrain Models). The only competing technique might be aerial photogrammetry with direct camera orientation by GPS/INS (Inertial Navigation Systems) and DTM generation by digital image correlation; with aerial digital cameras the automation of the workflow should not be far from that of the laser scanner. Nevertheless, the preference for the laser scanner is clear and unlikely to be reversed. Because of its characteristics (first and last pulse, penetration rate in forested areas, narrow field angles, independence on shadows and object textur), laser scanning is indeed better suited and more versatile than photogrammetry for DTM production in urban areas as well as in forested areas. Focused on the Island of Stromboli this work investigates whether airborne laser scanner systems can be effectively adopted to survey and monitor active volcanic areas. We present the results obtained from the analysis of ALS data collected on Stromboli Island before and after the last eruption at Stromboli occurred in February-April 2007. The analysis allowed to obtain quantitative data to identify the geometry of deformation features and evaluate the volumes of the displaced (failures and landslides) and emplaced (lava flows) mass along the of the Sciara del Fuoco slope. We focused on the capability of extracting accurate topographic data from ALS range measurements, despite the rough morphology, the presence of vegetation and the steepness of the island slopes. Beam intensity values were processed in order to identify different surface features related to lithology and roughness and to evidence changes induced by erosion and the lava effusion processes.

Nardinocchi, C.; Idda, B.; Marsella, M.

2009-04-01

378

Island sizes and capture zone areas in submonolayer deposition:? Scaling and factorization of the joint probability distribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The joint probability distribution (JPD) for island sizes, s, and capture zone areas, A, provides extensive information on the distribution of islands formed during submonolayer deposition. For irreversible island formation via homogeneous nucleation, this JPD is shown to display scaling of the type F(s/sav,A/Aav), where “av” denotes average values. The form of F reflects both a broad monomodal distribution of island sizes, and a significant spread of capture zone areas for each island size. A key ingredient determining this scaling behavior is the impact of each nucleation event on existing capture zone areas, which we quantify by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Combining this characterization of the spatial aspects of nucleation with a simplified but realistic factorization ansatz for the JPD, we provide a concise rate equation formulation for the variation of both the capture zone area and the island density with island size. This is achieved by analysis of the first two moments of the evolution equations for the JPD.

Evans, J. W.; Bartelt, M. C.

2002-12-01

379

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the Hong Kong Observatory. The urban heat island intensity, determined as the air-temperature difference between the selected urban/suburban area and the reference rural area (i.e., Ta Kuw Ling) with thin population and lush vegetation, was used for the analysis. Results showed stronger heat island effect during winter and nighttime than during summer and daytime. An investigation of the cooling and heating degree days indicate that all areas have observed higher number of cooling degree days. However, the cooling degree days were the maximum while heating degree days were the minimum in the urban area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui). Clearly, the minimum heating degree days and the maximum cooling degree days in the urban area were a direct consequence of urban heat island. The 10-year (i.e., from 1995 to 2005) average shows that Cheung Chau experienced the least number of cooling degree days while Lau Fau Shan experienced the highest number of heating degree days. Seemingly, the area of Cheung Chau offers better thermal comfort conditions with the minimum number of cooling and heating degree days.

Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Liu, Chun-Ho; Leung, Michael K. H.

2010-07-01

380

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the Hong Kong Observatory. The urban heat island intensity, determined as the air-temperature difference between the selected urban/suburban area and the reference rural area (i.e., Ta Kuw Ling) with thin population and lush vegetation, was used for the analysis. Results showed stronger heat island effect during winter and nighttime than during summer and daytime. An investigation of the cooling and heating degree days indicate that all areas have observed higher number of cooling degree days. However, the cooling degree days were the maximum while heating degree days were the minimum in the urban area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui). Clearly, the minimum heating degree days and the maximum cooling degree days in the urban area were a direct consequence of urban heat island. The 10-year (i.e., from 1995 to 2005) average shows that Cheung Chau experienced the least number of cooling degree days while Lau Fau Shan experienced the highest number of heating degree days. Seemingly, the area of Cheung Chau offers better thermal comfort conditions with the minimum number of cooling and heating degree days.

Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Liu, Chun-Ho; Leung, Michael K. H.

2011-03-01

381

Biogeographic and ecological regulation of disease: prevalence of Sin Nombre virus in island mice is related to island area, precipitation, and predator richness.  

PubMed

The relative roles of top-down and bottom-up forces in affecting disease prevalence in wild hosts is important for understanding disease dynamics and human disease risk. We found that the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the agent of a severe disease in humans (hantavirus pulmonary syndrome), in island deer mice from the eight California Channel Islands was greater with increased precipitation (a measure of productivity), greater island area, and fewer species of rodent predators. In finding a strong signal of the ecological forces affecting SNV prevalence, our work highlights the need for future work to understand the relative importance of average rodent density, population fluctuations, behavior, and specialist predators as they affect SNV prevalence. In addition to illustrating the importance of both bottom-up and top-down limitation of disease prevalence, our results suggest that predator richness may have important bearing on the risk of exposure to animal-borne diseases that affect humans. PMID:21508614

Orrock, John L; Allan, Brian F; Drost, Charles A

2011-05-01

382

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2011-01-01

383

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau, Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2010-01-01

384

Urban heat island and its effect on the cooling and heating demands in urban and suburban areas of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the urban heat island characteristics of four major areas of Hong Kong. The areas of study include\\u000a a densely populated and well-developed commercial area (i.e., Tsim Sha Tsui) and three suburban areas (i.e., Cheung Chau,\\u000a Lau Fau Shan and Sha Tin) with differing degrees of development. The weather station data of respective areas were acquired\\u000a from the

Rizwan Ahmed Memon; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; Michael K. H. Leung

2011-01-01

385

Geologic Map of the Upper Wolf Island Creek Watershed, Reidsville Area, Rockingham County, North Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map provides a foundation for hydrogeologic investigations in the Reidsville area of Rockingham County, north-central North Carolina. The 16-mi2 area within the Southeast Eden and Reidsville 7.5-min quadrangles includes the watershed of Wolf Island Creek and its tributary, Carroll Creek, upstream of their confluence. Layered metamorphic rocks in this area of the Milton terrane, here informally named the Chinqua-Penn metamorphic suite, include a heterogeneous mica gneiss and schist unit that contains interlayers and lenses of white-mica schist, felsic gneiss, amphibolite, and ultramafic rock; a felsic gneiss that contains interlayers of amphibolite, white-mica schist, and minor ultramafic lenses; and a migmatitic biotite gneiss. Crushed stone is produced from an active quarry in the felsic gneiss. Igneous intrusive rocks include a mafic-ultramafic assemblage that may have originated as mafic intrusive bodies containing ultramafic cumulates, a foliated two-mica granite informally named the granite of Reidsville, and unmetamorphosed Jurassic diabase dikes. The newly recognized Carroll Creek shear zone strikes roughly east-west and separates heterogeneous mica gneiss and schist to the north from structurally overlying felsic gneiss to the south. Regional amphibolite-facies metamorphism accompanied polyphase ductile deformation in the metamorphic rocks. Two phases of isoclinal to tight folding and related penetrative deformation, described as D1 and D2, were followed by phases of high-strain mylonitic deformation in shear zones and late gentle to open folding. Later brittle deformation produced minor faults, steep joints, foliation-parallel parting, and sheeting joints. The metamorphic and igneous rocks are mantled by saprolite and residual soil derived from weathering of the underlying bedrock, and unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium occupies the flood plains of Wolf Island Creek and its tributaries. The geologic map delineates lithologic and structural features that may act as barriers or conduits for ground-water flow. It provides a hydrogeologic framework for the upper Wolf Island Creek drainage basin, including coreholes and ground-water monitoring wells along two transects. Collaborative hydrogeologic investigations by the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the U.S. Geological Survey are in progress to increase understanding of the influence of geological features on ground-water quality, availability, and transport in an area representative of large areas in the west-central Piedmont.

Horton, J. Wright., Jr.; Geddes, Donald J., Jr.

2006-01-01

386

Geo-archeological survey inside the Cala san Giovanni area (Pianosa Island)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paleo-morphology of the Cala San Giovanni area (Pianosa Island, Tuscany) has been investigated by means of a new methodology based on the synergy between classical geophysical techniques (such as GeoRadar and Electric Resistivity Tomography) and AF Shallow Coring System. Inside this area a huge number of remnants of human settlements of various age was found during the archaeological surveys conducted by SBAT from 2004 to 2009. After the Roman presence, testified by wall remnants and pottery fragments, this area has been interested by at least two mass flux events that filled that depression and has been utilized as a burial area. The aim of this study was to define the presence and the distribution of the ancient settlement in this nowadays flat area, by means of an only-surface survey. As a result of our investigations we reconstructed the post-Roman age stratigraphical succession and the pre-Roman surface characterized by artificial terraces and the picking up of fresh waters inside huge "cisternae".

Principe, Claudia; Ghilardi, Andrea; Ducci, Silvia; Perazzi, Paola; Grandinetti, Giuditta; Firmati, Marco; Patèra, Anna

2010-05-01

387

The Life History and Trophic Relationship of the Ninespine Stickleback, 'Pungitius pungitius', in the Apostle Islands Area of Lake Superior.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ninespine stickleback is an important food of juvenile lake trout in the Apostle Islands area. It is the most numerous fish of the area and is distributed in deep waters during the winter and in shallow waters during the summer. Females grow faster th...

B. L. Griswold L. L. Smith

1973-01-01

388

Radiocarbon ages of lacustrine deposits in volcanic sequences of the Lomas Coloradas area, Socorro Island, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Extensive eruptions of alkalic basalt from low-elevation fissures and vents on the southern flank of the dormant volcano, Cerro Evermann, accompanied the most recent phase of volcanic activity on Socorro Island, and created the Lomas Coloradas, a broad, gently sloping terrain comprising the southern part of the island. The authors obtained [sup 14]C ages of 4690 [plus minus] 270 Bp (5000-5700 cal Bp) and 5040 [plus minus] 460 Bp (53090-6300 cal Bp) from lacustrine deposits that occur within volcanic sequences of the lower Lonas Coloradas. Apparently, the sediments accumulated within a topographic depression between two scoria cones shortly after they formed. The lacustrine environment was destroyed when the cones were breached by headward erosion of adjacent stream drainages. This was followed by the eruption of a thin basaltic flow from fissures near the base of the northernmost cone. The flow moved downslope for a short distance and into the drainages that presently bound the study area on the east and west. The flow postdates development of the present drainage system and may be very recent. These [sup 14]C data, along with historical accounts of volcanic activity over the last century, including submarine eruptions that occurred a few km west of Socorro in early 1993, underscore the high risk for explosive volcanism in the region and the need for a detailed volcanic hazards plan and seismic monitoring.

Farmer, J.D. (NASA-Ames Research Center, MS-239-4, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Farmer, M.C. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography and Anthropology); Berger, R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Depts. of Geography and Anthropology and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences)

1993-01-01

389

HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND  

EPA Science Inventory

Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

390

Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Groundwater in the Western Coastal Area in Jeju Volcanic Island, Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Residents in Jeju volcanic island use most part of water resources from groundwater. Actually, in the island, there exist no perennial streams or rivers due to extremely high infiltration rate of water into surface soils and rocks (basalt and trachyte). In the western part of Jeju Island, high pumping rate of wells caused great drawdown especially during drought period. By this current trend, great decline of groundwater level as well as seawater intrusion is predictable. According to drill data from 13 wells for monitoring seawater intrusion installed in the western part of the island by the authority of Jeju Special Governed Island, the geology of the western area is composed of five units: lava sequence (hyaloclastic breccia, acicular feldspar basalt, olivine basalt, aphanitic feldspar basalt, augite feldspar basalt, and porphyritic feldspar basalt), sedimentary layer (containing gravel and sand) intercalated in lava sequences, Seoguipo Formation (gravels, unconsolidated sands, shell fossils, and sandy mudstone), trachyandesite and tuff occurring in Seoguipo Formation, and U Formation. Geophysical well logging on the five monitoring wells (Panpo (PP), Kosan (KS), Shindo (SD), Ilgwa (IG), and Hamo (HM)), resulted in approximately 20~40 cps (counts per second) of natural gamma intensity in lava sequence. High gamma intensity of approximately 60 cps is noticeble in the sedimentary layer intercalated in lava sequence, and in Seoguipo Formation, especially clay minerals. Electric conductivity (EC) on PP, KS and IG wells showed 100~400 ?S/cm with fresh water range. However, EC on SD and HM wells increased up to around 20,000~10,000 ?S/cm with depth, which indicates variation from freshwater to salt water. Pumping tests were performed on nine monitoring wells in the range of 900~2,300m3/d and with an average discharge rate of 1,371m3/d. Among them, data from only five monitoring wells were used for pumping test analysis, since the other four wells were highly affected by tide. Transmissivity was estimated using transmissivity (T) ~ specific capacity (Q/s) relationsip: T = 0.99(Q/s)0.89/ proposed by Hamm et al. (2005). T estimates ranged from 21.9 to 2664.3m2/d, and Q/s estimates ranged from 32.4 to 7,143m2/d. The average drawdown is 12.9 m, between 0.1 and 40 m, presenting a wide variation of drawdown on different monitoring wells. From drill data, geophysical logs, and pumping tests, it is concluded that main aquifers develops in jointed parts in lava sequence, especially hyaloclastic breccia, and gravels and unconsolidated sands in Seoguipo Formation. Keywords: transmissivity, specific capacity, geophygical log, pumping test, Jeju volcainc Island Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by of the 21st Century Frontier R&D Program (project no. 3-4-3 of the Sustainable Water Resources Research Center) and by the 2nd stage of the BK21 Project, Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea.

Lee, S.; Hamm, S.; Lee, J.; Koh, G.; Hwang, S.

2008-12-01

391

Coral Reef Habitat Assessment for U.S. Marine Protected Area: U.S. Virgin Islands.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) is composed of the three main islands of St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas, and 54 small islands and keys. Several types of coral reefs, including patch, bank, barrier, and fringing reefs can be found in the waters surroun...

2009-01-01

392

Marine protected areas and resilience to sedimentation in the Solomon Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability of marine protected areas (MPAs) to provide protection from indirect stressors, via increased resilience afforded by decreased impact from direct stressors, remains an important and unresolved question about the role MPAs can play in broader conservation and resource management goals. Over a five-year period, we evaluated coral and fish community responses inside and outside three MPAs within the Roviana Lagoon system in Solomon Islands, where sedimentation pressure from upland logging is substantial. We found little evidence that MPAs decrease impact or improve conditions and instead found some potential declines in fish abundance. We also documented modest to high levels of poaching during this period. Where compliance with management is poor, and indirect stressors play a dominant role in determining ecosystem condition, as appears to be the case in Roviana Lagoon, MPAs may provide little management benefit.

Halpern, B. S.; Selkoe, K. A.; White, C.; Albert, S.; Aswani, S.; Lauer, M.

2013-03-01

393

Marine fouling in offshore areas east of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on results of the investigation of marine biofouling on offshore structures east of Hainan Island in the northern South China Sea. Two buoy investigation stations were deployed in Qiongdong (W1, 68 n miles offshore) and southern Qiongdong (J2, 23 n miles offshore) waters, respectively. At both sites, water depths were more than 100 meters. Test panels on iron frames were placed at 1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 m below the seawater surface, and exposed for 8 months from October 1989 to June 1990. The results indicated that hydroids, gooseneck barnacles and oysters were the most important fouling species in these offshore areas. Acorn barnacles were mainly found at Station J2. The maximum fouling accumulations were observed in near surface waters. Substantial reduction of biomass and species diversity occurred with increasing depth and distance from shore. Sources of fouling organisms and influences of environmental factors on the species distributions are discussed in this paper.

Yan, Tao; Yan, Wen-Xia; Dong, Yu; Wang, Hua-Jie; Yan, Yan; Liang, Guan-He

1999-09-01

394

Marine biofouling in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study on the characteristics of fouling communities in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea, was conducted at four sites there. At each station, test panels on iron frames were hung on the mooring system at different depths. Data on biofouling were mainly obtained by examination of the fouled test panels. Organisms attached to buoys and anchors were scraped off and examined also. The results showed that the thickness and biomass of marine growth that increased the fluid loading on offshore installations depended to a large extent on hard foulers, i. e. mollusks and acorn barnacles. Algae, hydroids, stalked barnacles and bryozoans were important fouling species. The occurrence frequency and biomass of acorn barnacles decreased with increasing distance from the shore.

Yan, Tao; Yan, Wen-Xia; Liang, Guan-He; Dong, Yu; Wang, Hua-Jie; Yan, Yan

2000-06-01

395

Simushir (January 15, 2009) and Samoa (September 30, 2009) tsunami recording in the area of South Kuril Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Institute of Marine Geology & Geophysics (the Far East Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences) carried out long wave measurements in the area of South Kuril Islands with the purpose of tsunami recording closely to the seismic active zone and study long wave spectra variability depending of weather conditions. Bottom pressure gauges were installed in several harbors of Shikotan Island, near Cape Lovtsov (north-eastern end of Kunashir Island), in the Kitoviy Bay (Iturup Island) and near Cape Van-der-Lind (Urup Island). Sakhalin Tsunami Center has a cable telemetry tsunami warning station in the Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island). Two tsunamis - a remote Samoa (September 30) and nearby Simushir tsunami (January 15) were recorded by different gauges in the area of South Kuril Islands and by telemetry station in Severo-Kurilsk. To examine spectral properties of long wave oscillations at each gauge, we calculated power spectral estimation using two different data segments (both 1 day length): the period preceding the tsunami event, we identified as "normal" and selected for analysis of the background signal; the "tsunami period" included tsunami caused oscillations. The spectral maxima at each station were different however they are mainly the same for each gauge for the two states ("normal" and "tsunami"). For example, well-expressed peaks with period 19 and 20 min were found in power spectra in Malokurilskaya Harbor and near Cape Van-der-Lind. Numerical modeling was used to examine spatial structure of eigen modes in different harbors and frequency-selective properties of the shelf of South Kuril islands. In the first case a peak with period 19 min is associated with zeroth resonance mode of harbor oscillations. In the case of Van-der-Lind gauge a peak with period 20 min is caused by shelf resonance effect. These examples show a great effect of local bottom topography on tsunami height on the coast

Shevchenko, Georgy; Chernov, Anton; Kovalev, Peter; Ivelskaya, Tatyana; Loskutov, Artem; Shishkin, Alexander

2010-05-01

396

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO). South America and Selected Island Coastal Marine Areas, Atlantic Islands. Volume 3. Area 17 - Tierra del Fuego, Area 18 - Falkland Islands, Area 19 -South Georgia, Area 20 - Tristan da Cunha Group, Area 21 - Trindade, Area 22 - St. Helena, Area 23 - Ascension, Area 24 - St. Peter and Paul Rocks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1977-01-01

397

Core area analysis at semi-deciduous forest islands in the Comoé National Park, NE Ivory Coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the protection of forest-interior species in both natural forest islands and anthropogenic forest fragments knowledge\\u000a on the size of forest-core areas is a central issue. In an intact mosaic of semi-deciduous forests and savanna in the Comoé\\u000a National Park 31 forest islands were selected (2.1–146.1 ha). Values for the depth-of-edge influence (DEI) of the study area\\u000a recently published range from

Klaus J. Hennenberg; Bettina Orthmann; Ingo Steinke; Stefan Porembski

2008-01-01

398

Glacial and periglacial deposits of the Tumbledown Cliffs area, James Ross Island, West Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Investigations of the glacial geology of an ice-free area between local glaciers on western James Ross Island have shown that recent glaciation consists of small cirque glaciers and outlet glaciers from the central icefields. Erratics are evidence of an earlier, more widespread glaciation. Two till types are found in the area, a thin, erratic-bearing older diamicton interpreted as a lodgement till or a glaciotectonite and a younger, local till of supraglacial origin forming the recent terminal moraines. The present grounding line lies close to the sea level, resulting in subglacial deposition. A former more extended glacier was grounded further out in the Prins Gustav Channel. Frost action is intense in the cold, continental climate and large volumes of talus are produced. Rock glaciers are common, probably of both talus and glacier derived origin. The glacial and periglacial features, including a kame terrace and a raised beach, imply that the area has been ice-free throughout the Holocene and possibly longer.

Lundqvist, Jan; Lilliesköld, Marianne; Östmark, Karin

1995-02-01

399

Two-dimensional vs three-dimensional interpretation comparison in High Island area  

SciTech Connect

A structural seismic interpretation comparison involving two-dimensional (2-D) vs three-dimensional (3-D) data from the High Island area of offshore Texas reveals significant interpretative advantages in using 3-D seismic mapping procedures. Differences in fault delineation and the positioning of structural highs and lows are illustrated using computer contour maps and time slice/vertical section compositions derived through interactive workstation application. Incorporated into the comparison are the following studies: (1) structural mapping of 2-D grid and 3-D volume over a common area; (2) correlation of synthetic seismograms with the seismic data in order to calculate phase-matching filters; (3) measurement of areal extent of anomalous amplitude events associated with hydrocarbon-bearing Pleistocene sands, based on interactive amplitude extraction and interactively derived reflection strength attribute; and (4) amplitude vs offset (AVO) calculations of anomalous amplitude events. The continuous volumetric nature of 3-D seismic data allows accurate interpretation of faults and horizons both temporally and laterally. The extension of such interpreted events out of the vertical plane, which conventional 2-D seismic data attempts to image, clearly invokes a great amount of subjectivity into the exploration task. In many instances this subjectivity can be tolerated. However, optimal field development requires the precise structural description of subsurface features that only a dense coverage survey can provide.

Snyder, G.L.

1989-03-01

400

Spatiotemporal dynamics of ecological variation of waterbird habitats in Dongtan area of Chongming Island  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on Landsat TM images, we explored the pattern of variation of suitable waterbird habitats from 1990 to 2008 in the Dongtan area of Chongming Island at the Changjiang (Yangtze) River mouth. By applying our highly accurate indicator model ( R=0.999, P<0.01), we quantified the variations of fluctuation intensity for local waterbird habitats during 1990-2008, and for the main waterbird groups (Anatidae, Charadriidae, Ardeidae and Laridae) from 2006 to 2008, to evaluate the impact of habitat quantity change on the waterbird habitat status and the population dynamics of the different waterbird groups. The results show that the aquaculture ponds (AP) and the Scirpus mariqueter zone (SMZ) underwent drastic habitat changes during certain periods (AP: 1997-2000, 2000-2003, 2005-2008; SMZ: 1997-2000), and the fluctuation intensity differed among habitat types in the order AP>SMZ>TSH (total suitable habitat)>BSA (bare mud flat and shallow water area). The abandonment of tracts of aquaculture ponds in Dongtan in mid-2006 brought about an intensive population fluctuation, caused by rapidly changing habitat with the population expanding to adjacent areas. At present, Anatidae and Ardeidae are threatened in the Dongtan area with declining populations because of their very "picky" habitat requirements (i.e., high reliance on AP). The Charadriidae experienced enormous population declines in the late 1990s, however, they have since recovered to normal levels as habitat change has stabilized. Our findings suggest that the current challenges for habitat management are the protection and stabilization of AP and SMZ habitats.

Fan, Xuezhong; Zhang, Liquan

2012-05-01

401

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands Area During 1994.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island and the Barking Sands area during 1994 are provided. The data presented are: (1) Tidal data; (2) times of moonrise and moonset; (3) times of lunar phases; and (4) times of sunrise and sunset. B...

C. J. Fisk B. C. Cohenour

1993-01-01

402

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands Area during 1992.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, California San Nicolas Island, California and the Barking Sands Area, Hawaii during 1992 are provided. The data presented are (1) Tidal data, (2) times of moonrise and moonset, (3) times of lunar phases, and (4) ...

C. J. Fisk B. C. Cohenour

1991-01-01

403

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicholas Island, and the Barking Sands Area during 1986.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island, and the Barking Sands Area during 1986 are provided. The data presented are (1) tidal data, (2) times of moonrise and moonset, (3) times of lunar phases, and (4) times of sunrise and sunset. K...

R. Dixon

1985-01-01

404

Tidal and Lunar Data for Point Mugu, San Nicholas Island, and the Barking Sands Area During 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic lunar and tidal data for Point Mugu, San Nicolas Island and the Barking Sands Area during 1990 are provided. The data presented are (1) Tidal data, (2) times of moonrise and moonset, (3) times of lunar phases, and (4) times of sunrise and sunset. Ke...

C. Fisk

1990-01-01

405

Timing of Late Pliocene to Middle Pleistocene tectonic events in Rhodes (Greece) inferred from magneto-biostratigraphy and 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of a volcaniclastic layer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discovered a volcaniclastic layer in the Plio-Pleistocene coastal sequences on the island of Rhodes (Aegean fore-arc, Greece). Here, we present an integrated isotopic, magnetostratigraphic, and biostratigraphic (planktonic foraminifers) study for the Haraki section, where this layer is found intercalated in several meters of sedimentary rocks corresponding to the Lindos Bay clay Member of the Rhodes Formation. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the volcaniclastic layer provides an age of 1.89 ± 0.09 Ma, which is consistent with our planktonic foraminiferal data. Magnetostratigraphic results show that the entire Haraki section is of normal polarity and according to the isotopic results this corresponds to the Olduvai subchron (1.95-1.77 Ma). The new age determination provides severe constraints for deciphering the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of Rhodes since the Late Pliocene, which can be summarized in the following: (1) 500 to 600 m drowning during the latest Pliocene that could be related to the westward motion of the Anatolian Plate; (2) at least 520 m of uplift at around 1.4-1.3 Ma related to activity of the sinistral strike-slip of the Pliny Trench, the deep Rhodes basin being separated from the island of Rhodes; (3) a counterclockwise rotation of Rhodes, younger than 1.2-1.1 Ma, and possibly synchronous with the young clockwise rotation of the western Aegean arc.

Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Münch, Philippe; Quillévéré, Frédéric; Moissette, Pierre; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Krijgsman, Wout; Verati, Chrystèle; Lécuyer, Christophe

2006-10-01

406

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...31, operating a vessel, or otherwise approaching within 1/4 nautical mile of, Spider Island or any of the four small islets lying immediately west of Spider Island. (d) May 1 through August 31, operating a cruise ship on Johns Hopkins...

2010-07-01

407

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...31, operating a vessel, or otherwise approaching within 1/4 nautical mile of, Spider Island or any of the four small islets lying immediately west of Spider Island. (d) May 1 through August 31, operating a cruise ship on Johns Hopkins...

2009-07-01

408

36 CFR 13.1178 - Closed waters, islands and other areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...31, operating a vessel, or otherwise approaching within 1/4 nautical mile of, Spider Island or any of the four small islets lying immediately west of Spider Island. (d) May 1 through August 31, operating a cruise ship on Johns Hopkins...

2013-07-01

409

Rethinking Biodiversity Conservation Effectiveness and Evaluation in the National Protected Areas Systems of Tropical Islands: The Case of Jamaica and the Dominican Republic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Island conservation theory and practice with regard to conservation of tropical terrestrial biodiversity in protected areas systems has yet to be adequately addressed in conservation literature. This knowledge gap is identified as a key contributor to the adoption of scientific principles for in situ biodiversity conservation, and “universal” conservation and protected area management paradigms that are unsuitable for island contexts

Suzanne Mae Camille Davis

2010-01-01

410

LIFE-FORMS OF MOSS SPECIES IN DEFROSTING AREAS OF KING GEORGE ISLAND, SOUTH SHETHLAND ISLANDS, ANTARCTICA FORMAS DE VIDA DE ESPÉCIES DE MUSGOS DE ÁREAS DE DEGELO DA ILHA REI GEORGE, ARQUIPÉLAGO SHETLANDS DO SUL, ANTÁRTICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The colonization form of moss species depends upon the genetic and environment conditions. The life-forms of moss species in the ice-free areas of the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, have been evaluated in the present work. The majority of the species occurs in tuft forms (59%), followed by cushions (31%). Few species occur in form of

Denise Pinheiro; Antonio Batista PEREIRA

411

77 FR 13147 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Northeastern University, Forsyth Street, Shillman Hall, Room 220, Boston, MA. The agenda will include: A presentation about the geology of Boston Harbor Islands; elections of officers; bylaws review; park update; and, public comment. The meeting will...

2012-03-05

412

Changes to dunes caused by 4WD vehicle tracks in beach camping areas of Fraser Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although dunes are known to have very low tolerance to human disturbance and provide irreplaceable ecosystem services (e.g. erosion co ntrol, critical habitat and nesting sites), in dunes serve as campsites for large numbers of people (~ 90,000 p.a.) on the ocean-exposed shores of Fraser Island, Australia. On the island, camp sites are located in the established dunes and can

Thomas A. Schlacher; Luke M. C. Thompson

413

Source areas and long-range transport of pollen from continental land to Tenerife (Canary Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Canary Islands, due to their geographical position, constitute an adequate site for the study of long-range pollen transport from the surrounding land masses. In this study, we analyzed airborne pollen counts at two sites: Santa Cruz de Tenerife (SCO), at sea level corresponding to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and Izaña at 2,367 m.a.s.l. corresponding to the free troposphere (FT), for the years 2006 and 2007. We used three approaches to describe pollen transport: (1) a classification of provenances with an ANOVA test to describe pollen count differences between sectors; (2) a study of special events of high pollen concentrations, taking into consideration the corresponding meteorological synoptic pattern responsible for transport and back trajectories; and (3) a source-receptor model applied to a selection of the pollen taxa to show pollen source areas. Our results indicate several extra-regional pollen transport episodes to Tenerife. The main provenances were: (1) the Mediterranean region, especially the southern Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, through the trade winds in the MBL. These episodes were characterized by the presence of pollen from trees ( Casuarina, Olea, Quercus perennial and deciduous types) mixed with pollen from herbs ( Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae and Poaceae wild type). (2) The Saharan sector, through transport at the MBL level carrying pollen principally from herbs (Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type) and, in one case, Casuarina pollen, uplifted to the free troposphere. And (3) the Sahel, characterized by low pollen concentrations of Arecaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae wild type in sporadic episodes. This research shows that sporadic events of long-range pollen transport need to be taken into consideration in Tenerife as possible responsible agents in respiratory allergy episodes. In particular, it is estimated that 89-97% of annual counts of the highly allergenous Olea originates from extra-regional sources in southern Iberia and northern Africa.

Izquierdo, Rebeca; Belmonte, Jordina; Avila, Anna; Alarcón, Marta; Cuevas, Emilio; Alonso-Pérez, Silvia

2011-01-01

414

The burden of liver cancer in Asians and Pacific Islanders in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area, 1990 through 2004  

PubMed Central

Background No previous U.S. study has examined time trends in the incidence rate of liver cancer in the high-risk Asian/Pacific Islander population. We evaluated liver cancer incidence trends in Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese males and females in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area of California between 1990 and 2004. Methods Populations at risk were estimated using the cohort component demographic method. Annual percentage changes (APCs) in age-adjusted incidence rates of primary liver cancer among Asians/Pacific Islanders in the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry were calculated using joinpoint regression analysis. Results The incidence rate of liver cancer between 1990 and 2004 did not change significantly in Asian/Pacific Islander males or females overall. However, the incidence rate declined, albeit statistically non-significantly, in Chinese males (APC =?1.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) =?3.4%, 0.3%], Japanese males (APC = ?4.9%, 95% CI =?10.7%, 1.2%), and Japanese females (APC =?3.6%, 95% CI =?8.9%, 2.0%). Incidence rates remained consistently high for Vietnamese, Korean, and Filipino males and females. Trends in the incidence rate of hepatocellular carcinoma were comparable to those for liver cancer. While disparities in liver cancer incidence between Asians/Pacific Islanders and other racial/ethnic groups diminished between 1990–1994 and 2000–2004, those among Asian subgroups increased. Conclusions Liver cancer continues to affect Asian/Pacific Islander Americans disproportionately, with consistently high incidence rates in most subgroups. Culturally targeted prevention methods are needed to reduce the high rates of liver cancer in this growing population in the U.S.

Chang, Ellen T.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.; Gomez, Scarlett L.; Le, Gem M.; Clarke, Christina A.; So, Samuel K. S.; Glaser, Sally L.

2009-01-01

415

NONTARGET ARTHROPODS CAPTURED IN CUE-LURE-BAITED BUCKET TRAPS AT AREA-WIDE PEST MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION SITES IN KAMUELA AND KULA, HAWAIIAN ISLANDS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Seventy and 2,371 specimens or about 1.1 and 34.4 individuals per day were captured in melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), cue-lure monitoring/suppression traps at two area-wide integrated pest management implementation sites in Kula (Maui Island) and Kamuela (Hawaii Island), respectively...

416

A Case Study in the Effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs): the Islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The islands of Bonaire and Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, were both mapped along their leeward coasts for dominant coral community and other benthic cover in the early 1980s. This mapping effort offers a unique baseline for comparing changes in the benthic community of the two islands since that time, particularly given the marked differences between the two islands. Bonaire is well-protected and completely surrounded by a marine protected area (MPA), which includes two no-diving marine reserves; additionally, Bonaire's population is only around 15,000. In contrast, the island of Curacao is home to 140,000 inhabitants and marine protection is limited, with a reef area of 600 ha established as a "paper" park (i.e., little enforcement). Video transects collected by SCUBA over the reefs were collected on Bonaire in January of 2008; when compared to data from 1985, coral cover had declined in the shallowest portion of the reef (< 5 m) and was mostly the result of declines in Acropora spp., whereas head corals increased. Transects closest to the no-diving marine reserves showed higher coral cover and diversity than transects located farther from the reserves. Satellite remote sensing techniques were used to create landscape-scale reef maps along the leeward coasts of both islands, which could differentiate areas of high hard coral cover (> 20%), predominantly sand (> 50%) and areas where hard coral and sand were mixed with soft corals, sea whips and marine plants. These modern maps (2007-09) were groundtruthed using the video data collected on Bonaire for accuracy and then compared to the early 1980s maps of the reefs on both islands. Bonaire experienced declines in coral cover overall and the remaining coral was increasingly patchy; however, changes in patch characteristics were not significant over the time period, but status as a marine reserve and the sheltering of the shoreline did appear to buffer against coral loss. Surprisingly, the island of Curacao did not experience a decline in total coral cover, but did become increasingly patchy, significantly more so than Bonaire. The Curacao Underwater Park afforded no additional protection against coral loss or fragmentation than an adjacent unprotected area of reef. The difference between the two islands in coral loss versus fragmentation has the potential for a unique natural experiment to study the effects of habitat fragmentation in the absence of overall habitat loss at the landscape scale. The Bonaire National Marine Park could benefit by restricting visitors to its most frequented dive sites by increasing the cost of entry into a tiered pay system, thus generating more income for education and management of the park, as well as deterring some divers from these overused sites. Satellite remote sensing-derived maps are useful for rapid reef mapping and can be utilized for comparison to ancillary maps created by more traditional methods. Satellite-derived maps can only distinguish benthic habitats coarsely (3-4 habitat classes) and are only as reliable as their source data, they benefit greatly from fieldwork to determine depth, geographic location, and benthic habitat cover in real time.

Relles, Noelle J.

417

33 CFR 117.905 - Rhode Island [Reserved  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.905 Schuylkill River. (a) The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Schuylkill...

2013-07-01

418

Further Dosimetry Studies at Rhode Island Nuclear Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The RINSC is a 2 mega-watt, light water cooled and graphite moderated reactor that has a graphite thermal column built as a user facility for sample irradiation. Over the past decade, after the reactor conversion from a highly-enriched uranium core to a low-enriched one, flux and dose measurements and calculations had been performed in the thermal column to update the ex-core parameters and to predict the effect from in-core fuel burn-up and rearrangement. The most recent data from measurements and calculations that have been made at the RINSC thermal column since October of 2005 are reported. Results of additional tests performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory against a calibrated neutron source indicate that, in the range from 5 mSv to 35 mSv, the neutron dose measured by the TLD dosimeters was about 5% to 10% higher than the delivered dose.

Reciniello, R. N.; Holden, N. E.; Hu, J.-P.; Johnson, D. G.; Middleton, M.; Tehan, T. N.

2009-08-01

419

Further Dosimetry Studies at Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center.  

SciTech Connect

The RINSC is a 2 mega-watt, light water and graphite moderated and cooled reactor that has a graphite thermal column built as a user facility for sample irradiation. Over the past decade, after the reactor conversion from a highly-enriched uranium core to a low-enriched one, flux and dose measurements and calculations had been performed in the thermal column to update the ex-core parameters and to predict the effect from in-core fuel burn-up and rearrangement. The most recent data from measurements and calculations that have been made at the RINSC thermal column since October of 2005 are reported.

Reciniello,R.N.; Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.-P.; Johnson, D.G.; Meddleton, M.; Tehan, T.N.

2008-05-05

420

Online Learning: Addressing Challenges and Seizing Opportunities. Rhode Island  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|America's K-12 education system faces three significant challenges: (1) increased global demands for skilled workers, (2) significant financial shortfalls, and (3) a looming teacher shortage. Independently, these factors present significant challenges for U.S. schools. In combination, they create a national imperative for swift action to create a…

Alliance for Excellent Education, 2010

2010-01-01

421

Moving after the CrisisA Prospective Study of Three Mile Island Area Population Mobility  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted to determine the effect of the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) on residential mobility and population composition. The entire population living within five miles of TMI was registered shortly after the accident and traced one year later to identify movers. An estimated 15% of movers (about 2% of total residents) gave TMI as

Marilyn K. Goldhaber; Peter S. Houts; Renee Disabella

1983-01-01

422

Cancer incidence among residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1982–1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe Pennsylvania Department of Health established a registry of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident in 1979. Over 93% of the population present on the day of the accident within a 5-mile radius was enrolled and interviewed. We used the registry to investigate the potential cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure among the TMI population.

Yueh-Ying Han; Ada O. Youk; Howell Sasser; Evelyn O. Talbott

2011-01-01

423

High level shore features of Jersey (Channel Islands) and adjacent areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past marine surfaces occur between present low tide and 45 m mean sea level (msl) in the Channel Islands and along adjacent French coasts, particularly on Jersey. A detailed historical review of the early work concerned with the mapping of the range of marine surfaces is supported by detailed levelling surveys including a new one of the cove of Le Pulec

John Renouf; Les James

2011-01-01

424

Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO), South America and Selected Island Coastal Marine Areas, West Coast. Volume 4. Area 25 - Magellan Strait West, Area 26 - Gulf of Penas, Area 27 - Valdivia, Area 28 - Valparaiso, Area 29 - Coquimbo, Area 30 - Antofagasta.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents marine climatological data for specific coastal areas in 21 different tables including weather occurrence, wind direction and speed, cloud amount, ceiling height, visibility, precipitation, dry bulb, relative humidity, air-sea tempera...

1979-01-01

425

Gas venting rates from submarine hydrothermal areas around the island of Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas seeps were located, by echo sounding, SCUBA divers and ROV observations, at hydrothermal sites around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic Volcanic Arc. Samples were collected by SCUBA divers and by a ROV from water depths between 3 and 110 m. Fifty-six flow rates from 39 individual seeps were measured and these ranged from 0.2 to 18.51 h?1

P. R. Dando; J. A. Hughes; Y. Leahy; S. J. Niven; L. J. Taylor; C. Smith

1995-01-01

426

271. MONUMENT AT ENTRANCE TO SENIOR OFFICERS' QUARTERS AREA: A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

271. MONUMENT AT ENTRANCE TO SENIOR OFFICERS' QUARTERS AREA: A BROWNSTONE CARTOUCHE SALVAGED FROM A BUILDING ERECTED IN 1894-95 BY THE STATE OF RHODE ISLAND AS PART OF ITS QUONSET POINT NATIONAL GUARD RESERVATION AND SET UP AS A FREE-STANDING MONUMENT, SUPPORTED BY BRICK PIERS, WHEN THE NAVAL AIR STATION WAS DEVELOPED IN 1940-41; LOCATED AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF GLENN CURTIS DRIVE AND RANGER STREET. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

427

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. Aerial photograph (1973) looking south across Gould Island. Firing pier (still possessing third and fourth levels) in foreground. Pitched roof extending from south end of firing pier marks location of frame approach between pier and shop building (center rear) and power plant (to right of shop). Photo courtesy of Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport, Rhode Island. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

428

Coral Reef Habitat Assessment for U.S. Marine Protected Areas: Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) is part of the 290-km long Mariana Islands Archipelago which encompasses the 14 islands of the CNMI, numerous offshore banks, and the U.S. Territory of Guam. The southernmost islands of the CNMI (Rot...

2009-01-01

429

A geological-acoustical framework for an integrated environmental evaluation in Mediterranean marine protected areas. Marettimo Island, a case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A GEOLOGICAL-ACOUSTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION IN MEDITERRANEAN MARINE PROTECTED AREAS. MARETTIMO ISLAND, A CASE STUDY. M. Agate (1), R. Catalano (1), R. Chemello (2), C. Lo Iacono (1) &S. Riggio (2) (1)Dipartimento di Geologia e Geodesia dell'Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 26, 90123 Palermo, clageo@katamail.com, rcatal@unipa.it (2)Dipartimento di Biologia animale dell'Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 18, 90123 Palermo,rchemello@unipa.it New analytical methods have been designed to support an objective quantitative evaluation of geological components whose results dictate the lines for a sustainable use of the natural resources. We tried to adopt the fundaments of the seascape concept, based on the thematic elements of landscape ecology and translated into terms fitting with the principles of coastal ecology. The seascape concept is central to our view of the environment and is referred to as an integrated unit (Environmental Unit) resulting from a long multidisciplinary approach, carried out in both the field and the laboratory by an interdisciplinary team of experts. Side Scan Sonar and Multi Beam acoustical data collected in the Marettimo and Ustica Islands (south-western Tyrrhenian Sea))inner shelves, make possible to sketch geomorphological and sedimentological maps, whose details have been tested as deep as 45 m in diving surveys. On the basis of the collected data sets, the inner shelf (0-60 m) has been subdivided into different portions, following the concept of the Environmental Unit (E.U). Every E.U. presents constant morphological and sedimentological features that, probably, can be associated to specified biological communities. In order to find the relationships between physical settings and communities, geological thematic maps are eventually overlaid and fitted to macrobenthic and fishery spatial distribution maps. The result, based on the rule of the Environmental Impact Assessment, puts into evidence the major environmental features and territorial links, useful for correct evaluation and management of a Marine Protected Area. This strategy has informed the GEBEC project, designed to sketch an overall picture of some coastal areas in Southern and Central Mediterranean (Egadi Islands, S. Maria di Castellabate coast, Ustica Island) needing protection and sustainable development.

Agate, M.; Catalano, R.; Chemello, R.; Lo Iacono, C.; Riggio, S.

2003-04-01

430

LIS - Lampedusa Island Spectrometer - for atmospheric compounds observations in the Mediterranean area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The LIS (Lampedusa Island Spectrometer) is an instrument for the measurements of solar radiation scattered along the vertical direction in the UV-Visible spectral regions. By means of DOAS methodology application, the vertical contents of atmospheric compounds as NO2 and ozone, are calculated. LIS will be installed at the Lampedusa Island Climatic Station (35.50' N, 12.54' E) with the aim to monitor the physical and the chemical processes of air masses exchange between tropical and mid-latitudes regions. The heart of the spectrometer is the monochromator, where the luminous bundle is decomposed in its wavelengths thanks to a holographic spherical diffraction grating of 1200 grooves/mm (with spectral dispersion of 2.4 nm/mm at 300 nm, and spectral resolution of 0,5 nm). This last is moved by a stepper motor allowing inquiring the spectral range from 250 to 800 nm, in successive windows of 60 nm each. The Optical Mechanic Unit (OMU) comprises, beyond to the monochromator, the incoming radiation input. This can be positioned for external radiation or internal calibration lamps measurements by means of another stepper motor. Furthermore, a series of mechanical and electrical device as the filter wheel, 2 calibration lamps (HG and QJ), optical diodes and temperature sensors are utilized to optimize the performance of the instrument and to ensure the goodness of the measurements. The Electronic Control Unit (ECU) is located under the OMU and is composed by a monoboard computer, steppers and CCD driver devices. Its main tasks are the measurements and the storage of the collected data by means of LISDAS (LIS Data Acquisition Software). The first results for NO2 vertical column obtained during the LIS testing phase are presented. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:The author Daniele Bortoli was financially supported by the Subprograma Ciência e Tecnologia do 3° Quadro Comunitário de Apoio.

Bortoli, D.; Giovanelli, G.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

2003-04-01

431

Geophysical reconnaissance of prospective geothermal areas on the Island of Hawaii using electrical methods  

SciTech Connect

Resistivity data from several areas were compiled, analyzed, and interpreted in terms of possible geologic models. On the basis of this analysis alone, two areas have been ruled out for possible geothermal exploitation, two have been interpreted to have a moderate-temperature resource, and two have been interpreted to have a high-temperature resource. The two areas which have been ruled out are the Keaau and South Point areas. The Kawaihae area and the lower northwest rift zone of Hualalai appear to have anomalous resistivity structures which suggest a moderate-temperature resource in each of these areas. Finally, specific areas in the lower southwest and lower east rift zones of Kilaauea have been outlined as locations where high-temperature fluids may exist at depth.

Kauahikaua, J.; Mattice, M.

1981-12-01

432

Geophysical reconnaissance of prospective geothermal areas on the island of Hawaii using electrical methods  

SciTech Connect

Resistivity data from several areas were compiled, analyzed, and interpreted in terms of possible geologic models. On the basis of this analysis alone, two areas have been ruled out for possible geothermal exploitation, two have been interpreted to have a moderate-temperature resource, and two have been interpreted to have a high-temperature resource. The two areas which have been ruled out are the Keaau and South Point areas. The Kawaihae area and the lower northwest rift zone of Hualalai appear to have anomalous resistivity structures, which suggest a moderate-temperature resource in each of these areas. Finally, specific areas in the lower southwest and lower east rift zones of Kilauea have been outlined as locations where high-temperature fluids may exist at depth.

Kauahikaua, J.; Mattice, M.

1981-07-01

433

Boston Harbor Islands National Park Area: 2002 Islands Biodiversity. Proceedings of a Seminar Held in Cambridge, Massachusetts on May 30, 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Biodiversity Seminar took place on May 30, 2002, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The seminar provided a rorum for scientists and land managers to present and exchange information about the Boston Harbor Islands' diverse natural resources. The Partnership...

B. Jacobsen J. Pederson

2003-01-01

434

Anthozoa from a subtidal hydrothermal area of Milos Island (Aegean Sea), with notes on the construction potential of the scleractinian coral Madracis pharensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eleven species of Anthozoa (two Octocorallia and nine Hexa?corallia) were found on subtidal (2 to 90 m depth) hard substrata off Palaeochori Bay (SE Milos Island), an area characterised by submarine hydrothermalism. For each species, depth distribution and habitat were recorded. Their ecology at Milos was consistent with previous knowledge in other areas of the Mediterranean Sea. The corallites of

Carla Morri; Dimitris Vafidis; Andrea Peirano; Chariton Charles Chintiroglou; Carlo Nike Bianchi

2000-01-01

435

Ida Rhodes and the dreams of a human computer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the spring of 1952, Ida Rhodes outlined her vision of the digital future in a talk entitled “The human computer's dreams of the future”, which she gave in Los Angeles at a conference sponsored by the Institute of Radio Engineers, a precursor of the IEEE Computer Society. Rhodes described an electronic computer and a computing environment surprisingly similar to

J. E. Tomayko

2000-01-01

436

A GIS for the Antarctic specially managed area of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

A GIS is proposed as a tool for the managing plan for the Antarctic specially managed area (ASMA) in Admiralty Bay. The ASMA\\u000a comprises the area considered to be within the glacial drainage basin of the bay. Furthermore, it includes part of SSSI No.\\u000a 8 adjacent to the area but outside of the glacial drainage basin. Three stations and six

Jefferson Cardia Simões; Fo A. Ferron; Matthias Braun; J. Arigony Neto; F. E. Aquino

2001-01-01

437

Pond inlet, northern Baffin island: The structure of an Eskimo resource area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure and yield of hunting, trapping and fishing areas around Pond Inlet in northern Baffin Land are analyzed on the basis of interviews with local Eskimos. Despite the abandonment of outlying Eskimo camps and the concentration of population in the central settlement of Pond Inlet since the 1960's, virtually all the former hunting and fishing areas continue to be

Erhard Treude

1977-01-01

438

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point Light; extending in a direction...degrees true to Pyramid Head Light. (2) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point Light; extending in a...

2009-07-01

439

33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point Light; extending in a direction...degrees true to Pyramid Head Light. (2) The waters of the Pacific Ocean within an area beginning at China Point Light; extending in a...

2010-07-01

440

A Sharp Continent-Ocean Transition in the Area of the Canary Islands: Evidence From Upper Mantle and Lower Crustal Xenoliths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our present information on passive margins rests almost exclusively on seismic and density data. An important exception is the west Iberia margin where petrological and geochemical information on crustal and mantle rocks have been made available through drilling experiments. In order to increase our information about, and understanding of, passive margins and their mode of formation, more information on crustal and mantle rocks along different types of passive margins are needed. In the area of the Canary Islands such information has been obtained through the study of mantle and deep crustal xenoliths brought to the surface by basaltic magmas. In-situ laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS mineral analyses have enabled us to "see through" the effects of the Canary Islands event and obtain robust information about the original (pre-Canarian) chemical character of the crust and upper mantle on which these islands are built. Our studies show that the lithosphere beneath the Canary Islands originated as highly refractory N-MORB type oceanic mantle overlain by highly refractory N-MORB crust. Both the lithospheric mantle and lower crust have been metasomatized to different degrees by a variety of fluid and melts. The enriched material is commonly concentrated along grain boundaries and cracks through mineral grains, suggesting that the metasomatism is relatively recent, and is thus associated with the Canary Islands magmatism. The original, strongly depleted trace element patterns and the low 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios typical of the oceanic lithosphere are preserved in the minerals in the least metasomatized rocks (e.g. LaN/LuN<0.1 in orthopyroxene and 87Sr/86Sr=0.7027-0.7029 in clinopyroxene in mantle xenoliths). The compositions of the most depleted gabbro samples from the different islands are closely similar, implying that there was no significant change in chemistry during the early stages of formation of the Atlantic oceanic crust in this area. Strongly depleted gabbros similar to those collected in Fuerteventura have also been retrieved in the MARK area along the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Furthermore, we have found no evidence of continental material that might reflect attenuated continental lithosphere in this area. The easternmost Canary Islands, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, appear to overlap the lower part of the continental slope of Africa. The presence of normal oceanic lithosphere beneath these islands implies that the continent-ocean transition in the Canary Islands area must be relatively sharp, in contrast to the passive non-volcanic margin further north along the coast of Morocco, along the Iberia peninsula, and in many other areas. Our data also contradict the hypothesis that a mantle plume was present in this area during the opening of the Atlantic Ocean.

Neumann, E.; Vannucci, R.; Tiepolo, M.; Griffin, W. L.; Pearson, N. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

2005-05-01

441

Acute coronary syndromes related to bio-climate in a Mediterranean area. The case of Ierapetra, Crete Island, Greece.  

PubMed

The occurrence of non-fatal acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is examined in relation with the local bioclimatic conditions in the Ierapetra area, in the southernmost part of Crete Island, Greece, during the period 2004-2007. Daily ACS counts and corresponding meteorological parameters, such as maximum and minimum air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were analyzed. Besides, the daily values of the human thermal index, physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) was evaluated. Pearson's ?(2) test and generalized linear models (GLM) with Poisson distribution were applied. The ACS syndromes present a multiple variation within the year, with the primary maximum in August and the secondary in May, while relative high ACS frequencies exist in early winter time. The impact of the weather variability on the ACS incidence is not statistically significant (C.L. 95%). PMID:22774800

Nastos, Panagiotis T; Giaouzaki, Katerina N; Kampanis, Nikos A; Matzarakis, Andreas

2012-07-10

442

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the withdrawing its notice of intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii. Groundwater quality in and adjacent to Kilauea`s east rift zone (KERZ), is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. Two segments of KERZ lie within the Puna District. These segments are the middle east rift zone (KERZ) and lower east rift zone (LERZ). The degree of mixing between meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the also is discussed.

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01

443

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii (DRAFT)  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17,1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its notice of intent (Fed. Regis. 575433) of February 14,1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Groundwater quality inside and outside the lower east rift zone (LERZ) of Kilauea is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. The degree of mixing between meteoric water, sea water, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the LERZ also is discussed. Finally, groundwater pathways and use in the Puna District are discussed. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey publications and open-file reports.

Staub, W.P.

1994-06-01

444

Determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions on two small Greek islands: is ecotourism possible at coastal protected areas?  

PubMed

A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass 'seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors. PMID:22538319

Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

2012-04-27

445

Environmental Data Collected with Automated Field Station at the Upper Blakeley Island Disposal Area, Mobile, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the system of instruments and the automated field station used by the WES for the acquisition of environmental data in support of field experiments on methods of densifying dredged material in containment areas at Upper Blakely Islan...

M. H. Smith H. M. Floyd H. W. West

1977-01-01

446

Evidence of Macroalgal Colonization on Newly Ice-Free Areas following Glacial Retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica  

PubMed Central

Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem.

Quartino, Maria Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

2013-01-01

447

Mortality among the residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1979-1992.  

PubMed

The largest U.S. population exposed to low-level radioactivity released by an accident at a nuclear power plant is composed of residents near the Three Mile Island (TMI) Plant on 28 March 1979. This paper (a collaboration of The University of Pittsburgh and the Pennsylvania Department of Health) reports on the mortality experience of the 32,135 members in this cohort for 1979-1992. We analyzed standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) using a local comparison population and performed relative risk regression modeling to assess overall mortality and specific cancer risks by confounding factors and radiation-related exposure variables. Total mortality was significantly elevated for both men and women (SMRs = 109 and 118, respectively). All heart disease accounted for 43.3% of total deaths and demonstrated elevated SMRs for heart disease of 113 and 130 for men and women, respectively; however, when controlling for confounders and natural background radiation, these elevations in heart disease were no longer evident. Overall cancer mortality was similar in this cohort as compared to the local population (male SMR = 100; female SMR = 101). In the relative risk modeling, there was a significant effect for all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue in males in relation to natural background exposure (p = 0.04). However, no trend was noted. We found a significant linear trend for female breast cancer risk in relation to increasing levels of TMI-related likely [gamma]-exposure (p = 0.02). Although such a relationship has been noted in other investigations, emissions from the TMI incident were significantly lower than in other documented studies. Therefore, it is unlikely that this observed increase is related to radiation exposure on the day of the accident. The mortality surveillance of this cohort does not provide consistent evidence that radioactivity released during the TMI accident has a significant impact on the mortality experience of this cohort to date. However, continued follow-up of these individuals will provide a more comprehensive description of the morbidity and mortality experience of the cohort. PMID:10856029

Talbott, E O; Youk, A O; McHugh, K P; Shire, J D; Zhang, A; Murphy, B P; Engberg, R A

2000-06-01

448

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...178 58.95 W 6 Semisopochnoi I 51 53.10 N 179 53.11 E 51 53.10 N 179 46.55 E 51 48.84 N 179 46.55 E 51 48.89 N 179 53.11 E Note: Each area is delineated by connecting the coordinates in the order listed...

2011-10-01

449

50 CFR Table 23 to Part 679 - Aleutian Islands Coral Habitat Protection Areas  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...178 58.95 W 6 Semisopochnoi I 51 53.10 N 179 53.11 E 51 53.10 N 179 46.55 E 51 48.84 N 179 46.55 E 51 48.89 N 179 53.11 E Note: Each area is delineated by connecting the coordinates in the order listed...

2012-10-01

450

Preparation of a 1:25000 Landsat map for assessment of burnt area on Etajima Island  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Etajima fire of 1978 in Japan was used to assess the accuracy of a method of classification, mapping and area estimation of the devastation caused by forest fire using Landsat MSS data. The classification and mapping method developed was limited to field sizes of about 10 km × 10 km, and the registration of Landsat data for mapping was

S. Tanaka; H. Kimura; Y. Suga

1983-01-01

451

Repeat Measurements of Seismic Noise at the Waiotapu Geothermal Area, North Island, NZ  

SciTech Connect

The amplitudes of seismic ground noise were remeasured at 66 sites in the Waiotapu and Reporoa geothermal areas in 1995 to determine whether amplitudes had changed since the first survey in 1970. In both 1995 and 1970 high levels of seismic noise occurred in two localities, one at Waiotapu and one at Reporoa. The elevated levels of seismic noise at most sites are thought to be caused by surface or near-surface geothermal activity. At seven sites in the Waiotapu area seismic noise levels were almost the same in 1995 as in 1970, indicating no change in the intensity of the source of the geothermal seismic noise. At most other sites the 1995 seismic noise levels were different to those measured in 1970, although at sites with high levels of seismic noise the differences were usually less than at sites with low levels of seismic noise.

Whiteford, P.C.

1995-01-01

452

Surficial Geologic Map of the Pocasset-Provincetown-Cuttyhunk-Nantucket 24-Quadrangle Area of Cape Cod and Islands, Southeast Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surficial geologic map layer shows the distribution of nonlithified earth materials at land surface in an area of 24 7.5-minute quadrangles (555 mi2 total) in southeast Massachusetts. Across Massachusetts, these materials range from a few feet to more than 500 ft in thickness. They overlie bedrock, which crops out in upland hills and as resistant ledges in valley areas. On Cape Cod and adjacent islands, these materials completely cover the bedrock surface. The geologic map differentiates surficial materials of Quaternary age on the basis of their lithologic characteristics (such as grain size and sedimentary structures), constructional geomorphic features, stratigraphic relations, and age. Surficial earth materials significantly affect human use of the land, and an accurate description of their distribution is particularly important for assessing water resources, construction aggregate resources, and earth-surface hazards, and for making land-use decisions. This work is part of a comprehensive study to produce a statewide digital map of the surficial geology at a 1:24,000-scale level of accuracy. This report includes explanatory text (PDF), quadrangle maps at 1:24,000 scale (PDF files), GIS data layers (ArcGIS shapefiles), metadata for the GIS layers, scanned topographic base maps (TIF), and a readme.txt file.

Stone, Byron D.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.

2006-01-01

453

Salmonella infections in Antarctic fauna and island populations of wildlife exposed to human activities in coastal areas of Australia.  

PubMed

Salmonella infections in Antarctic wildlife were first reported in 1970 and in a search for evidence linking isolations with exposure to human activities, a comparison was made of serovars reported from marine fauna in the Antarctic region from 1982-2004 with those from marine mammals in the Northern hemisphere. This revealed that 10 (83%) Salmonella enterica serovars isolated from Antarctic penguins and seals were classifiable in high-frequency (HF) quotients for serovars prevalent in humans and domesticated animals. In Australia, 16 (90%) HF serovars were isolated from marine birds and mammals compared with 12 (86%) HF serovars reported from marine mammals in the Northern hemisphere. In Western Australia, HF serovars from marine species were also recorded in humans, livestock, mussels, effluents and island populations of wildlife in urban coastal areas. Low-frequency S. enterica serovars were rarely detected in humans and not detected in seagulls or marine species. The isolation of S. Enteritidis phage type 4 (PT4), PT8 and PT23 strains from Adélie penguins and a diversity of HF serovars reported from marine fauna in the Antarctic region and coastal areas of Australia, signal the possibility of transient serovars and endemic Salmonella strains recycling back to humans from southern latitudes in marine foodstuffs and feed ingredients. PMID:18789175

Iveson, J B; Shellam, G R; Bradshaw, S D; Smith, D W; Mackenzie, J S; Mofflin, R G

2008-09-15

454

INDICATORS AND STANDARDS OF QUALITY AT AN URBAN-PROXIMATE PARK: LITTER AND GRAFFITI AT BOSTON HARBOR ISLANDS NATIONAL RECREATION AREA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines visitor norms for litter and graffiti at Boston Harbor Islands Nation- al Recreation Area, an urban-proximate park. Keep America Beautiful (KAB), a non-profit organiza- tion, has developed two visual methods to monitor litter - the Litter Index approach and Photometric Index\\/ Grid approach. Both methods utilize a series of photographs illustrating a range of litter accumulation. This

Megha Budruk

455

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

50 Ç Wildlife and Fisheries Ç 11 Ç 2011-10-01 Ç 2011-10-01 Ç false Ç Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing Ç 24 Ç Table 24 to Part 679 Ç Wildlife and Fisheries Ç FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...

2011-10-01

456

50 CFR Table 24 to Part 679 - Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

50 Ç Wildlife and Fisheries Ç 13 Ç 2012-10-01 Ç 2012-10-01 Ç false Ç Except as Noted, Locations in the Aleutian Islands Habitat Conservation Area Open to Nonpelagic Trawl Fishing Ç 24 Ç Table 24 to Part 679 Ç Wildlife and Fisheries Ç FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC...

2012-10-01

457

Could the San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuge Serve to Protect Marine Areas? Building on Existing Institutions and Legal Authorities to Create Marine Protected Areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuge (San Juan NWR) is comprised of 83 small islands, rocks, and reefs scattered throughout the San Juan Archipelago in the inland waters of Washington State. Current guidelines, set forth by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), advise vessels to stay 200 yards offshore from refuge sites to provide a marine buffer for

Cristen Don

2002-01-01

458

McPac field (Matagorda Island Block 487-L) new gas reserves in a mature area  

SciTech Connect

The McPac field produces gas and gas condensates from lower Miocene Marginulina ascensionensis sands. These sands were deposited in a wave-dominated delta front or strandplain environment. The field was discovered in 1988 and has proven reserves of 60-70 bcf with probable reserves in the 100 bcf range. McPac field lies adjacent to Cove field, discovered in 1966, which has produced 140+ bcf. The McPac discovery resulted from the recognition of an undrilled fault block reinforced by a differential pressure seal. The majority of the reserves in the two fields occurs in the two normally pressured sands, the ME and MF. Both fields overlie a complexly faulted shale diapir with hydrocarbons present only on the west half of the structure. Hydrocarbon entrapment is enhanced by the presence of differential pressure traps resulting in gas columns (1,500 ft, 457 m) unusual for the Gulf Coast. Although numerous shallower sands produce on the structure, none have the long columns associated with the ME and MF reservoirs. The same conditions responsible for these gas columns are present on other uplifts in the Marg. A trend as well as other trends of onshore and offshore Texas. A knowledge of these trapping phenomena should aid in a better understanding of geology in this area and serve as a guide to highgrade the numerous fault traps associated with similar trends such as the currently active ROB. L-ROB. M trend.

McCullough, J. (TXO Production Corp., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-09-01

459

FEEDING AREAS OF ARCTIC TERNS (Sterna paradisaea) AND COMMON TERNS (Sterna hirundo) BREEDING ON MACHIAS SEAL ISLAND, NEW BRUNSWICK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Machias Seal Island (MSI) is a 9.5 ha, treeless island located at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy, 20 km south of Grand Manan. It is designated a Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) Migratory Bird Sanctuary and managed by CWS because it is the breeding grounds of a large number of seabirds, including both arctic and common terns. The Atlantic

Amie L. Black; Antony W. Diamond

2005-01-01

460

33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...San Pablo Bay adjacent to the westerly shore of Mare Island with a radius of 4,700 yards, centered at a point bearing 316° true, 3,605 yards, from Mare Island Strait Light 1, with limiting true bearings...

2013-07-01

461

33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...San Pablo Bay adjacent to the westerly shore of Mare Island with a radius of 4,700 yards, centered at a point bearing 316° true, 3,605 yards, from Mare Island Strait Light 1, with limiting true bearings...

2009-07-01

462

33 CFR 334.1160 - San Pablo Bay, Calif.; target practice area, Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...San Pablo Bay adjacent to the westerly shore of Mare Island with a radius of 4,700 yards, centered at a point bearing 316° true, 3,605 yards, from Mare Island Strait Light 1, with limiting true bearings...

2010-07-01

463

Distribution and ecology of Ophionotus victoriae Bell, 1902 (Ophiuroidea, Echinodermata) in the South Shetland Islands area (Antarctica)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a distribution analysis for Ophionotus victoriae Bell, 1902, based on abundance data obtained during the Bentart 95 Expedition, on a macrozoobenthos sampling transect from north of Livingston Island to the Antarctic Peninsula, with 24 Agassiz trawls carried out at depths of 40- 850 m. This ophiuroid seems characteristic of the macrobenthic assemblages south of Livingston Island and Deception,

F. Moya; A. Ramos; E. Manjón-Cabeza

464

Epiphytic bryophytes growing on Laurus azorica (Seub.) Franco in three laurel forest areas in Tenerife (Canary Islands)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examined bryophyte species growing on Laurus azorica, in three localities of the laurel forest in Tenerife (Canary Islands), in order to determine differences in species composition, richness and cover, that depend on variations in mist frequency and density. Among the 35 bryophyte species found (26 liverworts and nine mosses), 16 occurred in all three locations while nine species occurred in only one location. Detrended correspondence analysis and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the epiphyte-phorophyte relationship varied in terms of cover, richness and bryophyte composition, depending on the humidity conditions (related to mist frequency and plot height) and tree age. In spite of differences in the dominant species found at each locality, the community types have many species in common and may be seen as a natural unit of the communities involved. Variation in the dominant species at each locality is mainly related to a trade off between humidity conditions and tree diameter, and the speed of the successional processes. Plot aspect was the only variable among those considered with no significant influence, which might be related to the closed canopy conditions. Variation in cover, richness and bryophyte composition related to plot height and tree diameter increased in the drier location. Cover was positively related to species richness in all analyses. This is related to low diversity during initial colonization and the fact that the highest biomass species, related to later successional stages, also occur on younger trees, especially in the more humid areas.

González-Mancebo, Juana M.; Romaguera, Francisco; Losada-Lima, Ana; Suárez, Andrés

2004-05-01

465

Hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater using multivariate statistical analysis and tritium in the mountainous area of Jeju Island, South Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The baseline groundwater quality of Jeju volcanic island was investigated for the mountainous area where natural area is dominant and basaltic rocks and hydrovolcanic tuffs are distributed. Principal component analysis (PCA) results showed that principal component (PC) 1 represented natural mineralization by CO2- charged water and PC 2 corresponded to contamination from nitrate sources among four PCs considered. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was performed to PC scores generated from PCA to reduce clustering biases due to mutually-dependant variables, which resulted in 5 sample groups; high-altitude springs, low- mineral water, nitrate-contaminated water, intermediate-mineral water and high-mineral water which are distinguished by total dissolved solids (TDS), nitrate concentration and water type. High-mineral water has higher PCO2 and calcite saturation states than other groups. The high-mineral water also has 3H values lower than 1.5 TU indicating contribution of old groundwater is significant while low-mineral water has 3H values of about 3 TU which is close to those in rainwater. Geographically, the high-mineral water is concentrated in the southwestern area accompanying with intermediate-mineral water. This feature is likely to be related to (1) the presence of extensive trachytic rocks which could form locally isolating aquifers to enable prolonged water-rock interactions under high PCO2 and (2) higher location of low-permeable hydrovolcanic tuffs in subsurface in the southern area which increases chances to tap the aquifers below the hydrovolcanic tuffs. Cumulative probability of TDS showed two break points of 50 and 150 mg/L which distinguished high-altitude springs, low-mineral water and high-mineral water. Cumulative probability of nitrate provided possible threshold values for anthropogenic contamination of 2.5 mg/L and 5.5 mg/L. 32% of samples have nitrate concentration higher than 2.5 mg/L indicating high vulnerability to surface contamination sources in the mountainous area. These threshold values were consistent with the result of PCA and HCA. PCA and HCA are more effective than other threshold calculating statistics because PCA and HCA have implication of geochemical processes and anthropogenic contamination. It is suggested that PCA and HCA could be used as complementary method for determining threshold values.

Koh, D.; Chae, G.; Kang, B.; Koh, G.; Yoon, Y.; Ko, K.; Park, K.

2008-12-01

466

Metagenomic profiles of free-living archaea, bacteria and small eukaryotes in coastal areas of Sichang island, Thailand  

PubMed Central

Background Tha Wang and Tham Phang coasts, though situated at similar oceanographic positions on Sichang island, Chonburi province, Thailand, are different in bay geography and amount of municipal disturbances. These affect the marine ecosystems. The study used metagenomics combined with 16S and 18S rDNA pyrosequencing to identify types and distributions of archaea, bacteria, fungi and small eukaryotes of sizes ranges 0.45 and ~30 ?m. Results Following the open bay geography and minimal municipal sewages, Tham Phang coast showed the cleaner water properties, described by color, salinity, pH, conductivity and percent dissolved oxygen. The 16S and 18S rDNA metagenomic profiles for Tha Wang and Tham Phang coasts revealed many differences, highlighting by low Lennon and Yue & Clayton theta similarity indices (66.03-73.03% for 16S rDNA profiles, 2.85-25.38% for 18S rDNA profiles). For 16S rDNA, the percent compositions of species belonging to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Gammatimonadetes, Tenericutes, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, Chlamydiae, Euryarchaeota, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Thermotogae and Aquificae were higher or distinctly present in Tha Wang. In Tham Phang, except Actinobacteria, the fewer number of prokaryotic species existed. For 18S rDNA, fungi represented 74.745% of the species in Tha Wang, whereas only 6.728% in Tham Phang. Basidiomycota (71.157%) and Ascomycota (3.060%) were the major phyla in Tha Wang. Indeed, Tha Wang-to-Tham Phang percent composition ratios for fungi Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota were 1264.701 and 25.422, respectively. In Tham Phang, Brachiopoda (lamp shells) and Mollusca (snails) accounted for 80.380% of the 18S rDNA species detected, and their proportions were approximately tenfold greater than those in Tha Wang. Overall, coastal Tham Phang comprised abundant animal species. Conclusions Tha Wang contained numerous archaea, bacteria and fungi, many of which could synthesize useful biotechnology gas and enzymes that could also function in high-saline and high-temperature conditions. Tham Phang contained less abundant archaea, bacteria and fungi, and the majority of the extracted metagenomes belonged to animal kingdom. Many microorganisms in Tham Phang were essential for nutrient-recycling and pharmaceuticals, for instances, Streptomyces, Pennicilium and Saccharomyces. Together, the study provided metagenomic profiles of free-living prokaryotes and eukaryotes in coastal areas of Sichang island.

2012-01-01

467

50 CFR 665.598 - Management area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...PRIA fishery management area is the EEZ seaward of Palmyra Atoll, Kingman Reef, Jarvis Island, Baker Island, Howland Island, Johnston Atoll, and Wake Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas with the inner boundary a line coterminous with the seaward boundaries...

2012-10-01

468

Survey of Tourism in the State of Rhode Island (Including a Special Report on Block Island).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The survey was programmed to determine and define the existing and projected tourism potential; to recommend immediate action programs; to suggest changes and improvements in existing facilities; determine the need for, size, location, design, cost and fe...

1964-01-01

469

Hydrogeology, water quality, and saltwater intrusion in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in the offshore area near Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and Tybee Island, Georgia, 1999-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To assess the hydrogeology, water quality, and the potential for saltwater intrusion in the offshore Upper Floridan aquifer, a scientific investigation was conducted near Tybee Island, Georgia, and Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Four temporary wells were drilled at 7, 8, 10, and 15 miles to the northeast of Tybee Island, and one temporary well was drilled in Calibogue Sound west of Hilton Head Island. The Upper Floridan aquifer at the offshore and Calibogue sites includes the unconsolidated calcareous quartz sand, calcareous quartz sandstone, and sandy limestone of the Oligocene Lazaretto Creek and Tiger Leap Formations, and the limestone of the late Eocene Ocala Limestone and middle Avon Park Formation. At the 7-, 10-, and 15-mile sites, the upper confining unit between the Upper Floridan and surficial aquifers correlates to the Miocene Marks Head Formation. Paleochannel incisions have completely removed the upper confining unit at the Calibogue site and all but a 0.8-foot-thick interval of the confining unit at the 8-mile site, raising concern about the potential for saltwater intrusion through the paleochannel-fill sediments at these two sites. The paleochannel incisions at the Calibogue and 8-mile sites are filled with fine- and coarse-grained sediments, respectively. The hydrogeologic setting and the vertical hydraulic gradients at the 7- and 10-mile sites favored the absence of saltwater intrusion during predevelopment. After decades of onshore water use in Georgia and South Carolina, the 0-foot contour in the regional cone of depression of the Upper Floridan aquifer is estimated to have been at the general location of the 7- and 10-mile sites by the mid-1950s and at or past the 15-mile site by the 1980s. The upward vertical hydraulic gradient reversed, but the presence of more than 17 feet of upper confining unit impeded the downward movement of saltwater from the surficial aquifer to the Upper Floridan aquifer at the 7- and 10-mile sites. At the 10-mile site, the chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan borehole-water sample and the pore-water samples from the Oligocene and Eocene strata support the conclusion of no noticeable modern saltwater intrusion in the Upper Floridan aquifer. The chloride concentration of 370 milligrams per liter in the borehole-water sample at the 7-mile site from the Upper Floridan aquifer at 78 to 135 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988 is considerably higher than the chloride concentration of 25 milligrams per liter measured at the 10-mile site. The higher concentration probably is the result of downward leakage of saltwater through the confining unit at the 7-mile site or could reflect downward leakage of saltwater through an even thinner layer of the upper confining unit beneath the paleochannel to the northeast and lateral movement (encroachment) from the paleochannel to the 7-mile site. Carbon-14 concentrations at both sites, however, are low and indicate that most of the water is relict fresh ground water. The hydrogeology at the 15-mile site includes 17 feet of the upper confining unit. The chloride concentration in the Upper Floridan aquifer is 6,800 milligrams per liter. The setting for the Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the 15-mile site is interpreted as a transitional mixing zone between relict freshwater and relict saltwater. At the Calibogue site, 35 feet of fine-grained paleochannel-fill sediments overlies the Oligocene strata of the Upper Floridan aquifer. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the paleochannel fill at this site is similar to the upper confining unit and effectively replaces the missing upper confining unit. Chloride concentrations and low carbon-14 and tritium concentrations in borehole water from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and low chloride concentrations in pore water from the upper confining unit indicate relict freshwater confined in the Upper Floridan aquifer at the Calibogue site. The coarse-grained paleochannel-f

Falls, W. Fred; Ransom, Camille; Landmeyer, James E.; Reuber, Eric J.; Edwards, Lucy E.

2005-01-01

470

Long-term follow-up of the residents of the Three Mile Island accident area: 1979-1998.  

PubMed

The Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant accident (1979) prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Health to initiate a cohort mortality study in the TMI accident area. This study is significant because of the long follow-up (1979-1998), large cohort size (32,135), and evidence from earlier reports indicating increased cancer risks. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated to assess the mortality experience of the cohort compared with a local population. Relative risk (RR) regression modeling was performed to assess cause-specific mortality associated with radiation-related exposure variables after adjustment for individual smoking and lifestyle factors. Overall cancer mortality in this cohort was similar to the local population [SMRs = 103.7 (male); 99.8 (female)]. RR modeling showed neither maximum gamma nor likely gamma exposure was a significant predictor of all malignant neoplasms; bronchus, trachea, and lung; or heart disease mortality after adjusting for known confounders. The RR estimates for maximum gamma exposure (less than or equal to 8, 8-19, 20-34, greater than or equal to 35 mrem) in relation to all lymphatic and hematopoietic tissue (LHT) are significantly elevated (RRs = 1.00, 1.16, 2.54, 2.45, respectively) for males and are suggestive of a potential dose-response relationship, although the test for trend was not significant. An upward trend of RRs and SMRs for levels of maximum gamma exposure in relation to breast cancer in females (RRs = 1.00, 1.08, 1.13, 1.31; SMRs = 104.2, 113.2, 117.9) was also noted. Although the surveillance within the TMI cohort provides no consistent evidence that radioactivity released during the nuclear accident has had a significant impact on the overall mortality experience of these residents, several elevations persist, and certain potential dose-response relationships cannot be definitively excluded. PMID:12611664

Talbott, Evelyn O; Youk, Ada O; McHugh-Pemu, Kathleen P; Zborowski, Jeanne V

2003-03-01

471

Areas contributing ground water to the Peconic Estuary, and ground-water budgets for the north and south forks and Shelter Island, eastern Suffolk County, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Peconic Estuary, at the eastern end of Long Island, has been plagued by a recurrent algal bloom, locally referred to as ?Brown Tide,? that has caused the severe decline of local marine resources. Although the factors that trigger Brown Tide blooms remain uncertain, groundwater discharge has previously been shown to affect surface-water quality in the western part of the estuary. A U.S. Geological Survey groundwater- flow model of the main body of Long Island indicates that a total of about 7.5 x 106 ft3/d (cubic feet per day) of freshwater discharges to the western part of the estuary, but the model does not include the ground-water flow systems on the North and South Forks and Shelter Island, which contribute significant amounts of freshwater to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. The need for information on freshwater discharge to the entire estuary prompted the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate ground-water discharge from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island. Source areas that contribute ground water to the Peconic Estuary were delineated, and groundwater budgets for these areas were developed, to evaluate the distribution and magnitude of ground-water discharge to the central and eastern parts of the estuary. Contributing-area boundaries that were delineated coincide with the hydraulic boundaries of the fresh ground-water-flow systems of the North and South Forks and Shelter Island; these boundaries are of two types? external (saltwater bodies) and internal (groundwater divides). Hydrologic components that were evaluated include recharge from precipitation, public-supply withdrawal and return flow, and agricultural withdrawal. Values for each of these components were calculated or estimated for the individual freshwater flow subsystems that form each ground-water-budget area, then summed to obtain the total discharge of fresh ground water to tidewater. Ground-water discharge to the Peconic Estuary is about 3.8 x 106 ft3/d from the North Fork, 11 x 106 ft3/d from the South Fork, and 1.7 x 106 ft3/d from Shelter Island. The total contribution to the estuary from these areas is about 16 x 106 ft3/d?roughly twice the total contribution from the main body of Long Island. In contrast to the freshwater contribution from the main body of Long Island, which is concentrated near the head of the estuary, the contributions from the North and South Forks and Shelter Island are distributed along the east-west length of the estuary. Changes in water-table altitude and the resulting changes in total discharge to the Peconic Estuary were estimated from the relative changes in annual mean water level at observation wells. The 1985-95 interval included 7 years (1985-88, 1991- 92, 1995) of generally below-average water-table altitudes that presumably caused similar decreases in ground-water discharge to the estuary; intense Brown Tide blooms coincided with six of these years (1985-88, 1991, 1995), and localized blooms coincided with the remaining year (1992). Watertable altitudes in the remaining 4 years of the 1985-95 interval (1989-90, 1993-94) were nearly average or above average, and presumably produced comparably near-average or increased amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary; none of these years saw any widespread Brown Tide blooms. Fluctuations in the amounts of ground-water discharge to the estuary appear to affect the occurrence of Brown Tide blooms, although the factors that trigger the blooms have not been determined.

Schubert, C. E.

1998-01-01

472

Lavender Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lavender Islands: Portrait of the Whole Family is the first national strengths-based study of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people in New Zealand. The 133-item survey was made available both by website and paper copy from April to July 2004. Multidisciplinary interest areas were developed by a community reference group, and included identity and self-definition, families of origin, relationships and

Mark Henrickson; Stephen Neville; Claire Jordan; Sara Donaghey

2007-01-01

473

40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of the territorial area...boundaries of the area so delimited): The Entire State of Rhode Island. In the State of Massachusetts:...

2012-07-01

474

1997 Economic Census of Outlying Areas: Virgin Islands: Construction Industries, Manufactures, Wholesale Trade, Retail Trade, and Service Industries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Census Bureau reports that the retail trade sector of the US Virgin Islands has grown by 20 percent since 1992, with sales reaching $1.1 billion in 1997. In 1997, jewelry stores sold a total of $248.7 million and hotels and motels reported receipts of $123.8 million.

475

Environmental Study of the Sewage Outfall Area at San Clemente Island. An Open-Ocean Sewage Disposal Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An environmental-impact study of the San Clemente Island sewage discharge site was used as a model to predict the effects of dumping raw sewage into the open ocean. Coliform bacterial counts, used to assess water sanitary quality, showed that the water at...

P. R. Kenis M. H. Salazar J. A. Tritschler

1972-01-01

476

Boom Hoist Wire Rope Line Failure Results in Fatality High Island Area Block A557, Platform 'A'.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On 16 August 2011 at approximately 0815 hours, a fatal accident occurred on the offshore production platform, High Island A557 A, operated by Energy Resource Technology GOM, Inc. (ERT). Platform personnel were using the platform crane to move a rental gen...

C. Hudson C. Pohler J. Hail R. Laidig

2013-01-01

477

Distribution and biogeography of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) in Antarctica, the subAntarctic islands and nearby land areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oribatid mites are an ancient group of cosmopolitan terrestrial arthropods with limited trans-oceanic dispersal abilities. They provide an opportunity to answer questions concerning the role played by Gondwanaland, either as a migration route for terrestrial organisms or as a centre for their origin and subsequent glacial destruction, in the development of the biota of Antarctica, the sub-Antarctic islands and nearby

Josef Starý; William Block

1998-01-01

478

Distribution of selected anthropogenic radionuclides (137Cs, 238Pu, (239,240)Pu and 241Am) in marine sediments with emphasis on the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area.  

PubMed

Measurements of anthropogenic radionuclides in marine sediments can provide good estimates of past and present radioactive contamination of the marine environment. The Barents Sea is one of the world's richest ocean areas, and it is therefore of major interest for Norwegian fisheries to document the levels of radioactive contamination of this and adjacent ocean areas. In this study, concentrations of 137Cs, 238Pu, (239,240)Pu and 241Am were measured in marine sediments collected mainly in the Spitsbergen-Bear Island region. Additional samples collected in the deep Norwegian Sea and near the Greenland ice-edge have been included for comparison. The highest radionuclide levels were found near Spitsbergen, reaching over 50% higher than in adjacent areas. Determinations of the mineral content and particle size distribution indicate a relation between the content of clay minerals and radionuclide levels. The present study confirms earlier observations of elevated levels of 137Cs in sediments in the Spitsbergen-Bear Island area and documents elevated levels of 238Pu, (239,240)Pu and 241Am in these sediments. Using an exponential curve fit based on determinations of unsupported 210Pb in sediment cores, sedimentation rates of 0.28, 0.05 and 0.26 cm year(-1) were calculated at locations south of Spitsbergen, near the Greenland ice-edge and in the deep Norwegian Sea, respectively. PMID:12109476

Heldal, Hilde Elise; Varskog, Per; Føyn, Lars

2002-07-01

479

The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and geochemical biomarker composition of sediments from voes and coastal areas in the Shetland and Orkney Islands.  

PubMed

Marine sediments from coastal areas and voes in the Shetland and Orkney Islands were analysed for parent and branched 2- to 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and geochemical biomarkers. Where possible 14 sediment samples were collected at random from each of 17 Shetland and 9 Orkney sites. The wide range of total PAH concentrations in sediments (i.e., < LOD up to 22619 ng g(-1) dry weight) was indicative of a variety of anthropogenic activities and different sediment types associated with the specific locations. Low PAH concentrations were determined in sandy sediments from areas of limited boat activity. The highest PAH concentrations were found in muddy sediment close to a boat repair yard. PAH concentration ratios were consistent with the main source of these compounds, in most areas, being pyrolysis. Geochemical biomarker (triterpane and sterane) profiles from the sediment were indicative, for some areas, of limited petrogenic input. Punds Voe was the only voe to show evidence of North Sea oil. PAH profiles were similar across sites within each island group, with any differences attributable to known local sources of PAHs. However, there was a clear difference in the PAH profiles of Shetland and Orkney sediments, with Orkney sediments having a higher proportion of the lighter alkylated PAHs. PMID:11785632

Webster, L; Fryer, R J; Dalgarno, E J; Megginson, C; Moffat, C F

2001-12-01

480

How Eight State Education Agencies in the Northeast and Islands Region Identify and Support Low-Performing Schools and Districts. Issues & Answers. REL 2009-No. 068  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes and analyzes how eight state education agencies in the Northeast and Islands Region (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and Vermont) identify and support low-performing schools and districts under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Data collection for the report…

Hergert, Leslie F.; Gleason, Sonia Caus; Urbano, Carole

2009-01-01