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1

Airborne Laser Swath Mapping: First and Second Epoch Surveys of Landslide Areas in South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Landslide areas at the Oahe Dam, near Pierre, South Dakota, were surveyed using airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM), in August 2000 and again in June 2002. The two surveys were conducted using the same basic flight plan, including flying height (nominally 600 m agl), scan angle (20 degree half angle), scan rate (28 Hz) and a 50 percent overlap of

W. E. Carter; R. L. Shrestha; D. Bloomquist; M. Sartori; V. Shaefer

2002-01-01

2

Drainage areas in the James River basin in eastern South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The James River of eastern South Dakota contains an important surface-water supply for the agricultural economy within the basin. Proposed water-resource development has prompted numerous hydrologic studies of the James River. To aid in planning for future development, the map delineates all named stream basins, and all unnamed basins larger than 10 square miles within the James River basin South Dakota and lists by stream name and area of each basin. Stream drainage basins were delineated by visual interpretation of contour information of U.S. Geological Survey seven and one-half minute topographic maps. Two tables list areas of drainage basins, reaches, and noncontributing areas and drainage areas above gaging stations. (USGS)

Benson, Rick D.; Freese, M. E.; Amundson, F. D.; Wipf, V. J.

1987-01-01

3

40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South Dakota. 81.342 Section 81.342 Protection...Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.342 South Dakota. South DakotaâSO2 Designated area Does not meet...

2013-07-01

4

40 CFR 81.427 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South Dakota. 81.427 Section 81.427 Protection of Environment...Federal Areas Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.427 South Dakota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2013-07-01

5

Archeology in the Cul-de-sac Area, Big Bend Reservoir, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Test excavations and surface collections from nine archeological sites in Hughes County, South Dakota, produced material evidence of prehistoric and protohistoric villages. Ceramic styles indicate occupations of Great Oasis peoples, as well as those of th...

R. E. Jensen

1965-01-01

6

40 CFR 81.427 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false South Dakota. 81.427 Section 81.427 Protection of Environment...Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.427 South Dakota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2012-07-01

7

Drainage areas in the Vermillion River basin in eastern South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Above-normal precipitation in the northern portion of the Vermillion River basin from 1982 through 1987 caused substantial rises in lake levels in the Lake Thompson chain of lakes, resulting in discharge from Lake Thompson to the East Fork Vermillion River. Prior to 1986, the Lake Thompson chain of lakes was thought to be a noncontributing portion of the Vermillion River basin. To better understand surface drainage, the map delineates all named stream basins, and all unnamed basins larger than approximately 10 sq mi within the Vermillion River basin in South Dakota and lists by stream name the area of each basin. Stream drainage basins were delineated by visual interpretation of contour information of U.S. Geological Survey 7 1/2 minute topographic maps. Two tables list areas of drainage basins and reaches, as well as drainage areas above gaging stations. (USGS)

Benson, Rick D.; Freese, M. D.; Amundson, Frank D.

1988-01-01

8

Selected hydrogeologic data for the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers in the Black Hills area, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents selected hydrogeologic data on wells and springs in the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. The data were used to create potentiometric maps for these five aquifers.

Galloway, J. M.

1999-01-01

9

South Dakota geothermal handbook  

SciTech Connect

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-06-01

10

South Dakota Cooperative Extension Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the South Dakota Cooperative Extension Services (SDCES) is to "provide practical learning resources to address complex problems of youth and families, communities, agriculture, business, and industry." The SDCES is based at South Dakota State University, and their work includes creating fact sheets, reports, and educational materials on community development, Native American life, 4-H programs, and natural resources.

11

South Dakota geothermal resources  

SciTech Connect

South Dakota is normally not thought of as a geothermal state. However, geothermal direct use is probably one of the best kept secrets outside the state. At present there are two geothermal district heating systems in place and operating successfully, a resort community using the water in a large swimming pool, a hospital being supplied with part of its heat, numerous geothermal heat pumps, and many individual uses by ranchers, especially in the winter months for heating residences, barns and other outbuildings, and for stock watering.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01

12

Airborne Laser Swath Mapping: First and Second Epoch Surveys of Landslide Areas in South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landslide areas at the Oahe Dam, near Pierre, South Dakota, were surveyed using airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM), in August 2000 and again in June 2002. The two surveys were conducted using the same basic flight plan, including flying height (nominally 600 m agl), scan angle (20 degree half angle), scan rate (28 Hz) and a 50 percent overlap of adjacent swaths. However, the ALSM system used for the two surveys was upgraded from 10,000 pps to 33,000 pps between the two surveys, resulting in more than a three-fold reduction in the nominal point-to-point spacing of the surface points. Digital color photographs were collected simultaneously with the ALSM observations during the 2000 survey and a small landslide area was also mapped with a ground based laser scanner during the 2002 survey. The topographic relief across a single swath was as much as fifty meters, with hillside slopes as steep as 70 degrees. Both the 2000 and 2002 surveys clearly delineate the landslide features, including the head scarps and the toes. However, when Digital Elevation Models are derived from the two surveys, using all of the observations, differences in the elevations are strongly correlated with breaks in the slope of the terrain. When the 2002 data set is thinned, keeping only those points closest and horizontally within 30 centimeters of the 2000 survey points, the differences between the two surveys are reduced. The RMS difference in heights is approximately 6 cm. Still, the largest differences are correlated with the terrain break lines. It appears that differences between the horizontal positioning of the surface points, both real and observational errors, limit the achievable accuracy of the height results in steep terrain to a few decimeters, making it difficult to accurately compute the volume of material involved in subtle landslides.

Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Bloomquist, D.; Sartori, M.; Shaefer, V.

2002-12-01

13

Wind powering America: South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet contains a description of South Dakota's wind energy resources, and the state's financial incentives that support the installation of renewable energy systems. The fact sheet includes a list of contacts for those interested in obtaining more information.

NREL

2000-04-11

14

South Dakota Social Studies Content Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document presents the South Dakota Content Standards for K-12 Social Studies. The document outlines the four major areas of social studies: history, geography, civics, and economics. Standards are provided for each major area according to grade level, separately for grades K-8 and collectively for grades 9-12. Grade level standards represent…

South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

15

Statistics of South Dakota Libraries. 1975.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The South Dakota State Library 1975 annual report is presented in this volume, followed by tables of statistical data on services, resources, income, and expenditures for South Dakota public, academic, and special libraries. Sections include: (1) a summar...

1976-01-01

16

South Dakota Kids Count Project: 1994 Factbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This factbook provides data on the well-being of South Dakota children. It is intended as a vehicle for policy makers, advocates, the media, and service providers to raise awareness on the status of children in South Dakota. Section 1 of the factbook is an introduction and overview on South Dakota demographics. Section 2 presents special reports…

Haven, Terry; Dykstra, De Vee

17

South Dakota Kids Count Factbook, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count fact book examines statewide trends in well-being for South Dakota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators in the areas of demographics, health, education, economic status, and safety. The indicators are: (1) population; (2) family profile; (3) poverty thresholds; (4) infant mortality; (5) low birth weight…

Cochran, Carole

18

South Dakota Kids Count Factbook, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count factbook examines statewide trends in well-being for South Dakota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 24 indicators in the areas of demographics, health, education, economic status, and safety. The indicators are: (1) poverty thresholds; (2) population; (3) population on Indian Reservations; (4) infant mortality; (5)…

Cochran, Carole, Ed.

19

Ancient Granite Gneiss in the Black Hills, South Dakota.  

PubMed

Granite gneiss, with an age of approximately 2.5 billion years, in the Black Hills, South Dakota, provides a link between ancient rocks in western Wyoming and Montana and in eastern North and South Dakota and Minnesota. The discovery suggests that early Precambrian rocks covered an extensive area in northcentral United States and were not restricted to several small nuclei. PMID:17759093

Zartman, R E; Norton, J J; Stern, T W

1964-07-31

20

Ecoregions of North Dakota and South Dakota: Interactive Map  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. This interactive map shows the ecoregions of North and South Dakota in increasing levels of detail (from level III to level IV). Clicking on the legend shows information for each type of ecoregion, including a photo and description, physiography, geology, soils type, climate, natural vegetation types, and land use/land cover. A downloadable version is available.

21

South Dakota Geothermal Energy Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are detailed. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resources are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized.

Not Available

1980-06-01

22

30 CFR 941.700 - South Dakota Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South Dakota Federal program. 941.700 Section 941...OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.700 South Dakota Federal program. (a) This part...

2013-07-01

23

Hereditary hemochromatosis: implications for South Dakota physicians.  

PubMed

Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH) still causes debate among health professionals regarding appropriateness of diagnostic and screening tools. The Hemochromatosis gene (HFE) was discovered in 1996 and is now recognized to cause the majority of HH cases. A C282Y missense mutation in the HFE gene causes up to 90 percent of HH cases. In northern European populations, prevalence of heterozygosity is estimated to be as high as 10 percent, with symptomatic iron overload developing in as many as one in 200 to 300. Many guidelines regarding population screening have been proposed. It is especially important to strike a balance between allocation of healthcare resources and patient well-being in areas such as South Dakota with a large northern European and high proportion of Medicare and Medicaid patient population. This article outlines a reasonable approach to diagnosis and management for primary care physicians in South Dakota centered on a prototypical case review. PMID:23342715

Stampe, Christopher; Weiland, Kevin

2013-01-01

24

Wetland Resources of Eastern South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center has recently posted a resource on South Dakota Wetlands. This report, by R. Johnson and K. Higgins, offers text, tables, and color illustrations of South Dakota's wetlands, including history of wetland drainage and the National Wetlands Inventory. Both reports may be browsed online or downloaded (.zip) from the respective sites.

Johnson, Rex R.; Higgens, Kenneth F.

25

Geology Fieldnotes: Badlands National Park, South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Badlands National Park, located in southwestern South Dakota, consists of 244,000 acres of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles and spires blended with the largest, protected mixed grass prairie in the United States. Features include information on park geology, maps, photographs, visitor information, links to related publications, and lesson plans for teaching geology with National Park examples. The park geology section discusses the Park's geologic history during the Eocene and Oligocene epochs and the rich fossil deposits found there. Maps of the park and the surrounding area are included.

26

Geothermal resource assessment, South Dakota: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Seven geothermal aquifers in South Dakota contain an accessible resource base of about 11,207 x 10/sup 18/ J. The potentially productive geothermal aquifers are: Deadwood Formation (Cambrian), Winnipeg Formation + Red River Formation + Englewood Limestone (Ordovician through Devonian), Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Minnelusa Formation (Mississippian-Permian), Inyan Kara Group (Cretaceous), and Newcastle Sandstone (Cretaceous). The resource estimate was obtained by first using heat flow, thermal conductivity, temperature gradient, and stratigraphic data to estimate aquifer temperatures. The heat content of each aquifer was determined from the product of the volumetric heat capacity, aquifer volume, and temperature difference between the aquifer and the mean annual temperature for a 14 x 14 grid of 240 km/sup 2/ cells. Geothermal fluid temperatures range from about 120/sup 0/C in the Deadwood Formation in the Williston Basin to about 30/sup 0/C for the Newcastle Sandstone in south-central South Dakota. The area containing the resource lies largely west of the Missouri River. About 10,000 km/sup 2/ of the resource area is characterized by anomalously high heat flow values greater than 100 mW m/sup -2/.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1987-07-01

27

Bird Damage to Sunflower in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota, 1979-1981 (and Influence of Environmental Factors on Blackbird Damage to Sunflower).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sunflower growing areas in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota were surveyed for bird damage from 1979 through 1981. Individual fields were sampled each year, and bird damage on sample sunflower heads was estimated using a gridded, plastic template....

R. L. Hothem R. W. DeHaven S. D. Fairaizl D. L. Otis C. M. Kilburn

1988-01-01

28

Healthcare Workforce Report, 2011. (South Dakota).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recognizing the importance of a highly trained and available health care workforce, the South Dakota Department of Health established the Healthcare Workforce Center to help address the healthcare workforce needs of the State. The purpose of the Center is...

2011-01-01

29

Badlands Bombing Range, South Dakota. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this demonstration was to compare the discrimination potential of three dynamic surveys among themselves and with static grid data over common targets at the CT-3A Bombing target, Former Badlands Bombing Range, South Dakota. This demonstr...

2007-01-01

30

Geology and pegmatites of part of the Fourmile area, Custer County, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Fourmile area, Custer County, S. Dak., is underlain by pre-Cambrian metamorphic rocks that surround the granitic core of the Black Hills. The main structure in the area is the upright limb of an overturned anticline that plunges about 30 ? S. 10 ? E. Three units of metamorphic rocks are described that have a total thickness of at least 7, 700 feet. The oldest of these units, a quartz-mica schist, is more than 6, 500 feet thick. The overlying unit, about 200 feet thick, is composed of thin beds of amphibolite and hornblende schist, lime-silicate rock, cordierite-biotite schist, microcline-biotite schist, and other types of rocks. The youngest unit, a quartz-mica-feldspar schist, is more than 1,000 feet thick. The presence of kyanite, staurolite, cordierite, and sillimanite in the rocks indicates that they have been subjected to high-grade metamorphism. About 420 pegmatites were mapped in the quartzmica-schist and the quartz-mica-feldspar schist. A few thin pegmatites in the third unit were not mapped. Most of these are concordant with the schistosity and relict (?) bedding of the enclosing metamorphic rocks. They are as much as 250 feet thick and range from 10 to 2, 600 feet in length. Nine peqmatites are zoned and classified as heterogeneous. The remainder are homogeneous and are poorly zoned. The major constituents are plaqioclase, quartz, perthite, and muscovite. The accessory minerals are tourmaline, apatite, garnet, and biotite. Beryl was observed in 15 peqmatites. The heterogeneous pegmatites contain commercial deposits of potash feldspar, mica (sheet and scrap), and beryl.

Lang, Andrew J.; Redden, Jack Allison

1953-01-01

31

Stratabound geothermal resources in North Dakota and South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of all geothermal aquifers in North Dakota and South Dakota indicates an accessible resource base of approximately 21.25 exajoules (10{sup 18} J = 1 exajoule, 10{sup 18} J{approximately}10{sup 15} Btu=1 quad) in North Dakota and approximately 12.25 exajoules in South Dakota. Resource temperatures range from 40{degree}C at depths of about 700 m to 150{degree}C at 4500 m. This resource assessment increases the identified accessible resource base by 31% over the previous assessments. These results imply that the total stratabound geothermal resource in conduction-dominated systems in the United States is two-to-three times greater than some current estimates. The large increase in the identified accessible resource base is primarily due to inclusion of all potential geothermal aquifers in the resource assessment and secondarily due to the expanded data base compiled in this study. These factors were interdependent in that the extensive data base provided the means for inclusion of all potential geothermal aquifers in the analysis. Previous assessments included only well-known aquifer systems and were limited by the amount of available data. 40 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs.

Gosnold, W.D. Jr.

1991-08-01

32

Groundwater flow, quality (2007-10), and mixing in the Wind Cave National Park area, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of groundwater flow, quality, and mixing in relation to Wind Cave National Park in western South Dakota was conducted during 2007-11 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service because of water-quality concerns and to determine possible sources of groundwater contamination in the Wind Cave National Park area. A large area surrounding Wind Cave National Park was included in this study because to understand groundwater in the park, a general understanding of groundwater in the surrounding southern Black Hills is necessary. Three aquifers are of particular importance for this purpose: the Minnelusa, Madison, and Precambrian aquifers. Multivariate methods applied to hydrochemical data, consisting of principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis, and an end-member mixing model, were applied to characterize groundwater flow and mixing. This provided a way to assess characteristics important for groundwater quality, including the differentiation of hydrogeologic domains within the study area, sources of groundwater to these domains, and groundwater mixing within these domains. Groundwater and surface-water samples collected for this study were analyzed for common ions (calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, silica, and sulfate), arsenic, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, specific conductance, and pH. These 12 variables were used in all multivariate methods. A total of 100 samples were collected from 60 sites from 2007 to 2010 and included stream sinks, cave drip, cave water bodies, springs, and wells. In previous approaches that combined PCA with end-member mixing, extreme-value samples identified by PCA typically were assumed to represent end members. In this study, end members were not assumed to have been sampled but rather were estimated and constrained by prior hydrologic knowledge. Also, the end-member mixing model was quantified in relation to hydrogeologic domains, which focuses model results on major hydrologic processes. Finally, conservative tracers were weighted preferentially in model calibration, which distributed model errors of optimized values, or residuals, more appropriately than would otherwise be the case The latter item also provides an estimate of the relative effect of geochemical evolution along flow paths in comparison to mixing. The end-member mixing model estimated that Wind Cave sites received 38 percent of their groundwater inflow from local surface recharge, 34 percent from the upgradient Precambrian aquifer, 26 percent from surface recharge to the west, and 2 percent from regional flow. Artesian springs primarily received water from end members assumed to represent regional groundwater flow. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons, dissolved gasses (argon, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and oxygen), and tritium at selected sites and used to estimate groundwater age. Apparent ages, or model ages, for the Madison aquifer in the study area indicate that groundwater closest to surface recharge areas is youngest, with increasing age in a downgradient direction toward deeper parts of the aquifer. Arsenic concentrations in samples collected for this study ranged from 0.28 to 37.1 micrograms per liter (?g/L) with a median value of 6.4 ?g/L, and 32 percent of these exceeded 10 ?g/L. The highest arsenic concentrations in and near the study area are approximately coincident with the outcrop of the Minnelusa Formation and likely originated from arsenic in shale layers in this formation. Sample concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite were less than 2 milligrams per liter for 92 percent of samples collected, which is not a concern for drinking-water quality. Water samples were collected in the park and analyzed for five trace metals (chromium, copper, lithium, vanadium, and zinc), the concentrations of which did not correlate with arsenic. Dye tracing indicated hydraulic connection between three water bodies in Wind Cave.

Long, Andrew J.; Ohms, Marc J.; McKaskey, Jonathan D. R. G.

2012-01-01

33

CUBED: South Dakota 2010 Research Center For Dusel Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the selection of the Homestake Mine in western South Dakota by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as the site for a national Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), the state of South Dakota has sought ways to engage its faculty and students in activities planned for DUSEL. One such effort is the creation of a 2010 Research Center focused on ultra-low background experiments or a Center for Ultra-low Background Experiments at DUSEL (CUBED). The goals of this center include to 1) bring together the current South Dakota faculty so that one may begin to develop a critical mass of expertise necessary for South Dakota's full participation in large-scale collaborations planned for DUSEL; 2) to increase the number of research faculty and other research personnel in South Dakota to complement and supplement existing expertise in nuclear physics and materials sciences; 3) to be competitive in pursuit of external funding through the creation of a center which focuses on areas of interest to experiments planned for DUSEL such as an underground crystal growth lab, a low background counting facility, a purification/depletion facility for noble liquids, and an electroforming copper facility underground; and 4) to train and educate graduate and undergraduate students as a way to develop the scientific workforce of the state. We will provide an update on the activities of the center and describe in more detail the scientific foci of the center.

Keller, Christina; Alton, Drew; Bai, Xinhau; Durben, Dan; Heise, Jaret; Hong, Haiping; Howard, Stan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Keeter, Kara; McTaggart, Robert; Medlin, Dana; Mei, Dongming; Petukhov, Andre; Rauber, Joel; Roggenthen, Bill; Spaans, Jason; Sun, Yongchen; Szczerbinska, Barbara; Thomas, Keenan; Zehfus, Michael; Zhang, Chao

2010-03-01

34

Cultural Resources Reconnaissance in Dewey County, South Dakota from Below the Moreau River to the Forest City Recreation Area. Volume 1: Main Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An intensive cultural resources reconnaissance (Class II Inventory) survey was conducted by the Archeology Laboratory, Augustana College, along the west bank of Lake Oahe in Dewey County, South Dakota, within the Grand/Moreau Archeological Region, from be...

E. J. Lueck K. Lippincott R. P. Winham

1989-01-01

35

75 FR 61229 - South Dakota Disaster #SD-00034  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12333 and 12334] South Dakota Disaster SD-00034 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1938-DR), dated 09/23/2010....

2010-10-04

36

78 FR 48764 - South Dakota Disaster # SD-00061  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13703 and 13704] South Dakota Disaster SD-00061 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-4137-DR), dated 08/02/2013....

2013-08-09

37

75 FR 69732 - South Dakota Disaster #SD-00035  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12375 and 12376] South Dakota Disaster SD-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1947-DR), dated 11/02/2010....

2010-11-15

38

78 FR 42147 - South Dakota Disaster #SD-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13649 and 13650] South Dakota Disaster SD-00059 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-4125-DR), dated 06/28/2013....

2013-07-15

39

78 FR 55771 - South Dakota Disaster Number SD-00061  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Declaration 13703 and 13704] South Dakota Disaster Number SD-00061 AGENCY...Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-4137-DR), dated 08...Non-Profit organizations in the State of South Dakota, dated 08/02/2013, is...

2013-09-11

40

75 FR 15452 - South Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of South Dakota resulting from a severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of December 23-27, 2009, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a...

2010-03-29

41

78 FR 32415 - South Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...as follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of South Dakota resulting from a severe winter storm and snowstorm during the period of April 8-10, 2013, is of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant a...

2013-05-30

42

South Dakota Kids Count Factbook, 2002. Tenth Annual Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count factbook examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Dakotas children. The statistical portrait is based on 25 indicators in the areas of demographics, health, education, economics, and safety. The indicators include: (1) poverty thresholds; (2) racial groups; (3) single age years; (4) households and families; (5) infant…

Cochran, Carole; Nelson-Kraayenbrink, Briana

43

National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for South Dakota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of South Dakota. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

44

A Profile of Homeschooling in South Dakota  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The authors conducted a statewide study to determine which factors influenced parents' decision making in electing to homeschool their children rather than send them to public school education in South Dakota. Analysis of data, using frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations revealed that the most prevalent reasons for…

Boschee, Bonni F.; Boschee, Floyd

2011-01-01

45

South Dakota shallow gas hunt heats up  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the search for shallow gas reserves in South Dakota intensifies, most of the exploratory drilling activity is concentrating along the Camp Crook anticline in the northwestern part of the state, where large amounts of gas could be locked in shallow, low-pressure sands. Gas production found in 1977 in the Cretaceous Shannon of the West Short Pine hills field in

McCaslin

1981-01-01

46

Educational Renewal in Rural South Dakota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|At Howard High School (Miner County, South Dakota), educational reform focuses on student understanding of community history, economics, and government; entrepreneurship; sustainability of agriculture, environment, and community; and democratic values. The school aims to nurture community and give students the option of staying in the community.…

Stangohr, Mary

2000-01-01

47

Philip, South Dakota geothermal district heating systems  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal heating project in Philip, South Dakota which uses the waste water from the Haakon School has now been in operation for 15 years. This project was one of the 23 cost shared by the U.S. DOE starting in 1978, of which 15 became operational. This article describes the geothermal heating system for eight buildings in downtown Philip.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01

48

Pierre Municipal Airport, Pierre, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The city of Pierre, Hughes County, South Dakota, has submitted a request for Federal financial assistance for a project to extend the present NW/SE runway and acquire land at the Pierre Municipal Airport. Since there is no anticipated change in type of ai...

1971-01-01

49

Pesticide and Toxicity Evaluation of Wetland Waters and Sediments on National Wildlife Refuges in South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Wetlands, especially marshes, small streams, and ponds, are valuable waterfowl habitats. Some waterfowl use these areas for resting and feeding during migration to more northern nesting areas. In South Dakota, their most important uses are for nesting and...

R. Ruelle

1991-01-01

50

Water resources of Spink County, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Spink County, an agricultural area of about 1,505 square miles, is in the flat to gently rolling James River lowland of east-central South Dakota. The water resources are characterized by the highly variable flows of the James River and its tributaries and by aquifers both in glacial deposits of sand and gravel, and in sandstone in the bedrock. Glacial aquifers underlie about half of the county, and bedrock aquifers underlie most of the county. The James River is an intermittent prairie stream that drains nearly 8,900 square miles north of Spink County and has an average annual discharge of about 124 cubic feet per second where it enters the county. The discharge is augmented by the flow of Snake and Turtle Creeks, each of which has an average annual flow of about 25 to 30 cubic feet per second. Streamflow is unreliable as a water supply because precipitation, which averages 18.5 inches annually, is erratic both in volume and in distribution, and because the average annual potential evapotranspiration rate is 43 inches. The flow of tributaries generally ceases by summer, and zero flows are common in the James River in fall and winter. Aquifers in glacial drift deposits store nearly 3.3 million acre-feet of fresh to slightly saline water at depths of from near land surface to more than 500 feet below land surface beneath an area of about 760 square miles. Yields of properly developed wells in the more productive aquifers exceed 1,000 gallons per minute in some areas. Withdrawals from the aquifers, mostly for irrigation, totaled about 15,000 acre-feet of water in 1990. Water levels in observation wells generally have declined less than 15 feet over several decades of increasing pumpage for irrigation, but locally have declined nearly 30 feet. Water levels generally rose during the wet period of 1983-86. In Spink County, bedrock aquifers store more than 40 million acre-feet of slightly to moderately saline water at depths of from 80 to about 1,300 feet below land surface. Yields of properly developed wells range from 2 to 600 gallons per minute. The artesian head of the heavily used Dakota aquifer has declined about 350 feet in the approximately 100 years since the first artesian wells were drilled in the county, but water levels have stabilized locally as a result of decreases in the discharge of water from the wells. Initial flows of from 4 gallons per minute to as much as 30 gallons per minute of very hard water can be obtained in the southwestern part of the county, where drillers report artesian heads of nearly 100 feet above land surface. The quality of water from aquifers in glacial drift varies greatly, even within an aquifer. Concentrations of dissolved solids in samples ranged from 151 to 9,610 milligrams per liter, and hardness ranged from 84 to 3,700 milligrams per liter. Median concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, iron, and manganese in some glacial aquifers are near or exceed Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels (SMCL's) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some of the water from aquifers in glacial drift is suitable for irrigation use. Water samples from aquifers in the bedrock contained concentrations of dissolved solids that ranged from 1,410 to 2,670 milligrams per liter (sum of constituents) and hardness that ranged from 10 to 1,400 milligrams per liter; these concentrations generally are largest for aquifers below the Dakota aquifer. Median concentrations of dissolved solids, sulfate, iron, and manganese in Dakota wells either are near or exceed EPA SMCL's. Dissolved solids, sodium, and boron concentrations in water from bedrock aquifers commonly are too large for the water to be suitable for irrigation use.

Hamilton, L. J.; Howells, L. W.

1996-01-01

51

Facts on Kids in South Dakota, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report consists of four issues in a series of fact sheets that examine specific indicators of the well-being of children in South Dakota. Issue one focuses on teens and motor vehicle crashes. The fact sheet notes that teen death rates from car crashes have been higher than the national rate for 4 of the 5 years between 1992-1996.…

Goebel, Pat, Ed.; Blad, Amy, Ed.

2000-01-01

52

Midland, South Dakota geothermal district heating  

SciTech Connect

This article describes historical aspects and present usage of geothermal district heating systems in the town of Midland, South Dakota. The use of geothermal resources exists due to a joint venture between the school district and the city back in the early 1960`s. A total of approximately 30,000 square feet (2800 square meters) of floor space is heated using geothermal energy in Midland. This provides an estimated annual saving in propane cost of $15,000 to the community.

Lund, J.W.

1997-12-01

53

An Archeological Investigation and Assessment of the Three Horse Site (39DW35), Moreau River Area, West Shore Lake Oahe, Dewey County, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An archeological reconnaissance investigation of the Three Horse site (39DW35), located on the west shore of Lake Oahe, Dewey County, South Dakota, was completed in July 1979 under an agreement between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Omaha District) and...

C. R. Falk R. E. Pepperl

1980-01-01

54

State of South Dakota's child: 2004.  

PubMed

South Dakota saw a 3% increase in births in 2003 with more than 11,000 newborns joining the state for the first time since 1992. This increase in births was only observed for American Indians and other minority populations, while the births of white babies decreased from the previous year. National trends are revealing a concerning increase in low birth weight (<2500 grams) newborns. South Dakota's rate of low birth weight has consistently been lower than that noted for the country but it is also increasing. Reflecting this national trend in low birth weight, was an increase in the country's 2002 infant mortality rate (7.0), the first increase over the previous year's rate noted in the past 44 years. South Dakota also noted a slight increase in its infant mortality rate in 2002 but it decreased to 6.6 in 2003. The state's 2003 neonatal mortality rate (<28 days of life) dropped to 3.2, but its post neonatal mortality rate slightly increased in 2003, accounted for by an increase in the rate of these deaths only among its white population. PMID:15696733

Wilson, Ann L

2005-01-01

55

40 CFR 282.91 - South Dakota State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South Dakota State-Administered Program... Approved State Programs § 282.91 South Dakota State-Administered Program. (a) The State of South Dakota is approved to administer...

2013-07-01

56

40 CFR 272.2101 - South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization...APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS South Dakota § 272.2101 South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final...

2013-07-01

57

40 CFR 272.2101 - South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...26 2009-07-01 2009-07-01 false South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization...APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS South Dakota § 272.2101 South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final...

2009-07-01

58

40 CFR 272.2101 - South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final Authorization...APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS South Dakota § 272.2101 South Dakota State-Administered Program: Final...

2010-07-01

59

Retail Trade Area Analysis Grafton North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to provide an indepth trade area analysis of Grafton, North Dakota. Specific analyses included determining Grafton's main and greater trade areas, identifying the demographic profile of Grafton shoppers, examining important and less important services for patron shoppers of Grafton, identifying neighboring cities that area shoppers patronize, determining distances area shoppers traveled to Grafton, and listing popular

Dean A. Bangsund; F. Larry Leistritz; Janet K. Wanzek; Dale F. Zetocha; Holly E. Bastow-Shoop

1991-01-01

60

Retail Trade Area Analysis Larimore, North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to provide an in depth trade area analysis of Larimore, North Dakota. Specific analyses included determining Larimore's main and greater trade areas, identifying the demographic profile of Larimore shoppers, examining important and less important services for patron shoppers of Larimore, identifying neighboring cities that area shoppers patronize, determining distances area shoppers traveled to Larimore, and listing

Dean A. Bangsund; F. Larry Leistritz; Janet K. Wanzek; Dale F. Zetocha; Holly E. Bastow-Shoop

1991-01-01

61

Retail Trade Area Analysis Fessenden North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to provide an indepth trade area analysis of Fessenden, North Dakota. Specific analyses included determining Fessenden's main and greater trade areas, identifying the demographic profile of Fessenden shoppers, examining important and less important services for patron shoppers of Fessenden, identifying neighboring cities that area shoppers patronize, determining distances area shoppers traveled to Fessenden, and listing popular

Dean A. Bangsund; F. Larry Leistritz; Janet K. Wanzek; Dale F. Zetocha; Holly E. Bastow-Shoop

1991-01-01

62

Retail Trade Area Analysis Ashley North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to provide an in-depth trade area analysis of Ashley, North Dakota. Specific analyses included determining Ashley's main and greater trade areas, identifying the demographic profile of Ashley shoppers, examining important and less important services for patron shoppers of Ashley, identifying neighboring cities that area shoppers patronize, determining distances area shoppers traveled to Ashley, and listing popular

Dean A. Bangsund; F. Larry Leistritz; Janet K. Wanzek; Dale F. Zetocha; Holly E. Bastow-Shoop

1991-01-01

63

Floods in eastern Nebraska and southeastern South Dakota, June 1984  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thunderstorms during 1984 produced significant rainfall and subsequent runoff that caused substantial flooding in eastern Nebraska and southeastern South Dakota. The storms ocurred in rapid succession over the area, and the rain fell on ground that was near saturation from greater-than-normal precipitation during April and May. Flooding ocurred in the Loup River, Blue River, Platte River, Elkhorn River, and Weeping Water Creek basins in Nebraska and the James River, Vermillion River, and Big Sioux river basins in South Dakota. Record and near-record peak discharges occurred on many streams. The floodflows from tributary streams caused the highest stages and the most widespread flooding along the Missouri River from Sioux City, Iowa, to Rulo, Nebraska, since April 1952. (USGS)

Engel, G. B.; Benson, R. D.

1987-01-01

64

Comparing geotechnical to geologic estimates for past overburden in the Pierre-Hayes, South Dakota area: an argument for in-situ pressuremeter determination  

SciTech Connect

A knowledge of past overburden thickness is useful for designing underground structures such as waste repositories. This study attempts to determine if a correlation can be made between a geologic estimate and two types of geotechnical calculations of past overburden thickness. For the Pierre-Hayes, South Dakota area, the authors have found that of the two geotechnical determinations, the in-situ pressuremeter is better than the laboratory consolidation determination as an indicator of past overburden thickness. In the Pierre-Hayes area, Late Cretaceous Pierre Shale is the only bedrock present, but clasts of the Miocene Ogallala Formation were found in the Pleistocene deposits, suggesting that rocks of the Ogallala Formation once covered this area. Based on the geologic estimate, the Ogallala surface was 1100 ft higher than the present surface. Of the two types of geotechnical data acquired for the Hayes site, the laboratory overconsolidation ratios indicate a past overburden thickness value of 2300 ft, whereas the in-situ pressuremeter overconsolidation ratios indicate 1318 ft. The authors therefore, believe that in-situ determination is a better indicator of past overburden that the laboratory results. However, why the two test results differ to this degree is unknown at present.

Collins, D.S.; Nichols, T.C. Jr.

1987-04-01

65

Systematic Spacing of Townsites along Eastern South Dakota's Rail Lines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates townsite distribution in South Dakota's land settlement pattern. Reviews past theories explaining eastern South Dakota's systematic spacing of towns along rail lines. Indicates a correlation between railroad functions and town development, advancing the theory that nineteenth-century railroad technology, involving traffic control and…

Lockwood, Catherine M.

1990-01-01

66

South Dakota: Developing Policy-Driven Change in Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the next few years, the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education will conduct a series of in-depth case studies on higher education in several states. South Dakota is the first state to be examined in this series. Government, business, and higher education leaders in South Dakota have been steadily developing policy-driven…

Martinez, Mario C.

67

American Indian Population in South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is used in an Indians of North America class for undergraduate students. This activity looks at Indian poulation shifts in South Dakota. Using the CensusScope website, similar trends can be analyzed in all 50 states. This activity uses the charts, rankings and maps on CensusScope.org. CensusScope is an easy-to-use tool to investigate U.S. trends using census data. There is an answer key for the activity that can be found under teaching materials.

Hess, Donna

68

Sarcocystis of deer in South Dakota.  

PubMed

The prevalence of Sarcocystis in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (O. hemionus) in South Dakota was determined through microscopic examination of tongue samples. The percentage of Sarcocystis infection for both species of deer was determined for prairies east of the Missouri River, west of the Missouri River, and Black Hills of western South Dakota. Sixteen percent (N = 62) of the white-tailed deer tongues from East River, 69% (N = 42) from West River, and 74% (N = 23) from the Black Hills were infected. Prevalence for mule deer was 88% (N = 24), 78% (N = 63), and 75% (N = 12) from East River, West River, and the Black Hills, respectively. Of 50 tongue samples obtained from both species of deer during a special antlerless deer hunt in the Black Hills in 1978, 66% were infected. Coyotes (Canis latrans), dogs (Canis familiaris), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), a gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), bobcat (Felis rufus), and raccoon (Procyon lotor) were fed muscle from white-tailed deer and mule deer naturally infected with Sarcocystis to determine their role as definitive hosts. All coyotes, dogs, and the gray fox shed sporocysts, while none were recovered from the other animals. Sporocysts shed by coyotes were counted and concentrated into an inoculum and administered to a white-tailed deer fawn, which was necropsied 85 days after inoculation. Sections of heart, tongue, esophagus, diaphragm, and skeletal muscle were found to be heavily infected with sarcocysts, while sarcocysts were not detected in a control fawn. PMID:6808161

Emnett, C W; Hugghins, E J

1982-04-01

69

Paleoenvironment of Fort Union Formation, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Rocks of Paleocene age are represented in the Cave Hills of northwestern South Dakota by the Ludlow, Cannonball, and Tongue River members of the Fort Union Formation. The Cave Hills are situated within the southern margin of the Williston basin, 80 mi (130 km) north of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Numerous fine-grained, fining-upward sedimentary sequences comprise the Ludlow Member and are attributed to meandering streams occupying a low-gradient lower alluvial to upper deltaic plain. The Cannonball Member is 130 ft (40 m) thick in the North Cave Hills and is represented by two fine-grained, coarsening-upward sandstone mudstone sequences. A distinct vertical succession of sedimentary facies occur within each sequence representing offshore/lower shoreface through upper shoreface/foreshore depositional environment. A north to northeast depositional strike for the Cannonball shoreline is inferred from ripple crest and cross-bed orientations. The basal part of the Tongue River consists of approximately 40 to 50 ft (12 to 15 m) of lenticular sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, thin-bedded lignite, and kaolinite beds representing thin broad channels, point-bar, levee, overbank, and nearshore swamp depositional environments. Massive fluvial channel sandstones measuring several tens of ft in thickness overlie the fine-grained basal Tongue River lithologies. These channel sandstones represent the continued progradation of continental/fluvial/coastal plain depositional environments eastward over the marine sandstones of the Cannonball Member.

Goodrum, C.

1983-08-01

70

BIA Forest Lands of North and South Dakota, 1996.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The inventory of BIA lands in North and South Dakota was part of the statewide inventories of the two States, which sampled all forest lands across both States, without regard to ownership. The North Dakota inventory covered all lands in the State and the...

D. E. Haugen M. H. Hansen

2002-01-01

71

Improving rural health care in South Dakota.  

PubMed

This study was designed to find ways to improve the quality of health care in rural settings. The study includes three components: a telephone survey of a rural community, a patient quiz, and interviews with ten rural family practice doctors in the southeast corner of South Dakota. This study was conducted in a rural community of about 1,500 people. The results of the survey suggest that rural health care can be improved by more education of the public on what is offered for preventative medicine, especially for the men 55 or younger, a female doctor who is willing to do obstetrical/gynecological services to meet the local demand, and physicians learning new procedures such as colonoscopy, colposcopy, and stress testing to better serve their patients. PMID:8997151

Mortinsen, R

1996-12-01

72

US hydropower resource assessment for South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

A total of 33 sites have been identified and assessed for their hydropower potential. Information as to the potential megawatts of capacity for 4 of the sites was not available; however, these sites have been identified as having hydropower potential and are included in the group of 33. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results for site capacities range from 35 kilowatts to 234 megawatts. Most of the sites have potential capacities of under 1 megawatts. The unadjusted hydropower potential for South Dakota was identified as being 1,124 megawatts. The Hydropower Evaluation Software results lower this estimate 38% to 695 megawatts. The greatest reduction in undeveloped potential occurs at developed sites with current power production. These sites have a Hydropower Evaluation Software estimated capacity of 285 megawatts, a 50% reduction in capacity. The number of sites does not change, only the identified capacity is reassessed.

Francfort, J.E.

1993-12-01

73

The state of South Dakota's child: 2010.  

PubMed

The year 2009 brought the second consecutive year of a decreased number of births, declining from the recent 2007 crest noted in the state and nationwide. This decrease could be an echo from the decline in births noted after the 1980 crest or could also reflect effects of the economic recession. The 2009 cohort of births included 21 percent of racial minority newborns that parallels national observations. A sharp decrease is noted in infant deaths in 2009 (for a rate of 6.7 per 1,000 population), returns its rate to a level comparable to previous years but slightly higher than the preliminary 2009 national rate of 6.3. Changing perceptions of hazards accompanying infant sleep may be affecting the designated causes given for sudden deaths of sleeping infants. Sudden unexplained infant death remains more frequent in South Dakota than nationwide. PMID:21337919

Wilson, Ann L

2011-01-01

74

75 FR 13144 - South Dakota Disaster #SD-00028  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1887-DR), dated 03/10/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 01/20/2010 through 01/26/2010. Effective Date: 03/10/2010. Physical Loan...

2010-03-18

75

75 FR 28312 - South Dakota Disaster # SD-00030  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1914-DR), dated 05/13/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm. Incident Period: 04/02/2010. DATES: Effective Date: 05/13/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline...

2010-05-20

76

75 FR 13145 - SOUTH DAKOTA Disaster #SD-00027  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1886-DR), dated 03/09/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 12/23/2009 through 12/27/2009. DATES: Effective Date:...

2010-03-18

77

75 FR 19435 - South Dakota Disaster Number SD-00027  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1886-DR), dated 03/09/2010. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 12/23/2009 through 12/27/2009. DATES: Effective Date:...

2010-04-14

78

78 FR 29425 - South Dakota Disaster #SD-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-4115-DR), dated 05/10/2013. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Snowstorm. Incident Period: 04/08/2013 through 04/10/2013. Effective Date: 05/10/2013....

2013-05-20

79

Determination of the Total Storage Capacity of the Cretaceous Sandstone Aquifers in South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For this study, the sandstones were divided into three stratigraphic units. In the western two-thirds of South Dakota, where Skull Creek Shale separates the Dakota and Fall River Formations from the overlying Newcastle-Dakota Formations, separate estimate...

J. P. Gries W. J. Siok R. K. Baker

1973-01-01

80

Flow-System Analysis of the Madison and Minnelusa Aquifers in the Rapid City Area, South Dakota: Conceptual Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The conceptual model of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Rapid City area synthesizes the physical geography, hydraulic properties, and ground-water flow components of these important aquifers. The Madison hydrogeologic unit includes the karstic M...

A. J. Long L. D. Putnam

2002-01-01

81

Numerical Groundwater-Flow Model of the Minnelusa and Madison Hydrogeologic Units in the Rapid City Area, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The city of Rapid City and other water users in the Rapid City area obtain water supplies from the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers, which are contained in the Minnelusa and Madison hydrogeologic units. A numerical groundwater-flow model of the Minnelusa an...

2009-01-01

82

Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File (ARF) (for Microcomputers): Demographic State by County--South Dakota, Wyoming.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the diskette version of the Area Resource File (ARF), which is a county-unit database with over 6,000 data elements. The purpose of ARF is to summarize data from many sources into a single file to facilitate health analysis. ARF on diskette is com...

R. B. Cole M. Morris

1986-01-01

83

Annotated Bibliography of South Dakota, Pioneer, and Indian Fiction in the Youth Collection of the Learning Resources Lab, I. D. Weeks Library, University of South Dakota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography focuses on fiction for children and young adults that is concerned with three subject areas: South Dakota, pioneers, and American Indian culture. The publication dates of these titles span the 1930s to the late 1980s. Entries are listed alphabetically by author and include title, publisher, date of publication, an…

Miller, Margaret B., Comp.

84

University of South Dakota Mathematics/Science Symposium: First Eisenhower Focused Initiative K-12 Mathematics and Science Symposium Conference Proceedings (Vermillion, South Dakota, January 13-14, 1995).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains papers presented at a mathematics and science symposium. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for the interchange of the state-of-the-art mathematics and science education activities taking place within a South Dakota National Science Foundation State Systemic Initiative project within Southeast Area

Otto, Paul B., Ed.

85

Flow-system analysis of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Rapid City area, South Dakota--conceptual model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The conceptual model of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Rapid City area synthesizes the physical geography, hydraulic properties, and ground-water flow components of these important aquifers. The Madison hydrogeologic unit includes the karstic Madison aquifer, which is defined as the upper, more permeable 100 to 200 ft of the Madison Limestone, and the Madison confining unit, which consists of the lower, less permeable part of the Madison Limestone and the Englewood Formation. Overlying the Madison hydrogeologic unit is the Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit, which includes the Minnelusa aquifer in the upper, more permeable 200 to 300 ft and the Minnelusa confining unit in the lower, less permeable part. The Madison and Minnelusa hydrogeologic units outcrop in the study area on the eastern flank of the Black Hills where recharge occurs from streamflow losses and areal recharge. The conceptual model describes streamflow recharge, areal recharge, ground-water flow, storage in aquifers and confining units, unsaturated areas, leakage between aquifers, discharge from artesian springs, and regional outflow. Effective transmissivities estimated for the Madison aquifer range from 500 to 20,000 ft2/d and for the Minnelusa aquifer from 500 to 10,000 ft2/d. Localized anisotropic transmissivity in the Madison aquifer has tensor ratios as high as 45:1. Vertical hydraulic conductivities for the Minnelusa confining unit determined from aquifer tests range from 1.3x10-3 to 3.0x10-1 ft/d. The confined storage coefficient of the Madison and Minnelusa hydrogeologic units was estimated as 3x10-4 ft/d. Specific yield was estimated as 0.09 for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers and 0.03 for the Madison and Minnelusa confining units. Potentiometric surfaces for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers have a general easterly gradient of about 70 ft/mi with local variations. Temporal change in hydraulic head in the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers ranged from about 5 to 95 ft in water years 1988-97. The unconfined areas were estimated at about 53 and 36 mi2 for the Madison and Minnelusa hydrogeologic units, respectively, in contrast to an aquifer analysis area of 629 mi2. Dye-tracer tests, stable isotopes, and hydrogeologic features were analyzed conjunctively to estimate generalized ground-water flowpaths in the Madison aquifer and their influences on the Minnelusa aquifer. The western Rapid City area between Boxelder Creek and Spring Creek was characterized as having undergone extensive tectonic activity, greater brecciation in the Minnelusa Formation, large transmissivities, generally upward hydraulic gradients from the Madison aquifer to the Minnelusa aquifer, many karst springs, and converging flowpaths. Water-budget analysis included: (1) a dry-period budget for declining water levels; October 1, 1987, to March 31, 1993; (2) a wet-period budget for rising water levels, April 1, 1993, to September 30, 1997; and (3) a full 10-year period budget for water years 1988-97. By simultaneously balancing these water budgets, initial estimates of recharge, discharge, change in storage, and hydraulic properties were refined. Inflow rates for the 10-year budget included streamflow recharge of about 45 ft3/s or 61 percent of the total budget and areal recharge of 22 ft3/s or 30 percent. Streamflow recharge to the Madison hydrogeologic unit was about 86 percent of the total streamflow recharge. Outflow for the 10-year budget included springflow of 31 ft3/s or 42 percent of the total budget, water use of about 10 ft3/s or 14 percent, and regional outflow of 22 ft3/s or 30 percent. Ground-water storage increased 9 ft3/s during the 10-year period, and net ground-water movement from the Madison to Minnelusa hydrogeologic unit was about 8 ft3/s.

Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

2002-01-01

86

Floods in North and South Dakota, frequency and magnitude  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The magnitude of a flood of a selected frequency for any point in the two states may be determined by methods outlined in this report, with two limitations. These methods are not applicable for regulated streams or for small-drainage areas (in general, less than 100 square miles). The determination of the magnitude of a flood of a selected frequency in the two-state area is accomplished by the use of composite frequency curves for 2 flood regions and curves showing variation of mean annual flood with drainage area for 9 hydrologic areas and 10 main-stem streams. These curves are based on all flood data collected in North and South Dakota with some use made of records from adjoining states. These data are tabulated in the report. Also included in the report is a tabulation of maximum flood experiences at gaging stations and outstanding floods at many miscellaneous sites.

McCabe, John A; Crosby, Orlo A.

1959-01-01

87

Geology of the Knife River area, North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Knife River area, consisting of six 15-minute quadrangles, includes the lower half of the Knife River valley in west-central North Dakota. The area, in the center of the Williston Basin, is underlain by the Tongue River member of the Fort Union formation (Paleocene) and the Golden Valley formation (Eocene). The Tongue River includes beds equivalent to the Sentinel Butte shale; the Golden Valley formation, which receives its first detailed description in this report, consists of two members, a lower member of gray to white sandy kaolin clay and an upper member of cross-bedded micaceous sandstone. Pro-Tongue River rocks that crop out in southwestern North Dakota include the Ludlow member of the Fort Union formation, the Cannonball marine formation (Paleocene) and the Hell Creek, Fox Hills, and Pierre formations, all upper Cretaceous. Post-Golden Valley rocks include the White River formation (Oligocene) and gravels on an old planation surface that may be Miocene or Pliocent. Surficial deposits include glacial and fluvial deposits of Pleistocene age and alluvium, dune sand, residual silica, and landslide blocks of Recent age. Three ages of glacial deposits can be differentiated, largely on the basis of three fills, separated by unconformities, in the Knife River valley. All three are of Wisconsin age and probably represent the Iowan, Tazewell, and Mankato substages. Deposits of the Cary substage have not been identified either in the Knife River area or elsewhere in southern North Dakota. Iowan glacial deposits form the outermost drift border in North Dakota. Southwest of this border are a few scattered granite boulders that are residual from the erosion of either the White River formation or a pre-Wisconsin till. The Tazewell drift border cannot be followed in southern North Dakota. The Mankato drift border can be traced in a general way from the South Dakota State line northwest across the Missouri River and through the middle of the Knife River area. The major land forms of southwestern North Dakota are: (1) high buttes that stand above (2) a gravel-capped planation surface and (3) a gently-rolling upland; below the upland surface are (4) remnants of a broad valley stage of erosion into which (5) modern valleys have been cut. The broad valley profiles of many streams continue east across the Missouri River trench and are part of a former drainage system that flowed into Hudson Bay. Crossing the divides are (6) large trenches, formed when the former northeast-flowing streams were dammed by the glacier and diverted to the southeast. The largest diversion valley is occupied by the Missouri River; another diversion system, now largely abandoned, extends from the Killdeer Mountains southwest to the mouth of Porcupine Creek in Sioux County. By analogy with South Dakota, most of the large diversion valleys are thought to have been cut in Illinoian time. Numerous diversion valleys of Illinoian to late Wisconsin age cut across the divides. Other Pleistocene land forms include ground and moraines, kames, and terraces. Land forms of Recent age include dunes, alluvial terraces, floodplains, and several types of landslide blocks. One type of landslide, called rockslide slump, has not previously been described. Drainage is well adjusted to the structure, most of the streams flowing down the axes of small synclines. The bedrock formations have been gently folded into small domes and synclines that interrupt a gentle northward regional dip into the Williston Basin. Three episodes of deformation affected southwestern North Dakota in Tertiary time: (1) intra-Paleocene, involving warping and minor faulting; (2) post-Eocene, involving uplift and tilting; (2) Oligocene, involving uplift and gentle folding. Mineral resources include ceramic clay, sand and gravel and lignite coal. The Knife River area is the largest lignite-producing district in the United States.

Benson, William Edward

1953-01-01

88

78 FR 48904 - United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota; Public Comment and Response on...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Division United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota; Public Comment...Judgment in United States v. Chiropractic Associates, Ltd. of South Dakota., Civil Action...AMERICA, Plaintiff, v. CHIROPRACTIC ASSOCIATES, LTD. OF SOUTH DAKOTA,...

2013-08-12

89

Estimated water use in South Dakota, 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water use in South Dakota during 1985 is estimated to have been 674 million gal/day. This is a slight decrease from the 1980 estimate of 690 million gal/day. Of the total use, 63% was from surface-water sources and 37% was from groundwater sources. About 75% of the total water use was for agriculture, 16% was for domestic and commercial use, 8% was for industrial and mining use, and 1% was for thermoelectric and geothermal uses. Of the total used, 361 million gal/day were consumed and 313 million gal/day were returned to the surface- and groundwater system. Water use by agriculture, the largest user, was mostly for irrigation. Total use was 516,000 acre-ft (460 million gal/day) for irrigation of 397,000 acres. Non-irrigation use, mainly for livestock, was 47.1 million gal/day. About 12% of the total use was by public-water suppliers. Seventy-five percent of the deliveries by public-water suppliers were for domestic use by 78% of the population. In addition to offstream use, instream use was substantial because of hydroelectric-power generation by the four dams on the Missouri River. During 1985, 60,500 million gal/day were used to generate 6,095 gigawatt-hr of electricity. (USGS)

Benson, Rick D.; Winterton, J. E.

1988-01-01

90

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report for IRP site No. 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota - Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Investigation Report for IRP Site No 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Volume I. This is the first volume of a two volume site investigation report. Two sites (Site 12 - Ramp area and Site 13 - Motor Vehicle Maintenance Facility) was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended on site 13 and quarterly sampling was recommended for site 12. South Dakota Regulators have agreed to both recommendations. Decision documents will be prepared for each site.

NONE

1996-02-01

91

BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG COLONY DYNAMICS IN SOUTH DAKOTA OVER A 10YEAR PERIOD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1968 and 1978, aerial photography was used to monitor distribution of black- tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies on a 400-square mile area in South Dakota, including parts of Buffalo Gap National Grassland, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, and Badlands National Monument (now Badlands National Park). Aerial photographs were taken of the study area in 1968 and annually from 1974

KATHLEEN A. FAGERSTONE; HOWARD P. TIETJEN; JAMES F. GLAHN; GREG L. SCHENBECK; JEAN BOURASSA

92

30 CFR 941.700 - South Dakota Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...are applicable to surface coal mining operations in South Dakota...been adopted under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act...regulations in this chapter. The full text of a rule is in the permanent...part apply to all surface coal mining operations in South...

2009-07-01

93

77 FR 24845 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; South Dakota; Regional Haze State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; South Dakota; Regional Haze State Implementation Plan AGENCY: Environmental...Implementation Plan (SIP) addressing regional haze submitted by the State of South Dakota...also referred to as the ``Regional Haze program''). DATES: This rule is...

2012-04-26

94

76 FR 47221 - South Dakota; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Emergency Management Agency [Internal Agency Docket No. FEMA-1984-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] South Dakota; Amendment...major disaster declaration for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1984-DR), dated May 13, 2011, and related determinations....

2011-08-04

95

Evaluation of Exploration Methods for Coarse Aggregate in Eastern South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The coarse aggregate research project was initiated to assist the South Dakota Department of Highways in the organization of an aggregate inventory. Aggregate in the glaciated portion of South Dakota is found in recognizable landforms. These landforms may...

R. L. Bruce B. E. Lundberg

1964-01-01

96

Water resources of Aurora and Jerauld Counties, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large quantities of slightly saline ground water are available for future water requirements in Aurora and Jerauld Counties, 1 ,236 square miles of glaciated, till-covered hills and plains in southeastern South Dakota. More than one million acre-feet of ground water is stored in five major glacial aquifers, outwash sand and gravel, beneath 340 square miles. About 58 million acre-feet is stored in bedrock, in the Niobrara marl aquifer, the Codell sandstone aquifer, and the Dakota sandstone aquifer. Recharge of aquifers by infiltration of precipitation totals 31 ,000 acre-feet annually. Effects of increased ground-water withdrawals generally have been small for glacial aquifers and large for some bedrock aquifers. Water levels declined 0.6 to 4 feet in glacial aquifers during 1978-80 within a mile of irrigation wells pumping 300 to 1,000 gallons per minute. In contrast, water levels declined 40 feet near a well pumping 1 ,500 gallons per minute from the Niobrara aquifer because of small artesian storage. Artesian pressure of the Dakota aquifer declined about 200 feet between 1909 and 1979 because of large withdrawals through flowing wells. The availability of surface water is limited because streams are ephemeral and have large flows only during spring of wet years. Most of the lakes are small, semipermanent, and shallow. Most surface water in the study area contains low concentrations of dissolved solids but most of the ground water is very hard and slightly saline. Some ground water has a very high-salinity hazard for irrigation. Water from the Niobrara and Codell aquifers also has a high sodium hazard and high boron concentrations. (USGS)

Hamilton, L. J.

1985-01-01

97

77 FR 12563 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers for South Dakota and Kentucky; Availability of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...MEP) Centers for South Dakota and Kentucky; Availability of Funds AGENCY: National...establish MEP centers in South Dakota and Kentucky. DATES: All proposals, paper and electronic...separate locations, South Dakota and/or Kentucky. These MEP centers will become...

2012-03-01

98

Review of South Dakota Non-State Trunk Road Inventory and Cultural Inventory. Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Government Research Bureau (GRB) at the University of South Dakota provided an assessment of South Dakota's Non-State Trunk Road Inventory (NSTRI) and Cultural Inventory (CI) databases. The first stage of the project involved a review of South Dakota ...

A. D. Molina C. Gonsor S. A. Nordyke W. D. Anderson

2010-01-01

99

Population Growth and Sprawl on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in South Dakota, especially Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the towns and agricultural areas of the reservation are undergoing a change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen

R. L. Campbell

2006-01-01

100

South Dakota Statewide Core Curriculum, Career Ladder, and Challenge System. A Case History.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The South Dakota Core Curriculum Project involving the career ladder approach to health manpower training, which began in 1970, had seven objectives including the following: (1) To organize a Health Manpower Council for the entire State; (2) to define the areas of basic commonality among the various training programs; and (3) to develop a core…

Brekke, Donald G.; Gildseth, Wayne M.

101

South Dakota Department of Education 2010 Annual Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|South Dakota has many things to be proud of: Its students consistently outperform their peers on national assessments. The state has a high graduation rate, and it ranks among the top states in the nation for students going on to postsecondary. Credit for these achievements goes to the state's local school districts. This annual report covers key…

South Dakota Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

102

South Dakota School Health Profiles. 2006 Executive Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of the study was to assess the status of elementary health and health education in public schools throughout South Dakota during the 2005-2006 school year. The study was designed to provide current data collected from both elementary and secondary school principals and teachers regarding health and physical education curricula,…

South Dakota Department of Education, 2007

2007-01-01

103

Biotelemetry of White Bass in a South Dakota Glacial Lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biotelemetry was used to track daily and monthly distributions of white bass (Morone chrysops) in Lake Poinsett, a South Dakota glacial lake. Ultrasonic transmitters were implanted into 30 adult white bass (332–450 mm, total length) during May 1997. White bass distribution was monitored from June to October 1997, January and February 1998, and April and May 1998. Distributions were quantified

H. Denise Becka; David W. Willis

2000-01-01

104

Biology of White Bass in Eastern South Dakota Glacial Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of investigations were undertaken to better understand the biology of white bass Morone chrysops in natural lakes of glacial origin in eastern South Dakota. White bass recruitment was erratic in these lakes. The relative abundance of age-0 white bass, as determined by means of bottom trawling during late summer and early fall, was positively related to both precipitation

David W. Willis; Craig P. Paukert; Brian G. Blackwell

2002-01-01

105

Summary of data pertaining to land use, rainfall, dryfall, stream discharge, and storm runoff collected as part of a study of the effects of urban runoff on Rapid Creek, Rapid City area, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The objectives of a 3-year study of urban runoff in the Rapid City area of South Dakota were to characterize the effects of urban runoff from rainfall on the water quality of Rapid Creek, and to evaluate the effects of the runoff on the existing cold-water fishery. In order to meet these objectives, it was necessary to obtain detailed data pertaining to land use, rainfall, dryfall, stream discharge, and storm runoff. This report describes the rationale behind the data collection program, describes the methods used to collect and analyze the data, and presents the data collected and summarized during the study. Six watersheds were investigated, ranging in size from 1 ,610 to 20,990 acres. Water quality data from 6 sites for about 30 rainstorms that occurred between June 1980 and July 1982 are presented. (USGS)

Goddard, K. E.; Lockner, T. K.; Harms, L. L.; Smith, M. H.

1989-01-01

106

UPPER MIDWEST SIX-STATE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION NETWORK SURVEY, IOWA, MINNESOTA, NEBRASKA, NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, WISCONSIN.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A DETERMINATION OF THE FEASIBILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF A SIX-STATE EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION NETWORK IN THE STATES OF IOWA, NEBRASKA, MINNESOTA, NORTH DAKOTA, SOUTH DAKOTA, AND WISCONSIN WAS CONDUCTED. IT WAS FOUND THAT A SIX-STATE, EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION NETWORK WAS POSSIBLE FROM A TECHNICAL VIEWPOINT. THE NETWORK WOULD USE ONLY EDUCATIONAL…

SCHWARZWALDER, JOHN C.; AND OTHERS

107

The Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mammoth Site of Hot Springs contains thousands of fossilized mammoths, and was discovered by chance in 1974 while excavating for a housing development in South Dakota. Their website offers visitors a 360-degree virtual tour of the unique museum that was built over the site of the now dry sinkhole, along with views of excavations that are still in progress. The "Paleontology" tab informs visitors not only about the woolly and Columbian mammoths that drowned in the sinkhole, but other animals as well. The "Mammoth Site Vertebrate List" link shows a slew of other animals, such as camels, shrub oxen, and the giant short-faced bear that lived throughout the Great Plains of South Dakota. A PDF of the 85 species of flora and fauna recovered at The Mammoth Site, as of January 2008, is also available in the same link. Visitors should also check out the "Research" tab to learn about current and ongoing research at the site.

108

Supreme Court refuses South Dakota appeal in parental notice case.  

PubMed

This overview of Federal cases points out that the refusal of the US Supreme Court on April 29, 1996, to hear the South Dakota case of Janklow v. Planned Parenthood leaves confusion about which standard (Salerno or Casey) is appropriate to apply to abortion cases. The South Dakota case involved an attempt to reverse an appellate ruling that changed the 1993 law requiring parental notification within 48 hours of the abortion procedure for an adolescent. The 1987 decision in United States v. Salerno established that plaintiffs who challenge an abortion law must meet the strict standard of proving that there was no set of circumstances under which the statute could be applied in a constitutional manner. The 1992 ruling in Planned Parenthood v. Casey required federal courts to eliminate abortions laws that placed an undue burden on a large number of women. Justices Scalia, Rehnquist, and Thomas considered it the duty of the high court to resolve the conflict between appellate courts over the legal standard for reviewing suits against abortion restrictions that was presented in a 1995 appellate decision. Justice Stevens issued a rare statement of agreement with the decision to reject the South Dakota case. The appeals court for South Dakota had invalidated the one-parent notification provision, because it did not permit a young adolescent to seek a judicial by-pass to avoid the mandate. This appellate ruling was based on a Supreme Court ruling involving two-parent consent and two-parent notification requirements that required states to provide a confidential and expeditious alternative to women who could not tell their parents. The lower appellate courts assumed that the two-parent notification alternatives would apply to one-parent notification alternatives. PMID:12291324

1996-05-01

109

Canada thistle biological control agents on two South Dakota wildlife refuges  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We monitored populations of Canada thistle biocontrol agents Cassida rubiginosa, Ceutorhynchus litura, Larinus (= Hadroplantus) planus, Urophora cardui, Orellia (= Terellia) ruficauda, and Rhinocyllus conicus on Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) at two national wildlife refuges in South Dakota from 1999 through 2003. C. litura, U. cardui, O. ruficauda, and R. conicus were present on both refuges. Agent populations were low except for C. litura, which was present in up to 90% of stems in some plots. C. litura infestation did not reduce thistle flowering, stem length, or over-winter survival. There was no change in thistle stem numbers over the study period and no difference in stem numbers in areas of high C. litura populations compared to areas of low C. litura populations. Our results suggest that insect biological control agents are inadequate for reduction of Canada thistle in southern South Dakota.

Reed, C. C.; Larson, D. L.; Larson, J. L.

2006-01-01

110

Factors affecting road mortality of white- tailed deer in eastern South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) mortalities (n = 4,433) caused by collisions with automobiles during 2003 were modeled in 35 counties in eastern South Dakota. Seventeen independent variables and 5 independent variable interactions were evaluated to explain deer mortalities. A negative binomial regression model (Ln Y = 1.25 - 0.12 (percentage tree coverage) + 0.0002 (county area) + 5.39 (county hunter

TROY W. GROVENBURG; JONATHAN A. JENKS; ROBERT W. KLAVER; KEVIN L. MONTEITH; DWIGHT H. GALSTER; RON J. SCHAUER; WILBERT W. MORLOCK; JOSHUA A. DELGER

2008-01-01

111

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a high-sensitivity aerial gamma-ray spectrometer survey of the Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in volume 1 of this report. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic information to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the US. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-04-01

112

Thunderstorms and Flooding of August 17, 2007, with a Context Provided by a History of Other Large Storm and Flood Events in the Black Hills Area of South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Black Hills area of western South Dakota has a history of damaging flash floods that have resulted primarily from exceptionally strong rain-producing thunderstorms. The best known example is the catastrophic storm system of June 9-10, 1972, which caused severe flooding in several major drainages near Rapid City and resulted in 238 deaths. More recently, severe thunderstorms caused flash flooding near Piedmont and Hermosa on August 17, 2007. Obtaining a thorough understanding of peak-flow characteristics for low-probability floods will require a comprehensive long-term approach involving (1) documentation of scientific information for extreme events such as these; (2) long-term collection of systematic peak-flow records; and (3) regional assessments of a wide variety of peak-flow information. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with the South Dakota Department of Transportation and National Weather Service to produce this report, which provides documentation regarding the August 17, 2007, storm and associated flooding and provides a context through examination of other large storm and flood events in the Black Hills area. The area affected by the August 17, 2007, storms and associated flooding generally was within the area affected by the larger storm of June 9-10, 1972. The maximum observed 2007 precipitation totals of between 10.00 and 10.50 inches occurred within about 2-3 hours in a small area about 5 miles west of Hermosa. The maximum documented precipitation amount in 1972 was 15.0 inches, and precipitation totals of 10.0 inches or more were documented for 34 locations within an area of about 76 square miles. A peak flow of less than 1 cubic foot per second occurred upstream from the 2007 storm extent for streamflow-gaging station 06404000 (Battle Creek near Keystone); whereas, the 1972 peak flow of 26,200 cubic feet per second was large, relative to the drainage area of only 58.6 square miles. Farther downstream along Battle Creek, a 2007 flow of 26,000 cubic feet per second was generated entirely within an intervening drainage area of only 44.4 square miles. An especially large flow of 44,100 cubic feet per second was documented for this location in 1972. The 2007 peak flow of 18,600 cubic feet per second for Battle Creek at Hermosa (station 06406000) was only slightly smaller than the 1972 peak flow of 21,400 cubic feet per second. Peak-flow values from 2007 for three sites with small drainage areas (less than 1.0 square mile) plot close to a regional envelope curve, indicating exceptionally large flow values, relative to drainage area. Physiographic factors that affect flooding in the area were examined. The limestone headwater hydrogeologic setting (within and near the Limestone Plateau area on the western flank of the Black Hills) has distinctively suppressed peak-flow characteristics for small recurrence intervals. Uncertainty is large, however, regarding characteristics for large recurrence intervals (low-probability floods) because of a dearth of information regarding the potential for generation of exceptionally strong rain-producing thunderstorms. In contrast, the greatest potential for exceptionally damaging floods is around the flanks of the rest of the Black Hills area because of steep topography and limited potential for attenuation of flood peaks in narrow canyons. Climatological factors that affect area flooding also were examined. Area thunderstorms are largely terrain-driven, especially with respect to their requisite upward motion, which can be initiated by orographic lifting effects, thermally enhanced circulations, and obstacle effects. Several other meteorological processes are influential in the development of especially heavy precipitation for the area, including storm cell training, storm anchoring or regeneration, storm mergers, supercell development, and weak upper-level air flow. A composite of storm total precipitation amounts for 13 recent individual storm events indicates

Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bunkers, Matthew J.; Carter, Janet M.; Stamm, John F.; Williamson, Joyce E.

2010-01-01

113

Summary of Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) activities in South Dakota, 2000-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated data-collection activities for the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program-West (EMAP-West) in South Dakota during 2000. The objectives of the study were to develop the monitoring tools necessary to produce unbiased estimates of the ecological condition of surface waters across a large geographic area of the western United States, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of those tools in a large-scale assessment. In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks (GF&P) established a cooperative agreement and assumed responsibility for completing the remaining assessments for the perennial, wadable streams of the EMAP-West in the State. Stream assessment sites were divided into two broad categories-the first category of sites was randomly selected and assigned by the USEPA for South Dakota. The second category consisted of sites that were specifically selected because they appeared to have reasonable potential for representing the best available physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the State. These sites comprise the second category of assessment sites and were called 'reference' sites and were selected following a detailed evaluation process. Candidate reference site data will serve as a standard or benchmark for assessing the overall ecological condition of the randomly selected sites. During 2000, the USEPA completed 22 statewide stream assessments in South Dakota. During 2001-2003, the USGS and GF&P completed another 42 stream assessments bringing the total of randomly selected stream assessments within South Dakota to 64. In addition, 18 repeat assessments designed to meet established quality-assurance/quality-control requirements were completed at 12 of these 64 sites. During 2002-2004, the USGS in cooperation with GF&P completed stream assessments at 45 candidate reference sites. Thus, 109 sites had stream assessments completed in South Dakota for EMAP-West (2000-2004). Relatively early in the EMAP-West stream-assessment process, it became apparent that for some streams in south-central South Dakota, in-stream conditions varied considerably over relatively short distances of only a few miles. These changes appeared to be a result of geomorphic changes associated with changes in the underlying geology. For these streams, moving stream assessment sites short distances upstream or downstream had the potential to provide substantially different bioassessment data. In order to obtain a better understanding of how geology influences stream conditions, two streams located in south-central South Dakota were chosen for multiple stream sampling at sites located along their longitudinal profile at points where notable changes in geomorphology were observed. Subsequently, three sites on Bear-in-the-Lodge Creek and three sites on Black Pipe Creek were selected for multiple stream sampling using EMAP-West protocols so that more could be learned about geologic influences on stream conditions. Values for dissolved oxygen and specific conductance generally increased from upstream to downstream locations on Bear-in-the-Lodge Creek. Values for pH and water temperature generally decreased from upstream to downstream locations. Decreasing water temperature could be indicative of ground-water inflows. Values for dissolved oxygen, pH, and water temperature generally increased from upstream to downstream locations on Black Pipe Creek. The increase in temperature at the lower sites is a result of less dense riparian cover, and the warmer water also could account for the lower concentrations of dissolved oxygen found in the lower reaches of Black Pipe Creek. Values for specific conductance were more than three times greater at the lower site (1,342 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm)) than at the upper site (434 ?S/cm). The increase probably occurs when the stream transitions from contacting the underlying Ar

Heakin, Allen J.; Neitzert, Kathleen M.; Shearer, Jeffrey S.

2006-01-01

114

South Dakota 1995 Kids Count Factbook: Key Indicators of Child Well-Being.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The South Dakota Kids Count Project began in 1993 with a grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The goal is to improve the collection of national, state, and local data on the well-being of children in a way that increases awareness of their situation and provides the means to address their needs. South Dakota Kids Count tracks children using…

Kids Count--South Dakota, Vermillion.

115

JV 38APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-01-01

116

LEAVE OF ABSENCE PRACTICES IN SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOLS--SCHOOL YEAR 1964-65.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

IN ADDITION TO SCHOOL POLICIES RELATING TO TEACHER LEAVES OF ABSENCE IN SOUTH DAKOTA, STATE BY STATE SUMMARIES OF EDUCATIONAL LEGISLATION REGARDING SICK LEAVE, MATERNITY LEAVE, AND SABBATICAL LEAVE ARE PRESENTED IN THIS DOCUMENT. OF THE 228 RESPONDING SCHOOLS IN SOUTH DAKOTA, 215 REPORTED EXISTING SICK LEAVE POLICIES. THE MAJORITY OF RESPONDING…

South Dakota Education Association, Pierre.

117

Assessment Data at South Dakota State University: Analysis, Results, and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The history of assessment in South Dakota, the creation of the Assessment Program Team at South Dakota State University (SDSU), the rationale and purpose of assessment programs, and the initial findings from a 6-month assessment team analysis of assessment data at SDSU are highlighted. The data were collected during the first 2 years of SDSU's…

Hyman, Randy; And Others

118

75 FR 51835 - South Dakota; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FEMA-1886-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] South Dakota; Amendment No. 2 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration...notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of South Dakota (FEMA-1886-DR), dated March 9, 2010, and...

2010-08-23

119

50 CFR 32.61 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2. Anglers must not be on the ice until 1 hour prior to legal sunrise and must be off the ice by 1 hour after legal sunset. 3. Anglers must remove ice shacks (see § 27.93 of this chapter...Waterfowl Production Areas throughout the District in accordance with...

2009-10-01

120

50 CFR 32.61 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2. Anglers must not be on the ice until 1 hour prior to legal sunrise and must be off the ice by 1 hour after legal sunset. 3. Anglers must remove ice shacks (see § 27.93 of this chapter...Waterfowl Production Areas throughout the District in accordance with...

2010-10-01

121

Retail Trade Area Analysis Mayville-Portland North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to provide an indepth trade area analysis of Mayville-Portland, North Dakota. Specific analyses included determining Mayville-Portland's main and greater trade areas, identifying the demographic profile of Mayville-Portland shoppers, examining important and less important services for patron shoppers of Mayville-Portland, identifying neighboring cities that area shoppers patronize, determining distances area shoppers traveled to Mayville-Portland, and listing popular

Dean A. Bangsund; F. Larry Leistritz; Janet K. Wanzek; Dale F. Zetocha; Holly E. Bastow-Shoop

1991-01-01

122

The South Dakota Land Use Inventory System  

Microsoft Academic Search

All levels of government share the need for natural resource information. Remote Sensing and computer technology can provide a cost effective means of collecting, analyzing, and synthesizing some of this data.\\u000aOne of the principal areas where remotely sensed data is being applied in governmental natural resource planning is in the generation of land use, or more precisely, land cover

Paul A. Tessar

1975-01-01

123

Hepatitis transmission among the Sioux Indians of South Dakota.  

PubMed Central

Hepatitis A continues to occur in cyclical community-wide epidemics on the Indian reservations of South Dakota. In June 1985 a population-based serosurvey for viral hepatitis involving 120 households was conducted at the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Indian reservations in South Dakota. The serosurvey was performed shortly after a large hepatitis A epidemic on the Pine Ridge reservation in 1983-84, and immediately before a large hepatitis A epidemic on the Rosebud reservation in 1985-86. The overall seroprevalence for antibodies to hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) was 76.2 percent (Pine Ridge reservation 80.5 percent, Rosebud reservation 72.0 percent, relative risk = 1.12, 95 percent confidence interval = 1.01, 1.24). For age groups 0 to 4 years, 54.2 percent and 36.1 percent of children were seropositive at Pine Ridge and Rosebud, respectively. Seropositivity rose rapidly with age; by age 40, more than 90 percent of persons at both Pine Ridge and Rosebud were anti-HAV positive. Only 1.1 percent of persons tested were positive for hepatitis B markers. Anti-HAV seroprevalence rates in both communities are similar to rates observed in developing countries. The surprisingly high anti-HAV seroprevalence among young children at Rosebud, where clinical hepatitis A had been virtually absent in the previous seven years, indicates that high-grade silent transmission was taking place during the interepidemic period.

Shaw, F E; Shapiro, C N; Welty, T K; Dill, W; Reddington, J; Hadler, S C

1990-01-01

124

South Dakota School of Mines, Keystone, South Dakota solar-energy-system performanceevaluation, June 1980-April 1981  

SciTech Connect

The South Dakota School of Mines site is the Mount Rushmore National Memorial Visitor's Center in Keystone, South Dakota. The active solar energy system is a retrofit designed to supply 45% of the heating load and 53% of the observation room cooling load. The system is equipped with 2000 square feet of flat-plate collector panels double-glazed with a black chrome absorber surface; 3000 gallons of water in an insulated tank for sensible heat storage; a two-stage fuel oil furnace for auxiliary heating; and direct expansion electric air conditioning units for auxiliary cooling. The actual heating and cooling provided are 42% and 12% respectively. The solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fueld savings, electrical energy expense, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance are among the performance data listed. A control problem is reported that kept the collector pump running 24 hours a day for 18 days. Performance data are given for each subsystem as well as for the overall system. Typical system operation and the system operating sequence for a day are given. The system's use of solar energy and the percentage of losses are given. Also included are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, long-term weather data, chemical analysis of the antifreeze solutions, sensor technology, and typical weather and performance data for a month. (LEW)

Eck, T.F.

1981-01-01

125

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04

126

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

Not Available

1981-04-01

127

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

Not Available

1981-04-01

128

Distribution of Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota: clarifying the epidemiology of bluetongue disease in the northern Great Plains region of the United States.  

PubMed

The presence or absence of the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a primary vector of bluetongue viruses (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae, BTV) in North America, was assessed on ranches and farms across the Northern Great Plains region of the United States, specifically Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota, as part of a 2-yr regional study of BTV exposure among cattle. Blacklight/suction trap samples totaling 280 2-night intervals were taken at 140 aquatic sites (potential larval habitat for C. sonorensis) on 82 livestock operations (ranches and farms) that span a south-to-north gradient of expected decreasing risk for exposure to BTV. In Nebraska, C. sonorensis populations were common and widespread, present at 15 of 18 operations. Of 32 operations sampled in South Dakota, seven of which were sampled in successive years, 18 were positive for C. sonorensis; 13 of 14 operations located west of the Missouri River were positive, whereas 13 of 18 operations east of the river were negative. Of 32 operations sampled in North Dakota, seven of which were sampled both years, 12 were positive for C. sonorensis. Six of eight operations located west and south of the Missouri River in North Dakota were positive, whereas 18 of 24 operations east and north of the river were negative for C. sonorensis. These data illustrate a well-defined pattern of C. sonorensis spatial distribution, with populations consistently present across Nebraska, western South Dakota, and western North Dakota; western South Dakota, and North Dakota encompass the Northwestern Plains Ecoregion where soils are nonglaciated and evaporation exceeds precipitation. In contrast, C. sonorensis populations were largely absent east of the Missouri River in South Dakota and North Dakota; this area comprises the Northwestern Glaciated Plains Ecoregion and Northern Glaciated Plains Ecoregion where surface soils reflect Wisconsinan glaciation and precipitation exceeds evaporation. In defining a well-demarcated pattern of population presence or absence on a regional scale, the data suggest that biogeographic factors regulate the distribution of C. sonorensis and in turn BTV exposure. These factors, ostensibly climate and soil type as they affect the suitability of larval habitat, may explain the absence of C. sonorensis, hence limited risk for exposure to BTV, across the eastern Northern Plains, upper Midwest, and possibly Northeast, regions of the United States. PMID:21661325

Schmidtmann, E T; Herrero, M V; Green, A L; Dargatz, D A; Rodriquez, J M; Walton, T E

2011-05-01

129

An occurrence of autunite, Lawrence County, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In July 1952 an occurrence of autunite was found in the northern part of the Black Hills, South Dakota, during a reconnaissance for radioactive deposits. The autunite occurs as fracture coatings and disseminations in siltstone of the Deadwood formation of Cambrian age and is concentrated mainly in the lower 2 feet of the siltstone at the contact with an intrusive rhyolite porphyry; the radioactive zone is exposed in two old workings, which are 90 feet apart. An 18-inch vertical channel sample of the autanite-bearing siltstene contained 0. 048 percent uranium. The gangue minerals are fluorite and limonite. The uranium is believed to have been introduced into the siltstone by solutions of magmatic origin that migrated along the lower contact of the siltstone after or during emplacement of the porphyry'

Vickers, Rollin C.

1953-01-01

130

Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

The South Dakota Consumer's Guide for Small Wind Electric Systems provides consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include: how to make your home more energy efficient, how to choose the right size turbine, the parts of a wind electric system, determining if there is enough wind resource on your site, choosing the best site for your turbine, connecting your system to the utility grid, and if it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a state wind resource map and a list of state incentives and state contacts for more information.

O'Dell, K.

2001-10-04

131

Toward the Twenty-First Century. Public Supported Academic Libraries and the State Library in South Dakota. Report of a Study-Team. Publication 87-6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report documents the findings of a study that examined library and information services in South Dakota's state-supported academic libraries, the first such study conducted in 15 years. The state library and six schools--University of South Dakota, South Dakota State University, Black Hills State College, Dakota State College, Northern State…

Eaton, Nancy; And Others

132

Water resources data collected during water year 1988 at selected James River basin sites in North Dakota and South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Operation of the proposed Garrison Diversion Unit will supply water from the Missouri River in North Dakota to the upstream part of the James River basin. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation initiated a monitoring program in 1984 to aid in determining whether the potential impacts resulting from Garrison Diversion Unit operation will be compatible with the operational objectives of the three national wildlife refuges located on the James River in North Dakota and South Dakota. This report presents water resources data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during water year 1988 in the James River basin as part of the Garrison Diversion Unit monitoring program. Water discharge records for 12 stations, reservoir elevation and contents records for one station, stream gage-height records for three stations, and water quality records for 23 stations are presented. (USGS)

Sando, S. K.; Guttormson, K. G.; Gleich, T. A.

1990-01-01

133

Use of Remote Sensing Techniques for Inventorying and Planning Utilization of Land Resources in South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The basic procedures for interpreting remote sensing imagery to rapidly develop general soils and land use inventories were developed and utilized in Pennington County, South Dakota. These procedures and remote sensing data products were illustrated and e...

V. I. Myers C. J. Frazee A. E. Rusche D. G. Moore G. D. Nelson

1974-01-01

134

South Dakota State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The South Dakota State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in South Dakota. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in South Dakota. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in South Dakota.

Not Available

1981-10-01

135

A Tribute to Weatherization Solutions in South Dakota: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

South Dakota demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

D& R International

2001-10-10

136

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sioux Falls quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains the flight path, radiometric multi-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, and anomaly maps for the Sioux Falls Quadrangle in South Dakota.

Not Available

1981-05-01

137

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains the flight path, radiometric multi-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, and anomaly maps for the Huron Quadrangle in South Dakota.

Not Available

1981-04-01

138

Comparing geotechnical to geologic estimates for past overburden in the Pierre-Hayes, South Dakota area: an argument for in-situ pressuremeter determination ( USA).  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A knowledge of past overburden thickness is useful for designing underground structures such as waste repositories. This study attempts to determine if a correlation can be made between a geologic estimate and two types of geotechnical calculations of past overburden thickness. In the Pierre-Hayes area, Late Cretaceous Pierre Shales is the only bedrock present, but clasts of the Miocene Ogallala Formation were found in the Pleistocene deposits, suggesting that rocks of the Ogallala Formation once covered this area. Based on the geologic estimate, the Ogallala surface was 1100 ft higher than the present surface. Of the two types of geotechnical data acquired for the Hayes site, the laboratory overconsolidation ratios indicate a past overburden thickness value of 2300 ft, whereas the in situ pressuremeter overconsolidation ratios indicate 1318 ft. We, therefore, believe that in situ determination is a better indicator of past overburden that the laboratory results. However, why the two test results differ to this degree is unknown at present.-from Authors

Collins, D. S.; Nichols, Jr, T. C.

1987-01-01

139

Selected Science Educational Outcomes as a Function of South Dakota Educational Reform Policies 1995-2004  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates selected South Dakota science educational outcomes as a function of selected educational reform policies. In the state of South Dakota, echoing divergent reform initiatives from "A Nation at Risk" to "No Child Left Behind," new guidelines and requirements have been instituted. Yet, very little effort has been made to assess the progress of these educational changes. In this study, selected educational outcomes-SAT8/9/10 scores-as a function of selected South Dakota educational reform policies were examined. School districts, ranked in the top and bottom five percent of socioeconomic status (SES) in the state, were selected for analysis. Comparison on student's science educational outcomes was also be made between the two major ethnic populations-Caucasians and Native Americans. All research questions were stated in the null form for hypothesis for statistical testing. Critical t was the statistic technique used to test the hypotheses. The findings revealed that the selected reform policies in South Dakota appeared to assist students from the higher socioeconomic backgrounds to perform better than pupils from the lower socioeconomic backgrounds. The academic performance for the ethnic and social class minorities remained unchanged within the study timeline for reform. Examined from the prism of Michael Apple's critical theory, the selected South Dakota reform policies have paid little attention to the issues of social equality. Continuing and collective efforts to promote equitable reform policies for enhancing the learning experience of all children in South Dakota seem necessary.

Hsu, T.; Tien, K. C.

2005-05-01

140

Geology of the Williston basin, North Dakota, Montana, and South Dakota, with reference to subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The southern Williston basin, which underlies about 110,000 square miles #n North Dakota, South Dakota, and eastern Montana, is part of a large structural and sedimentary basin. Its surface is a flat to gently rolling plain, standing about 1,500 to 3,500 feet above sea level and locally studded by a few high buttes. The sedimentary sequence that fills the basin has a maximum thickness of about 16,700 feet and rests on Precambrian metamorphic rocks at depths of 500 to 13,900 feet below sea level. It contains rocks of every geologic system, from Cambrian to Quaternary. Rocks of Middle Cambrian through Middle Ordovician age are largely shale and sandstone, as much as 1,200 feet thick; rocks of Late Ordovician through Pennsylvanian age are largely limestone and dolomite, as much as 7,500 feet thick; and rocks of Permian through Tertiary age are predominantly shale and siltstone, as much as 8,000 feet thick. Pleistocene glacial drift mantles the northern and eastern parts of the area. Rocks of the Williston basin are gently folded and regional dips are 1? or less from the margins to the basin center. Dips on the flanks of the major anticlinal folds, the Nesson and cedar Creek anticlines and the Poplar and Bowdoin domes, generally are about 1? to 3? except on the steep west limb of the Cedar Creek anticline. The basin was shaped by Laramide orogeny during latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary time. Most of the present structural features, however, were initiated during the Precambrian and reactivated by several subsequent orogenies, of which the latest was the Laramide. The most important mineral resource of the area is oil, which is produced predominantly from the Paleozoic carbonate sequence and largely on three of the major anticlinal folds, and lignite, which is present near the surface in Paleocene rocks. The subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes at some places in the Williston basin appears to be geographically and geologically feasible. Many sites, at which large quantities of wastes might be injected with minimal danger of contamination of fresh-water aquifers and-oil-producing strata, are available.. The strata and types of reservoirs that deserve primary consideration for waste disposal are the Winnipeg Formation of Middle Ordovician age as a deep salaquifer, the Permian to Jurassic salt beds as moderately deep-units in which solution cavities might be created for storage, the thick Upper Cretaceous shale beds as shallow hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs, and the Newcastle Sandstone of Early Cretaceous age as a shallow shale-enclosed sandstone reservoir.

Sandberg, C. A.

1962-01-01

141

77 FR 37438 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease SDM 96907, South Dakota  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease SDM 96907, South Dakota AGENCY: Bureau...reinstatement of competitive oil and gas lease SDM 96907, Fall River County, South Dakota...accruing from the date of termination. No leases were issued that affect these lands....

2012-06-21

142

Spawning-related movement patterns of a unique rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population in a South Dakota headwater stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to determine the spawning locations and movement patterns, and provide insight to the success of a naturalized rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) population that occurs in a 3?km section of Spearfish Creek, South Dakota. Twelve rainbow trout from Spearfish Creek, South Dakota were implanted with radio transmitters and tracked from 6 December 2006 to 19

Daniel A. James

2011-01-01

143

Math and science technology access and use in South Dakota public schools grades three through five  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of K-12 technology standards, soon to be added to state testing of technology proficiency, and the increasing presence of computers in homes and classrooms reflects the growing importance of technology in current society. This study examined math and science teachers' responses on a survey of technology use in grades three through five in South Dakota. A researcher-developed survey instrument was used to collect data from a random sample of 100 public schools throughout the South Dakota. Forced choice and open-ended responses were recorded. Most teachers have access to computers, but they lack resources to purchase software for their content areas, especially in science areas. Three-fourths of teachers in this study reported multiple computers in their classrooms and 67% reported access to labs in other areas of the school building. These numbers are lower than the national average of 84% of teachers with computers in their classrooms and 95% with access to computers elsewhere in the building (USDOE, 2000). Almost eight out of 10 teachers noted time as a barrier to learning more about educational software. Additional barriers included lack of school funds (38%), access to relevant training (32%), personal funds (30%), and poor quality of training (7%). Teachers most often use math and science software as supplemental, with practice tutorials cited as another common use. The most common interest for software was math for both boys and girls. The second most common choice for boys was science and for girls, language arts. Teachers reported that there was no preference for either individual or group work on computers for girls or boys. Most teachers do not systematically evaluate software for gender preferences, but review software over subjectively.

Schwietert, Debra L.

144

Comprehensive Water Quality Management for the State of South Dakota. 303(e) Basin Plan for the Niobrara River Basin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document states South Dakota's strategy for correcting water pollution and thereby improving and maintaining water quality in the Niobrara River Basin. It specifies the process of planning and managing pollution abatement operations to achieve South ...

1976-01-01

145

Summit-Watertown transmission line project, South Dakota. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to rebuild the existing Summit-Watertown 115-kV transmission line, located in northeastern South Dakota, and western Minnesota. Nearly 60 percent of the existing facility was replaced in 1965 after severe ice-loading broke structures and wires. Because of the extensive loss of the line, surplus poles had to be used to replace the damaged H-frame structures. These were of varying sizes, causing improper structure loading. Additionally, the conductors and overhead shield wires have been spliced in numerous places. This provides additional space on these wires for icing and wind resistance, which in turn create problems for reliability. Finally, a progressive fungal condition has weakened the poles and, along with the improper loading, has created an unsafe condition for maintenance personnel and the general public.

Not Available

1993-12-01

146

Asesssment of mobile gamma-scanning van activities in Edgemont, South Dakota. [UMTRA program  

SciTech Connect

All accessible thoroughfares in an area in Edgemont, South Dakota, comprising approximately 800 properties, were traversed by a mobile gamma-ray scanning van operated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the mobile survey was to identify residual radioactive contamination on properties in the vicinity of the nearby uranium tailings pile. The properties identified by mobile scanning (herein referred to as anomalies) were compared with results from walk-on measurements conducted by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). The mobile scan was successful in identifying 48% of the properties previously identified as contaminated by PNL walk-on measurements. Modification of the algorithm used by the mobile scanning van to identify radioactive contamination from the measured gamma radiation resulted in mixed success; the number of successful identifications increased but the number of false identifications increased disproportionately and unacceptably.

Not Available

1986-04-01

147

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Whitewood Creek Site, Lawrence, Meade, and Butte Counties, South Dakota (First Remedial Action), Final Report, March 30, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Whitewood Creek site is a mine tailings deposit area near the town of Whitewood in Lawrence, Mead, and Butte counties, South Dakota. From 1877 to 1977, arsenic-rich tailings from gold and ore mining and milling operations, conducted by the Homestake M...

1990-01-01

148

Generalized Potentiometric Surface of the Arikaree Aquifer, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and Bennett County, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and Bennett County are located in southwest South Dakota. The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation includes all of Shannon County and the part of Jackson County south of the White River. Extensive Indian trust lands are in Bennett County. For purposes of this map, the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and all of Bennett County are included in the study area (sheet 1). Ground water from wells and springs is the predominant source of public and domestic supply within the study area. The Arikaree aquifer is the largest source of ground water throughout this area. The Oglala Sioux Tribe is developing a ground-water management plan designed to ?preserve, protect and maintain the quality of ground water for living and future members and non-members of the Oglala Sioux Indian Tribe within the internal and external boundaries of the Pine Ridge Reservation? (Michael Catches Enemy, Oglala Sioux Tribe Natural Resources Regulatory Agency, oral commun., 2007). Hydrologic information about the Arikaree aquifer is important to managing this resource. In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began working in cooperation with the Oglala Sioux Tribe to develop a potentiometric map of the Arikaree aquifer in Jackson and Shannon Counties, with a primary component of that effort being a well inventory in those counties. In 2003, the study area was expanded to include Bennett County.

Carter, Janet M.; Heakin, Allen J.

2007-01-01

149

South Dakota 1996 KIDS COUNT Factbook: Key Indicators of Child Well-Being.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This KIDS COUNT statistical report is the fourth to examine trends in children's and adolescents' well-being in South Dakota using indicators of health, education, social, and economic well-being, along with information on family income, household relationships, population, and AFDC/food stamp usage for each county. The information is organized…

Kids Count--South Dakota, Vermillion.

150

Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Interval in Badlands National Park, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A marine K-T boundary interval has been identified throughout the Badlands National Park region of South Dakota. Data from marine sediments suggest that deposits from two asteroid impacts (one close, one far away) may be preserved in the Badlands. These i...

P. W. Stoffer P. Messina J. A. Chamberlain D. O. Terry

2001-01-01

151

Optimizing habitat location for black-tailed prairie dogs in southwestern South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

A spatial optimization model was formulated and used to maximize black-tailed prairie dog populations in the Badlands National Park and the Buffalo Gap National Grassland in South Dakota. The choice variables involved the strategic placement of limited additional protected habitat. Population dynamics were captured in formulations that reflected exponential population growth combined with the recalcitrant dispersal behavior of this social

John Hof; Michael Bevers; Daniel W. Uresk; Gregory L. Schenbeck

2002-01-01

152

Murdo Municipal Airport, Murdo, South Dakota. Project 72-1-7-46-0036-01.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposal for the construction of a general aviation airport at Murdo, South Dakota. Land acquisition - development and clear zones; runway and site preparation 4400x150 ft; taxiway 150x50 ft; apron 300x150 ft; aircraft tie down an...

1972-01-01

153

Design and Development of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology's Aerial Robotic Reconnaissance System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Team will participate in the 2008 International Aerial Robotics Competition (IARC) with a two vehicle system consisting of an Airstar International Mongoose helicopter and a custom quad-rotor helicopter. The vehicles have been modified to work together and complete stages 1-3 in the 15 minute time limit of stage 4.

Raunaq Bhushan; John Heiberger; Adam Helmers; Brian Jensen; Jacob Oursland; Mason Pluimer; Justin Williamson; Jamie Vickery

154

Organochlorine insecticide, polychlorinated biphenyl, and metal residues in some South Dakota birds, 1975-76  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common species of South Dakota birds with different feeding habits were analyzed in 1975-76 for 11 insecticide residues, six metals, and PCB's. Crows, American coots, starlings, and Franklin's gulls were analyzed. DDE was the most prevalent residue, detected in 93% of all samples. Dieldrin was detected in 61% of all samples. PCB's were not found to be above the minimum

Y. A. Greichus; B. D. Gueck; B. D. Ammann

1978-01-01

155

Geochemical Modeling of the Madison Aquifer in Parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaction models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. The sulfur isotope data are treated as an isotope dilution problem, whereas the carbon isotope data are treated as Rayleigh distillations. All reaction models

L. Niel Plummer; John F. Busby; Roger W. Lee; Bruce B. Hanshaw

1990-01-01

156

Putting the Pieces Together: South Dakota Integration Training Model. 4th Ed.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a compilation of materials that form the South Dakota Integration Training Model. Section 1 contains materials related to career information, including transparency masters/handouts with information on workplace trends, job skills, growth occupations, earnings, and nontraditional careers. Section 2, on integration basics,…

Kucker, Marsha, Comp.; Bemis, Dodie, Comp.; Smith-Rockhold, Gloria, Comp.; Wiese, Vicki, Comp.

157

Geochemical modeling of the Madison aquifer in parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaciton models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. All reaction models reproduce the observed chemical and carbon and sulfur isotopic composition of the final waters and are partially validated by predicting the

L. Niel Plummer; B. B. Hanshaw; J. F. Busby; R. W. Lee

1990-01-01

158

Gizzard Shad Recruitment Patterns in a Western South Dakota Irrigation Reservoir  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is a primary prey species in Angostura Reservoir, South Dakota, which is on the northwestern edge of the shad range. The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent to which winter severity influences gizzard shad recruitment patterns in this reservoir. Adult gizzard shad were collected during spring electrofishing, and sagittal otoliths were removed

Mathew J. Ward; David W. Willis; Gene F. Galinat

2006-01-01

159

Standards and Guidelines for Providing Due Process of Law to the South Dakota Student.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|On January 22, 1974, the South Dakota State Board of Education, after a year's study and deliberation, adopted a resolution defining the nimimal standards for procedural due process guaranteed a public school student when he is suspended or expelled from school. Under the resolution the due process procedure adopted by each school district must…

South Dakota State Div. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Pierre.

160

INDIAN EDUCATION, STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA, JOHNSON O'MALLEY PROGRAM, FISCAL 1966. ANNUAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THIS DOCUMENT PRESENTS THE FISCAL REPORT AND INFORMATION RELATED TO SOUTH DAKOTA'S PARTICIPATION IN THE JOHNSON O'MALLEY PROGRAM, 1966. CHARTS RELATING THE FINANCIAL BREAKDOWN OF EXPENDITURES, INCOME, ENROLLMENT, AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE, AND THE NUMBER OF 8TH GRADE AND 12TH GRADE GRADUATES OF THE FORTY-THREE SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE PRESENTED. COSTS…

WADE, JON C.

161

Physicochemical and Biological Influences on Black Bullhead Populations in Eastern South Dakota Glacial Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lake and fish survey data (1991–1992) were compiled for 23 eastern South Dakota natural lakes to provide a basis for preliminary investigation of black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) populations. Survey data contained numerous physical and chemical variables describing lake environments and relative abundance and sue structure of the primary fish species present. Analyses indicated that abundance of black bullheads increased with

Michael L. Brown; David W. Willis; Brian G. Blackwell

1999-01-01

162

Organic Matter and Water Stability of Field Aggregates Affected by Tillage in South Dakota  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Increased tillage intensity has been associated with declines in soil organic matter (SOM). A case study was conducted (2001-2004) on adjacent farms (both in a two-year crop rotation) in eastern South Dakota to quantify tillage effects on components of SOM and soil aggregate stability. One farm used...

163

South Dakota School Principals' Preferred Leadership Styles for Leading Change to Face Poverty and Discrimination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This quantitative research study identified perceptions regarding leadership styles of a sample of high school, middle school, and elementary school principals serving in South Dakota public and tribal/BIE (Bureau of Indian Education) schools in 2011. From 152 public school districts and 20 tribal/BIE schools, a sample of 148 school principals…

Soka, John Alex

2011-01-01

164

Demography and Socio-Economic Characteristics of South Dakota and lts Economic Regions. Bulletin Number 120.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The information about South Dakota presented in this booklet is intended for use by both private and government sector planners and decisionmakers at every level who would profit from knowledge of the character of the underlying trends and forces at work within the State. The first half of the booklet is devoted to the State in general: History…

Bergman, W. H.

165

Soil microbial properties under permanent grass, conventional tillage, and no-till management in South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine how no-till and conventional tillage affected microbial properties of soil quality, using permanent grass fields as a standard of local high-quality soils. Agricultural fields in South Dakota were matched within soil type and location so that each set contained one field managed in permanent grass cover, one managed for annual crops using

Lynne Carpenter-Boggs; Peter D. Stahl; Mike J. Lindstrom; Tom E. Schumacherd

2003-01-01

166

Structural Relationships of Largemouth Bass and Bluegill Populations in South Dakota Ponds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spring electrofishing samples were collected from 13 small South Dakota impound- ments to determine if the population structures of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus in a northern state were similar to those in more southerly waters. Largemouth bass catch per hour of electrofishin g (catch per unit effort; CPUE) was inversely correlated with proportional stock density (PSD;

CHRISTOPHER S. GUY; DAVID W. WILLIS

1990-01-01

167

Relationship between Larval and Juvenile Yellow Perch Abundance in Eastern South Dakota Glacial Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We sought to determine if abundance of larval yellow perch Perca flavescens could predict abun- dance of age-0 juvenile perch in late summer. Yellow perch larvae and juveniles were sampled from six eastern South Dakota glacial lakes in 1997. The number of age- 0 yellow perch caught per seine haul in late summer was positively related to larval abundance in

Marcy R. Anderson; Shannon J. Fisher; David W. Willis

1998-01-01

168

Video lottery gambling: Effects on pathological gamblers seeking treatment in South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty-eight pathological gamblers receiving treatment for addictive illness in two South Dakota hospitals were assessed for types of gambling and grouped into three categories; 15 “video lottery only” (VLO), 36 “video lottery mixed” (VLM), and 7 “not video lottery” (NVL). There were 51 male and 7 female respondents, with a mean age of 38.2. We hypothesized that video lottery would

Timothy Morgan; Lial Kofoed; Jerry Buchkoski; Robert D. Carr

1996-01-01

169

Project F 047-5( ) and F-047-4, Beadle and Sanborn Counties, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes relocation of approximately 2.0 miles of State Highway 37 in Sanborn County, South Dakota, and construction of a 4-lane divided highway with limited control of access. Adverse environmental effects include the acquisition of right of ...

1971-01-01

170

Residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of the latest survey of residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota. Topics examined include the geographic distribution of residential fuelwood consumption and production within the State; the species of trees used for residential fuelwood; the types of wood-burning facilities used; the reasons for burning fuelwood; and the land, ownership, and tree classes from which fuelwood was produced.

May, D.M.

1996-02-23

171

Population Characteristics of Black Crappies in South Dakota Waters: A Case for Ecosystem-Specific Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

We sampled 22 populations of black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus from three ecosystem types (large impoundments, >40 ha; small impoundments, <40 ha; natural lakes) to determine the factors that influence population characteristics (recruitment, growth, size structure, and condition) in South Dakota. Recruitment variability was best correlated with the logio of the shoreline development index (r = 0.63, df = 16) and

CHRISTOPHER S. GUY; DAVID W. WILLIS

1995-01-01

172

Population Characteristics of Black Crappies in South Dakota Waters: A Case for Ecosystem-Specific Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

We sampled 22 populations of black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus from three ecosystem types (large impoundments, >40 ha; small impoundments, ?40 ha; natural lakes) to determine the factors that influence population characteristics (recruitment, growth, size structure, and condition) in South Dakota. Recruitment variability was best correlated with the log10 of the shoreline development index (r = 0.63, df = 16) and

Christopher S. Guy; David W. Willis

1995-01-01

173

South Dakota Department of Education Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. Amended with Approval  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This workbook, submitted by the South Dakota Department of Education to the U.S. Department of Education, is for State Grants under Title IX, Part C, Section 9302 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Public Law 107-110). By January 31, 2003, States must complete and submit to the Department this Consolidated State Application…

US Department of Education, 2006

2006-01-01

174

South Dakota School of Mines & Technology Electric Snowmobile 2009 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Alternative Fuel Vehicle Team at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology took on an unfamiliar task once again this year. The team designed and manufactured a zero emissions snowmobile to compete in the 2009 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. The snowmobile was designed following the fundamental requirements set forth by the team. A design was selected that fit

Thomas Clay; Erik Engelmeyer; Nate Fischer; Justin Griesinger; Jake Kraemer; Kyle Krajewski; Jake Leland; Charles Maupin; Justin Schoepf; Adam Schulz

175

Criteria and Format to Optimize Political Debates: An Analysis of South Dakota's "Election '80" Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The academic community, news media, and public have expressed interest in debate as a vehicle to facilitate intelligent citizen evaluation of political candidates. This paper focuses on the format, criteria, and survey results of the "Election 80" television debates between congressional candidates from South Dakota, as compared with the…

Pfau, Michael

1983-01-01

176

Digital map of hydraulic conductivity for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set consists of hydraulic conductivity contours and polygons for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32 degrees to almost 45 degrees north latitude and from 96 degrees 30 minutes to almost 104 degrees west longitude. The area covers 174,000 square miles and is present in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota.

Cederstrand, J. R.; Becker, M. F.

1998-01-01

177

Expanding the Circle: South Dakota Deaf-Blind Project. Final Report, 10-1-98 through 9-30-99.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the South Dakota Deaf-Blind Project, a 4-year federally funded project designed to raise awareness of the need for early identification of children who are deaf-blind and reside on Native American reservation lands. To this end, the states of Montana, Minnesota, North Dakota, Nebraska,…

South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

178

Characterization and Removal of Silica from Webster, South Dakota, and Roswell, New Mexico, well Waters (Part I), and Removal of Iodide from Webster, South Dakota, well Water (Part II).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Work performed has established that all of the silica in Roswell, New Mexico and Webster, South Dakota well water supplies is in solution and is probably monomeric. Four materials were then found which have sorptive or chemisorptive properties for monomer...

G. R. Bell J. P. Leineweber J. C. Yang J. A. Hunter W. F. Savage

1968-01-01

179

Cultural Resource Investigation of the Proposed Lake Brekken and Lake Holmes Recreation Area, North Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The University of North Dakota Anthropology-Archaeology Department undertook an intensive pedestrian survey of the proposed Lake Brekken-Lake Holmes Recreation Area. The survey was conducted to identify any cultural resources, whether historical, archaeol...

K. N. Good

1978-01-01

180

Resource and Potential Reclamation Evaluation: Garrison Study Area Report (North Dakota).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the investigation was to collect baseline data for establishing reclamation objectives and lease stipulations. The Garrison Study Area, located in west-central North Dakota, lies within the glaciated portion of the Great Plains Physiographi...

G. H. Westman L. M. Parish

1983-01-01

181

Sunset Committee Findings Transmitted to the 1978 Legislature Pursuant to Section 8, Chapter 3, 1977 South Dakota Session Laws.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document presents the letter of transmittal by the Senator, Chairman of the 1977 Sunset Committee, to the Members of the 1978 South Dakota Legislature. The document further presents the Sunset Committee's findings and recommendations pertaining to the...

1977-01-01

182

Proposed Second Watertown-Brookings 115-KV Transmission Line, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program. South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposed construction of a 45-mile second 115-kv Transmission Line between Watertown and Brookings, South Dakota, in Codington, Deuel and Brookings Counties. The line is scheduled for completion in 1976. A summary of environmental...

1972-01-01

183

Catastrophic flood origin, little Missouri River valley, Montana, South Dakota, and North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Mosaics of photographically reduced topographic maps demonstrate the Little Missouri River valley was developed by gigantic floods. Catastrophic flood landforms, oriented in a northwest-southeast direction, cross the entire Little Missouri drainage basin. Field evidence, consisting of abundant flood-deposited alluvium, supports map evidence. Flood-produced landforms, cut in easily eroded claystone bedrock, appear fresh, suggesting that floods occurred late during the last glacial cycle. Sheets of water, several hundred kilometers wide, flowed in a southeast direction, parallel with a continental ice margin. Erosion lowered the regional surface from a level corresponding to the tops of the highest present-day buttes to the surface now crossed by the headwaters of the Moreau, Grand, Cannonball, Heart, and Green Rivers. Spillway trenches served to channel flow and rapidly cut headward into easily eroded claystone. These trenches include the Moreau, Grand, Cannonball, Heart, and Missouri valleys. The Missouri valley in western North Dakota became the dominant spillway as tributary trenches systematically cut off flow feeding competing spillways. Formation of the Little Missouri spillway, first as a north-trending valley, progressively cut off floodwaters flowing into the Heart, Cannonball, Grand, and Moreau spillways. The north end of the Little Missouri spillway also was cut off by a deeper east-trending spillway. Huge sheets of floodwater continued to pour across the divide west of the Little Missouri continuing to lower that surface. These floodwaters were cut off by development of the Yellowstone spillway in eastern Montana.

Clausen, E.N.

1988-07-01

184

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04

185

Sources and summaries of water-quality information for the Rapid Creek basin, western South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report provides a compilation of water quality information for the Rapid Creek basin in western South Dakota. Two types of information are included: First, past and current water quality monitoring data collected by the South Dakota Department of Water and Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and others are described. Second, a summary is included for all past water quality reports, publications, and theses that could be located during this study. A total of 62 documents were abstracted and included journal articles, abstracts, Federal agency reports and publications, university and State agency reports, local agency reports, and graduate theses. The report should be valuable to water resources managers, regulators, and others contemplating water quality research, monitoring, and regulatory programs in the Rapid Creek basin. (USGS)

Zogorski, John S.; Zogorski, E. M.; McKallip, T. E.

1990-01-01

186

Interrelationships between Fish Tissue Mercury Concentrations and Water Quality for South Dakota Natural Lakes and Impoundments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine whether water quality parameters commonly associated with primary productivity\\u000a may be used to predict the susceptibility of a specific water body to exceed proposed fish consumption advisory limitation\\u000a of 0.3 mg kg?1. South Dakota currently has nine lakes and impoundments that exceed fish tissue mercury advisory limits of 1.0 mg kg?1 total mercury, far exceeding US

James J. Stone; Cindie M. McCutcheon; Larry D. Stetler; Steven R. Chipps

187

Seasonal movements and home ranges of white-tailed deer in north-central South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of movement patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann, 1780)) inhabiting landscapes intensively modified by agricultural systems is important to the present and future understanding of deer ecol- ogy. Little information exists regarding daily and seasonal movements of white-tailed deer in north-central South Dakota. Therefore, our goal was to determine movement patterns and home-range use of female white-tailed deer

T. W. Grovenburg; J. A. Jenks; R. W. Klaver; C. C. Swanson; C. N. Jacques; D. Todey

2009-01-01

188

Evaluation of Largemouth Bass-Yellow Perch Communities in Small South Dakota Impoundments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and yellow perch Percaflavescens were sam- pled in eight small (0.9-27.9 hectares) South Dakota impoundments to evaluate community dy- namics and determine whether the yellow perch can be used as a panfish for small-pond manage- ment. Largemouth bass catch per hour of electro fishing (CPUE) was positively correlated (r = 0.81, P = 0.02) with yellow

CHRISTOPHER S. GUY; DAVID W. WILLIS

1991-01-01

189

Early tertiary age of pitchstone in the northern black hills, South dakota.  

PubMed

A block of pitchstone in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, is Paleocene in age, according to potassium-argon dating of biotite and fission-track dating of zircon in the sample. These data invalidate published suggestions that the age is much younger. The pitchstone is not extrusive in its present position but instead is in a volcanic pipe with other fragments that came downward from as much as 1100 meters above the modern surface. PMID:17818496

Redden, J A; Obradovich, J D; Naeser, C W; Zartman, R E; Norton, J J

1983-06-10

190

Food Selectivity of Bigmouth Buffalo, Ictiobus cyprinellus, in Lake Poinsett, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food habits and food selectivity of bigmouth buffalo, Ictiobus cyprinellus, in Lake Poinsett, South Dakota were studied from January through November 1968. Food of bigmouth buffalo fry ranging from 12.5 to 21.0 mm total length was primarily benthic organisms. Food of sub-adult and adult bigmouth buffalo ranging from 236 to 833 mm total length was primarily zooplankton. Most planktonic organisms

Victor J. Starostka; Richard L. Applegate

1970-01-01

191

Economic impact of a private sector micro-financing scheme in South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

While poverty rates on Native American Indian reservations are triple the US average. Small business incubation programs,\\u000a available elsewhere in the US, scarcely exist on the Native American Indian Reservations (NAIRs). Our unique study tests the\\u000a effects of the Lakota Fund (LF), a private sector small business development initiative on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South\\u000a Dakota, on the economic

David A. Benson; Aaron K. Lies; Albert A. Okunade; Phanindra V. Wunnava

2011-01-01

192

Early Tertiary Age of Pitchstone in the Northern Black Hills, South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A block of pitchstone in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, is Paleocene in age, according to potassium-argon dating of biotite and fission-track dating of zircon in the sample. These data invalidate published suggestions that the age is much younger. The pitchstone is not extrusive in its present position but instead is in a volcanic pipe with other fragments that came downward from as much as 1100 meters above the modern surface.

Redden, Jack A.; Obradovich, John D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Zartman, Robert E.; Norton, James J.

1983-06-01

193

SEASONAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA  

Microsoft Academic Search

-,!.. Abstract: Seasonal activity patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were studied injl tensively along a IS-mile stretch of the Big Sioux River and less intensively on an expanse of 1,100; square miles in central eastern South Dakota from February, 1964, to March, 1966. Thirty-three deer were.'i marked individually with ear tags, streamers, and collars, and 461 locations were recorded.

ROLLIN D. SPARROWE; PAUL F. SPRINGER

194

Influence of Angler Exploitation on Black Crappie Population Structure in a Rural South Dakota Impoundment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anglers harvested approximately 122 black crappies (Pomoxis nigromaculatus)\\/ha at 18-ha Murdo Lake, South Dakota, in 1992. Based on a mean length of 26.2 cm for harvested black crappies, anglers likely harvested 36.1 kg\\/ha. The following spring (1993), proportional stock density (PSD) for black crappies collected with trap nets was 10—far lower than for any of the previous four years. Thus,

David W. Willis; Robert M. Neumann; Christopher S. Guy

1994-01-01

195

Movement Patterns of Adult Black Crappie, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, in Brant Lake, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Movement of adult black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) in Brant Lake, South Dakota was studied with ultrasonic telemetry from April through August 1991. Movement ranged from 0 to 584 m\\/h and was significantly different among months (P=0.0001, F=9.34, df=4) and diel periods (P=0.0013, F=5.45, df=3). Activity was greatest during April and July. Diel movement increased from evening to morning, and the

Christopher S. Guy; Robert M. Neumann; David W. Willis

1992-01-01

196

Comparison of Otolith and Scale Age Characteristics for Black Crappies Collected from South Dakota Waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scales and otoliths (sagittae) were collected from black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus sampled during the spring of 1991 in Red Plum Reservoir and Roy Lake, South Dakota. Red Plum Reservoir contained a slow-growing black crappie population, whereas Roy Lake had a fast-growing population. Annuli in scales and otoliths were identified independently by three readers. Within-structure (i.e., among-reader) and between-structure agreements in

Carter G. Kruse; Christopher S. Guy; David W. Willis

1993-01-01

197

The Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary (K-T) Interval in Badlands National Park, South Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Philip W. Stoffer and USGS colleagues wrote this report (.pdf format) on the marine K-T boundary interval that occurs throughout the Badlands National Park region of South Dakota. Data from marine sediments (supported by paleontological correlation, sequence stratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and strontium isotope geochronology) suggest that several asteroid impacts may be preserved in the Badlands. The deposits are thought to represent late Maestrichtian events or possibly the terminal K-T event.

Terry, Dennis O.; Chamberlain, John A.; Messina, Paula.; Stoffer, Philip W.

2001-01-01

198

"So long as I can read": farm women's reading experiences in Depression-era South Dakota.  

PubMed

During the Great Depression, with conditions grim, entertainment scarce, and educational opportunities limited, many South Dakota farm women relied on reading to fill emotional, social, and informational needs. To read to any degree, these rural women had to overcome multiple obstacles. Extensive reading (whether books, farm journals, or newspapers) was limited to those who had access to publications and could make time to read. The South Dakota Free Library Commission was valuable in circulating reading materials to the state's rural population. In the 1930s the commission collaborated with the USDA's Extension Service in a popular reading project geared toward South Dakota farm women. This "Reading in the Home" program greatly increased reading opportunities and motivations. Of particular interest to rural women were tales of pioneer life featuring strong protagonists. Through these stories, farm women found validation and encouragement to persevere. Reading also broadened horizons and challenged assumptions. For the depression-era farm woman, reading books and other materials provided recreation, instruction, and inspiration in a discouraging time. PMID:19860030

Lindell, Lisa R

2009-01-01

199

Technical-assistance report on a geothermal heating utility for Lemmon, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this effort was to review work already done toward establishing a geothermal heating utility in Lemmon, South Dakota; to redefine the goals for such a project; and to recommend how the project might proceeed to completion. The minimum size Phase I suggested would provide heat for up to 62 buildings in a 9-block area. Total cost is estimated at $1,800,000 to 1,950,000. The geothermal source is expected to be 100 to 400 gpm of 160/sup 0/F water pumped from 500 feet deep. Proposed energy savings and energy cost savings are presented. Analysis indicates that the major geothermal development effort in Lemmon should be directed toward the Madison aquifer. The minimum project dictates simple reinjection of the water after primary thermal extraction, although other uses are attractive and may be promoted if this resource is developed. A wide range of funding sources was investigated. Most promising avenues appear to be some form of local bond financing, and loans from the Farmer's Home Administration or the HUD Urban Development action grant program. The report suggests that a municipally-owned geothermal district heating utility be established, and a bond issue approved to pay for the initial well drilling, which is the major risk in the whole venture. A UDAG grant for 25% of the well cost may be obtainable. If the well proves successful, then the rest of the project can go forward.

Not Available

1982-02-01

200

Depositional environments of middle Minnelusa Leo (Middle and Upper Pennsylvanian), Wyoming, South Dakota, and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

The informal middle member of the Minnelusa Formation, commonly known as Leo, consists of a spectrum of sediments including sandstone, dolomite, anhydrite, bedded chert, limestone, and radioactive carbonaceous shale. Deposition within the upper Paleozoic alliance basin of the present day tri-state area of South Dakota, Wyoming, and Nebraska occurred in sabkha, tidal flat, and shallow subtidal environments. Major and minor cycles of eustatic sea level changes are manifest by the Leo section. Early Desmoinesian (lowermost Leo) sediments are open marine, upper subtidal limestone interbedded with restricted marine upper subtidal dolomite, anhydrite, and radioactive organic-rich dolomite. During the upper Desmoinesian and lower Missourian, most of the Alliance basin was a restricted carbonate tidal flat. Throughout the remainder of the Pennsylvanian, the prevalent environment was a restricted coastal to inland sabkha with episodic inundations intercalating intertidal dolomite and lagoonal black shale with the sabkha sediments. Prolonged periods of exposure allowed migration of eolian bypass with only isolated patches of dunes being trapped by rare topographic relief. Criteria suggesting windblown deposition of the majority of Leo sandstone include deflationary lag surfaces, low-amplitude ripples, subcritically climbing translatent cross-stratification, and sand-flow toes. Isolated eolian sandstones provide excellent stratigraphic traps for hydrocarbons generated in the organic-rich shales. The current flurry of Leo drilling that began in 1978, has affirmed the inherent potential of this play. Definition of paleodepositional trends and seismic recognition of isolated dunes are the keys to Leo exploration success.

Tromp, P.L.

1983-08-01

201

LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF NORTH DAKOTA AND SOUTH DAKOTA  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources; they are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. Ecore...

202

76 FR 7810 - Notice of Proposed Change to Section I of the South Dakota and North Dakota State Technical Guides  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...made to the NRCS State Technical Guides concerning State...used as part of the technical documents to conduct...Dakota, inquire in writing to Janet L. Oertly...Dakota, inquire in writing to Paul J. Sweeney...the law to NRCS State Technical Guides used to...

2011-02-11

203

A comparison of media frames in print vs. television news: an examination of the Elijah Page death penalty case in South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to determine the frames used during the South Dakota news media coverage of the Elijah Page death penalty case and detect patterns of frame usage, valence of news coverage and source usage. A content analysis of 163 South Dakota news reports from three years of news media coverage was conducted. The study found that the procedural frame

Heather Rexanne Haley

2010-01-01

204

Peak Stages from Backwater Conditions at Streamflow-Gaging Stations in and near South Dakota through Water Year 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Stream stages associated with the annual peak discharge are presented for 182 streamflow-gaging stations in and near South Dakota. The peak stage at a station can occur as the result of the annual maximum discharge, but also as the result of backwater conditions. Backwater, often caused by ice, can produce a peak stage higher than the stage coincident with annual maximum discharge. The U.S. Geological Survey has cooperated with the South Dakota Department of Transportation to prepare this report, which provides a summary of peak-stage data through water year 2001 for gaging stations in and near South Dakota where annual peak stages resulting from backwater conditions have exceeded stages associated with annual peak discharge by as much as several feet. Where applicable, data summaries include the flood stage that is assigned by the National Weather Service.

Thompson, Ryan F.

2007-01-01

205

Geothermal heating project at St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

St. Mary's Hospital, Pierre, South Dakota, with the assistance of the US Department of Energy, drilled a 2176 ft well into the Madison Aquifer ot secure 108/sup 0/F artesian flow water at 385 gpm (475 psig shut-in pressure). The objective was to provide heat for domestic hot water and to space heat 163,768 sq. ft. Cost savings for the first three years were significant and, with the exception of a shutdown to replace some corroded pipe, the system has operated reliably and continuously for the last four years.

Not Available

1984-12-01

206

Effectiveness of corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) areawide pest management in South Dakota.  

PubMed

Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence and Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are serious pests of maize, Zea mays L. To reduce the amount of toxicants released into the environment, the Agricultural Research Service implemented a 5-yr (1997-2001) areawide pest management program in five geographic locations, including one in South Dakota. The objective was to use integrated pest management tactics to suppress adult Diabrotica populations over a broad geographic area by using aerially applied semiochemical-baited insecticides. Suppressed populations theoretically should reduce oviposition, limit larval feeding damage to maize roots, and result in fewer beetles emerging in subsequent years. We used emergence cages, sticky traps, and CRW lure traps to monitor adult D. barberi and D. v. virgifera populations. We sampled for Diabrotica eggs, and we determined damage to maize roots. We sampled in several maize fields (control) located near the areawide site. The baited insecticides were effective in reducing adult populations 1 and 2 wk after application, and most remained low for the duration of the maize growing season. Fewer beetles were captured in both sticky and lure traps in the areawide site than in the control site. With a few exceptions, egg counts, adult emergence, and maize root damage were similar between the areawide and control sites; however, maize roots had greater fresh weight in the control site. Although not all goals were accomplished, when considering the amount of toxicant released into the environment, using semiochemical-baited insecticides to suppress adult pest Diabrotica populations seems to be an effective areawide management tool. PMID:17972631

French, B Wade; Chandler, Laurence D; Riedell, Walter E

2007-10-01

207

Report to the Department of Energy on the DOE/EPSCoR planning activities for the state of South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

An extensive review of the current status of energy-related research and educational activities within the state of South Dakota was carried out. Information exchange meetings were conducted at the major research institutions as well as with many representatives of state government. Visits were also made to professional educators who are deeply involved with the state`s principal minority group, the American Indian. Several activities in the human resource development area that will be carried out in the five-year implementation project were identified. Many of these will be closely coordinated with other efforts currently in progress under the auspices of the NSF SSI (Statewide Systemic Initiatives in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education) office. The authors will also work closely with AWU and other regional consortia to foster a higher level of participation in existing DOE programs and to develop adaptations and {open_quotes}follow-ons{close_quotes} that are tailored to the specific needs of South Dakota. Many of these programs will involve extensive interaction with DOE laboratories. Special programs will be carried out that are designed to keep a larger number of the Native American population in the science and engineering pipeline. An assessment of the research strengths of this state was made. With the assistance of external consultants, the authors identified two principal areas in which they have the potential to develop nationally competitive research programs that fall within DOE objectives. One is a comprehensive biomass systems study, and the other a water quality study as it relates to energy production.

Not Available

1994-12-01

208

Native Woodlands and Birds of South Dakota: Past and Present.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eighty-four percent of the upland bird species in present-day bird counts along the Missouri River were included in bird species lists 150 years ago. Eighty-three percent of upland bird species in the Slim Buttes area also occurred 80 to 120 years ago. Hi...

M. M. Rumble C. H. Sieg D. W. Uresk J. Javersak

1998-01-01

209

Direct utilization of geothermal energy in western South Dakota agribusiness. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project involved the direct utilization of geothermal energy for (1) space heating of farm and ranch buildings, (2) drying grain, and (3) providing warm stock water during the winter. The site for this demonstration project was the Diamond Ring Ranch north of Midland, South Dakota. Geothermal water flowing from an existing well into the Madison Aquifer was used to heat four homes, a shop, a hospital barn for cattle, and air for a barn and grain dryer. This site is centrally located in the western region of South Dakota where geothermal water is available from the Madison Aquifer. The first year of the project involved the design of the heating systems and its construction while the following years were for operation, testing, demonstrating, and monitoring the system. Required modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating modifications and improvements were made during this period. Operating experience showed that such application of geothermal resources is feasible and can result in substantial fuel savings. Economic analyses under a variety of assumptions generally gave payback periods of less than ten years. Numerous technical recommendations are made. The most significant being the necessity of passive protection from freezing of remote geothermal systems subject to winter shut downs caused by power or equipment failure. The primary institutional recommendation is to incorporate a use for the geothermal water such as irrigation or stock watering into agribusiness-related geothermal development.

Howard, S.M.

1983-09-01

210

Spatio-temporal epidemiology of human west nile virus disease in South dakota.  

PubMed

Despite a cold temperate climate and low human population density, the Northern Great Plains has become a persistent hot spot for human West Nile virus (WNV) disease in North America. Understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of WNV can provide insights into the epidemiological and ecological factors that influence disease emergence and persistence. We analyzed the 1,962 cases of human WNV disease that occurred in South Dakota from 2002-2012 to identify the geographic distribution, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability of disease risk. The geographic and seasonal patterns of WNV have changed since the invasion and initial epidemic in 2002-2003, with cases shifting toward the eastern portion of South Dakota and occurring earlier in the transmission season in more recent years. WNV cases were temporally autocorrelated at lags of up to six weeks and early season cumulative case numbers were correlated with seasonal totals, indicating the possibility of using these data for short-term early detection of outbreaks. Epidemiological data are likely to be most effective for early warning of WNV virus outbreaks if they are integrated with entomological surveillance and environmental monitoring to leverage the strengths and minimize the weaknesses of each information source. PMID:24173141

Wimberly, Michael C; Giacomo, Paolla; Kightlinger, Lon; Hildreth, Michael B

2013-10-29

211

JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

Darren D. Schmidt

2002-11-01

212

Rural Sprawl and the Impact of Human Land Use on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in South Dakota, specifically Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the towns and communities of the reservation are undergoing change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent

R. Campbell; T. Bennett

2005-01-01

213

A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF THE PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND SUPPORTING MATHEMATICS INSTRUCTION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS OF SOUTH DAKOTA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

FACTORS WHICH WERE BELIEVED TO CONTRIBUTE TO STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT WERE INVESTIGATED. THE SAMPLE WAS TAKEN FROM 130 FOUR-YEAR SECONDARY PUBLIC AND NON-PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN SOUTH DAKOTA. STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS WAS COMPARED TO CLASS RANK, AND EXAMINED IN RELATION TO SUCH SCHOOL VARIABLES AS (1) SCHOOL ENROLLMENT, (2) SCIENCE AND…

BEDWELL, THOMAS HOWARD

214

Quantification of Mass Loading to Strawberry Creek Near the Gilt Edge Mine, Lawrence County, South Dakota, June 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Gilt Edge mine, near Deadwood in Lawrence County, South Dakota, is part of the famous mining district in the northern Black Hills. Mining for gold, copper, and tungsten started in the Gilt Edge deposits in 1876. In the early mining days, small mines b...

B. A. Kimball R. L. Runkel K. Walton-Day J. E. Williamson

2006-01-01

215

Perceptions of Parents, Teachers, and Administrators Regarding Procedures of the Individualized Educational Program in Selected South Dakota Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study was to determine the perceptions of parents, teachers, and administrators concerning four major requirements of individualized educational programs (IEP) in public, Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and contract Indian schools in South Dakota. A questionnaire was hand delivered to 31 parents of "special needs" children, 24…

Hughes, Dean Mack

216

Homestake Gold Mine, an Early Proterozoic Iron-Formation-Hosted Gold Deposit, Lawrence County, South Dakota. Chapter J.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Homestake mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, is the largest iron-formation-hosted gold deposit known. The deposit was discovered in 1876, and the mine has operated continuously to the present day. Ore is currently mined from depths as gre...

S. W. Caddey R. L. Bachman T. J. Campbell R. R. Reid R. P. Otto

1991-01-01

217

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 92-097-2238, Langers Black Hills Silver Jewelry, Inc., Spearfish, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from employees of Langers Black Hills Silver Jewelry (SIC-3911), an investigation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at that site in Spearfish, South Dakota. Twenty one to 23 workers at the facility were engag...

M. Kiefer

1992-01-01

218

Bovine viral diarrhea virus multi-organ infection in two white-tailed deer in southeastern South Dakota  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The role of wild ruminants especially cervids in the transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has remained an enigma. Two white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were submitted to the Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory (ADRDL) in the fall of 2003 by the South Dakota Game ...

219

Proposed Second Watertown-Brookings 115-KV Transmission Line, Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program. South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Construction is proposed of a 45-mile second 115-kv transmission line between Watertown and Brookings, South Dakota, in Codington, Deuel and Brookings Counties. Wood-pole, H-frame, structures with three conductors and two overhead static wires are planned...

1973-01-01

220

Evaluation of a 23-cm Minimum Length Limit for Black and White Crappies in a Small South Dakota Impoundment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks instituted a 23-cm minimum length limit for black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie P. annularis in Lake Alvin on 1 January 1996 because an undesirable size and age structure indicated that these pop- ulations were being overharvested. Crappies were sampled annually using trap (modified fyke) nets from 1992 to 1999.

Timothy J. Bister; David W. Willis; Allen D. Knapp; Todd R. St Sauver

2002-01-01

221

Influence of a Saugeye (Sauger × Walleye) Introduction Program on the Black Crappie Population in Richmond Lake, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Saugeyes, a purposeful hybrid between walleye Stizostedion vitreum and sauger S. canadense, were introduced into 336-ha Richmond Lake, South Dakota, with a management objective of improving the size structure of the population of black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the influence of stocking size on the relative survival of saugeyes, (2) changes in

Gene F. Galinat; David W. Willis; Brian G. Blackwell; Matthew J. Hubers

2002-01-01

222

Influence of a Saugeye (Sauger × Walleye) Introduction Program on the Black Crappie Population in Richmond Lake, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Saugeyes, a purposeful hybrid between walleye Stizostedion vitreum and sauger S. canadense, were introduced into 336-ha Richmond Lake, South Dakota, with a management ob- jective of improving the size structure of the population of black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the influence of stocking size on the relative survival of saugeyes, (2) changes

Gene F. Galinat; David W. Willis; Brian G. Blackwell; Matthew J. Hubers

2002-01-01

223

Evaluation of a 23-cm Minimum Length Limit for Black and White Crappies in a Small South Dakota Impoundment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks instituted a 23-cm minimum length limit for black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie P. annularis in Lake Alvin on 1 January 1996 because an undesirable size and age structure indicated that these populations were being overharvested. Crappies were sampled annually using trap (modified fyke) nets from 1992 to 1999. Mean

Timothy J. Bister; David W. Willis; Allen D. Knapp; Todd R. St. Sauver

2002-01-01

224

An Investigation of the Television Viewing Habits of Students in Grades Three through Eight in Vermillion, South Dakota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A sample of 422 students from grades three through eight in Vermillion, South Dakota, schools completed a questionnaire about their television-viewing habits, including a day-by-day record of the amount of television viewed over a two-week period. Analysis of results indicated that the school population had an average of two television sets per…

Wood, Robert W.; Eicher, Charles E.

225

Nature and timing of the latest Wisconsin advance of the James River lobe, South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaciation of the James River lobe area in eastern South Dakota (SD) produced several prominent geomorphic features of the Laurentide ice sheet record. During late Wisconsin time, the James lobe advanced southward in the James River lowland, overlapping the Prairie Coteau upland on the east and the Missouri Coteau on the west. The known southern limit of late Wisconsin till is the modern Missouri River Valley between Yankton and Richland, SD. North of the Missouri River, radiocarbon dates on wood in or beneath till from 12 sites in 10 counties of the southern James River lowland range from 12,050 to 12,880 14C yr B.P. and average 12,430 yr B.P. (~14,500 ka cal), with a mean reported uncertainty of 260 yrs. At most of these sites, including two within 20 km of Yankton, the dated wood is in till at depths as great as 58 m or in underlying sand and gravel. The dates are consistent with paleoecologic studies (e.g. Yansa, 2006) that indicate spruce parkland was in this region at that time prior to the glacial readvance. Outcrops of calcite-cemented glacial gravel cut by veins of banded travertine are present on a marginal escarpment of the James River valley, where it is incised into the 30-60-m-thick surface till of the James River lowland about 15 km north of the Missouri River. Twelve robust 230Th/U dates on calcite laminae ranging from 10.5 to 13.5 ka (mean 2s uncertainty of 0.4 ka) indicate that ground-water discharge from glacial-bed aquifers was closely related to the latest Wisconsin advance of the James lobe. Four dates on younger vug-filling calcite between 8.1 and 5.8 ka, as well as modern spring discharge, show decreasing initial 234U/238U with age. Stable-isotope data on dated travertine and modern spring water provide other means for evaluating environments of carbonate precipitation, including subglacial and/or subaerial settings and mixing of surface and ground water associated with ice-sheet dynamics. The 14C dates span the Bolling-Allerod time interval that ice core records show was markedly warmer than preceding glacial conditions. Thus, the late Wisconsin readvance of the James lobe, and similar readvances of the Des Moines and Lake Michigan lobes, may be complex dynamic responses of the Laurentide ice sheet to warming and increased meltwater.

Lundstrom, S. C.; Paces, J. B.; Iles, D.; Cowman, T.

2009-12-01

226

The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary interval in Badlands National Park, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A marine K-T boundary interval has been identified throughout the Badlands National Park region of South Dakota. Data from marine sediments suggest that deposits from two asteroid impacts (one close, one far away) may be preserved in the Badlands. These impact-generated deposits may represent late Maestrichtian events or possibly the terminal K-T event. Interpretation is supported by paleontological correlation, sequence stratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and strontium isotope geochronology. This research is founded on nearly a decade of NPS approved field work in Badlands National Park and a foundation of previously published data and interpretations. The K-T boundary occurs within or near the base of a stratigraphic interval referred to as the 'Interior Zone.' We interpret the stratigraphy of the Interior Zone as a series of distinct, recognizable lithologic members and units from oldest to youngest, an upper weathered interval of the Elk Butte Member of the Pierre Shale (early late Maestrichtian), a complete (albeit condensed) interval of Fox Hill Formation, a pedogenically altered K-T Boundary 'Disturbed Zone,' and a generally unresolved sequence of marine to marginal marine units ranging in age from possibly latest Maestrichtian to late Paleocene (the 'Yellow Mounds'), that underlie a basal red clay unit (the late Eocene overbank channel facies of the Chamberlain Pass Formation at the base of the White River Group). Within this sequence is a series of unconformities that all display some degree of subaerial weathering and erosion. The dating of marine fossils above and below these unconformities are in line with generally accepted global sea-level changes recognized for the late Campanian through early Eocene. Within the greater framework of regional geology, these findings support that the Western Interior Seaway and subsequent Cannonball Seaway were dependently linked to the changing base-level controlled by sea-level of the global ocean through the Gulf of Mexico and possibly the Arctic Ocean. The variation of facies preserved in Late Cretaceous strata in the Badlands National Park area were in part controlled by local or regional tectonic blocks that were either rising or sinking contemporaneous with deposition.

Stoffer, Philip Ward; Messina, Paula; Chamberlain, John A., Jr.; Terry, Dennis O., Jr.

2001-01-01

227

Geochemical Modeling of the Madison Aquifer in Parts of Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stable isotope data for dissolved carbonate, sulfate, and sulfide are combined with water composition data to construct geochemical reaction models along eight flow paths in the Madison aquifer in parts of Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota. The sulfur isotope data are treated as an isotope dilution problem, whereas the carbon isotope data are treated as Rayleigh distillations. All reaction models reproduce the observed chemical and carbon and sulfur isotopic composition of the final waters and are partially validated by predicting the observed carbon and sulfur isotopic compositions of dolomite and anhydrite from the Madison Limestone. The geochemical reaction models indicate that the dominant groundwater reaction in the Madison aquifer is dedolomitization (calcite precipitation and dolomite dissolution driven by anhydrite dissolution). Sulfate reduction, [Ca2+ + Mg2+]/Na+ cation exchange, and halite dissolution are locally important, particularly in central Montana. The groundwater system is treated as closed to CO2 gas from external sources such as the soil zone or cross-formational leakage but open to CO2 from oxidation of organic matter coupled with sulfate reduction and other redox processes occurring within the aquifer. The computed mineral mass transfers and modeled sulfur isotopic composition of Madison anhydrites are mapped throughout the study area. Carbon 14 groundwater ages, adjusted for the modeled carbon mass transfer, range from modern to about 23,000 years B.P. and indicate flow velocities of 7-87 ft/yr (2.1-26.5 m/yr). Most horizontal hydraulic conductivities calculated from Darcy's Law using the average 14C flow velocities are within a factor of 5 of those based on digital simulation. The calculated mineral mass transfer and adjusted 14C groundwater ages permit determination of apparent rates of reaction in the aquifer. The apparent rate of organic matter oxidation is typically 0.12 ?mol/L/yr. Sulfate and, to a lesser extent, ferric iron are the predominant electron acceptors. The (kinetic) biochemical fractionation of 34S between sulfate and hydrogen sulfide is approximately -44‰ at 25°C, with a temperature variation of -0.4‰ per °C. The rates of precipitation of calcite and dissolution of dolomite and anhydrite typically are 0.59, 0.24, and 0.95 ?mol/L/yr, respectively.

Plummer, L. Niel; Busby, John F.; Lee, Roger W.; Hanshaw, Bruce B.

1990-09-01

228

Introducing ethics across the curriculum at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology.  

PubMed

This paper describes how the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has chosen to integrate ethics into their curriculum. All university freshmen engineering students are introduced to ethics through the presentation of ethical dilemmas. During this exercise, students are forced to argue both sides ('for' and 'against') of a hypothetical ethical engineering dilemma. It provides a setting for great discussion with the desired outcome that they learn to carefully analyze a situation before they draw conclusions. In the sophomore year, students are introduced to methods to use the fundamental principles, the fundamental canons, and the suggested guidelines for use with the fundamental canons of ethics when analyzing appropriate action to be taken when confronted with ethical dilemmas. We currently use the 'sophomore' method for seniors because the sequencing is just beginning. Next year the seniors will do more in-depth analysis of ethical case studies. PMID:16279762

Simonson, Larry

2005-10-01

229

Contaminants, water quality, and wildlife mortality on oil production sites in western South Dakota. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study were to evaluate oil pits and other hazards at oil production sites to (1) document the magnitude of wildlife mortality due to exposure to oil and other chemicals, (2) determine the physical and toxic effects of oil pit contents on wildlife, and (3) identify methods to prevent sublethal and lethal impacts to wildlife. Pits at oil production sites in Fall River and Harding Counties of western South Dakota were surveyed for wildlife carcasses by searching the shorelines and raking underwater around the pit edges in April, July, and October 1992. In July, composite water and sediment samples were collected from 26 pits, and analyzed for oil and grease. Bioassays were conducted with two life stages of Hyalella azteca and Daphnia magna to determine pit water toxicity. Seed germination tests were conducted using radish seeds exposed to pit water. Oil and poor water quality appeared to be the primary causes of pit liquid toxicity.

Henry, C.J.; Ruelle, R.

1993-04-01

230

Geothermal feasibility-analysis II for Polo School District No. 29-2, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of utilizing a low temperature geothermal resource to heat the Polo High School and the community of Polo, consisting of 17 residential homes, 2 public school buildings, 5 commercial establishments, and the St. Liborius Church/School complex is addressed. Depending upon the availability of a water use permit from the South Dakota Department of Natural Resources and the payback period required for this type of project, there is heat energy in the existing geothermal resource to heat the Polo High School or even the entire community of Polo. The chemical analysis of the water indicates that any heat exchangers used should be stainless steel or thick-walled copper and piping should be plastic. An environmental assessment would be required to consider the disposal of geothermal fluid.

Not Available

1982-03-01

231

Distribution of boron in the Tip Top pegmatite, Black Hills, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Experimental evidence has shown the importance of boron on the crystallization behavior of granitic systems; however, the intercrystalline and intracrystalline distribution of boron in mineral phases crystallizing from granitic systems is not well documented. The distribution of boron between coexisting phases in the Tip Top pegmatite, South Dakota, is as follows: beryl ca = quartz ca = triphylite ca = montebrasite ca = potassium feldspar < biotite < albite < muscovite < spodumene << tourmaline. The bulk boron content of the Tip Top pegmatite decreases significantly with the termination of tourmaline crystallization. The significant decrease in boron in the inner zones of the pegmatite is consistent with the depletion of boron in the granite melt by either the crystallization of tourmaline from the granitic melt or the partitioning of boron into an exsolved aqueous solutions. 35 references.

Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J.

1986-02-01

232

Climatic data for the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota, 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Research on the hydrology of the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota, includes study of evaporation. Climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer evaporation studies that were collected during 1983 include water-surface temperature, sediment temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperature, vapor pressure at and above the water surface, wind speed, and short-and long-wave radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations. (USGS)

Sturrock, A. M.; Hanson, B. A.; Scarborough, J. L.; Winter, T. C.

1987-01-01

233

Climatic data for the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Research on the hydrology of the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota, includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer evaporation studies, including: water-surface temperature, sediment temperature dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, vapor pressure at and above the water surface, wind speed, and short- and long-wave radiation. Data were collected at raft and land stations. (USGS)

Sturrock, A. M.; Hanson, B. A.; Scarborough, J. L.; Winter, T. C.

1986-01-01

234

36 CFR 251.10 - Prohibition of location of mining claims within certain areas in the Norbeck Wildlife Preserve...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...areas in the Norbeck Wildlife Preserve, South Dakota. 251.10 Section 251.10...areas in the Norbeck Wildlife Preserve, South Dakota. The location of mining...Counties and the post offices State of South Dakota. [13 FR 3676, July 1,...

2013-07-01

235

Amphibian, reptilian, and avian remains from the Fox Hills Formation (Maastrichtian): Shoreline and estuarine deposits of the Pierre Sea in south-central North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Although vertebrate fossils, except for fish, are not common in the Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formation, amphibian, reptilian, and avian remains have been recovered at several localities in south-central North Dakota from shoreline facies of the retreating Pierre-Fox Hills seaway. This mixed fauna of aquatic, terrestrial, and marine taxa provides insight into the composition of coastal communities and habitats at the interface between the Hell Creek delta and the Western Interior Seaway. The delta-platform aquatic paleocommunity is represented by the efficient swimming salamanders Opistho- trition kayi and Lisserpeton bairdi, the carnivorous soft-shelled turtle "Aspideretes" sensu lato, the underwater piscivorous predator Champsosaurus laramiensis, and the large, predatory crocodile IBorealosuchus. Terrestrial areas were inhabited by the tortoise-like Basilemys and the predatory dinosaurs Tyrannosaurus and cf. Saurornit- holestes. Birds occupied niches in the warm-temperate to subtropical, forested delta platform and shoreline areas. These nonmarine taxa in the Fox Hills Formation indicate that the geographic range of these animals extended to shoreline areas of the Western Interior Seaway. The toxochelyid turtle Lophochelys and the ambush predators Mosasaurus dekayi and IPlioplatecarpus resided in the shallow marine and estuarine habitats. These taxa and marine fish taxa reported earlier indicate that normal marine conditions in south- central North Dakota persisted into the latest Late Cretaceous in comparison with coeval Hell Creek Formation sites more distal from the Western Interior Seaway. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

Hoganson, J. W.; Erickson, J. M.; Holland, Jr. , F. D.

2007-01-01

236

School illness absenteeism during 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic--South Dakota, 2009-2010.  

PubMed

Schools are important amplification settings of influenza virus transmission. We demonstrated correlation of school absenteeism (due to any illness) with other influenza A (H1N1) activity surveillance data during the 2009 pandemic. We collected nonspecific illness student absenteeism data from August 17, 2009 through April 3, 2010 from 187 voluntarily participating South Dakota schools using weekly online surveys. Relative risks (RR) were calculated as the ratio of the probability of absenteeism during elevated weeks versus the probability of absenteeism during the baseline weeks (RR = 1.89). We used Pearson correlation to associate absenteeism with laboratory-confirmed influenza cases, influenza cases diagnosed by rapid tests, influenza-associated hospitalizations and deaths reported in South Dakota during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic period. School-absenteeism data correlated strongly with data from these other influenza surveillance sources. PMID:23798263

Kightlinger, Lon; Horan, Vickie

2013-05-01

237

Contaminant evaluation of interior least tern and piping plover eggs and chicks on the Missouri River, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Missouri River in South Dakota is bordered by bluffs containing marine shale. Analyses of shale from these bluffs revealed that they contained maximum concentrations of 13.6 mg\\/kg dry weight selenium and 9.35 mg\\/kg dry weight cadmium. Wind and water erode the dry shale bluffs, releasing biologically available selenium to the river. Selenium also is present at relatively high concentrations

Ruelle

1991-01-01

238

Mineralogical and chemical evolution of a rare-element granite-pegmatite system: Harney Peak Granite, Black Hills, South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Harney Peak Granite (1.7 b.y.) in the Black Hills, South Dakota, is a well-exposed granite complex surrounded by a rare-element pegmatite field (barren to Nb-, Ta-, Be, Li-enriched pegmatites). It consists of a multitude of large and small sills and dikes, which exhibit great variation in texture, mineralogy and geochemistry. This granite is moderately to strongly peraluminous with the

C. K. Shearer; J. J. Papike; J. C. Laul

1987-01-01

239

Economic Census 1997: South Dakota. Retail Trade. Geographic Area Series.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Retail Trade sector (sector 44-45) comprises establishments engaged in retailing merchandise, generally without transformation, and rendering services incidental to the sale of merchandise. The retailing process is the final step in the distribution o...

1999-01-01

240

Appraisal of the water resources of the eastern part of the Tulare aquifer, Beadle, Hand, and Spink Counties, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A system of glacial outwash aquifers lie in the central James Valley in east-central South Dakota. Within this system, the eastern part of the Tulare aquifer, which has an area of approximately 681 square miles, was simulated by means of a numerical ground-water flow model. The model estimates the yearly average recharge rate for that part of the aquifer lying west of the James River to be approximately 23,000 acre-feet per year. This rate is considerably more than the estimated 1978 yearly average irrigation pumpage rate of 9,800 acre-feet per year. It is expected that, since pumping will reduce discharge from the aquifer through evapotranspiration and flow to the James River, this part of the aquifer would be able to supply irrigation water at recent pumpage rates for an indefinite period. For that part of the aquifer lying east of the river, estimated recharge is 6,800 acre-feet per year; a rate slightly smaller than the estimated 1978 yearly average irrigation pumpage rate of 7,200 acre-feet per year. It is estimated that this part of the aquifer would be able to supply irrigation water at 7,200 acre-feet per year for approximately 50 years, at which time excessive drawdown would begin to cause reduced well yields at several locations. (USGS)

Kuiper, L. K.

1984-01-01

241

Relations of zoned pegmatites to other pegmatites, granite, and metamorphic rocks in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The pegmatite field and the Harney Peak Granite of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, form an igneous system that progresses from slightly biotitic muscovite granite through layered pegmatitic granite, with alternating sodic and potassic rocks, to simple plagioclase-quartz-perthite pegmatites, and on to zoned pegmatites. Most of the country rocks are Lower Proterozoic mica schists. At 1700 Ga, intrusion of the Harney Peak Granite created a large dome in these rocks, a thermal aureole with a staurolite, a first sillimanite isograd, and a small area of metamorphism above the second sillimanite isograd. The zoned pegmatites have a strong tendency to occur in clusters, and the types of pegmatites are different in different clusters. A less obvious tendency is a regional zonation in which rare-mineral pegmatites become more abundant and muscovite pegmatites less abundant toward the outskirts of the region. The composition of the granite indicates that its magma originated by partial melting of metasedimentary mica schists similar to those at the present surface. The pegmatitic nature of most of the granite probably reflects exsolution of an aqueous phase. -from Authors

Norton, J. J.; Redden, J. A.

1990-01-01

242

Failure to identify alveolar echinococcosis in trappers from South Dakota in spite of high prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in wild canids.  

PubMed

Echinococcus multilocularis causes a rare but potentially lethal zoonotic disease in humans. This tapeworm has been known to be endemic in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and coyotes (Canis latrans) within the northern United States since the 1960s. One purpose of this study was to provide recent data on the prevalence of E. multilocularis in foxes and coyotes from eastern South Dakota. In a survey conducted from 1987 to 1991 and involving 137 foxes and 9 coyotes from this area, 74.5% of the foxes and 4 of the coyotes were infected. To assess the possible prevalence of alveolar echinococcosis in a group at presumptive high risk, we also conducted a serological survey of members of the South Dakota Trappers Association in 1990 and 1991. Serum samples from 115 trappers were evaluated for the presence of E. multilocularis antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests involving a purified antigen called Em2, a crude E. multilocularis antigen, and a recombinant E. multilocularis antigen called II/3-10. None of the trappers showed antibody evidence for the presence of E. multilocularis. Roughly half of the surveyed individuals had trapped more than 50 foxes during their life, and almost one-fourth had trapped more than 1,000 foxes. PMID:10701567

Hildreth, M B; Sriram, S; Gottstein, B; Wilson, M; Schantz, P M

2000-02-01

243

Spearfish High School, Sparfish, South Dakota solar energy system performance evaluation, September 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

Spearfish High School in South Dakota contains 43,000 square feet of conditioned space. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 57% of the space heating and 50% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 8034 square feet of flat plate collectors, 4017 cubic feet of rock bin sensible heat storage, and auxiliary equipment including 8 heat pumps, 6 of which are solar supplied and instrumented, air conditioning units, and natural-gas-fired boilers. Performance data are given for the system including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor and solar system coefficient of performance. Insolation, solar energy utilization and operation data are also given. The performance of the collector, storage, domestic hot water and space heating subsystems, the operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, long-term weather data, sensor technology, and typical monthly data. (LEW)

Howard, B.D.

1981-01-01

244

Mordenite and montmorillonite alteration of glass structures in a rhyolite pipe, northern Black Hills, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Green structures, 0.5 to 1.5 in. across, occur in a Tertiary rhyolite pipe in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota. The structures are of two types: angular to ellipsoidal masses and stretched or smeared structures. Thin section analysis revealed that those of the first type are massive, with no internal structure, and those of the second type are cellular and have classic flame structure characteristics. XRD indicated the composition to be a mixture of secondary mordenite (a zeolite) and montmorillonite. The first type is interpreted to be deuterically altered vitrophyre clasts and the second type to be altered vesicular structures produced by degassing of the magma in the pipe. Chemical analysis of the alteration material indicates a loss of alkalies and silica, with an increase in water, CaO, MgO and ferric iron when compared to the composition of fresh vitrophyre from the same pipe. The changes are in agreement with experimental work on the alteration of rhyolitic glass by a number of researchers. This is the first occurrence of mordenite reported for the Black Hills.

Kirchner, J.G. (Illinois State Univ., Normal (United States))

1991-10-01

245

South Dakota Space Grant Consortium: Balancing Indigenous Earth System and Space Science with Western/Contemporary Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC) was established March 1, 1991 by a NASA Capability Enhancement Grant. Since that time SDSGC has worked to provide earth system and space science education, outreach and services to all students across South Dakota. South Dakota has nine tribes and five Tribal Colleges. This has presented a tremendous opportunity to develop sustainable equitable partnerships and collaborations. SDSGC believes strongly in developing programs and activities that highlight and reinforce the balance of Indigenous science and ways of knowing with current findings in Western/Contemporary Science. This blending of science and culture creates a learning community where individuals especially students, can gain confidence and pride in their unique skills and abilities. Universities are also witnessing the accomplishments and achievements of students who are able to experience a tribal environment and then carry that experience to a college/university/workplace and significantly increase the learning achievement of all. The presentation will highlight current Tribal College and Tribal Community partnerships with the Rosebud Sioux Reservation (Sinte Gleska University), Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (Oglala Lakota College), Standing Rock Sioux Reservation (Sitting Bull College) and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation (Si Tanka) amongst others. Programs and activities to be explained during the presentation include but not limited to: NASA Workforce Native Connections, Scientific Knowledge for Indian Learning and Leadership (SKILL), NSF "Bridges to Success" Summer Research Program, NSF "Fire Ecology" Summer Research Experience, as well as geospatial and space science programs for students and general community members. The presentation will also cover the current initiatives underway through NASA Workforce Development. These include: partnering with the Annual He Sapa Wacipi (Black Hills Pow Wow - attendance of 14,000 Natives) to host Native Space Days 2005 (October 2005), NASA research and internship programs, and the NASA Student Fellowship Summit. An overview of recent American Indian student success will conclude the presentation. The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has struggled over many years to develop and implement sustainable successful initiatives with Tribal Colleges and Communities. The motivating philosophy is the betterment of all people in South Dakota and the nation through developing a worldview and understanding of the integrated nature of all things, especially earth system and space science. If people are provided equity and access, there is no limit to what they can accomplish. SDSM&T in the last three years has graduated nineteen Natives with degrees in engineering, many of those students Tribal College transfers. This is a significant increase, as only forty Natives had graduated from SDSM&T between the years of 1970 and 2000. SDSM&T has seen a number of "historical firsts" in the past five years. We see this as being a direct result of creating for students an educational philosophy and process where Indigenous understanding and connections become the foundation on which to build a STEM degree program. NASA's presence on the SDSM&T campus and in South Dakota has provided the necessary focus and encouragement for success to take place. We are building bridges in South Dakota and the builders are from Indian Country.

Bolman, J.; Nall, J.

2005-05-01

246

Assessment of Pharmacists' Perception of Patient Care Competence and Need for Training in Rural and Urban Areas in North Dakota  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Context: Few studies have examined pharmacists' level of patient care competence and need for continuous professional development in rural areas. Purpose: To assess North Dakota pharmacists' practice setting, perceived level of patient care competencies, and the need for professional development in urban and rural areas. Methods: A survey was…

Scott, David M.

2010-01-01

247

Microgravity methods for characterization of groundwater-storage changes and aquifer properties in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, 2009-12  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study of groundwater storage in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota using microgravity methods was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with West Dakota Water Development District, South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and Lawrence County. Microgravity measurements from 2009 to 2012 were used to investigate groundwater-storage changes and effective porosity in unconfined areas of the Madison aquifer. Time-lapse microgravity surveys that use portable high-sensitivity absolute and relative gravimeters indicated temporal-gravity changes as a result of changing groundwater mass. These extremely precise measurements of gravity required characterization and removal of internal instrumental and external environmental effects on gravity from the raw data. The corrected data allowed groundwater-storage volume to be quantified with an accuracy of about plus or minus 0.5 foot of water per unit area of aquifer. Quantification of groundwater-storage change, coupled with water-level data from observation wells located near the focus areas, also was used to calculate the effective porosity at specific altitudes directly beneath gravity stations. Gravity stations were established on bedrock outcrops in three separate focus areas for this study. The first area, the Spring Canyon focus area, is located to the south of Rapid City with one gravity station on the rim of Spring Canyon near the area where Spring Creek sinks into the Madison aquifer. The second area, the Doty focus area, is located on outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation to the northwest of Rapid City, and consists of nine gravity stations. The third area, the Limestone Plateau focus area, consists of a single gravity station in the northwestern Black Hills located on an outcrop of the Madison Limestone. An absolute-gravity station, used to tie relative-gravity survey data together, was established on a relatively impermeable bedrock outcrop to minimize groundwater-storage change at the reference location. Data from the three focus areas allow for interpretation of groundwater-storage characteristics using microgravity measurements. Gravity measurements, together with water-level data from an observation well located 2 miles from the Spring Canyon focus area and measured streamflow in Spring Creek, provided evidence that rapid groundwater-storage change, responding to changes in sinking streamflow over the recharge area of the aquifer, occurred in the Madison aquifer directly beneath the gravity station at Spring Canyon. This phenomenon likely was a result of groundwater movement through caverns, conduits, and fractures, which are common in karst aquifers. Spatially and temporally separated microgravity data for the Doty focus area indicated horizontal and vertical heterogeneity of effective porosity for the Madison aquifer. One such example of this was indicated by water-level measurements at an observation well and gravity measurements at four gravity stations in the southeastern part of the Doty area, which were used to estimate effective porosity values ranging from greater than 0 to 0.18. A decrease in groundwater storage determined by microgravity measurements during the spring recharge period for five upgradient stations in the Doty focus area indicated the possibility of rapid release and downgradient cascading of perched groundwater. Evidence for similar phenomena was documented for Wind Cave and Brooks Cave in the Black Hills. Absolute-gravity measurements at the Limestone Plateau focus area confirmed the relation between water levels in an observation well and changes in groundwater storage. Comparison of these gravity measurements with water levels in a nearby observation well resulted in an effective porosity estimate of 0.02 for the Madison aquifer beneath the gravity station.

Koth, Karl R.; Long, Andrew J.

2012-01-01

248

Alteration of sandstone as a guide to uranium deposits and their origin, northern Black Hills, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Several uranium deposits are present in the Fall River sandstone of Early Cretaceous age on the northeast flank of the Black Hills, Butte County, South Dakota. The deposits are within a fine-grained, well-sorted, persistent basal sandstone unit that ranges in thickness from 2 to 18 feet and dips about 4° NE. Detailed mapping of about 2 square miles surrounding the deposits have shown that all the uranium occurrences and most of the areas of high radioactivity are where the color changes in the basal sandstone from reddish on the up-dip side of the the occurrences to yellowish-gray or buff down-dip. Radioactivity measurements show that uranium is distributed almost continuously along the sinuous red-buff contact for more than 5 miles. Laboratory work indicates that the red color is caused by the hematite resulting from the alteration of ferrous iron minerals and hydrous ferric oxides. The close association of the red-buff contact and the uranium deposits suggest that the two were formed by the same solutions. The uranium was probably deposited originally from ground water which moved down-dip and gradually changed from an oxidizing solution near the surface to a mildly reducing solution at depth. Concentrations of uranium have resulted from the localization of reducing conditions cause perhaps by structures superimposed on the regional dip, local thinning or decrease in permeability of the sandstone, or concentrations of pyritiferous carbonaceous material. The red alteration is probably the result of pre-Oligocene weathering that has extended downward in the more permeable beds about 200 feet below the ancient erosion surface. Oxidation of the primary uranium during the present weathering cycle has resulted in the formation of carnotite and possibly other secondary uranium minerals.

Vickers, R.C.

1956-01-01

249

Evaluation of a total dissolved solids model in comparison to actual field data measurements in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, U.S.A.  

PubMed

During the summers of 2002 and 2004, in-stream integrated flow and concentration measurements for the total dissolved solids in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, USA was conducted in order to compare the obtained actual field measurements with the predictions values made by the Bureau of Reclamation in the Environmental Impact Statement. In comparison to the actual field measurements conducted in this study, The Bureau of Reclamation extension of a small database used in the analysis for the impact of operations at the Angostura Unit over the past 50 years and into the future to predict the annual total dissolved solid loadings doesn't represent the actual loading values and various conditions in the study area. Additional integrated flow and concentration sampling is required to characterize the impact of the current Angostura Dam operations and Angostura Irrigation District return flows on the Cheyenne River in different seasons of the year. PMID:16917716

Berdanier, Bruce W; Ziadat, Anf H

2006-06-01

250

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

251

Hydrochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Buffalo-Lignite, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. Generalized geologic maps of the project areas are provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater in the Custer project area with anomalously high uranium concentrations occur along the eastern margins of North Cave Hill. Groundwater in this area is derived primarily from the Paleocene Tongue River Formation where high values were determined for U, 1000.U/specific conductance, 1000.U/B, U/SO/sub 4/, Ba, Ca, Mg, Mol, and Sr. Anomalously high uranium concentrations in stream sediments in the Custer project area are derived from the Paleocene Tongue River and Ludlow Formations and are found in four areas: (1) south of Table Mountain, (2) North Cave Hills, (3) east of South Cave Hills, and (4) surrounding Teppee Butte. Sediments with high uranium concentrations are associated with high values for U-FL/U-NT, As, Mo, and Se. Groundwater in the Slim Buttes project area with anomalously high uranium concentrations occur along the northern and southern regions of the Slim Buttes area. Groundwater in this area is derived almost exclusively from the Tertiary White River Group where high values were determined for U, 1000.U/specific conductance, 1000.U/B, U/SO/sub 4/, As, Se, and Si. Anomalously high uranium concentrations in stream sediments in the Slim Buttes project area are derived primarily from the Tertiary White River Group and the Arikaree-Ogallala Sediments. These high uranium concentrations are found primarily scattered along the Slim Buttes with slightly higher concentrations occurring in the central and southern regions. High concentrations are also found north of Flat Top Butte and in areas southeast of Slim Buttes. Sediments with high U concentrations are associated with high values for As, Co, Se, and V.

Butz, T.R.; Bard, C.S.; White, R.E.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-08-31

252

South Asia Area Syllabus. Center for Area and Country Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this syllabus is to help government personnel assigned to South Asia, or to positions dealing with South Asian affairs, to acquire a basic knowledge of the area and some understanding of the motivational dynamics of the people. It is not intended to serve as an operational briefing nor to take its place. The goal is the facilitation…

Rossow, Robert

253

An Analysis of Potential Additional Measures of Fiscal Capacity of South Dakota School Districts. Papers in Education Finance, No. 13. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To help South Dakota develop new measures of school district fiscal capacity (besides assessed value per pupil) to use in its state school aid formula, researchers used multiple regression analysis to examine the effects on district expenditure per pupil of each district's average family income and of the composition of the property tax base.…

Vincent, Phillip E.; Adams, E. Kathleen

254

An Analysis of Potential Additional Measures of Fiscal Capacity of South Dakota School Districts. Papers in Education Finance, No. 13. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help South Dakota develop new measures of school district fiscal capacity (besides assessed value per pupil) to use in its state school aid formula, researchers used multiple regression analysis to examine the effects on district expenditure per pupil of each district's average family income and of the composition of the property tax base. Also…

Vincent, Phillip E.; Adams, E. Kathleen

255

The Impact of Four-Year Participation in Music and/or Athletic Activities in South Dakota Public High Schools on GPA and ACT Scores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Finding the key to success for high school students has long been the goal for both school personnel and parents. This study examined the impact of four-year participation in music and/or athletics activities in South Dakota public high schools on student GPA and ACT scores. The data in this study were collected from five Class A high schools…

Jones, Patrick S.

2010-01-01

256

HPV infection among rural American Indian women and urban white women in South Dakota: an HPV prevalence study  

PubMed Central

Background High-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cervical cancer. American Indian (AI) women in the Northern Plains of the U.S. have significantly higher incidence and mortality rates for cervical cancer than White women in the same geographical area. We compared HPV prevalence, patterns of HPV types, and infection with multiple HPV types in AI and White women living in South Dakota, U.S. Methods We analyzed the HPV status of cervical samples collected in 2006-2008 from women aged 18-65 years who attended two rural AI reservation clinics (n = 235) or an urban clinic in the same area serving mostly White women (n = 246). Data collection occurred before HPV vaccination was available to study participants. HPV DNA was amplified by using the L1 consensus primer system and an HPV Linear Array detection assay to identify HPV types. We used chi-square tests to compare HPV variables, with percentages standardized by age and lifetime number of sexual partners. Results Compared to White women, AI women were younger (p = 0.01) and reported more sexual partners (p < 0.001). A lower percentage of AI women tested negative for HPV infection compared to Whites (58% [95% CI = 51-65] vs. 77% [95% CI = 71-82]; p < 0.001), and a higher percentage of AI women were infected by oncogenic types (30% [95% CI = 25-36] vs. 16% [95% CI = 11-21]; p = 0.001). Infections among AI women showed a wider variety and very different pattern of HPV types, including a higher prevalence of mixed HPV infections (19% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 7% [95% CI = 4-11]; p = 0.001). AI women had a higher percentage of HPV infections that were not preventable by HPV vaccination (32% [95% CI = 26-38] vs. 15% [95% CI = 11-21]; p < 0.001). Conclusions A higher HPV burden and a different HPV genotyping profile may contribute to the high rate of cervical cancer among AI women.

2011-01-01

257

Fluid inclusion and carbon isotope studies of quartz-graphite veins, Black Hills, South Dakota, and Ruby Range, Montana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluid inclusions and graphite are intimately associated in quartz veins that cut high grade metamorphic rocks in the Black Hills, South Dakota, and at the Crystal Graphite Mine in the southwestern Ruby Range, Montana. Measured fluid inclusion compositions and volumetric properties were compared with calculated compositions of graphite-saturated fluids and with estimates of metamorphic P-T conditions and carbon isotope ratios of graphite were measured to evaluate possible sources of carbon in veinforming fluids. Fluid inclusions from the two areas contrast markedly in their reliability as recorders of metamorphic fluid compositions and metamorphic conditions. The ?13C of graphite associated with the veins indicates that the source of carbon was also different in the two areas. In the Black Hills veins, fluid inclusions are dominantly H 2O?CO 2 mixtures with 24-96 mol% CO 2 and a maximum of ˜5 mol% N 2 and ˜ 13 mol% CH 4. Isochores for the highest density inclusions pass near estimated peak metamorphic conditions (550°-600°C, 4.5-6.5 kbar) and fluid inclusion compositions are compatible with thermodynamic predictions for fluids in equilibrium with graphite in the stated P- T range at geologically reasonable ƒ O 2.Graphite in a 12-cm wall-rock alteration zone adjacent to one of the veins has uniform ?13C of -20.8 ± 0.2%., indicating that carbon in the vein-forming fluid was derived largely from reduced organic carbon. In the Ruby Range, peak metamorphic conditions were higher - ˜750°-850°C, 5-8 kbar. In contrast to the Black Hills veins, fluid inclusions are almost all CO 2?CH 4 mixtures (with unknown N 2 content). Many contain > 20 equivalent mol% CH 4 and mixed H 2O?CO 2 inclusions were observed in only one sample. Inclusions in one vein have ˜ 84-97 mol% CH 4. Virtually all inclusion compositions are incompatible with computed graphite equilibria and inclusion isochores likewise do not pass through estimated metamorphic conditions. The density and composition of most, if not all, inclusions have been modified subsequent to original trapping, possibly through H 2O loss. The range of ?13C values of vein graphites (-5.8 to -8.6%.) is nearly indistinguishable from values for graphite in dolomitic marble near the veins (-4.8 to -7.1%.). Carbon was probably mobilized through devolatilization reactions in the marble and precipitated as 13C-rich graphite in the veins at fairly constant temperature and from fluid of fairly constant composition.

Duke, Edward F.; Galbreath, Kevin C.; Trusty, Kane J.

1990-03-01

258

Coleoptera species inhabiting prairie wetlands of the Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The aquatic Coleoptera of a prairie wetland complex in Stutsman County, North Dakota, were collected from April 1979 to November 1980. Identification of 2594 individuals confirmed 57 species, including seven new records for North Dakota. Two seasonally flooded and two semipermanent wetlands, totaling 7.43 ha, contained 53% of the Dytiscidae, 43% of the Haliplidae, 38% of the Hydrophilidae, and 22% of the Gyrinidae species previously identified from North Dakota. Although 49.1% of the Coleoptera species occurred in both types of wetlands, the occurrence of 29 species varied by wetland class.

Hanson, B. A.; Swanson, G. A.

1989-01-01

259

Health Systems Plan for 1979. Health Service Area 3 North Dakota. Volume II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Goals, objectives, recommended actions, and resource requirements for health service components are indicated in the health systems plan of the Min-Dak Health Systems Agency, Inc., serving southeastern North Dakota and west central Minnesota. Eighteen ser...

1979-01-01

260

Project F 047-5( ) and F 047-4( ), Beadle and Sanborn Counties, Project Begins 5.5 Miles South of Huron, South Dakota on State Highway 37, and Continues South Along the Present Route of Highway 37 to a Point App roximately 2.0 Plus or Minus Miles South of the Beadle-Sanborn County Line. Approximately 6.0 Miles, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposal for relocation of approximately 2.0 miles of State Highway 37 in Sanborn County, South Dakota to a proposed 4-lane divided highway with limited control of access. The beneficial effects are improvement of the transportati...

1972-01-01

261

Paleomagnetism of Eocene Intrusive Rocks, Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming are a large Precambrian-cored Laramide uplift. Intruding the Black Hills are a diverse suite of igneous rocks, which include phonolites, trachytes, latites, garnet-bearing rhyolites, and pyroxenites. These intrusive bodies range in size from several meter outcrop-scale bodies, to several 10s of km wide intrusive complexes. New geochronology (40Ar-39Ar) data indicate many of these intrusive rocks are between 58 and 45 Ma in age (Duke at al, 2002). As part of a larger paleomagnetic study aimed at Jurassic strata surrounding the Black Hills, a collection of 20 sites and 145 samples of the Eocene intrusive rocks was made. A combination of alternating field, thermal, and liquid nitrogen step-wise demagnetization revealed that, with a few exceptions, these rocks have two well-defined magnetization components. The first-removed component is interpreted to be a present (dipole) field magnetization, and is removed by 10 to 30 mT a.f., or 200 C thermal demagnetization steps. The second-removed components have either positive or negative inclinations, and are defined by demagnetization steps between 30 and 200 mT a.f., or 300 to 630 C thermal demagnetization steps. These components are interpreted to be ancient, presumably Eocene, magnetizations. A preliminary mean of the normal-polarity sites is D=352, I=59.3, k=26.7, a95=18.2, N=4, and of the reverse-polarity sites is D=154.9, I=-61.3, k=23.1, a95=18.2, N=4. The combined mean direction is D=344.9, I=60.3, k=28.8, a95=10.5, N=8. Two sites of rhyolites at Mt. Theodore Roosevelt have well-defined magnetization components, but either mixed polarity (Site 99Trr1), or reverse-polarity with what might be a transitional-field direction (D=27.7, I=-37.4, k=18.0, a95=18.6, n=5), and are not included in the calculation of means. The magnetizations recorded by these Eocene rocks are essentially identical to the expected direction for the Black Hills calculated from the Diehl et al., 1983 Eocene reference pole for North America. This result indicates that the Black Hills have experienced no rotation or large-scale tilting since the Eocene, that these intrusive rocks are suitable for additional study of geomagnetic field behavior. In addition, the mean direction reported here is similar to the Jurassic Morrison Formation from the Black Hills (D=349.7, I=61.8, k=87.4, a95=4.5, N=13), supporting an assertion that the Jurassic rocks had been remagnetized during the Eocene.

Housen, B. A.; Fawcett, T. C.; Gregiore, P.

2003-12-01

262

Comparison of detection rates of breeding marsh birds in passive and playback surveys at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We compared detection rates of passive and playback breeding bird survey techniques on elusive marsh birds - Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis), Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola), and Sora (Porzana carolina) - during a two-year study at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, in southwestern South Dakota. We conducted 151 passive point counts followed by playback-response surveys at the same points in marsh-bird habitat on the refuge. Playback surveys detected secretive water birds more frequently than our passive surveys, increasing rates for each species by factors of 2.4 to 7.0. The distance a bird was detected from a point varied with the species and the survey technique.

Allen, T.; Finkbeiner, S. L.; Johnson, D. H.

2004-01-01

263

Water resources data for South Dakota, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Water-resources data for the 1995 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 138 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 10 lakes and reservoirs, stage for 7 streams and 4 lakes; water-quality records for 8 streamflow-gaging stations, 4 daily sediment stations, 3 wells, 10 ungaged stream sites, 5 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation sites; water levels for 7 wells; daily precipitation records at 46 sites; and 22 partial-record creast-stage gage sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses.

Burr, M.J.; Teller, R.W.; Neitzert, K.M.

1996-05-01

264

Natural groundwater recharge in an upland area of central North Dakota, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The magnitude of groundwater recharge to coal aquifers in a 150-km2 area in west-central North Dakota was determined using three separate approaches: (1) the net water level rise in water-table wells; (2) calculations of the fluid flux between nested piezometers, using the Darcy equation and measured values of hydraulic conductivity and vertical gradients; and (3) evaluation of the inputs to and outputs from the coal aquifer, using a steady-state control volume approach in which the aquifer was divided into semi-rectangular cells bounded by equipotential lines and flow lines. Measurements of potential gradients and hydraulic conductivity permitted indirect determination of all components of flow into and out of the cell except the recharge input, which was determined by difference. All methods yielded consistent results on the order of 0.04-0.01 m yr.-1 These values, which represent 2-9% of the annual precipitation, are consistent with results of other studies on recharge throughout the prairies of North America. Evaluation of site hydrology and stable-isotope data indicates that recharge is restricted in both time and place. Most recharge occurs in late spring and in the fall following heavy rainfall events. During these seasons the ground is not frozen and vegetation is not transpiring large amounts of water. Some recharge may occur during very heavy localized summer storms, but it is not considered volumetrically significant. Major permanent depressions on the site are a source of significant recharge. In addition, the extensive area of ephemeral standing water bodies that result from snowmelt can produce significant amounts of infiltration over the entire site. ?? 1982.

Rehm, B. W.; Moran, S. R.; Groenewold, G. H.

1982-01-01

265

Habitat selection of a declining white-tailed deer herd in the central Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Habitat selection, survival rates, the Black Hills National Forest Habitat Capability Model (HABCAP), and the USDA Forest Service Geographic Information System (GIS) data base were evaluated for a declining white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus dacotensis) herd in the central Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. From July 1993 through July 1996, 73 adult and yearling female and 12 adult and yearling male white-tailed deer were radiocollared and visually monitored. Habitat information was collected at 4,662 white-tailed deer locations and 1,087 random locations. Natural mortality (71%) was the primary cause of female mortality, followed by harvest (22.5%) and accidental causes (6.5%). More females died in spring (53.2%) than in fall (22.6%), winter (14.5%), or summer (9.7%). Male mortality resulted from hunting in fall (66.7%) and natural causes in spring (33.3%). Survival rates for all deer by year were 62.1% in 1993, 51.1% in 1994, 56.4% in 1995, and 53.9% in 1996 and were similar (P = 0.691) across years. During winter, white-tailed deer selected ponderosa pine- (Pinus ponderosa ) deciduous and burned pine cover types. Overstory-understory habitats selected included pine/grass-forb, pine/bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), pine/snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus), burned pine/grass-forb, and pine/shrub habitats. Structural stages selected included sapling-pole pine stands with >70% canopy cover, burned pine sapling-pole and saw-timber stands with <40% canopy cover. Bedding locations were represented by saw-timber pine structural stages with >40% canopy cover and all sapling-pole pine structural stages; sapling-pole stands with >70% canopy cover received the greatest use. White-tailed deer primarily fed in pine saw-timber structural stage with less than 40% canopy cover. Overall, selected habitats contained lower amounts of grass/forb, shrubs, and litter than random locations. Male and female deer generally bedded in areas that were characterized by greater horizontal cover than feeding and random sites. When feeding and bedding sites were combined males selected areas that were characterized by greater levels of horizontal cover than females. During summer, white-tailed deer selected pine-deciduous, aspen (Populus tremuloides), aspen-coniferous, spruce (Picea glauca), and spruce-deciduous cover types. Overstory-understory habitats selected included pine/juniper (Juniperus communis), aspen/shrubs, spruce/juniper, and spruce/shrub habitats. Structural stages selected included pine, aspen, and spruce sapling pole stands with all levels (0--40%, 41--70%, 71--100%) of canopy cover. All habitat types (i.e., pine, aspen, and spruce) were used as bedding locations with pine sapling-pole structural stages with >70% canopy cover used most, whereas pine saw-timber structural stage with less than 40% canopy cover was primarily used for feeding. Females bedded in areas that were characterized by greater horizontal cover than feeding and random sites, whereas male feeding sites had greater horizontal cover characteristics than bedding or random locations.

Deperno, Christopher Shannon

266

Small-area snow surveys on the northern plains of North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The variation in snow cover over small areas is the focus of this study of the feasibility of using aerial surveys to obtain information on the snow water equivalent of the snow cover in order to minimize the necessity of labor intensive ground snow surveys. A low-flying aircraft was used to measure attenuations of natural terrestrial gamma radiation by snow cover. Aerial and ground snow surveys of eight 1-mile snow courses and one 4-mile snow course in North Dakota were used in the evaluation, with ground snow surveys used as the base to evaluate aerial data. Each of the 1-mile snow courses consisted of a single land use and all had the same terrain type (plane). The 4-mile snow course consists of a variety of land uses and the same terrain type (plane). Using the aerial snow-survey technique, the snow water equivalent of the 1-mile snow courses was measured with three passes of the aircraft. Use of more than one pass did not improve the results. The mean absolute difference between the aerial- and ground-measured snow water equivalents for the 1-mile snow courses was 26 percent (0.77 inches). The aerial snow water equivalents determined for the 1-mile snow courses were used to estimate the variations in the snow water equivalents over the 4-mile snow course. The weighted mean absolute difference for the 4-mile snow course was 27 percent (0.8 inches). Variations in snow water equivalents could not be verified adequately by segmenting the aerial snow-survey data because of the uniformity found in the snow cover. On the 4-mile snow course, about two-thirds of the aerial snow-survey data agreed with the ground snow-survey data within the accuracy of the aerial technique (+or-0.5 inch of the mean snow water equivalent). (USGS)

Emerson, D. G.; Carroll, T. R.; Steppuhn, Harold

1985-01-01

267

65 FR 18121 - South Baggs Area Natural Gas Development Project  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1310] South Baggs Area Natural Gas Development Project AGENCY...for the South Baggs Area Natural Gas Project (Project...fifty (50) additional natural gas wells in the Project area...Office. Approximately 43 oil and gas wells have...

2000-04-06

268

Hydrologic Characterization for Spring Creek and Hydrologic Budget and Model Scenarios for Sheridan Lake, South Dakota, 1962-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks to characterize hydrologic information relevant to management of water resources associated with Sheridan Lake, which is formed by a dam on Spring Creek. This effort consisted primarily of characterization of hydrologic data for a base period of 1962 through 2006, development of a hydrologic budget for Sheridan Lake for this timeframe, and development of an associated model for simulation of storage deficits and drawdown in Sheridan Lake for hypothetical release scenarios from the lake. Historically, the dam has been operated primarily as a 'pass-through' system, in which unregulated outflows pass over the spillway; however, the dam recently was retrofitted with an improved control valve system that would allow controlled releases of about 7 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) or less from a fixed depth of about 60 feet (ft). Development of a hydrologic budget for Sheridan Lake involved compilation, estimation, and characterization of data sets for streamflow, precipitation, and evaporation. The most critical data need was for extrapolation of available short-term streamflow records for Spring Creek to be used as the long-term inflow to Sheridan Lake. Available short-term records for water years (WY) 1991-2004 for a gaging station upstream from Sheridan Lake were extrapolated to WY 1962-2006 on the basis of correlations with streamflow records for a downstream station and for stations located along two adjacent streams. Comparisons of data for the two streamflow-gaging stations along Spring Creek indicated that tributary inflow is approximately proportional to the intervening drainage area, which was used as a means of estimating tributary inflow for the hydrologic budget. Analysis of evaporation data shows that sustained daily rates may exceed maximum monthly rates by a factor of about two. A long-term (1962-2006) hydrologic budget was developed for computation of reservoir outflow from Sheridan Lake for the historical pass-through operating system. Two inflow components (stream inflow and precipitation) and one outflow component (evaporation) were considered. The hydrologic budget uses monthly time steps within a computational year that includes two 6-month periods - May through October, for which evaporation is accounted for, and November through April, when evaporation is considered negligible. Results indicate that monthly evaporation rates can substantially exceed inflow during low-flow periods, and potential exists for outflows to begin approaching zero-flow conditions substantially prior to the onset of zero-inflow conditions, especially when daily inflow and evaporation are considered. Results also indicate that September may be the month for greatest potential benefit for enhancing fish habitat and other ecosystem values in downstream reaches of Spring Creek with managed releases of cool water. Computed monthly outflows from Sheridan Lake for September are less than 1.0 ft3/s for 8 of the 44 years (18 percent) and are less than 2.0 ft3/s for 14 of the 44 years (32 percent). Conversely, none of the computed outflows for May are less than 2.0 ft3/s. A short-term (July through September 2007) data set was used to calculate daily evaporation from Sheridan Lake and to evaluate the applicability of published pan coefficients. Computed values of pan coefficients of approximately 1.0 and 1.1 for two low-flow periods are larger than the mean annual pan coefficient of 0.74 for the area that is reported in the literature; however, the computed values are consistent with pan coefficients reported elsewhere for similar late summer and early fall periods. Thus, these results supported the use of variable monthly pan coefficients for the long-term hydrologic budget. A hydrologic model was developed using the primary components of the hydrologic budget and was used to simulate monthly storage deficits and drawdown for Sheridan Lake using hypothetical

Driscoll, Daniel G.; Norton, Parker A.

2009-01-01

269

Digital map of water levels in 1980 for the High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains digital data and accompanying documentation for contours for 1980 water-level elevations for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. This digital data set was created by digitizing the 1980 water-level elevation contours from a 1:1,000,000-scale base map created by the U.S. Geological Survey High Plains Regional Aquifer Systems-Analysis (RASA) project (Gutentag, E.D., Heimes, F.J., Krothe, N.C., Luckey, R.R., and Weeks, J.B., 1984, Geohydrology of the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1400-B, 63 p.) The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:1,000,000.

Cederstrand, Joel R.; Becker, Mark F.

1999-01-01

270

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in South Dakota (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in South Dakota. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in South Dakota to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,795 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01

271

Assessment of the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum L.) for growing pigs1,2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fourexperimentswere conductedtoin- vestigate the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum L.) for growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 96 pigs (initial BW = 22 ± 3.35 kg) were allotted to four treatment groups (four pigs per pen, six replicate pens per treatment) and fed growing (0.95% Lys) and finish- ing (0.68% Lys) diets containing 0, 12, 24, or

H. H. Stein; G. Benzoni; R. A. Bohlke; D. N. Peters

272

Isolation and characterization of cellulose-degrading bacteria from the deep subsurface of the Homestake gold mine, Lead, South Dakota, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the cultivable mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (60°C) cellulose-degrading bacterial diversity\\u000a in a weathered soil-like sample collected from the deep subsurface (1.5 km depth) of the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South\\u000a Dakota, USA. Chemical characterization of the sample by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy revealed a high amount of toxic heavy\\u000a metals such as Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni, and

Gurdeep Rastogi; Geetha L. Muppidi; Raghu N. Gurram; Akash Adhikari; Kenneth M. Bischoff; Stephen R. Hughes; William A. Apel; Sookie S. Bang; David J. Dixon; Rajesh K. Sani

2009-01-01

273

Evaluation of a Total Dissolved Solids Model in Comparison to ActualField Data Measurements in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the summers of 2002 and 2004, in-stream integrated flow and concentration measurements for the total dissolved solids\\u000a in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, USA was conducted in order to compare the obtained actual field measurements with the\\u000a predictions values made by the Bureau of Reclamation in the Environmental Impact Statement. In comparison to the actual field\\u000a measurements conducted in

Bruce W. Berdanier; Anf H. Ziadat

2006-01-01

274

Constraints on the genesis of gold mineralization at the Homestake Gold Deposit, Black Hills, South Dakota from rhenium–osmium sulfide geochronology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Homestake gold deposit, located in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA, is one of the largest known hydrothermal gold deposits\\u000a globally, with total mining production exceeding 40 Moz Au. Rhenium–osmium geochronology of ore-associated arsenopyrite and\\u000a pyrrhotite was performed in an effort to delineate the timing of gold mineralization in relation to known tectonothermal events\\u000a in the northern Black Hills. Arsenopyrite

Ryan M. Morelli; Chris C. Bell; Robert A. Creaser; Antonio Simonetti

2010-01-01

275

A digital simulation of the glacial-aquifer system in Sanborn and parts of Beadle, Miner, Hanson, Davison, and Jerauld counties, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The drought in South Dakota from 1974-76 and the near drought conditions in 1980-81 have resulted in increased demands on the groundwater resources within many of the irrigated areas of the James River basin in eastern South Dakota. These increases in demand for irrigation water from the glacial aquifer system, and continued requests to the State for additional irrigation well permits, have created a need for a systematic water management program to avoid over-development of this system in the James River basin. An equally spaced grid containing 56 rows and 52 columns used to simulate the glacial aquifer system, was calibrated using water level data collected before significant groundwater development (before 1973). The aquifer was also simulated in 11 annual transient stress periods from 1973 through 1983 and in 12 monthly transient stress periods for 1976. The simulated pre-development potentiometric heads were compared to average water levels from 32 observation wells to check the accuracy of the simulate potentiometric surface. The average arithmetic difference between the simulated and observed water levels was 1.68 ft and the average absolute difference was 4.38 ft. The non-pumping steady-state simulated water budget indicates that recharge from precipitation accounts for 97.1% of the water entering the aquifer and evapotranspiration accounts for 98.2% of the water leaving the aquifer. The sensitivity analysis of the steady-state model indicates that the model is most sensitive to reductions in recharge and least to changes in hydraulic conductivity. The maximum annual recharge varied from 0.10 inch in 1976 to 8.14 inches in 1977. The potential annual evapotranspiration varied from 29.9 inches in 1982 to 48.9 inches in 1976. Withdrawals from the glacial aquifer system increased 2.6 times between 1975 and 1976. The average annual arithmetic difference between the simulated and observed water levels ranged from 3.88 ft in 1974 to 2.23 ft in 1982; the average absolute difference ranged from 4.70 ft in 1973 to 11.70 ft in 1982. In the 1976 monthly transient simulation, the maximum annual recharge rate 0.10 inch was distributed over the months of March, April, and September. The potential monthly evapotranspiration rate ranged from 12.50 inches in August to 0.00 inch during the winter when the ground was frozen. (Author 's abstract)

Emmons, P. J.

1988-01-01

276

Personal Health Record Use by Patients as Perceived by Ambulatory Care Physicians in Nebraska and South Dakota: A Cross-Sectional Study  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to examine the awareness and engagement that ambulatory care physicians have with patients who use a personal health record (PHR). This is part of a larger study examining health information technology (HIT) and electronic health record (EHR) adoption by ambulatory care physicians in Nebraska and South Dakota. Descriptive results and inferential findings about physician awareness and engagement are presented in relationship to the physician's stage of EHR adoption, practice type and size, gender, specialty, and age. Overall, physicians' awareness of PHRs and their engagement with the technology remains low. Physicians using EHRs were more likely to be aware and engaged with PHRs than physicians who either plan to adopt EHRs or have no intention to adopt EHRs. Practice type, gender, and specialty have an association as well. The implications of the findings are discussed, and a recommendation is made that education of physicians is needed in this area as the nation progresses toward the creation of a national health information network for health information exchange.

Fuji, Kevin T; Galt, Kimberly A; Serocca, Alexandra B

2008-01-01

277

A probable extralimital post-breeding assembly of Bufflehead Bucephala albeola in southcentral North Dakota, USA, 1994-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bufflehead Bucephala albeola breeds predominantly in Canada and Alaska (USA). Evidence suggests that the species may have recently expanded its breeding range southward into central and south central North Dakota. This paper presents data on observations of Buffleheads during the breeding season in Kidder County, North Dakota, 1994-2002, and discusses the possibility that the species has not expanded its breeding range but rather has established an extralimital post-breeding staging area south of its typical breeding range.

Igl, L. D.

2003-01-01

278

A probable extralimital postbreeding assembly of bufflehead Bucephala albeola in southcentral North Dakota, USA, 1994-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bufflehead Bucephala albeola predominantly in Canada and Alaska (USA). Evidence suggests that the species may have recently expanded its breeding range southward into central and south-central North Dakota. This paper presents data on observations of Buffleheads during the breeding season in Kidder County, North Dakota, 1994-2002, and discusses the possibility that the species has not expanded its breeding range but rather has established an extralimital post-breeding staging area south of its typical breeding range.

Igl, L. D.

2003-01-01

279

Mineral recorders of pegmatite internal evolution: REE contents of tourmaline from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Trace rare earth elements (REE) have been determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis for tourmaline samples from an internally zoned, rare-element, granitic pegmatite, located in the Black Hills, South Dakota. The Total REE concentrations range from 40 ppm-0.2 ppm, and are highest in tourmaline from the exomorphic halo (country rock) and pegmatite border zone. Chondrite-normalized patterns are highly fractionated from light REE to heavy REE; and REE concentrations decrease in tourmaline from the outer wall zone and first intermediate zone, through the inner wall zone and third intermediate zone, to lowest levels in the pegmatite core. The REEs, as recorded by tourmaline, appear to behave compatibly in this pegmatite system due to early crystallization of apatite and other possible REE-sink minerals. The large range of REE concentrations and differences in slopes of chondrite-normalized patterns probably also reflect significant changes in the structural state of the pegmatite melt, caused by changes in pH/sub 2/O and other volatiles (B, F, P) as crystallization progressed. Tourmaline samples that appear to have been fluid-derived are HREE-depleted relative to coexisting silicate-melt-derived tourmaline. Tourmaline does not exhibit any strong preference for specific REEs, rather its REE content appears to reflect the REE content of the medium from which the tourmaline crystallized.

Jolliff, B.L.; Papike, J.J.

1987-08-01

280

Paleosols from Pakistan, Greece, and South Dakota: Strengths and pitfalls of the use of carbon isotopes in paleoecologic reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

The delta C-13 of soil carbonates in paleosols can be used to reconstruct the proportion of C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] plants that grew on the site during pedogenesis. This reconstruction is only possible where: (1) soil carbonate, not other secondary carbonates, is sampled, (2) carbon isotopes have not undergone post-burial replacement or exchange, and (3) there is no detrital contamination of soil nodules. Preservation of soil organic matter provides the simplest test of all these conditions. In modern soils coexisting soil carbonate and organic matter differ by 14--17%. This difference is preserved in Mio-Pliocene paleosols from the Siwalik Sequence in Pakistan, verifying a pedogenic origin, but not in coexisting carbonate and organic layers from Pikermi in Greece. Minor detrital contamination is present in some Siwalik soil carbonates, but this can be quantified by analyzing entire paleosol profiles. Other post-pedogenic carbonate cements are also present by they display very different delta C-13 and delta O-18 values from those in soil carbonates, aging suggesting that post-pedogenic exchange has not occurred. In the Badlands of South Dakota, preliminary results show that all sampled carbonate phases, including those in paleosols, display very homogeneous delta C-13 values of around [minus]7 to [minus]8%, indicating that (1) no pedogenic carbonate is present, (2) post-burial isotopic alteration may have occurred, or (3) Oligocene atmospheric pCO[sub 2] was substantially higher than today's.

Quade, J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences); Cerling, T.E.; Wang, Yang (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1992-01-01

281

Analysis of HLA Haplotype Segregation in the Schmiedeleut Hutterites of South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

HLA data from 1,085 South Dakotan Schmiedeleut Hutterites were examined for evidence of nonrandom transmission of haplotypes. The inheritance of haplotypes was viewed as a series of genetic contests between competing pairs of parental haplotypes using a maximum likelihood approach first put forward by Carlisle and Woodbury. Haplotype transmission probabilities were expressed in terms of weights, and the null hypothesis

J. M. Bryttan; D. D. Kostyu; C. Ober; S. Elias; D. V. Dawson

1994-01-01

282

Project F020-7, Lake County, F020-8, Moody County, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes construction of a four lane highway from the corner south of Wentworth, S.D. along SD 34 approximately 10.5 miles to the I-29 Interchange. Since the project follows the present alignment of SD 34, only some extra right of way along th...

1974-01-01

283

BREEDING BIOLOGY AND DIET OF THE FERRUGINOUS HAWK IN SOUTH DAKOTA  

Microsoft Academic Search

throughout the area and is widespread in the western third of the county. Small grain crops compose 9% of the area. pastureland and tame hay 3% and woodland 3%. Elevated table lands are dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) savannah. whereas green ash (Fraxinus penmylvanicus). willow (Salix spp.) and Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila) predominate in riparian areas and ravines. Two

CHARLES L. BLAIR; FRANK SCH

284

Assessment of the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum l.) for growing pigs.  

PubMed

Four experiments were conducted to investigate the feeding value of South Dakota-grown field peas (Pisum sativum L.) for growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 96 pigs (initial BW = 22 +/- 3.35 kg) were allotted to four treatment groups (four pigs per pen, six replicate pens per treatment) and fed growing (0.95% Lys) and finishing (0.68% Lys) diets containing 0, 12, 24, or 36% field peas (as-fed basis). There were no differences among the treatment groups in ADG, ADFI, or G:F. Likewise, there were no differences in backfat thickness or lean meat percent among treatment groups, but pigs fed diets containing 12, 24, or 36% field peas had greater (P < 0.05) loin depths than pigs fed the control diet. In Exp. 2, 120 pigs (initial BW = 7.8 +/- 1.04 kg) were allotted to four treatment groups 2 wk after weaning. Pigs were then fed diets containing 0, 6, 12, or 18% field peas (as-fed basis) during the following 4 wk. There were five pigs per pen and six replicate pens per treatment. Results of the experiment showed no differences in ADG, ADFI, or G:F among treatment groups. In Exp. 3, apparent (AID) and standardized (SID) ileal digestibility coefficients of CP and AA in field peas and soybean meal were measured using six individually penned growing pigs (initial BW = 36.5 +/- 2.1 kg) arranged in a repeated 3 x 3 Latin square design. The AID for Met, Trp, Cys, and Ser, and the SID for Met, Trp, and Cys were lower (P < 0.05) in field peas than in soybean meal; but for CP and all other AA, no differences in AID or SID were observed between the two feed ingredients. Experiment 4 was an energy balance experiment conducted to measure the DE and ME concentrations in field peas and corn. Six growing pigs (initial BW = 85.5 +/- 6.5 kg) were placed in metabolism cages and fed diets based on field peas or corn and arranged in a two-period switch-back design. The DE values for field peas and corn (3,864 and 3,879 kcal/kg DM, respectively) were similar, but the ME of corn was higher (P < 0.05) than the ME of field peas (3,825 vs. 3,741 kcal ME/kg DM). The results from the current experiments demonstrate that the nutrients in South Dakota-grown field peas are highly digestible by growing pigs. Therefore, such field peas may be included in diets for nursery pigs and growing-finishing pigs in amounts of at least 18 and 36%, respectively, without negatively affecting pig performance. PMID:15446472

Stein, H H; Benzoni, G; Bohlke, R A; Peters, D N

2004-09-01

285

Numerical modeling of a long-term in situ chemical osmosis experiment in the Pierre Shale, South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have numerically modeled evolving fluid pressures and concentrations from a nine-year in situ osmosis experiment in the Pierre Shale, South Dakota. These data were obtained and recently interpreted by one of us (C.E.N.) as indicating a potentially significant role for chemical osmosis in media like the Pierre Shale. That analysis considered only the final pressure differentials among boreholes that were assumed to represent osmotic equilibrium. For this study, the system evolution was modeled using a recently developed transient model for membrane transport. The model simulates hydraulically and chemically driven fluid and solute transport. The results yield an estimate of the thickness of the water film between the clay platelets b of 40 Å, which corresponds to an osmotic efficiency ? of 0.21 for the ambient pore water salinity of 3.5 g/l TDS. These values largely confirm the results of the earlier equilibrium analysis. However, the new model analysis provides additional constraints suggesting that intrinsic permeability k = 1.4 × 10-19 m2, specific storage Ss = 1.7 × 10-5 m-1, and diffusion coefficient D* = 6 × 10-11 m2/s. The k value is larger than certain independent estimates which range from 10-21 to 10-20; it may indicate opening of microcracks during the experiments. The fact that the complex transient pressure and concentration behavior for the individual wells could be reproduced quite accurately, and the inferred parameter values appear to be realistic for the Pierre Shale, suggests that the new model is a useful tool for modeling transient coupled flows in groundwater systems.

Garavito, A. M.; Kooi, H.; Neuzil, C. E.

2006-03-01

286

Mass transfer during wall-rock alteration: An example from a quartz-graphite vein, Black Hills, South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mass transfer and fluid-rock interaction have been evaluated along two sample traverses in low-sillimanite grade quartz-mica schist adjacent to a synmetamorphic quartz-graphite vein in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. In an ~ 17 cm halo between apparently unaltered schist and the vein contact is an outer zone of cryptic alteration and three inner zones of visible alteration. The cryptic zone consists of the original prograde metamorphic mineral assemblage (quartz + biotite ± muscovite + plagioclase + microcline) plus anomalously high amounts of tourmaline. The outermost visible zone contains abundant graphite. The second visible zone is defined by intensive bleaching of the schist. The innermost visible zone, immediately adjacent to the vein, is tourmaline + quartz + plagioclase + limonite + graphite. The vein is composed almost entirely of quartz, but also contains trace amounts of graphite. Mass balance calculations indicate that Al was essentially inert. The predominant chemical changes during wall-rock alteration were addition of B and C from the vein-forming fluid along with loss of K from the wall rocks, corresponding to precipitation of tourmaline and graphite, and the progressive destruction of microcline, biotite, and muscovite toward the vein. In addition, the elements V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, W, and Au were introduced into the country rock, whereas Si, Rb, Ba, and Cs were removed. On the basis of a constant Al reference frame, calculations indicate a net volume loss of 21-34% within one centimeter of the vein with little or no volume loss further from the vein. Fluid-rock interaction modeling suggests that between one and four equivalent masses of fluid interacted chemically with the most altered mineral assemblages. In addition, greater than one equivalent mass of reactive fluid penetrated to distances of at least 5 cm from the vein contact.

Galbreath, K. C.; Duke, E. F.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.

1988-07-01

287

Effects of CRP field age and cover type on ring-necked pheasants in eastern South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Loss of native grasslands to tillage has increased the importance of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grasslands to maintain ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) populations. Despite the importance of CRP to pheasants, little is known about the effects of CRP field age and cover type on pheasant abundance and productivity in the northern Great Plains. Therefore, we assessed effects of these characteristics on pheasant use of CRP fields. We stratified CRP grasslands (n=42) by CRP stand age (old [10-13 yrs] vs. new [1-3 yrs] grasslands) and cover type (CP1 [cool-season grasslands] vs. CP2 [warm-season grasslands]) in eastern South Dakota and used crowing counts and roadside brood counts to index ring-necked pheasant abundance and productivity. Field-age and cover-type effects on pheasant abundance and productivity were largely the result of differences in vegetation structure among fields. More crowing pheasants were recorded in old cool-season CRP fields than any other age or cover type, and more broods were recorded in cool- than warm-season CRP fields. Extending existing CRP contracts another 5-10 years would provide the time necessary for new fields to acquire the vegetative structure used most by pheasants without a gap in habitat availability. Cool-season grass-legume mixtures (CP1) that support higher pheasant productivity should be given equal or higher ratings than warm-season (CP2) grass stands. We also recommend that United States Department of Agriculture administrators and field staff provide broader and more flexible guidelines on what seed mixtures can be used in CRP grassland plantings in the northern Great Plains. This would allow landowners and natural resource professionals who manage pheasant habitat to plant a mosaic of cool- and warm-season CRP grassland habitats.

Eggebo, S. L.; Higgins, K. F.; Naugle, D. E.; Quamen, F. R.

2003-01-01

288

1. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTH PLANT FROM SETTLING BASIN AREA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTH PLANT FROM SETTLING BASIN AREA. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

289

Evaporation from a small prairie wetland in the Cottonwood Lake Area, North Dakota - An energy-budget study  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaporation from Wetland Pl in the Cottonwood Lake area of North Dakota, USA was determined by the energy-budget method for 1982-85 and 1987. Evaporation rates were as high as 0.672 cm day-1. Incoming solar radiation, incoming atmospheric radiation, and long-wave radiation emitted from the water body are the largest energy fluxes to and from the wetland. Because of the small heat storage of the water body, evaporation rates closely track solar radiation on short time scales. The effect of advected energy related to precipitation is small because the water quickly heats up by solar radiation following precipitation. Advected energy related to ground water is minimal because ground-water fluxes are small and groundwater temperature is only about 7 ??C. Energy flux related to sediment heating and thermal storage in the sediments, which might be expected to be large because the water is clear and shallow, affects evaporation rates by less than 5 percent.

Parkhurst, R. S.; Winter, T. C.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Sturrock, A. M.

1998-01-01

290

Evidence for a Widespread Disruption Layer Associated With the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary in the Upper Fox Hills Formation Throughout the Badland National Park Region of South Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A widespread zone of disrupted bedding (0.5 to 3.0 m thick) is preserved in the upper Fox Hills Formation throughout the Badlands National Park region. This unit, the Disturbed Zone (DZ), is recognizable in park outcrops extending for twelve miles (east to west) along the crest of the Sage Creek Arch. It also extends at least 20 miles north of the park along the Cheyenne River valley. The DZ features an abundance of soft-sediment liquefaction characteristics including rolled-up sandy beds (now mostly concretions) with an east-to-west axis orientation. The current mapped extent of the DZ covers about 3,000 square kilometers in central South Dakota, but may be much greater. In the park, the DZ unit rest on top of richly fossiliferous marine marls bearing marine mollusks (mostly ammonites and belemnites) of Late Maestrichtian age. After many seasons of searching, the sandstone and shale units overlying the DZ have not yielded any Cretaceous fossils. However, the overlying beds do preserve an abundance of small traces fossils, arthropod and fish remains, and plant material. In the park, this uppermost unit above the DZ ranges up to 16 meters thick, and the upper part preserves a series of paleosols known locally as the Yellow Mounds. The Fox Hills Formation in the park preserves the same biozonation sequence as the Type Fox Hills in the Missouri Valley region. In both regions the thickness of the formation varies, but the measurable maximum thickness is about the same (50 meters). In the Badlands National Park area, structural patterns preserved in the underlying Pierre Shale seem to have influenced sedimentation characteristics (including sand content and fossil distribution) in the overlying Fox Hills Formation. In addition, the thickness of the Fox Hills Formation is controlled by the distribution and pattern of ancient stream valleys preserved beneath the overlying Tertiary White River Group.

Stoffer, P. W.

2002-12-01

291

Composition, distribution, and hydrologic effects of contaminated sediments resulting from the discharge of gold milling wastes to Whitewood Creek at Lead and Deadwood, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Whitewood Creek-Belle Fourche-Cheyenne River stream system in western South Dakota has been extensively contaminated by the discharge to Whitewood Creek of about 100 million tons of mill tailings from gold-mining operations. The resulting contaminated sediments contain unusually large concentrations of arsenic, as much as 11,000 micrograms/g, derived from the mineral arsenopyrite, as well as potentially toxic constituents derived from the ore-body minerals or from the milling processes. Because of the anomalous arsenic concentrations associated with the contamination, arsenic was used as an indicator for a geochemically based, random, sediment-sampling program. Arsenic concentrations in shallow, contaminated sediments along the flood plains of the streams were from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than arsenic concentrations in uncontaminated sediments in about 75% of the flood plains of Whitewood Creek and the Belle Fourche River. Appreciable surface-water contamination resulting from the contaminated sediments is confined to Whitewood Creek and a reach of the Belle Fourche River downstream from the mouth of Whitewood Creek. In Whitewood Creek , dissolved-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 80 microgram/L during the year in response to variations in groundwater inflow and dilution, whereas total-recoverable-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 8 ,000 micrograms/L during short periods in response to rapid changes in suspended-sediment concentration. Contamination of the alluvial aquifer along the stream system is limited to areas in direct contact with large deposits of contaminated sediments. Within the aquifer, arsenic concentrations are thought to be controlled by sorption-desorption on metallic hydroxides. (USGS)

Goddard, K. E.

1989-01-01

292

Composition, distribution, and hydrologic effects of contaminated sediments resulting from the discharge of gold milling wastes to Whitewood Creek at Lead and Deadwood, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Whitewood Creek-Belle Fourche-Cheyenne River stream system in western South Dakota has been extensively contaminated by the discharge to Whitewood Creek of about 100 million tons of mill tailings from gold-mining operations. The resulting contaminated sediments contain unusually large concentrations of arsenic, as much as 11,000 micrograms/g, derived from the mineral arsenopyrite, as well as potentially toxic constituents derived from the ore-body minerals or from the milling processes. Because of the anomalous arsenic concentrations associated with the contamination, arsenic was used as an indicator for a geochemically based, random, sediment-sampling program. Arsenic concentrations in shallow, contaminated sediments along the flood plains of the streams were from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude larger than arsenic concentrations in uncontaminated sediments in about 75% of the flood plains of Whitewood Creek and the Belle Fourche River. Appreciable surface-water contamination resulting from the contaminated sediments is confined to Whitewood Creek and a reach of the Belle Fourche River down-stream from the mouth of Whitewood Creek. In Whitewood Creek, dissolved-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 80 microgram/L during the year in response to variations in groundwater inflow and dilution, whereas total-recoverable-arsenic concentrations vary from about 20 to 8,000 micrograms/L during short periods in response to rapid changes in suspended-sediment concentration. Contamination of the alluvial aquifer along the stream system is limited to areas in direct contact with large deposits of contaminated sediments. Within the aquifer, arsenic concentrations are thought to be controlled by sorption-desorption on metallic hydroxides. 31 refs., 20 figs., 14 tabs.

Goddard, K.E.

1989-01-01

293

Water quality impacts from mining in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The focus of this research was to determine if abandoned mines constitute a major environmental hazard in the Black Hills. Many abandoned gold mines in the Black Hills contribute acid and heavy metals to streams. In some areas of sulfide mineralization local impacts are severe, but in most areas the impacts are small because most ore deposits consist of small quartz veins with few sulfides. Pegmatite mines appear to have negligible effects on water due to the insoluble nature of pegmatite minerals. Uranium mines in the southern Black Hills contribute some radioactivity to surface water, but the impact is limited because of the dry climate and lack of runoff in that area.

Rahn, P. H.; Davis, A. D.; Webb, C. J.; Nichols, A. D.

1996-02-01

294

Human Needs Assessment of the First Planning and Development District, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study (1972-1973) designed to provide necessary data for district one planners and public officials on the problems, opinions, and attitudes of residents; to establish priorities among those areas; and to provide a basis for development and implementati...

1973-01-01

295

64 FR 26435 - South Baggs Area Natural Gas Development Project  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...WY-030-1310-00] South Baggs Area Natural Gas Development Project AGENCY...for the South Baggs Area Natural Gas Project. The DEIS analyzes...50) additional natural gas wells in the project area...Office. Approximately 43 oil and gas wells have...

1999-05-14

296

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium

T. R. Butz; N. E. Dean; C. S. Bard; R. N. Helgerson; J. G. Grimes; P. M. Pritz

1980-01-01

297

The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 4, Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

2011-01-01

298

The Nation's Report Card Science 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 8, Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by a new framework, the NAEP science assessment was updated in 2009 to keep the content current with key developments in science, curriculum standards, assessments, and research. The 2009 framework organizes science content into three broad content areas. Physical science includes concepts related to properties and changes of matter, forms…

National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

2011-01-01

299

U.S. Geological Survey applied research studies of the Cheyenne River system, South Dakota; description and collation of data, water years 1985-86  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cheyenne River system in Western South Dakota has been impacted by the discharge of about 100 million metric tons of gold-mill tailings to Whitewood Creek near Lead, South Dakota. In April 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated an extensive series of research studies to investigate the magnitude of the impact and to define important processes acting on the contaminated sediments present in the system. The report presents all data collected during the 1985 and 1986 water years for these research studies. Some of the data included have been published previously. Hydrologic, geochemical, and biologic data are available for sites on Whitewood Creek, the Belle Fourche and Cheyenne Rivers, and for the Cheyenne River arm of Lake Oahe. Data complexity varies from routine discharge and water quality to very complex photon-correlation spectroscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Methods for sample collection, handling and preservation, and laboratory analysis are also presented. No interpretations or complex statistical summaries are included. (USGS)

Edited by Goddard, Kimball E.

1988-01-01

300

U.S. Geological Survey applied research studies of the Cheyenne River System, South Dakota; description and collation of data, water years 1987-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cheyenne River System in western South Dakota has been impacted by the discharge of about 100 million metric tons of gold-mill tailings to Whitewood Creek near Lead, South Dakota. In April 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated an extensive series of research studies to investigate the magnitude of the impact and to define important processes acting on the contaminated sediments present in the system. The report presents all data collected during the 1987 and 1988 water years for these research studies. Some of the data included have been published previously. Data collected in the 1985 and 1986 water years have been published in a companion report (U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 88-484). Hydrologic, geochemical, and biologic data are available for sites on Whitewood Creek, and the Belle Fourche and Cheyenne Rivers. Data complexity varies from routine discharge and water-quality to very complex energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Methods for sample collection, handling and preservation, and laboratory analysis are also presented. No interpretations or complex statistical summaries are included. (See also W89-08390) (USGS)

edited by Goddard, K. E.

1990-01-01

301

Evaluation of trawls for monitoring and harvesting fish populations in Lake Oahe, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trawls of various designs and sizes were compared to evaluate their use for monitoring and harvesting fish populations in Lake Oahe. Catches of a 10.7-m semiballoon trawl, selected to monitor changes in the fish populations from 1965 to 1970, showed a downward trend in the abundance of all species, except walleye; the decline was largest in the lower area of the reservoir with a slight increase in the upper area. Of two trawl designs tested, semiballoon trawls captured more fish per hour than high-rise trawls, and a 15.9-m semiballoon trawl with a 3.8-cm mesh cod end captured fish at the highest and most consistent rate. The size and species composition of fish caught in small-mesh trawls differed from those caught in trap nets. Trawl catches were too small to recommend or warrant their use as a commercial fishing gear, but the use of both small mesh trawls and trap nets should improve accuracy in monitoring fish populations in this reservoir.

Nelson, William R.; Boussu, Marvin S.

1974-01-01

302

Natural gas in North Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost all natural gas produced in North Dakota is casinghead gas from oil pools in the Madison group along the Nesson anticline and from pools in Burke County. Relatively minor quantities of dry gas are produced from the gas fields of North Dakota part of the Cedar Creek anticline. Only the natural gas from these areas is used commercially; the

S. B. Anderson; W. P. Eastwood

1968-01-01

303

Geochemistry and shock petrography of the Crow Creek Member, South Dakota, USA: Ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Crow Creek Member is one of several marl units recognized within the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale Formation of eastern South Dakota and northeastern Nebraska, but it is the only unit that contains shock-metamorphosed minerals. The shocked minerals represent impact ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure (MIS). This study was aimed at determining the bulk chemical compositions and analysis of planar deformation features (PDFs) of shocked quartz; for the basal and marly units of the Crow Creek Member. We studied samples from the Gregory 84-21 core, Iroquois core and Wakonda lime quarry. Contents of siderophile elements are generally high, but due to uncertainties in the determination of Ir and uncertainties in compositional sources for Cr, Co, and Ni, we could not confirm an extraterrestrial component in the Crow Creek Member. We recovered several shocked quartz grains from basal-unit samples, mainly from the Gregory 84-21 core, and results of PDF measurements indicate shock pressures of at least 15 GPa. All the samples are composed chiefly of SiO2, (29-58 wt%), Al2O3 (6-14 wt%), and CaO (7-30 wt%). When compared to the composition of North American Shale Composite, the samples are significantly enriched in CaO, P2O5, Mn, Sr, Y, U, Cr, and Ni. The contents of rare earth elements (REE), high field strength elements (HFSE), Cr, Co, Sc, and their ratios and chemical weathering trends, reflect both felsic and basic sources for the Crow Creek Member, an inference, which is consistent with the lithological compositions in the environs of the MIS. The high chemical indices of alteration and weathering (CIA' and CIW': 75-99), coupled with the Al2O3-(CaO*,+Na2O -K2O (A-CN'-K) ratios, indicate that the Crow Creek Member and source rocks had undergone high degrees of chemical weathering. The expected ejecta thicknesses at the sampled locations (409 to 219 km from Manson) were calculated to range from about 1.9 to 12.2 cm (for the present-day crater radius of Manson), or 0.4 to 2.4 cm (for the estimated transient cavity radius). The trend agrees with the observed thicknesses of the basal unit of the Crow Creek Member, but the actually observed thicknesses are larger than the calculated ones, indicating that not all of the basal unit comprises impact ejecta. ?? Meteoritical Society, 2004.

Katongo, C.; Koeberl, C.; Witzke, B. J.; Hammond, R. H.; Anderson, R. R.

2004-01-01

304

Peak-Flow Frequency Estimates Based on Data through Water Year 2001 for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous users, including the South Dakota Department of Transportation, have continuing needs for peak-flow information for the design of highway infrastructure and many other purposes. This report documents results from a cooperative study between the South Dakota Department of Transportation and the U.S. Geological Survey to provide an update of peak-flow frequency estimates for South Dakota. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals are reported for 272 streamflow-gaging stations, which include most gaging stations in South Dakota with 10 or more years of systematic peak-flow records through water year 2001. Recommended procedures described in Bulletin 17B were used as primary guidelines for developing peak-flow frequency estimates. The computer program PEAKFQ developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was used to run the frequency analyses. Flood frequencies for all stations were initially analyzed by using standard Bulletin 17B default procedures for fitting the log-Pearson III distribution. The resulting preliminary frequency curves were then plotted on a log-probability scale, and fits of the curves with systematic data were evaluated. In many cases, results of the default Bulletin 17B analyses were determined to be satisfactory. In other cases, however, the results could be improved by using various alternative procedures for frequency analysis. Alternative procedures for some stations included adjustments to skew coefficients or use of user-defined low-outlier criteria. Peak-flow records for many gaging stations are strongly influenced by low- or zero-flow values. This situation often results in a frequency curve that plots substantially above the systematic record data points at the upper end of the frequency curve. Adjustments to low-outlier criteria reduced the influence of very small peak flows and generally focused the analyses on the upper parts of the frequency curves (10- to 500-year recurrence intervals). The most common alternative procedures involved several different methods to extend systematic records, which was done primarily to address biases resulting from nonrepresentative climatic conditions during several specific periods of record and to reduce inconsistencies among multiple gaging stations along common stream channels with different periods of record. In some cases, records for proximal stations could be combined directly. In other cases, the two-station comparison procedure recommended in Bulletin 17B was used to adjust the mean and standard deviation of the logs of the systematic data for a target station on the basis of correlation with concurrent records from a nearby long-term index station. In some other cases, a 'mixed-station procedure' was used to adjust the log-distributional parameters for a target station, on the basis of correlation with one or more index stations, for the purpose of fitting the log-Pearson III distribution. Historical adjustment procedures were applied to peak-flow frequency analyses for 17 South Dakota gaging stations. A historical adjustment period extending back to 1881 (121 years) was used for 12 gaging stations in the James and Big Sioux River Basins, and various other adjustment periods were used for additional stations. Large peak flows that occurred in 1969 and 1997 accounted for 13 of the 17 historical adjustments. Other years for which historical peak flows were used include 1957, 1962, 1992, and 2001. A regional mixed-population analysis was developed to address complications associated with many high outliers for the Black Hills region. This analysis included definition of two populations of flood events. The population of flood events that composes the main body of peak flows for a given station is considered the 'ordinary-peaks population,' and the population of unusually large peak flows that plot substantially above the main body of peak flows on log-probability scale is co

Sando, Steven K.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Parrett, Charles

2008-01-01

305

Lakota Formation, southern Black Hills, South Dakota: an Early Cretaceous evolving fluvial system  

SciTech Connect

The fluvial, Early Cretaceous Lakota Formation consists of four spatially and temporally distinct sandstone units in the southern Black Hills and southeastern Powder River basin. Three of these units crop out in proximity to an area of uranium roll-front development (Edgemont mining district) where approximately 2300 wells were drilled and logged. Comparison of the resistivity logs of several of these wells with continuous cores of the Lakota Formation confirms their lithologic sensitivity. These logs (utilized to assist in subsurface facies interpretations where cores were not available), cores, and outcrops are the basis for the following facies interpretations. The discharge, sediment load, and resulting sinuosity of this fluvial system varied substantially throughout the time of Lakota deposition. The oldest unit consists of tabular deposits with complex internal architecture comprised of cross-cutting lateral accretion deposits. Upward-fining grain size, upward-decreasing scale of sedimentary structures, and the angular relationship between lateral accretion surfaces and overlying crevasse-splay deposits support this conclusion. The intermediate unit of ephemeral stream sediments is characterized by abundant pebble- and cobble-strewn erosional surfaces with up to 1.5 m relief, very poor clast sorting, and trough and planar cross-bedding with concave-upward foresets. The youngest unit has a predominance of tabular cross-bedding with back flow climbing ripples and low dispersion of paleocurrent directions, suggesting a relatively straight, bed-load-type channel dominated by trains of sand waves.

Dahlstrom D.J.; Fox, J.E.

1986-08-01

306

Dakota Tallgrass Prairie Wildlife Management Area. Grassland Easement Program Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Great Plains of North America once covered over a million square miles through the center of the continent. The eastern third of this prairie ecosystem, from Manitoba, to Illinois and south to Texas, is known as the tallgrass prairie region. The tallg...

2000-01-01

307

A Study of the Economic Impact of Variation in the Nonresident Tuition Rate at Public Institutions of Higher Education in South Dakota. Bulletin Number One Hundred Thirty-Two.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined the likely response of nonresident enrollments to a lowering of nonresident tuition rates in South Dakota public institutions of higher education; the cost of educating additional nonresident students; and other economic benefits to the state of increased enrollment of nonresident students at state universities. Nonresident…

Brown, Ralph J.; Johnson, Dennis A.

308

Archeological Investigations at the Lower Grand Site (39CO14), Corson County, South Dakota. A Report on the 1984 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Excavations. Volume 1. Main Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1994, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted with the Archeology Laboratory, Augustana College, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Contract No. DACW45-94-P-1335), to complete the analyses of recovered materials and a detailed analytical report of the 1984...

R. P. Winham

1995-01-01

309

Toxic substances in surface waters and sediments--A study to assess the effects of arsenic-contaminated alluvial sediment in Whitewood Creek, South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field measurements and bioassay experiments were done to investigate the effects of arsenic and phosphorus interactions on sorption of these solutes by the benthic flora (periphyton and submerged macrophytes) in Whitewood Creek, a stream in western South Dakota. Short-term (24-hour) sorption experiments were used to determine arsenic transport characteristics for algae (first-order rate constants for solute sorption, biomass, and accumulation factors) collected in the creek along a transect beginning upstream from a mine discharge point and downgradient through a 57-kilometer reach. Temporal changes in biomass differed significantly between and within sampling sites. Arsenic concentrations in plant tissue increased with distance downstream, but temporal changes in concentrations in tissues differed considerably from site to site. Cultures of Achnanthes minutissima (Bacillariophyceae) and Stichococcus sp. (Chlorophyceae) were isolated from four sites along a longitudinal concentration gradient of dissolved arsenic within the study reach and were maintained at ambient solute concentrations. Arsenic accumulation factors and sorption-rate constants for these isolates were determined as a function of dissolved arsenate and orthophosphate. Cell surfaces of algal isolates exhibited preferential orthophosphate sorption over arsenate. Initial sorption of both arsenate and orthophosphate followed first-order mass transfer for each culturing condition. Although sorption-rate constants increased slightly with increased dissolved-arsenate concentration, algae, isolated from a site with elevated dissolved arsenic in the stream channel, had a significantly slower rate of arsenic sorption compared with the same species isolated from an uncontaminated site upstream. In diel studies, amplitudes of the pH cycles increased with measured biomass except at a site immediately downstream from water-treatment-plant discharge. Inorganic pentavalent arsenic dominated arsenic speciation at all sites?not a surprising result for the well-oxygenated water column along this reach. Concentration fluctuations in dissolved-arsenic species lagged pH fluctuations by approximately 3 hours at the most downstream site, but no discernible lag was observed at an artificially pooled area with an order of magnitude higher biomass. Furthermore, the amplitudes of diel fluctuations in arsenic species were greater at the pooled area than at the most downstream site. Lack of correspondence between changes in dissolved-orthophosphate concentrations and arsenic species may have resulted from preferential sorption of orthophosphate over arsenate by the biomass. Based on carbon-fixation estimates, the phosphorus demand from photosynthetic activity required water-column concentrations to be supplemented by another source such as phosphate regeneration within the benthic community or desorption of particle-bound phosphate.

edited by Kuwabara, James S.; Fuller, Christopher C.

2003-01-01

310

Proposed Cape Romain Wilderness Area, South Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposal recommends that 28,0000 acres of the Cape Romain national wildlife refuge, located in Charleston County, South Carolina, be designated as wilderness within the national wilderness preservation system. The wilderness designation would not resu...

1972-01-01

311

South Dakota's Forests, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report analyzes 5 years of data collected in an annual inventory of 20 percent of State inventory plots. Earlier reports were based on periodic inventories and were limited to different regions of the State. This report is the culmination of an effor...

B. J. Butler C. H. Perry C. W. Woodall D. D. Haugan D. M. Meneguzzo G. J. Brand G. J. Josten M. H. Hansen R. J. Piva S. J. Crocker W. K. Moser

2009-01-01

312

Water resources data for South Dakota, water year 1992. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Water Resources Data for the 1992 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. The report contains discharge records for 142 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 10 lakes and reservoirs; stage for 6 streams and 4 lakes; water-quality records for 16 streamflow-gaging stations, 4 daily-sediment stations, 3 wells, 9 ungaged stream sites, 5 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation site; water levels for 7 wells; daily precipitation records at 46 sites; and 22 partial-record crest-stage gage sites.

Burr, M.J.; Benson, R.D.; Sando, S.K.

1993-05-01

313

Water resources data for South Dakota, water year 1993. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1992-30 September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Water resources data for the 1993 water year for South Dakota consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; precipitation; and water levels in wells. The report contains discharge records for 142 streamflow-gaging stations; stage and contents records for 11 lakes and reservoirs, stage for 6 streams and 4 lakes; water-quality records for 12 streamflow-gaging stations, 4 daily-sediment stations, 3 wells, 9 ungaged stream sites, 7 lakes, 1 sewage lagoon, and 1 precipitation site; water levels for 7 wells; daily precipitation records at 46 sites; and 25 partial-record crest-stage gage sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses.

Burr, M.J.; Sando, S.K.; Teller, R.W.; Lindskov, K.L.

1994-08-01

314

Field and laboratory data describing physical and chemical characteristics of metal-contaminated flood-plain deposits downstream from Lead, west-central South Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Samples from metal-contaminated flood-plain sediments at 9 sites downstream from Lead, in west-central South Dakota, were collected during the summers of 1985-87 to characterize aspects of the sedimentology, chemistry, and geometry of a deposit that resulted from the discharge of a large volume of mining wastes into a river system. Field and laboratory data include stratigraphic descriptions, chemical contents and grain-size distributions of samples, and surveyed flood-plain positions of samples. This report describes sampling-site locations, and methods of sample collection and preservation, and subsequent laboratory analysis. Field and laboratory data are presented in 4 figures and 11 tables in the ' Supplemental Data ' section at the back of the report. (USGS)

Marron, D. C.

1988-01-01

315

Establishing a Patient Navigator Program to Reduce Cancer Disparities in the American Indian Communities of Western South Dakota: Initial Observations and Results  

PubMed Central

Background American Indians (AIs) in the Northern Plains region suffer disproportionately high cancer mortality rates compared with the general US population and with AIs from other regions in the United States. Methods The National Cancer Institute developed the Cancer Disparity Research Partnership to address these inequities. This initiative in Rapid City, South Dakota, attempts to lower cancer mortality rates for AIs by access to innovative clinical trials, behavioral research, and a genetic study. Patient navigation is a critical part of the program. Two navigation strategies are described: navigators at the cancer center and navigators on each reservation. A retrospective analysis was performed to determine if navigated patients (n = 42) undergoing potentially curative radiotherapy had fewer treatment interruptions compared with nonnavigated patients (n = 74). Results A total of 213 AIs with cancer have undergone patient navigation. For those undergoing cancer treatment, the median number of patient navigation interactions was 15 (range 1 to 95), whereas for those seen in follow-up after their cancer treatment, the median number of contacts was 4 (range 1 to 26). AIs who received navigation services during curative radiation treatment had on average 3 fewer days of treatment interruptions compared to AIs who did not receive navigation services during curative radiation treatment (P = .002, N = 116). Conclusions Early findings suggest that patient navigation is a critical component in addressing cancer disparities in this population. The program has established trust with individual cancer patients, with the tribal councils, and with the general population on each of the three reservations of western South Dakota.

Petereit, Daniel G.; Molloy, Kevin; Reiner, Mary L.; Helbig, Petra; Cina, Kristin; Miner, Raylene; Rost, Catherine; Conroy, Patricia; Roberts, Chester R.

2008-01-01

316

Art & Indian Children of the Dakotas. An Introduction to Art. Series One.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This first volume in a bicultural educational series designed and produced especially for use in the Aberdeen (South Dakota) area schools has educational import for children and teachers everywhere who have an interest in the art and culture of the Western Sioux Tribe. This visual and verbal approach to art appreciation emphasizes the function of…

Amiotte, Arthur

317

Geologic framework of the ground-water system in Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Energy development in the Northern Great Plains will place new and increased demands on ground-water development. Water from Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks might supply part of the needed water. Geologic framework of the ground-water flow system in the Northern Great Plains is divided into two parts: structural and stratigraphic. Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks are divided into six chronostratigraphic intervals. Thickness and sedimentological variations of each interval show distinct patterns or lineaments. These lineaments may reflect paleogeographic and paleostructural trends. The tectonic and sedimentation model most appropriate for the lineaments and the orientations of these lineaments can be explained best by a horizontal stress system. This system created the structural configuration of grabens, half-grabens, and horsts, initiated in Precambrian time, that influenced the position of depositional environments, subsequently influenced the lateral and vertical distribution of sediments, and was enhanced by eustatic changes in sea level. Orientation of tensional and compressional structural features and lineaments is predictable under this stress system. Tensional features, oriented east-west and northeast-southwest, enhance secondary porosity or permeability; thus, they become partial conduits for ground-water flow. Compressional features, oriented generally north-south and northwest-southeast, decrease porosity or permeability and become barriers or partial barriers to ground-water flow.

Anna, L.O.

1986-01-01

318

8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. TANKWATER VAT IN RENDERING AREA ON SOUTH SIDE OF LEVEL 3; LOOKING WEST - Rath Packing Company, Grease Interceptor Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

319

Geology of the Area South of Vioolsdrif, Cape Province.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Geological reconnaissance of an area of 1,500 square km to the south of Vioolsdrif in northern Namaqualand has revealed that this region straddles the boundary between the upper crustal Richtersveld domain and the subjacent Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex...

J. H. W. Ward

1977-01-01

320

VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN REROLL BAY TOWARD ROLL MAINTENANCE AREA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN REROLL BAY TOWARD ROLL MAINTENANCE AREA. #43 TWO-HIGH HOT ROLL STAND (R FOREGROUND) AND DISCHARGE END OF #44 BREAKDOWN ROLL (L FOREGROUND). - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

321

Regional Ecosystems Survey of the South Pacific Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report deals with islands of the South Pacific Commission area. Included in the study are: classification and characteristics of ecosystems: biomes and habitats; conservation interest, rare or endemic species, conservation legislation; existing reserv...

A. L. Dahl

1980-01-01

322

Hydrologic setting of wetlands in the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Because of growing interest in the role of lakes and wetlands in the hydrology of the prairie environment, a group of wetlands in the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, N. Dak., are being instrumented for long-term hydrologic studies. The study site is on a regional topographic high near the eastern edge of the Missouri Coteau and is underlain by more than 400 feet of glacial drift, largely silty, clayey till. Long-term climatic data indicate the study area is in a water deficient area--mean annual evaporation exceeds mean annual precipitation by about 18 inches. Different methodologies are being used to compare measurements and estimates of each hydrologic component interacting with the lakes and wetlands. For example, for a 3-month period in 1979, estimates of precipitation for the study site using data collected at National Weather Service stations differed from that measured by a recording gage at the study site by several tenths of an inch for 14-day totals and differed by more than half an inch for individual storms. Numerical simulation analysis of regional groundwater flow systems shows the study site is situated in a regional recharge area, but local groundwater flow systems can discharge to lakes and wetlands within the recharge area. Instrumentation at the study site shows a complex interrelation of wetlands and groundwater. Based on data for 1979 only, some wetlands appear to recharge groundwater, some wetlands are flow-through types where groundwater enters one side and surface water seeps to groundwater on the other side, and some wetlands are discharge points for groundwater. Further, these interrelations vary throughout the year. (USGS)

Winter, Thomas C.; Carr, Mark R.

1980-01-01

323

Data from the surface-water hydrologic investigations of the Hay Creek Study Area, Montana, and the West Branch Antelope Creek Study Area, North Dakota, October 1976 through April 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data are provided for the Hay Creek study area near Wibaux, Montana, and the West Branch Antelope Creek study area near Beulah, North Dakota. The report contains data on the following: Air temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, wind run, solar radiation, precipitation, soil temperature, snowpack temperature, snowpack density and moisture content, streamflow, water quality, soil moisture, land use, and basin characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the location of the data-collection sites, instrumentation, and methods used to collect data are included. (USGS)

Emerson, Douglas G.; Norbeck, Steven W.; Boespflug, Kelvin L.

1983-01-01

324

Ecological Studies on the Revegetation Process of Surface Coal Mined Areas in North Dakota. 8. Soil Algae.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Surface soil/spoil samples (0-10 cm) from experimental test sites in western North Dakota were aseptically collected during August 1975 and each month (May through September) during 1976 and 1977. Selected samples were cultured in a defined inorganic medi...

T. L. Starks L. E. Shubert

1982-01-01

325

Mediterranean Sea potential seen in area south of Malta  

SciTech Connect

Seismic data and stratigraphic projections indicate that an entirely different facies exists in Area 4 in the Mediterranean Sea south of Malta than the continuous carbonate sequence of the Malta platform. Japan National Oil Corp., in September 1989 under authority of the government of Malta, conducted a 3,615 line km geophysical survey (seismic, gravity, magnetics) in Area 4, which comprises about 13,000 sk km and is 40 km south of Malta. The paper describes the geology of Malta Area 4, its inferred stratigraphy, seismic results, and potential geologic traps.

Bishop, W.F. (Bishop (William F.), Houston, TX (United States)); Debono, G. (Office of the Prime Minister, Valletta (Malta))

1993-07-05

326

FROM OLD SOUTH TO NEW SOUTH? BLACK-WHITE RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION IN MICROPOLITAN AREAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines black-white residential segregation in micropolitan areas across the South. Micropolitan areas are newly defined urban clusters with a core population that ranges from 10,000 to 50,000. By shifting the focus to the nonmetropolitan South, we take debates about the “American dilemma” back to a historically important terrain of black-white relations that few scholars have systematically examined in

Ana-María González Wahl; Steven E. Gunkel

2007-01-01

327

30 CFR 941.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 941.762 Section 941.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION...OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable...

2013-07-01

328

Ligia Grischa: A Successful Swiss Colony on the Dakota Territory Frontier  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 1877 a small group of Swiss immigrants from the Graubunden canton formed a cooperative with another Swiss group in Stillwater, Minnesota, to begin a colony in eastern South Dakota. These settlers founded the Badus Swiss colony on the open prairie in Lake County, Dakota Territory (later South Dakota), based on cooperative rules written in…

Quinn, Todd; Benedict, Karl; Dickey, Jeff

2012-01-01

329

Reservoir performance in Ordovician Red River Formation, Horse Creek and South Horse Creek fields, Bowman County, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The contiguous Horse Creek and South Horse Creek fields produce oil from the Ordovician Red River Formation's 'D' zone (equal to the 'C' Burrowed Member). These fields produce from dolomite reservoirs at depths of about 9000 ft (3000 m) in the southern Williston basin on the northeastern flank of the southern end of the Cedar Creek anticline. Gentle ({lt}1{degree}) northeast regional dip allows oil entrapment in both areas of updip porosity pinch-out and small ({lt}2 km diameter), low-relief ({lt}30 m) structural closures. Reservoir rocks in both types of traps are burrowed dolomitized carbonate mudstones and wackestones deposited in open to restricted shelf environments. The best reservoir rocks occur where up to 25% porosity is present between completely dolomitized burrow fills. Reservoir-quality porosity is mainly intercrystalline and vuggy in finely crystalline dolomites, but even in the most porous intervals, permeability only locally exceeds 30 md. Amounts of porosity in wells producing from the 'D' zone can be used to estimate a well's ultimate oil recovery when integrated with data on structural position, thickness of porous dolomite, and the nature of the fluid saturation (best indicated by bulk volume water values). Production in the structurally trapped 'D' zone oil pools in each field, where initial water saturation was 22%, will average about 625 thousand bbl of oil/well with initially negligible water, but with increasing watercut through time. The stratigraphically trapped oil pools in the fields, where initial water saturations ranged from 32 to 66%, will average 237 thousand bbl of oil/well with higher initial watercuts, but little increase in watercut through time.

Longman, M.W. (Consulting Geologist, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Fertal, T.G. (Samuel Gary, Jr. and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)); Stell, J.R. (Snyder Oil Corp., Denver, CO (United States))

1992-04-01

330

Marine biofouling in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study on the characteristics of fouling communities in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea,\\u000a was conducted at four sites there. At each station, test panels on iron frames were hung on the mooring system at different\\u000a depths. Data on biofouling were mainly obtained by examination of the fouled test panels. Organisms attached to buoys and

Tao Yan; Wen-Xia Yan; Guan-He Liang; Yu Dong; Hua-Jie Wang; Yan Yan

2000-01-01

331

Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization  

SciTech Connect

This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

Varney, Peter J.

2002-04-23

332

Reconnaissance-level assessment of water and bottom-sediment quality, including pesticides and mercury, in Yankton Sioux Tribe wetlands, Charles Mix County, South Dakota, June-July 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During June and July 2005, water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from selected Yankton Sioux Tribe wetlands within the historic Reservation area of eastern Charles Mix County as part of a reconnaissance-level assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey and Yankton Sioux Tribe. The water samples were analyzed for pesticides and mercury species. In addition, the water samples were analyzed for physical properties and chemical constituents that might help further characterize the water quality of the wetlands. The bottom-sediment samples were analyzed for mercury species. During June 2005, water samples were collected from 19 wetlands and were analyzed for 61 widely used pesticide compounds. Many pesticides were not detected in any of the water samples and many others were detected only at low concentrations in a few of the samples. Thirteen pesticides were detected in water samples from at least one of the wetlands. Atrazine and de-ethyl atrazine were detected at each of the 19 wetlands. The minimum, maximum, and median dissolved atrazine concentrations were 0.056, 0.567, and 0.151 microgram per liter (?g/L), respectively. Four pesticides (alachlor, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and dicamba) were detected in only one wetland each. The number of pesticides detected in any of the 19 wetlands ranged from 3 to 8, with a median of 6. In addition to the results for this study, recent previous studies have frequently found atrazine in Lake Andes and the Missouri River, but none of the atrazine concentrations have been greater than 3 ?g/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level for atrazine in drinking water. During June and July 2005, water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from 10 wetlands. Water samples from each of the wetlands were analyzed for major ions, organic carbon, and mercury species, and bottom-sediment samples were analyzed for mercury species. For the whole-water samples, the total mercury concentrations ranged from 1.11 to 29.65 nanograms per liter (ng/L), with a median of 10.56 ng/L. The methylmercury concentrations ranged from 0.45 to 14.03 ng/L, with a median of 2.28 ng/L. For the bottom-sediment samples, the total mercury concentration ranged from 21.3 to 74.6 nanograms per gram (ng/g), with a median of 54.2 ng/g. The methylmercury concentrations ranged from <0.11 to 2.04 ng/g, with a median of 0.78 ng/g. The total mercury concentrations in the water samples were all much less than 2 ?g/L (2,000 ng/L), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Contaminant Level for mercury in drinking water. However, water samples from four of the wetlands had concentrations larger than 0.012 ?g/L (12 ng/L), the State of South Dakota's chronic standard for surface waters, including wetlands. Maximum methylmercury concentrations for this study are larger than reported concentrations for wetlands in North Dakota and concentrations reported for the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

Schaap, Bryan D.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

2006-01-01

333

67. 1911 BOILER HOUSE LOOKING SOUTH. AREA FRAMED BY HIGH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

67. 1911 BOILER HOUSE LOOKING SOUTH. AREA FRAMED BY HIGH WINDOWS ON RIGHT IS FORMER EAST EXTERIOR WALL OF 1901 STEAM ENGINE HOUSE. BELOW RIGHT IS A TANK FOR HEATING OIL ENCLOSED IN CEMENT BLOCK CA. 1945. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

334

7. LOOKING WEST TOWARD SHEEP KILL AREA ON SOUTH END ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. LOOKING WEST TOWARD SHEEP KILL AREA ON SOUTH END OF BUILDING 149; INCLINED CONVEYOR AT LEFT CENTER CARRIED TROLLEYS TO THE AUTOMATIC WASHER/OILER ON THE GALLERY LEVEL - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

335

75 FR 41073 - South American Cactus Moth Regulations; Quarantined Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the interstate movement of regulated articles from Louisiana is restricted. This action...it out and killing the plant. Within a short period of time, the South American cactus...restrict the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas to prevent...

2010-07-15

336

Britain, South African Gold and Sterling Area, 1945-51  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to tap South African gold was regarded as vital for the restoration of sterling as an international currency after World War Two. Economic relations between Britain and the Union were dominated by the extreme volatility of capital movements within the sterling area.

T. Rooth

2000-01-01

337

76 FR 44029 - North Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] North Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of North Dakota (FEMA-1986-DR), dated May...in certain areas of the State of North Dakota resulting from a severe...

2011-07-22

338

75 FR 11900 - North Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] North Dakota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations...major disaster for the State of North Dakota (FEMA-1879-DR), dated February...in certain areas of the State of North Dakota resulting from a severe...

2010-03-12

339

40 CFR 81.423 - North Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false North Dakota. 81.423 Section 81.423 Protection of Environment...Where Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.423 North Dakota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing...

2013-07-01

340

33 CFR 165.165 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. 165.165 Section 165.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters...Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY. (a) Regulated navigation area. All navigable...

2013-07-01

341

LANDSCAPE FEATURES AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ADULT NORTHERN CORN ROOTWORMS (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE) IN THE SOUTH DAKOTA AREAWIDE MANAGEMENT SITE  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), creates economic and environmental concerns in the Corn Belt region of the United States. In order to supplement the population control tactics of the Areawide Pest Management Program in Brookings, South D...

342

Unstable ground in western North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Unstable ground in western North Dakota is mainly the result of mass-wasting processes. The units most affected are mudstones, siltstones, and sandstones of the Fort Union Formation. Ground instability generally is indicated by landslides, soil slides, or subsidence. Landslides are mostly of the slump-earthflow type and are localized along the flanks of the high buttes in southwestern North Dakota, including HT (Black) Butte, Chalky Buttes, Sentinel Butte, and East and West Rainy Buttes, and along parts of the valleys of the Des Lacs, Missouri, Little Missouri, and Heart Rivers. Landslides are sparse elsewhere. Soil slides are common in the areas south and southwest of the maximum position of the Pleistocene glacial ice margin on slopes of 15 degrees or more, and have taken place on some slopes as gentle as five degrees. The weathered, exposed surface of the Fort Union Formation seems to be especially susceptible to soil slides. Soil slides constitute the major type of ground instability in southwestern North Dakota. Subsidence is of two types: (1) subsidence over old underground mine workings, and (2) subsidence over naturally ignited and burned underground coal beds. Major subsidence has taken place over old, underground workings near Beulah, Wilton, Lehigh, Haynes, and Belfield, and lesser subsidence near Scranton, and west and north of Bowman. Thickness of overburden above the coal in all these areas is believed to be less than 30 m (100 ft). Subsidence has not taken place over old underground workings along the Des Lacs and-Souris valleys northwest of Minot, where the thickness of overburden is more than 60 m (200 ft). Spectacular subsidence has occurred over a burning underground coal bed at Burning Coal Vein Park near the Little Missouri River, northwest of Amidon.

Trimble, Donald E.

1979-01-01

343

Swainson's hawk nesting ecology in North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni) were studied at 270 occupied nest sites in south-central North Dakota on a 1,259-km2 intensive study block and on a surrounding study area (16,519 km2) during three breeding seasons. On the intensive study block the number of occupied nests ranged from 46 in 1977 to 100 in 1979. Average nest densities were highest on ground moraine (0.119 nest/km2) and on eolian sand deposit (0.102 nest/km2 landforms. Pasture and haylands made up 75% of the land-use within 1.0 km of a sample of 27 nests. Some pairs nested successfully in sites characterized by intensive agriculture and human activity; about 75% of all nests were in sites attributable to human activities. The most common nesting sites (43%) were in shelterbelts. Cottonwoods (Populus deltoides) were the most frequently used (44%) nest trees. At least 50% of the pairs constructed new nests each year. Mean nest success was 64% and mean number of young fledged per occupied nest was 1.5. Wind and hail caused over 30% of the nest failures each of the three years. Northern pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) were the most frequent prey, accounting for 44% of all animal remains found at nests. Man-made changes in central North Dakota during the last century have provided many nesting sites in areas previously sparsely populated by Swainson's Hawks.

Gilmer, D. S.; Stewart, R. E.

1984-01-01

344

7 CFR 301.38-3 - Protected areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. (2) The following counties...Franklin, Garfield, Grant, Kittitas, Klickitat, Lincoln, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens,...

2013-01-01

345

Evaluation of drainage-area ratio method used to estimate streamflow for the Red River of the North Basin, North Dakota and Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The drainage-area ratio method commonly is used to estimate streamflow for sites where no streamflow data were collected. To evaluate the validity of the drainage-area ratio method and to determine if an improved method could be developed to estimate streamflow, a multiple-regression technique was used to determine if drainage area, main channel slope, and precipitation were significant variables for estimating streamflow in the Red River of the North Basin. A separate regression analysis was performed for streamflow for each of three seasons-- winter, spring, and summer. Drainage area and summer precipitation were the most significant variables. However, the regression equations generally overestimated streamflows for North Dakota stations and underestimated streamflows for Minnesota stations. To correct the bias in the residuals for the two groups of stations, indicator variables were included to allow both the intercept and the coefficient for the logarithm of drainage area to depend on the group. Drainage area was the only significant variable in the revised regression equations. The exponents for the drainage-area ratio were 0.85 for the winter season, 0.91 for the spring season, and 1.02 for the summer season.

Emerson, Douglas G.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Dahl, Ann L.

2005-01-01

346

Phenology and abundance of bean leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in eastern South Dakota on alfalfa and soybean relative to tillage, fertilization, and yield.  

PubMed

Phenology and abundance of bean leaf beetles, Cerotoma trifurcata (Förster), were examined throughout two eastern South Dakota growing seasons in relation to grain yields in chisel- and ridge-tilled soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] grown in 2-yr rotation with corn (Zea mays L.) with and without added nitrogen (N). Populations were also sampled early and late season in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Beetles were present in alfalfa by late May and most were reproductively active within a week, but their presence in alfalfa did not always precede soybean emergence. Most beetles taken from alfalfa in late fall were teneral; all were previtellogenic and unmated. Reproductively active beetles were detected in soybeans as soon as seedlings emerged. A partial second generation apparently occurred each year. First-generation beetles started to emerge in soybean fields during the first or third week of July but, whether emergence started early or late, most beetles emerging after July seemingly failed to mature their eggs and started leaving soybeans within several weeks of eclosion. This pattern suggested that any second generation arose from only the earliest emerging beetles of the first generation, with later emerging individuals having to overwinter before reproducing. Thus, any factors delaying emergence of the first generation, such as delayed soybean planting, could potentially limit its reproductive capacity through winter mortality. Cumulative seasonal beetle counts were lower in N-treated subplots and in ridge-tilled compared with chisel-tilled plots. Soybean grain yield increased with decreases in peak abundance of first-generation beetles and with N fertilization. PMID:20550786

Hammack, Leslie; Pikul, Joseph L; West, Mark S

2010-06-01

347

Upward lightning observations from towers in Rapid City, South Dakota and comparison with National Lightning Detection Network data, 2004-2010  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on upward lightning observations from ten tall towers (91-191 m) in Rapid City, South Dakota, USA and compare with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) data. A total of 81 upward flashes were observed from 2004-2010 using GPS time-stamped optical sensors, and in all but one case, visible flash activity preceded the development of the upward leaders. Time-correlated analysis showed that the NLDN recorded an event within 50 km of towers and within 500 ms prior to upward leader development from the tower(s) for 83% (67/81) of the upward flashes. A preceding positive cloud-to-ground stroke (+CG) was detected in 57% (46/81) of the cases, and a preceding positive intracloud flash (+IC) in 23% (19/81) of the cases. However, 8 of the 19 NLDN-indicated +IC events were actually +CG strokes based on optical observations. Preceding negative intracloud flashes (-IC) were recorded for 2% (2/81) of the cases. Analysis also showed that for 44% (36/81) of the upward flashes, the NLDN reported subsequent negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) strokes and/or -IC events at one or more tower locations. Of the 151 subsequent events, 70% (105/151) were -CG reports and 30% (46/151) were listed as -IC events. The geometric mean/median location accuracy and peak current for subsequent events were 194 m/206 m and -12.9 kA/-12.4 kA respectively. These correlated observations suggest that a majority of the upward lightning flashes were triggered by a preceding flash with the dominant triggering type being the +CG flash.

Warner, Tom A.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Orville, Richard E.

2012-10-01

348

Isolation and characterization of cellulose-degrading bacteria from the deep subsurface of the Homestake gold mine, Lead, South Dakota, USA.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the cultivable mesophilic (37 degrees C) and thermophilic (60 degrees C) cellulose-degrading bacterial diversity in a weathered soil-like sample collected from the deep subsurface (1.5 km depth) of the Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota, USA. Chemical characterization of the sample by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy revealed a high amount of toxic heavy metals such as Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni, and Zn. Molecular community structures were determined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from enrichment cultures growing in presence of microcrystalline cellulose as the sole source of carbon. All phylotypes retrieved from enrichment cultures were affiliated to Firmicutes. Cellulose-degrading mesophilic and thermophilic pure cultures belonging to the genera Brevibacillus, Paenibacillus, Bacillus, and Geobacillus were isolated from enrichment cultures, and selected cultures were studied for enzyme activities. For a mesophilic isolate (DUSELG12), the optimum pH and temperature for carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) were 5.5 and 55 degrees C, while for a thermophilic isolate (DUSELR7) they were 5.0 and 75 degrees C, respectively. Furthermore, DUSELG12 retained about 40% CMCase activity after incubation at 60 degrees C for 8 h. Most remarkably, thermophilic isolate, DUSELR7 retained 26% CMCase activity at 60 degrees C up to a period of 300 h. Overall, the present work revealed the presence of different cellulose-degrading bacterial lineages in the unique deep subsurface environment of the mine. The results also have strong implications for biological conversion of cellulosic agricultural and forestry wastes to commodity chemicals including sugars. PMID:19189143

Rastogi, Gurdeep; Muppidi, Geetha L; Gurram, Raghu N; Adhikari, Akash; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hughes, Stephen R; Apel, William A; Bang, Sookie S; Dixon, David J; Sani, Rajesh K

2009-02-03

349

Characterization of intra-annual reflectance properties of land cover classes in southeastern South Dakota using Landsat TM and ETM+ data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Landsat-7 and Landsat-5 have orbits that are offset from each other by 8 days. During the time that the sensors on both satellites are operational, there is an opportunity for conducting analyses that incorporate multiple intra-annual high spatial resolution data sets for characterizing the Earth's land surface. In the current study, nine Landsat thematic mapper (TM) and enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) data sets, covering the same path and row on different dates, were acquired during a 1-year time interval for a region in southeastern South Dakota and analyzed. Scenes were normalized using pseudoinvariant objects, and digital data from a series of test sites were extracted from the imagery and converted to surface reflectance. Sunphotometer data acquired on site were used to atmospherically correct the data. Ground observations that were made throughout the growing season by a large group of volunteers were used to help interpret spectroradiometric patterns and trends. Normalized images were found to be very effective in portraying the seasonal patterns of reflectance change that occurred throughout the region. Many of the radiometric patterns related to plant growth and development, but some also related to different background properties. The different kinds of land cover in the region were spectrally and radiometrically characterized and were found to have different seasonal patterns of reflectance. The degree to which the land cover classes could be separated spectrally and radiometrically, however, depended on the time of year during which the data sets were acquired, and no single data set appeared to be adequate for separating all types of land cover. This has practical implications for classification studies because known patterns of seasonal reflectance properties for the different types of land cover within a region will facilitate selection of the most appropriate data sets for producing land cover classifications.

Vogelmann, J. E.; DeFelice, T. P.

2003-01-01

350

Origin of rhythmic layering in the Calamity Peak satellite pluton of the Harney Peak Granite, South Dakota: The role of boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Calamity Peak satellite granite pluton on the flanks of the Harney Peak Granite, South Dakota, displays prominent mineral and textural layering, the latter defined by alternating fine-grained and pegmatitic granite. Superimposed on the fine-grained granite layers is a fine-scale, 0.1-5 cm, rhythmic layering defined by modal differences in tourmaline, microcline, albite and muscovite. There is very little variation in the major element mineral compositions in the whole complex. Analyses by Prompt-Gamma Neutron Activation gave a B 2O 3 content of 0.07% in the light layers (albite, quartz, and muscovite) and 0.65% in the dark layers (tourmaline, microcline, quartz, and albite); these contents are essentially proportional to tourmaline abundance in each layer. The textural and mineralogic layering is the result of the interplay of tourmaline crystallization and shifts in phase equilibria due to changes in B concentration in the melt. Initial cotectic crystallization of albite, quartz and muscovite increased the activity of Fe and Mg in the adjacent melt to levels sufficient for tourmaline to form. Tourmaline crystallization depleted B and decreased the solubility of H 2O in the melt, causing exsolution of H 2O from the melt and further removal of B due to high fluid/melt partition coefficient. This process also resulted in the precipitation of K-feldspar, partly at the expense of muscovite and partly due to a slight increase in the solidus temperature. Once the crystallization front moved to an Fe and Mg-poor region of the melt, tourmaline precipitation ceased and the equilibrium shifted back toward quartz, muscovite, and albite. The pegmatitic layers, some of which cut across previously formed rhythmic layers and commonly have tourmaline along their borders, appear to have crystallized from melt enriched in the exsolved fluid phase.

Rockhold, J. R.; Nabelek, P. I.; Glascock, M. D.

1987-03-01

351

Protected areas and regional avian species richness in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Protected areas are generally regarded as essential for the long-term maintenance of biodiversity. Evidence for their effectiveness in this regard is, however, somewhat equivocal. Here, we document the relationship between the proportion of protected land and species richness in a region, both with and without taking spatial variation in environmental energy availability into account. Using the South African avifauna as a case study, we find that total and threatened species richness exhibit modest increases with the proportion of protected land. While the protected area network should be expanded, it is essential that conservation efforts also focus on maintaining biodiversity in the wider unprotected landscape that supports high species richness.

Evans, Karl L; Rodrigues, Ana S.L; Chown, Steven L; Gaston, Kevin J

2006-01-01

352

75 FR 10300 - South Texas Area Maritime Security (STAMS) Committee; Vacancies  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2010-0074] South Texas Area Maritime Security (STAMS) Committee; Vacancies...interested in serving on the South Texas Area Maritime Security (STAMS) Committee to submit...INFORMATION: Authority Section 102 of the Maritime Transportation Security Act...

2010-03-05

353

40Ar/39Ar evidence for Middle Proterozoic (1300-1500 Ma) slow cooling of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, midcontinent, North America: Implications for Early Proterozoic P-T evolution and posttectonic magmatism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

40Ar/39Ar total gas and plateau dates from moscovite and biotite in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, provide evidence for a period of Middle Proterozoic slow cooling. Early Proterozoic (1600-1650 Ma) mica dates were obtained from metasedimentary rocks located in a synformal structure between the Harney Peak and Bear Mountain domes and also south of Bear Mountain. Metamorphic rocks from the dome areas and undeformed samples of the ˜1710 Ma Harney Peak Granite (HPG) yield Middle Proterozoic mica dates (˜1270-1500 Ma). Two samples collected between the synform and Bear Mountain dome yield intermediate total gas mica dates of ˜1550 Ma. We suggest two end-member interpretations to explain the map pattern of cooling ages: (1) subhorizontal slow cooling of an area which exhibits variation in mica Ar retention intervals or (2) mild folding of a Middle Proterozoic (˜1500 Ma) ˜300°C isotherm. According to the second interpretation, the preservation of older dates between the domes may reflect reactivation of a preexisting synformal structure (and downwarping of relatively cold rocks) during a period of approximately east-west contraction and slow uplift during the Middle Proterozoic. The mica data, together with hornblende data from the Black Hills published elsewhere, indicate that the ambient country-rock temperature at the 3-4 kbar depth of emplacement of the HPG was between 350°C and 500°C, suggesting that the average upper crustal geothermal gradient was 25°-40°C/km prior to intrusion. The thermochronologic data suggest HPG emplacement was followed by a ˜200 m.y. period of stability and tectonic quiescence with little uplift. We propose that crust thickened during the Early Proterozoic was uplifted and erosionally(?) thinned prior to ˜1710 Ma and that the HPG magma was emplaced into isostatically stable crust of relatively normal thickness. We speculate that uplift and crustal thinning prior to HPG intrusion was the result of differential thinning of the subcrustal lithosphere beneath the Black Hills. If so, this process would have also caused an increase in mantle heat flux across the Moho and triggered vapor-absent melting of biotite to produce the HPG magma. This scenario for posttectonic granite generation is supported, in part, by the fact that in the whole of the Black Hills, the HPG is spatially associated with the deepest exposed Early Proterozoic country rock.

Holm, Daniel K.; Dahl, Peter S.; Lux, Daniel R.

1997-08-01

354

Sonar Use in Locating Fish Aggregations for Commercial Seining under the Ice, 1970-1973, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sonar was used to locate fish aggregations to define the potentially good haul areas, and eliminate unproductive seining during January, February and March of 1971, 1972, and 1973. Seine catch rates for Lake Poinsett for carp (Cyprinus carpio) and bigmout...

D. C. Warnick

1974-01-01

355

33 CFR 162.210 - Lake Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. 162.210 Section 162.210...Tahoe, Calif.; restricted areas along south shore. (a) The areas â(1) Baldwin...north of the high waterline; and thence south 300 feet to the high waterline....

2013-07-01

356

76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park...South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY...SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby...South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky,...

2011-06-20

357

Catawba Nuclear Station and surrounding area, Lake Wylie, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

An aerial gamma survey was conducted over the Catawba Nuclear Station, located near Lake Wylie, South Carolina, during the period 31 May through 7 June 1984. The survey covered a 260-square-kilometer (100-square-mile) area centered on the Station. A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate plus cosmic exposure rate at the 1-meter level was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a USGS topographic map of the area. The terrestrial plus cosmic gamma exposure rate ranged from 3.7 microroentgens per hour (..mu..R/h), the cosmic level over Lake Wylie, to 17.4 ..mu..R/h just east of the Catawba River below the dam site. A search of the gamma data showed no man-made gamma emitters in the survey area. Soil samples and ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations on the ground to support the aerial data. 8 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1984-10-01

358

Simulation of a semi-permanent wetland basin in the Cottonwood Lake area, east-central North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A coupled surface/subsurface hydrologic model was developed to examine the effects of climatic conditions on stage fluctuations within a semi-permanent wetland located in the Prairie Pothole region of east-central North Dakota. Model calibration was accomplished using data collected from 1981 to 1996 to encompass extreme climatic conditions. Results show that the processes of precipitation largely control wetland stage. Surface runoff produces short duration, high magnitude flows typically associated with spring thaw. On the other hand, groundwater contribution provides flows smaller in magnitude but higher in duration and these become increasingly important with respect to wetland stage during extended periods of drought and flood. Peak groundwater fluxes lag one-to-two months behind peak recharge rates and therefore occur predominantly during the month of June. Groundwater fluxes then attenuate slowly for the remainder of the year to the point where water may move out of the wetland and into the underlying aquifer during the fall and winter months. Despite an over simplification of the complex groundwater component of the wetland system it was found that this modeling approach was able to predict system response over 15 years, under extreme climatic conditions and with relatively easily attainable data input.

Carroll, R. W. H.; Pohll, G. M.; Tracy, J. C.; Winter, T. C.

2001-01-01

359

77 FR 24980 - Final General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement for the South Unit of Badlands...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement for the South Unit of Badlands National Park, South Dakota AGENCY: National...EIS) for the South Unit of Badlands National Park, South Dakota. DATES...by request by writing to Badlands National Park, P.O. Box 6,...

2012-04-26

360

Orientation Patterns of Chalcedony Veins and Clastic Dikes in Tertiary strata of NW Nebraska and SW South Dakota  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stratiform bound arrays of subvertical chalcedony veins occur in distinct patches of varying size in White River Group strata in the study area. At Toadstool Geologic Park in Nebraska they are associated with normal faults, and within a patch display orthogonal patterns with one direction dominant. Junctures and tip interactions indicate the orthogonal veins formed together. Two different patches at

H. D. Harmon

2008-01-01

361

Reaching North Dakota’s food insecure  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

For 1 in 12 North Dakotans the charitable feeding network is the difference between having food on the table and going hungry. The goal of this research was to determine needs, barriers to, and facilitators of optimal access to North Dakota’s charitable feeding programs. Focus groups and interviews ...

362

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sioux Falls quadrangle, South Dakota. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Computer printer maps of the magnetic total intensity and the six radiometric parameters have been prepared in addition to the radiometric anomaly maps for this area. The magnetic total intensity map displays a rather subdued response pattern of broad low amplitude anomalies over much of the area with an average magnetic intensity of approximately 58,900 gammas. The radiometric response over much of the area is relatively low. Equivalent concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium only rarely exceed 3.2 ppM, 7.5 ppM and 1.4% respectively. A number of these zones of increased concentrations show corresponding anomalous responses on the uranium/potassium and/or uranium/thorium pseudo-contour maps. Based on this set of computer printer maps alone however, it is, at times, difficult to discern the contribution of coinciding local decreases in the potassium and thorium parameters to these ratio anomalies. Based on the criteria stated in the general section on interpretation, a total of seven uranium and seven thorium anomalies have been outlined on the interpretation map. All of these features, described in Appendix B, exhibit only weakly to moderately anomalous responses. Due to the generally low radiometric levels encountered throughout the quadrangle along with the lack of any favorable indications for enriched accumulation of either uranium or thorium as seen in their radioelement distributions when correlated with the mapped geology and the weak, at best, evidence of preferential accumulations of either parameter, no follow-up work is recommended.

Not Available

1981-05-01

363

Geology in North Dakota  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Department of Geosciences at North Dakota State University educates visitors about the geologic features and landforms of North Dakota through clear text and astonishing images at this website. In the Glacial Features of North Dakota link, visitors can learn about end moraines, eskers, kettle lakes, and kames. Educators can find amazing photographs of mass wasting including creep, slope failure, and slumps. Users can also find materials on stream features and satellite imagery of North Dakota. While the website concentrates on North Dakota, the materials can be a great addition to any earth science or geomorphology class.

364

Marine biofouling in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study on the characteristics of fouling communities in offshore areas south of Hainan Island, northern South China Sea, was conducted at four sites there. At each station, test panels on iron frames were hung on the mooring system at different depths. Data on biofouling were mainly obtained by examination of the fouled test panels. Organisms attached to buoys and anchors were scraped off and examined also. The results showed that the thickness and biomass of marine growth that increased the fluid loading on offshore installations depended to a large extent on hard foulers, i. e. mollusks and acorn barnacles. Algae, hydroids, stalked barnacles and bryozoans were important fouling species. The occurrence frequency and biomass of acorn barnacles decreased with increasing distance from the shore.

Yan, Tao; Yan, Wen-Xia; Liang, Guan-He; Dong, Yu; Wang, Hua-Jie; Yan, Yan

2000-06-01

365

19 CFR 122.23 - Certain aircraft arriving from areas south of the U.S.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Certain aircraft arriving from areas south of the U.S. 122.23 Section 122... Certain aircraft arriving from areas south of the U.S. (a) Application. ...requirements for certain aircraft arriving from south of the United States. This section...

2013-04-01

366

Mapping rice areas of South Asia using MODIS multitemporal data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our goal is to map the rice areas of six South Asian countries using moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) time-series data for the time period 2000 to 2001. South Asia accounts for almost 40% of the world's harvested rice area and is also home to 74% of the population that lives on less than $2.00 a day. The population of the region is growing faster than its ability to produce rice. Thus, accurate and timely assessment of where and how rice is cultivated is important to craft food security and poverty alleviation strategies. We used a time series of eight-day, 500-m spatial resolution composite images from the MODIS sensor to produce rice maps and rice characteristics (e.g., intensity of cropping, cropping calendar) taking data for the years 2000 to 2001 and by adopting a suite of methods that include spectral matching techniques, decision trees, and ideal temporal profile data banks to rapidly identify and classify rice areas over large spatial extents. These methods are used in conjunction with ancillary spatial data sets (e.g., elevation, precipitation), national statistics, and maps, and a large volume of field-plot data. The resulting rice maps and statistics are compared against a subset of independent field-plot points and the best available subnational statistics on rice areas for the main crop growing season (kharif season). A fuzzy classification accuracy assessment for the 2000 to 2001 rice-map product, based on field-plot data, demonstrated accuracies from 67% to 100% for individual rice classes, with an overall accuracy of 80% for all classes. Most of the mixing was within rice classes. The derived physical rice area was highly correlated with the subnational statistics with R2 values of 97% at the district level and 99% at the state level for 2000 to 2001. These results suggest that the methods, approaches, algorithms, and data sets we used are ideal for rapid, accurate, and large-scale mapping of paddy rice as well as for generating their statistics over large areas.

Gumma, Murali Krishna; Nelson, Andrew; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Singh, Amrendra N.

2011-01-01

367

Mapping rice areas of South Asia using MODIS multitemporal data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Our goal is to map the rice areas of six South Asian countries using moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) time-series data for the time period 2000 to 2001. South Asia accounts for almost 40% of the world's harvested rice area and is also home to 74% of the population that lives on less than $2.00 a day. The population of the region is growing faster than its ability to produce rice. Thus, accurate and timely assessment of where and how rice is cultivated is important to craft food security and poverty alleviation strategies. We used a time series of eight-day, 500-m spatial resolution composite images from the MODIS sensor to produce rice maps and rice characteristics (e.g., intensity of cropping, cropping calendar) taking data for the years 2000 to 2001 and by adopting a suite of methods that include spectral matching techniques, decision trees, and ideal temporal profile data banks to rapidly identify and classify rice areas over large spatial extents. These methods are used in conjunction with ancillary spatial data sets (e.g., elevation, precipitation), national statistics, and maps, and a large volume of field-plot data. The resulting rice maps and statistics are compared against a subset of independent field-plot points and the best available subnational statistics on rice areas for the main crop growing season (kharif season). A fuzzy classification accuracy assessment for the 2000 to 2001 rice-map product, based on field-plot data, demonstrated accuracies from 67% to 100% for individual rice classes, with an overall accuracy of 80% for all classes. Most of the mixing was within rice classes. The derived physical rice area was highly correlated with the subnational statistics with R2 values of 97% at the district level and 99% at the state level for 2000 to 2001. These results suggest that the methods, approaches, algorithms, and data sets we used are ideal for rapid, accurate, and large-scale mapping of paddy rice as well as for generating their statistics over large areas. ?? 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

Gumma, M. K.; Nelson, A.; Thenkabail, P. S.; Singh, A. N.

2011-01-01

368

Small Generator Demonstration Project. Final report. [South Tacoma area  

SciTech Connect

The Small Generator Demonstration Project is an experimental effort to decrease the amount of hazardous waste being mishandled and improperly disposed by small businesses in the South Tacoma area of Tacoma, WA. This one-year project is centered around a program of education stressing voluntary compliance to increase recycling and decrease improper waste disposal. The project is designed to make the alternative waste-handling practices presented to the business community easy, inexpensive, and permanent by identifying available disposal resources such as local recyclers. 116 small businesses ranging from the automotive to the wood-products industry were visited and notified of safe methods of handling and disposing of their hazardous wastes. This information resulted in 40% of the businesses with waste-handling problems changing to proper waste disposal.

Not Available

1985-02-01

369

Evaluation of the hydrologic system and potential effects of mining in the Dickinson lignite area, eastern slope and western Stark and Hettinger counties, North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aquifer systems in the Dickinson lignite area of North Dakota are in sandstone beds in the Fox Hills Sandstone and lower Hell Creek Formation, in the upper Hell Creek Formation and lower Ludlow Member of the Fort Union Formation, in the upper Ludlow and lower Tongue River Members of the Fort Union Formation, and in the upper Tongue River and the Sentinel Butte Members of the Fort Union Formation. Well yields from each of the aquifer systems generally are less than 100 gallons per minute. Water in the Fox Hills-lower Hell Creek aquifer system and in the upper Hell Creek-lower Ludlow aquifer system is soft and a sodium bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 1 ,010 to 1,690 milligrams per liter. Water in the upper Ludlow-lower Tongue River aquifer system and in the upper Tongue River-Sentinel Butte aquifer system ranges from soft to very hard and generally is a sodium bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 574 to 2,720 milligrams per liter. Discharges of ground water are less than 0.1 cubic foot per second to the Cannonball River and less than 1.0 cubic foot per second to the Heart River. (USGS)

Armstrong, C. A.

1984-01-01

370

Status of emergency obstetric care in a local government area in south-south Nigeria.  

PubMed

This study assessed the status of the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in 12 functional public health facilities out of the existing 19 in Gokana Local Government Area of Rivers State in south-south Nigeria, prior to the midwives service scheme (MSS) launch in 2009. No facility qualified as basic EmOC, while one had comprehensive EmOC status. Signal functions that required supply of medical consumables were performed by more facilities than services that required special training, equipment and maintenance. Only two facilities (16.67%) had the minimum requirement of > or =4 midwives for 24-hour EmOC service; while only 2.2% of expected births occurred at the facilities. The poor state of maternal health resources in the study area requires urgent interventions by Local and State Governments for infrastructure upgrade and deployment and training of staff towards attainment of MDG-5. A follow-up evaluation would be required since the commencement of the MSS. PMID:23437510

Mezie-Okoye, Margaret M; Adeniji, Foluke O; Tobin-West, Charles I; Babatunde, Seye

2012-09-01

371

South-south monetary integration: the case for a research framework beyond the theory of optimum currency area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimum Currency Area (OCA) theory proves inadequate in the analysis of the new regional monetary integration schemes that have sprung up among developing and emerging market economies since the 1990s. Building on the concept of 'original sin' developed by Eichengreen et al. (2006), we argue that a different conceptual framework is needed as these regional monetary South-South integration (SSI) schemes

Barbara Fritz; Laurissa Muhlich

2010-01-01

372

South Dakota After 3PM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each afternoon across the U.S., 15 million children--more than a quarter of children--are alone and unsupervised after school. The parents of 18 million would enroll their children in an afterschool program, if one were available. These are some of the key findings from the nation's most in-depth study of how America's children spend their…

Afterschool Alliance, 2009

2009-01-01

373

Cultural Resources Survey of Borrow Area for Dam 96, Souris River Basin Project, Ward County, North Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A class III cultural resource inventory was accomplished for a small borrow area in the Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge. The surveyed area encompasses about 3 acres on the valley wall slopes of the Souris River. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St....

C. Spaeth

1990-01-01

374

Preliminary report on the coal resources of the Dickenson area, Billings, Dunn, and Stark counties, North Dakota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Dickinson area is underlain by the coal-bearing Fort Union Formation (Paleocene). The Fort Union in this area contains nine potentially economic coal beds. Five of these beds are, either all or in part, shallow enough to be economically extracted by conventional strip-mining methods, while the remaining four deeper beds represent future possible strip-mining, in situ, or shaft-mining coal resources. The Fort Union coal beds in the Dickinson area are relatively flat lying (dips are less than 1??) and only slightly influenced by faulting and both depositional and post-depositional channeling. Topography, coal thickness, and minimum overburden all combine to give the Dickinson area an excellent future coal resource development potential.

Menge, Michael L.

1977-01-01

375

Mineral Resources of the South Warner Contiguous Wilderness Study Area, Modoc County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The South Warner Contiguous Wilderness Study Area (CA-020-708) is located along the east flank of the South Warner Mountains in northwestern California. At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 4,330 acres of the South Warner Contiguous Wilde...

M. G. Sawlan J. G. Frisken M. S. Miller

1989-01-01

376

33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test...REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test...including the waters of the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area...

2013-07-01

377

Timing of the deposition of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene coal-bearing deposits in the Greater Glendive area, Montana and North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

With the aid of a grant from the National Geographic Society, a cooperative agreement with the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Late Cretaceous and Paleocene geologic and paleontologic field studies were undertaken in Makoshika, State Park and vicinity, Dawson County, Montana. This region was chosen as a study area because of its potential for yielding new fossil localities and extensive exposures both above and below the K/T boundary, as suggested by previous research by David W. Krause and Joseph H. Hartman. Related field studies were also undertaken in areas adjacent to the Cedar Creek Anticline in North Dakota. This work was part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of mammalian and molluscan faunas during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene and to relate observed patterns to floral and invertebrate changes in composition. This study focuses on the record of mammals and mollusks in the Makoshika stratigraphic section and places old and new observations into a paleomagnetic and palynomorph framework. Of particular interest is the appearance and diversification of archaic ungulate mammals. Simultaneous dinosaur extinction with ungulate radiation has been invoked in gradual, as opposed to catastrophic, models of faunal change at the K/T boundary. However, supposed Cretaceous localities bearing archaic ungulates and other mammals of {open_quotes}Paleocene aspect{close_quotes} may be the product of faunal reworking. Elsewhere in the Williston Basin (e.g., Garfield and McCone Counties, Montana), the molluscan record of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene strata indicates the extinction of all of the highly sculptured unionid bivalves just prior to the onset of coal swamps and subsequent coal formation.

NONE

1996-02-01

378

Hydrodynamic Simulations of Physical Aquatic Habitat Availability for Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River, at Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri, 2006-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of habitat availability in the Lower Missouri River to discharge variation, with emphasis on habitats that might support spawning of the endangered pallid sturgeon. We constructed computational hydrodynamic models for four reaches that were selected because of evidence that sturgeon have spawned in them. The reaches are located at Miami, Missouri (river mile 259.6-263.5), Little Sioux, Iowa (river mile 669.6-673.5), Kenslers Bend, Nebraska (river mile 743.9-748.1), and Yankton, South Dakota reach (river mile 804.8-808.4). The models were calibrated for a range of measured flow conditions, and run for a range of discharges that might be affected by flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam. Model performance was assessed by comparing modeled and measured water velocities. A selection of derived habitat units was assessed for sensitivity to hydraulic input parameters (drag coefficient and lateral eddy viscosity). Overall, model results were minimally sensitive to varying eddy viscosity; varying lateral eddy viscosity by 20 percent resulted in maximum change in habitat units of 5.4 percent. Shallow-water habitat units were most sensitive to variation in drag coefficient with 42 percent change in unit area resulting from 20 percent change in the parameter value; however, no habitat unit value changed more than 10 percent for a 10 percent variation in drag coefficient. Sensitivity analysis provides guidance for selecting habitat metrics that maximize information content while minimizing model uncertainties. To assess model sensitivities arising from topographic variation from sediment transport on an annual time scale, we constructed separate models from two complete independent surveys in 2006 and 2007. The net topographic change was minimal at each site; the ratio of net topographic change to water volume in the reaches at 95 percent exceedance flow was less than 5 percent, indicating that on a reach-average basis, annual topographic change contributed little to habitat area variation. Net erosion occurred at Yankton (the upstream reach) and because erosion was distributed uniformly, there was little affect on many habitat metrics. Topographic change was spatially nonuniform at Little Sioux and Kenslers Bend reaches. Shallow water habitat units and some reach-scale patch statistics (edge density, patch density, and Simpson's Diversity Index) were affected by these changes. Erosion dominated at the downstream reach but habitat metrics did not vary substantially from 2006 to 2007. Among habitat metrics that were explored, zones of convergent flow were identified as areas that most closely correspond to spawning habitats of other sturgeon species, as identified in the scientific literature, and that are consistent with sparse data on pallid sturgeon spawning locations in the Lower Missouri River. Areas of convergent zone habitat varied little with discharges that would be associated with spring pulsed flows, and relations with discharge changed negligibly between 2006 and 2007. Other habitat measures show how physical habitat varies with discharge and among the four reaches. Wake habitats defined by velocity gradients seem to correspond with migration pathways of adult pallid sturgeon. Habitats with low Froude-number correspond to low energy areas that may accumulate passively transporting particles, organic matter, and larval fish. Among the modeled reaches, Yankton had substantially longer water residence time for equivalent flow exceedances than the other three modeled reaches. Longer residence times result from greater flow resistance in the relatively wide, shallow channel and may be associated with longer residence times of passively transported particulate materials.

Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E., III; Dietsch, Benjamin J.

2009-01-01

379

Climatic and lake temperature data for Wetland P1, Cottonwood Lake Area, Stutsman County, North Dakota, 1982-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Research on the hydrology of Wetland P1 and the Cottonwood Lake Area includes the study of evaporation. Presented here in a graphical format are those data collected during the open-water seasons of 1982-87 that were needed for energy- budget and mass-transfer evaporation studies. The data include air temperatures, water surface and lake-bottom temperatures, windspeed, radiation, humidity, and precipitation. Data were collected at a raft station and two land stations.

Parkhurst, Renee S.; Sturrock, A. M.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Winter, T. C.

1995-01-01

380

Hydrology and chemistry of selected prairie wetlands in the Cottonwood Lake area, Stutsman County, North Dakota, 1979-82  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The relation of hydrologic setting and temporal variability in hydrology to nutrient content and geochemical characteristics of a group of prairie wetlands and adjacent ground water was studied during the period 1979-82. Although data were collected from many wetlands and wells at the study site, emphasis in this report primarily is on four wetlands-two seasonal and two semipermanent-and four wells contiguous to them along a hydrologic section. The seasonal wetlands, T8 and T3, contained water only for a few weeks to months after filling in spring and early summer; both were completely dry by August. The semipermanent wetlands, PI and P8, contained water throughout each year and were ice covered in winter. One wetland, T8, recharges ground water. Wetlands PI and P8 are in areas of ground-water discharge. None of the wetlands received water by channelized surface-water inlets. Only wetland P8 had a channelized surface-water outlet. Ground-water-Ievel data showed that high points of the water table did not always occur beneath land-surface highs. Reversals of ground-water flow occurred occasionally between two of the wetlands, T3 and PI. Significant differences existed in the chemical composition of the wetlands based on their hydrologic setting. In general, the dominant cation and anion in the wetlands were potassium and bicarbonate in wetland T8, calcium and sulfate in wetland T3, magnesium and sulfate in wetland PI, and magnesium and bicarbonate in wetland P8. Significant seasonal differences existed in the water chemistry of the wetlands in ground-water discharge areas. Water in three of the wetlands, T3, PI, and P8, was most dilute while they filled in spring after ice melt. Concentration increased during the open-water period, and two of the wetlands, PI and P8, became most concentrated under ice cover. Concentrations of total phosphorus and total nitrogen were greatest in wetlands in areas of ground-water recharge and least in wetlands in areas of ground-water discharge. Differences in the chemistry of water from wells in the adjacent ground water resulted primarily from the positions of the wells in the ground-water flow system. The chemical type of water from well 12, which was located in a ground-water recharge area, was calcium sodium bicarbonate. Water from well 4, located downgradient from wetland T8, and from well 16, located downgradient from wetland PI, typically was a calcium sulfate type. Water from well 13, located between wetlands T3 and PI in an area of changing ground-water flow directions, was a magnesium sulfate type. Data from this study show that an understanding of hydrologic conditions is important in the interpretation of the water chemistry of wetlands in the study area.

LaBaugh, J. W.; Winter, T. C.; Adomaitis, V. A.; Swanson, G. A.

1987-01-01

381

Quantity of Surface Water Runoff from South Plants Area Watersheds on Rocky Mountain Arsenal.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a study conducted of the south plants chemical manufacturing area on Rocky Mountain Arsenal to determine the quantity of water leaving the area as surface runoff. Since the south plants were originally constructed over a high point on the a...

R. Gregg

1983-01-01

382

76 FR 51047 - North Dakota; Amendment No. 10 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] North Dakota; Amendment No. 10 to Notice of...major disaster for the State of North Dakota (FEMA-1981-DR), dated May...in certain areas of the State of North Dakota resulting from flooding...

2011-08-17

383

A survey of obstetric malpractice in western frontier areas.  

PubMed

A mail survey of 524 physicians in the frontier areas of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming, and the rural areas of Utah was conducted; 286 valid responses were collected (54.6%). Of the respondents, 97% had at some time practiced obstetrics, and, of those now practicing obstetrics, 39% reported they would discontinue providing obstetrical care within the next year. Of those stopping, 95% indicated that malpractice was a major factor in their decision. Of the respondents, 74% indicated that access to obstetric services would be a problem in their areas if they discontinued this type of care. PMID:2347452

Chappell, L J; Cianciolo, M S; Harris, D L; Denton, D

384

North Dakota's Forests, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The first completed annual inventory of North Dakota's forests reports estimates of more than 724,000 acres of forest land. Information about forest attributes and forest health is presented along with information on agents of change including changing la...

2005-01-01

385

Spaceward Bound North Dakota  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on Spaceward Bound North Dakota, an educational program designed to inspire and train students and teachers in the exploration of scientifically interesting geologic features in the upper midwest as an analog for exploration of Mars.

Rask, J. C.; McKay, C. P.; Schwert, D.; Clambey, G.; Lepper, K.; de Leon, P.; Bieri, S.

2010-03-01

386

77 FR 52756 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the South Gillette Area Maysdorf II Coal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for the South Gillette Area Maysdorf II Coal Lease-by-Application and Environmental...of Decision (ROD) for the Maysdorf II Coal Lease-by- Application (LBA) included in the South Gillette Area Coal Lease Applications Final...

2012-08-30

387

33 CFR 334.660 - Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.660...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The...

2009-07-01

388

33 CFR 334.660 - Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.660...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The...

2010-07-01

389

33 CFR 334.660 - Gulf of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.660...of Mexico and Apalachicola Bay south of Apalachicola, Fla., Drone Recovery Area, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The...

2013-07-01

390

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

Not Available

1981-04-01

391

Wildlife tuberculosis in South African conservation areas: Implications and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, was first diagnosed in African buffalo in South Africa's Kruger National Park in 1990. Over the past 15 years the disease has spread northwards leaving only the most northern buffalo herds unaffected. Evidence suggests that 10 other small and large mammalian species, including large predators, are spillover hosts. Wildlife tuberculosis has also been diagnosed in

A. L. Michel; R. G. Bengis; D. F. Keet; M. Hofmeyr; L. M. de Klerk; P. C. Cross; A. E. Jolles; D. Cooper; I. J. Whyte; P. Buss; J. Godfroid

2006-01-01

392

Small Area Indices of Multiple Deprivation in South Africa  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents the Provincial Indices of Multiple Deprivation that were constructed by the authors at ward level using 2001 Census data for each of South Africa's nine provinces. The principles adopted in conceptualising the indices are described and multiple deprivation is defined as a weighted combination of discrete dimensions of…

Noble, Michael; Barnes, Helen; Wright, Gemma; Roberts, Benjamin

2010-01-01

393

South Texas: High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. Drug Market Analysis, 2011.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the South Texas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Drug Market Analysis for 2011. The South Texas HIDTA region has a growing influence on domestic drug availability as evidenced by the large and increasing quantities of marijuana and her...

2011-01-01

394

19 CFR 122.24 - Landing requirements for certain aircraft arriving from areas south of U.S.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for certain aircraft arriving from areas south of U.S. 122.24 Section 122...for certain aircraft arriving from areas south of U.S. (a) In general. Certain aircraft arriving from areas south of the United States that...

2013-04-01

395

Aerial view, view south with Hagley area lower right, TylerMcconnell ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view, view south with Hagley area lower right, Tyler-Mcconnell Bridge middleground, and Henry Clay Village and Walkers Mill in upper background - Charles I. Du Pont House, 162 Main Street, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

396

Natural Resource Condition Assessment for Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the state of natural resources at Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (BISO). It also addresses sets of stressors that threaten these resources and the biological integrity of habitats in th...

G. Grossman G. Sundin L. Worsham M. T. Mengak N. P. Nibbelink

2013-01-01

397

Variation in groundwater quality in South Estonian rural areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1991, the groundwater monitoring has been carried out in the experimental watershed of Porijôgi River (276 km2), South Estonia. Water samples to analyze the content of NH4, N02, N03> P04, total-P, and S0 4 in water were taken from 46 dug wells (with 0.5-10 m depth) four times a year (in spring, summer, autumn and winter). Three main subwatersheds

U. MANDER; V. KUUSEMETS; K. TREIER

398

A COMPARISON AMONG SOME EUROPEAN UNION AND SOUTH AMERICAN COUNTRIES ABOUT FORESTS AND PROTECTED AREAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper aims to compare forest and protected area policies and performance in some European Union-member countries and South American countries. Special attention is paid to Austria, the United Kingdom, Finland and Brazil as well as to forest protected areas. A protected area is a share of a territory where economic activities are forbidden or subject to some restrictions.

Carlos José Caetano Bacha

2007-01-01

399

Western North Dakota High School Senior Profiles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the attitudes of high school seniors in North Dakota toward isolationism and toward lignite coal development, and (2) to determine the future occupational and educational plans of high school seniors in the sampled area. A survey instrument was sent early in 1974 to all high school seniors in a…

Bickel, David; Markell, Clark

400

South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study: executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight has numerous areas of live bottom which are defined as areas containing biological assemblages consisting of such sessile invertebrates. Although live bottom areas are known to be important to commercial and recreational fisheries of the South Atlantic region, the ecology of bottom dwelling invertebrates and valuable finfish species utilizing live bottom reefs is not well understood. The primary study objectives were to characterize the invertebrate and nektonic communities associated with each live bottom area and evaluate factors which might influence community structure such as depth, latitude, bottom relief, season, and petroleum related activities.

Not Available

1981-10-01

401

Ecological studies on the revegetation process of surface coal mined areas in North Dakota. 10. Elements of macro- and microclimate. Final report Aug 75-Jun 82  

SciTech Connect

The general or macroclimate of the study sites in western North Dakota is characterized by rapid and sometimes extreme daily and day-to-day temperature fluctuations, rainfall patterns which are erratic in spatial and temporal distribution and intensity, generally low relative humidity, plentiful sunshine, nearly continuous air movement, and a relatively short frost-free period. Of particular relevance to plant growth and productivity is the mosaic of microclimates: these microclimates are affected by landform (convex and concave surfaces); exposure; slope angle, length and aspect; soil color, texture and surface cover (litter), and vegetation cover.

Bares, R.H.

1982-06-01

402

Step-leach Pb-Pb dating of inclusion-bearing garnet and staurolite, with implications for Early Proterozoic tectonism in the Black Hills collisional orogen, South Dakota, United States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report 207Pb/206Pb stepwise-leaching (PbSL) ages of 1762 ± 15 Ma, 1759 ± 8 Ma, and 1760 ± 7 Ma for almandine garnet, staurolite, and garnet-staurolite (combined) in an Early Proterozoic metapelite from the Black Hills collisional orogen, South Dakota. PbSL-derived 208Pb/206Pb (Th/U) trends reveal that staurolite contains inclusions of both cogenetic monazite (ca. 1760 ± 7 Ma) and older detrital zircon (?2040 Ma), whereas coexisting garnet contains only the zircon. These results and petrologic data indicate prograde sequential growth of garnet, monazite, and staurolite during tectonic burial at temperatures between ˜400 °C and ˜550 °C (i.e., well below Pb closure temperatures). We interpret the 1760 ± 7 Ma date as a maximum age for Wyoming-Superior continental collision in the Black Hills, which apparently postdated the 1800 1900 Ma Trans-Hudson orogeny in Canada, but was nearly synchronous with north-directed accretion of the Central Plains orogen in southeastern Wyoming.

Dahl, Peter S.; Frei, Robert

1998-02-01

403

Streamflow and sediment data collected at seven stream-gaging stations in the James River basin downstream from Forestburg, South Dakota, from October 1, 1982 to September 30, 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A compilation of streamflow and suspended-sediment data collected from October 1, 1982, to September 30, 1983, at seven gaging stations in the James River basin downstream from Forestburg, South Dakota, is presented in tabular and graphic form. Three of the gaging stations are on the main stem and four are on tributary streams. These are the results from the second year of a two-year study in cooperation with the Lower James Conservancy Sub-District. The data listed in the tables and figures include location, a summary of the streamflow for the period of record, tables listing the daily streamflow, mean suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment discharge; and figures showing the daily streamflow, mean suspended-sediment concentration and suspended-sediment discharge for each gaging station. Sandbars are developing in the river and this data is to be used in studies analyzing sources of the sediment and tributary sediment loads relative to those carried by the main stem. (USGS)

Little, J. R.

1985-01-01

404

Areas of permanent shadow in Mercury's south polar region ascertained by MESSENGER orbital imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radar-bright features near Mercury's poles have been postulated to be deposits of water ice trapped in cold, permanently shadowed interiors of impact craters. From its orbit about Mercury, MESSENGER repeatedly imaged the planet's south polar region over one Mercury solar day, providing a complete view of the terrain near the south pole and enabling the identification of areas of permanent shadow larger in horizontal extent than approximately 4 km. In Mercury's south polar region, all radar-bright features correspond to areas of permanent shadow. Application of previous thermal models suggests that the radar-bright deposits in Mercury's south polar cold traps are in locations consistent with a composition dominated by water ice provided that some manner of insulation, such as a thin layer of regolith, covers many of the deposits.

Chabot, Nancy L.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Denevi, Brett W.; Harmon, John K.; Murchie, Scott L.; Blewett, David T.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zhong, Ellen D.

2012-05-01

405

Evaluation of groundwater contamination in a coastal area of south-eastern Sicily  

Microsoft Academic Search

This investigation was under taken to evaluate the groundwater resources contamination due to intensive agricultural practices (particularly greenhouses). The study-area is located in the coastal area of the Ragusa province (South-East Sicily), where numerous existing greenhouses may cause the contamination of groundwater systems (unconfined and confined aquifers) beneath the cropped land. The pollution risk is mainly related with the seepage

Feliciana Licciardello; Maria Lucia Antoci; Luana Brugaletta; Giuseppe Luigi Cirelli

2011-01-01

406

Attenuation of shallow microearthquakes at Abu Simbel area, south Egypt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last few years Abu Simbel area received a special attention from the Egyptian government from the tourism point of view as well as the construction of new projects, cities and cultivation of more new areas. As this area is seismically active we decided to carry out studies on attenuation of high-frequency seismic waves at this area. The quality factor (Q) of P-wave was calculated using the Spectral ratio known as the Single-Station method. A selected data set of 14 shallow seismic events recorded by a local network operated around the area was used to calculate QP for four stations. Magnitude of these earthquakes varied between 1.7 and 3.6. The results show variations in QP as a function of frequency according to the power law Q = Q0fn, with frequency dependence coefficient n ranging between 0.4 and 1.2. Strong azimuthal variations of QP were found. It is proposed that this variation indicates presence of local strong lateral heterogeneities and/or fluid filled cracks.

Mohamed, G. A.; Mohamed, H. H.

2012-02-01

407

Geological development, origin, and energy mineral resources of Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Williston basin of North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota, and south-central Canada (Manitoba and Saskatchewan) is a major producer of oil and gas, lignite, and potash. Oil exploration and development in the United States portion of the Williston basin since 1972 have given impetus to restudy basin evolution and geologic controls for energy-resource locations. Consequently, oil production in North Dakota has jumped from a nadir of 19 million bbl in 1974 to 40 million bbl in 1980. The depositional origin of the basin and the major structural features of the basin are discussed. (JMT)

Gerhard, L.C.; Anderson, S.B.; Lefever, J.A.; Carlson, C.G.

1982-08-01

408

Geological classification of hyperspectral imagery in Hongseong Area, South Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperspectral imagery can be applied to geological classification of the earth surface with few vegetation or bare soil. In Korea, about 65% of land surface is covered with forest and bare soil area on a large scale rarely exists, so it is difficult to classify surface geology by using traditional remote sensing techniques. In spite of these circumstances, bare land

C. U. Hyun; H. D. Park

2005-01-01

409

Hydrology of the Arbuckle Mountain area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water in the aquifer is confined in some parts of the area, while in other parts it is unconfined. The average saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 3,500 feet in the outcrop area. Water levels measured in wells fluctuated from 8 to 53 feet each year, primarily in response to recharge from rainfall. Recharge to the aquifer is estimated at about 4.7 inches per year. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer is estimated at 0.008, and the average transmissivity is estimated at 15,000 feet squared per day. Based on an average saturated thickness of about 3,500 feet and a storage coefficient of 0.008, the volume of ground water contained in the 500-square-mile outcrop area is about 9 million acre-feet. An undetermined amount of fresh water probably exists in the aquifer around the periphery of the aquifer outcrop. Base flow of streams that drain the aquifer accounts for about 60 percent of the total annual runoff from the outcrop area and is maintained by numerous springs. The close hydraulic connection between streams in the outcrop area and the aquifer is shown by a close correlation between base flow in Blue River and the fluctuation of ground-water levels in five wells in the Blue River basin. This correlation also exists between the discharge by Byrds Mill Spring and the fluctuation in water level in a nearby observation well; increase and decrease in spring discharge correspond to rise and fall of the water level in the well. The chemical quality of water from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is suitable for most industrial and municipal uses. The water is hard and of the bicarbonate type; the average hardness is about 340 milligrams per liter, and the average dissolved-solids concentration is about 360 milligrams per liter. Because springs issue from the aquifer and discharge to streams in the area, the quality of water from springs and base flow in streams is similar to that of ground water. The average dissolved-solids concentration of stream water is slightly less than that of water from wells and springs. (available as photostat copy only)

Fairchild, R. W.; Hanson R. L.; Davis R. E.

1982-01-01

410

RELATIONSHIPS OF PELVIC STRUCTURE, BODY MEASUREMENTS, PELVIC AREA AND CALVING DIFFICULTY 1'2'3  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on 186 Hereford heifers from five South Dakota ranches were collected to evaluate the relationships of pelvic structure and body measurements with calving difficulty (CD) and pelvic area. Body measurements obtained prebreeding and precalving included two internal pelvic and seven external rump measurements, three pelvic angles and two slope of rump measurements. A calving difficulty score (CDS) of 1

S. K. Johnson; G. H. Deutscher; A. Parkhurst

411

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 8): North Dakota Arsenic Trioxide in Southeastern North Dakota, September 1986. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The North Dakota Arsenic Trioxide site consists of twenty townships in Richland, Ransom, and Sargent counties in southeastern North Dakota. Ground water use includes residential consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering. The contamination, limited to ground water, appears to have two sources; naturally occurring arsenic contained in shales native to the area; and an estimated 330,000 pounds of arsenic-laced bait used to control grasshopper infestations in the 1930s and 1940s. The primary contaminant of concern is arsenic trioxide.

Not Available

1986-09-26

412

Evolution of late Pleistocene and Holocene climates in the circum-South Pacific land areas  

SciTech Connect

Paleovegetation maps were reconstructed based on a network of pollen records from Australia, New Zealand, and southern South America for 18000, 12000, 9000, 6000, and 3000 BP and interpreted in terms of paleoclimatic patterns. These patterns permitted us to speculate on past atmospheric circulation in the South Pacific and the underlying forcing missing line mechanisms. During full glacial times, with vastly extended Australasian land area and circum-Antarctic ice-shelves, arid and cold conditions characterized all circum-South Pacific land areas, except for a narrow band in southern South America (43{degrees} to 45{degrees}S) that might have been even wetter and moister than today. This implies that ridging at subtropical and mid-latitudes must have been greatly increased and that the storm tracks were located farther south than today. At 12000 BP when precipitation had increased in southern Australia, New Zealand, and the mid-latitudes of South America, ridging was probably still as strong as before but has shifted into the eastern Pacific, leading to weaker westerlies in the western Pacific and more southerly located westerlies in the eastern Pacific. At 9000 BP when, except for northernmost Australia, precipitation reached near modern levels, the south Pacific ridges and the westerlies must have weakened. Because of the continuing land connection between New Guinea and Australia, and reduced seasonality, the monsoon pattern had still not developed. By 6000 BP, moisture levels in Australia and New Zealand reached their maximum, indicating that the monsoon pattern had become established. Ridging in the South Pacific was probably weaker than today, and the seasonal shift of the westerlies was stronger than before. By 3000 BP essentially modern conditions had been achieved, characterized by patterns of high seasonal variability. 93 refs., 8 figs.

Markgraf, V. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Dodson, J.R. [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia); Kershaw, A.P. [Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

1992-01-01

413

The Environment in the Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Technology Learning Areas for General Education and Training in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article assesses the inclusion of environmental concerns in South Africa's Revised National Curriculum Statements for Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology. It comments on the state of environmental education in formal education in South Africa generally but more specifically in the areas mentioned. Challenges for advancing the project of environmental education in South Africa are noted and a collective effort

Lesley Le Grange

2010-01-01

414

Heavy metal pollution in coastal areas of South China: A review.  

PubMed

Coastal areas of South China face great challenges due to heavy metal contamination caused by rapid urbanization and industrialization. In this paper, more than 90 articles on levels, distributions, and sources of heavy metals in sediments and organisms were collected to review the status of heavy metal pollution along coastal regions of South China. The results show that heavy metal levels were closely associated with local economic development. Hong Kong and the Pearl River Estuary were severely contaminated by heavy metals. However, concentrations of heavy metals in sediments from Hong Kong have continually decreased since the early 1990s. High levels of heavy metals were found in biota from Lingdingyang in Guangdong province. Mollusks had higher concentrations of heavy metals than other species. Human health risk assessments suggested that levels of heavy metals in some seafood from coastal areas of South China exceeded the safety limit. PMID:24084375

Wang, Shuai-Long; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Sun, Yu-Xin; Liu, Jin-Ling; Li, Hua-Bin

2013-09-29

415

A Closing Window of Opportunity: Under-Serviced Area Licensing in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technological innovation and the decreasing costs of wireless and other technologies, combined with progressive policy and regulatory environments, have resulted in the provision of telecommunication services in remote areas thought unserviceable by incumbent telcos in Latin America, Central Europe, and Asia. In line with the increasing number of success stories in other parts of the world, the South African government,

Alison Gillwald

2005-01-01

416

The Italian-Americans of the South Bend-Mishawaka Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed as part of an ethnic heritage studies program, this historical narrative of Italian Americans can enhance cultural awareness. This document presents the story of Italians beginning with cultural roots in Italy and their subsequent emigration to the United States, including to South Bend, Indiana. Four major areas are explored. An account…

Fotia, Elizabeth R.; Rasmussen, Karen

417

Hurricane & Tropical Storm Impacts over the South Florida Metropolitan Area: Mortality & Government  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1985, the South Florida Metropolitan area (SFMA), which covers the counties of Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach, has been directly affected by 9 tropical cyclones: four tropical storms and 5 hurricanes. This continuous hurricane and tropical storm activity has awakened the conscience of the communities, government, and private sector, about the social vulnerability, in terms of age, gender, ethnicity,

I. C. Colon Pagan

2007-01-01

418

Agricultural impacts on ecosystem functioning in temperate areas of North and South America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Land use has a large impact on ecosystem functioning, though evidences of these impacts at the regional scale are scarce. The objective of this paper was to analyze the impacts of agricultural land use on ecosystem functioning (radiation interception and carbon uptake) in temperate areas of North and South America. From land cover maps generated using high-resolution satellite images we

Juan Pablo Guerschman; José María Paruelo

2005-01-01

419

Social Change, Anomy and Alienation in Low-Income Areas of the Rural South.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theories of social change suggest that both anomy and alienation should increase among low-income people experiencing rapid social change. To more sharply distinguish the causal relationship between social change and the state of peoples' minds in rural and semirural areas of the South, separate hypotheses were developed for anomy (Durkheim's…

Kim, Dong I.; And Others

420

Geology Fieldnotes: Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, Kentucky/Tennesee  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The free-flowing Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries pass through 90 miles of scenic gorges and valleys containing a wide range of natural and historic features. This National Park Service site includes a brief history of the area, visitor information, and links to sites pertaining to the geology of the region.

421

The Italian-Americans of the South Bend-Mishawaka Area.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developed as part of an ethnic heritage studies program, this historical narrative of Italian Americans can enhance cultural awareness. This document presents the story of Italians beginning with cultural roots in Italy and their subsequent emigration to the United States, including to South Bend, Indiana. Four major areas are explored. An…

Fotia, Elizabeth R.; Rasmussen, Karen

422

North Dakota Geological Survey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the North Dakota Geological Survey. Site materials include information on the state's oil, gas and coal resources, maps, publications, and regulations. The paleontology page features educational articles, information on fossil collecting, articles about fossil exhibits, and information on the state fossil collection. The state GIS hub creates and distributes digital spatial data that conforms to national mapping standards. The teaching tools page includes illustrations and descriptions of rocks and minerals found in the state, as well as information on meteorites and newsletter articles about teaching North Dakota geology. There are also links to landslide maps, surficial geology maps, and links to other survey publications such as reports, bulletins, field studies, other geological and topographic maps, and information on groundwater resources.

423

Perceptions of a Nearby Exurban Protected Area in South Carolina, United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address the dearth of literature on the relations between local residents in urban areas and nearby higher-order exurban\\u000a protected areas, this study examined the perceptions of Columbia (South Carolina) residents toward Congaree National Park.\\u000a Mail-out survey results from a random sample of 455 adult residents showed positive overall attitudes toward the park, although\\u000a this did not extend to a

David B. Weaver; Laura J. Lawton

2008-01-01

424

Structural style and Basin Formation in Deep-water Area of Northern South China Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the deep-water area of northern South China Sea (SCS) developed a series of sedimentary basins. Active exploration for deep-water hydrocarbon has begun in these areas since this century. The well LW3-1-1 at water depth of 1480m in the BaiYun Sag (BYS) of the Pearl River Mouth Basin in 2006 discovered 56m layer of pure gas, demonstrated the good hydrocarbon

Z. di; S. Zhen; P. Xiong; C. C. Min

2007-01-01

425

Investigation on liver function among population in high background of rare earth area in South China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The health effects of long-term ingestion of rare earth elements (REEs) on the villagers living in high-REE-background areas\\u000a in South Jangxi Province, China were studied. Major health complaints from the REE area population included indigestion, diarrhea,\\u000a abdominal distension, anorexia, weakness, and fatigue, especially after high-fat or high-protein intake. Liver function tests\\u000a were conducted for adult villagers. Among them, 45 live

Weifang Zhu; Suqin Xu; Pinpin Shao; Hui Zhang; Donseng Wu; Wenjia Yang; Jia Feng; Lei Feng

2005-01-01

426

Nitrate removal with reverse osmosis in a rural area in South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nitrate-nitrogen concentration (>6 mg\\/l) and the salinity (>1000 mg\\/l TDS) of many borehole waters in rural areas in South Africa are too high for human consumption. Therefore, an urgent need for water denitrification and water desalination exists in these areas. Reverse osmosis (RO), electrodialysis (ED), ion-exchange (IX) and certain biological technologies can be very effectively applied for water denitrification.

J. J. Schoeman; A. Steyn

2003-01-01

427

Vaccination coverage and timeliness in three South African areas: a prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Timely vaccination is important to induce adequate protective immunity. We measured vaccination timeliness and vaccination\\u000a coverage in three geographical areas in South Africa.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This study used vaccination information from a community-based cluster-randomized trial promoting exclusive breastfeeding\\u000a in three South African sites (Paarl in the Western Cape Province, and Umlazi and Rietvlei in KwaZulu-Natal) between 2006 and\\u000a 2008. Five interview visits

Lars T Fadnes; Debra Jackson; Wanga Zembe; David Sanders; Halvor Sommerfelt; Thorkild Tylleskär

2011-01-01

428

33 CFR 165.840 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. 165.840 Section 165.840 Navigation...Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. (a) Effective date. This...

2013-07-01

429

Gravity investigations of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geological configuration of the Arbuckle Uplift in the vicinity of Chickasaw National Recreation Area in south-central Oklahoma plays a governing role in the distribution of fresh and mineral springs within the park and in the existence of artesian wells in and around the park. A confining layer of well-cemented conglomerate lies immediately below the surface of the recreation area, and groundwater migrates from an area of meteoric recharge where rocks of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer crop out as close as two kilometers to the east of the park. Prominent, Pennsylvanian-aged faults are exposed in the aquifer outcrop, and two of the fault traces project beneath the conglomerate cover toward two groups of springs within the northern section of the park. We conducted gravity fieldwork and analysis to investigate the subsurface extensions of these major faults beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area. By defining gravity signatures of the faults where they are exposed, we infer that the Sulphur and Mill Creek Faults bend to the south-west where they are buried. The South Sulphur Fault may project westward linearly if it juxtaposes rocks that have a density contrast opposite that of that fault's density configuration in the Sulphur Syncline area. The Sulphur Syncline, whose eastern extent is exposed in the outcrop area of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer, does not appear to extend beneath Chickasaw National Recreation Area nor the adjacent City of Sulphur. The South Sulphur Fault dips steeply northward, and its normal sense of offset suggests that the Sulphur Syncline is part of a graben. The Mill Creek Fault dips vertically, and the Reagan Fault dips southward, consistent with its being mapped as a thrust fault. The Sulphur and Mill Creek Synclines may have formed as pull-apart basins in a left-lateral, left-stepping strike-slip environment. The character of the gravity field of Chickasaw National Recreation Area is different from the lineated gravity field in the area of Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer outcrop. This change in character is not due to the presence of the overlying conglomerate layer, which is quite thin (<100 m) in the area of the park with the springs. The presence of relatively high-density Precambrian basement rocks in a broader region suggests that significant gravity anomalies may arise from variations in basement topography. Understanding of the geological configuration of Chickasaw National Recreation Area can be improved by expanding the study area and by investigating complementary geophysical and borehole constraints of the subsurface.

Scheirer, Daniel S.; Scheirer, Allegra Hosford

2006-01-01

430

The North Dakota Thunderstorm Project: A Cooperative Study of High Plains Thunderstorms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The North Dakota Thunderstorm Project was conducted in the Bismarck, North Dakota, area from 12 June through 22 July 1989. The project deployed Doppler radars, cloud physics aircraft, and supporting instrumentation to study a variety of aspects of convective clouds. These included transport and dispersion; entrainment; cloud-ice initiation and evolution; storm structure, dynamics, and kinematics; atmospheric chemistry; and electrification.Of primary

Bruce A. Boe; Jeffrey L. Stith; Paul L. Smith; John H. Hirsch; John H. Helsdon Jr.; Andrew G. Detwiler; Harold D. Orville; Brooks E. Martner; Roger F. Reinking; Rebecca J. Meitín; Rodger A. Brown

1992-01-01

431

A preliminary report on the bentonite beds of the lower Virgin Creek Member of the Pierre Shale, Stanley County, South Dakota ( USA).  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Virgin Creek Member of the Pierre Shales has been divided by earlier workers into lower and upper zones based on weathering and shale differences. Of the 49 bentonite beds of the lower Virgin Creek, the Government Draw Bentonite Beds, and bentonite bed 20 are the best markers for correlation from stream valley to stream valley. The variation of number and thickness of shale and bentonite beds is due to bioturbation, current activity, differential compaction, basin subsidence, and merging and splitting of bentonite beds. Three distinctive concretion horizons have the potential of also being used as stratigraphic markers within the study area. They include a nodule zone between two bentonite beds, barite(?) concretions that locally mark the lower contact of the Virgin Crrek, and a set of concretions at the contact between the upper and lower Virgin Creek. -from Author

Collins, D. S.

1987-01-01

432

Locatable Mineral Reports for Colorado, South Dakota, and Wyoming provided to the USDA Forest Service in Fiscal Years 2006-2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey is required by Congress (under Public Law 86-509) to provide Locatable Mineral Reports to the USDA Forest Service whenever National Forest System lands are sold or exchanged. This volume is a compilation of the reports already provided to the Forest Service by the author in fiscal years 2006-2009 (October 2006-September 2009). Altogether, the reports describe the geology and locatable mineral resource potential of 57 properties offered in 10 land-exchange proposals. Approximately 41,084 acres were evaluated: 19,068 acres in Federal parcels and 22,016 acres in non-Federal parcels. The parcels are located in eight National Forests and one National Grassland in three States. Locatable Mineral Reports provide a summary of the geology and a subjective appraisal of the mineral resource potential of land parcels considered for exchange. Information in each report is based on a review of published maps and reports, unpublished data in U.S. Geological Survey files, the professional expertise of the writer, and interviews with other knowledgeable geoscientists. No visits were conducted to support the reports included in this volume. The mineral resource information provided is used in making relative comparisons of the potential future mineral value of lands being offered in an exchange and in appraising the value of the land. Future mineral potential value is subjectively expressed in qualitative terms using a three-tier nomenclature of 'high,' 'moderate,' and 'low.' In general, 'high' is applied where mineral deposits are present on the property or adjacent to it or there are other indications that the area has been mineralized. 'Moderate' is applied where mineralization is only suspected or where an area possesses some of the same geologic characteristics that are common to areas around known mineral deposits. A 'low' value is routinely applied to all remaining areas, with the understanding that the information required to prove the absence of any mineral resource potential will never be available. Copies of the reports reside in U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resource Program and USDA Forest Service files. Ten reports are included in this volume. They are grouped by State, then alphabetically by Forest. Each starts with a cover letter and title page. Geologic descriptions of properties, their mineral potential, and references make up the main body of each report. Legal descriptions of the property locations (either verbatim or paraphrased from descriptions supplied by the Forest Service) are included as attachments designated Exhibits A and B. Also included as attachments are the report request from the USDA Forest Service and any index maps, geologic maps, or other figures or illustrations that are provided for the convenience of the Forest Service minerals examiner. Page numbers for each individual report are retained: the larger number at the bottom of each page is the pagination for this volume.

Wilson, Anna B.

2010-01-01

433

Water Quality in the High Plains Aquifer, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming, 1999-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains the major findings of a 1999-2004 assessment of water quality in the High Plains aquifer. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings for principal and other aquifers and major river basins across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, regional, State, and national issues. Conditions in the aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as drinking-water quality, the effects of agricultural practices on water quality, source-water protection, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of ground water in areas near where they live and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the region and the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the High Plains aquifer summarized in this report are discussed in greater detail in other reports that can be accessed in Appendix 1 of http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1749/. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa). This report accompanies the detailed and technical report of water-quality conditions in the High Plains aquifer 'Water-quality assessment of the High Plains aquifer, 1999-2004' (http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1749/)

Gurdak, Jason J.; McMahon, Peter B.; Dennehy, Kevin; Qi, Sharon L.

2009-01-01

434

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Leaves and Soil from Typical Electronic Waste Polluted Area in South China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leaves and soil from typical e-waste polluted area in South China were investigated.\\u000a The concentrations (ng\\/g dry weight) of PBDE congeners and ?PBDE of five leaf samples were much lower than those in soil sample.\\u000a The general patterns of ?di-BDEs to ?hepta-BDEs percentage distribution in leaf samples were similar to those of the soil\\u000a sample,

Z. Z. Yang; X. R. Zhao; Q. Zhao; Z. F. Qin; X. F. Qin; X. B. Xu; Z. X. Jin; C. X. Xu

2008-01-01

435

Garnet clinopyroxenite inclusions from diatremes in the Gloucester area, New South Wales, Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper discusses the petrography, mineralogy, petrochemical affinities, P\\/T crystallization regimes and genetic aspects of four garnet clinopyroxenite inclusions from diatremes in the Gloucester area, New South Wales. Inclusion mineral assemblages (which generally display textural evidence of annealing) include garnet-plagioclase-(sulphur-rich scapolite)-clinopyroxene, garnet-hornblende-orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene and garnet-hornblende-clinopyroxene. The garnet-plagioclase clinopyroxenite inclusion possesses an essentially alkali basaltic chemistry. It probably represents a crystallized basaltic

J. F. G. Wilkinson; G. I. Z. Kalocsai

1974-01-01

436

SPATIAL BAYESIAN METHODS OF FORECASTING HOUSE PRICES IN SIX METROPOLITAN AREAS OF SOUTH AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper estimates Spatial Bayesian Vector Autoregressive (SBVAR) models, based on the First-Order Spatial Contiguity and the Random Walk Averaging priors, for six metropolitan areas of South Africa, using monthly data over the period of 1993:07 to 2005:06. We then forecast one- to six-months-ahead house prices over the forecast horizon of 2005:07 to 2007:06. When we compare forecasts generated from

Rangan Gupta; Sonali Das

2008-01-01

437

Paleomagnetism of Proterozoic Mafic Dikes of the South Pass Area, Southern Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Northeast-striking, unmetamorphosed Proterozoic mafic dikes that cut Archean basement rocks are a common feature of the geology of the South Pass area at the southern end of the Wind River Mountains. Although some dikes cut a north-northeast-striking quartz diorite dike that has yielded a U-Pb date of 2170±8 Ma (Harlan et al., 2003), the absolute age of the mafic dikes

S. S. Harlan; J. W. Geissman; L. W. Snee

2010-01-01

438

Mineralogy and radioactivity of pegmatites from South Wadi Khuda area, Eastern Desert, Egypt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioactive minerals in pegmatites associated with granitic rocks are commonly encountered in the south of the Wadi Khuda\\u000a area and found as dyke-like and small bodies. They are observed within garnet-muscovite granites near the contact with older\\u000a granitoids. Field surveys indicated that the studied pegmatites vary in dimensions ranging from 2 to 10 m in width and from\\u000a 10 to

Mohamed F. Raslan; Mohamed A. Ali; Mohamed G. El-Feky

2010-01-01

439

Water-quality characteristics and trends for selected sites in or near the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, South Dakota, 1973-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents data on water-quality samples that were collected in and near the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center from 1973 through 2000. The investigation is a collaborated effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Discipline (WRD), and Geography (formerly National Mapping) Discipline, EROS Data Center. A water-quality monitoring program was initiated in 1973, when the EROS Data Center was constructed, and continues at the present time (2003). Under this program, water-quality samples were collected at various sites on the EROS Data Center's property and in the surrounding area. These sites include 4 wastewater-treatment lagoons, 1 site on EROS Lake located behind the EROS Data Center, 2 stream sites near the EROS Data Center, and 9 ground-water wells surrounding the EROS Data Center. Additionally, 3 sites on EROS Lake, 7 stream sites, and 9 ground-water sites are located within the study area and have been sampled during the period covered in the report. Some of these additional sites were part of the initial water-quality monitoring conducted during and immediately after the construction of the EROS Data Center. For other sites, some special sampling (depth-profile and bottom material) has occurred at times during the sampling history; however, these sites have little water-quality data and were not used for statistical or trend analysis. A trend-analysis program, Estimate TREND (ESTREND), was used to analyze for trends for one surface-water site, the Big Sioux River, which was the only site that had a substantial number of samples collected during an extensive period. The ESTREND trend-analysis program was used to analyze 16 constituents. Specific conductance and dissolved orthophosphate were the only constituents determined to have statistically significant trends. Results showed an increasing trend for specific conductance and a decreasing trend for dissolved orthophosphate. Scatter plots with regression smoothing lines for selected constituents are presented for selected surface-water and ground-water sites. Regression analyses using a Lowess (Locally Weighted Scatterplot Smoothing) smoothing line for Split Rock Creek, EROS Lake, the lagoon sites, and the ground-water sites indicated variable results, with some constituents indicating an increasing or decreasing trend, some having varied results, and others indicating no change during the sampling period.

Neitzert, Kathleen M.

2004-01-01

440

Identifying high-risk areas for sporadic measles outbreaks: lessons from South Africa  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To develop a model for identifying areas at high risk for sporadic measles outbreaks based on an analysis of factors associated with a national outbreak in South Africa between 2009 and 2011. Methods Data on cases occurring before and during the national outbreak were obtained from the South African measles surveillance programme, and data on measles immunization and population size, from the District Health Information System. A Bayesian hierarchical Poisson model was used to investigate the association between the risk of measles in infants in a district and first-dose vaccination coverage, population density, background prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and expected failure of seroconversion. Model projections were used to identify emerging high-risk areas in 2012. Findings A clear spatial pattern of high-risk areas was noted, with many interconnected (i.e. neighbouring) areas. An increased risk of measles outbreak was significantly associated with both the preceding build-up of a susceptible population and population density. The risk was also elevated when more than 20% of infants in a populous area had missed a first vaccine dose. The model was able to identify areas at high risk of experiencing a measles outbreak in 2012 and where additional preventive measures could be undertaken. Conclusion The South African measles outbreak was associated with the build-up of a susceptible population (owing to poor vaccine coverage), high prevalence of HIV infection and high population density. The predictive model developed could be applied to other settings susceptible to sporadic outbreaks of measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Cohen, C; Chirwa, T; Ntshoe, G; Puren, A; Hofman, K

2013-01-01

441

Development of a channel classification to evaluate potential for cottonwood restoration, lower segments of the Middle Missouri River, South Dakota and Nebraska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents development of a spatially explicit river and flood-plain classification to evaluate potential for cottonwood restoration along the Sharpe and Fort Randall segments of the Middle Missouri River. This project involved evaluating existing topographic, water-surface elevation, and soils data to determine if they were sufficient to create a classification similar to the Land Capability Potential Index (LCPI) developed by Jacobson and others (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2007-5256) and developing a geomorphically based classification to apply to evaluating restoration potential. Existing topographic, water-surface elevation, and soils data for the Middle Missouri River were not sufficient to replicate the LCPI. The 1/3-arc-second National Elevation Dataset delineated most of the topographic complexity and produced cumulative frequency distributions similar to a high-resolution 5-meter topographic dataset developed for the Lower Missouri River. However, lack of bathymetry in the National Elevation Dataset produces a potentially critical bias in evaluation of frequently flooded surfaces close to the river. High-resolution soils data alone were insufficient to replace the information content of the LCPI. In test reaches in the Lower Missouri River, soil drainage classes from the Soil Survey Geographic Database database correctly classified 0.8-98.9 percent of the flood-plain area at or below the 5-year return interval flood stage depending on state of channel incision; on average for river miles 423-811, soil drainage class correctly classified only 30.2 percent of the flood-plain area at or below the 5-year return interval flood stage. Lack of congruence between soil characteristics and present-day hydrology results from relatively rapid incision and aggradation of segments of the Missouri River resulting from impoundments and engineering. The most sparsely available data in the Middle Missouri River were water-surface elevations. Whereas hydraulically modeled water-surface elevations were available at 1.6-kilometer intervals in the Lower Missouri River, water-surface elevations in the Middle Missouri River had to be interpolated between streamflow-gaging stations spaced 3-116 kilometers. Lack of high-resolution water-surface elevation data precludes development of LCPI-like classification maps. An hierarchical river classification framework is proposed to provide structure for a multiscale river classification. The segment-scale classification presented in this report is deductive and based on presumed effects of dams, significant tributaries, and geological (and engineered) channel constraints. An inductive reach-scale classification, nested within the segment scale, is based on multivariate statistical clustering of geomorphic data collected at 500-meter intervals along the river. Cluster-based classifications delineate reaches of the river with similar channel and flood-plain geomorphology, and presumably, similar geomorphic and hydrologic processes. The dominant variables in the clustering process were channel width (Fort Randall) and valley width (Sharpe), followed by braiding index (both segments). Clusters with multithread and highly sinuous channels are likely to be associated with dynamic channel migration and deposition of fresh, bare sediment conducive to natural cottonwood germination. However, restoration potential within these reaches is likely to be mitigated by interaction of cottonwood life stages with the highly altered flow regime.

Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Huhmann, Brittany L.

2010-01-01

442

TEACHERS’ INQUIRY-BASED MATHEMATICS IMPLEMENTATION IN RAPID CITY AREA SCHOOLS: EFFECTS ON ATTITUDE AND ACHIEVEMENT WITHIN AMERICAN INDIAN ELEMENTARY STUDENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Project PRIME (Promoting Reflective Inquiry in Mathematics Education), was funded by the National Science Foundation in October 2002. Implementation subsequently began in 2003 and focused upon K-12 mathematics education within Rapid City, South Dakota Area Schools (RCAS). One goal of the project has been to reduce the achievement gap between Native American and non-native students enrolled in RCAS. At the

Jamalee Bussinger-Stone

2009-01-01

443

The intake of cadmium in the Kempen, an area in the south of The Netherlands  

SciTech Connect

In The Netherlands many areas with soil pollution have been detected. The largest polluted area is a zone of 350 km2 in the Kempen, in the south of The Netherlands. This Kempen zone is polluted with heavy metals, especially cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn), emitted from metal factories in the Netherlands and in Belgium. Because of the high Cd in soil, vegetables grown in that area contain relatively high Cd concentrations. The Cd uptake by inhabitants of these areas--especially individuals consuming vegetables from their own gardens--therefore is considerably increased. This Cd intake is shown to be higher than the provisionally tolerated weekly uptake of Cd set by the WHO. The role of smoking in Cd intake is discussed.

Copius Peereboom-Stegeman, J.H.; Copius Peereboom, J.W. (Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands))

1989-08-01

444

Hydrostratigraphy of the General Separations Area, Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

Detailed analysis and synthesis of geophysical, core, and hydrologic data from 230 wells were used to delineate the hydrostratigraphy and aquifer characteristics of the General Separations Area at SRS. The study area is hydrologically bounded on the north and northwest by Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and on the south by Fourmile Branch (FB). The Cretaceous-Tertiary sedimentary sequence underlying the study area is divided into two Aquifer Systems; in ascending order, Aquifer Systems I and 11. The study concentrated on Aquifer System U, which includes all the Tertiary sediments above the Black Mingo Group (Paleocene) to the water table. This report includes a series of lithostratigraphic cross-sections, piezometric gradient profiles, head ratio contour maps, aquifer isopach maps, and potentiometric surface maps which illustrate the aquifer characteristics of the study area.

Aadland, R.K.; Harris, M.K.; Lewis, C.M.; Gaughan, T.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Westbrook, T.M. [Dames and Moore, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1991-01-01

445

Outbreak of vivax malaria in areas adjacent to the demilitarized zone, South Korea, 1998.  

PubMed

Malaria had been eradicated in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) by the late 1970s. In 1993, a soldier was infected with Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ; the border area between North and South Korea), and since then, the number of cases has been steadily increasing year after year. In 1998, 3,932 vivax malaria cases were microscopically confirmed, affecting 2,784 (70.8%) soldiers (including discharged soldiers) and 1,148 (29.2%) civilians. These cases occurred throughout the year, peaking in July (30.1%) and August (30.5%). Most of the patients were infected in areas in or near the DMZ. Taking into consideration entomologic, socioecologic, and epidemiologic factors, it is postulated that there has been an epidemic of malaria in North Korea since 1993, with the number of cases increasing yearly; the continuous infiltration across the DMZ from North Korea of infected female mosquitoes of the vector species Anopheles sinensis resulted in an outbreak of vivax malaria in the DMZ of South Korea. PMID:12135260

Lee, Jong Soo; Lee, Won Ja; Cho, Shin Hyung; Ree, Han-Il

2002-01-01

446

33 CFR 334.60 - Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing target...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.60 Cape Cod Bay south of Wellfleet Harbor, Mass.; naval aircraft bombing...

2013-07-01

447

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15

448

Vaccination coverage and timeliness in three South African areas: a prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Timely vaccination is important to induce adequate protective immunity. We measured vaccination timeliness and vaccination coverage in three geographical areas in South Africa. Methods This study used vaccination information from a community-based cluster-randomized trial promoting exclusive breastfeeding in three South African sites (Paarl in the Western Cape Province, and Umlazi and Rietvlei in KwaZulu-Natal) between 2006 and 2008. Five interview visits were carried out between birth and up to 2 years of age (median follow-up time 18 months), and 1137 children were included in the analysis. We used Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis to describe vaccination coverage and timeliness in line with the Expanded Program on Immunization for the first eight vaccines. This included Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), four oral polio vaccines and 3 doses of the pentavalent vaccine which protects against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, hepatitis B and Haemophilus influenzae type B. Results The proportion receiving all these eight recommended vaccines were 94% in Paarl (95% confidence interval [CI] 91-96), 62% in Rietvlei (95%CI 54-68) and 88% in Umlazi (95%CI 84-91). Slightly fewer children received all vaccines within the recommended time periods. The situation was worst for the last pentavalent- and oral polio vaccines. The hazard ratio for incomplete vaccination was 7.2 (95%CI 4.7-11) for Rietvlei compared to Paarl. Conclusions There were large differences between the different South African sites in terms of vaccination coverage and timeliness, with the poorer areas of Rietvlei performing worse than the better-off areas in Paarl. The vaccination coverage was lower for the vaccines given at an older age. There is a need for continued efforts to improve vaccination coverage and timeliness, in particular in rural areas. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00397150

2011-01-01

449

Quality Childcare Top Priority in South Dakota  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of quality care for infants, toddlers, and young children continues to be emphasized. The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center provided data that support the importance of quality childcare. Their longitudinal study showed that infants who received quality care were more likely to score higher on IQ, reading, and math tests,…

Daniels, Ann Michelle; Wilson, Ann

2005-01-01

450

Quality Childcare Top Priority in South Dakota  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The importance of quality care for infants, toddlers, and young children continues to be emphasized. The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center provided data that support the importance of quality childcare. Their longitudinal study showed that infants who received quality care were more likely to score higher on IQ, reading, and math…

Daniels, Ann Michelle; Wilson, Ann

2005-01-01

451

40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Codington County Corson County Custer County Davison County Day County...County Codington County Corson County Custer County Davison County Day County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Custer County Unclassifiable/Attainment...

2010-07-01

452

Lake Cochrane, Deuel County, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

453

Cottonwood Lake, Spink County, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Annual total phosphorus and total nitrogen loadings to the lake were estimated and subdivided according to either point or non-point source origin. An assessment of the lake's trophic condition and limiting nutrient is also provided. All data collected by...

1977-01-01

454

Gettysburg Municipal Airport, Gettysburg, South Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed project contemplates the following items of improvement: (1) acquire land for airport development (7.7 acres) and clear zones (7.5 acres easement); (2) surface (2500' x 150'), extend (700' x 50') and mark NW/SE runway; (3) surface apron (165'...

1971-01-01

455

40 CFR 81.342 - South Dakota.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County Hanson County Harding County Hughes County Hutchinson County Hyde County...County Hanson County Harding County Hughes County Hutchinson County Hyde County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment Hughes County...

2009-07-01

456

2011 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. South Dakota  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|For five years running, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has tracked states' teacher policies, preparing a detailed and thorough compendium of teacher policy in the United States on topics related to teacher preparation, licensure, evaluation, career advancement, tenure, compensation, pensions and dismissal. The "2011 State Teacher…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2011

2011-01-01

457

78 FR 34894 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA; Correction AGENCY...resulted from Hurricane Ivan's storm surge that toppled the Mississippi Canyon (MC) 20 Platform A. The platform's wells were...

2013-06-11

458

Inventaire des Ecosystemes de la Region du Pacifique Sud (Regional Ecosystems Survey of the South Pacific Area).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report deals with islands of the South Pacific Commission area. Included in the study are classification and characteristics of ecosystems: biomes and habitats; conservation interest, rare or endemic species, conservation legislation; existing reserve...

A. L. Dahl

1980-01-01

459

Paleomagnetism of Proterozoic Mafic Dikes of the South Pass Area, Southern Wind River Mountains, Wyoming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Northeast-striking, unmetamorphosed Proterozoic mafic dikes that cut Archean basement rocks are a common feature of the geology of the South Pass area at the southern end of the Wind River Mountains. Although some dikes cut a north-northeast-striking quartz diorite dike that has yielded a U-Pb date of 2170±8 Ma (Harlan et al., 2003), the absolute age of the mafic dikes in this region is poorly known. K-Ar apparent ages from whole rocks and mineral (pyroxene) separates range from 2010 to 1270 Ma (Condie, 1969; Spall, 1971), but the large spread of apparent ages and the inconsistency of results precludes their use in understanding the emplacement history of the dikes. In order to better understand the age and tectonic setting of the dikes, we report new paleomagnetic data from the South Pass dikes. Our results indicate that the remanence recorded by the dikes is complex: some dikes yield well-defined, in situ magnetizations that are of northeast declination and moderate to steep positive inclination; others yield magnetizations of south to southwest declination and moderate to steep positive inclination. One dike yields a well-defined magnetization of southwest declination and shallow negative inclination. A previous paleomagnetic study of the dikes has argued that the southern Wind River dikes may record evidence for dike emplacement at ca. 2.1 Ga and 1.4 Ga (Harlan et al., 2003). Emplacement of dikes at ca. 1.4 Ga is consistent with whole rock 40Ar/39Ar dates from two dikes in the area reported by Donohue (2002), with evidence for Mesoproterozoic magmatism along the northern margin of the Wyoming craton, and with U-Pb dates derived from mafic dikes elsewhere in the Wind River and Granite Mountains (Chamberlain and Frost, 1995); however, virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) from these dikes do not agree with 1.4 Ga poles from Laurentia, and correction for 10 to 20° northeast tilt of Paleozoic strata further accentuates this discordance. Emplacement of the South Pass dikes at 2.1 Ga is also consistent with U-Pb dates from mafic dikes elsewhere in Wyoming (Bowers and Chamberlain, 2006), but the VGPs from these dikes are inconsistent with time-equivalent poles from the Superior craton. It is possible that the dikes record multiple magnetization acquisition events over an extended period of the Mesoproterozoic, but additional high-precision isotopic dating of the mafic dikes in the South Pass area is required to unravel their age of emplacement and to facilitate their use in the construction of apparent polar wander paths and for testing Proterozoic plate reconstructions.

Harlan, S. S.; Geissman, J. W.; Snee, L. W.

2010-12-01

460

The influence of gaming expenditure on crime rates in South Australia: a local area empirical investigation.  

PubMed

Although there has been much speculation about the possible links between gambling and crime rates, relevant quantitative evidence has been practically non-existent in Australia to date. This paper reports the results of research that utilised a model designed to investigate the potential relationship between electronic gaming machine expenditures and property (income-generating) crime rates reported to police in local areas in South Australia in 2002-2003. The research found that the higher the expenditures on gaming machines in a particular local area per adult, the higher the income-generating crime rate in that area. No such relationship was found between gaming machine expenditure and non-income-generating crime rates. However, further research is required before any policy-relevant conclusions can be drawn. PMID:17647095

Wheeler, Sarah Ann; Round, David K; Sarre, Rick; O'Neil, Michael

2007-07-24