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Sample records for areas mediating motion-induced

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  3. The effects of area postrema lesions and selective vagotomy on motion-induced conditioned taste aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Sutton, R. L.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is one of several behaviors which was suggested as a putative measure of motion sickness in rats. A review is made of studies which used surgical disruption of area postrema or the vagus nerve to investigate whether CTA and vomiting induced by motion may depend on common neural pathways or structures. When the chemoreceptive function of the area postrema (AP) is destroyed by complete ablation, rats develop CTA and cats and monkeys develop CTA and vomit. Thus the AP is not crucially involved in either CTA or vomiting induced by motion. However, after complete denervation of the stomach or after labyrinthectomy rats do not develop CTA when motion is used as the unconditioned stimulus. Studies of brainstem projections of the vagus nerve, the area postrema, the periaqueductal grey, and the vestibular system are used as the basis for speculation about regions which could mediate both motion-induced vomiting and behavioral food aversion.

  4. Motion-induced dose artifacts in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry

    2009-10-01

    Tumor motion is a particular concern for a complex treatment modality such as helical tomotherapy, where couch position, gantry rotation and MLC leaf opening all change with time. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of tumor motion for helical tomotherapy, which could result in three distinct motion-induced dose artifacts, namely (1) dose rounding, (2) dose rippling and (3) IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect. Dose rounding and dose rippling effects have been previously described, while the IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is a newly discovered motion-induced dose artifact. Dose rounding is the penumbral widening of a delivered dose distribution near the edges of a target volume along the direction of tumor motion. Dose rippling is a series of periodic dose peaks and valleys observed within the target region along the direction of couch motion, due to an asynchronous interplay between the couch motion and the longitudinal component of tumor motion. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is caused by an asynchronous interplay between the temporal patterns of leaf openings and tumor motion. The characteristics of each dose artifact were investigated individually as functions of target motion amplitude and period for both non-IMRT and IMRT helical tomotherapy cases, through computer simulation modeling and experimental verification. The longitudinal dose profiles generated by the simulation program agreed with the experimental data within ±0.5% and ±1.5% inside the PTV region for the non-IMRT and IMRT cases, respectively. The dose rounding effect produced a penumbral increase up to 20.5 mm for peak-to-peak target motion amplitudes ranging from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm. Maximum dose rippling magnitude of 25% was calculated, when the target motion period approached an unusually high value of 10 s. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect produced dose differences ranging from -29% to 7% inside the PTV region. This information on

  5. Multi-flexible-body dynamics capturing motion-induced stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Arun K.; Lemak, Mark E.; Dickens, John M.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-flexible-body dynamics formulation incorporating a recently developed theory for capturing motion induced stiffness for a arbitrary structure undergoing large rotation and translation accompanied by small vibrations is presented. In essence, the method consists of correcting prematurely linearized dynamical equations for an arbitrary flexible body with generalized active forces due to geometric stiffness corresponding to a system of twelve inertia forces and nine inertia couples distributed over the body. Equations of motion are derived by means of Kane's method. A useful feature of the formulation is its treatment of prescribed motions and interaction forces. Results of simulations of motions of three flexible spacecraft, involving stiffening during spinup motion, dynamic buckling, and a repositioning maneuver, demonstrate the validity and generality of the theory.

  6. Kinematic domain decomposition for boundary-motion-induced flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Yen, Guan-Wei

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations on a composite grid, which consists of subdomain grids moving with respect to each other. These subdomains are structured grids with different topologies. This method eliminates assuming the moving components to be instantaneously stationary, where deciding on the particular frozen instants is difficult and affects the solution adversely. Moreover, this method captures the boundary-motion-induced flow component. The method is demonstrated through a transonic flow past an airfoil, which experiences a combined motion of pitching and plunging. An O-grid around the airfoil is overlapped on a fine Cartesian grid, which is zonally embedded in a coarse Cartesian grid. The coarse grid is stationary but the other two grids are plunging. Only the O-grid is also sinusoidally pitching. The results are compared successfully with the experimental data.

  7. Motion-induced phase error estimation and correction in 3D diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Van, Anh T; Hernando, Diego; Sutton, Bradley P

    2011-11-01

    A multishot data acquisition strategy is one way to mitigate B0 distortion and T2∗ blurring for high-resolution diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging experiments. However, different object motions that take place during different shots cause phase inconsistencies in the data, leading to significant image artifacts. This work proposes a maximum likelihood estimation and k-space correction of motion-induced phase errors in 3D multishot diffusion tensor imaging. The proposed error estimation is robust, unbiased, and approaches the Cramer-Rao lower bound. For rigid body motion, the proposed correction effectively removes motion-induced phase errors regardless of the k-space trajectory used and gives comparable performance to the more computationally expensive 3D iterative nonlinear phase error correction method. The method has been extended to handle multichannel data collected using phased-array coils. Simulation and in vivo data are shown to demonstrate the performance of the method. PMID:21652284

  8. Verification of motion induced thread effect during tomotherapy using gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Ljusberg, Anna; Ceberg, Crister; Medin, Joakim; Ambolt, Lee; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how breathing motion during tomotherapy (Accuray, CA, USA) treatment affects the absorbed dose distribution. The experiments were carried out using gel dosimetry and a motion device simulating respiratory-like motion (HexaMotion, ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden). Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were irradiated, both during respiratory-like motion and in a static mode. To be able to investigate interplay effects the static absorbed dose distribution was convolved with the motion function and differences between the dynamic and convolved static absorbed dose distributions were interpreted as interplay effects. The expected dose blurring was present and the interplay effects formed a spiral pattern in the lower dose volume. This was expected since the motion induced affects the preset pitch and the theoretically predicted thread effect may emerge. In this study, the motion induced thread effect was experimentally verified for the first time.

  9. Freezing motion-induced dephasing for single spin-state stored in atomic ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Jun, Rui; Bao, Xiao-Hui; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-ensemble quantum memories are well considered as a promising approach of long-distance quantum communication and computation for strong light-matter interaction. While the storage lifetime is limited by the motion-induced dephasing. Spin-echo technique, increasing wavelength of spin-wave, as well as optical lattice are used commonly to overcome this dephasing process. However, these techniques either need extremely high fidelity of echo pulse or put high restriction on filter and experimental complexity. In this poster, we demonstrate a convenient technique to freeze the motion-induced dephasing without population inversion and can be used in large storage angles. Combined with ``clock states'', the lifetime is extended by one order of magnitude to the limit of the thermal expansion. What's more, high non-classical correlation above 20 has been achieved to guarantee the memory in quantum regime.By making the advance from passive engineering to coherent manipulation of single spin-wave states, our work enriches the experimental toolbox of harnessing atomic ensembles for high-performance quantum memories, especially for holographic quantum memories where many spin-waves with different wave-vectors are used.

  10. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  11. A plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area defines adhesion size and lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Berge, Ulrich; Lock, John G.; Strömblad, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Cell-matrix adhesions are central mediators of mechanotransduction, yet the interplay between force and adhesion regulation remains unclear. Here we use live cell imaging to map time-dependent cross-correlations between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area, revealing a plastic, context-dependent relationship. Interestingly, while an expected positive cross-correlation dominated in mid-sized adhesions, small and large adhesions display negative cross-correlation. Furthermore, although large changes in adhesion complex area follow vinculin-mediated tension alterations, small increases in area precede vinculin-mediated tension dynamics. Modelling based on this mapping of the vinculin-mediated tension-adhesion complex area relationship confirms its biological validity, and indicates that this relationship explains adhesion size and lifetime limits, keeping adhesions focal and transient. We also identify a subpopulation of steady-state adhesions whose size and vinculin-mediated tension become stabilized, and whose disassembly may be selectively microtubule-mediated. In conclusion, we define a plastic relationship between vinculin-mediated tension and adhesion complex area that controls fundamental cell-matrix adhesion properties. PMID:26109125

  12. Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangjie; Ang, L K

    2013-01-01

    In Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang et al., we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation. PMID:24166002

  13. Motion-induced interruptions and postural equilibrium in linear lateral accelerations.

    PubMed

    Matsangas, P; McCauley, M E; Gehl, G; Kiser, J; Bandstra, A; Blankenship, J; Pierce, E

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses lateral tipping motion-induced interruptions (MIIs) in a simulated motion environment. The objective is to revisit MII occurrence and sway motion relationship by focusing on the frequency and acceleration of the lateral motion stimulus. Results verify that MIIs increase with increasing peak sway acceleration, but the effect of sway frequency is not as clear as that of acceleration. Complex multidirectional motions create more tipping MIIs than unidirectional motion. Research should incorporate acceleration, frequency and motion complexity as factors influencing MII occurrence. To describe a temporary loss of balance without tipping, the term 'probable' MII is introduced. This term fills the gap between the theoretical definition and a human-centred perception of an MII where loss of balance is not a binary phenomenon. The 'probable' MIIs were 16-67% more common than the 'definite' MIIs. The developed mathematical model of MII occurrence versus sway acceleration (amplitude, frequency) approximated the observed MIIs with less than 9% difference. PMID:24646414

  14. Microsaccade rate varies with subjective visibility during motion-induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Jang; Tse, Peter U

    2009-01-01

    Motion-induced blindness (MIB) occurs when a dot embedded in a motion field subjectively vanishes. Here we report the first psychophysical data concerning effects of microsaccade/eyeblink rate upon perceptual switches during MIB. We find that the rate of microsaccades/eyeblink rises before and after perceptual transitions from not seeing to seeing the dot, and decreases before perceptual transitions from seeing it to not seeing it. In addition, event-related fMRI data reveal that, when a dot subjectively reappears during MIB, the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in V1v and V2v and decreases in contralateral hMT+. These BOLD signal changes observed upon perceptual state changes in MIB could be driven by the change of perceptual states and/or a confounding factor, such as the microsaccade/eyeblink rate. PMID:19357789

  15. Motion-induced radiation from electrons moving in Maxwell's fish-eye

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yangjie; Ang, L. K.

    2013-01-01

    In Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, evanescent wave from motion of charged particles transfers into radiation coherently. However, such dissipative motion-induced radiations require particles to move faster than light in medium or to encounter velocity transition to pump energy. Inspired by a method to detect cloak by observing radiation of a fast-moving electron bunch going through it by Zhang et al., we study the generation of electron-induced radiation from electrons' interaction with Maxwell's fish-eye sphere. Our calculation shows that the radiation is due to a combination of Čerenkov radiation and transition radiation, which may pave the way to investigate new schemes of transferring evanescent wave to radiation. PMID:24166002

  16. Cross-modal prediction changes the timing of conscious access during the motion-induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Chang, Acer Y C; Kanai, Ryota; Seth, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence that perceptual predictions influence perceptual content, the relations between these predictions and conscious contents remain unclear, especially for cross-modal predictions. We examined whether predictions of visual events by auditory cues can facilitate conscious access to the visual stimuli. We trained participants to learn associations between auditory cues and colour changes. We then asked whether congruency between auditory cues and target colours would speed access to consciousness. We did this by rendering a visual target subjectively invisible using motion-induced blindness and then gradually changing its colour while presenting congruent or incongruent auditory cues. Results showed that the visual target gained access to consciousness faster in congruent than in incongruent trials; control experiments excluded potentially confounding effects of attention and motor response. The expectation effect was gradually established over blocks suggesting a role for extensive training. Overall, our findings show that predictions learned through cross-modal training can facilitate conscious access to visual stimuli. PMID:25486340

  17. 8-OH-DPAT does not interfere with habituation to motion-induced emesis in cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.; Crampton, George H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine if suppression of motion-induced emesis (motion sickness) by 8-OH-DPAT altered the development or retention of habituation to the motion stimulus. Cats received 8-OH-DPAT followed by provocative motion on three consecutive treatment days. A drug-free test on the fourth day resulted in an incidence of emesis that was not different from that obtained on the fourth consecutive day of drug-free motion testing. Three consecutive days of treatment with 8-OH-DPAT without motion had no effect on the incidence of motion sickness on the fourth day. It was concluded that suppression of motion sickness by 8-OH-DPAT does not alter the acquisition or retention of habituation.

  18. Calculation of motion induced eddy current forces in null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.; Morris, T.; Shaaf, J.; Rote, D.

    1995-11-01

    Time dependent motion induced eddy current forces can be quite difficult to compute. The movement of null flux coils between magnets is approached using a coupled boundary element-circuit approach to compute the forces on the structure. The technique involves treating the magnets as a separate circuit whose current is dictated by the product of the magnet thickness and the working coercivity. The mutual inductance between the windows of the moving null flux coil and the stationary equivalent magnet coil hold the key for predicting lift, guidance, and drag forces on the coil. The rate of change of these inductances with respect to position determines the forces and currents. A steady state approximation to these forces is derived in addition to a numerical simulation when the steady state assumption is invalid. The results compare favorably to laboratory results from a 4 ft. diameter experimental test wheel.

  19. Multiple Nuclear Localization Signals Mediate Nuclear Localization of the GATA Transcription Factor AreA

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Cameron C.; Siebert, Kendra S.; Downes, Damien J.; Wong, Koon Ho; Kreutzberger, Sara D.; Fraser, James A.; Clarke, David F.; Hynes, Michael J.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans GATA transcription factor AreA activates transcription of nitrogen metabolic genes in response to nitrogen limitation and is known to accumulate in the nucleus during nitrogen starvation. Sequence analysis of AreA revealed multiple nuclear localization signals (NLSs), five putative classical NLSs conserved in fungal AreA orthologs but not in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae functional orthologs Gln3p and Gat1p, and one putative noncanonical RRX33RXR bipartite NLS within the DNA-binding domain. In order to identify the functional NLSs in AreA, we constructed areA mutants with mutations in individual putative NLSs or combinations of putative NLSs and strains expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-AreA NLS fusion genes. Deletion of all five classical NLSs individually or collectively did not affect utilization of nitrogen sources or AreA-dependent gene expression and did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of the bipartite NLS conferred the inability to utilize alternative nitrogen sources and abolished AreA-dependent gene expression likely due to effects on DNA binding but did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of all six NLSs simultaneously prevented AreA nuclear accumulation. The bipartite NLS alone strongly directed GFP to the nucleus, whereas the classical NLSs collaborated to direct GFP to the nucleus. Therefore, AreA contains multiple conserved NLSs, which show redundancy and together function to mediate nuclear import. The noncanonical bipartite NLS is conserved in GATA factors from Aspergillus, yeast, and mammals, indicating an ancient origin. PMID:24562911

  20. Crime Victims and Offenders in Mediation: An Emerging Area of Social Work Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    Presents brief overview of mediation process between crime victims and their offenders and role of social workers as mediators. Includes case example of mediation involving burglary. Presents impact of mediation process on helping victims achieve closure and helping offenders personally make amends. Identifies issues related to program development…

  1. Recovery of the vomiting reflex following area postrema ablation in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfar, S.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Fox, Robert A.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Daunton, Nancy G.; Coleman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the area postrema (AP) in motion-induced emesis was re-assessed recently in several different species. In a few of these studies, the role of the AP in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was also addressed. The purpose was to extend this comparative study to the squirrel monkey, to evaluate further the role of AP in vomiting, and to investigate the dynamics of the recovery process. The AP was ablated bilaterally in 7 motion-susceptible squirrel monkeys which previously had been characterized in terms of their responses to various motion sickness-inducing stimuli. After recovery from surgery all animals were tested at 30-day intervals for a period of 11 months to determine the effects of AP ablations on susceptibility to the same sickness-inducing conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of motion in preducing CTA was evaluated. All pre-ablation motion tests involved stimulation for 30 min., while post-lesion tests were 60 min., in duration. All animals showed significant increases in latencies to vomiting after AP ablations. However, the latencies tended to decrease with time after ablation. All but one animal vomited on at least one of the 10 motion tests occurring after ablation of AP. In addition, CTA was produced by motion used in the conditioning sessions. These results suggest that structures other than AP, and processes other that those mediated through AP, may play an important role in motion-induced emesis.

  2. Pulsed Rydberg four-wave mixing with motion-induced dephasing in a thermal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Hsin; Ripka, Fabian; Löw, Robert; Pfau, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    We report on time-resolved pulsed four-wave mixing (FWM) signals in a thermal Rubidium vapor involving a Rydberg state. We observe FWM signals with dephasing times up to 7 ns, strongly dependent on the excitation bandwidth to the Rydberg state. The excitation to the Rydberg state is driven by a pulsed two-photon transition on ns timescales. Combined with a cw de-excitation laser, a strongly directional and collective emission is generated according to a combination of the phase matching effect and averaging over Doppler classes. In contrast to a previous report (Huber et al. in Phys Rev A 90: 053806, 2014) using off-resonant FWM, at a resonant FWM scheme we observe additional revivals of the signal shortly after the incident pulse has ended. We infer that this is a revival of motion-induced constructive interference between the coherent emissions of the thermal atoms. The resonant FWM scheme reveals a richer temporal structure of the signals, compared to similar, but off-resonant excitation schemes. A simple explanation lies in the selectivity of Doppler classes. Our numerical simulations based on a four-level model including a whole Doppler ensemble can qualitatively describe the data.

  3. Motion-induced blindness continues outside visual awareness and without attention.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Kevin C; Tadin, Duje; Pearson, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Visual phenomena demonstrating striking perceptual disappearances of salient stimuli have fascinated researchers because of their utility in identifying neural processes that underlie subjective visibility and invisibility. Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is appealing for such purposes because it, like a class of ostensibly related paradigms such as binocular rivalry, features periods of unequivocal subjective disappearances despite constant physical stimulation. It remains unclear, however, exactly how the mechanisms that cause MIB are related to subjectively observed fluctuations in visual awareness. To address this question, we used continuous flash suppression (CFS) to present the MIB stimulus outside visual awareness. Results indicated that MIB occasionally reappeared from suppression with its salient yellow target absent. To quantify this observation, we measured reaction times (RTs) to detect the yellow dot target following visible or perceptually suppressed MIB and indeed found no difference in RTs between these conditions. We also provide evidence that MIB fluctuations can occur without attention. In sum, these experiments indicate that MIB fluctuations are effectively changes in stimulus strength, which under typical conditions result in unmistakable subjective disappearances, but are not inherently fluctuations in stimulus visibility. More broadly, these results challenge the assumed privileged link between bistable stimuli and visual awareness. PMID:26138079

  4. Fluctuations of visual awareness: Combining motion-induced blindness with binocular rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Lages, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Binocular rivalry (BR) and motion-induced blindness (MIB) are two phenomena of visual awareness where perception alternates between multiple states despite constant retinal input. Both phenomena have been extensively studied, but the underlying processing remains unclear. It has been suggested that BR and MIB involve the same neural mechanism, but how the two phenomena compete for visual awareness in the same stimulus has not been systematically investigated. Here we introduce BR in a dichoptic stimulus display that can also elicit MIB and examine fluctuations of visual awareness over the course of each trial. Exploiting this paradigm we manipulated stimulus characteristics that are known to influence MIB and BR. In two experiments we found that effects on multistable percepts were incompatible with the idea of a common oscillator. The results suggest instead that local and global stimulus attributes can affect the dynamics of each percept differently. We conclude that the two phenomena of visual awareness share basic temporal characteristics but are most likely influenced by processing at different stages within the visual system. PMID:25240063

  5. Motion-induced blindness and Troxler fading: common and different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bonneh, Yoram S; Donner, Tobias H; Cooperman, Alexander; Heeger, David J; Sagi, Dov

    2014-01-01

    Extended stabilization of gaze leads to disappearance of dim visual targets presented peripherally. This phenomenon, known as Troxler fading, is thought to result from neuronal adaptation. Intense targets also disappear intermittently when surrounded by a moving pattern (the "mask"), a phenomenon known as motion-induced blindness (MIB). The similar phenomenology and dynamics of these disappearances may suggest that also MIB is, likewise, solely due to adaptation, which may be amplified by the presence of the mask. Here we directly compared the dependence of both phenomena on target contrast. Observers reported the disappearance and reappearance of a target of varying intensity (contrast levels: 8%-80%). MIB was induced by adding a mask that moved at one of various different speeds. The results revealed a lawful effect of contrast in both MIB and Troxler fading, but with opposite trends. Increasing target contrast increased (doubled) the rate of disappearance events for MIB, but decreased the disappearance rate to half in Troxler fading. The target mean invisible period decreased equally strongly with target contrast in MIB and in Troxler fading. The results suggest that both MIB and Troxler are equally affected by contrast adaptation, but that the rate of MIB is governed by an additional mechanism, possibly involving antagonistic processes between neuronal populations processing target and mask. Our results link MIB to other bi-stable visual phenomena that involve neuronal competition (such as binocular rivalry), which exhibit an analogous dependency on the strength of the competing stimulus components. PMID:24658600

  6. Simulation by using the lattice Boltzmann method of microscopic particle motion induced by artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong; Mannoor, Madhusoodanan; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the simulation of particle motion induced by the fluid flow driven by an array of beating artificial cilia inside a micro-channel. A worm-like-chain model is used to simulate the elastic cilia, and the lattice Boltzmann equation is used to compute the fluid flow. We employ a harmonic force at the extreme tip of each cilium to actuate it. Our simulation methods are first validated by applying them to the motion of a single cilium and a freely falling sphere. After validation, we simulate the fluid flow generated by an array of beating cilia and find that a maximum flow rate is achieved at an optimum sperm number. Next, we simulate the motion of a neutrally buoyant spherical particle at this optimum sperm number by tracking the particle motion with a smoothed profile method. We address the effect of the following parameters on the particle velocity: the gap between cilia and particle, the particle size, the cilia density, and the presence of an array of intermediate particles.

  7. Obesity attenuates D2 autoreceptor‐mediated inhibition of putative ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Susumu; Mori, Masayoshi; Kanamaru, Syohei; Sazawa, Takuya; Miyazaki, Ayano; Terai, Hiroki; Hirose, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the midbrain is important for food reward. High‐fat containing palatable foods have reinforcing effects and accelerate obesity. We have previously reported that diet‐induced obesity selectively decreased the spontaneous activity of VTA GABA neurons, but not dopamine neurons. The spontaneous activity of VTA dopamine neurons is regulated by D2 autoreceptors. In this study, we hypothesized that obesity would affect the excitability of VTA dopamine neurons via D2 autoreceptors. To examine this hypothesis, we compared D2 receptor‐mediated responses of VTA dopamine neurons between lean and obese mice. Mice fed on a high‐fat (45%) diet and mice fed on a standard diet were used as obese and lean models, respectively. Brain slice preparations were made from these two groups. Spontaneous activity of VTA neurons was recorded by extracellular recording. Putative VTA dopamine neurons were identified by firing inhibition with a D2 receptor agonist quinpirole, and electrophysiological criteria (firing frequency <5 Hz and action potential current duration >1.2 msec). Single‐dose application of quinpirole (3−100 nmol/L) exhibited similar firing inhibition of putative VTA dopamine neurons between lean and obese mice. In stepwise application by increasing quinpirole concentrations of 3, 10, 30, and 100 nmol/L subsequently, quinpirole‐induced inhibition of firing decreased in putative VTA dopamine neurons of obese mice compared with those of lean mice. In conclusion, high‐fat diet‐induced obesity attenuated D2 receptor‐mediated inhibition of putative VTA dopamine neurons due to the acceleration of D2 receptor desensitization. PMID:24793981

  8. Hypoxia-induced hypothermia mediated by GABA in the rostral parapyramidal area of the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Osaka, T

    2014-05-16

    Hypoxia evokes a regulated decrease in the body core temperature (Tc) in a variety of animals. The neuronal mechanisms of this response include, at least in part, glutamatergic activation in the lateral preoptic area (LPO) of the hypothalamus. As the sympathetic premotor neurons in the medulla oblongata constitute a cardinal relay station in the descending neuronal pathway from the hypothalamus for thermoregulation, their inhibition can also be critically involved in the mechanisms of the hypoxia-induced hypothermia. Here, I examined the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced hypothermia is mediated by glutamate-responsive neurons in the LPO that activate GABAergic transmission in the rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa) and neighboring parapyramidal region (PPy) of the medulla oblongata in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. Unilateral microinjection of GABA (15nmol) into the rRPa and PPy regions elicited a prompt increase in tail skin temperature (Ts) and decreases in Tc, oxygen consumption rate (VO2), and heart rate. Next, when the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide (bicuculline methiodide (BMI), 10pmol) alone was microinjected into the rRPa, it elicited unexpected contradictory responses: simultaneous increases in Ts, VO2 and heart rate and a decrease in Tc. Then, when BMI was microinjected bilaterally into the PPy, no direct effect on Ts was seen; and thermogenic and tachycardic responses were slight. However, pretreatment of the PPy with BMI, but not vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the hypothermic responses evoked by hypoxic (10%O2-90%N2, 5min) ventilation or bilateral microinjections of glutamate (5nmol, each side) into the LPO. The results suggest that hypoxia-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by the activation of GABAA receptors in the PPy. PMID:24607346

  9. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  10. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Yupeng

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  11. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Liao, Zhongxing; Balter, Peter; Li, Yupeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique. Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration. Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle. Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients. PMID:24320498

  12. Collaborative Strategic Reading as a Means To Enhance Peer-Mediated Instruction for Reading Comprehension and Content-Area Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette K.; Bryant, Diane P.

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes studies conducted with Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR), a program designed to enhance reading comprehension and content-area reading for diverse learners. It describes the stages of CSR development and discusses the role of peer-mediated learning in improving the social and academic outcomes of participating students.…

  13. A template-free solvent-mediated synthesis of high surface area boron nitride nanosheets for aerobic oxidative desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Zhu, Wenshuai; Chao, Yanhong; Zhang, Jinshui; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhu, Huiyuan; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Zhigang; Li, Huaming; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (h-BNNs) with rather high specific surface area (SSA) are important two-dimensional layer-structured materials. Here, a solvent-mediated synthesis of h-BNNs revealed a template-free lattice plane control strategy that induced high SSA nanoporous structured h-BNNs with outstanding aerobic oxidative desulfurization performance. PMID:26502800

  14. Area-Specific Cell Stimulation via Surface-Mediated Gene Transfer Using Apatite-Based Composite Layers

    PubMed Central

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Surface-mediated gene transfer systems using biocompatible calcium phosphate (CaP)-based composite layers have attracted attention as a tool for controlling cell behaviors. In the present study we aimed to demonstrate the potential of CaP-based composite layers to mediate area-specific dual gene transfer and to stimulate cells on an area-by-area basis in the same well. For this purpose we prepared two pairs of DNA–fibronectin–apatite composite (DF-Ap) layers using a pair of reporter genes and pair of differentiation factor genes. The results of the area-specific dual gene transfer successfully demonstrated that the cells cultured on a pair of DF-Ap layers that were adjacently placed in the same well showed specific gene expression patterns depending on the gene that was immobilized in theunderlying layer. Moreover, preliminary real-time PCR results indicated that multipotential C3H10T1/2 cells may have a potential to change into different types of cells depending on the differentiation factor gene that was immobilized in the underlying layer, even in the same well. Because DF-Ap layers have a potential to mediate area-specific cell stimulation on their surfaces, they could be useful in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25874757

  15. Effect of macular ablation on frequency and latency of motion-induced emesis in the squirrel monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Igarashi, Makoto

    1986-01-01

    Three previously motion-emetic sensitive squirrel monkeys were rendered refractory to a standard motion-emetic regimen by a two-stage utriculosacculectomy procedure which preserved the cristae ampullares of semicircular canals. Three nonoperated control squirrel monkeys tested on the same motion-emetic regimen time schedule as the operated animals remained motion-emetic sensitive with regard to incidence, frequency, and latency of motion-induced emetic responses. Following a sham surgical procedure (stapedectomy) performed on two of the latter animals and one additional new animal, the emetic incidence decreased from 100 to 89 percent, but the frequency and latency were not altered significantly.

  16. On the existence of motion-induced heat flux due to thermoelastic waves in a one-dimensional solid rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2014-03-01

    In this Letter, we show the existence of motion-induced heat transfer in homogeneous isotropic solids due to the propagation of thermoelastic waves. In particular, using the linearized governing equations for thermoelastic waves, we show that heat transfer in a one-dimensional rod is not only due to conduction but also to the local particle displacement a phenomenon which, in principle, is similar to advective heat transfer in fluids. It is found that the time-averaged heat transfer is dependent on both the material properties and the external excitation parameters. This mechanism can potentially be useful in ultrasonic welding and in the development of solid state refrigerators or heat pumps.

  17. The cortical surface area of the insula mediates the effect of DBH rs7040170 on novelty seeking.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Cui, Yue; Wu, Karen; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-08-15

    Novelty seeking (NS) is a personality trait important for adaptive functioning, but an excessive level of NS has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as ADHD and substance abuse. Previous research has investigated separately the neural and genetic bases of the NS trait, but results were mixed and neural and genetic bases have yet to be examined within the same study. In this study, we examined the interrelationships among the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) gene, brain structure, and the NS trait in 359 healthy Han Chinese subjects. We focused on the DBH gene because it encodes a key enzyme for dopamine metabolism, NS is believed to be related to the dopaminergic system and has been reported associated with DBH variation. Results showed a significant positive association between the cortical surface area of the left insula and NS score. Furthermore, the DBH genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs7040170 was strongly associated with both the surface area of the left insula and NS score, with G carriers having a larger left insula surface area and a higher NS score than AA homozygotes. Subsequent path analysis suggested that the insula partially mediated the association between the DBH gene and the NS trait. Our data provided the first evidence for the involvement of the insula in the dopamine-NS relationship. Future studies of molecular mechanisms underlying the NS personality trait and related psychiatric disorders should consider the mediation effect of the neural structure. PMID:26003854

  18. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P. C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-10-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications.

  19. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Bazylewski, Paul F.; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P.C.; Hunt, Adrian H.; McDermott, Eamon J. G.; Leedahl, Brett D.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Cholakh, Seif O.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  20. Selective Area Band Engineering of Graphene using Cobalt-Mediated Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bazylewski, Paul F; Nguyen, Van Luan; Bauer, Robert P C; Hunt, Adrian H; McDermott, Eamon J G; Leedahl, Brett D; Kukharenko, Andrey I; Cholakh, Seif O; Kurmaev, Ernst Z; Blaha, Peter; Moewes, Alexander; Lee, Young Hee; Chang, Gap Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a scalable and economical method to open a band gap in single layer graphene by deposition of cobalt metal on its surface using physical vapor deposition in high vacuum. At low cobalt thickness, clusters form at impurity sites on the graphene without etching or damaging the graphene. When exposed to oxygen at room temperature, oxygen functional groups form in proportion to the cobalt thickness that modify the graphene band structure. Cobalt/Graphene resulting from this treatment can support a band gap of 0.30 eV, while remaining largely undamaged to preserve its structural and electrical properties. A mechanism of cobalt-mediated band opening is proposed as a two-step process starting with charge transfer from metal to graphene, followed by formation of oxides where cobalt has been deposited. Contributions from the formation of both CoO and oxygen functional groups on graphene affect the electronic structure to open a band gap. This study demonstrates that cobalt-mediated oxidation is a viable method to introduce a band gap into graphene at room temperature that could be applicable in electronics applications. PMID:26486966

  1. Leptin/LepRb in the Ventral Tegmental Area Mediates Anxiety-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, has been implicated in emotional regulation. We have previously shown that systemic administration of leptin produces anxiolytic-like effects and deletion of the leptin receptor, LepRb, in midbrain dopamine neurons leads to an anxiogenic phenotype. This study investigated whether activation or deletion of LepRb in the ventral tegmental area of adult mice is capable of inducing anxiolytic and anxiogenic effects, respectively. Methods: Mice were cannulated in the ventral tegmental area and received bilateral intra-ventral tegmental area infusions of leptin or the JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor AG490. Anxiety-like behaviors were assessed using the elevated plus-maze, light-dark box, and novelty suppressed feeding tests. Deletion of LepRb in the ventral tegmental area was achieved by bilateral injection of AAV-Cre into the ventral tegmental area of adult Leprflox/flox mice. Anxiety-related behaviors were evaluated 3 weeks after viral injection. Results: Intra-ventral tegmental area infusions of leptin reduced anxiety-like behaviors, as indicated by increased percent open-arm time and open-arm entries in the elevated plus-maze test, increased time spent in the light side and decreased latency to enter the light side of the light-dark box, and decreased latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Blockade of JAK2/STAT3 signaling in the ventral tegmental area by AG490 attenuated the anxiolytic effect produced by systemic administration of leptin. Leprflox/flox mice injected with AAV-Cre into the ventral tegmental area showed decreased leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and enhanced anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze test and the novelty suppressed feeding test. Conclusions: These findings suggest that leptin-LepRb signaling in the ventral tegmental area plays an important role in the regulation of anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:26438799

  2. Role of the Ventral Tegmental Area in Methamphetamine Extinction: AMPA Receptor-Mediated Neuroplasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen Han-Ting; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying drug extinction remain largely unknown, although a role for medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) glutamate neurons has been suggested. Considering that the mPFC sends glutamate efferents to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), we tested whether the VTA is involved in methamphetamine (METH) extinction via conditioned…

  3. Areas of Left Perisylvian Cortex Mediate Auditory-Verbal Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenigs, Michael; Acheson, Daniel J.; Barbey, Aron K.; Solomon, Jeffrey; Postle, Bradley R.; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    A contentious issue in memory research is whether verbal short-term memory (STM) depends on a neural system specifically dedicated to the temporary maintenance of information, or instead relies on the same brain areas subserving the comprehension and production of language. In this study, we examined a large sample of adults with acquired brain…

  4. Multi-Hazard Analysis for the Estimation of Ground Motion Induced by Landslides and Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Rubén; Koudogbo, Fifame; Ardizzone, Francesca; Mondini, Alessandro; Bignami, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors allow obtaining all-day all-weather terrain complex reflectivity images which can be processed by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) for the monitoring of displacement episodes with extremely high accuracy. In the work presented, different PSI strategies to measure ground surface displacements for multi-scale multi-hazard mapping are proposed in the context of landslides and tectonic applications. This work is developed in the framework of ESA General Studies Programme (GSP). The present project, called Multi Scale and Multi Hazard Mapping Space based Solutions (MEMpHIS), investigates new Earth Observation (EO) methods and new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to improve the understanding and management of disasters, with special focus on Disaster Risk Reduction rather than Rapid Mapping. In this paper, the results of the investigation on the key processing steps for measuring large-scale ground surface displacements (like the ones originated by plate tectonics or active faults) as well as local displacements at high resolution (like the ones related with active slopes) will be presented. The core of the proposed approaches is based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) algorithm, which is the advanced PSI processing chain developed by ALTAMIRA INFORMATION. Regarding tectonic applications, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. In this context, a low-resolution approach based in the integration of differential phase increments of velocity and topographic error (obtained through the fitting of a linear model adjustment function to data) will be evaluated. Data from the default mode of Sentinel-1, the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode, will be considered for this application. Regarding landslides

  5. Neuropeptide Y system in accumbens shell mediates ethanol self-administration in posterior ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Chandrashekhar D; Upadhya, Manoj A; Shelkar, Gajanan P; Subhedar, Nishikant K; Kokare, Dadasaheb M

    2016-07-01

    Although modulatory effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on ethanol consumption are well established, its role in ethanol reward, in the framework of mesolimbic dopaminergic system, has not been studied. We investigated the influence of nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) NPYergic system on ethanol self-administration in posterior ventral tegmental area (p-VTA) using intracranial self-administration paradigm. Rats were stereotaxically implanted with cannulae targeted unilaterally at the right p-VTA and trained to self-administer ethanol (200 mg%) in standard two-lever (active/inactive) operant chamber, an animal model with high predictive validity to test the rewarding mechanisms. Over a period of 7 days, these rats showed a significant increase in the number of lever presses for ethanol self-administration suggesting reinforcement. While intra-AcbSh NPY (1 or 2 ng/rat) or [Leu(31) , Pro(34) ]-NPY (0.5 or 1 ng/rat) dose-dependently increased ethanol self-administration, BIBP3226 (0.4 or 0.8 ng/rat) produced opposite effect. The rats conditioned to self-administer ethanol showed significant increase in the population of NPY-immunoreactive cells and fibres in the AcbSh, central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and lateral part of bed nucleus of stria terminalis as compared with that in the naïve rats. Neuronal tracing studies showed that NPY innervations in the AcbSh may derive from the neurons of ARC and CeA. As NPY and dopamine systems in reward areas are known to interact, we suggest that NPY inputs from ARC and CeA may play an important role in modulation of the dopaminergic system in the AcbSh and consequently influence the ethanol induced reward and addiction. PMID:25929272

  6. Combined prospective and retrospective correction to reduce motion-induced image misalignment and geometric distortions in EPI.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Melvyn B; Muraskin, Jordan; Zou, Xiaowei; Thomas, William J; Krueger, Sascha; Aksoy, Murat; Bammer, Roland; Brown, Truman R

    2013-03-01

    Despite rigid-body realignment to compensate for head motion during an echo-planar imaging time-series scan, nonrigid image deformations remain due to changes in the effective shim within the brain as the head moves through the B(0) field. The current work presents a combined prospective/retrospective solution to reduce both rigid and nonrigid components of this motion-related image misalignment. Prospective rigid-body correction, where the scan-plane orientation is dynamically updated to track with the subject's head, is performed using an active marker setup. Retrospective distortion correction is then applied to unwarp the remaining nonrigid image deformations caused by motion-induced field changes. Distortion correction relative to a reference time-frame does not require any additional field mapping scans or models, but rather uses the phase information from the echo-planar imaging time-series itself. This combined method is applied to compensate echo-planar imaging scans of volunteers performing in-plane and through-plane head motions, resulting in increased image stability beyond what either prospective or retrospective rigid-body correction alone can achieve. The combined method is also assessed in a blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI task, resulting in improved Z-score statistics. PMID:22499027

  7. Motion induced remote field eddy current effect in a magnetostatic non-destructive testing tool: A finite element prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.S.; Lord, W.; Katragadda, G.; Shin, Y.K.

    1994-09-01

    A hitherto unobserved phenomenon -- motion induced remote field eddy current effect, is presented in this paper. A numerical study of the non-destructive inspection of tubing with conducting walls, using a DC electromagnetic probe led to the detection of this interesting effect. This paper describes a bidirectional transmission of the electromagnetic field energy through the tube walls, similar to the phenomenon responsible for the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) effect in eddy current (an AC electromagnetic nondestructive testing tool) inspection of tubing. Thus far it was considered that the RFEC effect by the nature of its physics was possible only in the presence of AC excitation in tubular geometries. However, it is shown in this paper that currents induced by magnetic flux moving over conducting material produce a RFEC effect even when a DC probe is used. This phenomenon may .enable extraction of valuable information regarding the entire thickness of the tube wall from measurements made on the same side as the excitation source.

  8. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test

    PubMed Central

    Addy, N.A.; Nunes, E.J.; Wickham, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125 mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2 μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24 μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30 μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST. PMID:25865152

  9. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST. PMID:25865152

  10. A proof for insignificant effect of Brownian motion-induced micro-convection on thermal conductivity of nanofluids by utilizing molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Hasan; Keblinski, Pawel; Khodadadi, J. M.

    2013-02-01

    It has been recently demonstrated through experiments that the observed high enhancements in thermal conductivity of nanofluids are due to aggregation of nanoparticles rather than the previously stated mechanism of the Brownian motion-induced micro-convection. In this paper, we use equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the role of micro-convection on the thermal conductivity of well-dispersed nanofluids. We show that while the individual terms in the heat current autocorrelation function associated with nanoparticle diffusion achieve significant values, these terms essentially cancel each other if correctly defined average enthalpy expressions are subtracted. Otherwise, erroneous thermal conductivity enhancements will be predicted, which are attributed to Brownian motion-induced micro-convection. Consequently, micro-convection does not contribute noticeably to the thermal conductivity and the predicted thermal conductivity enhancements are consistent with the effective medium theory.

  11. Acute alcohol effects on attentional bias are mediated by subcortical areas associated with arousal and salience attribution.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Kyriaki; Field, Matt; Critchley, Hugo; Duka, Theodora

    2013-06-01

    Acute alcohol ingestion increases attentional bias to alcohol-related stimuli; however, the underlying cognitive and brain mechanisms remain unknown. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with performance of a dual task that probed attentional distraction by alcohol-related stimuli during 'conflict' processing: the Concurrent Flanker/Alcohol-Attentional bias task (CFAAT). In this task, an Eriksen Flanker task is superimposed on task-unrelated background pictures with alcohol-associated or neutral content. Participants respond to the direction of a central 'target' arrow and ignore adjacent congruent (low cognitive load) or incongruent (high cognitive load) 'flanking' arrows. Using a between-subject design, 40 healthy moderate-to-heavy social drinkers received either no alcohol (placebo), 0.4 g/kg (low dose), or 0.8 g/kg (high dose) of alcohol, and underwent fMRI while performing the CFAAT. The low alcohol dose, relative to placebo, increased response latencies on trials with alcohol-associated backgrounds and, under low cognitive load, increased the activity evoked by these pictures within a medial hypothalamic region. Under high cognitive load, the low alcohol dose, relative to placebo, elicited greater activity within a more lateral hypothalamic region, and reduced activity within frontal motor areas. The high alcohol dose, relative to placebo, did not reliably affect response latencies or neural responses to background images, but reduced overall accuracy under high cognitive load. This effect correlated with changes in reactivity within medial and dorsal prefrontal cortices. These data suggest that alcohol at a low dose primes attentional bias to alcohol-associated stimuli, an effect mediated by activation of subcortical hypothalamic areas implicated in arousal and salience attribution. PMID:23361162

  12. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  13. Apolar surface area determines the efficiency of translocon-mediated membrane-protein integration into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Öjemalm, Karin; Higuchi, Takashi; Jiang, Yang; Langel, Ülo; Nilsson, IngMarie; White, Stephen H; Suga, Hiroaki; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2011-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins are integrated cotranslationally into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum in a process mediated by the Sec61 translocon. Transmembrane α-helices in a translocating polypeptide chain gain access to the surrounding membrane through a lateral gate in the wall of the translocon channel [van den Berg B, et al. (2004) Nature 427:36-44; Zimmer J, et al. (2008) Nature 455:936-943; Egea PF, Stroud RM (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:17182-17187]. To clarify the nature of the membrane-integration process, we have measured the insertion efficiency into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane of model hydrophobic segments containing nonproteinogenic aliphatic and aromatic amino acids. We find that an amino acid's contribution to the apparent free energy of membrane-insertion is directly proportional to the nonpolar accessible surface area of its side chain, as expected for thermodynamic partitioning between aqueous and nonpolar phases. But unlike bulk-phase partitioning, characterized by a nonpolar solvation parameter of 23 cal/(mol · Å(2)), the solvation parameter for transfer from translocon to bilayer is 6-10 cal/(mol · Å(2)), pointing to important differences between translocon-guided partitioning and simple water-to-membrane partitioning. Our results provide compelling evidence for a thermodynamic partitioning model and insights into the physical properties of the translocon. PMID:21606334

  14. Joint correction of Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact in interleaved diffusion weighted EPI data using a composite two-dimensional phase correction procedure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obtained with interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence has great potential of characterizing brain tissue properties at high spatial-resolution. However, interleaved EPI based DWI data may be corrupted by various types of aliasing artifacts. First, inconsistencies in k-space data obtained with opposite readout gradient polarities result in Nyquist artifact, which is usually reduced with 1D phase correction in post-processing. When there exist eddy current cross terms (e.g., in oblique-plane EPI), 2D phase correction is needed to effectively reduce Nyquist artifact. Second, minuscule motion induced phase inconsistencies in interleaved DWI scans result in image-domain aliasing artifact, which can be removed with reconstruction procedures that take shot-to-shot phase variations into consideration. In existing interleaved DWI reconstruction procedures, Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact are typically removed subsequently in two stages. Although the two-stage phase correction generally performs well for non-oblique plane EPI data obtained from well-calibrated system, the residual artifacts may still be pronounced in oblique-plane EPI data or when there exist eddy current cross terms. To address this challenge, here we report a new composite 2D phase correction procedure, which effective removes Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion induced aliasing artifact jointly in a single step. Our experimental results demonstrate that the new 2D phase correction method can much more effectively reduce artifacts in interleaved EPI based DWI data as compared with the existing two-stage artifact correction procedures. The new method robustly enables high-resolution DWI, and should prove highly valuable for clinical uses and research studies of DWI. PMID:27114342

  15. Real-Time Correction of Rigid-Body-Motion-Induced Phase Errors for Diffusion-Weighted Steady State Free Precession Imaging

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, R; Aksoy, M; Aboussouan, E; Peterson, E; Van, A; Bammer, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion contrast in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI is generated through the constructive addition of signal from many coherence pathways. Motion-induced phase causes destructive interference which results in loss of signal magnitude and diffusion contrast. In this work, a 3D navigator-based real-time correction of the rigid-body-motion-induced phase errors is developed for diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI. Methods The efficacy of the real-time prospective correction method in preserving phase coherence of the steady-state is tested in 3D phantom experiments and 3D scans of healthy human subjects. Results In nearly all experiments, the signal magnitude in images obtained with proposed prospective correction was higher than the signal magnitude in images obtained with no correction. In the human subjects the mean magnitude signal in the data was up to 30 percent higher with prospective motion correction than without. Prospective correction never resulted in a decrease in mean signal magnitude in either the data or in the images. Conclusions The proposed prospective motion correction method is shown to preserve the phase coherence of the steady state in diffusion-weighted steady state free precession MRI, thus mitigating signal magnitude losses that would confound the desired diffusion contrast. PMID:24715414

  16. Mutational Analysis of AREA, a Transcriptional Activator Mediating Nitrogen Metabolite Repression in Aspergillus nidulans and a Member of the “Streetwise” GATA Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    1998-01-01

    Summary: The transcriptional activator AREA is a member of the GATA family of transcription factors and mediates nitrogen metabolite repression in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The nutritional versatility of A. nidulans and its amenability to classical and reverse genetic manipulations make the AREA DNA binding domain (DBD) a useful model for analyzing GATA family DBDs, particularly as structures of two AREA-DNA complexes have been determined. The 109 extant mutant forms of the AREA DBD surveyed here constitute one of the highest totals of eukaryotic transcription factor DBD mutants, are discussed in light of the roles of individual residues, and are compared to corresponding mutant sequence changes in other fungal GATA factor DBDs. Other topics include delineation of the DBD using both homology and mutational truncation, use of frameshift reversion to detect regions of tolerance to mutational change, the finding that duplication of the DBD can apparently enhance AREA function, and use of the AREA system to analyze a vertebrate GATA factor DBD. Some major points to emerge from work on the AREA DBD are (i) tolerance to sequence change (with retention of function) is surprisingly great, (ii) mutational changes in a transcription factor can have widely differing, even opposing, effects on expression of different structural genes so that monitoring expression of one or even several structural genes can be insufficient and possibly misleading, and (iii) a mutational change altering local hydrophobic packing and DNA binding target specificity can markedly influence the behavior of mutational changes elsewhere in the DBD. PMID:9729601

  17. Pannexin-1-mediated ATP release from area CA3 drives mGlu5-dependent neuronal oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lopatář, Jan; Dale, Nicholas; Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2015-06-01

    The activation of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (GI mGluRs) in the hippocampus results in the appearance of persistent bursts of synchronised neuronal activity. In response to other stimuli, such activity is known to cause the release of the purines ATP and its neuroactive metabolite, adenosine. We have thus investigated the potential release and role of the purines during GI mGluR-induced oscillations in rat hippocampal areas CA3 and CA1 using pharmacological techniques and microelectrode biosensors for ATP and adenosine. The GI mGluR agonist DHPG induced both persistent oscillations in neuronal activity and the release of adenosine in areas CA1 and CA3. In contrast, the DHPG-induced release of ATP was only observed in area CA3. Whilst adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors suppressed DHPG-induced burst activity, the activation of mGlu5 and P2Y1 ATP receptors were necessary for the induction of DHPG-induced oscillations. Selective inhibition of pannexin-1 hemichannels with a low concentration of carbenoxolone (10 μM) or probenecid (1 mM) did not affect adenosine release in area CA3, but prevented both ATP release in area CA3 and DHPG-induced bursting. These data reveal key aspects of GI mGluR-dependent neuronal activity that are subject to bidirectional regulation by ATP and adenosine in the initiation and pacing of burst firing, respectively, and which have implications for the role of GI mGluRs in seizure activity and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25645390

  18. Intra-ventral tegmental area HIV-1 Tat1–86 attenuates nicotine-mediated locomotor sensitization and alters mesocorticolimbic ERK and CREB signaling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Midde, Narasimha M.; Gomez, Adrian M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Harrod, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking prevalence in the HIV-positive individuals is profoundly higher than that in the HIV-negative individuals. We have demonstrated that HIV-1 transgenic rats exhibit attenuated nicotine-mediated locomotor activity, altered cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling in the mesocorticolimbic regions. This study investigated the role of HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein in the alterations of nicotine-mediated behavior and the signaling pathway observed in the HIV-1 transgenic rats. Rats received bilateral microinjection of recombinant Tat1–86 (25 μg/side) or vehicle directed at ventral tegmental area (VTA) followed by locomotor testing in response to 13 daily intravenous injections of nicotine (0.05 mg/kg, freebase, once/day) or saline. Further, we examined the phosphorylated levels of CREB (pCREB) and ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and VTA. Tat diminished baseline activity in saline control rats, and attenuated nicotine-induced behavioral sensitization. Following repeated saline injection, the basal levels of pERK1 in the NAc and VTA and pERK2 in VTA were lower in the vehicle control group, relative to the Tat group. After repeated nicotine injection, pERK1 in NAc and VTA and pERK2 in VTA were increased in the vehicle group, but not in the Tat group. Moreover, repeated nicotine injections decreased pCREB in the PFC and VTA in the Tat group but not in the vehicle group. Thus, these findings indicate that the direct injection of Tat at the VTA may mediate CREB and ERK activity in response to nicotine-induced locomotor activity. PMID:26150803

  19. Overcrowding-mediated stress alters cell proliferation in key neuroendocrine areas during larval development in Rhinella arenarum.

    PubMed

    Distler, Mijal J; Jungblut, Lucas D; Ceballos, Nora R; Paz, Dante A; Pozzi, Andrea G

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to adverse environmental conditions can elicit a stress response, which results in an increase in endogenous corticosterone levels. In early life stages, it has been thoroughly demonstrated that amphibian larval growth and development is altered as a consequence of chronic stress by interfering with the metamorphic process, however, the underlying mechanisms involved have only been partially disentangled. We examined the effect of intraspecific competition on corticosterone levels during larval development of the toad Rhinella arenarum and its ultimate effects on cell proliferation in particular brain areas as well as the pituitary gland. While overcrowding altered the number of proliferating cells in the pituitary gland, hypothalamus, and third ventricle of the brain, no differences were observed in areas which are less associated with neuroendocrine processes, such as the first ventricle of the brain. Apoptosis was increased in hypothalamic regions but not in the pituitary. With regards to pituitary cell populations, thyrotrophs but not somatoatrophs and corticotrophs showed a decrease in the cell number in overcrowded larvae. Our study shows that alterations in growth and development, produced by stress, results from an imbalance in the neuroendocrine systems implicated in orchestrating the timing of metamorphosis. J. Exp. Zool. 9999A:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26817921

  20. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the Indus River catchment area, Pakistan: Status, soil-air exchange and black carbon mediated distribution.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Anam; Ali, Usman; Mahmood, Adeel; Chaudhry, Muhammad Jamshed Iqbal; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-06-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were investigated in passive air and soil samples from the catchment area of the Indus River, Pakistan. ∑15OCPs ranged between 0.68 and 13.47 ng g(-1) in soil and 375.1-1975 pg m-(3) in air. HCHs and DDTs were more prevalent in soil and air compartments. Composition profile indicated that β-HCH and p,p'-DDE were the dominant of all metabolites among HCHs and DDTs respectively. Moreover, fBC and fTOC were assessed and evaluated their potential role in the distribution status of OCPs. The fTOC and fBC ranged between 0.77 and 2.43 and 0.04-0.30% respectively in soil. Regression analysis showed the strong influence of fBC than fTOC on the distribution of OCPs in the Indus River catchment area soil. Equilibrium status was observed for β-HCH, δ-HCH, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, TC, HCB and Heptachlor with ff ranged between 0.3 and 0.59 while assessing the soil-air exchange of OCPs. PMID:26978705

  1. Quantitative inference of population response properties across eccentricity from motion-induced maps in macaque V1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Wu, Si; Lu, Haidong D.; Roe, Anna W.

    2013-01-01

    Interpreting population responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge especially with the advent of techniques measuring activations of large cortical areas simultaneously with high precision. For successful interpretation, a quantitatively precise model prediction is of great importance. In this study, we investigate how accurate a spatiotemporal filter (STF) model predicts average response profiles to coherently drifting random dot motion obtained by optical imaging of intrinsic signals in V1 of anesthetized macaques. We establish that orientation difference maps, obtained by subtracting orthogonal axis-of-motion, invert with increasing drift speeds, consistent with the motion streak effect. Consistent with perception, the speed at which the map inverts (the critical speed) depends on cortical eccentricity and systematically increases from foveal to parafoveal. We report that critical speeds and response maps to drifting motion are excellently reproduced by the STF model. Our study thus suggests that the STF model is quantitatively accurate enough to be used as a first model of choice for interpreting responses obtained with intrinsic imaging methods in V1. We show further that this good quantitative correspondence opens the possibility to infer otherwise not easily accessible population receptive field properties from responses to complex stimuli, such as drifting random dot motions. PMID:23197457

  2. Application of Motion Induced Remote-Field Eddy-Current effect to online inspection and quality examination of rolling metallic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Udpa, Satish; Lord, William; Udpa, Lalita; Ouyang, Tianhe

    2001-04-01

    The Motion Induced Remote-Field Eddy-Current (MIRFEC) effect was first observed in 1994. The effect was first exploited for detecting pipeline stress corrosion cracks as a part of a research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation. This paper presents a new application of the MIRFEC effect for online inspection of rolling metallic strips. Currently, rolled metallic strips and sheets are inspected off-line, which is costly, time consuming and not ideal for quality control. A well-designed online diagnostic and control system for metal rolling process may be able to reduce cost, improve quality, and hence enhance competitiveness of the product. The overall objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new nondestructive measurement system for on-line diagnostics and control of metallic rolling process using the MIRFEC effect. The system can be used to monitor, in real time, metallic strips/sheets for possible anomalies, inclusions, voids, bubbles, lamination, as well as variations in its magnetic and other properties. The potential advantages of the MIRFEC system include simplicity, robustness, low cost, high reliability, quick and accurate signal classification and characterization. Such systems can be used for real-time process control, or off-line data analysis. The technique also allows operation at high temperatures, tolerates large lift-off and vibration, and high rolling speed. Results of finite element modeling of the MIRFEC effect and experimental measurement data obtained from a prototype system are presented.

  3. Numerical modeling and experimental study of motion-induced remote field current effect and its applications to online inspection and quality examination of rolling metallic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Udpa, Satish S.; Lord, William; Udpa, Lalita; Ouyang, Tianhe

    2000-06-01

    Currently, rolled metallic strips and sheets are inspected off-line, which is costly, time consuming and not ideal for quality control. A well designed online diagnostic and control system for metal rolling process may largely reduce cost, improve quality, and hence enhance competitiveness of the product. The overall objective of this paper is to study a new nondestructive measurement system for on-line diagnostics and control of metallic rolling process using motion-induced remote-field eddy-current (MIRFEC) effect. The system can be used to monitor in real time the rolled metallic strips/sheets for possible anomalies, inclusions, voids, bubbles, lamination, as well as measuring variations of its properties. The potential advantages of the MIRFEC system include simplicity, robustness, low cost, high reliability, quick and accurate signal classification and characterization that can used for real-time process control, or off-line data analysis. The technique also allows operation at high temperature, large lift-off and vibration, and high rolling speed. Results of finite element modeling of the MIRFEC effect and experimental measurement data obtained from a prototype system are presented.

  4. System and method of reducing motion-induced noise in the optical detection of an ultrasound signal in a moving body of material

    DOEpatents

    Habeger, Jr., Charles C.; LaFond, Emmanuel F.; Brodeur, Pierre; Gerhardstein, Joseph P.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method to reduce motion-induced noise in the detection of ultrasonic signals in a moving sheet or body of material. An ultrasonic signal is generated in a sheet of material and a detection laser beam is moved along the surface of the material. By moving the detection laser in the same direction as the direction of movement of the sheet of material the amount of noise induced in the detection of the ultrasonic signal is reduced. The scanner is moved at approximately the same speed as the moving material. The system and method may be used for many applications, such in a paper making process or steel making process. The detection laser may be directed by a scanner. The movement of the scanner is synchronized with the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal under the scanner. A photodetector may be used to determine when a ultrasonic pulse has been directed to the moving sheet of material so that the scanner may be synchronized the anticipated arrival of the ultrasonic signal.

  5. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  6. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  7. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; Di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system. PMID:27192939

  8. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  9. GABAergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area receive dual GABA/enkephalin-mediated inhibitory inputs from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takehiro; Konno, Kohtarou; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Sora, Ichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-06-01

    Activation of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) disinhibits dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. This mechanism is thought to play a pivotal role in mediating reward behaviors. Here, we characterised VTA-projecting enkephalinergic neurons in the anterior division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and investigated their targets by examining MOR expression in the VTA. In the BST, neurons expressing preproenkephalin mRNA were exclusively GABAergic, and constituted 37.2% of the total GABAergic neurons. Using retrograde tracer injected into the VTA, 21.6% of VTA-projecting BST neurons were shown to express preproenkephalin mRNA. Enkephalinergic projections from the BST exclusively formed symmetrical synapses onto the dendrites of VTA neurons. In the VTA, 74.1% of MOR mRNA-expressing neurons were GABAergic, with the rest being glutamatergic neurons expressing type-2 vesicular glutamate transporter mRNA. However, MOR mRNA was below the detection threshold in dopaminergic neurons. By immunohistochemistry, MOR was highly expressed on the extrasynaptic membranes of dendrites in GABAergic VTA neurons, including dendrites innervated by BST-VTA projection terminals. MOR was also expressed weakly on GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals in the VTA. Given that GABAA α1 is expressed at GABAergic BST-VTA synapses on dendrites of GABAergic neurons [T. Kudo et al. (2012) J. Neurosci., 32, 18035-18046], our results collectively indicate that the BST sends dual inhibitory outputs targeting GABAergic VTA neurons; GABAergic inhibition via 'wired' transmission, and enkephalinergic inhibition via 'volume' transmission. This dual inhibitory system provides the neural substrate underlying the potent disinhibitory control over dopaminergic VTA neurons exerted by the BST. PMID:24580812

  10. Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.; Fritz, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables are prominent in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an independent variable on a dependent variable. Differences between mediating variables and confounders, moderators, and covariates are outlined. Statistical methods to assess mediation and modern comprehensive approaches are described. Future directions for mediation analysis are discussed. PMID:16968208

  11. Current Directions in Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Fairchild, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Mediating variables continue to play an important role in psychological theory and research. A mediating variable transmits the effect of an antecedent variable on to a dependent variable, thereby providing more detailed understanding of relations among variables. Methods to assess mediation have been an active area of research for the last two decades. This paper describes the current state of methods to investigate mediating variables. PMID:20157637

  12. Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, T.J.; Vansteelandt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the causal inference literature on mediation have extended traditional approaches to direct and indirect effects to settings that allow for interactions and non-linearities. In this paper, these approaches from causal inference are further extended to settings in which multiple mediators may be of interest. Two analytic approaches, one based on regression and one based on weighting are proposed to estimate the effect mediated through multiple mediators and the effects through other pathways. The approaches proposed here accommodate exposure-mediator interactions and, to a certain extent, mediator-mediator interactions as well. The methods handle binary or continuous mediators and binary, continuous or count outcomes. When the mediators affect one another, the strategy of trying to assess direct and indirect effects one mediator at a time will in general fail; the approach given in this paper can still be used. A characterization is moreover given as to when the sum of the mediated effects for multiple mediators considered separately will be equal to the mediated effect of all of the mediators considered jointly. The approach proposed in this paper is robust to unmeasured common causes of two or more mediators. PMID:25580377

  13. Sex-specific mediation effect of the right fusiform face area volume on the association between variants in repeat length of AVPR1A RS3 and altruistic behavior in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Qin, Wen; Liu, Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhou, Yuan; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-07-01

    Microsatellite variants in the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A) RS3 have been associated with normal social behaviors variation and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in a sex-specific manner. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that AVPR1A RS3 variants affect altruistic behavior by modulating the gray matter volume (GMV) of specific brain regions in a sex-specific manner. We investigated 278 young healthy adults using the Dictator Game to assess altruistic behavior. All subjects were genotyped and main effect of AVPR1A RS3 repeat polymorphisms and interaction of genotype-by-sex on the GMV were assessed in a voxel-wise manner. We observed that male subjects with relatively short repeats allocated less money to others and exhibited a significantly smaller GMV in the right fusiform face area (FFA) compared with male long homozygotes. In male subjects, the GMV of the right FFA exhibited a significant positive correlation with altruistic behavior. A mixed mediation and moderation analysis further revealed both a significant mediation effect of the GMV of the right FFA on the association between AVPR1A RS3 repeat polymorphisms and allocation sums and a significant moderation effect of sex (only in males) on the mediation effect. Post hoc analysis showed that the GMV of the right FFA was significantly smaller in male subjects carrying allele 426 than in non-426 carriers. These results suggest that the GMV of the right FFA may be a potential mediator whereby the genetic variants in AVPR1A RS3 affect altruistic behavior in healthy male subjects. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2700-2709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27027249

  14. Mediation and Counseling Services: A Viable Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Mediation has become common in many areas of society, including marital dissolution, community disputes, governmental agencies, and business and industry. Though higher education has been slower than society to adopt mediation services, campus mediation is becoming increasingly more common. This article explains why mediation is a viable…

  15. Boric acid-mediated B,N-codoped chitosan-derived porous carbons with a high surface area and greatly improved supercapacitor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zheng; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Mengdi; Fan, Xiaoming; Yu, Chang; Yang, Juan; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-01

    This work reports an efficient strategy to synthesize B,N-codoped porous carbons with a high specific surface area using chitosan as the carbon precursor with the help of boric acid, featuring a high specific capacitance, large operation voltage and excellent cycle stability for supercapacitors.This work reports an efficient strategy to synthesize B,N-codoped porous carbons with a high specific surface area using chitosan as the carbon precursor with the help of boric acid, featuring a high specific capacitance, large operation voltage and excellent cycle stability for supercapacitors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, additional figures and tables see DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00081e

  16. Comparison between the pharmacology of dopamine receptors mediating the inhibition of cell firing in rat brain slices through the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed Central

    Bowery, B.; Rothwell, L. A.; Seabrook, G. R.

    1994-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological recordings were made from presumed dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area of rat brain slices. The ability of selective dopamine receptor agonists to hyperpolarize neurones and inhibit cell firing, as well as the ability of dopamine receptor antagonists to block responses to quinpirole were compared. 2. Six dopamine receptor agonists were examined for their ability to hyperpolarize neurones within the substantia nigra pars compacta. Of these, the most potent ligand tested was naxagolide with an EC50 value of 20 nM and estimated maximum of 10 mV. The rank order of agonist potency was naxagolide > quinpirole > apomorphine > dopamine. 3. Quinpirole was more potent at inhibiting cell firing in the substantia nigra pars compacta (pIC50 = 7.65 +/ 0.06, n = 35) than in the ventral tegmental area (pIC50 = 7.24 +/- 0.06, n = 32; P < 0.01, Student's t test). 7-Hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), a putative D3 selective agonist, had a comparable potency to quinpirole in both the ventral tegmental area (pIC50 = 7.39 +/- 0.26, n = 4), and substantia nigra pars compacta (pIC50 = 7.71 +/- 0.20; n = 4). 4. The inhibition of cell firing by quinpirole was antagonized by haloperidol, S(-)-sulpiride, clozapine, and ritanserin. S(-)-sulpiride and haloperidol had the highest estimated affinities in the substantia nigra, with pA2 values of 8.97 (slope = 0.85) and 8.20 (slope = 2.09) respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921615

  17. Specialized Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Carol; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Six articles discuss librarians as mediators in special circumstances. Highlights include the reference librarian and the information paraprofessional; effective reference mediation for nontraditional public library users, including mentally impaired patrons and illiterate adults; the academic librarian's role in the education process; and…

  18. DECOHERENCE EFFECTS OF MOTION-INDUCED RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    P. NETO; D. DALVIT

    2000-12-01

    The radiation pressure coupling with vacuum fluctuations gives rise to energy damping and decoherence of an oscillating particle. Both effects result from the emission of pairs of photons, a quantum effect related to the fluctuations of the Casimir force. We discuss different alternative methods for the computation of the decoherence time scale. We take the example of a spherical perfectly-reflecting particle, and consider the zero and high temperature limits. We also present short general reviews on decoherence and dynamical Casimir effect.

  19. The representation of nonuniform motion: induced movement.

    PubMed

    Wade, N J; Swanston, M T

    1987-01-01

    Induced motion occurs when there is a misallocation of nonuniform motion. Theories of induced motion are reviewed with respect to the model for uniform motion recently proposed by Swanston, Wade, and Day. Theories based on single processes operating at one of the retinocentric, orbitocentric, egocentric, or geocentric levels are not able to account for all aspects of the phenomenon. It is therefore suggested that induced motion is a consequence of combining two different types of motion signals: one provides information by registering the motion with respect to the retina, orbit, and egocentre; the other provides information only on the relational motions between the pattern elements. Simple rules are given for defining a frame of reference for the relational motion process, which can result in a reallocation of the motion signals. It is proposed that the two signals in combination are weighted differentially, with the greater influence coming from the relational signals. Procedures for determining the weighting factors are described, and predictions from the model are examined. PMID:3330196

  20. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  1. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  2. Examining Rotational Ground Motion Induced by Tornados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Elijah; Dunn, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Ring lasers are well known for their ability to detect rotation and to serve as replacements for mechanical gyroscopes. The sensitivity of large ring lasers to various forms of ground motion is less familiar. Since ring lasers preferentially measure rotational ground motion and a standard seismograph is designed to measure translational and vertical ground motion, each device responds to different aspects of ground movement. Therefore, the two instruments will be used to explore responses to microseisms, earthquake generated shear waves, and in particular tornado generated ground movement. On April 27, 2014 an EF4 tornado devastated Vilonia, AR a small town ~ 21 km from the Hendrix College ring laser. The proximity of the tornado's path to the ring laser interferometer and to a seismograph located in Vilonia provided the opportunity to examine the response of these instruments to tornadic generated ground motion. Our measurements suggest tornadic weather systems can produce both rotational and lateral ground motion. This contention is supported by an after the fact damage survey which found that the tornado flattened a forest in which trees were uprooted and laid down in a pair of converging arcs with the centerline pointed in the direction of the tornado's path.

  3. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly presents the edited…

  4. Mediation from Multilevel to Structural Equation Modeling

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, David P.; Valente, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this article is to outline multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) for mediation analysis of longitudinal data. The introduction of mediating variables can improve experimental and nonexperimental studies of child growth in several ways as discussed throughout this article. Single-mediator individual-level and multilevel mediation models illustrate several current issues in the estimation of mediation with longitudinal data. The strengths of incorporating structural equation modeling (SEM) with multilevel mediation modeling are described. Summary and Key Messages Longitudinal mediation models are pervasive in many areas of research including child growth. Longitudinal mediation models are ideally modeled as repeated measurements clustered within individuals. Further, the combination of MSEM and SEM provides an ideal approach for several reasons, including the ability to assess effects at different levels of analysis, incorporation of measurement error and possible random effects that vary across individuals. PMID:25413658

  5. General, kappa, delta and mu opioid receptor antagonists mediate feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist baclofen in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens shell in rats: reciprocal and regional interactions.

    PubMed

    Miner, Patricia; Shimonova, Lyudmila; Khaimov, Arthur; Borukhova, Yaffa; Ilyayeva, Ester; Ranaldi, Robert; Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-03-14

    Food intake is significantly increased following administration of agonists of GABA and opioid receptors into the nucleus accumbens shell (NACs) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects mu-opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Correspondingly, general or selective opioid receptor antagonist pretreatment within the VTA or NACs differentially affects GABA agonist-induced feeding elicited from the same site. Regional interactions have been evaluated in feeding studies by administering antagonists in one site prior to agonist administration in a second site. Thus, opioid antagonist-opioid agonist and GABA antagonist-GABA agonist feeding interactions have been identified between the VTA and NACs. However, pretreatment with GABA-A or GABA-B receptor antagonists in the VTA failed to affect mu opioid agonist-induced feeding elicited from the NACs, and correspondingly, these antagonists administered in the NACs failed to affect mu opioid-induced feeding elicited from the VTA. To evaluate whether regional and reciprocal VTA and NACs feeding interactions occur for opioid receptor modulation of GABA agonist-mediated feeding, the present study examined whether feeding elicited by the GABA-B agonist, baclofen microinjected into the NACs was dose-dependently blocked by pretreatment with general (naltrexone: NTX), mu (beta-funaltrexamine: BFNA), kappa (nor-binaltorphamine: NBNI) or delta (naltrindole: NTI) opioid antagonists in the VTA, and correspondingly, whether VTA baclofen-induced feeding was dose-dependently blocked by NACs pretreatment with NTX, BFNA, NBNI or NTI in rats. Bilateral pairs of cannulae aimed at the VTA and NACs were stereotaxically implanted in rats, and their food intakes were assessed following vehicle and baclofen (200 ng) in each site. Baclofen produced similar magnitudes of increased food intake following VTA and NACs treatment. Baclofen

  6. Student Mediator's Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Shepherd Neighborhood House, Philadelphia, PA.

    Mediation is a process that enables two or more persons in a dispute to find mutually agreeable solutions to their differences with the aid of a mediator. The mediator does not take sides, but helps the disputants consider their options. Mediation is voluntary, and disputing parties must agree to participate. Furthermore, the mediator does not…

  7. School Mediation Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good Shepherd Neighborhood House, Philadelphia, PA.

    Mediation is a process that enables two or more persons in a dispute to find mutually agreeable solutions to their differences with the aid of a mediator. The mediator does not take sides, but helps the disputants consider their options. Mediation is voluntary, and disputing parties must agree to participate. The mediator does not have the power…

  8. Resolving Problems through Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Examines state variations in use of mediation to resolve domestic relations disputes. Mediation may be optional or mandatory, requested by the parties or the judge. Mediator qualifications vary considerably. Child support is less likely than custody and visitation to be the sole topic for mediation. More states are likely to use mediation in…

  9. Reassessment of area postrema's role in motion sickness and conditioned taste aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Crampton, G. H.; Damelio, F.; Elfar, S.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of classical studies on the role of the area psotrema (AP) in motion-induced emesis it was generally accepted that the AP is an essential structure for the production of vomiting in response to motion. However, in more recent studies it has been demonstrated that vomiting induced by motion can still occur in animals in which the AP has been destroyed bilaterally. It was inferred from some of these more recent studies that the AP plays no role in motion-induced emesis. From the standpoint of the current understanding of central nervous system (CNS) plasticity, redundancy, remodeling, unmasking, regeneration, and recovery of function, however, it is important to realize the limitations of using ablation procedures to determine the functional role of a given neural structure in a highly integrated, adaptable central nervous system (CNS). For example, the results of our recent investigations in cat and squirrel monkey on the role of the AP in emesis and conditioned taste aversion induced by motion indicate that while AP lesions do not prevent motion-induced emesis when animals are tested 30 days or more after surgery, the lesions do change the latency to emesis. Thus, contradictory findings from lesion studies must be evaluated not only in terms of species difference, differences in lesioning techniques and extent of lesions, and in stimulus parameters, but also in terms of duration of the recovery period, during which significant recovery of function may take place. In our judgment, inadequate consideration of the foregoing factors could lead to erroneous inferences about given structure's role in the behavior of the intact, nonablated animal.

  10. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  11. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-27

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ∼1 nm(2) of water-exposed area. PMID:27215821

  12. Causal mediation analysis with a latent mediator.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jeffrey M; Geng, Cuiyu; Nelson, Suchitra

    2016-05-01

    Health researchers are often interested in assessing the direct effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome variable, as well as its indirect (or mediation) effect through an intermediate variable (or mediator). For an outcome following a nonlinear model, the mediation formula may be used to estimate causally interpretable mediation effects. This method, like others, assumes that the mediator is observed. However, as is common in structural equations modeling, we may wish to consider a latent (unobserved) mediator. We follow a potential outcomes framework and assume a generalized structural equations model (GSEM). We provide maximum-likelihood estimation of GSEM parameters using an approximate Monte Carlo EM algorithm, coupled with a mediation formula approach to estimate natural direct and indirect effects. The method relies on an untestable sequential ignorability assumption; we assess robustness to this assumption by adapting a recently proposed method for sensitivity analysis. Simulation studies show good properties of the proposed estimators in plausible scenarios. Our method is applied to a study of the effect of mother education on occurrence of adolescent dental caries, in which we examine possible mediation through latent oral health behavior. PMID:26363769

  13. The importance of mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nastri, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental mediation involving hazardous materials often includes a neutral, third party to assist other groups with resolving disputes or with negotiations. Most often, mediators facilitate discussion and suggest possible resolutions among parties, rather than advise as to what action must be taken to reach an agreement. There is opportunity for all sides to express grievances and frustrations as well as hearing possible solutions to resolve discrepancies. Most often, those involved with mediation attain a sense of confidence, competency, and satisfaction with the mediation process. An honest broker is an example of a third party mediator believed capable of assisting mediation in an unbiased manner. The opposing groups must be confident that an honest broker is credible and will provide his/her services to reach a satisfactory conclusion; therefore, the reputation of the mediator is crucial to the success of the mediation process.

  14. Bayesian Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we propose Bayesian analysis of mediation effects. Compared with conventional frequentist mediation analysis, the Bayesian approach has several advantages. First, it allows researchers to incorporate prior information into the mediation analysis, thus potentially improving the efficiency of estimates. Second, under the Bayesian…

  15. Causal Mediation Analysis with Multiple Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, R M; De Stavola, B L; Cousens, S N; Vansteelandt, S

    2015-01-01

    In diverse fields of empirical research—including many in the biological sciences—attempts are made to decompose the effect of an exposure on an outcome into its effects via a number of different pathways. For example, we may wish to separate the effect of heavy alcohol consumption on systolic blood pressure (SBP) into effects via body mass index (BMI), via gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and via other pathways. Much progress has been made, mainly due to contributions from the field of causal inference, in understanding the precise nature of statistical estimands that capture such intuitive effects, the assumptions under which they can be identified, and statistical methods for doing so. These contributions have focused almost entirely on settings with a single mediator, or a set of mediators considered en bloc; in many applications, however, researchers attempt a much more ambitious decomposition into numerous path-specific effects through many mediators. In this article, we give counterfactual definitions of such path-specific estimands in settings with multiple mediators, when earlier mediators may affect later ones, showing that there are many ways in which decomposition can be done. We discuss the strong assumptions under which the effects are identified, suggesting a sensitivity analysis approach when a particular subset of the assumptions cannot be justified. These ideas are illustrated using data on alcohol consumption, SBP, BMI, and GGT from the Izhevsk Family Study. We aim to bridge the gap from “single mediator theory” to “multiple mediator practice,” highlighting the ambitious nature of this endeavor and giving practical suggestions on how to proceed. PMID:25351114

  16. Six Areas of Teacher Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Teachers Association, Burlingame.

    This is the third edition of the "California definition" of teacher competence, superseding "Measures of a Good Teacher" (1952) and "Teacher Competence: Its Nature and Scope" (1957). It defines the six areas as 1) director of learning, 2) counselor and guidance work, 3) mediator of the culture, 4) link with the community, 5) member of the school…

  17. Area postrema ablations in cats: Evidence for separate neural routes for motion- and xylazine-induced CTA and emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Fox, Robert A.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Crampton, G.; Daunton, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies on the role of the area postrema (AP) in vomiting induced in the cat by motion and drugs have shown that the AP is not essential for motion-induced vomiting, but is necessary for vomiting to apomorphine and xylazine. To confirm these findings and to determine the role of the AP in the formation of Conditioned Taste Aversion (CTA), the AP was ablated bilaterally in 10 adult female cats. With one exception, the ablated cats continued to vomit to the same motion that elicited emesis before the ablation. Doses of xylazine and apomorphine that elicit emesis in intact cats, failed to induce emesis in the ablated cats. Histological examination indicated that 8 cats had complete lesions and 2 had partial lesions. Investigations of effects of AP ablations on CTA revealed that cats with complete lesions did not form CTA to flavored milk paired with xylazine-induced CTA. Seven of the eigth completely lesioned cats developed motion-induced CTA, even though emesis was not consistently elicited by motion. These results suggest that there are multiple routes for inducing CTA and the emetic reflex, that CTA can form without eliciting emesis, and that CTA may be a sensitive measure of sub-emetic motion sickness.

  18. Peer-Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Peter S.

    The concept of peer-mediated instruction (PMI) grew out of the author's earlier research on applying techniques of drill and practice computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to language skills learning. Peer-mediated instruction directs pupils to work in pairs, interacting with one another according to structured pattern of dialogue. This book…

  19. Teaching Mediated Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses approaches to teaching a mediated public relations course, emphasizing the World Wide Web. Outlines five course objectives, assignments and activities, evaluation, texts, and lecture topics. Argues that students mastering these course objectives will understand ethical issues relating to media use, using mediated technology in public…

  20. Guidelines for Good Practice: Technology Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    Technology Mediated Instruction (TMI) is an alternate mode of instructional delivery that provides several benefits. In addition to assisting information transfer through integration of course material, TMI fosters instructor-student interaction through methods such as interactive question-answer areas, video-based office hours, e-mail, and…

  1. Augmented cocaine seeking in response to stress or CRF delivered into the ventral tegmental area following long-access self-administration is mediated by CRF receptor type 1 but not CRF receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Seubert, Chad; Baker, David A; Ferda, Nathan; Lee, Geng; Graf, Evan N; Mantsch, John R

    2011-08-01

    Stressful events are determinants of relapse in recovering cocaine addicts. Excessive cocaine use may increase susceptibility to stressor-induced relapse through alterations in brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) regulation of neurocircuitry involved in drug seeking. We previously reported that the reinstatement of cocaine seeking by a stressor (footshock) is CRF dependent and is augmented in rats that self-administered cocaine under long-access (LgA; 6 h daily) conditions for 14 d when compared with rats provided shorter daily cocaine access [short access (ShA) rats; 2 h daily]. Further, we have demonstrated that reinstatement in response to intracerebroventricular CRF administration is heightened in LgA rats. This study examined the role of altered ventral tegmental area (VTA) responsiveness to CRF in intake-dependent increases in CRF- and stress-induced cocaine seeking. Bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF (250 or 500 ng/side) produced reinstatement in LgA but not ShA rats. In LgA rats, intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement was blocked by administration of the CRF-receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) antagonist antalarmin (500 ng/side) or CP-376395 (500 ng/side), but not the CRF-R2 antagonist astressin-2B (500 ng or 1 μg/side) or antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30; 500 ng/side) into the VTA. Likewise, intra-VTA antalarmin, but not astressin-2B, blocked footshock-induced reinstatement in LgA rats. By contrast, neither intra-VTA antalarmin nor CP-376395 altered food-reinforced lever pressing. Intra-VTA injection of the CRF-R1-selective agonist cortagine (100 ng/side) but not the CRF-R2-selective agonist rat urocortin II (rUCN II; 250 ng/side) produced reinstatement. These findings reveal that excessive cocaine use increases susceptibility to stressor-induced relapse in part by augmenting CRF-R1-dependent regulation of addiction-related neurocircuitry in the VTA. PMID:21813699

  2. Generalized Causal Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Nelson, Suchitra

    2010-01-01

    Summary The goal of mediation analysis is to assess direct and indirect effects of a treatment or exposure on an outcome. More generally, we may be interested in the context of a causal model as characterized by a directed acyclic graph (DAG), where mediation via a specific path from exposure to outcome may involve an arbitrary number of links (or ‘stages’). Methods for estimating mediation (or pathway) effects are available for a continuous outcome and a continuous mediator related via a linear model, while for a categorical outcome or categorical mediator, methods are usually limited to two-stage mediation. We present a method applicable to multiple stages of mediation and mixed variable types using generalized linear models. We define pathway effects using a potential outcomes framework and present a general formula that provides the effect of exposure through any specified pathway. Some pathway effects are nonidentifiable and their estimation requires an assumption regarding the correlation between counterfactuals. We provide a sensitivity analysis to assess of the impact of this assumption. Confidence intervals for pathway effect estimates are obtained via a bootstrap method. The method is applied to a cohort study of dental caries in very low birth weight adolescents. A simulation study demonstrates low bias of pathway effect estimators and close-to-nominal coverage rates of confidence intervals. We also find low sensitivity to the counterfactual correlation in most scenarios. PMID:21306353

  3. [Mediation in health].

    PubMed

    Decastello, Alice

    2008-02-10

    The author presents mediation as an alternative dispute resolution method. Mediation is a process where the parties are ready to settle their dispute out of court, by way of negotiation and with the involvement of an independent third person as mediator. In the mediation process the mediator shall not decide the dispute, nor examine the default or give legal advice or express his/her opinion - the mediator's duty is to help the parties bring their positions closer and come to a settlement agreement within a short time (120 days). The author gives a summary of the applications of the Hungarian Act on Mediation in Public Health and draws conclusions from the practical experience since entry into force of the legislation and illustrates the advantages of mediation over the court procedure (which may drag on for years). The primary advantages of mediation are that both the mediators and the parties are bound by the obligation of secrecy, the procedure is cheaper than the court proceedings, and the parties can "save their faces" because in mediation the winner-winner formula asserts itself - against lawsuits where the winner-loser positions are confronted. The author also analyses the specific data and information available so far. As for the future, the legislation needs to be amended at several points. It is particularly expedient to regulate the legal relationship between the insurance companies and the health service providers because the liability insurance may not cover the damages the courts adjudicate. And so some of the service providers may go bankrupt as the difference in excess of the upper limit of coverage - it might as well be up to HUF 5 million per case - shall be paid from own budget, to the charge of the upkeep costs. It is also required to review and amend the regulations on expert activities, just as it is inevitable to make data supply compulsory - otherwise it will be impossible to monitor the number of mediation procedures in health. At present

  4. [Interleukin-1-mediated diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzinger, D; Becker, H; Jacobi, A M

    2013-04-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1)-mediated diseases are caused by an inappropriately high production and release of IL-1 beta which results in a multitude of symptoms, e.g. arthritis, exanthema, conjunctivitis, serositis, fever and loss of hearing. If IL-1-mediated diseases remain unrecognized or are recognized and treated too late, long-term complications, such as amyloidosis may occur. In recent years the diagnostic and therapeutic options with respect to IL-1-mediated diseases have drastically improved. These diseases often manifesting in childhood can now be treated with monoclonal antibodies against IL-1 or with IL-1 receptor antagonists. Increased IL-1 secretion does not only play a role in relatively rare hereditary diseases, such as cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes or familial Mediterranean fever but also in widespread diseases, such as gout or type 2 diabetes. This article will focus on pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of IL-1-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23460390

  5. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO₃ single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO₃ at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  6. Stellar motion induced by gravitational instabilities in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, R. H.

    2010-07-01

    We test the effect of assumptions about stellar motion on the behaviour of gravitational instabilities (GIs) in protoplanetary discs around solar-type stars by performing two simulations that are identical in all respects except the treatment of the star. In one simulation, the star is assumed to remain fixed at the centre of the inertial reference frame. In the other, stellar motion is handled properly by including an indirect potential in the hydrodynamic equations to model the star's reference frame as one which is accelerated by star/disc interactions. The discs in both simulations orbit a solar mass star, initially extend from 2.3 to 40 au with a ϖ-1/2 surface density profile, and have a total mass of 0.14 Msolar. The γ = 5/3 ideal gas is assumed to cool everywhere with a constant cooling time of two outer rotation periods. The overall behaviour of the disc evolution is similar, except for weakening in various measures of GI activity by about at most tens of per cent for the indirect potential case. Overall conclusions about disc evolution in earlier papers by our group, where the star was always assumed to be fixed in an inertial frame, remain valid. There is no evidence for independent one-armed instabilities, like the Stimulation by the Long-range Interaction of Newtonian Gravity (SLING), in either simulation. On the other hand, the stellar motion about the system centre of mass (COM) in the simulation with the indirect potential is substantial, up to 0.25 au during the burst phase, as GIs initiate, and averaging about 0.9 au during the asymptotic phase, when the GIs reach an overall balance of heating and cooling. These motions appear to be a stellar response to non-linear interactions between discrete global spiral modes in both the burst and asymptotic phases of the evolution, and the star's orbital motion about the COM reflects the orbit periods of disc material near the corotation radii of the dominant spiral waves. This motion is, in principle, large enough to be observable and could be confused with stellar wobble due to the presence of one or more super-Jupiter mass protoplanets orbiting at 10's au. We discuss why the excursions in our simulation are so much larger than those seen in simulations by Rice et al.

  7. Slowdown of Interhelical Motions Induces a Glass Transition in RNA

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Aaron T.; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    RNA function depends crucially on the details of its dynamics. The simplest RNA dynamical unit is a two-way interhelical junction. Here, for such a unit—the transactivation response RNA element—we present evidence from molecular dynamics simulations, supported by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments, for a dynamical transition near 230 K. This glass transition arises from the freezing out of collective interhelical motional modes. The motions, resolved with site-specificity, are dynamically heterogeneous and exhibit non-Arrhenius relaxation. The microscopic origin of the glass transition is a low-dimensional, slow manifold consisting largely of the Euler angles describing interhelical reorientation. Principal component analysis over a range of temperatures covering the glass transition shows that the abrupt slowdown of motion finds its explanation in a localization transition that traps probability density into several disconnected conformational pools over the low-dimensional energy landscape. Upon temperature increase, the probability density pools then flood a larger basin, akin to a lakes-to-sea transition. Simulations on transactivation response RNA are also used to backcalculate inelastic neutron scattering data that match previous inelastic neutron scattering measurements on larger and more complex RNA structures and which, upon normalization, give temperature-dependent fluctuation profiles that overlap onto a glass transition curve that is quasi-universal over a range of systems and techniques. PMID:26083927

  8. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  9. Elastic image registration via rigid object motion induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofen; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Hirsch, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we estimate the deformations induced on soft tissues by the rigid independent movements of hard objects and create an admixture of rigid and elastic adaptive image registration transformations. By automatically segmenting and independently estimating the movement of rigid objects in 3D images, we can maintain rigidity in bones and hard tissues while appropriately deforming soft tissues. We tested our algorithms on 20 pairs of 3D MRI datasets pertaining to a kinematic study of the flexibility of the ankle complex of normal feet as well as ankles affected by abnormalities in foot architecture and ligament injuries. The results show that elastic image registration via rigid object-induced deformation outperforms purely rigid and purely nonrigid approaches.

  10. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin's motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force. PMID:21797399

  11. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin’s motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force.

  12. Slowdown of Interhelical Motions Induces a Glass Transition in RNA.

    PubMed

    Frank, Aaron T; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2015-06-16

    RNA function depends crucially on the details of its dynamics. The simplest RNA dynamical unit is a two-way interhelical junction. Here, for such a unit--the transactivation response RNA element--we present evidence from molecular dynamics simulations, supported by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments, for a dynamical transition near 230 K. This glass transition arises from the freezing out of collective interhelical motional modes. The motions, resolved with site-specificity, are dynamically heterogeneous and exhibit non-Arrhenius relaxation. The microscopic origin of the glass transition is a low-dimensional, slow manifold consisting largely of the Euler angles describing interhelical reorientation. Principal component analysis over a range of temperatures covering the glass transition shows that the abrupt slowdown of motion finds its explanation in a localization transition that traps probability density into several disconnected conformational pools over the low-dimensional energy landscape. Upon temperature increase, the probability density pools then flood a larger basin, akin to a lakes-to-sea transition. Simulations on transactivation response RNA are also used to backcalculate inelastic neutron scattering data that match previous inelastic neutron scattering measurements on larger and more complex RNA structures and which, upon normalization, give temperature-dependent fluctuation profiles that overlap onto a glass transition curve that is quasi-universal over a range of systems and techniques. PMID:26083927

  13. Synchronized Intermittent Motion Induced by the Interaction between Camphor Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Nobuhiko J.; Tateno, Kurina; Nakata, Satoshi; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2015-03-01

    A new mode of collective motion was discovered in a system of camphor disks floating on the water surface in a circular chamber. The mode was induced by tuning the number of the disks. A single or few disks are known to continuously move on the water surface. Conversely, when many disks are present, motion comes to a stop and the disks form ordered spatial patterns by repulsive interaction. Here we found the third mode that emerged at an intermediate disk number, in which inactive and active motion phases alternated non-periodically. This new mode exhibited synchronization as the disk number increased.

  14. Ferroelectric domain wall motion induced by polarized light

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Del Campo, Adolfo; Marchet, Pascal; Fernández, Jose F.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials exhibit spontaneous and stable polarization, which can usually be reoriented by an applied external electric field. The electrically switchable nature of this polarization is at the core of various ferroelectric devices. The motion of the associated domain walls provides the basis for ferroelectric memory, in which the storage of data bits is achieved by driving domain walls that separate regions with different polarization directions. Here we show the surprising ability to move ferroelectric domain walls of a BaTiO3 single crystal by varying the polarization angle of a coherent light source. This unexpected coupling between polarized light and ferroelectric polarization modifies the stress induced in the BaTiO3 at the domain wall, which is observed using in situ confocal Raman spectroscopy. This effect potentially leads to the non-contact remote control of ferroelectric domain walls by light. PMID:25779918

  15. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  16. Metadata based mediator generation

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T

    1998-03-01

    Mediators are a critical component of any data warehouse, particularly one utilizing partially materialized views; they transform data from its source format to the warehouse representation while resolving semantic and syntactic conflicts. The close relationship between mediators and databases, requires a mediator to be updated whenever an associated schema is modified. This maintenance may be a significant undertaking if a warehouse integrates several dynamic data sources. However, failure to quickly perform these updates significantly reduces the reliability of the warehouse because queries do not have access to the m current data. This may result in incorrect or misleading responses, and reduce user confidence in the warehouse. This paper describes a metadata framework, and associated software designed to automate a significant portion of the mediator generation task and thereby reduce the effort involved in adapting the schema changes. By allowing the DBA to concentrate on identifying the modifications at a high level, instead of reprogramming the mediator, turnaround time is reduced and warehouse reliability is improved.

  17. [Immune-mediated neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Reiners, K

    2016-08-01

    The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) are the most common immune-mediated polyneuropathies, which can show variable clinical and electrophysiological manifestations. Rarer immune-mediated neuropathies encompass paraproteinemic neuropathies (PPN), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and vasculitic neuropathies. The diagnosis usually relies on the history of symptom evolution, distribution of nerve dysfunction and particularly on characteristic features in nerve conduction studies, aided by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy findings. The therapeutic toolbox encompasses corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis often accompanied by long-term immunosuppression. It is important to note that immune-mediated neuropathies selectively respond to treatment and contraindications need to be considered. Despite treatment a considerable number of patients suffer from permanent neurological deficits. PMID:27474733

  18. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  19. Immunologically Mediated Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Smith, Sallie; Akdal, Gulden; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Although most dementias are due to neurodegenerative or vascular disease, it is important to diagnose immunologically mediated dementias quickly because they can be both rapidly progressive and readily treatable. They usually affect function of limbic and cortical structures, but subcortical involvement can also occur. Because of the variety of symptoms and the rapid course, these dementias present a particular challenge to the clinician and may require evaluation and intervention in the inpatient setting. Diagnostic workup typically reveals evidence of an autoimmune process and, in some cases, cancer. In contrast to the neurodegenerative processes, many of the immunologically mediated dementias respond to immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:19664365

  20. Mediator-nucleosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Y; Beve, J; Gustafsson, C M; Myers, L C; Kornberg, R D

    2000-07-01

    Mediator, a multiprotein complex involved in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription, binds to nucleosomes and acetylates histones. Three lines of evidence identify the Nut1 subunit of Mediator as responsible for the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. An "in-gel" HAT assay reveals a single band of the appropriate size. Sequence alignment shows significant similarity of Nut1 to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Finally, recombinant Nut1 exhibits HAT activity in an in-gel assay. PMID:10949041

  1. Hypercharged anomaly mediation.

    PubMed

    Dermísek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2008-04-01

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio alpha between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or = |alpha| < or = 0.25 and m(3/2) > or = 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario. PMID:18517937

  2. Carrier-mediated electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steven P; Fyles, Thomas M

    2011-06-14

    Supported liquid membranes containing valinomycin or a calix[4]arene carrier can support electrodialysis under an imposed transmembrane potential. Under optimal conditions both transmembrane flux and carrier-based cation selectivity are enhanced relative to simple dialysis mediated by the same carriers. PMID:21308126

  3. Phenomenologically Investigating Mediated "Nature"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tony E.

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2001 I worked as a bartender in Wyoming, two miles east of Yellowstone National Park. This opportunity provided me with unique experiences of "the wilderness" and as a result, allowed me to become aware of intricacies of living within a primarily simulated and mass mediated culture, i.e., the United States. Following tenets of…

  4. Bradykinin-mediated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Krystyna

    2016-02-01

    Angioedema and urticaria often constitute a challenge in daily clinical practice. They may either co- -occur or present as independent conditions. They are characterized by a complex pathomechanism, and their symptoms may be triggered by diverse factors. These differences are crucial for developing a successful treatment regimen. Both conditions may have an allergic origin (immunoglobulin [Ig] E and non-IgE-related), usually induced by histamine, or a nonallergic one, such as bradykinin-mediated angioedema in patients with C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency or angioedema induced by certain drugs (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). Currently, we distinguish 5 types of nonallergic angioedema: hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-INH deficiency, acquired angioedema (AAE), and angioedema induced by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, all of which are mediated by bradykinin, as well as pseudoallergic angioedema and idiopathic angioedema. Bradykinin-mediated angioedema (eg, laryngeal angioedema) may be life-threatening because of resistance to corticosteroids and antihistamine drugs. C1-INH concentrates are the drugs of choice in the treatment of HAE and AAE. In recent years, some new drugs have been introduced in the treatment of bradykinin-mediated angioedema, such as bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, icatibant, and kallikrein inhibitor, ecallantide, which allow to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:26842379

  5. Computer-Mediated Collaboration to Reduce Isolation for Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Rural secondary content area teachers have little opportunity to discuss issues with similar content area teachers. Professional isolation can impact teacher satisfaction and ultimately affect rural student achievement. The purpose of this study was to investigate computer-mediated collaboration as a means of reducing isolation for rural teachers.…

  6. Axionic mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shuntaro; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Although mirage mediation is one of the most plausible mediation mechanisms of supersymmetry breaking, it suffers from two crucial problems. One is the {mu}/B{mu} problem, and the second is the cosmological one. The former stems from the fact that the B parameter tends to be comparable with the gravitino mass, which is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the other soft masses. The latter problem is caused by the decay of the modulus whose branching ratio into the gravitino pair is sizable. In this paper, we propose a model of mirage mediation, in which Peccei-Quinn symmetry is incorporated. In this axionic mirage mediation, it is shown that the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale is dynamically determined around 10{sup 10} GeV to 10{sup 12} GeV due to the supersymmetry breaking effects, and the {mu} problem can be solved naturally. Furthermore, in our model, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is the axino, that is, the superpartner of the axion. The overabundance of the LSPs due to decays of the modulus/gravitino, which is the most serious cosmological difficulty in the mirage mediation, can be avoided if the axino is sufficiently light. The next-LSPs (NLSPs) produced by the gravitino decay eventually decay into the axino LSPs, yielding the dominant component of the axinos remaining today. It is shown that the axino with a mass of O(100) MeV is naturally realized, which can constitute the dark matter of the Universe, with a free-streaming length of the order of 0.1 Mpc. The saxion, the real scalar component of the axion supermultiplet, can also be cosmologically harmless due to the dilution of the modulus decay. The lifetime of the NLSP is relatively long, but much shorter than 1 sec, when the big-bang nucleosynthesis commences. The decay of the NLSP would provide intriguing collider signatures.

  7. Mediation analysis with multiple versions of the mediator

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2013-01-01

    The causal inference literature has provided definitions of direct and indirect effects based on counterfactuals that generalize the approach found in the social science literature. However, these definitions presuppose well defined hypothetical interventions on the mediator. In many settings there may be multiple ways to fix the mediator to a particular value and these different hypothetical interventions may have very different implications for the outcome of interest. In this paper we consider mediation analysis when multiple versions of the mediator are present. Specifically, we consider the problem of attempting to decompose a total effect of an exposure on an outcome into the portion through the intermediate and the portion through other pathways. We consider the setting in which there are multiple versions of the mediator but the investigator only has access to data on the particular measurement, not which version of the mediator may have brought that value about. We show that the quantity that is estimated as a natural indirect effect using only the available data does indeed have an interpretation as a particular type of mediated effect; however, the quantity estimated as a natural direct effect in fact captures both a true direct effect and an effect of the exposure on the outcome mediated through the effect of the version of the mediator that is not captured by the mediator measurement. The results are illustrated using two examples from the literature, one in which the versions of the mediator are unknown and another in which the mediator itself has been dichotomized. PMID:22475830

  8. [Anorexia and corporal mediations].

    PubMed

    Bureau, Hélène; Moro, Marie Rose

    2013-01-01

    The body, the central point of expression of the anorexic symptom, is an important therapeutic lever.The young anorexic girl protects herself through corporal hypertonicity. This tension is consistent with her fears of seeing her body becoming that of an adult and to feel emotions and sensations with too much force. Corporal mediation consists in helping the young girls get to grips with this body. PMID:23923454

  9. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  10. An Alternative Framework for Defining Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda M.; Graham, John W.; Flaherty, Brian P.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an alternative framework for evaluating mediated relationships. The distinguishing feature of mediation is that mediation involves a chain reaction. The definition presented emphasizes the intra-individual, time-ordered nature of mediation. (SLD)

  11. Merlin Mediation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-16

    Merlin Mediation System (a.k.a., Merlin) is a set of reusable software components that provide seamless integration of information contained in multiple, heterogeneous data sources located across many computers. These software components utilize a combination of mediator and expert system technologies to provide intelligence for understanding and integrating data. Merlin provides a virtual database independent of operating systems, platforms, and user applications. Merlin in an implementation of "intelligent middleware" that solves data access and integration issues.more » Merlin resides between user applications and their independent data sources. a user application may be invoked via a Web browser or reside on an individual's workstation. The data sources can reside on multiple separate heterogeneous computer polatforms and may be recorded in a variety of formats (e.g., relational databases, flat files, object-oriented databases). Merlin creates a "virtual object database" so that the user application sees the data retrieved from the various sources as though it wre returned from a single, integrated database. In addition, Merlin provides advanced data instance integration capabilities such as object unification and fusion, abstraction, aggregation, and data and schema translations. It is important to note that Merlin is not bound to any single user application nor to any specific data source. Merlin's software components utilize a combination of mediator and expert system technologies to assure their adaptability for use by various disciplines. These software components accept domain-specific details (e.g., schema, mappings, expert system rules) as data from a "knowledge base". This enables the same software to be used for a variety of domains and user applications with no source code modifications or recompilations required.« less

  12. Immunologically mediated abortion (IMA).

    PubMed

    Giacomucci, E; Bulletti, C; Polli, V; Prefetto, R A; Flamigni, C

    1994-06-01

    Roughly 20% of all clinical pregnancies evolve into "spontaneous abortions". The causes of spontaneous abortion have been determined in under 60% of the total and comprise genetic, infectious, hormonal and immunological factors. In some cases the immune tolerance mechanism may be impaired and the foetus immunologically rejected (IMA, immunologically mediated abortion). The immunological mechanism implicated depends on the time in which pregnancy loss takes place. During preimplantation and up to the end of implantation (13th day) the cell-mediated immune mechanism (potential alloimmune etiologies) is responsible for early abortion. This mechanism involves immunocompetent decidual cells (eGL, endometrial granulated lymphocytes) already present during pre-decidualization (late luteal phase) and their production of soluble factors or cytokines. Once the implantation process is over, after blastocyst penetration of the stroma and the decidual reaction of uterine tissue, IMA could be caused by cell-mediated and humoral mechanism (anti-paternal cytotoxic antibodies or autoantibody etiology), by the production of paternal anti major histocompatibility complex antibodies, or even by an autoimmune disorder leading to the production of autoantibodies (antiphospholipid antibodies, antinuclear antibodies or polyclonal B cell activation). The diagnostic work-up adopted to select IMA patients is crucial and includes primary (karyotype of both partners, toxo-test, hysterosalpingography, endometrial biopsy, thyroid function tests, serum hprolactin, luteal phase dating) and secondary (full hemochromocytometric test, search for LE cells, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, antinuclear antibodies, Rheumatoid factor, blood complement VDRL) investigations. Therapeutical approaches vary. If autoimmune disorders are demonstrated therapies with different combinations of corticosteroids, aspirin and heparin or intravenous immunoglobulin are administered. Otherwise, therapy with paternal

  13. Ferrofluid mediated nanocytometry.

    PubMed

    Kose, Ayse Rezzan; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We present a low-cost, flow-through nanocytometer that utilizes a colloidal suspension of non-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for label-free manipulation and separation of microparticles. Our size-based separation is mediated by angular momentum transfer from magnetically excited ferrofluid particles to microparticles. The nanocytometer is capable of rapidly sorting and focusing two or more species, with up to 99% separation efficiency and a throughput of 3 × 10(4) particles/s per mm(2) of channel cross-section. The device is readily scalable and applicable to live cell sorting with biocompatible ferrofluids, offering competitive cytometer performance in a simple and inexpensive package. PMID:22076536

  14. Molecular Mediators of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ucuzian, Areck A.; Gassman, Andrew A.; East, Andrea T.; Greisler, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels from the preexisting vasculature, is a key component in numerous physiologic and pathologic responses and has broad impact in many medical and surgical specialties. In this review, we discuss the key cellular steps which lead to the neovascularization of tissues, and highlight the main molecular mechanisms and mediators in this process. We include discussions on proteolytic enzymes, cell/matrix interactions, pertinent cell signaling pathways, and end with a survey of the mechanisms which lead to the stabilization and maturation of neovasculatures. PMID:20061852

  15. Holographic Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Benini, Francesco; Dymarsky, Anatoly; Franco, Sebastian; Kachru, Shamit; Simic, Dusan; Verlinde, Herman; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2009-06-19

    We discuss gravitational backgrounds where supersymmetry is broken at the end of a warped throat, and the SUSY-breaking is transmitted to the Standard Model via gauginos which live in (part of) the bulk of the throat geometry. We find that the leading effect arises from splittings of certain 'messenger mesons,' which are adjoint KK-modes of the D-branes supporting the Standard Model gauge group. This picture is a gravity dual of a strongly coupled field theory where SUSY is broken in a hidden sector and transmitted to the Standard Model via a relative of semi-direct gauge mediation.

  16. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  17. Magnetically mediated thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaohua; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, alternating magnetic field is explored for inducing thermoacoustic effect on dielectric objects. Termed as magnetically mediated thermo-acoustic (MMTA) effect that provides a contrast in conductivity, this approach employs magnetic resonance for delivering energy to a desired location by applying a large transient current at radio frequency below 50MHz to a compact magnetically resonant coil. The alternating magnetic field induces large electric field inside conductive objects, which then undergoes joule heating and emanates acoustic signal thermo-elastically. The magnetic mediation approach with low radio frequency can potentially provide deeper penetration than microwave radiation due to the non-magnetic nature of human body and therefore extend thermoacoustic imaging to deep laid organs. Both incoherent time domain method that applies a pulsed radio frequency current and coherent frequency domain approach that employs a linear chirp signal to modulate the envelop of the current are discussed. Owing to the coherent processing nature, the latter approach is capable of achieving much better signal to noise ratio and therefore potential for portable imaging system. Phantom experiments are carried out to demonstrate the signal generation together with some preliminary imaging results. Ex-vivo tissue studies are also investigated.

  18. Interpreter-mediated dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Susan; Drew, Paul; Zayts, Olga; McGrath, Colman; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wong, H M; Au, T K F

    2015-05-01

    The global movements of healthcare professionals and patient populations have increased the complexities of medical interactions at the point of service. This study examines interpreter mediated talk in cross-cultural general dentistry in Hong Kong where assisting para-professionals, in this case bilingual or multilingual Dental Surgery Assistants (DSAs), perform the dual capabilities of clinical assistant and interpreter. An initial language use survey was conducted with Polyclinic DSAs (n = 41) using a logbook approach to provide self-report data on language use in clinics. Frequencies of mean scores using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) indicated that the majority of DSAs spoke mainly Cantonese in clinics and interpreted for postgraduates and professors. Conversation Analysis (CA) examined recipient design across a corpus (n = 23) of video-recorded review consultations between non-Cantonese speaking expatriate dentists and their Cantonese L1 patients. Three patterns of mediated interpreting indicated were: dentist designated expansions; dentist initiated interpretations; and assistant initiated interpretations to both the dentist and patient. The third, rather than being perceived as negative, was found to be framed either in response to patient difficulties or within the specific task routines of general dentistry. The findings illustrate trends in dentistry towards personalized care and patient empowerment as a reaction to product delivery approaches to patient management. Implications are indicated for both treatment adherence and the education of dental professionals. PMID:25828074

  19. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use. PMID:22080073

  20. Hexokinase mediates stomatal closure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gilor; Moshelion, Menachem; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Halperin, Ofer; Wallach, Rony; Attia, Ziv; Belausov, Eduard; Granot, David

    2013-09-01

    Stomata, composed of two guard cells, are the gates whose controlled movement allows the plant to balance the demand for CO2 for photosynthesis with the loss of water through transpiration. Increased guard-cell osmolarity leads to the opening of the stomata and decreased osmolarity causes the stomata to close. The role of sugars in the regulation of stomata is not yet clear. In this study, we examined the role of hexokinase (HXK), a sugar-phosphorylating enzyme involved in sugar-sensing, in guard cells and its effect on stomatal aperture. We show here that increased expression of HXK in guard cells accelerates stomatal closure. We further show that this closure is induced by sugar and is mediated by abscisic acid. These findings support the existence of a feedback-inhibition mechanism that is mediated by a product of photosynthesis, namely sucrose. When the rate of sucrose production exceeds the rate at which sucrose is loaded into the phloem, the surplus sucrose is carried toward the stomata by the transpiration stream and stimulates stomatal closure via HXK, thereby preventing the loss of precious water. PMID:23738737

  1. Protein mediated membrane adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    Adhesion in the context of mechanical attachment, signaling, and movement in cellular dynamics is mediated by the kinetic interactions between membrane-embedded proteins in an aqueous environment. Here, we present a minimal theoretical framework for the dynamics of membrane adhesion that accounts for the kinetics of protein binding, the elastic deformation of the membrane, and the hydrodynamics of squeeze flow in the membrane gap. We analyze the resulting equations using scaling estimates to characterize the spatiotemporal features of the adhesive patterning and corroborate them using numerical simulations. In addition to characterizing aspects of cellular dynamics, our results might also be applicable to a range of phenomena in physical chemistry and materials science where flow, deformation, and kinetics are coupled to each other in slender geometries.

  2. Symbiont-mediated protection

    PubMed Central

    Haine, Eleanor R

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that all vertically transmitted symbionts sequester resources from their hosts and are therefore costly to maintain, there is an extraordinary diversity of them in invertebrates. Some spread through host populations by providing their hosts with fitness benefits or by manipulating host sex ratio, but some do not: their maintenance in host lineages remains an enigma. In this review, I explore the evolutionary ecology of vertically transmitted symbionts and their impact on host resistance, and provide an overview of the evidence for the three-way interactions between these symbionts, natural enemies and invertebrate hosts. A number of recent empirical and theoretical studies suggest that vertically transmitted symbionts may protect their hosts from pathogens. If this ‘symbiont-mediated protection’ is widespread, it is likely that vertically transmitted symbionts contribute significantly to variation in measures of invertebrate resistance to natural enemies. PMID:18055391

  3. Colistin-mediated neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer; Tran, Betty

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 51-year-old man who developed renal and neural toxicity after the administration of colistin. He developed respiratory apnoea, neuromuscular blockade and severe comatose encephalopathy with the lack of brainstem reflexes. After discontinuation of the antibiotic, he made a prompt recovery to his baseline neurological function. The case illustrates the importance of recognising the toxicities associated with colistin. Although recent literature details its nephrotoxicity, current data have been discordant with the rare cases of respiratory apnoea or neuromuscular blockade once cited over 30 years ago. Additionally, no cases have ever described the profound encephalopathy with lack of brainstem function described here. The awareness of colistin's potentially fatal effects must be kept in mind when administering this antibiotic. Vigilance of the encephalopathic picture can also facilitate the diagnosis of colistin-mediated neurotoxicity in a patient with altered mental status of otherwise unknown aetiology. PMID:25199193

  4. Microbially mediated phosphine emission.

    PubMed

    Roels, Joris; Huyghe, Gwen; Verstraete, Willy

    2005-02-15

    There is still a lot of controversy in literature concerning the question whether a biochemical system exists enabling micro-organisms to reduce phosphate to phosphine gas. The search for so-called 'de novo synthesised' phosphine is complicated by the fact that soils, slurries, sludges, etc., which are often used as inocula, usually contain matrix bound phosphine (MBP). Matrix bound phosphine is a general term used to indicate non-gaseous reduced phosphorus compounds that are transformed into phosphine gas upon reaction with bases or acids. A study was carried out to compare the different digestion methods, used to transform matrix bound phosphine into phosphine gas. It was demonstrated that caustic and acidic digestion methods should be used to measure the matrix bound phosphine of the inoculum prior to inoculation to avoid false positive results concerning de novo synthesis. This is especially true if anthropogenically influenced inocula possibly containing minute steel or aluminium particles are used. The comparative study on different digestion methods also revealed that the fraction of phosphorus in mild steel, converted to phosphine during acid corrosion depended on the temperature. Following these preliminary studies, anaerobic growth experiments were set up using different inocula and media to study the emission of phosphine gas. Phosphine was detected in the headspace gases and its quantity and timeframe of emission depended on the medium composition, suggesting microbially mediated formation of the gas. The amount of phosphine emitted during the growth experiments never exceeded the bound phosphine present in inocula, prior to inoculation. Hence, de novo synthesis of phosphine from phosphate could not be demonstrated. Yet, microbially mediated conversion to phosphine of hitherto unknown reduced phosphorus compounds in the inoculum was evidenced. PMID:15713333

  5. Mediation and managed care.

    PubMed

    Dubler, N N

    1998-03-01

    Managed care has not only intensified existing conflicts between patient and provider, it has, by its very nature, changed the shape and scope of the healthcare enterprise and introduced an entirely new set of disputes. The decision-making dynamics have been altered, and the cast of players has expanded. Traditionally, the therapeutic interaction took place between the physician and the patient although it occasionally included the patient's family. Whatever obligations existed, such as fidelity, confidentiality, and standard of care, they bound only those parties. Now, as the managed care organization has interposed itself between the patient and the physician, the dyad has become a triad. The power balance has shifted, and a new set of rights and responsibilities now flows between and among the players, each of whom has interests that may or may not coincide. This article argues that, because of its cost containment origins and orientation, managed care increases the likelihood that misunderstandings, disagreements and disputes will develop into full-blown conflicts. If managed care is to succeed financially and operate with integrity, it must develop techniques for managing the increasing conflicts that arise inevitably between and among the organizations, physicians, and patients. It is clear that the voice of the patient needs to be strengthened within the new complex decision-making, review, and appeal procedures. Mediation is the most appropriate method of dispute resolution for the managed care setting because it balances the disparities in power endemic to the bureaucratization of medicine and refocuses the interests of the various parties. Using bioethics consultation as a model for dispute mediation provides a set of principles and guideline tasks that can be applied effectively to managed care. PMID:9514387

  6. Natural supersymmetric spectrum in mirage mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masaki; Higaki, Tetsutaro

    2012-08-01

    The current results of LHC experiments exclude a large area of the light new particle region, namely, natural parameter space, in supersymmetric extension models. One of the possibilities for achieving the correct electroweak symmetry breaking naturally is the low-scale messenger scenario. Actually, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model with TeV scale mirage mediation realizes the natural electroweak symmetry breaking with various mass spectra. In this paper, we show the possible mass spectrum in the scenario, e.g., the degenerate and/or hierarchical mass spectrum, and discuss these features.

  7. Moral Functioning as Mediated Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tappan, Mark B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that it is quite useful, both theoretically and empirically, to adopt a socio-cultural approach to the study of moral development. This entails viewing "moral functioning" as a form of mediated action, and moral development as the process by which persons gradually appropriate a variety of "moral mediational means". Mediated…

  8. 29 CFR 1203.1 - Mediation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mediation services. 1203.1 Section 1203.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD APPLICATIONS FOR SERVICE § 1203.1 Mediation services. Applications for the mediation services of the National Mediation Board under section 5, First, of the...

  9. 22 CFR 143.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 143.33 Section 143.33 Foreign... Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The agency will refer to the Federal Mediation and... participate in the mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or make an...

  10. 29 CFR 1202.1 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 1202.1 Section 1202.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD RULES OF PROCEDURE § 1202.1 Mediation. The mediation..., or where conferences are refused. The National Mediation Board may proffer its services in case...

  11. 29 CFR 1203.1 - Mediation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation services. 1203.1 Section 1203.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD APPLICATIONS FOR SERVICE § 1203.1 Mediation services. Applications for the mediation services of the National Mediation Board under section 5, First, of the...

  12. 32 CFR 776.38 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 776.38 Section 776.38 National... Professional Conduct § 776.38 Mediation. (a) Mediation: (1) A covered attorney may act as a mediator between... mediation, including the advantages and risks involved, and the effect on the...

  13. 29 CFR 35.32 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mediation. (a) Referral to mediation. CRC will promptly refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service or the mediation agency designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services under 45 CFR part... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mediation. 35.32 Section 35.32 Labor Office of the...

  14. 34 CFR 81.13 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 81.13 Section 81.13 Education Office of the... Mediation. (a) Voluntary mediation is available for proceedings that are pending before the OALJ. (b) A... mediation by filing a motion with the ALJ assigned to the case. The OALJ arranges for a mediator if...

  15. 24 CFR 3288.35 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 3288.35 Section 3288.35...-Administered States § 3288.35 Mediation. (a) Mediator. The dispute resolution provider will provide for the... identifies any other party that should be included in the mediation, the mediator will contact the...

  16. 29 CFR 1203.1 - Mediation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mediation services. 1203.1 Section 1203.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD APPLICATIONS FOR SERVICE § 1203.1 Mediation services. Applications for the mediation services of the National Mediation Board under section 5, First, of the...

  17. Gold-Mediated Exfoliation of Ultralarge Optoelectronically-Perfect Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sujay B; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Amani, Matin; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hettick, Mark; Tosun, Mahmut; Zhou, Yuzhi; Dubey, Madan; Ager, Joel W; Chrzan, Daryl; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Gold-mediated exfoliation of ultralarge optoelectronically perfect monolayers with lateral dimensions up to ≈500 μm is reported. Electrical, optical, and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy characterization show that the quality of the gold-exfoliated flakes is similar to that of tape-exfoliated flakes. Large-area flakes allow manufacturing of large-area mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenide electronics. PMID:27007751

  18. Implementing Computer Mediated Communication in the College Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay-Warner, Jody; Marsh, Kristin

    2000-01-01

    Examines the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in the college classroom using survey data from 89 undergraduate sociology students. Discusses advantages and disadvantages of conferencing systems, either through local area networks or Internet-based systems; preferred uses of CMC; and results of regression analyses. (Author/LRW)

  19. Computer-Mediated Negotiated Interaction and Lexical Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a paired-groups experimental study, which tests the Interaction Hypothesis in a computer-mediated communicative environment. Pairs of intermediate-level nonnative speakers of English (n = 24) interacted with one another in a synchronous mode over a local area network while attempting to jointly complete jigsaw and…

  20. A Mediating Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuszka, Peter

    2009-01-01

    For a suburban area of Washington, D.C., Southern Maryland has remained unusually "Southern." Its rolling tobacco fields, former slave quarters and lonesome two-lane roads through piney woods seem more reminiscent of the Deep South than the nation's capital. So, too, have its attitudes on race. That became evident on Dec. 6, 2004, when five men…

  1. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  2. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  3. 44 CFR 7.942 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... participate in the mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or for the mediator to make... reach an agreement, the mediator shall prepare a written statement of the agreement and have...

  4. An Alternative Framework for Defining Mediation.

    PubMed

    Collins, L M; Graham, J J; Flaherty, B P

    1998-04-01

    The present article provides an alternative framework for evaluating mediated relationships. From this perspective. a mediated process is a chain reaction, beginning with an independent variable that affects a mediator that in turn affects an outcome. The definition of mediation offered here, presented for stage sequences, states three conditions for establishing mediation: (a) the independent variable affects the probability of the sequence no mediator to mediator to outcome; (b) the independent variable affects the probability of a transition into the mediator stage; (c) the mediator affects the probability of a transition into the outcome stage at every level of the independent variable. This definition of mediation is compared and contrasted with the well-known definition of mediation for continuous variables discussed in Baron and Kenny (1986), Judd and Kenny (1981), and Kenny, Kashy, and Bolger (1997). The definition presented in this article emphasizes the intraindividual, time-ordered nature of mediation. PMID:26771887

  5. Estimation of Causal Mediation Effects for a Dichotomous Outcome in Multiple-Mediator Models using the Mediation Formula

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Suchitra; Albert, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Mediators are intermediate variables in the causal pathway between an exposure and an outcome. Mediation analysis investigates the extent to which exposure effects occur through these variables, thus revealing causal mechanisms. In this paper, we consider the estimation of the mediation effect when the outcome is binary and multiple mediators of different types exist. We give a precise definition of the total mediation effect as well as decomposed mediation effects through individual or sets of mediators using the potential outcomes framework. We formulate a model of joint distribution (probit-normal) using continuous latent variables for any binary mediators to account for correlations among multiple mediators. A mediation formula approach is proposed to estimate the total mediation effect and decomposed mediation effects based on this parametric model. Estimation of mediation effects through individual or subsets of mediators requires an assumption involving the joint distribution of multiple counterfactuals. We conduct a simulation study that demonstrates low bias of mediation effect estimators for two-mediator models with various combinations of mediator types. The results also show that the power to detect a non-zero total mediation effect increases as the correlation coefficient between two mediators increases, while power for individual mediation effects reaches a maximum when the mediators are uncorrelated. We illustrate our approach by applying it to a retrospective cohort study of dental caries in adolescents with low and high socioeconomic status. Sensitivity analysis is performed to assess the robustness of conclusions regarding mediation effects when the assumption of no unmeasured mediator-outcome confounders is violated. PMID:23650048

  6. Relationship of area postrema to three putative measures of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R.; Fox, Robert A.; Daunton, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Although the rat has an incomplete emetic reflex, several species-specific responses to motion were proposed as measures of 'motion sickness' in rats. The purpose was to determine the dependence of these responses on one of several neural structures known to be essential to motion-induced vomiting in species with a complete emetic reflex. The Area Postrema (AP) was shown to play an important role in the production of motion sickness in vomiting species. The effects of thermo-cautery ablations of the AP on three different responses supposedly reflecting motion sickness in the rat were compared: conditioned taste aversion (CTA); drinking suppression; and fecal boli. Efficacy of the ablations was determined by subjecting ablated, sham-operated, and unoperated control animals to a CTA test which is known to require a functional AP. Animals with AP ablations failed to form CTA when 0.15 M LiCl was paired with a 10 percent sucrose solution, while sham-operated control subjects conditioned as well as the unoperated control subjects. The extent of the ablations was evaluated histologically at the end of the experiment. To determine the effects of the ablations on the measures of motion sickness, all animals were subjected to rotation for 30 min or 90 min on a platform displaced 20 deg from earth horizontal. Results indicate that ablation of AP in the rat has no effect on the formation of CTA to a 4 percent solution of cider paired with motion, on the suppression of drinking immediately after exposure to motion, or on the frequency of fecal boli during exposure to motion. This failure of AP ablations to eliminate the effects of motion on any of these responses discourages their use as equivalents of motion-induced vomiting. The appropriateness of other suggested measures, e.g., pica, remains untested but the dependence of such measures on stimulation more severe than commonly used in motion sickness research and the absence of a demonstration of their dependence on neural

  7. Mediator-Generated Pressure Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Joseph F.

    1978-01-01

    Two examples of bluff pressures (as opposed to real pressures) used by mediators to effect contract settlements are presented, along with advice to negotiators on avoiding or minimizing such tactics. (Author/IRT)

  8. Mediated Character of Economic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanic, Josip; Bertovic, Igor; Kasac, Josip

    2003-06-01

    Economic interactions are conducted between economic agents - individuals and collectives, through exchange of natural or artificial entities - goods, services and money, in a myriad of combinations. In this article we adopt a microscopic point of view, concentrate on the exchanged entities, and extract their relevant attributes as seen from structurally simple economic processes. Following that, we approach the interpretation of the economic interactions with their mediated character emphasized. Mediators of the interaction are locally available environment units. They are locally recognized and appropriately interpreted in a given value set as goods and money. The overall intensity of economic interactions considered is related to mediators' spatial and temporal characteristics. Extracted characteristics of mediators and economic processes are compacted in the set of formal rules. The approach is connected with similar approaches in economy and physics.

  9. Computational nanomedicine: modeling of nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermal cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaddi, Chanchala D; Phan, John H; Wang, May D

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia for cancer therapy is a growing area of cancer nanomedicine because of the potential for localized and targeted destruction of cancer cells. Localized hyperthermal effects are dependent on many factors, including nanoparticle size and shape, excitation wavelength and power, and tissue properties. Computational modeling is an important tool for investigating and optimizing these parameters. In this review, we focus on computational modeling of magnetic and gold nanoparticle-mediated hyperthermia, followed by a discussion of new opportunities and challenges. PMID:23914967

  10. Bradykinin-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2014-01-01

    Diseases which have been demonstrated to be caused by increased plasma levels of bradykinin all have angioedema as the common major clinical manifestation. Angioedema due to therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is caused by suppressed bradykinin degradation so that it accumulates. This occurs because ACE metabolizes bradykinin by removal of Phe-Arg from the C-terminus, which inactivates it. By contrast, angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (either hereditary types I and II, or acquired) is caused by bradykinin overproduction. C1 inhibitor inhibits factor XIIa, kallikrein and activity associated with the prekallikrein-HK (high-molecular-weight kininogen) complex. In its absence, uncontrolled activation of the plasma bradykinin cascade is seen once there has been an initiating stimulus. C4 levels are low in all types of C1 inhibitor deficiency due to the instability of C1 (C1r, in particular) such that some activated C1 always circulates and depletes C4. In the hereditary disorder, formation of factor XIIf (factor XII fragment) during attacks of swelling causes C4 levels to drop toward zero, and C2 levels decline. A kinin-like molecule, once thought to be a cleavage product derived from C2 that contributes to the increased vascular permeability seen in hereditary angioedema (HAE), is now thought to be an artifact, i.e. no such molecule is demonstrable. The acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency is associated with clonal disorders of B cell hyperreactivity, including lymphoma and monoclonal gammopathy. Most cases have an IgG autoantibody to C1 inhibitor which inactivates it so that the presentation is strikingly similar to type I HAE. New therapies for types I and II HAE include C1 inhibitor replacement therapy, ecallantide, a kallikrein antagonist, and icatibant, a B2 receptor antagonist. A newly described type III HAE has normal C1 inhibitor, although it is thought to be mediated by bradykinin, as is an antihistamine-resistant subpopulation of

  11. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... mediator shall send a copy of the agreement to DOC. DOC will take no further action on the complaint unless... DOC. Mediation ends if: (1) 60 days elapse from the time DOC receives the complaint; or (2) Prior...

  12. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... mediator shall send a copy of the agreement to DOC. DOC will take no further action on the complaint unless... DOC. Mediation ends if: (1) 60 days elapse from the time DOC receives the complaint; or (2) Prior...

  13. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... mediator shall send a copy of the agreement to DOC. DOC will take no further action on the complaint unless... DOC. Mediation ends if: (1) 60 days elapse from the time DOC receives the complaint; or (2) Prior...

  14. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... mediator shall send a copy of the agreement to DOC. DOC will take no further action on the complaint unless... DOC. Mediation ends if: (1) 60 days elapse from the time DOC receives the complaint; or (2) Prior...

  15. 7 CFR 900.108 - Mediator's report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediator's report. 900.108 Section 900.108 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Mediator's report. The mediator, upon the completion of mediation proceedings, shall submit to...

  16. Mediation in Schools: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendry, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the developing role of mediation as a conflict resolution process in schools. It gives an accepted definition and clarifies the purposes of mediation, outlining the range of contexts in and beyond schools in which mediation is already offered as a formal intervention. The typical process of mediation itself is described. The…

  17. 14 CFR 1252.402 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 1252.402 Section 1252.402... Procedures § 1252.402 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. NASA will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) Fall within the jurisdiction of the Act...

  18. 15 CFR 20.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 20.12 Section 20.12... Procedures § 20.12 Mediation. (a) DOC will refer to a mediation service designated by the Secretary all... further processing. (b) Both the complainant and the recipient shall participate in the mediation...

  19. 7 CFR 614.11 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 614.11 Section 614.11 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS NRCS APPEAL PROCEDURES § 614.11 Mediation. (a) A participant who wishes to pursue mediation must file request for mediation under this part with the NRCS official designated in...

  20. 15 CFR 923.54 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 923.54 Section 923.54... Mediation. (a) Section 307(h) of the Act provides for mediation of serious disagreement between any Federal... cases, mediation by the Secretary, with the assistance of the Executive Office of the President, may...

  1. 15 CFR 930.111 - OCRM mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false OCRM mediation. 930.111 Section 930... FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Secretarial Mediation § 930.111 OCRM mediation. The availability of mediation does not preclude use by the parties of alternative means...

  2. 45 CFR 91.43 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 91.43 Section 91.43 Public Welfare... Enforcement Procedures § 91.43 Mediation. (a) HHS will promptly refer to a mediation agency designated by the... mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or make an informed judgment that...

  3. 24 CFR 146.35 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 146.35 Section 146.35... ASSISTANCE Investigation, Settlement, and Enforcement Procedures § 146.35 Mediation. (a) HUD shall refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, a mediation agency designated by the Secretary...

  4. 34 CFR 110.32 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 110.32 Section 110.32 Education Regulations..., Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 110.32 Mediation. (a) ED promptly refers to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service or to the mediation agency designated by the Secretary of Health and...

  5. 38 CFR 18.543 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 18.543 Section... Enforcement Procedures § 18.543 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. VA will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) Fall within the jurisdiction of...

  6. 10 CFR 4.333 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 4.333 Section 4.333 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Investigation, Conciliation, and Enforcement Procedures § 4.333 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. NRC will refer to a mediation agency designated by the Secretary of the Department of Health...

  7. 45 CFR 1156.16 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 1156.16 Section 1156.16 Public Welfare... Procedures § 1156.16 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The Endowment will promptly refer all complaints to the agency designated by the Secretary of HHS to manage the mediation process...

  8. 7 CFR 780.9 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation. 780.9 Section 780.9 Agriculture Regulations... PROGRAMS APPEAL REGULATIONS § 780.9 Mediation. (a) Any request for mediation must be submitted after... once: (1) If resolution of an adverse decision is not achieved in mediation, a participant may...

  9. 22 CFR 218.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mediation. 218.33 Section 218.33 Foreign... § 218.33 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. The agency will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that: (1) fall within the jurisdiction of...

  10. 43 CFR 17.332 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Enforcement Procedures § 17.332 Mediation. (a) Referral of complaints for mediation. DOI will... it. The FMCS shall send the agreement to DOI. DOI, however, retains the right to monitor the... process without prior approval of the head of the mediation agency. (e) DOI will use the mediation...

  11. Mediators of Change for Multisystemic Therapy with Juvenile Sexual Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Chapman, Jason E.; Borduin, Charles M.; Schewe, Paul A.; McCart, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The mediators of favorable multisystemic therapy (MST) outcomes achieved at 12 months post recruitment were examined within the context of a randomized effectiveness trial with 127 juvenile sexual offenders and their families. Outcome measures assessed youth delinquency, substance use, externalizing symptoms, and deviant sexual interest/risk behaviors; and hypothesized mediators included measures of parenting and peer relations. Data were collected at pretreatment, 6 months post recruitment, and 12 months post recruitment. Consistent with the MST theory of change and the small extant literature in this area of research, analyses showed that favorable MST effects on youth antisocial behavior and deviant sexual interest/risk behaviors were mediated by increased caregiver follow-through on discipline practices as well as decreased caregiver disapproval of and concern about the youth's bad friends during the follow-up. These findings have important implications for the community-based treatment of juvenile sexual offenders. PMID:19485587

  12. Area contingency plan Wisconsin area. (COTP Milwaukee)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-30

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Eastern Wisconsin Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Milwaukee Coastal Zone.

  13. Area contingency plan Chicago area. (COTP Chicago)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Area Contingency Plan, mandated under the Oil Pollution Act, was developed by the Chicago Area Committee, which is chaired by the Coast Guard and consists of local, state, federal, and private members. The plan prepares in advance for an oil or hazardous substance spill in the COTP Chicago Coastal Zone.

  14. Web Feature Service Semantic Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.; Percivall, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists from different organizations and disciplines need to work together to find the solutions to complex problems. Multi-disciplinary science typically involves users with specialized tools and their own preferred view of the data including unique characteristics of the user's information model and symbology. Even though organizations use web services to expose data, there are still semantic inconsistencies that need to be solved. Recent activities within the OGC Interoperability Program (IP) have helped advance semantic mediation solutions when using OGC services to help solve complex problems. The OGC standards development process is influenced by the feedback of activities within the Interoperability Program, which conducts international interoperability initiatives such as Testbeds, Pilot Projects, Interoperability Experiments, and Interoperability Support Services. These activities are designed to encourage rapid development, testing, validation, demonstration and adoption of open, consensus based standards and best practices. Two recent Testbeds, the OGC Web Services Phase 8 and Phase 9, have advanced the use of semantic mediation approaches to increase semantic interoperability among geospatial communities. The Cross-Community Interoperability (CCI) thread within these two testbeds, advanced semantic mediation approaches for data discovery, access and use of heterogeneous data models and heterogeneous metadata models. This presentation will provide an overview of the interoperability program, the CCI Thread and will explain the methodology to mediate heterogeneous GML Application Profiles served via WFS, including discovery of services via a catalog standard interface and mediating symbology applicable to each application profile.

  15. Mediation Analysis in Psychosomatic Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Ginger; MacKinnon, David P.; Ohlrich, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of statistical mediation analysis and its application to psychosomatic medicine research. The article begins with a description of the major approaches to mediation analysis and an evaluation of the strengths and limits of each. Emphasis is placed on longitudinal mediation models, and an application using latent growth modeling is presented. The article concludes with a description of recent developments in mediation analysis and suggestions for the use of mediation for future work in psychosomatic medicine research. PMID:21148809

  16. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, C.A.; Mayerle, Ronald T.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys of the Rattlesnake Roadless Area in Montana identified a small area of substantiated resource potential for a low-grade stratabound copper occurrence along the northwest border of the area. A demonstrated barite (BaSO//4) resource of 45 tons and a demonstrated limestone resource suitable for cement production are present in the southern part of the roadless area. Limestone, silica in quartz veins, and sand and gravel deposits are known in the southern part of the area but similar deposits occur widely outside the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area.

  17. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  18. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  19. Gauge mediated mini-split

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a simple model of split supersymmetry from gauge mediation. This model features gauginos that are parametrically a loop factor lighter than scalars, accommodates a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, and incorporates a simple solution to the μ- b μ problem. The gaugino mass suppression can be understood as resulting from collective symmetry breaking. Imposing collider bounds on μ and requiring viable electroweak symmetry breaking implies small a-terms and small tan β — the stop mass ranges from 105 to 108 GeV. In contrast with models with anomaly + gravity mediation (which also predict a one-loop loop suppression for gaugino masses), our gauge mediated scenario predicts aligned squark masses and a gravitino LSP. Gluinos, electroweakinos and Higgsinos can be accessible at the LHC and/or future colliders for a wide region of the allowed parameter space.

  20. Fracture healing and lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J Patrick; Manigrasso, Michaele B; Kim, Brian D; Subramanian, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Lipid mediators regulate bone regeneration during fracture healing. Prostaglandins and leukotrienes are well-known lipid mediators that regulate inflammation and are synthesized from the Ω-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase (COX-1 or COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyze the initial enzymatic steps in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, respectively. Inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 activity impairs fracture healing in animal models. Genetic ablation of COX-1 does not affect the fracture callus strength in mice, suggesting that COX-2 activity is primarily responsible for regulating fracture healing. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is performed clinically to reduce heterotopic ossification, although clinical evidence that NSAID treatment impairs fracture healing remains controversial. In contrast, inhibition or genetic ablation of 5-LO activity accelerates fracture healing in animal models. Even though prostaglandins and leukotrienes regulate inflammation, loss of COX-2 or 5-LO activity appears to primarily affect chondrogenesis during fracture healing. Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analog treatment, prostaglandin-specific synthase inhibition and prostaglandin or leukotriene receptor antagonism also affect callus chondrogenesis. Unlike the Ω-6-derived lipid mediators, lipid mediators derived from Ω-3 fatty acids, such as resolvin E1 (RvE1), have anti-inflammatory activity. In vivo, RvE1 can inhibit osteoclastogenesis and limit bone resorption. Although Ω-6 and Ω-3 lipid mediators have clear-cut effects on inflammation, the role of these lipid mediators in bone regeneration is more complex, with apparent effects on callus chondrogenesis and bone remodeling. PMID:24795811

  1. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  2. [Aesthetic surgeons and mediatic field].

    PubMed

    Volte, Ray

    2003-10-01

    Media alter our image; aesthetic surgery has become a good thing for journalists wanting a better TV audience. The standard plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgeon does not recognize himself in most of the TV shows: operate prepuberic children, enhance buttocks and pectoralis muscles, struggle with transsexuals em leader What is become whim mammoplasties, abdominoplasties, face lifts? We are partially responsible for this mediatic lynchage because we do not occupy the mediatic field. The journalists, without any professional ethical code, make an object out of us. So now is the time of our uprising. PMID:14599902

  3. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  4. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  5. CUCAMONGA ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Peters, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical surveys and an investigation of mines, prospects, and mineralized areas, the Cucamonga Roadless Areas in California have two areas of probable mineral-resource potential. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for low-grade tungsten and gold resources is located in the northern part of the roadless areas, and an area of similar potential for small deposits of silver, lead, and zinc is located in the southwestern part of the roadless areas. An interpretation of an aeromagnetic survey of the Cucamonga Roadless Areas showed magnetic anomalies and patterns closely related to magnetic variation in rock units, but indicated no unknown areas of mineral-resource potential.

  6. Mediation: A Violence Prevention Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conflict Resolution Unlimited, Inc., Bellevue, WA.

    Young people need help in learning alternative dispute resolution skills. A program that aims to do this, set in a context of preventing violent behavior, is presented here. It is structured into sixteen 45-minute sessions which can be presented by one teacher. The training is organized around the following seven themes: The Mediation Process,…

  7. Counterpoint: Response to Mediator Caraway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Gordon A.; Heinen, Mark

    1991-01-01

    In the Fall 1989 issue, Caraway discussed the advantages of grievance mediation, compared with arbitration. This article reexamines the issue from the viewpoint of the individual grievant and points to recent conflicting developments in the National Labor Relations Board's deferral doctrine. An introduction by Perry A. Zirkel summarizes the…

  8. Re/Mediating Adolescent Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, John, Ed.; Luke, Allan, Ed.

    Suggesting that teaching in New Times requires that educators read and re/mediate the social relations, the cultural knowledges, and the relationships of power between adolescents and their social, biological, and semiotic universes, this collection of essays offers new ways of seeing and talking about adolescents and their literacies. Most of the…

  9. Mediation analysis with principal stratification.

    PubMed

    Gallop, Robert; Small, Dylan S; Lin, Julia Y; Elliott, Michael R; Joffe, Marshall; Ten Have, Thomas R

    2009-03-30

    In assessing the mechanism of treatment efficacy in randomized clinical trials, investigators often perform mediation analyses by analyzing if the significant intent-to-treat treatment effect on outcome occurs through or around a third intermediate or mediating variable: indirect and direct effects, respectively. Standard mediation analyses assume sequential ignorability, i.e. conditional on covariates the intermediate or mediating factor is randomly assigned, as is the treatment in a randomized clinical trial. This research focuses on the application of the principal stratification (PS) approach for estimating the direct effect of a randomized treatment but without the standard sequential ignorability assumption. This approach is used to estimate the direct effect of treatment as a difference between expectations of potential outcomes within latent subgroups of participants for whom the intermediate variable behavior would be constant, regardless of the randomized treatment assignment. Using a Bayesian estimation procedure, we also assess the sensitivity of results based on the PS approach to heterogeneity of the variances among these principal strata. We assess this approach with simulations and apply it to two psychiatric examples. Both examples and the simulations indicated robustness of our findings to the homogeneous variance assumption. However, simulations showed that the magnitude of treatment effects derived under the PS approach were sensitive to model mis-specification. PMID:19184975

  10. Mediation and the Electronic World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, John; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss the issue of the mediator's role in the library of the electronic age. Topics addressed include computer-assisted instruction; online catalogs; computer networks; professional identity; reference service and bibliographic instruction; CD-ROMs; online systems; personal home microcomputers; Internet and list servers;…

  11. Eicosanoids mediate insect hemocyte migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hemocyte chemotaxis toward infection and wound sites is an essential component of insect defense reactions, although the biochemical signal mechanisms responsible for mediating chemotaxis in insect cells are not well understood. Here we report on the outcomes of experiments designed to test the hyp...

  12. Bioanalytical insights into mediator lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Kie; Suga, Takahiro; Mano, Nariyasu

    2015-09-10

    The importance of lipids in health and disease has been widely acknowledged. Lipids are well known to undergo enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic conversions to lipid mediators (LMs), which demonstrate potent actions in various biological events, such as the regulation of cellular signaling pathways and the promotion and resolution of inflammation. LMs activate G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to exert various functions. Monitoring these mediators in disease is essential to uncover the mechanisms of pathogenesis for many diseases, such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Along with technical developments in mass spectrometry, highly sensitive and multiplexed analyses of LMs in the human periphery and other tissues have become available. These advancements enable the temporal and spatial profiling of LMs; therefore, the findings obtained from LM profiling are expected to decode pathology. As trace amounts of LMs can exert functions, the development of a highly sensitive, accurate, and robust analytical method is necessary. Although not mandatory, mediator lipidomics validation is becoming popular and remains challenging. Because LMs already exist in biological matrices, evaluations of the matrix effect and extraction efficiencies are important issues. Thus, more careful analyses are required. In this review, we focus on mediator lipidomics, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and LMs derived from PUFAs, such as eicosanoids, lipoxins and resolvins. In addition to the recent progress in human mediator lipidomics, bioanalytical insights derived from this field (i.e., effective sample preparation from biological matrices and evaluation of the matrix effect) are described herein. PMID:25769667

  13. Broca's area - thalamic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bohsali, Anastasia A; Triplett, William; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Gullett, Joseph M; McGregor, Keith; FitzGerald, David B; Mareci, Thomas; White, Keith; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Broca's area is crucially involved in language processing. The sub-regions of Broca's area (pars triangularis, pars opercularis) presumably are connected via corticocortical pathways. However, growing evidence suggests that the thalamus may also be involved in language and share some of the linguistic functions supported by Broca's area. Functional connectivity is thought to be achieved via corticothalamic/thalamocortical white matter pathways. Our study investigates structural connectivity between Broca's area and the thalamus, specifically ventral anterior nucleus and pulvinar. We demonstrate that Broca's area shares direct connections with these thalamic nuclei and suggest a local Broca's area-thalamus network potentially involved in linguistic processing. Thalamic connectivity with Broca's area may serve to selectively recruit cortical regions storing multimodal features of lexical items and to bind them together during lexical-semantic processing. In addition, Broca's area-thalamic circuitry may enable cortico-thalamo-cortical information transfer and modulation between BA 44 and 45 during language comprehension and production. PMID:25555132

  14. SUGARLOAF ROADLESS AREA, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Schmauch, Steven W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey local areas in and near the western edge of the Sugarloaf Roadless Area, Nevada have probable resource potential for silver and small amounts of associated lead, zinc, and gold.

  15. [Familiy mediation within the counselling system].

    PubMed

    Bastine, Reiner; Römer-Wolf, Birgit; Decker, Frauke; Haid-Loh, Achim; Mayer, Stefan; Normann, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    Family mediation has been established as a method of resolving family conflicts within the counselling system. Unfortunately there existed only rare information about the real presence and efficacy of family mediation services within this system. 726 counselling centres from all over the country participated at the present study, which was outlined to evaluate their supply of family mediation and the use of it. The results show that nearly one third of the centres are offering family mediation as a regular service to their clients, and that mediative skills are quite frequently used by the counselling professionals. Centres, which offer a regular service of mediation, have an obviously higher percentage of honorary staff, indicating that this service might have a more fragile status. Each centre, which conducted mediation, had an average mediation caseload of 32 in 2003, which means a percentage of 7 percent of all counselling cases treated in this year. These mediations needed an average treatment of 7 hours. Most frequent cases in mediation are separated married or separated non-married parents with 2 children. In most cases, family mediation was used to regulate conflicts in separation, divorce or post divorce, mainly concerned with issues of child custody. In contrast to the researchers' expectations, children were introduced at the mediation process only rarely. The need for mediation in the local population was rated much higher than the factual demand for and the factual supply of mediation. Based on the outcomes of the study, some recommendations are made: for the improvement of the supply of family mediation, for the expansion of the issues to which mediation is offered, and for strengthening the approaches to include children into the mediation process. PMID:17152893

  16. TATOOSH ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and geochemical surveys of the Tatoosh Roadless Area in Washington were conducted. The results indicate that none of the four parts comprising the roadless area are likely to contain mineral or energy resources. The geology of this part of the Cascade Range is poorly known, and a regionally focussed program of geologic mapping and geochemical sampling might discover areas of promising mineralization perhaps extending into the roadless area beneath the surface.

  17. RATTLESNAKE ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Thor N.V.; McColly, Robert

    1984-01-01

    There is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the Rattlesnake Roadless Area, Arizona, as judged from field studies. Significant concentrations of minerals within the roadless area are not indicated by geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, or aeromagnetic studies. Basalt, volcanic cinders, sand and gravel, and sandstone that may be suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but are more readily accessible outside the roadless area boundary.

  18. Developing Illustrative Descriptors of Aspects of Mediation for the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR): A Council of Europe Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Brian; Piccardo, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    The notion of mediation has been the object of growing interest in second language education in recent years. The increasing awareness of the complex nature of the process of learning--and teaching--stretches our collective reflection towards less explored areas. In mediation, the immediate focus is on the role of language in processes like…

  19. CYPRESS ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, George L.; Capstick, Donald O.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys of the Cypress Roadless Area, located in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada, California, were conducted. On the basis of these investigations, the eastern part of this roadless area has probable resource potential for gold with associated silver in quartz veins. This area has been extensively prospected. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

  20. Developing Environmental Study Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan M.

    This publication is designed to help the teacher in developing environmental study areas. Numerous examples of study areas, including airports, lakes, shopping centers, and zoos, are listed. A current definition of environmental study areas is given and guidelines for their development and identification are included. The appendix, which comprises…

  1. Ratio-of-Mediator-Probability Weighting for Causal Mediation Analysis in the Presence of Treatment-by-Mediator Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Guanglei; Deutsch, Jonah; Hill, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional methods for mediation analysis generate biased results when the mediator--outcome relationship depends on the treatment condition. This article shows how the ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting (RMPW) method can be used to decompose total effects into natural direct and indirect effects in the presence of treatment-by-mediator…

  2. The mediating effect of psychosocial factors on suicidal probability among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ji-Won; Kim, Won-Joong; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2011-01-01

    Suicidal probability is an actual tendency including negative self-evaluation, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and hostility. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of psychosocial variances in the suicidal probability of adolescents, especially the role of mediating variance. This study investigated the mediating effects of psychosocial factors such as depression, anxiety, self-esteem, stress, and social support on the suicidal probability among 1,586 adolescents attending middle and high schools in the Kyunggi Province area of South Korea. The relationship between depression and anxiety/suicidal probability was mediated by both social resources and self-esteem. Furthermore, the influence of social resources was mediated by interpersonal and achievement stress as well as self-esteem. This study suggests that suicidal probability in adolescents has various relationships, including mediating relations, with several psychosocial factors. The interventions on suicidal probability in adolescents should focus on social factors as well as clinical symptoms. PMID:22023641

  3. Women's Facial Redness Increases Their Perceived Attractiveness: Mediation Through Perceived Healthiness.

    PubMed

    Pazda, Adam D; Thorstenson, Christopher A; Elliot, Andrew J; Perrett, David I

    2016-07-01

    In the present research, we investigated whether the red-attraction relation that has been observed for men viewing women may also be observed with regard to women's facial redness. We manipulated facial redness by slightly increasing or decreasing the redness on the faces of baseline pictures of target women, and then had men judge the attractiveness of the women. We also examined healthiness perceptions as a mediator of the redness-attraction relation, along with several other candidate mediator variables. A series of experiments showed that increased redness led to increased ratings of attractiveness, and decreased redness led to decreased ratings of attractiveness. Perceived healthiness was documented as a mediator of the influence of female facial redness on male perceptions of attractiveness, and this mediation was independent of other candidate mediator variables. The findings highlight the importance of attending to facial coloration as an attraction-relevant cue and point to interesting areas for subsequent research. PMID:26908567

  4. 13 CFR 117.12 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... complainant in the mediation process in an effort to reach a mutually satisfactory settlement of the complaint... mediator at the same time. (c) If the complainant and the recipient reach a mutually...

  5. 22 CFR 218.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the recipient shall participate in the mediation process to the extend necessary to reach an agreement... complainant and the recipient reach an agreement, the mediator shall prepare a written statement of...

  6. 22 CFR 143.33 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... participate in the mediation process to the extent necessary to reach an agreement or make an informed... complainant need not meet with the mediator at the same time. (c) If the complainant and the recipient...

  7. An Adviser Agent for Mediator Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Katagami, Daisuke; Nitta, Katsumi

    This paper describes an agent that shows advices for supporting mediator on our online mediation support system. The purpose of the advice is an education of mediator, and the agent presents it instead of the teacher. In this research, at first, we defined a mediation model that is an argumentation model between 3 people. Then, we defined some advice models based on the mediation model. The advice models create advice elements. The adviser agent monitors the mediation, gathers advice elements referring to advice models, and creates advice from elements according to the mediation scene. As a result, it becomes possible that is advising instead of the teacher according to the situation, education purpose and learner's level. We inspected the effectiveness of the advice by the experiment of moot mediation.

  8. Mediator Architecture and RNA Polymerase II Interaction.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, Clemens; Nozawa, Kayo; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-06-19

    Integrated structural biology recently elucidated the architecture of Mediator and its position on RNA polymerase II. Here we summarize these achievements and list open questions on Mediator structure and mechanism. PMID:26851380

  9. Nodal-mediated epigenesis requires dynamin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Robin P.; Robertson, Anthony J.; Saunders, Diane; Coffman, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Nodal proteins are diffusible morphogens that drive pattern formation via short-range feedback activation coupled to long-range Lefty-mediated inhibition. In the sea urchin embryo, specification of the secondary (oral-aboral) axis occurs via zygotic expression of nodal, which is localized to the prospective oral ectoderm at early blastula stage. In mid-blastula stage embryos treated with low micromolar nickel or zinc, nodal expression expands progressively beyond the confines of this localized domain to encompass the entire equatorial circumference of the embryo, producing radialized embryos lacking an oral-aboral axis. RNAseq analysis of embryos treated with nickel, zinc or cadmium (which does not radialize embryos) showed that several genes involved in endocytosis were similarly perturbed by nickel and zinc but not cadmium. Inhibiting dynamin, a GTPase required for receptor-mediated endocytosis, phenocopies the effects of nickel and zinc, suggesting that dynamin-mediated endocytosis is required as a sink to limit the range of Nodal signaling. PMID:21337468

  10. CHATTAHOOCHEE ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Welsh, Robert A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Chattahoochee Roadless Area, Georgia, offers little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources even though gold, mica, sillimanite, soapstone, dunite, chromite, and nickel have been mined nearby, and source rocks for these commodities are present in the roadless area. Granite gneiss, gneiss, schist, and metasandstone in the roadless area are suitable for stone, crushed rock, or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available outside the roadless area, closer to present markets. The potential for the occurrence of hydrocarbons (probably gas) beneath the thick regional thrust sheets in this area cannot be adequately evaluated from available data.

  11. Causal Mediation Analysis: Warning! Assumptions Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keele, Luke

    2015-01-01

    In policy evaluations, interest may focus on why a particular treatment works. One tool for understanding why treatments work is causal mediation analysis. In this essay, I focus on the assumptions needed to estimate mediation effects. I show that there is no "gold standard" method for the identification of causal mediation effects. In…

  12. Axino dark matter in mirage mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shuntaro; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2009-04-17

    The mirage mediation of supersymmetry breaking is a phenomenologically quite interesting possibility, however, it suffers from two major problems: the moduli-induced gravitino problem and the {mu}-B{mu} problem. In this paper, we propose that the axionic extension of mirage mediation, axionic mirage mediation can solve both problems simultaneously. We address the cosmological consequences of the scenario extensively.

  13. Mediation in the Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevaskis, David Keller

    This digest discusses mediation as a form of conflict management that is receiving widespread attention in schools. Mediation involves a neutral third person, called a mediator, who assists the disputants in resolving their problem with the consent of all parties. It offers a risk-free way to settle disputes for the parties involved. Unresolved…

  14. Single-Level and Multilevel Mediation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofighi, Davood; Thoemmes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis is a statistical approach used to examine how the effect of an independent variable on an outcome is transmitted through an intervening variable (mediator). In this article, we provide a gentle introduction to single-level and multilevel mediation analyses. Using single-level data, we demonstrate an application of structural…

  15. 7 CFR 900.109 - Mediation agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mediation agreement. 900.109 Section 900.109 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... Mediation agreement. An agreement arrived at by mediation shall not become effective until approved by...

  16. 45 CFR 617.10 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mediation. 617.10 Section 617.10 Public Welfare... OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM NSF § 617.10 Mediation. (a) NSF will refer to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service all complaints that fall...

  17. 34 CFR 300.506 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mediation. 300.506 Section 300.506 Education... DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Due Process Procedures for Parents and Children § 300.506 Mediation. (a... due process complaint, to resolve disputes through a mediation process. (b) Requirements....

  18. 41 CFR 101-8.717 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mediation. 101-8.717... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 8.7-Discrimination Prohibited on the Basis of Age § 101-8.717 Mediation. (a) GSA promptly refers to the mediation agency designated by the Secretary, HHS, all sufficient complaints...

  19. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative Compliance § 205.663 Mediation. Any dispute with respect... a qualified mediator mutually agreed upon by the parties to the mediation. If a State...

  20. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative Compliance § 205.663 Mediation. Any dispute with respect... a qualified mediator mutually agreed upon by the parties to the mediation. If a State...

  1. 7 CFR 205.663 - Mediation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Administrative Compliance § 205.663 Mediation. Any dispute with respect... a qualified mediator mutually agreed upon by the parties to the mediation. If a State...

  2. Methods for Mediation Analysis with Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite wide applications of both mediation models and missing data techniques, formal discussion of mediation analysis with missing data is still rare. We introduce and compare four approaches to dealing with missing data in mediation analysis including list wise deletion, pairwise deletion, multiple imputation (MI), and a two-stage maximum…

  3. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  4. Sequestered gravity in gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Benakli, Karim; Quiros, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mechanism of supersymmetry breaking embeddable in string theory and simultaneously sharing the main advantages of (sequestered) gravity and gauge mediation. It is driven by a Scherk-Schwarz deformation along a compact extra dimension, transverse to a brane stack supporting the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. This fixes the magnitude of the gravitino mass, together with that of the gauginos of a bulk gauge group, at a scale as high as 10^{10} GeV. Supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the observable sector dominantly by gauge interactions using massive messengers transforming non-trivially under the bulk and Standard Model gauge groups and leading to a neutralino LSP as dark matter candidate. The Higgsino mass μ and soft Higgs-bilinear B_μ term could be generated at the same order of magnitude as the other soft terms by effective supergravity couplings as in the Giudice-Masiero mechanism.

  5. General gauge mediation and deconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarrie, Moritz

    2010-11-01

    We locate a supersymmetry breaking hidden sector and supersymmetric standard model on different lattice points of an orbifold moose. The hidden sector is encoded in a set of current correlators and the effects of the current correlators are mediated by the lattice site gauge groups with "lattice hopping" functions and through the bifundamental matter that links the lattice sites together. We show how the gaugino mass, scalar mass and Casimir energy of the lattice can be computed for a general set of current correlators and then give specific formulas when the hidden sector is specified to be a generalised messenger sector. The results reproduce the effect of five dimensional gauge mediation from a purely four dimensional construction.

  6. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications.

    PubMed

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  7. Regulation of T cell receptor complex-mediated signaling by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifications

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Samantha F; Deason-Towne, Francina; Peterson, Lisa K; Berger, Allison J; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications are a dynamic method of regulating protein function in response to environmental signals. As with any cellular process, T cell receptor (TCR) complex-mediated signaling is highly regulated, since the strength and duration of TCR-generated signals governs T cell development and activation. While regulation of TCR complex-mediated signaling by phosphorylation has been well studied, regulation by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers is still an emerging area of investigation. This review will examine how ubiquitin, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and other ubiquitin-like modifications such as SUMO and NEDD8 regulate TCR complex-mediated signaling. PMID:25628960

  8. Direct mediation, duality and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Steven; Khoze, Valentin V.

    2008-11-01

    It is well-known that in scenarios with direct gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking the messenger fields significantly affect the running of Standard Model couplings and introduce Landau poles which are difficult to avoid. Among other things, this appears to remove any possibility of a meaningful unification prediction and is often viewed as a strong argument against direct mediation. We propose two ways that Seiberg duality can circumvent this problem. In the first, which we call ``deflected-unification'', the SUSY-breaking hidden sector is a magnetic theory which undergoes a Seiberg duality to an electric phase. Importantly, the electric version has fewer fundamental degrees of freedom coupled to the MSSM compared to the magnetic formulation. This changes the β-functions of the MSSM gauge couplings so as to push their Landau poles above the unification scale. We show that this scenario is realised for recently suggested models of gauge mediation based on a metastable SCQD-type hidden sector directly coupled to MSSM. The second possibility for avoiding Landau poles, which we call ``dual-unification'', begins with the observation that, if the mediating fields fall into complete SU(5) multiplets, then the MSSM+messengers exhibits a fake unification at unphysical values of the gauge couplings. We show that, in known examples of electric/magnetic duals, such a fake unification in the magnetic theory reflects a real unification in the electric theory. We therefore propose that the Standard Model could itself be a magnetic dual of some unknown electric theory in which the true unification takes place. This scenario maintains the unification prediction (and unification scale) even in the presence of Landau poles in the magnetic theory below the GUT scale. We further note that this dual realization of grand unification can explain why Nature appears to unify, but the proton does not decay.

  9. Mediators and Metaphorical Analysis: A Phenomenological Study of Florida Family Court Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrow, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Florida family court mediation programs have typically been assessed with quantitative analysis. To understand the complexity of the experience of being a family mediator, it was necessary to explore how mediators practiced through qualitative research. Metaphors have been considered to be representations of mediators' mental models regarding…

  10. Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fejerskov, Betina; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT) as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s) into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose – dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:23152927