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Sample records for arengukeskkonna mju lapse

  1. AMS Time Lapse Installation

    NASA Video Gallery

    A time lapse video compilation of the installation of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station’s starboard truss using the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, during the...

  2. A-3 Construction Time Lapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A time lapse from start to finish of steel erection for the 235-foot tall A-3 Test Stand. Ground work for the stand was broken in August 2008 and the final structural steel beam was placed April 9, 2009.

  3. Drinking Trajectories Following an Initial Lapse

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Masyn, Katherine E.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse following alcohol treatment is a major problem for individuals who are alcohol dependent, yet little is known about the course of drinking after the initial lapse. In the current study, discrete-time survival analysis and latent growth mixture modeling were used to evaluate the time to first lapse and the trajectories of postlapse drinking in a sample of 563 individuals who received community alcohol treatment. Results showed a decreasing risk of lapsing over time. After the initial lapse, 3 trajectory subgroups provided a parsimonious representation of the heterogeneity in postlapse drinking frequency and quantity, with the majority of individuals reporting light, infrequent drinking. Covariate analyses incorporating demographics, distal risk factors, time to first lapse, and coping behavior as predictors of time to lapse and postlapse drinking trajectories indicated that alcohol dependence and coping behavior were the strongest predictors of lapsing and postlapse drinking behavior. PMID:18540713

  4. Time-lapse camera for microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Compact, lightweight camera which advances film frames without use of conventional sprockets and slip clutches obtains time lapse photomicrographs of human cell growth in a zero-G environment over a period of about a month.

  5. Rim Fire Time Lapse, August 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse photography shows various perspectives of the 2013 Rim Fire, as viewed from Yosemite National Park. The first part of this video is from the Crane Flat Helibase. The fire is currently bu...

  6. Crawler-Transporter Time-Lapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse video shows crawler-transporter No. 2 traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move was performed by the Ground Syste...

  7. Pupillary correlates of lapses of sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Nash; Robison, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    The current study examined the extent to which pupillary responses (both pretrial baseline and phasic responses) would accurately track lapses of attention as predicted by theories of locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) functioning. Participants performed a sustained attention task while pupil responses were continuously recorded. Periodically during the task, participants were presented with thought probes to determine if they were on or off task. The results suggested the pupillary responses accurately distinguished on from off-task states. Importantly, pretrial baseline pupil responses distinguished different types of lapses of attention, with inattentive and mind-wandering states being associated with small pretrial baseline pupil diameters on average and distracted states being associated with larger pretrial baseline pupil diameters on average compared to focused states. These results support the notion that pupil diameter is sensitive to different types of lapses of attention which may be associated with different LC-NE modes. PMID:27038165

  8. [Auditory evoked potentials under attentional lapses].

    PubMed

    Lazarev, I E; Bryzgalov, D V; Osokina, E S; Viazovtseva, A A; Antonenko, A S; Arkhipova, E A; Chernyshev, B V

    2014-01-01

    In order to study spontaneous attentional lapses the experimental task was used that created a moderately high attentional load and involved response choice based on stimulus feature conjunction. The participant's average correct response rate was 85.1%; they made errors in 9.6% trials and response omissions in 5.4% trials. Peak N1 of the evoked potential was consistent across all behavioral outcomes, while peak P2 amplitude was significantly greater before errors and response omissions compared to correct responses. The analysis of polygraphic indexes (ECG, EMG, SGR) did not reveal any arousal level reduction before attentional lapses. The proposed interpretation of the results obtained is based on the assumption that attentional lapses are mediated by the suppression of external stimuli information processing caused by the state of mind-wandering. PMID:25723016

  9. Predicting the Initial Lapse Using a Mobile Health Application after Alcohol Detoxification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chih, Ming-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The prediction and prevention of the initial lapse--which is defined as the first lapse after a period of abstinence--is important because the initial lapse often leads to subsequent lapses (within the same lapse episode) or relapse. The prediction of the initial lapse may allow preemptive intervention to be possible. This dissertation reports on…

  10. MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-05-01

    MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

  11. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  12. New Siemens Research Turbine - time lapse

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Siemens Energy Inc. recently commissioned a new 2.3 megawatt Siemens wind turbine at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. This video shows a time lapse of the installation. The turbine is the centerpiece of a multi-year project to study the performance and aerodynamics of a new class of large, land-based machines — in what will be the biggest government-industry research partnership for wind power generation ever undertaken in the U.S.

  13. Lapse in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Continuing Reviews.

    PubMed

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Grabenbauer, Michael; Nguyen, Yen

    2016-01-01

    The United States federal animal welfare regulations and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals require that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) conduct continuing reviews of all animal research activities. However, little is known about the lapse rate of IACUC continuing reviews, and how frequently investigators continue research activities during the lapse. It is also not clear what factors may contribute to an institution's lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. As part of the quality assurance program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has collected performance metric data for animal care and use programs since 2011. We analyzed IACUC continuing review performance data at 74-75 VA research facilities from 2011 through 2015. The IACUC continuing review lapse rates improved from 5.6% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2015. The rate of investigators continuing research activities during the lapse also decreased from 47.2% in 2012 to 7.4% in 2015. The type of IACUCs used and the size of animal research programs appeared to have no effect in facility's rates of lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. While approximately 80% of facilities reported no lapse in IACUC continuing reviews, approximately 14% of facilities had lapse rates of >10% each year. Some facilities appeared to be repeat offenders. Four facilities had IACUC lapse rates of >10% in at least 3 out of 5 years, suggesting a system problem in these facilities requiring remedial actions to improve their IACUC continuing review processes. PMID:27606820

  14. 26 CFR 25.2704-1 - Lapse of certain rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2704-1 Lapse of... or a liquidation right may be conferred by and may lapse by reason of a State law, the corporate... the total voting power and the common stock had 40 percent. Under the corporate by-laws, the...

  15. 26 CFR 25.2704-1 - Lapse of certain rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... GIFT TAXES GIFT TAX; GIFTS MADE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 1954 Special Valuation Rules § 25.2704-1 Lapse of... or a liquidation right may be conferred by and may lapse by reason of a State law, the corporate... the total voting power and the common stock had 40 percent. Under the corporate by-laws, the...

  16. 30 CFR 256.55 - Lapse of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lapse of bond. 256.55 Section 256.55 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Bonding § 256.55 Lapse of...

  17. Time-Lapse Zirconography of Continental Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    When did the continents form? Peaks in the distributions of zircon U-Pb ages around 2.7, 1.9 and 1.2 Ga have been used as evidence for increased crustal growth rates at these times (growth pulses). The pulses appear linked to the formation of super-continents, with fundamental implications for the thermal evolution of the mantle. However, the age peaks could also be produced by variations in preservation/destruction rates, in which case the implications for the deep Earth are less direct. Here I use the novel approach of examining U-Pb zircon age spectra as a function of the age of the sediment in which the zircons are preserved. This produces time-lapse sequences of zircon age distributions, and presumably, crustal evolution. The database [1] is large enough (n>200,000) that time-lapse sequences can be constructed for each continent. To my knowledge, this approach has only been applied to the Australian zircon record [2]. The results are quite clear (Figure 1; circles are positions of peaks (x-axis) in detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra in different age sediments (y-axis), size of circle is proportional to the height of the peak). There are no major zircon U-Pb age peaks in the ranges 2.2-2.4 Ga and 1.3-1.6 Ga in any sediment of any age on any continent. While some crust was produced at these times, there is no evidence in the zircon record that substantial amounts of crust of these ages ever existed, suggesting that the troughs in the age spectra are due to substantial decreases in (though not cessation of) crustal production. In contrast, U-Pb age peaks between 2.5 and 2.7 Ga appear in sediments immediately after these times and persist in subsequent sedimentary records. The peak heights decrease steadily through time, indicating that crustal destruction is a significant process in modifying the zircon record, but is not responsible for producing the peaks. The same pattern is seen for age peaks at 1.6-2.1 and 1.0-1.3 Ga. Comparing the time-lapse results with Hf

  18. Time-Lapsed Animation of a Mercury Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    Parts of Prokofiev crater (center) and Kandinsky crater (upper left side of Prokofiev) stay in darkness, making it possible for ice to persist on the surface. This time-lapsed animation represents ...

  19. NEA Scout Solar Sail: Half-scale Fold Time Lapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this time lapse, the Near-Earth Asteroid Scout (NEA Scout) CubeSat team rolls a half-scale prototype of the small satellite's solar sail in preparation for a deployment test. During its mission,...

  20. Atlantis Time-Lapse Move to KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse cameras captured space shuttle Atlantis making a 10-mile trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex whe...

  1. 77 FR 38396 - Agency Information Collection (Notice of Lapse-Government Life Insurance) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Notice of Lapse--Government Life Insurance) Activities Under OMB... INFORMATION: Titles: a. Notice of Lapse--Government Life Insurance, VA Form 29-389. b. Application for... government life insurance has lapsed or will lapse due to nonpayment of premiums. The claimant must...

  2. Temperature lapse rate as an adjunct to wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweifil, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Several meteorological parameters were examined to determine if measurable atmospheric conditions can improve windshear detection devices. Lapse rate, the temperature change with altitude, shows promise as being an important parameter in the prediction of severe wind shears. It is easily measured from existing aircraft instrumentation, and it can be important indicator of convective activity including thunderstorms and microbursts. The meteorological theory behind lapse rate measurement is briefly reviewed, and and FAA certified system is described that is currently implemented in the Honeywell Wind Shear Detection and Guidance System.

  3. Negative Affect and Smoking Lapses: A Prospective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul; Waters, Andrew J.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse is a central problem in smoking treatment. Data collected at the time of relapse episodes indicate that stress and negative affect (NA) promote relapse, but retrospective data are potentially biased. The authors performed a prospective analysis of stress and NA prior to initial lapses in smokers (N = 215). Day-to-day changes in stress…

  4. Lessons from NAEYC Accreditation: Avoiding Lapses in Supervision that Place Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Lapses in supervision of children can happen in all types of programs, and even a momentary lapse can have disastrous consequences. When a lapse occurs that affects program quality and puts children at risk, it is critical to consider the nature of the incident and its lessons for future risk management. Between September 2006 and September 2009,…

  5. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Don W.

    2003-04-08

    Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

  6. Use and effectiveness of lapse prevention strategies among pregnant smokers.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Felix; McEwen, Andy; Sutton, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the use of lapse prevention strategies to help smokers manage situation-triggered urges to smoke. Pregnant smokers (N = 174) participating in an intervention trial reported use of cognitive-behavioural lapse prevention strategies and smoking abstinence (biochemically verified). Participants typically enacted few strategies. Distraction strategies were most commonly used. Total number of strategies used did not predict abstinence. However, using 'self-talk' (odds ratio (OR) = 3.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.14-10.40) or 'avoiding spending time with other smokers' (OR = 4.01, 95% confidence interval = 1.34-11.95) independently increased the odds of abstinence. The promotion of these and other under-utilised evidence-based strategies warrants further attention. PMID:24296735

  7. Surface-consistent matching filters for time-lapse processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mutlaq, Mahdi H.

    The problem of mismatch between repeated time-lapse seismic surveys remains a challenge, particularly for land acquisition. In this dissertation, we present a new algorithm, which is an extension of the surface-consistent model, and which minimizes the mismatch between surveys, hence improving repeatability. We introduce the concept of surface-consistent matching filters (SCMF) for processing time-lapse seismic data, where matching filters are convolutional filters that minimize the sum-squared error between two signals. Since in the Fourier domain, a matching filter is the spectral ratio of the two signals, we extend the well known surface-consistent hypothesis such that the data term is a trace-by-trace spectral ratio of two datasets instead of only one (i.e. surface-consistent deconvolution). To avoid unstable division of spectra, we compute the spectral ratios in the time domain by first designing trace-sequential, least-squares matching filters, then Fourier transforming them. A subsequent least-squares solution then factors the trace-sequential matching filters into four operators: two surface-consistent (source and receiver), and two subsurface-consistent (offset and midpoint). We apply the algorithm to two datasets: a synthetic time-lapse model and field data from a CO2 monitoring site in Northern Alberta. In addition, two common time-lapse processing schemes (independent processing and simultaneous processing) are compared. We present a modification of the simultaneous processing scheme as a direct result of applying the new SCMF algorithm. The results of applying the SCMF together with the new modified simultaneous processing flow reveal the potential benefit of the method, however some challenges remain, specifically in the presence of random noise.

  8. Time-lapse seismic imaging of the Reykjanes geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weemstra, Cornelis; Obermann, Anne; Blanck, Hanna; Verdel, Arie; Paap, Bob; Árni Guðnason, Egill; Páll Hersir, Gylfi; Jousset, Philippe; Sigurðsson, Ómar

    2016-04-01

    We report on the results obtained from a dense seismic deployment over a geothermal reservoir. The reservoir has been producing continuously for almost a decade and is located on the tip of the Reykjanes peninsula, SW Iceland. The seismic stations on top of the reservoir have continuously recorded the ambient seismic wavefield between April 2014 and September 2015. The density of the seismic network makes the data well suited for time-lapse seismic imaging of the reservoir. To that end we compute time-lapse responses through the application of seismic interferometry. These interferometric lapse responses are obtained by simple crosscorrelation of the seismic noise recorded by the different seismic stations. We subsequently evaluate the temporal variation of the coda of these crosscorrelations. The term coda refers to the later arriving, multiple scattered waves. The multiple scattering implies that these waves have sampled the subsurface very densely and hence become highly sensitive to tiny mechanical and structural changes in that subsurface. This sensitivity allows one, in principle at least, to monitor the geothermal reservoir. Preliminary results indeed suggest a relation between the temporal variation of the coda waves and the reservoir. Ultimately, this method may lead to a means to monitor a geothermal reservoir in both space and time.

  9. Time-lapse Raman imaging of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chiu, Liang-Da; Morimoto, Chiaki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takedachi, Masahide; Kawata, Satoshi; Murakami, Shinya; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Osteoblastic mineralization occurs during the early stages of bone formation. During this mineralization, hydroxyapatite (HA), a major component of bone, is synthesized, generating hard tissue. Many of the mechanisms driving biomineralization remain unclear because the traditional biochemical assays used to investigate them are destructive techniques incompatible with viable cells. To determine the temporal changes in mineralization-related biomolecules at mineralization spots, we performed time-lapse Raman imaging of mouse osteoblasts at a subcellular resolution throughout the mineralization process. Raman imaging enabled us to analyze the dynamics of the related biomolecules at mineralization spots throughout the entire process of mineralization. Here, we stimulated KUSA-A1 cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and conducted time-lapse Raman imaging on them every 4 hours for 24 hours, beginning 5 days after the stimulation. The HA and cytochrome c Raman bands were used as markers for osteoblastic mineralization and apoptosis. From the Raman images successfully acquired throughout the mineralization process, we found that β-carotene acts as a biomarker that indicates the initiation of osteoblastic mineralization. A fluctuation of cytochrome c concentration, which indicates cell apoptosis, was also observed during mineralization. We expect time-lapse Raman imaging to help us to further elucidate osteoblastic mineralization mechanisms that have previously been unobservable.

  10. Time-lapse Raman imaging of osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chiu, Liang-da; Morimoto, Chiaki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takedachi, Masahide; Kawata, Satoshi; Murakami, Shinya; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoblastic mineralization occurs during the early stages of bone formation. During this mineralization, hydroxyapatite (HA), a major component of bone, is synthesized, generating hard tissue. Many of the mechanisms driving biomineralization remain unclear because the traditional biochemical assays used to investigate them are destructive techniques incompatible with viable cells. To determine the temporal changes in mineralization-related biomolecules at mineralization spots, we performed time-lapse Raman imaging of mouse osteoblasts at a subcellular resolution throughout the mineralization process. Raman imaging enabled us to analyze the dynamics of the related biomolecules at mineralization spots throughout the entire process of mineralization. Here, we stimulated KUSA-A1 cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and conducted time-lapse Raman imaging on them every 4 hours for 24 hours, beginning 5 days after the stimulation. The HA and cytochrome c Raman bands were used as markers for osteoblastic mineralization and apoptosis. From the Raman images successfully acquired throughout the mineralization process, we found that β-carotene acts as a biomarker that indicates the initiation of osteoblastic mineralization. A fluctuation of cytochrome c concentration, which indicates cell apoptosis, was also observed during mineralization. We expect time-lapse Raman imaging to help us to further elucidate osteoblastic mineralization mechanisms that have previously been unobservable. PMID:26211729

  11. Time-lapse Raman imaging of osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Chiu, Liang-da; Morimoto, Chiaki; Fujita, Katsumasa; Takedachi, Masahide; Kawata, Satoshi; Murakami, Shinya; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoblastic mineralization occurs during the early stages of bone formation. During this mineralization, hydroxyapatite (HA), a major component of bone, is synthesized, generating hard tissue. Many of the mechanisms driving biomineralization remain unclear because the traditional biochemical assays used to investigate them are destructive techniques incompatible with viable cells. To determine the temporal changes in mineralization-related biomolecules at mineralization spots, we performed time-lapse Raman imaging of mouse osteoblasts at a subcellular resolution throughout the mineralization process. Raman imaging enabled us to analyze the dynamics of the related biomolecules at mineralization spots throughout the entire process of mineralization. Here, we stimulated KUSA-A1 cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and conducted time-lapse Raman imaging on them every 4 hours for 24 hours, beginning 5 days after the stimulation. The HA and cytochrome c Raman bands were used as markers for osteoblastic mineralization and apoptosis. From the Raman images successfully acquired throughout the mineralization process, we found that β-carotene acts as a biomarker that indicates the initiation of osteoblastic mineralization. A fluctuation of cytochrome c concentration, which indicates cell apoptosis, was also observed during mineralization. We expect time-lapse Raman imaging to help us to further elucidate osteoblastic mineralization mechanisms that have previously been unobservable. PMID:26211729

  12. The Attention-Lapse and Motor Decoupling accounts of SART performance are not mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Seli, Paul

    2016-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the mechanisms purported to underlie performance in the Sustained-Attention-to-Response Task (SART). Whereas the Attention-Lapse account posits that SART errors result from attentional disengagement, the Motor Decoupling account proposes that SART errors result from failures to inhibit a fast, prepotent motor response, despite adequate attention to the task. That SART performance might be fully accounted for by motor decoupling is problematic for a Attention-Lapse account, and for the use of the SART as an index of attention lapses. To test whether SART performance is in fact fully accounted for by motor decoupling, I examined the relation between SART performance and attention lapses while controlling for motor decoupling. The results were clear: The SART was associated with attention lapses independently of motor decoupling. Thus, the present study suggests that both accounts are correct and that the SART is a valid measure of attention lapses. PMID:26946296

  13. Distinct coping strategies differentially predict urge levels and lapses in a smoking cessation attempt.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Jeannette; Bachmann, Monica S; Znoj, Hansjörg

    2013-06-01

    This study analysed mechanisms through which stress-coping and temptation-coping strategies were associated with lapses. Furthermore, we explored whether distinct coping strategies differentially predicted reduced lapse risk, lower urge levels, or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses during the first week of an unassisted smoking cessation attempt. Participants were recruited via the internet and mass media in Switzerland. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) with mobile devices was used to assess urge levels and lapses. Online questionnaires were used to measure smoking behaviours and coping variables at baseline, as well as smoking behaviour at the three-month follow-up. The sample consisted of 243 individuals, aged 20 to 40, who reported 4199 observations. Findings of multilevel regression analyses show that coping was mainly associated with a reduced lapse risk and not with lower urge levels or a weaker association between urge levels and lapses. 'Calming down' and 'commitment to change' predicted a lower lapse risk and also a weaker relation between urge levels and lapses. 'Stimulus control' predicted a lower lapse risk and lower urge levels. Conversely, 'task-orientation' and 'risk assessment' were related to higher lapse risk and 'risk assessment' also to higher urge levels. Disengagement coping i.e. 'eating or shopping', 'distraction', and 'mobilising social support' did not affect lapse risk. Promising coping strategies during the initial stage of smoking cessation attempt are targeted directly at reducing the lapse risk and are characterised by engagement with the stressor or one's reactions towards the stressor and a focus on positive consequences instead of health risks. PMID:23501139

  14. Improved site contamination through time-lapse complex resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Orozco, Adrian; Kemna, Andreas; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 project ModelPROBE, time-lapse complex resistivity (CR) measurements were conducted at a test site close to Trecate (NW Italy). The objective was to investigate the capabilities of the CR imaging method to delineate the geometry and dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon contaminant plume which resulted from a crude oil spill in 1994. To achieve this it is required to discriminate the electrical signal associated to static (i.e., lithology) from dynamic changes in the subsurface, with the latter associated to significant seasonal groundwater fluctuations. Previous studies have demonstrated the benefits of the CR method to gain information which is not accessible with common electrical resistivity tomography. However field applications are still rarely and neither the analysis of the data error for CR time-lapse measurements, nor the inversion itself haven not received enough attention. While the ultimate objective at the site is to characterize, here we address the discrimination of the lithological and hydrological controls on the IP response by considering data collected in an uncontaminated area of the site. In this study we demonstrate that an adequate error description of CR measurements provides images free of artifacts and quantitative superior than previous approaches. Based on this approach, differential images computed for time-lapse data exhibited anomalies well correlated with spatiotemporal changes correlated to seasonal fluctuations in the groundwater level. The proposed analysis may be useful in the characterization of fate and transport of hydrocarbon contaminants relevant for the site, which presents areas contaminated with crude oil.

  15. Repeatability observations from a time-lapse seismic survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, S.L.; Miller, R.D.; Raef, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    Time-lapse seismic surveys have proven extremely valuable in recent years, having numerous economical and environmental applications. To fully utilize this monitoring technique, problems associated with recording repeatability must be minimized. Much work has been done to equalize data from one survey to the next via processing techniques (Huang et al., 1998). The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential for minimized processing, allowing study of extremely small changes in subsurface characteristics. The goal is to evaluate source and receiver terrain combination to optimize signal repeatability, and to improve deconvolution with the ground force to suppress different types of noise and increase repeatability. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  16. Temperature lapse rate and methane in Titan's troposphere.

    PubMed

    McKay, C P; Chau Martin, S; Griffith, C A; Keller, R M

    1997-10-01

    We have reanalyzed the Voyager radio occultation data for Titan, examining two alternative approaches to methane condensation. In one approach, methane condensation is facilitated by the presence of nitrogen because nitrogen lowers the condensation level of a methane/nitrogen mixture. The resulting enhancement in methane condensation lowers the upper limit on surface relative humidity of methane obtained from the Voyager occultation data from 0.7 to 0.6. We conclude that in this case the surface relative humidity of methane lies between 0.08 and 0.6, with values close to 0.6 indicated. In the other approach, methane is allowed to become supersaturated and reaches 1.4 times saturation in the troposphere. In this case, surface humidities up to 100% are allowed by the Voyager occultation data, and thus the upper limit must be set by other considerations. We conclude that if supersaturation is included, then the surface relative humidity of methane can be any value greater than 0.08--unless a deep ocean is present, in which case the surface relative humidity is limited to less than 0.85. Again, values close to 0.6 are indicated. Overall, the tropospheric lapse rate on Titan appears to be determined by radiative equilibrium. The lapse rate is everywhere stable against dry convection, but is unstable to moist convection. This finding is consistent with a supersaturated atmosphere in which condensation-and hence moist convection-is inhibited. PMID:11541736

  17. Predictive Modeling of Addiction Lapses in a Mobile Health Application

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Ming-Yuan; Patton, Timothy; McTavish, Fiona M.; Isham, Andrew; Judkins-Fisher, Chris L.; Atwood, Amy K.; Gustafson, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The chronically relapsing nature of alcoholism leads to substantial personal, family, and societal costs. Addiction-Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (A-CHESS) is a smartphone application that aims to reduce relapse. To offer targeted support to patients who are at risk of lapses within the coming week, a Bayesian network model to predict such events was constructed using responses on 2,934 weekly surveys (called the Weekly Check-in) from 152 alcohol-dependent individuals who recently completed residential treatment. The Weekly Check-in is a self-monitoring service, provided in A-CHESS, to track patients’ recovery progress. The model showed good predictability, with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.829 in the 10-fold cross-validation and 0.912 in the external validation. The sensitivity/specificity table assists the tradeoff decisions necessary to apply the model in practice. This study moves us closer to the goal of providing lapse prediction so that patients might receive more targeted and timely support. PMID:24035143

  18. Debye decomposition of time-lapse spectral induced polarisation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Spectral induced polarisation (SIP) measurements capture the low-frequency electrical properties of soils and rocks and provide a non-invasive means to access lithological, hydrogeological, and geochemical properties of the subsurface. The Debye decomposition (DD) approach is now increasingly being used to analyse SIP signatures in terms of relaxation time distributions due to its flexibility regarding the shape of the spectra. Imaging and time-lapse (monitoring) SIP measurements, capturing SIP variations in space and time, respectively, are now more and more conducted and lead to a drastic increase in the number of spectra considered, which prompts the need for robust and reliable DD tools to extract quantitative parameters from such data. We here present an implementation of the DD method for the analysis of a series of SIP data sets which are expected to only smoothly change in terms of spectral behaviour, such as encountered in many time-lapse applications where measurement geometry does not change. The routine is based on a non-linear least-squares inversion scheme with smoothness constraints on the spectral variation and in addition from one spectrum of the series to the next to deal with the inherent ill-posedness and non-uniqueness of the problem. By means of synthetic examples with typical SIP characteristics we elucidate the influence of the number and range of considered relaxation times on the inversion results. The source code of the presented routines is provided under an open source licence as a basis for further applications and developments.

  19. Time-lapse analysis of gravitropism in Ceratodon protonemata.

    PubMed

    Young, J C; Sack, F D

    1992-12-01

    The tip cell of the protonema of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. is negatively gravitropic when grown in the dark on supplemented agar. Gravitropism, plastid distribution, and plastid movement were studied in living cells using time-lapse video microscopy and infrared light. A wrong-way (downward) curvature preceded upward curvature and was detected as early as 2 minutes after reorientation. Upward curvature began 30-45 minutes after reorientation to the horizontal. Cell division temporarily reversed upward curvature, but did not inhibit wrong-way curvature. Since significant amyloplast sedimentation always occurred before the start of upward curvature, it is possible that these amyloplasts function as statoliths for upward curvature. However, no significant amyloplast sedimentation occurred before wrong-way curvature. Thus, this early phase of gravitropism cannot require plastid sedimentation for gravity sensing. Most plastids moved within and between zones, and plastid zonation was highly dynamic. Plastids moved toward the apex and toward the base of the cell at rates much slower than cytoplasmic streaming. Despite the dynamic nature of plastid movement and zonation, during upward curvature the distance between sedimented plastids and the apex stayed constant. Time-lapse analysis has revealed intriguing events not readily seen previously using destructive sampling. PMID:11537671

  20. Time-lapse analysis of gravitropism in Ceratodon protonemata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. C.; Sack, F. D.

    1992-01-01

    The tip cell of the protonema of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. is negatively gravitropic when grown in the dark on supplemented agar. Gravitropism, plastid distribution, and plastid movement were studied in living cells using time-lapse video microscopy and infrared light. A wrong-way (downward) curvature preceded upward curvature and was detected as early as 2 minutes after reorientation. Upward curvature began 30-45 minutes after reorientation to the horizontal. Cell division temporarily reversed upward curvature, but did not inhibit wrong-way curvature. Since significant amyloplast sedimentation always occurred before the start of upward curvature, it is possible that these amyloplasts function as statoliths for upward curvature. However, no significant amyloplast sedimentation occurred before wrong-way curvature. Thus, this early phase of gravitropism cannot require plastid sedimentation for gravity sensing. Most plastids moved within and between zones, and plastid zonation was highly dynamic. Plastids moved toward the apex and toward the base of the cell at rates much slower than cytoplasmic streaming. Despite the dynamic nature of plastid movement and zonation, during upward curvature the distance between sedimented plastids and the apex stayed constant. Time-lapse analysis has revealed intriguing events not readily seen previously using destructive sampling.

  1. Predictive modeling of addiction lapses in a mobile health application.

    PubMed

    Chih, Ming-Yuan; Patton, Timothy; McTavish, Fiona M; Isham, Andrew J; Judkins-Fisher, Chris L; Atwood, Amy K; Gustafson, David H

    2014-01-01

    The chronically relapsing nature of alcoholism leads to substantial personal, family, and societal costs. Addiction-comprehensive health enhancement support system (A-CHESS) is a smartphone application that aims to reduce relapse. To offer targeted support to patients who are at risk of lapses within the coming week, a Bayesian network model to predict such events was constructed using responses on 2,934 weekly surveys (called the Weekly Check-in) from 152 alcohol-dependent individuals who recently completed residential treatment. The Weekly Check-in is a self-monitoring service, provided in A-CHESS, to track patients' recovery progress. The model showed good predictability, with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.829 in the 10-fold cross-validation and 0.912 in the external validation. The sensitivity/specificity table assists the tradeoff decisions necessary to apply the model in practice. This study moves us closer to the goal of providing lapse prediction so that patients might receive more targeted and timely support. PMID:24035143

  2. Exploring Time-Lapse Photography as a Means for Qualitative Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persohn, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Collecting information via time-lapse photography is nothing new. Scientists and artists have been using this kind of data since the late 1800s. However, my research and experiments with time-lapse have shown that great potential may lie in its application to educational and social scientific research methods. This article is part history, part…

  3. Distress Tolerance Treatment for Early-Lapse Smokers: Rationale, Program Description, and Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard A.; Palm, Kathleen M.; Strong, David R.; Lejuez, Carl W.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Hayes, Steven C.; Wilson, Kelly G.; Gifford, Elizabeth V.

    2008-01-01

    A significant percentage of individuals attempting smoking cessation lapse within a matter of days, and very few are able to recover to achieve long-term abstinence. This observation suggests that many smokers may have quit-attempt histories characterized exclusively by early lapses to smoking following quit attempts. Recent negative-reinforcement…

  4. Relations among Affect, Abstinence Motivation and Confidence, and Daily Smoking Lapse Risk

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Bold, Krysten W.; Chapman, Gretchen B.; McCarthy, Danielle E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study tested the hypothesis that changes in momentary affect, abstinence motivation, and confidence would predict lapse risk over the next 12–24 hours using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data from smokers attempting to quit smoking. Method 103 adult, daily, treatment-seeking smokers recorded their momentary affect, motivation to quit, abstinence confidence, and smoking behaviors in near real time with multiple EMA reports per day using electronic diaries post-quit. Results Multilevel models indicated that initial levels of negative affect were associated with smoking, even after controlling for earlier smoking status, and that short-term increases in negative affect predicted lapses up to 12, but not 24, hours later. Positive affect had significant effects on subsequent abstinence confidence, but not motivation to quit. High levels of motivation appeared to reduce increases in lapse risk that occur over hours while momentary changes in confidence did not predict lapse risk over 12 hours. Conclusion Negative affect had short-lived effects on lapse risk, whereas higher levels of motivation protected against the risk of lapsing that accumulates over hours. An increase in positive affect was associated with greater confidence to quit, but such changes in confidence did not reduce short-term lapse risk, contrary to expectations. Relations observed among affect, cognitions, and lapse seem to depend critically on the timing of assessments. PMID:24955665

  5. Relations among affect, abstinence motivation and confidence, and daily smoking lapse risk.

    PubMed

    Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M; Bold, Krysten W; Chapman, Gretchen B; McCarthy, Danielle E

    2014-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that changes in momentary affect, abstinence motivation, and confidence would predict lapse risk over the next 12-24 hr using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data from smokers attempting to quit smoking. One hundred and three adult, daily, treatment-seeking smokers recorded their momentary affect, motivation to quit, abstinence confidence, and smoking behaviors in near real time with multiple EMA reports per day using electronic diaries postquit. Multilevel models indicated that initial levels of negative affect were associated with smoking, even after controlling for earlier smoking status, and that short-term increases in negative affect predicted lapses up to 12, but not 24, hr later. Positive affect had significant effects on subsequent abstinence confidence, but not motivation to quit. High levels of motivation appeared to reduce increases in lapse risk that occur over hours although momentary changes in confidence did not predict lapse risk over 12 hr. Negative affect had short-lived effects on lapse risk, whereas higher levels of motivation protected against the risk of lapsing that accumulates over hours. An increase in positive affect was associated with greater confidence to quit, but such changes in confidence did not reduce short-term lapse risk, contrary to expectations. Relations observed among affect, cognitions, and lapse seem to depend critically on the timing of assessments. PMID:24955665

  6. The Development of an Aftermath of Dietary Lapses Coping Questionnaire for Weight Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimpo, Misa; Akamatsu, Rie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to develop the Aftermath of Dietary Lapses Coping Questionnaire (ADLCQ) for evaluating how people cope with the aftermath of dietary lapses during weight control. Method: Between June-July 2012, dieticians working in public health centres and city offices in Sizuoka, Japan, recruited 466 participants. They were…

  7. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

    2003-03-13

    Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

  8. Time-lapse video sysem used to study nesting gyrfalcons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, Travis; Fuller, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    We used solar-powered time-lapse video photography to document nesting Gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) food habits in central West Greenland from May to July in 2000 and 2001. We collected 2677.25 h of videotape from three nests, representing 94, 87, and 49% of the nestling period at each nest. The video recorded 921 deliveries of 832 prey items. We placed 95% of the items into prey categories. The image quality was good but did not reveal enough detail to identify most passerines to species. We found no evidence that Gyrfalcons were negatively affected by the video system after the initial camera set-up. The video system experienced some mechanical problems but proved reliable. The system likely can be used to effectively document the food habits and nesting behavior of other birds, especially those delivering large prey to a nest or other frequently used site.

  9. Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Dust Storm Time Lapse Shows Opportunity's Skies Darken

    NASA's Opportunity rover is literally seeing some of its darkest days. Both Mars Exploration Rovers have been riding out a regional dust storm for several weeks. Conditions became particularly dreary in the Meridiani Planum region where Opportunity sits, perched on the edge of 'Victoria Crater.'

    This image is a time-lapse composite where each horizon-survey image has been compressed horizontally (but not vertically) to emphasize the sky. The relative brightness and darkness of the sky from sol to sol (over a 30-sol period beginning June 14, 2007) is depicted accurately in these images, which view roughly the same part of the plains southwest of the rover. The images are approximately true color composites, generated from calibrated radiance data files using the panoramic camera's 601-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 482-nanometer filters.

    The rovers' atmospheric science team is concerned that smaller, regional dust storms could expand into a larger, globe-encircling storm. That could extend the time the sun stays obscured, challenging the capability of Opportunity's solar panels to produce enough electricity for the rover to function.

    Fortunately, as of July 19, 2007, the Opportunity site is clearing slightly. When the storm ends, atmospheric scientists hope to review data from the rovers that will help them determine what sort of dust was being lifted and distributed.

    The numbers across the top of the image report a measurement of atmospheric opacity, called by the Greek letter tau. The lower the number, the clearer the sky. Both Opportunity and Spirit have been recording higher tau measurements in July 2007 than they had seen any time previously in their three and a half years on Mars. The five sol numbers across the bottom correspond (left to right) to June 14, June 30, July 5, July 13 and July 15, 2007.

  10. Work Predictors of Lapse in Patients under Treatment of Methadone Maintenance Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehrdad, Ramin; Zarbafi, Benafsheh; Pouryaghoub, Gholamreza; Saraeei, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Addiction to narcotics ‎can cause serious problems and ‎monetary losses. Therapeutic ‎success can be predicted ‎through identifying lapse risk ‎factors.‎ Objective: Determining Job Risk ‎Factor of Lapse.‎ Methods: This was a cross ‎sectional study on 351 addicts ‎visiting five methadone clinics. A ‎Data collection sheet consisting ‎of questions on demographic ‎and job information was filled up ‎through direct interviews. ‎Information relating to lapse in ‎the first month was analyzed.‎ Results: The mean (SD) age of ‎the participants was 40(12) ‎years; of them, 74% were ‎employed, of whom 34% had ‎lapsed. A relationship was ‎noticed between education ‎qualification (secondary school ‎compared with higher and lower ‎education) and lapse (p = .04), ‎and also between type of drug ‎abuse (amphetamine) and lapse ‎‎(p = .001).‎ Conclusion: ‎ ‏ ‏‎ Lapse was more ‎dependent on type of drug abused, ‎and employment had a protective role, ‎with no correlation with the type of ‎job and other job conditions. Non-‎work factors mediated/suppressed the ‎role of occupational conditions.‎ PMID:27006672

  11. Biomarkers identified with time-lapse imaging: discovery, validation, and practical application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Tan, Lei; Suraj, Vaishali; Reijo Pera, Renee; Shen, Shehua

    2013-03-15

    "Time-lapse markers," which are defined by time-lapse imaging and correlated with clinical outcomes, may provide embryologists with new opportunities for improving embryo selection. This article provides an overview of noninvasive biomarkers defined by time-lapse imaging studies. In addition to comprehensively reviewing the discovery of each time-lapse marker, it focuses on the criteria necessary for their successful integration into clinical practice, including [1] statistical and biological significance, [2] validation through prospective clinical studies, and [3] development of reliable technology to measure and quantify the time-lapse marker. Because manual analysis of time-lapse images is labor intensive and limits the practical use of the image data in the clinic, automated image analysis software platforms may contribute substantially to improvements in embryo selection accuracy. Ultimately, time-lapse markers that are based on a foundation of basic research, validated through prospective clinical studies, and enabled by a reliable quantification technology may improve IVF success rates, encourage broader adoption of single-embryo transfer, and reduce the risks associated with multiple gestation pregnancies. PMID:23499001

  12. Methylphenidate significantly reduces lapses of attention during on-road highway driving in patients with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; Roth, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Lapses of attention are characteristic for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and as such may impair performance of daily activities. Data from an on-road driving study were reanalyzed to determine lapses in patients with ADHD after treatment with methylphenidate and placebo.A total of 18 adult ADHD patients performed a 100-km on-road driving test and were instructed to drive with a steady lateral position and constant speed. The SD of lateral position (SDLP), that is, the weaving of the car, lapses, and alertness, was assessed.Driving was significantly better (P = 0.006) with methylphenidate (SDLP, 18.8 cm) when compared with placebo (SDLP, 21.2 cm). Both the reduction in SDLP and the number of lapses (P = 0.003) confirm this significant improvement, which is further supported by subjective assessments of perceived driving performance. Although lapses were common in the placebo condition (11/18 patients), they were much less frequently observed (5/18 patients) after treatment with methylphenidate. Postdriving assessments suggest that lapses often go unnoticed by drivers.In conclusion, methylphenidate significantly improves driving of patients with ADHD by significantly reducing the number of lapses. PMID:24978156

  13. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of everyday memory lapses in older adults.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Courtney; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-09-01

    Everyday memory lapses experienced by older adults (OAs) were examined using a daily-diary checklist and retrospective questionnaire. In Experiment 1, 138 younger and 138 OAs indicated the frequency of forgetting of 16 memory lapses, and whether each occurred daily during the course of a week. OAs reported more memory lapses on the questionnaire, but not the daily diary. OAs reported more frequently forgetting names and words, while younger adults had more difficulty with appointments and personal dates. Fewer memory lapses on the daily diary were related to better performance on a laboratory-memory measure for OAs. In Experiment 2, 62 OAs returned for a five-year follow-up and endorsed experiencing more memory lapses on the daily diary compared to baseline, specifically forgetting more names and words, but not the retrospective questionnaire. Daily checklist memory lapses again correlated with the laboratory-memory measure. A daily checklist may be a viable way to assess everyday memory lapses. PMID:26810777

  14. Biomarkers identified with time-lapse imaging: discovery, validation, and practical application

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice A.; Tan, Lei; Suraj, Vaishali; Pera, Renee Reijo; Shen, Shehua

    2014-01-01

    “Time-lapse markers,” which are defined by time-lapse imaging and correlated with clinical outcomes, may provide embryologists with new opportunities for improving embryo selection. This article provides an overview of noninvasive biomarkers defined by time-lapse imaging studies. In addition to comprehensively reviewing the discovery of each time-lapse marker, it focuses on the criteria necessary for their successful integration into clinical practice, including [1] statistical and biological significance, [2] validation through prospective clinical studies, and [3] development of reliable technology to measure and quantify the time-lapse marker. Because manual analysis of time-lapse images is labor intensive and limits the practical use of the image data in the clinic, automated image analysis software platforms may contribute substantially to improvements in embryo selection accuracy. Ultimately, time-lapse markers that are based on a foundation of basic research, validated through prospective clinical studies, and enabled by a reliable quantification technology may improve IVF success rates, encourage broader adoption of single-embryo transfer, and reduce the risks associated with multiple gestation pregnancies. PMID:23499001

  15. Relative influence of lapse rate and water vapor on the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.

    1995-03-01

    Observational data are employed in a radiative transfer model to simulate the mean variation in normalized greenhouse effect (NGE) between January and July. This is performed at a variety of locations, and the mean local rate of change in NGE with surface temperature is determined. The result is 1.5 times larger than the variation of NGE with surface temperature obtained by spatially correlating the aggregated data. This disagreement is ascribed to systematic differences between the two approaches and is interpreted as indicating the significant role that large-scale circulations as well as surface temperatures have on determining local thermal and humidity structures. The separate effects of water vapor and lapse rate variations are estimated, by simulating the January-July changes in NGE with each process in turn held constant: beyond the tropics the lapse rate feedback is found to dominate over the water vapor feedback, particularly over land; in the inter-tropics, lapse rate variations account for about a third of the change in greenhouse trapping, contributing substantially to the `super-greenhouse effect.` Utilizing a radiative-convective model, the possible effects on climate change of both lapse rate changes and water vapor feedback are compared: a global mean model cliamte is perturbed by a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide and equilibrium surface temperatures obtained for a variety of lapse rates. If, under conditions of climate change, the global mean lapse rate varies with surface temperature in the same manner as in the present-day mean seasonal cycle (increasing the lapse rate magnitude by 6%), then the lapse rate feedback amplifies the modeled water vapor feedback by 40%; conversely, a 12% reduction in the magnitude of the lapse rate completely nullifies the water vapor feedback.

  16. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of resistivity equipment enables the real time observation of infiltration processes through the vadose zone. In order to study the advantages and limitations of the method infiltration experiments are carried out for different soil types at various locations. All sites are subsequently excavated and investigated in detail. For an improved verification of the resistivity data the most recent experiment is conducted using a colour tracer. Two infiltration experiments are carried out in sandy soil. The location is Fuhrberg, close to Hannover, Germany. The area has been intensively studied for soil research purposes for more than 30 years. During both infiltration experiments water (110 l/80 l) is infiltrated for a period of 4.5 h and 8 h, respectively, and the infiltration process is observed by ERT. The resistivity measurements are conducted using a 3D-dipole-dipole configuration with electrode distances of 20 cm in the centre of the infiltration field. The whole resistivity array consists of 200 and 300 electrodes, respectively. The second experiment uses increased electrode spacing in the border area in order to enable the resolution of the deeper groundwater table (3.5 m during the second experiment compared to about 1.2 m for the first experiment). Immediately after completion of the resistivity measurements TDR and tensiometer measurements are carried out in 5-8 slices of the excavated infiltration area over a period of several days. The colour tracer used during the second experiment clearly outlines the infiltration plume with sharp outer limits. The ERT inversion depicts the shape of the plume successfully. Time lapse ERT interpretation reveals the development of the plume in time. The combination of ERT interpretation and TDR measurements enables the construction of the relationship between water content and resistivity as reconstructed by ERT using an Archie approach. By using this function water content changes can be

  17. Use of time-lapse video recording for the direct measurement of behavior in the mentally retarded.

    PubMed

    Linscheid, T R; Feiner, J; Sostek, A M

    1984-01-01

    In the present paper behaviors of mentally retarded children were recorded simultaneously on real time and time lapse video recorders. Behaviors on the time lapse recordings occurred at a rate 12 times faster than they actually occurred in real time resulting in a 92 percent reduction in the time required to score the tapes. Reliability estimates from real time and time lapse records were high and correspondence between the two methods was good. The limitations of time lapse and the feasibilities for the extended use of time lapse video recorders in behavioral and ecobehavioral assessment of mentally retarded individuals are discussed. PMID:6595965

  18. Time lapse gravity monitoring at Coso geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Rachel Vest

    An extensive time lapse gravity data set was acquired over the Coso geothermal field near Ridgecrest, California starting in 1987, with the latest data set acquired in 2013. In this thesis I use these gravity data to obtain a better understanding of mass changes occurring within the geothermal field. Geothermal energy is produced by flashing naturally heated ground water into steam which is used to turn turbines. Brine and re-condensed steam are then re-injected into the reservoir. A percentage of the water removed from the system is lost to the process. The time lapse gravity method consists of gravity measurements taken at the same locations over time, capturing snap shots of the changing field. After careful processing, the final data are differenced to extract the change in gravity over time. This change in gravity can then be inverted to recover the change in density and therefore mass over time. The inversion process also produces information on the three dimensional locations of these mass changes. Thirty five gravity data sets were processed and a subsection were inverted with two different starting times, a sixteen point data set collected continuously between 1991 and 2005, and a thirty-eight point data set collected between 1996 and 2005. The maximum change in gravity in the 1991 data group was -350 microGal observed near station CSE2. For the 1996 data group the maximum gravity change observed over the nine year period was -248 microGal. The gravity data were then inverted using the surface inversion method. Three values of density contrast were used, -0.05 g/cm3, -0.10 g/cm3, and -0.20 g/cm3. The starting surface in 1991 was set to 2,500 ft above sea level. The changes in surfaces were then converted to mass changes. The largest total mass change recovered was -1.39x1011 kg. This mass value is of the same order of magnitude as published well production data for the field. Additionally, the gravity data produces a better understanding of the spatial

  19. Terahertz time-lapse imaging of hydration in physiological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David B.; Taylor, Zachary D.; Bajwa, Neha; Tewari, Priyamvada; Maccabi, Ashkan; Sung, Shijun; Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Brown, Elliott R.

    2011-02-01

    This study describes terahertz (THz) imaging of hydration changes in physiological tissues with high water concentration sensitivity. A fast-scanning, pulsed THz imaging system (centered at 525 GHz; 125 GHz bandwidth) was utilized to acquire a 35 mm x 35 mm field-of-view with 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm pixels in less than two minutes. THz time-lapsed images were taken on three sample systems: (1) a simple binary system of water evaporating from a polypropylene towel, (2) the accumulation of fluid at the site of a sulfuric acid burn on ex vivo porcine skin, and (3) the evaporative dehydration of an ex vivo porcine cornea. The diffusion-regulating behavior of corneal tissue is elucidated, and the correlation of THz reflectivity with tissue hydration is measured using THz spectroscopy on four ex vivo corneas. We conclude that THz imaging can discern small differences in the distribution of water in physiological tissues and is a good candidate for burn and corneal imaging.

  20. Time-lapse Geophysical Data from a Stressed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.; Tibbo, M.; Kassam, A.; Carey, A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Mohammed, T. E.; Malehmir, R.; Guo, K.

    2015-12-01

    A complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines is the high-stress dependency of the physical properties of hard rocks. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Data from in situ monitoring of the mining induced seismicity, conductivity, and stress dependent physical properties have been obtained from two boreholes located in this mine. These borehole are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Multi-electrode array DC/IP borehole and borehole-to-borehole surveys were also conducted in 2014, showing an increase in resistivity only in the 1300 m borehole near the active mining area, possibly due to stress induced closing of fractures. There is only exploration activity near the 1700 m borehole over this time period, and it therefore shows no changes in resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density.

  1. Patenting time-lapse microscopy: the European story.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Sigrid; Cockbain, Julian; Pennings, Guido

    2014-02-01

    European Patent No. 2430454 of Stanford University is open to opposition before the European Patent Office if such opposition is filed by 23 October 2013. This is the European equivalent of the US Patent that raised such controversy in this journal in August 2013 as being a patent on time. The European Patent, which is directed to a method of selecting embryos for implantation using the results of time-lapse microscopy, should, in the present authors' opinion, be revoked as being directed to a method of medical diagnosis, which is unpatentable under European patent law. The only party currently opposing Stanford's patent is a competitor, Unisense FertiliTech A/S which is itself seeking to patent similar methods in Europe; the objection that Stanford has patented a method of diagnosis has not been raised by Unisense FertiliTech. We submit that Stanford's patent should be opposed to safeguard competition and to protect the freedom to operate of clinicians. In this paper we explain how Stanford's patent should fail under European law. PMID:24369922

  2. Time-lapse ratios of cone excitations in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Foster, David H; Amano, Kinjiro; Nascimento, Sérgio M C

    2016-03-01

    The illumination in natural environments varies through the day. Stable inferences about surface color might be supported by spatial ratios of cone excitations from the reflected light, but their invariance has been quantified only for global changes in illuminant spectrum. The aim here was to test their invariance under natural changes in both illumination spectrum and geometry, especially in the distribution of shadows. Time-lapse hyperspectral radiance images were acquired from five outdoor vegetated and nonvegetated scenes. From each scene, 10,000 pairs of points were sampled randomly and ratios measured across time. Mean relative deviations in ratios were generally large, but when sampling was limited to short distances or moderate time intervals, they fell below the level for detecting violations in ratio invariance. When illumination changes with uneven geometry were excluded, they fell further, to levels obtained with global changes in illuminant spectrum alone. Within sampling constraints, ratios of cone excitations, and also of opponent-color combinations, provide an approximately invariant signal for stable surface-color inferences, despite spectral and geometric variations in scene illumination. PMID:25847405

  3. Orb-2's Antares Rolls Out to Launch Pad (Time-Lapse)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This time-lapse video shows the roll out of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, with the Cygnus spacecraft aboard, from the Horizontal Integration Facility to the Mid-Atlantic Regional...

  4. NASA HS3 Mission Time Lapse Highlights Cameras Over Tropical Systems

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a time-lapse video created with images recorded during a recent HS3 Science Missions with the NASA Global Hawk. Shown are the images from the Daylight, HDVis, and the Low-light Cameras on t...

  5. Twelve tips for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism.

    PubMed

    Rougas, Steven; Gentilesco, Bethany; Green, Emily; Flores, Libertad

    2015-01-01

    Medical educators have gained significant ground in the practical and scholarly approach to professionalism. When a lapse occurs, thoughtful remediation to address the underlying issue can have a positive impact on medical students and resident physicians, while failure to address lapses, or to do so ineffectively, can have long-term consequences for learners and potentially patients. Despite these high stakes, educators are often hesitant to address lapses in professionalism, possibly due to a lack of time and familiarity with the process. Attention must be paid to generalizable, hands-on recommendations for daily use so that clinicians and administrators feel well equipped to tackle this often difficult yet valuable task. This article reviews the literature related to addressing unprofessional behavior among trainees in medicine and connects it to the shared experience of medical educators at one institution. The framework presented aims to provide practical guidance and empowerment for educators responsible for addressing medical student and resident physician lapses in professionalism. PMID:25665630

  6. Poor sleep quality as a risk factor for lapse following a cannabis quit attempt.

    PubMed

    Babson, Kimberly A; Boden, Matthew Tyler; Harris, Alex H; Stickle, Timothy R; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2013-04-01

    Treatments for cannabis dependence are associated with high rates of lapse/relapse, underscoring the importance of identifying malleable risk factors that are associated with quit failure. Whereas research has demonstrated that poor sleep quality following cannabis discontinuation is related to subsequent use, there has yet to be an examination of whether poor sleep quality prior to a quit attempt results in a similar pattern of lapse. The present study addressed this gap by examining the role of pre-quit sleep quality on early lapse to cannabis use following a self-guided quit attempt, among 55 cannabis dependent military veterans. Results indicated that participants who experienced poor pre-quit sleep quality had greater risk for lapse within the first 2 days (out of 7) following their quit attempt. Findings are discussed in terms of improving treatments for individuals who report poor sleep quality prior to a cannabis quit attempt. PMID:23098380

  7. Time-Lapse of Backplane of the JWST Being Moved Into Clean Room

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a time-lapse video of the center section of the 'pathfinder' backplane for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope being moved into the clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbe...

  8. Feasibility of time-lapse AVO and AVOA analysis to monitor compaction-induced seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.-X.; Angus, D. A.; Yuan, S. Y.; Xu, Y. G.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoir production generally results in observable time-lapse physical property changes, such as velocity increases within a compacting reservoir. However, the physical property changes that lead to velocity changes can be difficult to isolate uniquely. Thus, integrated hydro-mechanical simulation, stress-sensitive rock physics models and time-lapse seismic modelling workflows can be employed to study the influence of velocity changes and induced seismic anisotropy due to reservoir compaction. We study the influence of reservoir compaction and compartmentalization on time-lapse seismic signatures for reflection amplitude variation with offset (AVO) and azimuth (AVOA). Specifically, the time-lapse AVO and AVOA responses are predicted for two models: a laterally homogeneous four-layer dipping model and a laterally heterogeneous graben structure reservoir model. Seismic reflection coefficients for different offsets and azimuths are calculated for compressional (P-P) and converted shear (P-S) waves using an anisotropic ray tracer as well as using approximate equations for AVO and AVOA. The simulations help assess the feasibility of using time-lapse AVO and AVOA signatures to monitor reservoir compartmentalization as well as evaluate induced stress anisotropy due to changes in the effective stress field. The results of this study indicate that time-lapse AVO and AVOA analysis can be applied as a potential means for qualitatively and semi-quantitatively linking azimuthal anisotropy changes caused by reservoir production to pressure/stress changes.

  9. Estimation of atmospheric parameters from time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Jack E.; Basu, Santasri; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2016-05-01

    A time-lapse imaging experiment was conducted to estimate various atmospheric parameters for the imaging path. Atmospheric turbulence caused frame-to-frame shifts of the entire image as well as parts of the image. The statistics of these shifts encode information about the turbulence strength (as characterized by Cn2, the refractive index structure function constant) along the optical path. The shift variance observed is simply proportional to the variance of the tilt of the optical field averaged over the area being tracked. By presuming this turbulence follows the Kolmogorov spectrum, weighting functions can be derived which relate the turbulence strength along the path to the shifts measured. These weighting functions peak at the camera and fall to zero at the object. The larger the area observed, the more quickly the weighting function decays. One parameter we would like to estimate is r0 (the Fried parameter, or atmospheric coherence diameter.) The weighting functions derived for pixel sized or larger parts of the image all fall faster than the weighting function appropriate for estimating the spherical wave r0. If we presume Cn2 is constant along the path, then an estimate for r0 can be obtained for each area tracked, but since the weighting function for r0 differs substantially from that for every realizable tracked area, it can be expected this approach would yield a poor estimator. Instead, the weighting functions for a number of different patch sizes can be combined through the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse to create a new weighting function which yields the least-squares optimal linear combination of measurements for estimation of r0. This approach is carried out, and it is observed that this approach is somewhat noisy because the pseudo-inverse assigns weights much greater than one to many of the observations.

  10. Variability of the isotopic lapse rate across the mountain ranges in Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian, H.; Fan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Stable isotope based paleoaltimetry studies require knowledge of the isotope-elevation gradient during the time of interest, but this information is rarely available. As a result, many studies often apply the modern local lapse rate or a global average lapse rate and assume these values are valid for the area of interest and that they hold through time. However, natural variability in local-scale climate and mountain geometry and morphology can influence the isotope-elevation (and temperature-elevation) gradient. We evaluate the inter- and intra-mountain range variability of modern climate and isotope values of stream water for three Laramide ranges in Wyoming (Wind River Range, Bighorn and Laramie Mountains), as well as for a regional elevation transect across the central Rocky mountain front. Samples of steam water were taken from major catchments across Wyoming in 2007, 2011, and 2012. We find that the modern lapse rate for these ranges is -1.7‰/km, -2.2‰/km and -1.8‰/km respectively. Although these values are very similar to one another and to the global isotopic lapse rate (-2.1‰/km), large variation (up to 6‰/km) exists among individual small river catchments of the Bighorn Mountains. The variability in catchment-scale lapse rate does not appear to be systematically related to annual, or seasonal surface air temperature, precipitation amount, or catchment area. However, the range-scale lapse rates may yet reflect the regional climate, which is generally coolest and driest in the Wind River Range (lowest lapse rate) and warmest and wettest in the Bighorn Mountains (highest lapse rate). Similar d-excess values exist across individual mountain ranges, but inter-mountain range differences indicate that the Laramie Mountains (and regions of western Nebraska) receive evaporatively enriched rainwater compared to those in the Wind River Range and Bighorn Mountains. These differences do not necessarily require separate vapor sources as the lower d

  11. Distinct neural correlates for attention lapses in patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ryan C.; Salo, Taylor; Carter, Cameron S.

    2015-01-01

    Momentary lapses in attention are common in healthy populations. This phenomenon has recently received increased investigation, particularly in relationship to the default mode network (DMN). Previous research has suggested that these lapses may be due to intrusive task-irrelevant thoughts. The study of this phenomenon in schizophrenia, which is characterized by a wide variety of cognitive deficits including deficits in attention, has not previously been explored. We used the AX Continuous Performance Task to investigate attention lapses in healthy participants as well as patients with schizophrenia. We found distinct patterns of network activation between these two groups. Lapses in healthy participants were associated with DMN activation, while in patients, the same behavioral phenomenon was associated with deactivations in frontal-parietal control network (FPCN) regions. When considered in contrast to the results observed in healthy participants, these results suggest an additional origin of attention lapses in patients derived from a loss of task-related context, rather than intrusive task-irrelevant thoughts. PMID:26500517

  12. Distinct neural correlates for attention lapses in patients with schizophrenia and healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ryan C; Salo, Taylor; Carter, Cameron S

    2015-01-01

    Momentary lapses in attention are common in healthy populations. This phenomenon has recently received increased investigation, particularly in relationship to the default mode network (DMN). Previous research has suggested that these lapses may be due to intrusive task-irrelevant thoughts. The study of this phenomenon in schizophrenia, which is characterized by a wide variety of cognitive deficits including deficits in attention, has not previously been explored. We used the AX Continuous Performance Task to investigate attention lapses in healthy participants as well as patients with schizophrenia. We found distinct patterns of network activation between these two groups. Lapses in healthy participants were associated with DMN activation, while in patients, the same behavioral phenomenon was associated with deactivations in frontal-parietal control network (FPCN) regions. When considered in contrast to the results observed in healthy participants, these results suggest an additional origin of attention lapses in patients derived from a loss of task-related context, rather than intrusive task-irrelevant thoughts. PMID:26500517

  13. Acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition predict smoking lapse in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Scott R; Calhoun, Patrick S; Dennis, Michelle F; Kirby, Angela C; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-10-01

    Most smokers who attempt to quit lapse within the first week and are ultimately unsuccessful in their quit attempt. Nicotine withdrawal exacerbates cognitive and attentional problems and may be one factor in smoking relapse. The startle reflex response and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the response are sensitive to arousal and early attentional dysregulation. The current study examined whether startle response and PPI are related to early smoking lapse, and if this differs in people with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants with (N = 34) and without (N = 57) PTSD completed a startle reflex and PPI assessment during (1) ad lib smoking (2) on the first day of abstinence during a quit attempt. Most (88%) participants lapsed within the first week of the quit attempt. PTSD status predicted shorter time to lapse. Larger startle magnitude and greater PPI predicted a longer duration before smoking lapse. When diagnostic groups were examined separately, greater PPI predicted a longer successful quit attempt only in participants with a PTSD diagnosis. The startle reflex response and PPI may provide an objective, neurophysiological evaluation of regulation of arousal and early attentional processes by nicotine, which are important factors in smoking cessation success. PMID:26253620

  14. Dynamic self-efficacy and outcome expectancies: prediction of smoking lapse and relapse.

    PubMed

    Gwaltney, Chad J; Shiffman, Saul; Balabanis, Mark H; Paty, Jean A

    2005-11-01

    According to social learning models of drug relapse, decreases in abstinence self-efficacy (ASE) and increases in positive smoking outcome expectancies (POEs) should foreshadow lapses and relapse. In this study, the authors examined this hypothesis by using ecological momentary assessment data from 305 smokers who achieved initial abstinence from smoking and monitored their smoking and their ASE and POEs by using palmtop computers. Daily ASE and POEs predicted the occurrence of a 1st lapse on the following day. Following a lapse, variations in daily ASE predicted the onset of relapse, even after controlling for concurrent smoking. ASE and POEs generally neither mediated nor moderated each other's effects. These data emphasize the role of dynamic factors in the relapse process. PMID:16351387

  15. Climatological characteristics of high altitude wind shear and lapse rate layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Guttman, N. B.

    1981-01-01

    Indications of the climatological distribution of wind shear and temperature lapse and inversion rates as observed by rawinsonde measurements over the western United States are recorded. Frequencies of the strongest shear, lapse rates, and inversion layer strengths were observed for a 1 year period of record and were tabulated for the lower troposphere, the upper troposphere, and five altitude intervals in the lower stratosphere. Selected bivariate frequencies were also tabulated. Strong wind shears, lapse rates, and inversion are observed less frequently as altitude increases from 175 millibars to 20 millibars. On a seasonal basis the frequencies were higher in winter than in summer except for minor influences due to increased tropopause altitude in summer and the stratospheric wind reversal in the spring and fall.

  16. Physical activity adoption to adherence, lapse, and dropout: a self-determination theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Kinnafick, Florence-Emilie; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Duda, Joan L

    2014-05-01

    Grounded in Self-Determination Theory, we aimed to explore and identify key motivational processes involved in the transition from a physically inactive to an active lifestyle, and the processes involved in lapse and dropout behavior within a walking program. We implemented a qualitative, longitudinal case study method, using semistructured interviews and theoretical thematic analyses. Fifteen women were interviewed over 10 months and three profiles were generated: (a) nonadherence, (b) lapse/readoption of physical activity, and (c) adherence. Internalization of walking behavior was key to adherence. Satisfaction of the needs for competence and relatedness were central for participation during exercise at the adoption stages, and autonomy was particularly pertinent in facilitating adherence. Those who lapsed and restarted physical activity experienced feelings of autonomy at the point of readoption. Sources of support were driving forces in the adoption and adherence phases. PMID:24692183

  17. Psychological symptoms, smoking lapse behavior, and the mediating effects of nicotine withdrawal symptoms: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Katherine J; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-03-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms. PMID:25243836

  18. Psychological Symptoms, Smoking Lapse Behavior, and the Mediating Effects of Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms: A Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Ameringer, Katherine J.; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms. PMID:25243836

  19. Lapse time dependence of coda wave attenuation in Central West Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyol, Nihal

    2015-09-01

    The attenuation of coda waves has been inferred for Central West Turkey, which is characterized by a very complex tectonic evolution. The selected dataset is composed of 440 waveforms from 228 local earthquakes with a magnitude range of 2.9-4.9. The coda quality factor (Qc) was estimated for five central frequencies (fc = 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 Hz) and eight lapse times (tL, ranging from 25 to 60 s), based on the assumption of single isotropic scattering model. Estimated Qc values were strongly dependent on frequency and lapse time. The frequency dependence of Qc values for each lapse time was inferred from Qc(f) = Q0fn relationships. Q0 values change between 32.7 and 82.1, while n values changes between 0.91 and 0.79 for the lapse times of 25 and 60 s, respectively. The obtained low Q0 values show that the Central West Turkey region is characterized by a high seismic attenuation, in general. The whole region was divided into four subregions to examine spatial differences of attenuation characteristics. Obtained 1/Q0 and n values versus the lapse time for each subregion implies the tectonic complexity of the region. Lapse time dependencies of attenuation and n values were also examined for subdatasets from two different ranges of event depth (h < 10 km and h ≥ 10 km) and distance (r < 40 km and r ≥ 40 km). High attenuation and its high frequency dependence for long distances manifest the elevation of isotherms and increasing heterogeneity with depth. This could be associated with the extensional intra-continental plate setting, forming regional tectonics in the back-arc area.

  20. Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Photographer : JPL Range : 1 million kilometers Voyager 2 completed a dramatic 10 hour time lapse photo sequence to monitor the active volcanos on Jupiter's moon Io following the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. This picture is one of about 200 images that will be used to generate a time lapse motion picture to illustrate Io's volcanic activity. On the bright limb, two of the plumes (P-5 & P-6) discovered in March by Voyager 1 are again visible. The plumes are spewing materials to a height of about 100 kilometers.

  1. Advances in interpretation of subsurface processes with time-lapse electrical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-03-15

    Electrical geophysical methods, including electrical resistivity, time-domain induced polarization, and complex resistivity, have become commonly used to image the near subsurface. Here, we outline their utility for time-lapse imaging of hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical processes, focusing on new instrumentation, processing, and analysis techniques specific to monitoring. We review data collection procedures, parameters measured, and petrophysical relationships and then outline the state of the science with respect to inversion methodologies, including coupled inversion. We conclude by highlighting recent research focused on innovative applications of time-lapse imaging in hydrology, biology, ecology, and geochemistry, among other areas of interest.

  2. Lapses in Sustained Attention and Their Relation to Executive Control and Fluid Abilities: An Individual Differences Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Redick, Thomas S.; Lakey, Chad E.; Young, Diana L.

    2010-01-01

    A latent variable analysis was conducted to examine the nature of individual differences in lapses of attention and their relation to executive and fluid abilities. Participants performed a sustained attention task along with multiple measures of executive control and fluid abilities. Lapses of attention were indexed based on the slowest reaction…

  3. 77 FR 22069 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Lapse-Government Life Insurance); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Lapse--Government Life Insurance); Comment Request... Life Insurance policy. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection of...'s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (3) ways to enhance the...

  4. Automated time-lapse microscopy and high-resolution tracking of cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Fotos, Joseph S.; Vivek, Patel P.; Karin, Norm J.; Temburni, Murali; Koh, John T.; Galileo, Deni S.

    2006-08-09

    The study of cell motility is greatly enhanced by using a fully-automated high-throughput time-lapse microscopy system that is capable of collecting and analyzing data (1) from closely-spaced time points (seconds to minutes), (2) over long periods (hours to days), (3) from multiple areas of interest, (4) under several different experimental conditions simultaneously. Time-lapse video images collected under phase contrast and fluorescent illumination were analyzed using parameters of migration velocity, total accumulated distance (path length), and directionality for individual cells or for averaged cell populations. Quantitation of ''scratch'' or ''wound healing'' assays revealed unique motility dynamics of drug-treated and adhesion molecule-transfected cells with high resolution and, thus, is a vast distinct improvement of current methods. Several fluorescent vital labeling methods commonly used for end-point analyses, including GFP expression, were evaluated and most were useful for time-lapse studies under specific conditions. For example, fluorescently-labeled tumor cells were seeded onto cell monolayers expressing ectopic adhesion molecules displayed altered migration velocities compared to tumor cells plated directly onto culture dishes. The techniques described here revealed cell motility behavior not discernable by previously-used methods. We propose that quantitative time-lapse video analysis will foster the creation new cell motility assays, and increase the resolution and accuracy of existing assays.

  5. 78 FR 53011 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Reinstatement (Insurance Lapsed More Than 6 Months...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... comment. The PRA submission describes the nature of the information collection and its expected cost and... (Insurance Lapsed More than 6 Months), Government Life Insurance and/or Total Disability Income Provision, VA... Life Insurance, VA Form 29-353. OMB Control Number: 2900-0011. Type of Review: Extension of a...

  6. Knowledge of Ethical Lapses and Other Experiences on Clinical Licensure Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feil, Philip; Meeske, Jessica; Fortman, Jared

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 429 general dentists attempted to verify anecdotal reports of ethical lapses in clinical dental licensing examinations. It found significant occurrence of not arranging followup care for the patient even though indicated, intentional creation of lesions, premature treatment for the purpose of the examinations, coercing patients into…

  7. MathLTWA: Multiple lapse time window analysis using Wolfram Mathematica 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Bianco, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    The MATHCAD 2000 professional code to perform the Multiple Lapse Time Analysis (MLTWA) has been revised and rewritten in MATHEMATICA 7. The new code contains two new procedures to find the minimum of the misfit function between observation and model and a new example of application to real data from Chamoli earthquake aftershock sequence.

  8. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: application to an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Carbajal, M.; Linde, N.; Peacock, J.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, T.; Thiel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved. We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  9. Lapse of time effects on tax evasion in an agent-based econophysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Götz; Pickhardt, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We investigate an inhomogeneous Ising model in the context of tax evasion dynamics where different types of agents are parameterized via local temperatures and magnetic fields. In particular, we analyze the impact of lapse of time effects (i.e. backauditing) and endogenously determined penalty rates on tax compliance. Both features contribute to a microfoundation of agent-based econophysics models of tax evasion.

  10. Estimating topsoil water content of clay soils with data from time-lapse electrical conductivity surveys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial estimation of soil water content (') at the field, hillslope, or catchment scale is required in numerous applications. Time-lapse electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity surveys were recognized as the useful source of information about both spatial variations in soil water conten...

  11. A Typology of University Ethical Lapses: Types, Levels of Seriousness, and Originating Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Patricia C.; Chang, Pepe Lee

    2007-01-01

    Scandals ranging from National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) violations to falsified research results have fueled criticism of America's universities. Sports violations, research manipulation, gender discrimination, and other ethical lapses affect an entire institution as they have a spillover effect on its reputation. The results of…

  12. Feasibility of monitoring gas hydrate production with time-lapse VSP

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, M.B.; Nakagawa, S.; Moridis, G.J.

    2009-11-01

    In this work we begin to examine the feasibility of using time-lapse seismic methods-specifically the vertical seismic profiling (VSP) method-for monitoring changes in hydrate accumulations that are predicted to occur during production of natural gas.

  13. Time-lapse motion picture technique applied to the study of geological processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Crandell, D.R.

    1959-01-01

    Light-weight, battery-operated timers were built and coupled to 16-mm motion-picture cameras having apertures controlled by photoelectric cells. The cameras were placed adjacent to Emmons Glacier on Mount Rainier. The film obtained confirms the view that exterior time-lapse photography can be applied to the study of slow-acting geologic processes.

  14. 37 CFR 1.317 - Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of issue fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... payment of balance of issue fee. 1.317 Section 1.317 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Allowance and Issue of Patent § 1.317 Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of... is required at the time the issue fee is paid, any remaining balance of the issue fee is to be...

  15. 37 CFR 1.317 - Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of issue fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... payment of balance of issue fee. 1.317 Section 1.317 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Allowance and Issue of Patent § 1.317 Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of... is required at the time the issue fee is paid, any remaining balance of the issue fee is to be...

  16. 37 CFR 1.317 - Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of issue fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... payment of balance of issue fee. 1.317 Section 1.317 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Allowance and Issue of Patent § 1.317 Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of... is required at the time the issue fee is paid, any remaining balance of the issue fee is to be...

  17. 37 CFR 1.317 - Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of issue fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payment of balance of issue fee. 1.317 Section 1.317 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Allowance and Issue of Patent § 1.317 Lapsed patents; delayed payment of balance of... is required at the time the issue fee is paid, any remaining balance of the issue fee is to be...

  18. Dynamic Association between Negative Affect and Alcohol Lapses following Alcohol Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Villarroel, Nadia Aracelliz

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research has found a strong association between negative affect and returning to alcohol use after a period of abstinence. Yet little is known about the probability of a lapse given a particular level of negative affect or whether there is a reciprocal relationship between negative affect and alcohol use across time. The goal of the…

  19. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  20. First successful pregnancies following embryo selection using Time-lapse technology in Iran: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Azita; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Soleimani, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embryo selection is a vital part of in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, with morphology-based grading systems having been widely used for decades. Time-lapse imaging combined with embryo morph kinetics may proffer a non-invasive means for improving embryo selection. We report the first ongoing and chemical pregnancies using Time-lapse embryo scope to select best embryos for transfer in Iran. Cases: A case with tubal factor infertility was admitted to IVF program with normozoospermia. After ovarian hyper stimulation, 6 COCs were retrieved and inseminated with 25,000 progressive sperms/ oocyte. Five zygotes were placed individually into the micro wells of equilibrated embryo scope dish for Time-lapse observation, and incubated at 37°C, 5% CO2. On day 3, single embryo transfer (SET) took place based on kinetic parameters of the embryos. Clinical pregnancy was confirmed 7 weeks after SET. The second case with history of previous ICSI failure was admitted with azoospermia. Nine MII oocytes underwent ICSI, and incubated in Time-lapse facilities. The rest of procedures were followed as described for case 1. Chemical pregnancy was confirmed 15 days after SET. Conclusion: This approach opens a way to select best embryo non-invasively for SET; thus, increasing implantation, while reducing multiple pregnancy complications. PMID:26131014

  1. Diurnal Wind Regimes and Lapse-Rate Variability Over Clean and Debris-Covered Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, G. E.; Young, E.

    2015-12-01

    Near-surface winds and air temperature play an important role in the surface energy balance of glaciers and ice sheets, and can be highly variable in space and time. The increasing fraction of debris-covered ice observed in many retreating alpine glacier environments motivates the study of these variables, and the processes that control them, over both clean and debris-covered ice. We use meteorological data collected in the ablation zone of a ~ 5km-long valley glacier in Yukon, Canada, to analyze the diurnal variability of temperature and wind regimes over debris-covered and debris-free ice. Our data reveal pronounced diurnal cycles in temperature lapse rates, wind speeds, and wind directions. Common to both clean and debris-covered areas are: (1) a shallowing of lapse rates in the early morning from 6:00 to 9:00 and a steepening of lapse rates during the day from 9:00 to 16:00, (2) nearly identical lapse rates regardless of surface type between 15:00 and 19:00, and (3) a persistent diurnal wind regime in which up-valley winds occur from late morning to evening, peaking at 16:00-17:00, and relatively weaker down-valley winds occur overnight. Significant differences between the clean-ice and debris-covered sites are also evident in the data, namely: (1) much steeper night-time lapse rates over debris-covered ice than clean ice, (2) the occurrence of steepest lapse rates overnight for debris-covered ice and in late afternoon (around 16:00) for clean ice, and (3) a more pronounced diurnal cycle in windspeed over debris-covered ice than clean ice, despite all stations exhibiting evidence of the diurnal changes in wind direction. The patterns described above conform to a model of weak katabatic flow at night and relatively stronger up-valley winds during the day, peaking in late afternoon. Though absolute temperatures over clean and debris-covered ice are markedly different during the day, lapse rates over both surfaces evolve similarly through the day to achieve steep

  2. Time-Lapse inversion of EM Tomography data for polymer-injected hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Seiwook; Park, Chanho; Nam, Myung Jin; Son, Jeong-Sul

    2015-04-01

    Polymer flooding is a method to increase the production of hydrocarbon reservoir by injecting polymer solution into the reservoir. For a study on the monitoring fluid variation within the reservoir, we first make analysis on seismic- and electromagnetic (EM)- tomography responses for seismic and electrical-resistivity rock physics models (RPMs) of the reservoir considering polymer fluid. Constructing RPMs are dependent on not only geologic characteristics of reservoir but also reservoir parameters such as fluid-type, fluid saturation, pressure and temperature. When making RPM for monitoring analysis, we assume the geology does not changes while reservoir parameters change to affect responses of seismic and EM tomography data. Specifically when constructing electrical-resistivity RPM, we consider three different types of hydrocarbon reservoirs, which are clean sand, shaly sand, sand-shale lamination, while considering two different types of waters (fresh water and salt water) to make 2wt% polymer solution. To compute time lapse EM and seismic tomography responses for corresponding RPMs of polymer-injected reservoirs, we used 2.5D finite element EM modeling algorithm and staggered-grid finite difference elastic modeling algorithm, respectively. Comparison between sensitivities of seismic and EM tomography to polymer injection confirms that EM tomography is more sensitivity to the polymer injection. For the evaluation of the potential of EM tomography to monitor polymer flooding, this study subsequently develops an efficient time-lapse EM tomography inversion algorithm based on the 2.5D EM tomography modeling. Using the inversion algorithm, we inverted the time-lapse EM tomography data to construct true resistivity models of polymer-injected reservoirs and analyze differences between them. From the time-lapse inversion results, we can observe the differences in time lapse responses between using fresh water and salt water have been decreased in the inverted time-lapse

  3. Time-lapse monitoring of localized changes within heterogeneous media with scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinaemerem, Kanu

    Time-lapse monitoring of geological and mechanical media has been the focus of various studies over the past four decades because of the information that the inferred changes within the medium provides insight into the dynamic characteristics of the medium. Time-lapse changes within a medium can be used to characterize the temporal evolution of the medium, evaluate the forces driving the changes within the medium and make predictions on the future state of the monitored medium. The detectability of the changes within a material depends on the characteristics of the change to be imaged, the sensitivity of the monitoring data to the change, and the time-lapse monitoring parameters such as the monitoring source-receiver array and the spectral content of the monitoring waves. Various time-lapse monitoring tools have been used to monitor changes within media ranging from the earth's surface to tumors within the human body. These monitoring tools include the use of 4D active surveys were an imprint of the change within the medium is extracted from the time-lapse surveys and the use of interferometric techniques that use singly or multiply scattered waves. My major goal in this study is to image and localize changes present within a scattering medium using time-lapse multiply scattered waves generated within the monitored medium. The changes to be imaged are generally localized in space. This work is an extension of coda wave interferometry. Coda wave interferometry focuses on the identification and extraction of average velocity change occurring within a scattering medium. Due to the non-linear characteristics of multiply scattered waves and limited information of the origin of the multiply scattered waves, coda wave interferometry resolves the average velocity change within the scattering medium with no or limited indication of the location of the change. In this study, I demonstrate that time-lapse changes can be imaged and localized within scattering media using

  4. Developing an EEG-based on-line closed-loop lapse detection and mitigation system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Te; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Wei, Chun-Shu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Ko, Li-Wei; Lin, Chin-Teng; Cheng, Chung-Kuan; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    In America, 60% of adults reported that they have driven a motor vehicle while feeling drowsy, and at least 15–20% of fatal car accidents are fatigue-related. This study translates previous laboratory-oriented neurophysiological research to design, develop, and test an On-line Closed-loop Lapse Detection and Mitigation (OCLDM) System featuring a mobile wireless dry-sensor EEG headgear and a cell-phone based real-time EEG processing platform. Eleven subjects participated in an event-related lane-keeping task, in which they were instructed to manipulate a randomly deviated, fixed-speed cruising car on a 4-lane highway. This was simulated in a 1st person view with an 8-screen and 8-projector immersive virtual-reality environment. When the subjects experienced lapses or failed to respond to events during the experiment, auditory warning was delivered to rectify the performance decrements. However, the arousing auditory signals were not always effective. The EEG spectra exhibited statistically significant differences between effective and ineffective arousing signals, suggesting that EEG spectra could be used as a countermeasure of the efficacy of arousing signals. In this on-line pilot study, the proposed OCLDM System was able to continuously detect EEG signatures of fatigue, deliver arousing warning to subjects suffering momentary cognitive lapses, and assess the efficacy of the warning in near real-time to rectify cognitive lapses. The on-line testing results of the OCLDM System validated the efficacy of the arousing signals in improving subjects' response times to the subsequent lane-departure events. This study may lead to a practical on-line lapse detection and mitigation system in real-world environments. PMID:25352773

  5. Developing an EEG-based on-line closed-loop lapse detection and mitigation system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Te; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Wei, Chun-Shu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Ko, Li-Wei; Lin, Chin-Teng; Cheng, Chung-Kuan; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    In America, 60% of adults reported that they have driven a motor vehicle while feeling drowsy, and at least 15-20% of fatal car accidents are fatigue-related. This study translates previous laboratory-oriented neurophysiological research to design, develop, and test an On-line Closed-loop Lapse Detection and Mitigation (OCLDM) System featuring a mobile wireless dry-sensor EEG headgear and a cell-phone based real-time EEG processing platform. Eleven subjects participated in an event-related lane-keeping task, in which they were instructed to manipulate a randomly deviated, fixed-speed cruising car on a 4-lane highway. This was simulated in a 1st person view with an 8-screen and 8-projector immersive virtual-reality environment. When the subjects experienced lapses or failed to respond to events during the experiment, auditory warning was delivered to rectify the performance decrements. However, the arousing auditory signals were not always effective. The EEG spectra exhibited statistically significant differences between effective and ineffective arousing signals, suggesting that EEG spectra could be used as a countermeasure of the efficacy of arousing signals. In this on-line pilot study, the proposed OCLDM System was able to continuously detect EEG signatures of fatigue, deliver arousing warning to subjects suffering momentary cognitive lapses, and assess the efficacy of the warning in near real-time to rectify cognitive lapses. The on-line testing results of the OCLDM System validated the efficacy of the arousing signals in improving subjects' response times to the subsequent lane-departure events. This study may lead to a practical on-line lapse detection and mitigation system in real-world environments. PMID:25352773

  6. Formation of medical student professional identity: categorizing lapses of professionalism, and the learning environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acquiring the values of medical professionalism has become a critical issue in medical education. The purpose of this study was to identify lapses in professionalism witnessed by medical students during their four year MD curriculum, and to categorize, from the students’ perspective, who was responsible and the settings in which these occurred. Methods An electronic survey, developed by faculty and medical students, was sent to all students with two email reminders. It included quantitative responses and some open-ended opportunities for comments. All analyses were performed with SAS version 9.1. Results The response rate was 45.6% (255 of 559 students) for all four years of the medical school curriculum. Thirty six percent of students had witnessed or been part of an exemplary demonstration of professionalism; 64% responded that they had witnessed a lapse of professionalism. At the pre-clerkship level, the most frequent lapses involved students: arrogance (42.2%), impairment (24.2%), followed by cultural or religious insensitivity (20.5%). At the clerkship level of training, where students are exposed to real clinical situations, the lapses involved primarily faculty (including preceptor and clinician) or other staff; these included arrogance (55.3%), breach of confidentiality (28.3%), and cultural or religious insensitivity (26.6%); impairment involved mostly students (25.5%). These findings are analyzed from the perspective of role modeling by faculty and in the context of the learning environment. Conclusions Medical students witnessed a lapse of professionalism involving both fellow students as well as faculty and administrative staff, in several domains. Results from this study emphasize the importance of role modeling and the need for faculty development, to improve the learning environment. This study adds to the limited emerging literature on the forces that influence medical student professional identity formation. PMID:25004924

  7. The influence of surface characteristics on lapse rates and temperature profiles in areas of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, N. C.; Pike, G.; Fower, D.; Schaefer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Temperatures near the ground are often decoupled from free-air equivalents, particularly in areas of complex relief and at high latitudes where cold air drainage occurs particularly when radiation balances become negative. This means that it is hard to predict spatial patterns of surface temperature in such regions. In this study several years of intensive field measurements in complex terrain in northern Finland (Kevo) and Sweden (Abisko) allow detailed examination of the interaction between land surface characteristics (including cryosphere), vegetation, and local/micro-climate in mountain basins. Temperature and vapour pressure were measured every 30 minutes for 5 years (2007-2012) at 60 sites at Kevo and for a winter season (September-June) at 52 sites in Abisko, ranging over 300/600 metres of elevation respectively. In Finland lapse rates vary considerably both seasonally and diurnally, the relative importance of seasonal and diurnal forcing changing throughout the year. The results show intense (up to +80 °C/km) and persistent inversion events during the winter months (NDJ) which are broken up by mechanical effects since there is no diurnal cycle. In the transition from winter into spring (FMA) these inversions still occur but increasing radiation imposes a diurnal pattern on their formation and destruction. As snow cover peaks in spring the interaction between surface albedo, land cover and radiation serves to amplify the diurnal cycle in lapse rates. Daytime lapse rates peak in spring because of an increase in albedo with elevation as dark trees give way to reflective snow. At night inversions rapidly reform. Summer lapse rates are modified (usually weakened) by the presence of open water at low elevations. In Abisko similar processes are shown to be at work, although since the valley system is more open and at a larger spatial scale, the range of lapse rate variability is slightly less and the influence of surface characteristics more subdued. Taken

  8. Time-lapse resistivity investigations for imaging saltwater transport in glaciofluvial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Virginie; Dahlin, Torleif

    2006-01-01

    Five intersecting resistivity sections have been measured in glaciofluvial deposits hosting an aquifer of regional importance situated along a heavy traffic highway in Sweden. The winter salt spreading has caused a regular salinity increase through the years. For imaging the transport of saltwater in the aquifer, the sections were measured exactly in the same location before and after winter, and interpreted using a time-lapse inverse procedure. Some auger drilling and RCPT data were available for correlation. After winter, the resistivity had generally decreased under the water table and increased above it. The decrease in resistivity in the saturated zone is interpreted as a plume of more saline groundwater created by de-icing salt from the road. The increase in the upper layer can be explained by changes in temperature and soil moisture. The study shows that time-lapse resistivity investigations has potential for imaging hydraulic pathways in complex hydrogeological environments.

  9. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  10. Near-surface temperature lapse rates in a mountainous catchment in the Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala; Schauwecker, S.; Pellicciotti, F.; McPhee, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    In mountainous areas, and in the Chilean Andes in particular, the irregular and sparse distribution of recording stations resolves insufficiently the variability of climatic factors such as precipitation, temperature and relative humidity. Assumptions about air temperature variability in space and time have a strong effect on the performance of hydrologic models that represent snow processes such as accumulation and ablation. These processes have large diurnal variations, and assumptions that average over longer time periods (days, weeks or months) may reduce the predictive capacity of these models under different climatic conditions from those for which they were calibrated. They also introduce large uncertainties when such models are used to predict processes with strong subdiurnal variability such as snowmelt dynamics. In many applications and modeling exercises, temperature is assumed to decrease linearly with elevation, using the free-air moist adiabatic lapse rate (MALR: 0.0065°C/m). Little evidence is provided for this assumption, however, and recent studies have shown that use of lapse rates that are uniform in space and constant in time is not appropriate. To explore the validity of this approach, near-surface (2 m) lapse rates were calculated and analyzed at different temporal resolution, based on a new data set of spatially distributed temperature sensors setup in a high elevation catchment of the dry Andes of Central Chile (approx. 33°S). Five minutes temperature data were collected between January 2011 and April 2011 in the Ojos de Agua catchment, using two Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) and 13 T-loggers (Hobo H8 Pro Temp with external data logger), ranging in altitude from 2230 to 3590 m.s.l.. The entire catchment was snow free during our experiment. We use this unique data set to understand the main controls over temperature variability in time and space, and test whether lapse rates can be used to describe the spatial variations of air

  11. Capturing Tissue Repair in Zebrafish Larvae with Time-lapse Brightfield Stereomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Brochu, Elizabeth A.; Rieger, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish larval tail fin is ideal for studying tissue regeneration due to the simple architecture of the larval fin-fold, which comprises of two layers of skin that enclose undifferentiated mesenchyme, and because the larval tail fin regenerates rapidly within 2-3 days. Using this system, we demonstrate a method for capturing the repair dynamics of the amputated tail fin with time-lapse video brightfield stereomicroscopy. We demonstrate that fin amputation triggers a contraction of the amputation wound and extrusion of cells around the wound margin, leading to their subsequent clearance. Fin regeneration proceeds from proximal to distal direction after a short delay. In addition, developmental growth of the larva can be observed during all stages. The presented method provides an opportunity for observing and analyzing whole tissue-scale behaviors such as fin development and growth in a simple microscope setting, which is easily adaptable to any stereomicroscope with time-lapse capabilities. PMID:25742070

  12. Volumetric monitoring of aqueous two phase system droplets using time-lapse optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Bathany, C.; Ahn, Y.; Takayama, S.; Jung, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a volumetric monitoring method to observe the morphological changes of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in a microfluidic system. Our method is based on time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) which allows the study of the dynamics of ATPS droplets while visualizing their 3D structures and providing quantitative information on the droplets. In this study, we monitored the process of rehydration and deformation of an ATPS droplet in a microfluidic system and quantified the changes of its volume and velocity under both static and dynamic fluid conditions. Our results indicate that time-lapse OCT is a very promising tool to evaluate the unprecedented features of droplet-based microfluidics.

  13. Calixarenes and cations: a time-lapse photography of the big-bang.

    PubMed

    Casnati, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    The outstanding cation complexation properties emerging from the pioneering studies on calixarene ligands during a five-year period in the early 1980s triggered a big-bang burst of publications on such macrocycles that is still lasting at a distance of more than 30 years. A time-lapse photography of this timeframe is proposed which allows the readers to pinpoint the contributions of the different research groups. PMID:23792898

  14. Analysis of the repeatability of time-lapse 3d vsp multicomponent surveys, delhi field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Mariana Fernandes de

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. In order to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency, time-lapse 3D seismic data have been acquired in this area. Time-lapse studies are increasingly used to evaluate changes in the seismic response induced by the production of hydrocarbons or the injection of water, CO2 or steam into a reservoir. A 4D seismic signal is generated by a combination of production and injection effects within the reservoir as well as non-repeatability effects. In order to get reliable results from time-lapse seismic methods, it is important to distinguish the production and injection effects from the non-repeatability effects in the 4D seismic signal. Repeatability of 4D land seismic data is affected by several factors. The most significant of them are: source and receiver geometry inaccuracies, differences in seismic sources signatures, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. In this project, two 3D multicomponent VSP surveys acquired in Delhi Field were used to quantify the relative contribution of each factor that can affect the repeatability in land seismic data. The factors analyzed in this study were: source and receiver geometry inaccura- cies, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. This study showed that all these factors had a significant impact on the repeatability of the successive multicomponent VSP surveys in Delhi Field. This project also shows the advantages and disadvantages in the use of different repeata- bility metrics, normalized-root-mean-square (NRMS) difference and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) attribute, to evaluate the level of seismic repeatability between successive time-lapse seismic surveys. It is observed that NRMS difference is greatly influenced by time-shifts and that SDR attribute combined with the time-shift may give more distinct and representative repeatability information than the NRMS difference.

  15. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  16. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  17. Time-lapse AVO fluid inversion for dynamic reservoir characterization in Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Indah Hermansyah

    In the development stage, CO2 injection is becoming more widely used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Delhi Oil Field is part of Phases XIII and XIV of the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) Colorado School of Mines. The focus of these phases is to monitor the effectiveness of the CO 2 injection in Delhi Field by using multicomponent time-lapse seismic data. In this study, I analyze the amplitude versus offset (AVO) response of the time-lapse P-wave seismic data in order to quantify the fluid probability in the field. RCP acquired four square miles of multicomponent time-lapse seismic in Delhi Field to characterize the field dynamically. RCP's two surveys, monitor 1 and monitor 2, were shot in 2010 and 2011 after the start of CO2 injection in November 2009. Time-lapse AVO modeling was performed. The modeling results show that both the top Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations are class III AVO, and change toward class IV AVO by increasing the CO2 saturation in the reservoir. In addition, the Paluxy Formation shows a consistent result between the synthetic and real data, however, the Tuscaloosa Formation is not consistent as it is affected by tuning. AVO fluid inversion (AFI) was performed on both the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations in order to quantify the fluid probability in these formations. The inversion results are confirmed by the pseudo gamma ray model, the porosity model, the permeability model, the pressure model, and the production data. In the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations, oil and CO2 are located in the good quality, high porosity, and high permeability sandstones. The presence of CO2 is also confirmed by the pressure interpretation. Furthermore, production data from both Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations confirm the fluid presence in the reservoir.

  18. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  19. High-resolution imaging characterization of bladder dynamic morphophysiology by time-lapse optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. T.; Wu, Q.; Wang, Z. G.; Brink, P. R.; Du, C. W.

    2005-09-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) for high-resolution imaging characterization of detrusor dynamic morphophysiology and analysis of the mechanisms that lead to geriatric incontinence (GI). The spontaneous contractility of intact fresh rabbit bladders was imaged with two-dimensional (2D) OCT ex vivo at up to 8frames/s. The time-lapse 2D OCT images were postprocessed by image segmentation and fast-Fourier-transform analysis to characterize the dynamic morphological changes of the bladder contractility. In addition, we studied young and aging rat bladders to analyze the differences in dynamics. Preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that time-lapse OCT can track the contractile waves of bladders at high spatial resolution and characterize their dynamic morphophysiology in terms of amplitude, phase, and frequency. The results suggest that time-lapse OCT has the potential to act as a detrusor optical biopsy to enhance the diagnosis of detrusor dysfunction and thus of the mechanisms that lead to GI.

  20. Efficiency of time-lapse intervals and simple baits for camera surveys of wild pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Growing concerns surrounding established and expanding populations of wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have created the need for rapid and accurate surveys of these populations. We conducted surveys of a portion of the wild pig population on Fort Benning, Georgia, to determine if a longer time-lapse interval than had been previously used in surveys of wild pigs would generate similar detection results. We concurrently examined whether use of soured corn at camera sites affected the time necessary for pigs to locate a new camera site or the time pigs remained at a site. Our results suggest that a 9-min time-lapse interval generated dependable detection results for pigs and that soured corn neither attracted pigs to a site any quicker than plain, dry, whole-kernel corn, nor held them at a site longer. Maximization of time-lapse interval should decrease data and processing loads, and use of a simple, available bait should decrease cost and effort associated with more complicated baits; combination of these concepts should increase efficiency of wild pig surveys. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  1. Time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography monitoring effects of an urban tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellmunt, F.; Marcuello, A.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Falgàs, E.; Benjumea, B.; Velasco, V.; Vázquez-Suñé, E.

    2012-12-01

    Tunnel construction in urban areas has recently become a topic of interest and has increased the use of tunnel boring machines. Monitoring subsurface effects due to tunnel building in urban areas with conventional surface geophysical techniques is not an easy task because of space constraints. Taking advantage of the construction of a new metro line in Barcelona (Spain), a geoelectrical experiment, which included borehole logging and time-lapse cross-hole measurements using permanent electrode deployments, was designed to characterise and to study the subsurface effects of the tunnel drilling in a test site. We present a case study in which the differences between time-lapse cross-hole resistivity measurements acquired before, during and after the tunnel drilling below the test site have been calculated using three different procedures: a constrained time-lapse inversion, a model subtraction and an inversion of the normalised data ratio. The three procedures have provided satisfactory images of the resistivity changes and tunnel geometry, but resistivity changes for the tunnel void were lower than predicted by modelling. This behaviour has been explained by considering a conductive zone around the tunnel. Further, an apparent resistivity pseudosection for the cross-hole data, equivalent to the case of the equatorial dipole-dipole on the surface, is introduced.

  2. Dynamic Association Between Negative Affect and Alcohol Lapses Following Alcohol Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Villarroel, Nadia Aracelliz

    2009-01-01

    Clinical research has found a strong association between negative affect and returning to alcohol use after a period of abstinence. Yet little is known about the probability of a lapse given a particular level of negative affect or whether there is a reciprocal relationship between negative affect and alcohol use across time. The goal of the current study was to examine the association between negative affect and drinking behavior in the 1st year following alcohol treatment. The authors applied an associative latent transition analysis to the Project MATCH outpatient data (n = 952) and then replicated the model in the Project MATCH aftercare data (n = 774). Changes in drinking following treatment were significantly associated with current and prior changes in negative affect, and changes in negative affect were related to prior changes in drinking (effect size range = 0.13–0.33). The results supported the hypothesis that negative affect and alcohol lapses are dynamically linked and suggest that targeting the relationship between negative affect and alcohol use could greatly decrease the probability of lapses and improve alcohol treatment outcomes. PMID:19634957

  3. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  4. Can arousing feedback rectify lapses in driving? Prediction from EEG power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; Ko, Li-Wei; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Objective. This study explores the neurophysiological changes, measured using an electroencephalogram (EEG), in response to an arousing warning signal delivered to drowsy drivers, and predicts the efficacy of the feedback based on changes in the EEG. Approach. Eleven healthy subjects participated in sustained-attention driving experiments. The driving task required participants to maintain their cruising position and compensate for randomly induced lane deviations using the steering wheel, while their EEG and driving performance were continuously monitored. The arousing warning signal was delivered to participants who experienced momentary behavioral lapses, failing to respond rapidly to lane-departure events (specifically the reaction time exceeded three times the alert reaction time). Main results. The results of our previous studies revealed that arousing feedback immediately reversed deteriorating driving performance, which was accompanied by concurrent EEG theta- and alpha-power suppression in the bilateral occipital areas. This study further proposes a feedback efficacy assessment system to accurately estimate the efficacy of arousing warning signals delivered to drowsy participants by monitoring the changes in their EEG power spectra immediately thereafter. The classification accuracy was up 77.8% for determining the need for triggering additional warning signals. Significance. The findings of this study, in conjunction with previous studies on EEG correlates of behavioral lapses, might lead to a practical closed-loop system to predict, monitor and rectify behavioral lapses of human operators in attention-critical settings.

  5. Automated time-lapse microscopy and high-resolution tracking of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Fotos, Joseph S; Patel, Vivek P; Karin, Norman J; Temburni, Murali K; Koh, John T; Galileo, Deni S

    2006-05-01

    We describe a novel fully automated high-throughput time-lapse microscopy system and evaluate its performance for precisely tracking the motility of several glioma and osteoblastic cell lines. Use of this system revealed cell motility behavior not discernable with conventional techniques by collecting data (1) from closely spaced time points (minutes), (2) over long periods (hours to days), (3) from multiple areas of interest, (4) in parallel under several different experimental conditions. Quantitation of true individual and average cell velocity and path length was obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution in "scratch" or "wound healing" assays. This revealed unique motility dynamics of drug-treated and adhesion molecule-transfected cells and, thus, this is a considerable improvement over current methods of measurement and analysis. Several fluorescent vital labeling methods commonly used for end-point analyses (GFP expression, DiO lipophilic dye, and Qtracker nanocrystals) were found to be useful for time-lapse studies under specific conditions that are described. To illustrate one application, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were seeded onto cell monolayers expressing ectopic adhesion molecules, and this resulted in consistently reduced tumor cell migration velocities. These highly quantitative time-lapse analysis methods will promote the creation of new cell motility assays and increase the resolution and accuracy of existing assays. PMID:19002890

  6. Dynamic association between negative affect and alcohol lapses following alcohol treatment.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Villarroel, Nadia Aracelliz

    2009-08-01

    Clinical research has found a strong association between negative affect and returning to alcohol use after a period of abstinence. Yet little is known about the probability of a lapse given a particular level of negative affect or whether there is a reciprocal relationship between negative affect and alcohol use across time. The goal of the current study was to examine the association between negative affect and drinking behavior in the 1st year following alcohol treatment. The authors applied an associative latent transition analysis to the Project MATCH outpatient data (n = 952) and then replicated the model in the Project MATCH aftercare data (n = 774). Changes in drinking following treatment were significantly associated with current and prior changes in negative affect, and changes in negative affect were related to prior changes in drinking (effect size range = 0.13-0.33). The results supported the hypothesis that negative affect and alcohol lapses are dynamically linked and suggest that targeting the relationship between negative affect and alcohol use could greatly decrease the probability of lapses and improve alcohol treatment outcomes. PMID:19634957

  7. Enhancing Monitoring of Recharge-Related Environmental Remediation Processes Using Time-Lapse Seismic Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, D. P.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The application of time-lapse seismic methods has typically been constrained to large-scale geologic investigations associated with petroleum exploration and exploitation; however, there is growing interest in monitoring near-surface phenomena (e.g., fluid flow in fractured or karstic geologic media, hydraulic recharge, and near-surface anthropogenic manipulations) using time-lapse seismic methods. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of detailed time-lapse seismic refraction tomography (TLSRT), we have monitored a perched water table at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Y-12 site in conjunction with a multi- disciplinary investigation of the fate and transport of contaminants. Due to remnant anthropogenic alterations of the site (i.e., replacement of 0-7 meters of contaminated soil with poorly sorted limestone gravel fill during construction of a seepage basin cap), the near surface hydrology is extremely complex and is hypothesized to have a large influence on infiltration, contaminant distribution, and contaminant remobilization. Understanding the impact of recharge-related flow and transport processes is especially important in regions that are subjected to significant precipitation events, such as at the ORNL Y-12 site. Here, TLSRT techniques are used to monitor the changing geometry of a perched water table located near the covered seepage basin, while coincident time-lapse surface electrical resistivity (TLERT) measurements are used to monitor changes in total dissolved solids due to recharge-related dilution. Data are collected at multiple time intervals (i.e., daily, weekly, monthly, yearly) and at varying stages in the evolution of the perch zone. The resulting seismic data are processed using wavepath eikonal tomography (WET) and differenced to identify areas of variable velocity associated with a change in saturation. The differenced tomograms correlate with discrete point water table measurements; however, the highly variable water table at this

  8. Time-lapse borehole radar for monitoring rainfall infiltration through podosol horizons in a sandy vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobach, Elmar; Harris, B. D.; Dupuis, J. C.; Kepic, A. W.

    2014-03-01

    The shallow aquifer on the Gnangara Mound, north of Perth, Western Australia, is recharged by winter rainfall. Water infiltrates through a sandy Podosol where cemented accumulation (B-) horizons are common. They are water retentive and may impede recharge. To observe wetting fronts and the influence of soil horizons on unsaturated flow, we deployed time-lapse borehole radar techniques sensitive to soil moisture variations during an annual recharge cycle. Zero-offset crosswell profiling (ZOP) and vertical radar profiling (VRP) measurements were performed at six sites on a monthly basis before, during, and after annual rainfall in 2011. Water content profiles are derived from ZOP logs acquired in closely spaced wells. Sites with small separation between wells present potential repeatability and accuracy difficulties. Such problems could be lessened by (i) ZOP saturated zone velocity matching of time-lapse curves, and (ii) matching of ZOP and VRP results. The moisture contents for the baseline condition and subsequent observations are computed using the Topp relationship. Time-lapse moisture curves reveal characteristic vadose zone infiltration regimes. Examples are (I) full recharge potential after 200 mm rainfall, (II) delayed wetting and impeded recharge, and (III) no recharge below 7 m depth. Seasonal infiltration trends derived from long-term time-lapse neutron logging at several sites are shown to be comparable with infiltration trends recovered from time-lapse crosswell radar measurements. However, radar measurements sample a larger volume of earth while being safer to deploy than the neutron method which employs a radioactive source. For the regime (III) site, where time-lapse radar indicates no net recharge or zero flux to the water table, a simple water balance provides an evapotranspiration value of 620 mm for the study period. This value compares favorably to previous studies at similar test sites in the region. Our six field examples demonstrate

  9. Time-Lapse Electrical Geophysical Monitoring of Amendment-Based Biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy C; Versteeg, Roelof J; Day-Lewis, Frederick D; Major, William; Lane, John W

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling-based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation. Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation. In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surface-based ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  10. Time-lapse camera studies of sea-disposed chemical munitions in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Margo H.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Rognstad, Mark R.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Mah, Christopher L.; Davis, Logan K.; Flores, Kyle R. M.; Main, Erin L.; Bruso, Natalie L.

    2016-06-01

    The interactions between fauna and sea-disposed munitions provide important evidence regarding whether munitions constituents affect the health of the ocean environment and its inhabitants. To date few studies of these interactions have been conducted at deep-water disposal sites; typically observations of fauna in the vicinity of sea-disposed munitions are limited to the few minutes or hours required to collect physical samples at a specific location. During the 2012 Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) field program we deployed two deep-sea time-lapse camera systems with the objectives of cataloging the diversity of fauna visiting sea-disposed chemical munitions and observing faunal behavior and physiology. Over the 1- and 3-day deployments we recorded 28 different species of fishes, crustaceans, mollusks, cnidarians, and echinoderms at the two sites. Both cameras captured the previously undocumented behavior of brisingid sea stars repositioning themselves along chemical munitions casings. Despite the fact that brisingid sea stars are able to move, for the duration of both time-lapse experiments they remained on chemical munitions casings. We interpret this result to indicate that the advantages of residing on a hard substrate slightly elevated above the seafloor outweigh the effects of chemical munitions constituents for brisingid sea stars. One type of physiological anomaly observed on several arms of the brisingid sea stars at the time-lapse sites led to the collection and examination of six specimens. As reported by Mah (2015. Deep Sea Res. II, 2015, XX-XX), these physiological features are the result of parasitic crustaceans and are not caused by chemical munitions constituents.

  11. Sensitivity of MJO to the CAPE lapse time in the NCAR CAM3

    SciTech Connect

    LIU, P.; Wang, B.; Meehl, Gerald, A.

    2007-09-05

    Weak and irregular boreal winter MJO in the NCAR CAM3 corresponds to very low CAPE background, which is caused by easy-to-occur and over-dominant deep convection indicating the deep convective scheme uses either too low CAPE threshold as triggering function or too large consumption rate of CAPE to close the scheme. Raising the CAPE threshold from default 70 J/kg to ten times large only enhances the CAPE background while fails to noticeably improve the wind mean state and the MJO. However, lengthening the CAPE lapse time from one to eight hours significantly improved the background in CAPE and winds, and salient features of the MJO. Variances, dominant periods and zonal wave numbers, power spectra and coherent propagating structure in winds and convection associated with MJO are ameliorated and comparable to the observations. Lengthening the CAPE lapse time to eight hours reduces dramatically the cloud base mass flux, which prevents effectively the deep convection from occurring prematurely. In this case, partitioning of deep to shallow convection in MJO active area is about 5:4.5 compared to over 9:0.5 in the control run. Latent heat is significantly enhanced below 600 hPa over the central Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Such partitioning of deep and shallow convection is argued necessary for simulating realistic MJO features. Although the universal eight hours lies in the upper limit of that required by the quasi-equilibrium theory, a local CAPE lapse time for the parameterized cumulus convection will be more realistic.

  12. A state-space Bayesian framework for estimating biogeochemical transformations using time-lapse geophysical data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Pride, S.; Li, L.; Steefel, C.; Slater, L.

    2009-04-15

    We develop a state-space Bayesian framework to combine time-lapse geophysical data with other types of information for quantitative estimation of biogeochemical parameters during bioremediation. We consider characteristics of end-products of biogeochemical transformations as state vectors, which evolve under constraints of local environments through evolution equations, and consider time-lapse geophysical data as available observations, which could be linked to the state vectors through petrophysical models. We estimate the state vectors and their associated unknown parameters over time using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling methods. To demonstrate the use of the state-space approach, we apply it to complex resistivity data collected during laboratory column biostimulation experiments that were poised to precipitate iron and zinc sulfides during sulfate reduction. We develop a petrophysical model based on sphere-shaped cells to link the sulfide precipitate properties to the time-lapse geophysical attributes and estimate volume fraction of the sulfide precipitates, fraction of the dispersed, sulfide-encrusted cells, mean radius of the aggregated clusters, and permeability over the course of the experiments. Results of the case study suggest that the developed state-space approach permits the use of geophysical datasets for providing quantitative estimates of end-product characteristics and hydrological feedbacks associated with biogeochemical transformations. Although tested here on laboratory column experiment datasets, the developed framework provides the foundation needed for quantitative field-scale estimation of biogeochemical parameters over space and time using direct, but often sparse wellbore data with indirect, but more spatially extensive geophysical datasets.

  13. Time-lapse 3D ground-penetrating radar during plot-scale infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allroggen, Niklas; Jackisch, Conrad; Tronicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In electrical resistive soils, surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is known as the geophysical tool providing the highest spatial resolution. Thus, 2D and 3D GPR surveys are commonly used for imaging subsurface structures or estimating soil moisture content. Due to its sensitivity to soil moisture and its non-invasive character, GPR provides a large potential to monitor soil moisture variation at high temporal and spatial resolution. As shown in previous experiments, the acquisition of time-lapse GPR data under field conditions requires a high data quality in terms of repeatability as well as spatial and temporal resolution. We present hydrogeophysical field experiments at the plot scale (1m x 1m), during which we record time-lapse 3D GPR. For GPR data acquisition, we use a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system equipped with a pair of 500 MHz antennas in combination with a specially designed metal-free measuring platform. Additionally, we collect tracer and soil moisture data, which are used to improve the interpretation of the GPR data with special focus on preferential flow paths and their structured advective flow field. After an accurate time-lapse GPR data processing, we compare 3D reflection events before and after infiltration and quantitatively interpret their relative time-shift in terms of soil moisture variations. Thereby, we are able to account for basically all of the infiltrated water. The first experiments demonstrate the general applicability of our experimental approach but are limited by the number of acquired time steps and measurement during the sprinkling period (the time of the highest temporal dynamics) are not possible at all. Based on this experience we redesign our experimental setup to continuously collect GPR data during irrigation and infiltration. Thereby, we strongly increase the temporal resolution of our measurements, improve the interpretability of the GPR data, and monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of shallow subsurface

  14. Time-lapse Imaging of Active Lava Flows at Mt. Etna, Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.; Applegarth, L. J.; Hancock, A.; Slatcher, N.; Owen, J.; Calvari, S.; Ganci, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last ~6 years, remote time-lapse cameras have been deployed on Mt. Etna, Sicily, with a view to capturing the emplacement of a substantial lava flow field. Initial deployment of wildlife trail-style cameras in 2008 acquired data on lava channel processes during the 2008-9 eruption. In 2009, just in time to capture the dying phases of the eruption, an upgraded network of dSLRs was installed. The network has subsequently captured the steady growth of the New South East crater and the rapid emplacement of short-lived sheet flows that have accompanied the recent paroxysmal fire fountaining events. Most of the imagery has been acquired over distances of multiple kilometres, but the portability of the time-lapse setup has also allowed several opportunistic close range (hundreds of metres or less) deployments, to observe near-vent processes or effusion inside the Bocca Nuova crater. Here, we provide an overview of the equipment, and the approaches used to georeference the monoscopic time-lapse imagery through integrating with 3D data (e.g. existing DEMs, or data simultaneously collected by terrestrial laser scanner or photogrammetric techniques). The acquired observations of flow front emplacement, flow inflation, channel breaching and effusion rate variations that provide insight into the processes involved in long lived flow fields will be presented. Significant opportunities remain, for example, in the near real-time derivation of bulk rheological parameters, and integration with numerical flow models, and the challenges involved in using such imagery will be discussed.

  15. Time-lapse Measurements of Electrical Resistivities to Characterise Snowmelt Infiltration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Du Saire, M.; Binley, A.; Baker, J.

    2006-12-01

    During snowmelt Oslo airport has on repeated occations experienced the formation of large meltwater ponds due to impermeable ice forming below the snowcover. The airport is situated on a large glacial outwash plane with coarse sandy gravely sediments, hence the area normaly has a high infiltration capacity. Focussed infiltration can cause fast transport of contaminants to the groundwater, hence improved understanding of the processes determining where and how the focussed infiltration takes place is important. Previously the melting process has been monitored successfully on a small scale (4 m2) using a two dimensional grid of permanently installed electrodes (French and Binley, 2004). In the present work snowmelt infiltration was monitored by time-lapse measurements of electrical resistivity using grounded electrodes on 4 and 20 m2 plots and a capacitively coupled resistivity system (Ohmmapper, Geometrics) on a larger scale. While the smaller scale systems provide 3D images the capacitively coupled system was used to monitor changes in two dimensional vertical sections in a retention pond adjacent to one of the runways. The area covered by 4 lines was 170 m by 340 m. The initial data were collected late in the spring (2006) during the final stages of the snowmelt. The lines were repeated later in the year when the soil profile was dryer. The lines show good consistency in the description of the general geology of the subsurface and the time-lapse changes describe the infiltration pattern that occurred during snowmelt and subsequent drainage. The surveys provide useful information about the differences in spatial distribution of snowmelt infiltration at different scales. And there are good indications that capacitively coupled resistivity surveys can be used to describe infiltration processes at relatively large spacio-temporal scales. References French, H. and A. Binley, 2004, Snowmelt infiltration: monitoring temporal and spatial variability using time- lapse

  16. Fast and robust optical flow for time-lapse microscopy using super-voxels

    PubMed Central

    Amat, Fernando; Myers, Eugene W.; Keller, Philipp J.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Optical flow is a key method used for quantitative motion estimation of biological structures in light microscopy. It has also been used as a key module in segmentation and tracking systems and is considered a mature technology in the field of computer vision. However, most of the research focused on 2D natural images, which are small in size and rich in edges and texture information. In contrast, 3D time-lapse recordings of biological specimens comprise up to several terabytes of image data and often exhibit complex object dynamics as well as blurring due to the point-spread-function of the microscope. Thus, new approaches to optical flow are required to improve performance for such data. Results: We solve optical flow in large 3D time-lapse microscopy datasets by defining a Markov random field (MRF) over super-voxels in the foreground and applying motion smoothness constraints between super-voxels instead of voxel-wise. This model is tailored to the specific characteristics of light microscopy datasets: super-voxels help registration in textureless areas, the MRF over super-voxels efficiently propagates motion information between neighboring cells and the background subtraction and super-voxels reduce the dimensionality of the problem by an order of magnitude. We validate our approach on large 3D time-lapse datasets of Drosophila and zebrafish development by analyzing cell motion patterns. We show that our approach is, on average, 10 × faster than commonly used optical flow implementations in the Insight Tool-Kit (ITK) and reduces the average flow end point error by 50% in regions with complex dynamic processes, such as cell divisions. Availability: Source code freely available in the Software section at http://janelia.org/lab/keller-lab. Contact: amatf@janelia.hhmi.org or kellerp@janelia.hhmi.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23242263

  17. High-Resolution Time-Lapse Monitoring of Unsaturated Flow using Automated GPR Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.; Lytle, B. A.; Bradford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data provide the detailed information required to image subsurface structures. Recent advances in GPR monitoring now also make it possible to study transient hydrologic processes, but high-speed data acquisition is critical for this application. We therefore highlight the capabilities of our automated system to acquire time-lapse, high-resolution multifold GPR data during infiltration of water into soils. The system design allows for fast acquisition of constant-offset (COP) and common-midpoint profiles (CMP) to monitor unsaturated flow at multiple locations. Qualitative interpretation of the unprocessed COPs can provide substantial information regarding the hydrologic response of the system, such as the complexities of patterns associated with the wetting of the soil and geophysical evidence of non-uniform propagation of a wetting front. While we find that unprocessed images are informative, we show that the spatial variability of velocity introduced by infiltration events can complicate the images and that migration of the data is an effective tool to improve interpretability of the time-lapse images. The ability of the system to collect high density CMP data also introduces the potential for improving the velocity model along with the image via reflection tomography in the post-migrated domain. We show that for both simulated and empirical time-lapse GPR profiles we can resolve a propagating wetting front in the soil that is in good agreement with the response of in-situ soil moisture measurements. The data from these experiments illustrate the importance of high-speed, high-resolution GPR data acquisition for obtaining insight about the dynamics of hydrologic events. Continuing research is aimed at improving the quantitative analysis of surface-based GPR monitoring data for identifying preferential flow in soils.

  18. Time-Lapse Electrical Geophysical Monitoring of Amendment-Based Biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Major, William; Lane, John W.

    2015-12-02

    Biostimulation is increasingly used to accelerate microbial remediation of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants. Effective application of biostimulation requires successful emplacement of amendment in the contaminant target zone. Verification of remediation performance requires postemplacement assessment and contaminant monitoring. Sampling based approaches are expensive and provide low-density spatial and temporal information. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is an effective geophysical method for determining temporal changes in subsurface electrical conductivity. Because remedial amendments and biostimulation-related biogeochemical processes often change subsurface electrical conductivity, ERT can complement and enhance sampling-based approaches for assessing emplacement and monitoring biostimulation-based remediation. Field studies demonstrating the ability of time-lapse ERT to monitor amendment emplacement and behavior were performed during a biostimulation remediation effort conducted at the Department of Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) Yard, in Brandywine, Maryland, United States. Geochemical fluid sampling was used to calibrate a petrophysical relation in order to predict groundwater indicators of amendment distribution. The petrophysical relations were field validated by comparing predictions to sequestered fluid sample results, thus demonstrating the potential of electrical geophysics for quantitative assessment of amendment-related geochemical properties. Crosshole radar zero-offset profile and borehole geophysical logging were also performed to augment the data set and validate interpretation. In addition to delineating amendment transport in the first 10 months after emplacement, the time-lapse ERT results show later changes in bulk electrical properties interpreted as mineral precipitation. Results support the use of more cost-effective surfacebased ERT in conjunction with limited field sampling to improve spatial

  19. The Contribution of Attentional Lapses to Individual Differences in Visual Working Memory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Kirsten C. S.; Mance, Irida; Fukuda, Keisuke; Vogel, Edward K.

    2015-01-01

    Attentional control and working memory capacity are important cognitive abilities that substantially vary between individuals. Although much is known about how attentional control and working memory capacity relate to each other and to constructs like fluid intelligence, little is known about how trial-by-trial fluctuations in attentional engagement impact trial-by-trial working memory performance. Here, we employ a novel whole-report memory task that allowed us to distinguish between varying levels of attentional engagement in humans performing a working memory task. By characterizing low-performance trials, we can distinguish between models in which working memory performance failures are caused by either (1) complete lapses of attention or (2) variations in attentional control. We found that performance failures increase with set-size and strongly predict working memory capacity. Performance variability was best modeled by an attentional control model of attention, not a lapse model. We examined neural signatures of performance failures by measuring EEG activity while participants performed the whole-report task. The number of items correctly recalled in the memory task was predicted by frontal theta power, with decreased frontal theta power associated with poor performance on the task. In addition, we found that poor performance was not explained by failures of sensory encoding; the P1/N1 response and ocular artifact rates were equivalent for high- and low-performance trials. In all, we propose that attentional lapses alone cannot explain individual differences in working memory performance. Instead, we find that graded fluctuations in attentional control better explain the trial-by-trial differences in working memory that we observe. PMID:25811710

  20. Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring, SoilCAM project highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Van Der Zee, S. E.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Tsocano, G.

    2013-12-01

    The SoilCAM project (2008- 2012, EU-FP7-212663) aimed at improving methods for monitoring subsurace contaminant distribution and biodegradation. Two test sites were chosen, Oslo airport Gardermoen, Norway where de-icing agents infiltrate the soil during snowmelt and the Trecate site in Italy where an inland crude oil spill occurred in 1994. A number of geophysical investigation techniques were combined with soil and water sampling techniques. Data obtained from time-lapse measurements were further analysed by numerical modelling of flow and transport at different scales in order to characterise transport processes in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Laboratory experiments provided physical and biogeochemical data for model parameterisation and to select remediation methods. The geophysical techniques were used to map geological heterogeneities and to conduct time-lapse measurements of processes in the unsaturated zone. Both cross borehole and surface electrodes were used for electrical resistivity and induced polarisation surveys. Results showed clear indications of areas highly affected by de-icing chemicals along the runway at Oslo airport. The time lapse measurements along the runway at the airport showed infiltration patterns during snowmelt and were used to validate 2D unsaturated flow and transport simulations using SUTRA. The simulations illustrate the effect of layering geological structures and membranes, buried parallel to the runway, on the flow pattern. Complex interaction between bio-geo-chemical processes in a 1D vertical profile along the runway were described with the ORCHESTRA model. Smaller scale field site measurements revealed increase of iron and manganese during degradation of de-icing chemicals. At the Trecate site a combination of georadar, electrical resistivity and radio magneto telluric provided a broad outline of the geology down to 50 m. Anomalies in the Induced polarisation and electrical resistivity data from the cross borehole

  1. Live-streaming: Time-lapse video evidence of novel streamer formation mechanism and varying viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Parvinzadeh Gashti, Mazeyar; Bellavance, Julien; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Greener, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Time-lapse videos of growing biofilms were analyzed using a background subtraction method, which removed camouflaging effects from the heterogeneous field of view to reveal evidence of streamer formation from optically dense biofilm segments. In addition, quantitative measurements of biofilm velocity and optical density, combined with mathematical modeling, demonstrated that streamer formation occurred from mature, high-viscosity biofilms. We propose a streamer formation mechanism by sudden partial detachment, as opposed to continuous elongation as observed in other microfluidic studies. Additionally, streamer formation occurred in straight microchannels, as opposed to serpentine or pseudo-porous channels, as previously reported. PMID:26339304

  2. Arctic sea-ice variations from time-lapse passive microwave imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.J.; Ramseier, R.O.; Zwally, H.J.; Gloersen, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents: (1) a short historical review of the passive microwave research on sea ice which established the observational and theoretical base permitting the interpretation of the first passive microwave images of Earth obtained by the Nimbus-5 ESMR; (2) the construction of a time-lapse motion picture film of a 16-month set of serial ESMR images to aid in the formidable data analysis task; and (3) a few of the most significant findings resulting from an early analysis of these data, using selected ESMR images to illustrate these findings. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  3. When spacing out brings clarity. Mental lapses serve as diagnostic clue for type of dementia.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Rabiya S

    2004-01-28

    NEW YORK CITY--Everyone has slow-witted moments: entering a room only to forget why, putting ice cream into the fridge, or blanking out on how to use the microwave. Some clinicians think that periodic mental lapses might help diagnose dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), a scourge that kills brain cells (see DLB Case Study), although not all experts agree. Now, scientists have found that some cognitive blunders crop up more frequently in patients with DLB than in those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or in healthy elderly individuals, according to work presented here on 15 January 2004 at an American Medical Association briefing for media. PMID:14749519

  4. Time-lapse CCD imagery of plasma-tail motions in Comet Austin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Niedner, Malcolm B., Jr.; Oliversen, R. J.; Westpfahl, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The appearance of the bright comet Austin 1989c1 in April-May of 1990 allowed us to test a new imaging instrument at the Joint Observatory for Cometary Research (JOCR). It is a 300mm lens/charge coupled device (CCD) system with interference filters appropriate for cometary emissions. The 13 frames were made into a time-lapse movie showing the evolution of the plasma tail. We were able to follow at least two large-scale waves out through the main tail structure. During the sequence, we saw two new tail rays form and undergo similar wave motion.

  5. Reconstructed imaging of acoustic cloak using time-lapse reversal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Cheng, Ying; Xu, Jian-yi; Li, Bo; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2014-08-01

    We proposed and investigated a solution to the inverse acoustic cloak problem, an anti-stealth technology to make cloaks visible, using the time-lapse reversal (TLR) method. The TLR method reconstructs the image of an unknown acoustic cloak by utilizing scattered acoustic waves. Compared to previous anti-stealth methods, the TLR method can determine not only the existence of a cloak but also its exact geometric information like definite shape, size, and position. Here, we present the process for TLR reconstruction based on time reversal invariance. This technology may have potential applications in detecting various types of cloaks with different geometric parameters.

  6. Quantification of erosion and sedimentation using time-lapse gravimetry and Lidar in southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouyen, Maxime; Steer, Philippe; Croissant, Thomas; Le Moigne, Nicolas; Hwang, Cheinway; Cheng, Ching-Chung; Masson, Frédéric; Davy, Philippe; Lague, Dimitri; Longuevergne, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    After the 2009 Morakot typhoon, which triggered numerous large landslides in Taiwan, Mouyen et al. (2013) showed for the first time the potential of time-lapse gravity survey to infer the mass of sediments transferring by landsliding or through rivers. By providing an integrated measurement of masses, gravimetry might thus be complementary to common methods used to assess the sediments discharge of rivers. But the masses of rocks displaced by Morakot were exceptionally large as a result of the record-breaking rainfalls brought by this typhoon and one might wonder to what extent time-lapse gravimetry could record such sediment transfers. In order to better assess the capabilities of this method, we set a time-lapse gravity network dedicated to the monitoring of such sediments transfers in Paolai village (south-central Taiwan). Paolai is located near the large Laonong river where temporary alluvial deposits of sediments exist and face steep mountain slopes likely to experience landslides. Both features are considered as potential source of mass transfers, and in turn of temporal gravity changes. The first base gravity measurements were done in November 2015, using absolute and relative gravimeters, and will be repeated every year, before and after the typhoon season. In the same time, we also use a terrestrial lidar to scan the geometry of both the river and the mountain slopes, hence providing a detailed topographical survey of the studied area. Adding Lidar measurements is an efficient strategy to solve for the non-uniqueness of gravity solutions. Meanwhile, we use the Eros morphodynamic model, that combine landsliding and flooding models, to investigate various scenarios of landsliding and subsequent sediment transport and compute the gravity changes on a virtual network of gravimeters. This gives us insights on the expected order of magnitudes for these surface sediment transfers, which are useful to unravel the induced gravity signal from others sources such as

  7. Refinement of Eocene lapse rates, fossil-leaf altimetry, and North American Cordilleran surface elevation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ran; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of continental paleoelevation using proxy methods are essential for understanding the geodynamic, climatic, and geomorphoric evolution of ancient orogens. Fossil-leaf paleoaltimetry, one of the few quantitative proxy approaches, uses fossil-leaf traits to quantify differences in temperature or moist enthalpy between coeval coastal and inland sites along latitudes. These environmental differences are converted to elevation differences using their rates of change with elevation (lapse rate). Here, we evaluate the uncertainty associated with this method using the Eocene North American Cordillera as a case study. To do so, we develop a series of paleoclimate simulations for the Early (∼55-49 Ma) and Middle Eocene (49-40 Ma) period using a range of elevation scenarios for the western North American Cordillera. Simulated Eocene lapse rates over western North America are ∼5 °C/km and 9.8 kJ/km, close to moist adiabatic rates but significantly different from modern rates. Further, using linear lapse rates underestimates high-altitude (>3 km) temperature variability and loss of moist enthalpy induced by non-linear circulation changes in response to increasing surface elevation. Ignoring these changes leads to kilometer-scale biases in elevation estimates. In addition to these biases, we demonstrate that previous elevation estimates of the western Cordillera are affected by local climate variability at coastal fossil-leaf sites of up to ∼8 °C in temperature and ∼20 kJ in moist enthalpy, a factor which further contributes to elevation overestimates of ∼1 km for Early Eocene floras located in the Laramide foreland basins and underestimates of ∼1 km for late Middle Eocene floras in the southern Cordillera. We suggest a new approach for estimating past elevations by comparing proxy reconstructions directly with simulated distributions of temperature and moist enthalpy under a range of elevation scenarios. Using this method, we estimate mean elevations for

  8. High Lapse Rates in AIRS Retrieved Temperatures in Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian; Olsen, Edward T.; Fishbein, Evan

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment, on NASA's Aqua spacecraft, uses a combination of infrared and microwave observations to retrieve cloud and surface properties, plus temperature and water vapor profiles comparable to radiosondes throughout the troposphere, for cloud cover up to 70%. The high spectral resolution of AIRS provides sensitivity to important information about the near-surface atmosphere and underlying surface. A preliminary analysis of AIRS temperature retrievals taken during January 2003 reveals extensive areas of superadiabatic lapse rates in the lowest kilometer of the atmosphere. These areas are found predominantly east of North America over the Gulf Stream, and, off East Asia over the Kuroshio Current. Accompanying the high lapse rates are low air temperatures, large sea-air temperature differences, and low relative humidities. Imagery from a Visible / Near Infrared instrument on the AIRS experiment shows accompanying clouds. These lines of evidence all point to shallow convection in the bottom layer of a cold air mass overlying warm water, with overturning driven by heat flow from ocean to atmosphere. An examination of operational radiosondes at six coastal stations in Japan shows AIRS to be oversensitive to lower tropospheric lapse rates due to systematically warm near-surface air temperatures. The bias in near-surface air temperature is seen to be independent of sea surface temperature, however. AIRS is therefore sensitive to air-sea temperature difference, but with a warm atmospheric bias. A regression fit to radiosondes is used to correct AIRS near-surface retrieved temperatures, and thereby obtain an estimate of the true atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast in five subtropical regions across the north Pacific. Moving eastward, we show a systematic shift in this air-sea temperature differences toward more isothermal conditions. These results, while preliminary, have implications for our understanding of heat flow from ocean to

  9. Live-streaming: Time-lapse video evidence of novel streamer formation mechanism and varying viscosity.

    PubMed

    Parvinzadeh Gashti, Mazeyar; Bellavance, Julien; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Greener, Jesse

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse videos of growing biofilms were analyzed using a background subtraction method, which removed camouflaging effects from the heterogeneous field of view to reveal evidence of streamer formation from optically dense biofilm segments. In addition, quantitative measurements of biofilm velocity and optical density, combined with mathematical modeling, demonstrated that streamer formation occurred from mature, high-viscosity biofilms. We propose a streamer formation mechanism by sudden partial detachment, as opposed to continuous elongation as observed in other microfluidic studies. Additionally, streamer formation occurred in straight microchannels, as opposed to serpentine or pseudo-porous channels, as previously reported. PMID:26339304

  10. A Single-Cell Assay for Time Lapse Studies of Exosome Secretion and Cell Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cai, Wei; Shih, Yu-Ru V; Lian, Ian; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    To understand the inhomogeneity of cells in biological systems, there is a growing demand on the capability of characterizing the properties of individual single cells. Since single-cell studies require continuous monitoring of the cell behaviors, an effective single-cell assay that can support time lapsed studies in a high throughput manner is desired. Most currently available single-cell technologies cannot provide proper environments to sustain cell growth and, proliferation of single cells and convenient, noninvasive tests of single-cell behaviors from molecular markers. Here, a highly versatile single-cell assay is presented that can accommodate different cellular types, enable easy and efficient single-cell loading and culturing, and be suitable for the study of effects of in vitro environmental factors in combination with drug screening. One salient feature of the assay is the noninvasive collection and surveying of single-cell secretions at different time points, producing unprecedented insight of single-cell behaviors based on the biomarker signals from individual cells under given perturbations. Above all, the acquired information is quantitative, for example, measured by the number of exosomes each single-cell secretes for a given time period. Therefore, our single-cell assay provides a convenient, low-cost, and enabling tool for quantitative, time lapsed studies of single-cell properties. PMID:27254278

  11. Focused time-lapse inversion of radio and audio magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Niklas; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Geoelectrical techniques are widely used to monitor groundwater processes, while surprisingly few studies have considered audio (AMT) and radio (RMT) magnetotellurics for such purposes. In this numerical investigation, we analyze to what extent inversion results based on AMT and RMT monitoring data can be improved by (1) time-lapse difference inversion; (2) incorporation of statistical information about the expected model update (i.e., the model regularization is based on a geostatistical model); (3) using alternative model norms to quantify temporal changes (i.e., approximations of l1 and Cauchy norms using iteratively reweighted least-squares), (4) constraining model updates to predefined ranges (i.e., using Lagrange Multipliers to only allow either increases or decreases of electrical resistivity with respect to background conditions). To do so, we consider a simple illustrative model and a more realistic test case related to seawater intrusion. The results are encouraging and show significant improvements when using time-lapse difference inversion with non l2 model norms. Artifacts that may arise when imposing compactness of regions with temporal changes can be suppressed through inequality constraints to yield models without oscillations outside the true region of temporal changes. Based on these results, we recommend approximate l1-norm solutions as they can resolve both sharp and smooth interfaces within the same model.

  12. Fluorescence Time-lapse Imaging of the Complete S. venezuelae Life Cycle Using a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging of biological processes at the single cell level has been instrumental to our current understanding of the subcellular organization of bacterial cells. However, the application of time-lapse microscopy to study the cell biological processes underpinning development in the sporulating filamentous bacteria Streptomyces has been hampered by technical difficulties. Here we present a protocol to overcome these limitations by growing the new model species, Streptomyces venezuelae, in a commercially available microfluidic device which is connected to an inverted fluorescence widefield microscope. Unlike the classical model species, Streptomyces coelicolor, S. venezuelae sporulates in liquid, allowing the application of microfluidic growth chambers to cultivate and microscopically monitor the cellular development and differentiation of S. venezuelae over long time periods. In addition to monitoring morphological changes, the spatio-temporal distribution of fluorescently labeled target proteins can also be visualized by time-lapse microscopy. Moreover, the microfluidic platform offers the experimental flexibility to exchange the culture medium, which is used in the detailed protocol to stimulate sporulation of S. venezuelae in the microfluidic chamber. Images of the entire S. venezuelae life cycle are acquired at specific intervals and processed in the open-source software Fiji to produce movies of the recorded time-series. PMID:26967231

  13. Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

    2009-11-01

    Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

  14. Time-lapse nanoscopy of friction in the non-Amontons and non-Coulomb regime.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Oguma, Masatsugu; Itamura, Noriaki; Goda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Naruo; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-11

    Originally discovered by Leonard da Vinci in the 15th century, the force of friction is directly proportional to the applied load (known as Amontons' first law of friction). Furthermore, kinetic friction is independent of the sliding speed (known as Coulomb's law of friction). These empirical laws break down at high normal pressure (due to plastic deformation) and low sliding speed (in the transition regime between static friction and kinetic friction). An important example of this phenomenon is friction between the asperities of tectonic plates on the Earth. Despite its significance, little is known about the detailed mechanism of friction in this regime due to the lack of experimental methods. Here we demonstrate in situ time-lapse nanoscopy of friction between asperities sliding at ultralow speed (∼0.01 nm/s) under high normal pressure (∼GPa). This is made possible by compressing and rubbing a pair of nanometer-scale crystalline silicon anvils with electrostatic microactuators and monitoring its dynamical evolution with a transmission electron microscope. Our analysis of the time-lapse movie indicates that superplastic behavior is induced by decrystallization, plastic deformation, and atomic diffusion at the asperity-asperity interface. The results hold great promise for a better understanding of quasi-static friction under high pressure for geoscience, materials science, and nanotechnology. PMID:25330166

  15. Time-lapse electrical resistivity investigations for imaging the grouting injection in shallow subsurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad; Park, Samgyu; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  16. Time-Lapse Evaluation of Interactions Between Biodegradable Mg Particles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Florencia; Lozano Puerto, Rosa M; Pérez-Maceda, Blanca; Grillo, Claudia A; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica

    2016-02-01

    Mg-based implants have promising applications as biodegradable materials in medicine for orthopedic, dental, and cardiovascular therapies. During wear and degradation microdebris are released. Time-lapse multidimensional microscopy (MM) is proposed here as a suitable tool to follow, in fixed intervals over 24-h periods, the interaction between cells and particles. Results of MM show interactions of macrophages (J774) with the magnesium particles (MgPa) that led to modifications of cell size and morphology, a decrease in duplication rate, and cell damage. Corrosion products were progressively formed on the surface of the particles and turbulence was generated due to hydrogen development. Changes were more significant after treating MgPa with potassium fluoride. In order to complement MM observations, membrane damage as detected by a lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and mitochondrial activity as detected by a WST-1 assay with macrophages and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) were compared. A more significant concentration-dependent effect was detected for macrophages exposed to MgPa than for osteoblasts. Accordingly, complementary data showed that viability and cell cycle seem to be more altered in macrophages. In addition, protein profiles and expression of proteins associated with the adhesion process changed in the presence of MgPa. These studies revealed that time-lapse MM is a helpful tool for monitoring changes of biodegradable materials and the biological surrounding in real time and in situ. This information is useful in studies related to biodegradable biomaterials. PMID:26810154

  17. A study on quality-adjusted impact of time lapse on iris recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Nadezhda; Hua, Fang; Liu, Xuan; Remus, Jeremiah; Ross, Arun; Hornak, Lawrence; Schuckers, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Although human iris pattern is widely accepted as a stable biometric feature, recent research has found some evidences on the aging effect of iris system. In order to investigate changes in iris recognition performance due to the elapsed time between probe and gallery iris images, we examine the effect of elapsed time on iris recognition utilizing 7,628 iris images from 46 subjects with an average of ten visits acquired over two years from a legacy database at Clarkson University. Taken into consideration the impact of quality factors such as local contrast, illumination, blur and noise on iris recognition performance, regression models are built with and without quality metrics to evaluate the degradation of iris recognition performance based on time lapse factors. Our experimental results demonstrate the decrease of iris recognition performance along with increased elapsed time based on two iris recognition system (the modified Masek algorithm and a commercial software VeriEye SDK). These results also reveal the significance of quality factors in iris recognition regression indicating the variability in match scores. According to the regression analysis, our study in this paper helps provide the quantified decrease on match scores with increased elapsed time, which indicates the possibility to implement the prediction scheme for iris recognition performance based on learning of impact on time lapse factors.

  18. The Extreme Ice Survey: Capturing and Conveying Glacial Processes Through Time-Lapse Imagery and Narration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, J. D.; Box, J. E.; Pfeffer, W. T.; Hood, E. W.; Fagre, D. B.; Anker, C.; O'Neel, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) uses time-lapse photography, conventional photography, and video to document rapid change in the Earth's glacial ice. The EIS team currently has 38 time-lapse cameras at sites in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, the Rocky Mountains and Nepal. EIS supplements this ongoing record with annual repeat photography in British Columbia, Iceland, the Alps, and Bolivia. EIS imagery supplies basic knowledge in glacier dynamics to the science community, as well as compelling, engaging narratives to the general public about the immediacy of the Anthropocene and climate change. Visual materials from EIS have impacted more than 150 million people, ranging from White House staff, the U. S. Congress and government agency officials to globally influential corporate officers and all age strata of the general public. Media products include a National Geographic/NOVA special, two National Geographic magazine articles, a feature in Parade magazine (circulation 71 million), and numerous presentations on CNN, NBC, BBC and National Public Radio. Columbia Glacier, Alaska, June 2006, May 2007, June 2008 terminus indicated.

  19. Long-term time-lapse microscopy of C. elegans post-embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Nicola; Kienle, Simone; Filina, Olga; van Zon, Jeroen Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    We present a microscopy technique that enables long-term time-lapse microscopy at single-cell resolution in moving and feeding Caenorhabditis elegans larvae. Time-lapse microscopy of C. elegans post-embryonic development is challenging, as larvae are highly motile. Moreover, immobilization generally leads to rapid developmental arrest. Instead, we confine larval movement to microchambers that contain bacteria as food, and use fast image acquisition and image analysis to follow the dynamics of cells inside individual larvae, as they move within each microchamber. This allows us to perform fluorescence microscopy of 10-20 animals in parallel with 20 min time resolution. We demonstrate the power of our approach by analysing the dynamics of cell division, cell migration and gene expression over the full ∼48 h of development from larva to adult. Our approach now makes it possible to study the behaviour of individual cells inside the body of a feeding and growing animal. PMID:27558523

  20. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  1. Very-high-resolution time-lapse photography for plant and ecosystems research1

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Mary H.; Steven, Janet C.; Sargent, Randy; Dille, Paul; Schapiro, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Traditional photography is a compromise between image detail and area covered. We report a new method for creating time-lapse sequences of very-high-resolution photographs to produce zoomable images that facilitate observation across a range of spatial and temporal scales. • Methods and Results: A robotic camera mount and software were used to capture images of the growth and movement in Brassica rapa every 15 s in the laboratory. The resultant time-lapse sequence (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Plant_Growth) captures growth detail such as circumnutation. A modified, solar-powered system was deployed at a remote field site in southern Arizona. Images were collected every 2 h over a 3-mo period to capture the response of vegetation to monsoon season rainfall (http://timemachine.gigapan.org/wiki/Arizona_Grasslands). • Conclusions: A technique for observing time sequences of both individual plant and ecosystem response at a range of spatial scales is available for use in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:25202588

  2. Fluorescence Time-lapse Imaging of the Complete S. venezuelae Life Cycle Using a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Schlimpert, Susan; Flärdh, Klas; Buttner, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell imaging of biological processes at the single cell level has been instrumental to our current understanding of the subcellular organization of bacterial cells. However, the application of time-lapse microscopy to study the cell biological processes underpinning development in the sporulating filamentous bacteria Streptomyces has been hampered by technical difficulties. Here we present a protocol to overcome these limitations by growing the new model species, Streptomyces venezuelae, in a commercially available microfluidic device which is connected to an inverted fluorescence widefield microscope. Unlike the classical model species, Streptomyces coelicolor, S. venezuelae sporulates in liquid, allowing the application of microfluidic growth chambers to cultivate and microscopically monitor the cellular development and differentiation of S. venezuelae over long time periods. In addition to monitoring morphological changes, the spatio-temporal distribution of fluorescently labeled target proteins can also be visualized by time-lapse microscopy. Moreover, the microfluidic platform offers the experimental flexibility to exchange the culture medium, which is used in the detailed protocol to stimulate sporulation of S. venezuelae in the microfluidic chamber. Images of the entire S. venezuelae life cycle are acquired at specific intervals and processed in the open-source software Fiji to produce movies of the recorded time-series. PMID:26967231

  3. Automated identification of axonal growth cones in time-lapse image sequences.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Thomas M; Hooker, Andrew; Spilker, Mary E; Li, Nianzhen; Boggy, Gregory J; Vicini, Paolo; Folch, Albert

    2006-03-15

    The isolation and purification of axon guidance molecules has enabled in vitro studies of the effects of axon guidance molecule gradients on numerous neuronal cell types. In a typical experiment, cultured neurons are exposed to a chemotactic gradient and their growth is recorded by manual identification of the axon tip position from two or more micrographs. Detailed and statistically valid quantification of axon growth requires evaluation of a large number of neurons at closely spaced time points (e.g. using a time-lapse microscopy setup). However, manual tracing becomes increasingly impractical for recording axon growth as the number of time points and/or neurons increases. We present a software tool that automatically identifies and records the axon tip position in each phase-contrast image of a time-lapse series with minimal user involvement. The software outputs several quantitative measures of axon growth, and allows users to develop custom measurements. For, example analysis of growth velocity for a dissociated E13 mouse cortical neuron revealed frequent extension and retraction events with an average growth velocity of 0.05 +/- 0.14 microm/min. Comparison of software-identified axon tip positions with manually identified axon tip positions shows that the software's performance is indistinguishable from that of skilled human users. PMID:16174535

  4. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when

  5. Using a time lapse microgravity model for mapping seawater intrusion around Semarang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriyadi, Khumaedi, Yusuf, M.; Agung, W.

    2016-03-01

    A modeling of time-lapse microgravity anomaly due to sea water intrusion has been conducted. It used field data of aquifer cross section, aquifer thickness and lithology of research area. Those data were then processed using Grav3D and Surfer. Modeling results indicated that the intrusion of sea water resulting in a time-lapse microgravity anomalies of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal, at soil layer density of 0.15 g/cm3 to 0.3 g/cm3 and at depth of 30 to 100 m. These imply that the areas experiencing seawater intrusion were Tanjung Mas, SPBE Bandarharjo, Brass, Old Market Boom and Johar as the microgravity measured there were in the range of 0.12 to 0.18 mGal and the density contrast were at 0.15 g/cm3 to 0.28 g/cm3. Areas that experienced fluid reduction were Puri Anjasmoro, Kenconowungu and Puspowarno with microgravity changes from -0.06 mGal to -0.18 mGal.

  6. Tracking tracer breakthrough in the hyporheic zone using time‐lapse DC resistivity, Crabby Creek, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyquist, Jonathan E.; Toran, Laura; Fang, Allison C.; Ryan, Robert J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the hyporheic zone is of critical importance for understanding stream ecology, contaminant transport, and groundwater‐surface water interaction. A salt water tracer test was used to probe the hyporheic zone of a recently re‐engineered portion of Crabby Creek, a stream located near Philadelphia, PA. The tracer solution was tracked through a 13.5 meter segment of the stream using both a network of 25 wells sampled every 5–15 minutes and time‐lapse electrical resistivity tomographs collected every 11 minutes for six hours, with additional tomographs collected every 100 minutes for an additional 16 hours. The comparison of tracer monitoring methods is of keen interest because tracer tests are one of the few techniques available for characterizing this dynamic zone, and logistically it is far easier to collect resistivity tomographs than to install and monitor a dense network of wells. Our results show that resistivity monitoring captured the essential shape of the breakthrough curve and may indicate portions of the stream where the tracer lingered in the hyporheic zone. Time‐lapse resistivity measurements, however, represent time averages over the period required to collect a tomographic data set, and spatial averages over a volume larger than captured by a well sample. Smoothing by the resistivity data inversion algorithm further blurs the resulting tomograph; consequently resistivity monitoring underestimates the degree of fine‐scale heterogeneity in the hyporheic zone.

  7. Time-lapse 3D VSP monitoring of a carbon dioxide injection project at Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, Muhammad Husni Mubarak

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. The estimated original oil in place (OOIP) is 357 mmbo and approximately 54% of OOIP has been produced through the primary production and water-flooding. A CO2-EOR program has been implemented since November 2009 to recover an additional 17% of OOIP. Reservoir surveillance using time-lapse 3D seismic data has been conducted to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency. The goal of this study is to monitor the CO2 flow-path in the area around the injector using time-lapse 3D VSP data. For this purpose, two 3D VSPs acquired in June 2010 and again in August 2011 were processed together. Fluid substitution and VSP modeling were performed to understand the influence of pore-fluid saturation change on VSP records. A cross-equalization was performed to improve the similarity of the datasets. This step is important to reduce the ambiguity in time-lapse observation. The splice of a 3D VSP image into the surface seismic data becomes the key point in determining the reflector of the reservoir. By integrating the observation from the modeling and the splice of 3D VSP image to surface seismic, the CO2 flow-path from injector 164-3 can be identified from 3D time-lapse VSP data. The CO2 was not radially distributed around the injector, but moved toward southwest direction. This finding is also consistent with the flow-path interpreted from surface seismic. This consistency implies that time-lapse 3D VSP surveys at Delhi Field confirm and augment the time-lapse interpretation from surface seismic data.

  8. Selected time-lapse movies of the east rift zone eruption of KĪlauea Volcano, 2004–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has used mass-market digital time-lapse cameras and network-enabled Webcams for visual monitoring and research. The 26 time-lapse movies in this report were selected from the vast collection of images acquired by these camera systems during 2004–2008. Chosen for their content and broad aesthetic appeal, these image sequences document a variety of flow-field and vent processes from Kīlauea's east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983 and is still (as of 2011) ongoing.

  9. Time-lapse seismic waveform modelling and attribute analysis using hydromechanical models for a deep reservoir undergoing depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.-X.; Angus, D. A.; Blanchard, T. D.; Wang, G.-L.; Yuan, S.-Y.; Garcia, A.

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of fluids from subsurface reservoirs induces changes in pore pressure, leading not only to geomechanical changes, but also perturbations in seismic velocities and hence observable seismic attributes. Time-lapse seismic analysis can be used to estimate changes in subsurface hydromechanical properties and thus act as a monitoring tool for geological reservoirs. The ability to observe and quantify changes in fluid, stress and strain using seismic techniques has important implications for monitoring risk not only for petroleum applications but also for geological storage of CO2 and nuclear waste scenarios. In this paper, we integrate hydromechanical simulation results with rock physics models and full-waveform seismic modelling to assess time-lapse seismic attribute resolution for dynamic reservoir characterization and hydromechanical model calibration. The time-lapse seismic simulations use a dynamic elastic reservoir model based on a North Sea deep reservoir undergoing large pressure changes. The time-lapse seismic traveltime shifts and time strains calculated from the modelled and processed synthetic data sets (i.e. pre-stack and post-stack data) are in a reasonable agreement with the true earth models, indicating the feasibility of using 1-D strain rock physics transform and time-lapse seismic processing methodology. Estimated vertical traveltime shifts for the overburden and the majority of the reservoir are within ±1 ms of the true earth model values, indicating that the time-lapse technique is sufficiently accurate for predicting overburden velocity changes and hence geomechanical effects. Characterization of deeper structure below the overburden becomes less accurate, where more advanced time-lapse seismic processing and migration is needed to handle the complex geometry and strong lateral induced velocity changes. Nevertheless, both migrated full-offset pre-stack and near-offset post-stack data image the general features of both the overburden and

  10. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  11. Minds “At Attention”: Mindfulness Training Curbs Attentional Lapses in Military Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Amishi P.; Morrison, Alexandra B.; Dainer-Best, Justin; Parker, Suzanne; Rostrup, Nina; Stanley, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of mindfulness training (MT) on attentional performance lapses associated with task-unrelated thought (i.e., mind wandering). Periods of persistent and intensive demands may compromise attention and increase off-task thinking. Here, we investigated if MT may mitigate these deleterious effects and promote cognitive resilience in military cohorts enduring a high-demand interval of predeployment training. To better understand which aspects of MT programs are most beneficial, three military cohorts were examined. Two of the three groups were provided MT. One group received an 8-hour, 8-week variant of Mindfulness-based Mind Fitness Training (MMFT) emphasizing engagement in training exercises (training-focused MT, n = 40), a second group received a didactic-focused variant emphasizing content regarding stress and resilience (didactic-focused MT, n = 40), and the third group served as a no-training control (NTC, n = 24). Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) performance was indexed in all military groups and a no-training civilian group (CIV, n = 45) before (T1) and after (T2) the MT course period. Attentional performance (measured by A’, a sensitivity index) was lower in NTC vs. CIV at T2, suggesting that performance suffers after enduring a high-demand predeployment interval relative to a similar time period of civilian life. Yet, there were significantly fewer performance lapses in the military cohorts receiving MT relative to NTC, with training-focused MT outperforming didactic-focused MT at T2. From T1 to T2, A’ degraded in NTC and didactic-focused MT but remained stable in training-focused MT and CIV. In sum, while protracted periods of high-demand military training may increase attentional performance lapses, practice-focused MT programs akin to training-focused MT may bolster attentional performance more than didactic-focused programs. As such, training-focused MT programs should be further examined in cohorts experiencing

  12. Time-lapse microscopy and image processing for stem cell research: modeling cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Tomas; Althoff, Karin; Degerman, Johan; Olsson, Torsten; Thoreson, Ann-Catrin; Thorlin, Thorleif; Eriksson, Peter

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents hardware and software procedures for automated cell tracking and migration modeling. A time-lapse microscopy system equipped with a computer controllable motorized stage was developed. The performance of this stage was improved by incorporating software algorithms for stage motion displacement compensation and auto focus. The microscope is suitable for in-vitro stem cell studies and allows for multiple cell culture image sequence acquisition. This enables comparative studies concerning rate of cell splits, average cell motion velocity, cell motion as a function of cell sample density and many more. Several cell segmentation procedures are described as well as a cell tracking algorithm. Statistical methods for describing cell migration patterns are presented. In particular, the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) was investigated. Results indicate that if the cell motion can be described as a non-stationary stochastic process, then the HMM can adequately model aspects of its dynamic behavior.

  13. Electron microscopic time-lapse visualization of surface pore filtration on particulate matter trapping process.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ryoko; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to dynamically visualize the particulate matter (PM) trapping process on diesel particulate filter (DPF) walls at a micro scale as 'time-lapse' images corresponding to the increase in pressure drop simultaneously measured through the DPF. This visualization and pressure drop measurement led to the conclusion that the PM trapping in surface pores was driven by PM bridging and stacking at constricted areas in porous channels. This caused a drastic increase in the pressure drop during PM accumulation at the beginning of the PM trapping process. The relationship between the porous structure of the DPF and the depth of the surface pore was investigated in terms of the porosity distribution and PM penetration depth near the wall surface with respect to depth. The pressure drop calculated with an assumed surface pore depth showed a good correspondence to the measured pressure drop. PMID:26923765

  14. Iceberg Calving and Flow Dynamics at Helheim Glacier, East Greenland, from Time-Lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, G. S.; Khan, S. A.; Schild, K. M.; Stearns, L. A.; Nettles, M.; Ahlstrøm, A. P.; Andersen, M. L.; Davis, J. L.; Ekström, G.; Elósegui, P.; Forsberg, R.; de Juan, J.; Larsen, T. B.; Stenseng, L.

    2008-12-01

    Helheim Glacier in East Greenland is the focus of coordinated studies aimed at understanding tidewater outlet-glacier dynamics and kinematics, and their link to glacial earthquakes. As part of this effort, we installed three time-lapse cameras overlooking the calving terminus of the glacier during the Arctic summer of 2008. Images were captured every five minutes during the mostly unattended period of operation. Several interesting aspects of the glacier's behavior are observed in the image sequences, including vertical displacement of the glacier terminus by ocean tides, and very large calving events. These observations, in combination with simultaneous measurements of ice flow, ocean tides (including tsunamis) and seismic activity, contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of Helheim Glacier and the source mechanism of glacial earthquakes.

  15. TRIIG - Time-lapse reproduction of images through interactive graphics. [digital processing of quality hard copy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, J. D.; Council, H. W.; Edwards, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    Description of the hardware and software implementing the system of time-lapse reproduction of images through interactive graphics (TRIIG). The system produces a quality hard copy of processed images in a fast and inexpensive manner. This capability allows for optimal development of processing software through the rapid viewing of many image frames in an interactive mode. Three critical optical devices are used to reproduce an image: an Optronics photo reader/writer, the Adage Graphics Terminal, and Polaroid Type 57 high speed film. Typical sources of digitized images are observation satellites, such as ERTS or Mariner, computer coupled electron microscopes for high-magnification studies, or computer coupled X-ray devices for medical research.

  16. A poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based device enabling time-lapse imaging with high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masahiko; Hoshida, Tetsushi; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-02-12

    We have developed a regulator-free device that enables long-term incubation of mammalian cells for epi-fluorescence imaging, based on a concept that the size of sample to be gassed and heated is reduced to observation scale. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) block stamped on a coverslip works as a long-lasting supplier of CO{sub 2}-rich gas to adjust bicarbonate-containing medium in a tiny chamber at physiological pH, and an oil-immersion objective warms cells across the coverslip. A time-lapse imaging experiment using HeLa cells stably expressing fluorescent cell-cycle indicators showed that the cells in the chamber proliferated with normal cell-cycle period over 2 days.

  17. Time-lapse cinematography of the capillary tube cell migration inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Bray, M A

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of human and guinea pig cell migration inhibition have been studied using time-lapse cinematography of cells migrating from capillary tubes. Guinea pig and human cells exhibit markedly different kinetics in the absence of inhibitors. Specific antigen causes a dose-related inhibition of migration for up to 60 h using guinea pig cells and a peak of inhibition after 18 h using the human leucocyte system. The timing of measurement of maximum activity more critical for the latter test. The kinetics of lymphokine generation have been examined and the migration inhibitory activity of the plant mitogen (PHA), a Kurloff cell product and a continuous cell line supernatant have been compared with the inhibitory profiles of lymphokine preparations and specific antigen. PMID:7350125

  18. Early lens development in the zebrafish: a three-dimensional time-lapse analysis.

    PubMed

    Greiling, Teri M S; Clark, John I

    2009-09-01

    In vivo, high-resolution, time-lapse imaging characterized lens development in the zebrafish from 16 to 96 hr postfertilization (hpf). In zebrafish, the lens placode appeared in the head ectoderm, similar to mammals. Delamination of the surface ectoderm resulted in the formation of the lens mass, which progressed to a solid sphere of cells separating from the developing cornea at approximately 24 hpf. A lens vesicle was not observed and apoptosis was not a major factor in separation of the lens from the future cornea. Differentiation of primary fibers began in the lens mass followed by formation of the anterior epithelium after delamination was complete. Secondary fibers differentiated from elongating epithelial cells near the posterior pole. Quantification characterized three stages of lens growth. The study confirmed the advantages of live-cell imaging for three-dimensional quantitative structural characterization of the mechanism(s) responsible for cell differentiation in formation of a transparent, symmetric, and refractile lens. PMID:19504455

  19. Absent minds and absent agents: attention-lapse induced alienation of agency.

    PubMed

    Cheyne, James Allan; Carriere, Jonathan S A; Smilek, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    We report a novel task designed to elicit transient attention-lapse induced alienation (ALIA) of agency experiences in normal participants. When attention-related action slips occur during the task, participants reported substantially decreased self control as well as a high degree of perceived agency attributed to the errant hand. In addition, participants reported being surprised by, and annoyed with, the actions of the errant hand. We argue that ALIA experiences occur because of constraints imposed by the close and precise temporal relations between intention formation and a contrary action employed in this paradigm. We note similarities between ALIA experiences and anarchic hand sign (AHS) and argue that, despite important differences, both ALIA experiences and AHS phenomenology reflect failures of executive control to intervene and cancel contrary affordance-driven habitual motor plans. PMID:19264515

  20. Time-lapse cinematography in living Drosophila tissues: preparation of material.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ilan; Parton, Richard M

    2006-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been an extraordinarily successful model organism for studying the genetic basis of development and evolution. It is arguably the best-understood complex multicellular model system, owing its success to many factors. Recent developments in imaging techniques, in particular sophisticated fluorescence microscopy methods and equipment, now allow cellular events to be studied at high resolution in living material. This ability has enabled the study of features that tend to be lost or damaged by fixation, such as transient or dynamic events. Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila are shared with the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties in keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick hazy cytoplasm. This protocol outlines the preparation of major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping them alive. PMID:22485989

  1. 37 CFR 1.137 - Revival of abandoned application, terminated or limited reexamination prosecution, or lapsed patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revival of abandoned application, terminated or limited reexamination prosecution, or lapsed patent. 1.137 Section 1.137 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES...

  2. Motivations for Giving of Alumni Donors, Lapsed Donors and Non-Donors: Implications for Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugano, Emilio Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive and causal comparative study sought to identify motivations for alumni donor acquisition and retention in Christian institutions of higher learning. To meet this objective, motivations for alumni donors, lapsed donors, and non-donors were analyzed and compared. Data was collected through an electronic survey of a stratified sample…

  3. Smoking Abstinence-Induced Changes in Resting State Functional Connectivity with Ventral Striatum Predict Lapse During a Quit Attempt.

    PubMed

    Sweitzer, Maggie M; Geier, Charles F; Addicott, Merideth A; Denlinger, Rachel; Raiff, Bethany R; Dallery, Jesse; McClernon, F Joseph; Donny, Eric C

    2016-09-01

    The ventral and dorsal striatum are critical substrates of reward processing and motivation and have been repeatedly linked to addictive disorders, including nicotine dependence. However, little is known about how functional connectivity between these and other brain regions is modulated by smoking withdrawal and may contribute to relapse vulnerability. In the present study, 37 smokers completed resting state fMRI scans during both satiated and 24-h abstinent conditions, prior to engaging in a 3-week quit attempt supported by contingency management. We examined the effects of abstinence condition and smoking outcome (lapse vs non-lapse) on whole-brain connectivity with ventral and dorsal striatum seed regions. Results indicated a significant condition by lapse outcome interaction for both right and left ventral striatum seeds. Robust abstinence-induced increases in connectivity with bilateral ventral striatum were observed across a network of regions implicated in addictive disorders, including insula, superior temporal gyrus, and anterior/mid-cingulate cortex among non-lapsers; the opposite pattern was observed for those who later lapsed. For dorsal striatum seeds, 24-h abstinence decreased connectivity across both groups with several regions, including medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and supplemental motor area. These findings suggest that modulation of striatal connectivity with the cingulo-insular network during early withdrawal may be associated with smoking cessation outcomes. PMID:27091382

  4. Time-Lapse Joint Inversion of Cross-Well DC Resistivity and Seismic Data: A Numerical Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data is required to image the evolution of oil reservoirs during production and enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, geothermal fields during production, and to monitor the evolution of contaminant plumes. Joint inversion schemes red...

  5. Updated Optimal Designs of Time-Lapse Seismic Surveys for Monitoring CO2 Leakage through Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Shang, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective time-lapse seismic surveys are crucial for long-term monitoring of geologic carbon sequestration. Similar to Shang and Huang (2012), in this study we have numerically modeled time-lapse seismic surveys for monitoring CO2 leakage through fault zones, and designed updated optimal surveys for time-lapse seismic data acquisition using elastic-wave sensitivity analysis. When CO2 was confined in a relatively deep region, our results show that the most desired location for receivers at the surface is at the hanging-wall side of the two fault zones, of high-angle normal faults and reverse faults. The most sensitive places at the surface to the change of different P- and S-wave velocities and density are similar to each other, but are often not sensitive to the source location. When CO2 migrates close to the surface, our modeling suggests that the best region at the surface for time-lapse seismic surveys is very sensitive to the source location and the elastic parameter to be monitored.

  6. Time-lapse stereo-photogrammetry to monitor electrical sounding electrodes on an unstable slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Dewez, T.; Malet, J.-P.; Stumpf, A.

    2012-04-01

    Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) of landslides allows at characterizing the water flows inside the moving mass. Inversion of electrical measurements imposes to locate and track in time the positions of each electrode. The spacing of the electrodes is typically unknown if the electrodes are not equipped with a displacement monitoring system (total station, dGPS antennas, extensometers). Here we tackle this practical problem with time lapse stereo-photogrammetry. In the field, the electrodes were overlaid with white 10cm-diameter Styrofoam spheres and tracked in the stereophoto sequences through image processing of very-high resolution terrestrial photographs. The acquisition profile (114 m long) is located in the most active part of the Super-Sauze landslide which is experiencing average velocities of 2 to 3 cm.day-1 with possible sudden acceleration (0.4 m to 2.0 m.day-1 as observed in 2008). The two cameras are spaced by 75 m which leads to a B/h ratio ranging between 1.6 and 2.1 according to the distribution of electrodes within the image plane The image processing is composed of 4 stages: (i) removal of the slow camera motion, (ii) identification of the electrodes in the 2D image planes; (iii) correction of the lens distortion; (iv) computation of 3D electrode location for each image pair; (v) computation of ERT profile displacement. The method was applied on a serie of 17 photographs over a period of 29 days in June and July 2011. The displacements obtained from stereo-photogrammetry were compared to dGPS campaign measurements, and to the displacement monitored by a permanent GPS receiver.

  7. Assessment of Saturation Patterns on Agricultural Land Using Time-lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silasari, R.; Bloeschl, G.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land generates overland flow differently from natural environment due to features from anthropogenic activities such as cultivated soil layer and tile drain pipe. During rainfall events, the formation of overland flow may happen from infiltration excess and/or saturation excess according to the threshold processes which are influenced by rainfall characteristics and soil hydraulic parameters. The dynamics of threshold processes in varying rainfall and soil hydraulic conditions will affect the surface runoff response which can be inversely analyzed by visually observing the generated saturation patterns. This study aims to explore the use of time-lapse photographs of saturated plot during rainfall events to observe and understand the threshold processes of overland flow generation. The observation was conducted at Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) in Lower Austria with a 2 megapixels surveillance camera overlooking a 1.8 ha tile-drained agricultural field situated on a hillslope. The main tile drain pipe extends from the higher ground into the riparian area - creating a depression line which generates the main saturation track. The time-lapse photographs are able to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of 0.1 ha saturated plot (117 m long and 10 m wide in average) during three big rainfall events in 2014 which produced measurable overland flow. The photographs also manage to capture the behavior of overland flow on tractor tracks which were generated faster than on the main saturated plot - due to the more compacted soil - and contribute significantly to the overall overland flow discharge and movements. Comparison of the photographs with on-field manual plotting shows good accuracy of the captured saturation plot and the possibility of calculating the plot area digitally. This method gives opportunity to observe overland flow generation on visual basis as a complement of the customary discharge measurements.

  8. Characterization of connective tissue progenitors through phase contrast and multicolor fluorescence time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwee, Edward; Powell, Kimerly; Muschler, George

    2015-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are defined as the heterogeneous population of tissue resident stem and progenitor cells capable of proliferating and differentiating into connective tissue phenotypes. The prevalence and variation in clonal progeny of CTPs can be characterized using a colony formation assay. However, colony assays do not directly assess the characteristics of the colony founding CTP. We developed a large field of view, time lapse microscopy system with phase contrast and fluorescence capabilities that enables tracking from seeding through colony formation. Cells derived from the trabecular surface of bone were prepared and seeded in an Ibidi-Ph+ chamber slide. Phase contrast images of the slide were obtained every hour using a DMI6000 Leica microscope, 10X objective, and Retiga 2000R camera. Cells were stained using fluorescent antibodies for multiple markers at the time of plating to determine marker expression on seeded cells and re-stained to determine expression on their progeny. Colonies were identified and characterized using automated image processing and quantitative analysis methods. Following colony identification, the time lapse was reversed to identify and characterize the colony founding CTP according to morphology and marker expression. As a representative example, a CD73+/CD90-/CD105- and a CD73+/CD90+/CD105- CTP resulted in a colony with an area of 3720826 microns2 and percent area expression of 2.98%, 3.62%, and 1.13% for CD73, CD90, and CD105, respectively. This method can be used to study CTPs and other stem and progenitor cell populations to benefit point-of-care methods for assay and isolation in cell based therapies.

  9. Recreational use assessment of water-based activities, using time-lapse construction cameras.

    PubMed

    Sunger, Neha; Teske, Sondra S; Nappier, Sharon; Haas, Charles N

    2012-01-01

    Recreational exposure to surface waters during periods of increased pathogen concentration may lead to a significantly higher risk of illness. However, estimates of elementary exposure factors necessary to evaluate health risk (i.e., usage distributions and exposure durations) are not available for many non-swimming water-related activities. No prior studies have assessed non-swimming water exposure with respect to factors leading to impaired water quality from increased pathogen concentration, such as weather condition (rain events produce increased runoff and sewer overflows) and type of day (heavy recreational periods). We measured usage patterns and evaluated the effect of weather and type of day at eight water sites located within Philadelphia, by using a novel "time lapse photography" technology during three peak recreational seasons (May-September) 2008-2010. Camera observations validated with simultaneous in-person surveys exhibited a strong correlation (R(2)=0.81 to 0.96) between the two survey techniques, indicating that the application of remote photography in collecting human exposure data was appropriate. Recreational activities usage varied more on a temporal basis than due to inclement weather. Only 14% (6 out of 44) of the site-specific activity combinations showed dry weather preference, whereas 41.5% (17 out of 41) of the combinations indicated greater usage on weekends as compared with weekday. In general, the log normal distribution described the playing and wading duration distribution, while the gamma distribution was the best fit for fishing durations. Remote photography provided unbiased, real-time human exposure data and was less personnel intensive compared with traditional survey methods. However, there are potential limitations associated with remote surveillance data related to its limited view. This is the first study to report that time lapse cameras can be successfully applied to assess water-based human recreational patterns and can

  10. Low-Cost Motility Tracking System (LOCOMOTIS) for Time-Lapse Microscopy Applications and Cell Visualisation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Adam E.; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81±0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17±0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24±0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21±0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers. PMID:25121722

  11. Improving time-lapse seismic repeatability: CO2CRC Otway site permanent geophone array field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevzner, Roman; Dupuis, Christian; Shulakova, Valeriya; Urosevic, Milovan; Lumley, David

    2013-04-01

    The proposed Stage 2C of the CO2CRC Otway project involves injection of a small amount (around 15,000 tonnes) of CO2/CH4 gas mixture into saline acquifer (Paaratte formation) at the depth of ~1.5 km. The seismic time-lapse signal will depend largely on the formation properties and the injection scenario, but is likely to be relatively weak. In order to improve time-lapse seismic monitoring capabilities by decreasing the noise level, a buried receiver arrays can be used. A small-scale trial of such an array was conducted at Otway site in June 2012. A set of 25 geophones was installed in 3 m deep boreholes in parallel to the same number of surface geophones. In addition, four geophones were placed into boreholes of 1 to 12 m depth. In order to assess the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio and repeatability, both active and passive seismic surveys were carried out. The surveys were conducted in relatively poor weather conditions, with rain, strong wind and thunderstorms increasing the noise level. We found that noise level for buried geophones is on average 20 dB lower compared to the surface ones. Furthermore, the combination of active and passive experiments has allowed us to perform a detailed classification of various noise sources. Acknowledgement The authors acknowledge the funding provided by the Australian government through its CRC program to support this CO2CRC research project. We also acknowledge the CO2CRC's corporate sponsors and the financial assistance provided through Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research and Development (ANLEC R&D). ANLEC R&D is supported by Australian Coal Association Low Emissions Technology Limited and the Australian Government through the Clean Energy Initiative.

  12. Time-Lapse Video Microscopy for Assessment of EYFP-Parkin Aggregation as a Marker for Cellular Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Casimiro, Mathew C; Pestell, Timothy G; Pestell, Richard G

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse video microscopy can be defined as the real time imaging of living cells. This technique relies on the collection of images at different time points. Time intervals can be set through a computer interface that controls the microscope-integrated camera. This kind of microscopy requires both the ability to acquire very rapid events and the signal generated by the observed cellular structure during these events. After the images have been collected, a movie of the entire experiment is assembled to show the dynamic of the molecular events of interest. Time-lapse video microscopy has a broad range of applications in the biomedical research field and is a powerful and unique tool for following the dynamics of the cellular events in real time. Through this technique, we can assess cellular events such as migration, division, signal transduction, growth, and death. Moreover, using fluorescent molecular probes we are able to mark specific molecules, such as DNA, RNA or proteins and follow them through their molecular pathways and functions. Time-lapse video microscopy has multiple advantages, the major one being the ability to collect data at the single-cell level, that make it a unique technology for investigation in the field of cell biology. However, time-lapse video microscopy has limitations that can interfere with the acquisition of high quality images. Images can be compromised by both external factors; temperature fluctuations, vibrations, humidity and internal factors; pH, cell motility. Herein, we describe a protocol for the dynamic acquisition of a specific protein, Parkin, fused with the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) in order to track the selective removal of damaged mitochondria, using a time-lapse video microscopy approach. PMID:27168174

  13. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, M. H.; Nearing, M.; Hernandez, M.; Polyakov, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    Gullies that terminate at a vertical-wall are ubiquitous throughout arid and semiarid regions. Multi-year assessments of gully evolution and headcut advance are typically accomplished using traditional ground surveys and aerial photographs, with much recent research focused on integrating data collected at very high spatial resolutions using new techniques such as aerial surveys with blimps or kites and ground surveys with LiDar scanners. However, knowledge of specific processes that drive headcut advance is limited due to inadequate observation and documentation of flash floods and subsequent erosion that can occur at temporal resolutions not captured through repeat surveys. This paper presents a method for using very-high temporal resolution ground-based time-lapse photography to capture short-duration flash floods and gully head evolution in response. In 2004, a base level controlling concrete weir was removed from the outlet of a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeastern Arizona, USA. During the ten year period from 2004 to 2014 the headcut migrated upchannel a total of 14.5 m reducing the contributing area at the headwall by 9.5%. Beginning in July 2012, time-lapse photography was employed to observe event scale channel evolution dynamics. The most frequent erosion processes observed during three seasons of time-lapse photography were plunge pool erosion and mass wasting through sidewall or channel headwall slumping that occurred during summer months. Geomorphic change during the ten year period was dominated by a single piping event in August 2014 that advanced the channel head 7.4 m (51% of the overall advance) and removed 11.3 m3 of sediment. High temporal resolution time-lapse photography was critical for identifying subsurface erosion processes, in the absence of time-lapse images piping would not have been identified as an erosion mechanism responsible for advancing the gully headwall at this site.

  14. Time-lapse capacitive resistivity imaging: a new technology concept for the monitoring of permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuras, O.; Krautblatter, M.; Murton, J.; Haslam, E.; Wilkinson, P.; Meldrum, P.

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated and sought to prove a new technology concept for the non-invasive volumetric imaging and routine temporal monitoring of the thermal state of permafrost, a key indicator of global climate change. Capacitive Resistivity Imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements across permanently installed multi-sensor arrays is applied in order to emulate Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen soils or rocks. Recent work has shown that temperature-calibrated ERT using galvanic sensors is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime. However, our own laboratory experiments on rock samples under simulated permafrost conditions have equally demonstrated that galvanic electrodes experience large variations in contact resistances between sensors and the host material as the active layer freezes and thaws, leading to a rapid deterioration of data quality over time. As the presence of systematic but uncontrolled sensor noise will reduce the value of time-lapse ERT datasets for monitoring permafrost, the use of galvanic sensors will invariably impose practical limitations on field measurements. The capacitive methodology we are presenting here overcomes this problem and provides a roadmap for making stable resistance measurements with permanently installed sensors over time. We report on our experience with designing, building, testing and validating a functional prototype time-lapse CRI measurement system. The practical system architecture draws upon conceptual ideas incorporated in existing, field-scale CRI instrumentation designed by BGS; however, the use of dense capacitive sensor networks at the laboratory scale and the need for collecting tomographic imaging data across multiple sensors in an automated fashion required a novel technical approach. Our research has applied 4D CRI as well as

  15. Environmental monitoring of leaks using time-lapsed long electrode electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, Dale F.; Fink, James B.; Loke, Meng H.

    2011-08-01

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. The risk of this occurring may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. Although the method of using long electrodes has been proposed by others, no time-lapse resistivity data have been collected, modeled, and analyzed within a nuclear waste tank farm environment. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to test whether the long electrode method using steel-cased wells can be employed to spatially and temporally track simulated leaks in a highly industrialized setting. A secondary objective was to apply a time-lapse regularization procedure in the inverse modeling code, similar to the 4D tomography approach by Kim et al. (2009), and to test the procedure's effect on the quality of the outcome regarding plume intensity and position. For the synthetic examples, a simple target of varying electrical properties was placed beneath different types of layers of low resistivity to simulate the effects of the infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes were tested on the synthetic domain, and the test cases covered a variety of survey parameters including low and high electrode density, noise, array type, and the explicit location of the wells relative to the target. All data were processed in four dimensions, where the regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case showed that the long electrode resistivity method could detect relative changes in resistivity that was commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes

  16. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography: a powerful tool for landslide monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.

    2011-12-01

    The extreme rainfall events and the quick snowmelt occurrences play an important role in the triggering of the landslides. The occurrence of one of these factors can determine the variation of water content in the first layers of the subsoil and as a consequence a quick soil saturation inducing both an increase in pore-water pressures and the overloaded of the slopes progressively collapsing. The electrical resistivity, self-potential, electromagnetic induction and GPR methods can be considered as the most appropriate for assessing the presence of water in the underground. Such methods allow us to study the behavior of water content over much wider and deeper areas than those offered by traditional methods (thermo-gravimetric, tensiometric, TDR, etc) based on spot measures and concerning small volumes. In particular, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which has already proved to be a powerful tool both for the geometrical reconstruction of a landslide body (location of sliding surface, estimation of the thickness of the slide material) and the individuation of high water content areas, can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for a qualitative and quantitative water content monitoring in the first layers of the subsoil. Indeed, time-lapse 2D ERT can be tested in order to gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes and water content variation. This work reports the preliminary results from a new prototype system planned to obtain time-lapse 2D ERTs, TDR and precipitation measurements in two landslide areas located in the Southern Apennine chain (Italy). The system was planned with the aim to estimate the variation of the resistivity parameter on a long period considering the water content variation, the rain water infiltration and the seasonal changes. The prototype system, linked to a pc used for storing data and managing the time interval acquisition, consists of: a resistivimeter connected to a

  17. Fast history matching of time-lapse seismic and production data for high resolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Arismendi, Eduardo Antonio

    Integrated reservoir modeling has become an important part of day-to-day decision analysis in oil and gas management practices. A very attractive and promising technology is the use of time-lapse or 4D seismic as an essential component in subsurface modeling. Today, 4D seismic is enabling oil companies to optimize production and increase recovery through monitoring fluid movements throughout the reservoir. 4D seismic advances are also being driven by an increased need by the petroleum engineering community to become more quantitative and accurate in our ability to monitor reservoir processes. Qualitative interpretations of time-lapse anomalies are being replaced by quantitative inversions of 4D seismic data to produce accurate maps of fluid saturations, pore pressure, temperature, among others. Within all steps involved in this subsurface modeling process, the most demanding one is integrating the geologic model with dynamic field data, including 4Dseismic when available. The validation of the geologic model with observed dynamic data is accomplished through a "history matching" (HM) process typically carried out with well-based measurements. Due to low resolution of production data, the validation process is severely limited in its reservoir areal coverage, compromising the quality of the model and any subsequent predictive exercise. This research will aim to provide a novel history matching approach that can use information from high-resolution seismic data to supplement the areally sparse production data. The proposed approach will utilize streamline-derived sensitivities as means of relating the forward model performance with the prior geologic model. The essential ideas underlying this approach are similar to those used for high-frequency approximations in seismic wave propagation. In both cases, this leads to solutions that are defined along "streamlines" (fluid flow), or "rays" (seismic wave propagation). Synthetic and field data examples will be used

  18. Muscle satellite cell proliferation and association: new insights from myofiber time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As the resident stem cells of skeletal muscle, satellite cells are activated by extracellular cues associated with local damage. Once activated, satellite cells will re-enter the cell cycle to proliferate and supply a population of myoblasts, which will repair or replace damaged myofibers by differentiating and fusing either with an existing myofiber or with each other. There is also evidence that the orientation of cell division with respect to the myofiber may indicate or convey asymmetry in the two daughter cells. Our recent studies with time-lapse imaging of myofiber-associated satellite cells in vitro have yielded new data on the timing and orientation of satellite cell divisions, and revealed persistent differences in the behavior of daughter cells from planar versus vertical divisions. Results We analyzed 244 individual fiber-associated satellite cells in time-lapse video from 24 to 48 hours after myofiber harvest. We found that initial cell division in fiber culture is not synchronous, although presumably all cells were activated by the initial trauma of harvest; that cell cycling time is significantly shorter than previously thought (as short as 4.8 hours, averaging 10 hours between the first and second divisions and eight hours between the second and third); and that timing of subsequent divisions is not strongly correlated with timing of the initial division. Approximately 65% of first and 80% of second cell divisions occur parallel to the axis of the myofiber, whereas the remainder occur outside the plane of the fiber surface (vertical division). We previously demonstrated that daughter cells frequently remain associated with each other after division or reassociate after a brief separation, and that unrelated cells may also associate for significant periods of time. We show in this paper that daughter cells resulting from a vertical division remain associated with one another several times longer than do daughters from a horizontal division

  19. Monotoring of CO2 Sequestration at Sleipner Using Full Waveform Inversion in Time-lapse Mode.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselet, A.; Singh, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely admitted that recent increase of CO2 in the atmosphere is due to human activities. The consecutive greenhouse effect is a major ecological concern. Geological storage is one proposed way to reduce atmosphere CO2 emissions. The Sleipner methane field, North Sea, is the very first site where CO2 has been injected back into a deep saline aquifer. In 1996, the Norwegian company Statoil and its partners began the production of the methane. The extracted methane contains a relatively high ratio of CO2, between 4% and 9%, that has to be reduced below 2.5% before delivering into the pipeline. An environmental tax introduced in Norway as early as 1991 prompted the company to store the separated CO2 instead of releasing it into the atmosphere as usually done. The CO2 is injected at the base of the Utsira sands. This water bearing formation lies at a depth between 800 and 1000m and is sealed by a thick shale layer. Seismic monitoring is a key tool in this strategy from a security standpoint and for sequestration optimization itself. Consequently, 3D seismic data were acquired before injection in 1994 and after injection in 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2006. Well-log revealed that the reservoir is crossed by thin shale layers that are 1 to 10m thick. CO2 rises up and is confined vertically by the shale layers, favouring horizontal gas migration and creating gas bearing thin beds. Seismic imaging of the gas pockets is therefore a challenging problem because large velocity variations occur on very short distance. Classical processing of time-lapse data consists in subtracting repeated survey seismic traces from the pre- injection baseline traces to exhibit changes within the reservoir. This approach remains qualitative, providing only the shape and extent of the gas cloud. Instead, we propose to compare elastic models of the subsurface computed through 2D full wave form inversion, an advanced seismic imaging technique. This method is based on the wave equation

  20. Morphokinetic behavior of euploid and aneuploid embryos analyzed by time-lapse in embryoscope

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Deven V.; Shah, Preeti B.; Kotdawala, Aditi P.; Herrero, Javier; Rubio, Irene; Banker, Manish R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Embryonic aneuploidy may result in miscarriage, implantation failure, or birth defects. Thus, it is clinically necessary to avoid the selection of aneuploid embryos during in vitro fertilization treatment. AIM: The aim of this study was to identify the morphokinetic differences by analyzing the development of euploid and aneuploid embryos using a time-lapse technology. We also checked the accuracy of a previously described model for selection of euploid embryos based on morphokinetics in our study population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: It is a retrospective study of 29 cycles undergoing preimplantation genetic screening from October 2013 to April 2015 at our center. Of 253 embryos, 167 suitable for biopsy embryos were analyzed for their chromosomal status using array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH). The morphokinetic behavior of these embryos was further analyzed in embryoscope using time-lapse technology. RESULTS: Among the analyzed embryos, 41 had normal and 126 had abnormal chromosome content. No significant difference in morphokinetics was found between euploid and aneuploid embryos. The percentage of embryos with blastulation was similar in the euploid (65.85%, 27/41) and aneuploid (60.31%, 76/126) embryos (P = 0.76). Although hard to define, majority of the chromosomal defects might be due to meiotic errors. On applying embryo selection model from Basile et al., embryos falling within optimal ranges for time to division to 5 cells (t5), time period of the third cell cycle (CC3), and time from 2 cell division to 5 cell division (t5-t2) exhibited greater proportion of normal embryos than those falling outside the optimal ranges (28.6%, 25.9%, and 26.7% vs. 17.5%, 20.8%, and 14.3%). CONCLUSION: Keeping a track of time interval between two stages can help us recognize aneuploid embryos at an earlier stage and prevent their selection of transfer. However, it cannot be used as a substitute for array CGH to select euploid embryos for transfer. PMID

  1. Geoelectrical time-lapse analysis for improved interpretation of data in a contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitea, Florina; Serban, Adrian; Ioane, Dumitru; Georgescu, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Non invasive geoelectrical studies are useful in the preliminary assessment of areas suspected to be contaminated but also in the investigation stage. Correctly adapted to the site specific situation, they are used to detect and investigate buried sources of pollution, to characterize the geology of the area, to detect the contaminated plume or to study the attenuation of pollution in case the appliance of an site-specific remediation techniques. Despite the improved technological acquisition techniques and the optimized inversion data algorithms, interpretation of geoelectrical data in still a challenging task, especially in a contaminated hydrogeological context. Beside the soil physical properties (composition, porosity, texture, etc.), moisture content and chemical composition of the pollutant are also influencing the measured parameter. Apparent electrical resistivity method was use in an area located near an Oil Refinery. Electrical measurements performed on profiles (transverse and along the direction of water flow -according to hydrological data) revealed the presence of contaminants by means of high resistivity anomalies. Using the same acquisition technique (Schlumberger array, same VES points, injection - AB - and voltage - MN - lines extension), measurements were repeated during time, along the same profiles. On the resulted electrical sections from 2006 to 2013, a dynamic situation regarding the pollution plume was observed. Time - lapse analysis, based on the calculation of resistivity differences between sets of data acquired along the same profile was applied, and data interpretation was made using the resulted sections. Significant variation between data sets (> 17% of apparent resistivity normalized differences) observed along the main profile were mainly ranging from the near surface (1.5 m) to an approximated depth (AB/2) of 10m. Using the time-lapse method, changes in the lateral and in depth extension of polluted areas could be observed and

  2. Acquisition of time-lapse, 6-component, P- and S-wave, crosswell seismic survey with orbital vibrator and of time-lapse VSP for CO2 injection monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Tom; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Majer, E.L.

    2004-07-15

    Using an orbital vibrator source (2-components), and a 40 level 3-component geophone string, a 6-component crosswell survey was acquired before and after a CO2 injection in a saline aquifer. Decomposition of the two source components and component rotation of both source and sensors created good separation of P- and S-wave energy allowing independent analysis of travel time and reflectivity. A time-lapse VSP was also acquired.

  3. Three dimensional time lapse imaging of live cell mitochondria with photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jerome; Nahas, Amir; Pache, Christophe; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2016-03-01

    The photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscope (poli-OCM) introduced molecular specificity to OCM imaging, which is conventionally, a label-free technique. Here we achieve three-dimensional live cell and mitochondria specific imaging using ~4nm protein-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). These nanoparticles do not photobleach and we demonstrate they're suitability for long-term time lapse imaging. We compare the accuracy of labelling with these AuNPs using classical fluorescence confocal imaging with a standard mitochondria specific marker. Furthermore, time lapse poli-OCM imaging every 5 minutes over 1.5 hours period was achieved, revealing the ability for three-dimensional monitoring of mitochondria dynamics.

  4. Time-lapse CO2 monitoring using ambient-noise seismic interferometry: a feasibility study from Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullenger, Boris; Verdel, Arie; Paap, Bob; Thorbecke, Jan; Draganov, Deyan

    2015-04-01

    Seismic interferometry applied to ambient-noise measurements allows retrieval of the Green's function between two seismic receivers, by cross-correlating their recordings, as if from a source at one of the receivers. We propose to use ambient-noise seismic interferometry (ANSI) to retrieve reflection data. The time-lapse differences between different vintages of the retrieved data may help characterize property changes within a geologic reservoir with varying CO2 saturation. We test the feasibility of this time-lapse passive seismic method with numerical experiments based on the CO2-storage site of Ketzin, Germany. Ambient-noise recordings from Ketzin exhibit significant passive body-wave energy (from natural tremors or induced seismicity in the vicinity of the reservoir), which is advantageous to retrieve reflections with ANSI. The ANSI numerical experiments aim to understand what the requirements are for the recorded body-wave noise to retrieve the time-lapse reflection signal caused by an increase of CO2 saturation in the reservoir. For this purpose, we design two velocity scenarios at Ketzin: a base scenario before the injection of CO2, and a repeat scenario corresponding to a P-wave velocity decline in the reservoir by 20 percent. For both scenarios, we simulate passive seismic experiments of body-wave noise recordings that may take several days or months to record in the field. The passive recordings are obtained by modelling global (direct wave, internal and surface multiples) transmission responses from band-limited subsurface noise sources, randomly triggered in space and time. The time-lapse reflection signal is obtained by taking the differences between the base and the repeat retrieved reflection data (virtual common-shot gathers). We found that the time-lapse signal is still recovered with ANSI even if the base and repeat retrieved reflection data are partially polluted with artifacts. This means that uneven illumination of the array does not

  5. Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 ina brine aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten,G.M.

    2006-05-30

    Seismic surveys successfully imaged a small scale C02injection (1,600 tons) conducted in a brine aquifer of the Frio Formationnear Houston, Texas. These time-lapse bore-hole seismic surveys,crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquired to monitorthe C02 distribution using two boreholes (the new injection well and apre-existing well used for monitoring) which are 30 m apart at a depth of1500 m. The crosswell survey provided a high-resolution image of the C02distribution between the wells via tomographic imaging of the P-wavevelocity decrease (up to 500 mls). The simultaneously acquired S-wavetomography showed little change in S-wave velocity, as expected for fluidsubstitution. A rock physics model was used to estimate C02 saturationsof 10-20 percent from the P-wave velocity change. The VSP survey resolveda large (-70 percent) change in reflection amplitude for the Friohorizon. This C02 induced reflection amplitude change allowed estimationof the C02 extent beyond the monitor well and on 3 azimuths. The VSPresult is compared with numerical modeling of C02 saturations and isseismically modeled using the velocity change estimated in the crosswellsurvey.

  6. Time-lapse microscopy studies of bystander effects induced by photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chu; Redmond, Robert W.

    2006-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the pathogenesis of many critical diseases and are also utilized as cytotoxic agents in a variety of treatments for eradication of diseased tissue, including cancer. Oxidative stress ensues when the level of ROS in a system exceeds the antioxidant capacity. Oxidative stress can have local (direct) and long-range (bystander) effects in cells and tissue and this research was carried out to determine the spatial and temporal nature of the photosensitized bystander effect using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. By initiating photosensitization in only a portion of the microscopic imaging field it was possible to differentiate direct from bystander effects in EMT-6 murine breast cancer cells in 6-well plates. Elevated ROS levels are seen immediately following photodynamic treatment in direct cells with a delayed increase in oxidative stress observed in bystander cells. Cytotoxicity is also seen at earlier times in direct cells and occurs in bystander cells in a delayed fashion. These studies confirm the existence of a bystander effect following photosensitization and implicate mediators capable of diffusing in an intercellular manner from directly photosensitized cells to bystander cells and also implicate increased oxidative stress as a mechanistic factor in generating damage in bystander cells.

  7. Time-lapse geophysical investigations over a simulated urban clandestine grave.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Jamie K; Jervis, John; Cassella, John P; Cassidy, Nigel J

    2008-11-01

    A simulated clandestine shallow grave was created within a heterogeneous, made-ground, urban environment where a clothed, plastic resin, human skeleton, animal products, and physiological saline were placed in anatomically correct positions and re-covered to ground level. A series of repeat (time-lapse), near-surface geophysical surveys were undertaken: (1) prior to burial (to act as control), (2) 1 month, and (3) 3 months post-burial. A range of different geophysical techniques was employed including: bulk ground resistivity and conductivity, fluxgate gradiometry and high-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR), soil magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and self potential (SP). Bulk ground resistivity and SP proved optimal for initial grave location whilst ERT profiles and GPR horizontal "time-slices" showed the best spatial resolutions. Research suggests that in complex urban made-ground environments, initial resistivity surveys be collected before GPR and ERT follow-up surveys are collected over the identified geophysical anomalies. PMID:18808369

  8. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  9. Thermal erosion of a permafrost coastline: Improving process-based models using time-lapse photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wobus, C.; Anderson, R.; Overeem, I.; Matell, N.; Clow, G.; Urban, F.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal erosion rates locally exceeding 30 m y-1 have been documented along Alaska's Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that these erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the specific processes that connect climate change to coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where coastal erosion rates have averaged 10-15 m y-1 over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to observe and quantify coastal erosion directly via time-lapse photography in combination with meteorological observations. Our observations indicate that the erosion of these bluffs is largely thermally driven, but that surface winds play a crucial role in exposing the frozen bluffs to the radiatively warmed seawater that drives melting of interstitial ice. To first order, erosion in this setting can be modeled using formulations developed to describe iceberg deterioration in the open ocean. These simple models provide a conceptual framework for evaluating how climate-induced changes in thermal and wave energy might influence future erosion rates in this setting.

  10. Time lapse electrical resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of near-surface CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, V.; Kremer, T.; Williard, E.; Schmutz, M.; Maineult, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Field experiments were carried out to investigate the efficiency and the reliability of electrical geophysical methods to detect and monitor CO2 leakages at field scale. Each test consisted of injecting CO2 for approximately four hours at five meters depth, corresponding to a cumulative mass of gas of around six kilograms. Electrical resistivity tomography and temporal induced polarization were acquired at the surface before, during and after injections along profiles centered to the injection well. Time lapse measurements were compared to a reference acquisition performed before the injection. We observe that both methods are sensitive to variations in terms of gas saturation, the chargeability measurements being more sensitive to the presence of CO2 than electrical resistivity. During the injection, an increase of chargeability and a decrease of the measured resistivity are observed at depth in the vinicity of the injection well. Afterwards, the medium equilibrates and retrieves its original state, corresponding to the reference acquisition. The temporal variations of electrical resistivity and induced polarization responses are interpreted in terms of gas dissolution and water/gas saturation.

  11. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    PubMed Central

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Zuccotti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete's developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9 hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1) reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2) ~17 min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3) chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4) formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5) increase of the perivitelline space, ~57 min later in NSN oocytes; (6) formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84 min later in SN oocytes; (7) appearance of the MI plate ~40 min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes. PMID:24864231

  12. Cellular dynamics during early barley pollen embryogenesis revealed by time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daghma, Diaa Eldin S.; Hensel, Goetz; Rutten, Twan; Melzer, Michael; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Plants display a remarkable capacity for cellular totipotency. An intriguing and useful example is that immature pollen cultured in vitro can pass through embryogenic development to form haploid or doubled haploid plants. However, a lack of understanding the initial mechanisms of pollen embryogenesis hampers the improvement and more effective and widespread employment of haploid technology in plant research and breeding. To investigate the cellular dynamics during the onset of pollen embryogenesis, we used time-lapse imaging along with transgenic barley expressing nuclear localized Green Fluorescent Protein. The results enabled us to identify nine distinct embryogenic and non-embryogenic types of pollen response to the culture conditions. Cell proliferation in embryogenic pollen normally started via a first symmetric mitosis (54.3% of pollen observed) and only rarely did so via asymmetric pollen mitosis I (4.3% of pollen observed). In the latter case, proliferation generally originated from the vegetative-like cell, albeit the division of the generative-like cell was observed in few types of pollen. Under the culture conditions used, fusion of cell nuclei was the only mechanism of genome duplication observed. PMID:25538715

  13. Segmenting time-lapse phase contrast images of adjacent NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, J; Kociolek, M; Dima, A; Halter, M; Cardone, A; Peskin, A; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for segmenting phase contrast images of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells that is accurate even when cells are physically in contact with each other. The problem of segmentation, when cells are in contact, poses a challenge to the accurate automation of cell counting, tracking and lineage modelling in cell biology. The segmentation method presented in this paper consists of (1) background reconstruction to obtain noise-free foreground pixels and (2) incorporation of biological insight about dividing and nondividing cells into the segmentation process to achieve reliable separation of foreground pixels defined as pixels associated with individual cells. The segmentation results for a time-lapse image stack were compared against 238 manually segmented images (8219 cells) provided by experts, which we consider as reference data. We chose two metrics to measure the accuracy of segmentation: the 'Adjusted Rand Index' which compares similarities at a pixel level between masks resulting from manual and automated segmentation, and the 'Number of Cells per Field' (NCF) which compares the number of cells identified in the field by manual versus automated analysis. Our results show that the automated segmentation compared to manual segmentation has an average adjusted rand index of 0.96 (1 being a perfect match), with a standard deviation of 0.03, and an average difference of the two numbers of cells per field equal to 5.39% with a standard deviation of 4.6%. PMID:23126432

  14. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E; Kroghsbo, S; Wang, M; Sondergaard, T E

    2015-12-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96% overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates (168 antimicrobial agent-organism combinations) demonstrated 3.6% minor, no major and 1.2% very major errors of the oCelloScope system compared to conventional susceptibility testing, as well as a rapid and correct phenotypic detection of strains with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) profiles. The net average time-to-result was 108 min, with 95% of the results being available within 180 min. In conclusion, this study strongly indicates that the oCelloScope system holds considerable potential as an accurate and sensitive AST method with short time-to-result, enabling same-day targeted antimicrobial therapy, facilitating antibiotic stewardship and better patient management. A full-scale validation of the oCelloScope system including more isolates is necessary to assess the impact of using it for AST. PMID:26407621

  15. Adaptive time-lapse optimized survey design for electrical resistivity tomography monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul B.; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip I.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Carrière, Simon; Oxby, Lucy S.; Loke, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optimal experimental design methods use previous data and results to guide the choice and design of future experiments. This paper describes the formulation of an adaptive survey design technique to produce optimal resistivity imaging surveys for time-lapse geoelectrical monitoring experiments. These survey designs are time-dependent and, compared to dipole-dipole or static optimized surveys that do not change over time, focus a greater degree of the image resolution on regions of the subsurface that are actively changing. The adaptive optimization method is validated using a controlled laboratory monitoring experiment comprising a well-defined cylindrical target moving along a trajectory that changes its depth and lateral position. The algorithm is implemented on a standard PC in conjunction with a modified automated multichannel resistivity imaging system. Data acquisition using the adaptive survey designs requires no more time or power than with comparable standard surveys, and the algorithm processing takes place while the system batteries recharge. The results show that adaptively designed optimal surveys yield a quantitative increase in image quality over and above that produced by using standard dipole-dipole or static (time-independent) optimized surveys.

  16. Imaging Rainfall Infiltration Processes with the Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Ping-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Chen, Su-Chin; Chen, Chao-Wei; Jia, Zheng-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for 10 days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The reliability of the inverted resistivity structures down to about 25 m depth was examined with synthetic modeling using the same electrode arrangements installed on land surface as in field surveys, together with a DOI (depth-of-investigation) index calculated from the ERI data. The subsurface resistivity distribution is consistent with results from well logging. These ERI recordings were taken daily and provided highly resolved imagery of the resistivity distribution underground and illustrated the dynamical fluid-flow behavior due to heavy rainfall infiltration. Using Archie's law, the resistivity distribution was transformed into a map of relative water saturation (RWS), which is strongly correlated with the rainfall infiltration process. We then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that time-lapse ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration; moreover, the preferential flow paths can be delineated according to the changes in averaged RWS derived from the ERI data.

  17. High-resolution time-lapse tomography of rat vertebrae during compressive loading: deformation response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Kumpová, I.; Doktor, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jiroušek, O.

    2014-05-01

    This paper is focused on investigation of mechanical properties of rat vertebrae during compressive loading in the longitudinal direction of rat's spine. High-resolution time-lapse micro-tomography was used as a tool to create models of the inner structure and deformed shape in pre-defined deformation steps. First, peripheral areas of vertebra specimen were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate to obtain proper boundary conditions of contact between specimen and loading plattens. Experimental loading device designed for application in X-ray setups was utilized to compress the vertebrae in several deformation steps. High-resolution micro-tomography scanning was carried out at each deformation step. Specimen was irradiated in tomography device equipped with microfocus X-ray tube with 5μm focal spot size and large area flat panel detector. Spatial resolution of reconstructed three-dimensional images was approximately 10μm. Digital volume correlation algorithm was utilized in order to assess displacements in the microstructure in every loading increment. Finite element model of vertebra was created from volumetric data reconstructed from tomography of the undeformed specimen. Simulated compressive test of the developed finite element model was performed in order to compare stiffness and displacements obtained by digital volume correlation and finite element simulation.

  18. Estimation of the path-averaged atmospheric refractive index structure constant from time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Santasri; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2015-05-01

    A time-lapse imaging experiment was conducted to monitor the effects of the atmosphere over some period of time. A tripod-mounted digital camera captured images of a distant building every minute. Correlation techniques were used to calculate the position shifts between the images. Two factors causing shifts between the images are: atmospheric turbulence, causing the images to move randomly and quickly, plus changes in the average refractive index gradient along the path which cause the images to move vertically, more slowly and perhaps in noticeable correlation with solar heating and other weather conditions. A technique for estimating the path-averaged C 2n from the random component of the image motion is presented here. The technique uses a derived set of weighting functions that depend on the size of the imaging aperture and the patch size in the image whose motion is being tracked. Since this technique is phase based, it can be applied to strong turbulence paths where traditional irradiance based techniques suffer from saturation effects.

  19. Metamorphosis revealed: time-lapse three-dimensional imaging inside a living chrysalis

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tristan; Garwood, Russell J.; Simonsen, Thomas J.; Bradley, Robert S.; Withers, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of model insects have greatly increased our understanding of animal development. Yet, they are limited in scope to this small pool of model species: a small number of representatives for a hyperdiverse group with highly varied developmental processes. One factor behind this narrow scope is the challenging nature of traditional methods of study, such as histology and dissection, which can preclude quantitative analysis and do not allow the development of a single individual to be followed. Here, we use high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) to overcome these issues, and three-dimensionally image numerous lepidopteran pupae throughout their development. The resulting models are presented in the electronic supplementary material, as are figures and videos, documenting a single individual throughout development. They provide new insight and details of lepidopteran metamorphosis, and allow the measurement of tracheal and gut volume. Furthermore, this study demonstrates early and rapid development of the tracheae, which become visible in scans just 12 h after pupation. This suggests that there is less remodelling of the tracheal system than previously expected, and is methodologically important because the tracheal system is an often-understudied character system in development. In the future, this form of time-lapse CT-scanning could allow faster and more detailed developmental studies on a wider range of taxa than is presently possible. PMID:23676900

  20. A time-lapse photography method for monitoring salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) passage and abundance in streams.

    PubMed

    Deacy, William W; Leacock, William B; Eby, Lisa A; Stanford, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Accurately estimating population sizes is often a critical component of fisheries research and management. Although there is a growing appreciation of the importance of small-scale salmon population dynamics to the stability of salmon stock-complexes, our understanding of these populations is constrained by a lack of efficient and cost-effective monitoring tools for streams. Weirs are expensive, labor intensive, and can disrupt natural fish movements. While conventional video systems avoid some of these shortcomings, they are expensive and require excessive amounts of labor to review footage for data collection. Here, we present a novel method for quantifying salmon in small streams (<15 m wide, <1 m deep) that uses both time-lapse photography and video in a model-based double sampling scheme. This method produces an escapement estimate nearly as accurate as a video-only approach, but with substantially less labor, money, and effort. It requires servicing only every 14 days, detects salmon 24 h/day, is inexpensive, and produces escapement estimates with confidence intervals. In addition to escapement estimation, we present a method for estimating in-stream salmon abundance across time, data needed by researchers interested in predator--prey interactions or nutrient subsidies. We combined daily salmon passage estimates with stream specific estimates of daily mortality developed using previously published data. To demonstrate proof of concept for these methods, we present results from two streams in southwest Kodiak Island, Alaska in which high densities of sockeye salmon spawn. PMID:27326378

  1. Distortion effects in a switch array UWB radar for time-lapse imaging of human heartbeats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Aardal, Åyvind; Lande, Tor S.; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major cause of deaths all over the world. Microwave radar can be an alternative sensor for heart diagnostics and monitoring in modern healthcare that aids early detection of CVD symptoms. In this paper measurements from a switch array radar system are presented. This UWB system operates below 3 GHz and does time-lapse imaging of the beating heart inside the human body. The array consists of eight fat dipole elements. With a switch system, every possible sequence of transmit/receive element pairs can be selected to build a radar image from the recordings. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue, the antenna array is placed in contact with the body. Removal of the direct signal leakage through the antennas and body surface are done by high-pass (HP) filtering of the data prior to image processing. To analyze the results, measurements of moving spheres in air and simulations are carried out. We see that removal of the direct signal introduces amplitude distortion in the images. In addition, the effect of small target motion between the collection times of data from the individual elements is analyzed. With low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) this motion will distort the image. By using data from real measurements of heart motion in simulations, we analyze how the PRF and the antenna geometry influence this distortions.

  2. Imaging Rainfall Infiltration Processes with the Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Imaging Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Chen, Chien-chih; Chang, Ping-Yu; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Yen, Horng-Yuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Chen, Su-Chin; Chen, Chao-Wei; Jia, Zheng-yuan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) was carried out continuously for 10 days to map the subsurface resistivity distribution along a potentially hazardous hillslope at the Jieshou Junior High School in Taoyuan, Taiwan. The reliability of the inverted resistivity structures down to about 25 m depth was examined with synthetic modeling using the same electrode arrangements installed on land surface as in field surveys, together with a DOI (depth-of-investigation) index calculated from the ERI data. The subsurface resistivity distribution is consistent with results from well logging. These ERI recordings were taken daily and provided highly resolved imagery of the resistivity distribution underground and illustrated the dynamical fluid-flow behavior due to heavy rainfall infiltration. Using Archie's law, the resistivity distribution was transformed into a map of relative water saturation (RWS), which is strongly correlated with the rainfall infiltration process. We then found that the averaged RWS is significantly correlated with daily precipitation. Our observations indicate that time-lapse ERI is effective in monitoring subterraneous rainfall infiltration; moreover, the preferential flow paths can be delineated according to the changes in averaged RWS derived from the ERI data.

  3. Setting up a groundwater recharge model for an arid karst system using time lapse camera data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Stephan; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; Michelsen, Nils; Rausch, Randolf; Siebert, Christian; Schüth, Christoph; Merz, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater is the principal water resource in most dryland areas. Therefore, its replenishment rate is of great importance for water management. The amount of groundwater recharge depends on the climatic conditions, but also on the geological conditions, soil properties and vegetation. In dryland areas, outcrops of karst aquifers often receive enhanced recharge rates compared to other geological settings. Especially in areas with exposed karst features like sinkholes or open shafts rainfall accumulates in channels and discharges directly into the aquifer. Using the example of the As Sulb plateau in Saudi Arabia this study introduces a cost-effective and robust method for recharge monitoring and modelling in karst outcrops. The measurement of discharge of a small catchment (4.0 x 104 m2) into a sinkhole, and hence the direct recharge into the aquifer, was carried out with a time lapse camera observing a v-notch weir. During the monitoring period of two rainy seasons (autumn 2012 to spring 2014) four recharge events were recorded. Afterwards, recharge data as well as proxy data about the drying of the sediment cover are used to set up a conceptual water balance model. This model was run for 17 years (1971 to 1986 and 2012 to 2014). Simulation results show highly variable seasonal recharge-precipitation-ratios, which underlines the nonlinearity between recharge and precipitation in dryland areas. Besides the amount of precipitation this ratio is strongly influenced by the interannual distribution of rainfall events.

  4. Cell segmentation for division rate estimation in computerized video time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weijun; Wang, Xiaoxu; Metaxas, Dimitris; Mathew, Robin; White, Eileen

    2007-02-01

    The automated estimation of cell division rate plays an important role in the evaluation of a gene function in high throughput biomedical research. Using Computerized Video Time-Lapse (CVTL) microcopy , it is possible to follow a large number of cells in their physiological conditions for several generations. However analysis of this large volume data is complicated due to cell to cell contacts in a high density population. We approach this problem by segmenting out cells or cell clusters through a learning method. The feature of a pixel is represented by the intensity and gradient information in a small surrounding sub-window. Curve evolution techniques are used to accurately find the cell or cell cluster boundary. With the assumption that the average cell size is the same in each frame, we can use the cell area to estimate the cell division rate. Our segmentation results are compared to manually-defined ground truth. Both recall and precision measures for segmentation accuracy are above 95%.

  5. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  6. Time-lapse ERT for the monitoring of soil-plant interactions in the root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Rossi, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Fadda, G.; Putti, M.; Marani, M.

    2013-12-01

    The application of time-lapse non invasive 3D micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been proven to be an efficient tool to monitor the soil-plant interactions and particularly the root zone activity. This information can support water balance modeling in the upper subsoil critical zone. Here we present the results of two field experiments in very different environments: the case of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region (Northern Italy), and the case of salt-marshes plants in the Venice Lagoon. The micro-scale ERT apparatus consists of buried electrodes installed on micro boreholes, plus mini-electrodes on the ground surface. We collected repeated ERT, TDR and tensiometer data. For the apple orchard site test we adopted controlled irrigation tests in different seasons, while in the lagoon salt-marshes we monitored the root-plant activity during tidal flooding. The results demonstrate that micro-scale ERT is a very effective tool to characterize subsoil conditions and monitor root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. Micro-scale ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity, as demonstrated in the case of the apple orchard, while ERT and moisture measurements in the lagoon environment show a high resistivity suction layer located at root depth even during marsh flooding. Both observations will be important pieces of information for the comprehension of relevant eco- hydrological dynamics.

  7. Time-lapse ERT for the monitoring of soil-plant interactions in the root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Rossi, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Fadda, G.; Putti, M.; Marani, M.

    2011-12-01

    The application of time-lapse non invasive 3D micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been proven to be an efficient tool to monitor the soil-plant interactions and particularly the root zone activity. This information can support water balance modeling in the upper subsoil critical zone. Here we present the results of two field experiments in very different environments: the case of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region (Northern Italy), and the case of salt-marshes plants in the Venice Lagoon. The micro-scale ERT apparatus consists of buried electrodes installed on micro boreholes, plus mini-electrodes on the ground surface. We collected repeated ERT, TDR and tensiometer data. For the apple orchard site test we adopted controlled irrigation tests in different seasons, while in the lagoon salt-marshes we monitored the root-plant activity during tidal flooding. The results demonstrate that micro-scale ERT is a very effective tool to characterize subsoil conditions and monitor root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. Micro-scale ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity, as demonstrated in the case of the apple orchard, while ERT and moisture measurements in the lagoon environment show a high resistivity suction layer located at root depth even during marsh flooding. Both observations will be important pieces of information for the comprehension of relevant eco- hydrological dynamics.

  8. Landslide monitoring in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Hu, Xiang-Yun; Shan, Chun-Ling; Li, Rui-Heng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic monitoring of landslides in engineering geology has focused on the correlation among landslide stability, rainwater infiltration, and subsurface hydrogeology. However, the understanding of this complicated correlation is still poor and inadequate. Thus, in this study, we investigated a typical landslide in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) in November 2013 and August 2014. We studied landslide mechanisms based on the spatiotemporal characteristics of surface water infiltration and flow within the landslide body. Combined with borehole data, inverted resistivity models accurately defined the interface between Quaternary sediments and bedrock. Preferential flow pathways attributed to fracture zones and fissures were also delineated. In addition, we found that surface water permeates through these pathways into the slipping mass and drains away as fissure water in the fractured bedrock, probably causing the weakly weathered layer to gradually soften and erode, eventually leading to a landslide. Clearly, TLERT dynamic monitoring can provide precursory information of critical sliding and can be used in landslide stability analysis and prediction.

  9. Study of traveltime and amplitude time-lapse tomography using physical model data

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow . Dept. of Electron and Electric Engineering); Goulty, N.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Kragh, J.E. . Dept. of Geological Sciences Schlumberger Cambridge Research )

    1993-07-01

    In seismic tomography the observed traveltimes or amplitudes of direct waves are inverted to obtain an estimate of seismic velocity or absorption of the section surveyed. There has been much recent interest in using cross-well traveltime tomography to observe the progress of fluids injected into the reservoir rocks during enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. If repeated surveys are carried out, then EOR processes may monitored over a period of time. This paper describe the results of simulated time-lapse tomography experiment to image the flood zone in an EOR process. Two physical models were made out of epoxy resins to simulate an essentially plane-layered sedimentary sequence containing a reservoir layer and simple geological structure. The models differed only in the reservoir layer, which was uniform in the pre-flood' model and contained a flood zone of known geometry in the post-flood' model. Data sets were acquired from each model using a cross-well survey geometry. Traveltime and amplitude tomographic imaging techniques have been applied to these data in an attempt to locate the extent of the flood zone. Traveltime tomography locates the flood zone quite accurately. Amplitude tomography shows the flood zone as a region of higher absorption, but does not image its boundaries as precisely. This is primarily because of multipathing and diffraction effects, which are not accounted for by the ray-based techniques for inverting seismic amplitudes.

  10. Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Primed for Action: Time-Lapse Crystallography of Michaelis Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana; Parks, Jerry M; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Heller, William T

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg(2+) binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg(2+) binding to the M2 site. Concurrently, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. Lastly, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:26585512

  11. Time-lapse imaging of human heart motion with switched array UWB radar.

    PubMed

    Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Paichard, Yoann; Aardal, Øyvind; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2014-10-01

    Radar systems for detection of human heartbeats have mostly been single-channel systems with limited spatial resolution. In this paper, a radar system for ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging of the human heart is presented. To make the radar waves penetrate the human tissue the antenna is placed very close to the body. The antenna is an array with eight elements, and an antenna switch system connects the radar to the individual elements in sequence to form an image. Successive images are used to build up time-lapse movies of the beating heart. Measurements on a human test subject are presented and the heart motion is estimated at different locations inside the body. The movies show rhythmic motion consistent with the beating heart, and the location and shape of the reflections correspond well with the expected response form the heart wall. The spatial dependent heart motion is compared to ECG recordings, and it is confirmed that heartbeat modulations are seen in the radar data. This work shows that radar imaging of the human heart may provide valuable information on the mechanical movement of the heart. PMID:25350945

  12. Attentional Lapses of Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Tasks of Sustained Attention.

    PubMed

    Gmehlin, Dennis; Fuermaier, Anselm B M; Walther, Stephan; Tucha, Lara; Koerts, Janneke; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver; Weisbrod, Matthias; Aschenbrenner, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show attentional dysfunction such as distractibility and mind-wandering, especially in lengthy tasks. However, fundamentals of dysfunction are ambiguous and relationships of neuropsychological test parameters with self-report measures of ADHD symptoms are marginal. We hypothesize that basic deficits in sustaining attention explain more complex attentional dysfunction in persons with ADHD and relate to ADHD symptoms. Attentional function was analyzed by computing ex-Gaussian parameters for 3 time Blocks in a 20 min test of sustained alertness. Changes in performance across these blocks were analyzed by comparing adult persons with ADHD (n = 24) with healthy matched controls (n = 24) and correlated with neuropsychological measures of selective and divided attention as well as self-report measures of ADHD symptoms. We found a significantly steeper increase in the number of slow responses (ex-Gaussian parameter τ) in persons with ADHD with time on task in basic sustained alertness. They also performed significantly worse in tasks of sustained selective and divided attention. However, after controlling for an increase in τ during the alertness task, significant differences between groups disappeared for divided and partly selective attention. Increases in τ in the sustained alertness task correlated significantly with self-report measures of ADHD symptoms. Our results provide evidence that very basic deficits in sustaining attention in adults with ADHD are related to infrequent slow responses (=attentional lapses), with changes over time being relevant for more complex attentional function and experienced ADHD symptoms in everyday life. PMID:27193369

  13. Time-lapse characterization of hydrothermal seawater and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra at Surtsey Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. D.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Bach, W.; Cappelletti, P.; Coleman, N. J.; Ivarsson, M.; Jónasson, K.; Jørgensen, S. L.; Marteinsson, V.; McPhie, J.; Moore, J. G.; Nielson, D.; Rhodes, J. M.; Rispoli, C.; Schiffman, P.; Stefánsson, A.; Türke, A.; Vanorio, T.; Weisenberger, T. B.; White, J. D. L.; Zierenberg, R.; Zimanowski, B.

    2015-12-01

    A new International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) project will drill through the 50-year-old edifice of Surtsey Volcano, the youngest of the Vestmannaeyjar Islands along the south coast of Iceland, to perform interdisciplinary time-lapse investigations of hydrothermal and microbial interactions with basaltic tephra. The volcano, created in 1963-1967 by submarine and subaerial basaltic eruptions, was first drilled in 1979. In October 2014, a workshop funded by the ICDP convened 24 scientists from 10 countries for 3 and a half days on Heimaey Island to develop scientific objectives, site the drill holes, and organize logistical support. Representatives of the Surtsey Research Society and Environment Agency of Iceland also participated. Scientific themes focus on further determinations of the structure and eruptive processes of the type locality of Surtseyan volcanism, descriptions of changes in fluid geochemistry and microbial colonization of the subterrestrial deposits since drilling 35 years ago, and monitoring the evolution of hydrothermal and biological processes within the tephra deposits far into the future through the installation of a Surtsey subsurface observatory. The tephra deposits provide a geologic analog for developing specialty concretes with pyroclastic rock and evaluating their long-term performance under diverse hydrothermal conditions. Abstracts of research projects are posted at http://surtsey.icdp-online.org.

  14. Deciphering the Receptor Repertoire Encoding Specific Odorants by Time-Lapse Single-Cell Array Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masato; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Shimono, Ken; Kuroda, Shun’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammals can recognize a vast number of odorants by using olfactory receptors (ORs) known as G protein-coupled receptors. The OR gene family is one of the most diverse gene families in mammalian genomes. Because of the vast combinations of ORs and odorants, few ORs have thus far been linked to specific odorants. Here, we established a functional screening method for OR genes by using a microchamber array containing >5,400 single olfactory epithelium-derived cells from mice applied to time-lapse single-cell array cytometry. This method facilitated the prompt isolation of single olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to the odorant of interest. Subsequent single-cell RT-PCR allowed us to isolate the genes encoding respective ORs. By using volatile molecules recognized as biomarkers for lung cancers, this method could deorphanize ORs and thereby reconstitute the OR-mediated signaling cascade in HEK293T cells. Thus, our system could be applied to identify any receptor by using specific ligands in the fields of physiopathology and pharmacology. PMID:26832639

  15. Traxtile: Interactive editing of cell tracks in time-lapse images.

    PubMed

    Braun, Benjamin S

    2015-08-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to quantify how cells move, divide, and die over time and under defined culture conditions. Open source software packages such as CellProfiler, Icy, and Fiji provide robust and convenient interfaces for performing such analyses. However, object tracking algorithms are imperfect, and validation of significant events is often required. This is challenging, as CellProfiler produces only tabular data for object tracking, and the graphical tools in Icy and Fiji are not optimal for manual review of these events. Here we describe Traxtile, a program that allows interactive graphical review and revision of object tracking assignments. Traxtile imports initial assignments and automatically identifies events needing review (i.e., apparent creation of new objects, splits, merges, and losses). For each such event, the object track is displayed on a montage of images centered on the event and spanning the preceding and subsequent frames. Links between cells in successive frames can be reviewed and edited, yielding validated tracks for the image series. Reports summarize events from the validated tracks. Traxtile is implemented in Python version 2.7 using standard distribution libraries (available at www.python.org) and is freely available at https://github.com/braunb/traxtile-public. PMID:26260086

  16. Deciphering the Receptor Repertoire Encoding Specific Odorants by Time-Lapse Single-Cell Array Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masato; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Shimono, Ken; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammals can recognize a vast number of odorants by using olfactory receptors (ORs) known as G protein-coupled receptors. The OR gene family is one of the most diverse gene families in mammalian genomes. Because of the vast combinations of ORs and odorants, few ORs have thus far been linked to specific odorants. Here, we established a functional screening method for OR genes by using a microchamber array containing >5,400 single olfactory epithelium-derived cells from mice applied to time-lapse single-cell array cytometry. This method facilitated the prompt isolation of single olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to the odorant of interest. Subsequent single-cell RT-PCR allowed us to isolate the genes encoding respective ORs. By using volatile molecules recognized as biomarkers for lung cancers, this method could deorphanize ORs and thereby reconstitute the OR-mediated signaling cascade in HEK293T cells. Thus, our system could be applied to identify any receptor by using specific ligands in the fields of physiopathology and pharmacology. PMID:26832639

  17. A time-lapse photography method for monitoring salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) passage and abundance in streams

    PubMed Central

    Leacock, William B.; Eby, Lisa A.; Stanford, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately estimating population sizes is often a critical component of fisheries research and management. Although there is a growing appreciation of the importance of small-scale salmon population dynamics to the stability of salmon stock-complexes, our understanding of these populations is constrained by a lack of efficient and cost-effective monitoring tools for streams. Weirs are expensive, labor intensive, and can disrupt natural fish movements. While conventional video systems avoid some of these shortcomings, they are expensive and require excessive amounts of labor to review footage for data collection. Here, we present a novel method for quantifying salmon in small streams (<15 m wide, <1 m deep) that uses both time-lapse photography and video in a model-based double sampling scheme. This method produces an escapement estimate nearly as accurate as a video-only approach, but with substantially less labor, money, and effort. It requires servicing only every 14 days, detects salmon 24 h/day, is inexpensive, and produces escapement estimates with confidence intervals. In addition to escapement estimation, we present a method for estimating in-stream salmon abundance across time, data needed by researchers interested in predator--prey interactions or nutrient subsidies. We combined daily salmon passage estimates with stream specific estimates of daily mortality developed using previously published data. To demonstrate proof of concept for these methods, we present results from two streams in southwest Kodiak Island, Alaska in which high densities of sockeye salmon spawn. PMID:27326378

  18. Designing genetic algorithm for efficient calculation of value encoding in time-lapse gravity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyudi, Eko Januari

    2013-09-01

    As advancing application of soft computation technique in oil and gas industry, Genetic Algorithm (GA) also shows contribution in geophysical inverse problems in order to achieve better results and efficiency in computational process. In this paper, I would like to show the progress of my work in inverse modeling of time-lapse gravity data uses value encoding with alphabet formulation. The alphabet formulation designed to provide solution of characterization positive density change (+Δρ) and negative density change (-Δρ) respect to reference value (0 gr/cc). The inversion that utilize discrete model parameter, computed with GA as optimization algorithm. The challenge working with GA is take long time computational process, so the step in designing GA in this paper described through evaluation on GA operators performance test. The performances of several combinations of GA operators (selection, crossover, mutation, and replacement) tested with synthetic model in single-layer reservoir. Analysis on sufficient number of samples shows combination of SUS-MPCO-QSA/G-ND as the most promising results. Quantitative solution with more confidence level to characterize sharp boundary of density change zones was conducted with average calculation of sufficient model samples.

  19. Time lapse seismic signal analysis for Cranfield, MS, EOR and CCS site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditkof, J.; Caspari, E.; Pevzner, R.; Urosevic, M.; Meckel, T. A.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Cranfield field located in Southwest Mississippi is an EOR and CCS project which has been under continuous CO2 injection by Denbury Onshore LLC since 2008. To date, more than 3 million tons of CO2 remain in the subsurface. In 2007 and 2010, 3D seismic surveys were shot and an initial 4D seismic response was characterized showing coherent amplitude anomalies in some areas which received large amounts of CO2, but not in others. Previous work used Gassmann fluid substitution at two different wells, 31F-2 observation well and the 28-1 injection well to predict a post-injection saturation curves and acoustic impedance change through the reservoir. Since this writing, a second injection well, the 44-2 well, was added to the analysis to improve the practically unconstrained inversion. The two seismic volumes were cross-equalized with an appropriate correlation coefficient through well ties. Acoustic impedance inversions were carried out on each survey resulting with higher acoustic impedance changes than predicted by Gassmann for the 28-1 and 44-2 injection wells. The time-lapse acoustic impedance however is similar to the difference calculated from a time-delay along a horizon below the reservoir.

  20. Quantitative comparison of multiframe data association techniques for particle tracking in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Biological studies of intracellular dynamic processes commonly require motion analysis of large numbers of particles in live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy imaging data. Many particle tracking methods have been developed in the past years as a first step toward fully automating this task and enabling high-throughput data processing. Two crucial aspects of any particle tracking method are the detection of relevant particles in the image frames and their linking or association from frame to frame to reconstruct the trajectories. The performance of detection techniques as well as specific combinations of detection and linking techniques for particle tracking have been extensively evaluated in recent studies. Comprehensive evaluations of linking techniques per se, on the other hand, are lacking in the literature. Here we present the results of a quantitative comparison of data association techniques for solving the linking problem in biological particle tracking applications. Nine multiframe and two more traditional two-frame techniques are evaluated as a function of the level of missing and spurious detections in various scenarios. The results indicate that linking techniques are generally more negatively affected by missing detections than by spurious detections. If misdetections can be avoided, there appears to be no need to use sophisticated multiframe linking techniques. However, in the practically likely case of imperfect detections, the latter are a safer choice. Our study provides users and developers with novel information to select the right linking technique for their applications, given a detection technique of known quality. PMID:26176413

  1. Image-based characterization of thrombus formation in time-lapse DIC microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brieu, Nicolas; Navab, Nassir; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Stemple, Derek L.; Cvejic, Ana; Groher, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of thrombus formation in time-lapse DIC microscopy is of increased interest for identifying genes which account for atherothrombosis and coronary artery diseases (CADs). In particular, we are interested in large-scale studies on zebrafish, which result in large amount of data, and require automatic processing. In this work, we present an image-based solution for the automatized extraction of parameters quantifying the temporal development of thrombotic plugs. Our system is based on the joint segmentation of thrombotic and aortic regions over time. This task is made difficult by the low contrast and the high dynamic conditions observed in vivo DIC microscopic scenes. Our key idea is to perform this segmentation by distinguishing the different motion patterns in image time series rather than by solving standard image segmentation tasks in each image frame. Thus, we are able to compensate for the poor imaging conditions. We model motion patterns by energies based on the idea of dynamic textures, and regularize the model by two prior energies on the shape of the aortic region and on the topological relationship between the thrombus and the aorta. We demonstrate the performance of our segmentation algorithm by qualitative and quantitative experiments on synthetic examples as well as on real in vivo microscopic sequences. PMID:22482997

  2. ESIAC: A data products system for ERTS imagery (time-lapse viewing and measuring)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. E.; Serebreny, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    An Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC) has been developed for visual analysis and objective measurement of earth resources imagery. The system is being employed to process imagery for use by USGS investigators in several different disciplines studying dynamic hydrologic conditions. The ESIAC provides facilities for storing registered image sequences in a magnetic video disc memory for subsequent recall, enhancement, and animated display in monochrome or color. The unique feature of the system is the capability to time-lapse the ERTS imagery and/or analytic displays of the imagery. Data products have included quantitative measurements of distances and areas, brightness profiles, and movie loops of selected themes. The applications of these data products are identified and include such diverse problem areas as measurement of snowfield extent, sediment plumes from estuary dicharge, playa inventory, phreatophyte and other vegetation changes. A comparative ranking of the electronic system in terms of accuracy, cost effectiveness and data output shows it to be a viable means of data analysis.

  3. Lapses in skin conductance responding across anatomical sites: Comparison of fingers, feet, forehead, and wrist.

    PubMed

    Payne, Andrew F H; Schell, Anne M; Dawson, Michael E

    2016-07-01

    The fingers are widely accepted as the gold standard for skin conductance (SC) recording, with the feet as a strong alternative. However, there are gaps in the current literature comparing these sites. There is also a great deal of interest in alternative recording sites to permit mobility, but data evaluating these are few and inconsistent. The present report compared multiple sites (fingers, abductor hallucis of the foot, arch of the foot, toes, forehead, and wrist) from 45 college student participants in a short-term sedentary laboratory setting and found large variation in both tonic and phasic SC responses, as well as crucial lapses in responding at nonpalmar sites. Across-site correlations between participants and within participants were also examined. The present data show that, in the laboratory setting employing commonly used recording techniques and stimuli, the nonpalmar sites are generally less responsive than the fingers, and the wrist in particular is the lowest in responding, whereas the toes are most similar to the fingers in responding. Within-participant correlations between the fingers and other sites were greatest for the plantar sites and least for the forehead. PMID:27015847

  4. Estimation of soil hydraulic properties based on time-lapse Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Klenk, Patrick; Roth, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments brought surface-based GPR measurements to a precision that make them useful for estimating soil hydraulic properties. For this study, we estimate Mualem-Brooks-Corey parameters for a layered subsurface material distribution employing the Levenberg-Marquardt inversion algorithm. The required measurement data were recorded at our artificial test site ASSESS, where we forced the hydraulic system with a fluctuating water table and observed the dynamic deformation of the capillary fringe with time-lapse GPR. Subsequently, these measurements were simulated based on a model comprising (i) the Richards equation describing the temporal evolution of the soil hydraulic system which was solved with MUPHI, (ii) the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) serving as petrophysical relationship which links the soil hydraulic model to (iii) the electrodynamic model consisting of Maxwell's equations which are solved with MEEP. For the objective function of the optimization algorithm, both measured and simulated GPR data were evaluated with a semi-automated wavelet feature detection algorithm allowing to directly compare the travel time and amplitude of the GPR signal. In this presentation, we discuss the results of the inversion based on the inversion of GPR data and we also discuss how including Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement data influences the estimated parameters.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH; MYERS DA

    2009-11-05

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  6. Segmentation Method of Time-Lapse Microscopy Images with the Focus on Biocompatibility Assessment.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jindřich; Císař, Petr; Šroubek, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Biocompatibility testing of new materials is often performed in vitro by measuring the growth rate of mammalian cancer cells in time-lapse images acquired by phase contrast microscopes. The growth rate is measured by tracking cell coverage, which requires an accurate automatic segmentation method. However, cancer cells have irregular shapes that change over time, the mottled background pattern is partially visible through the cells and the images contain artifacts such as halos. We developed a novel algorithm for cell segmentation that copes with the mentioned challenges. It is based on temporal differences of consecutive images and a combination of thresholding, blurring, and morphological operations. We tested the algorithm on images of four cell types acquired by two different microscopes, evaluated the precision of segmentation against manual segmentation performed by a human operator, and finally provided comparison with other freely available methods. We propose a new, fully automated method for measuring the cell growth rate based on fitting a coverage curve with the Verhulst population model. The algorithm is fast and shows accuracy comparable with manual segmentation. Most notably it can correctly separate live from dead cells. PMID:27132464

  7. Non-rigid estimation of cell motion in calcium time-lapse images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachi, Siham; Lucumi Moreno, Edinson; Desmet, An-Sofie; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2016-03-01

    Calcium imaging is a widely used technique in neuroscience permitting the simultaneous monitoring of electro- physiological activity of hundreds of neurons at single cell resolution. Identification of neuronal activity requires rapid and reliable image analysis techniques, especially when neurons fire and move simultaneously over time. Traditionally, image segmentation is performed to extract individual neurons in the first frame of a calcium sequence. Thereafter, the mean intensity is calculated from the same region of interest in each frame to infer calcium signals. However, when cells move, deform and fire, this segmentation on its own generates artefacts and therefore biased neuronal activity. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop a more efficient cell tracking technique. We hereby present a novel vision-based cell tracking scheme using a thin-plate spline deformable model. The thin-plate spline warping is based on control points detected using the Fast from Accelerated Segment Test descriptor and tracked using the Lucas-Kanade optical flow. Our method is able to track neurons in calcium time-series, even when there are large changes in intensity, such as during a firing event. The robustness and efficiency of the proposed approach is validated on real calcium time-lapse images of a neuronal population.

  8. Estimating the hydrogeological parameters with the time-lapse resistivity imaging method during the pumping test in the unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.; Chang, L.; Chen, W.; Lu, H.

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted the time-lapse monitoring study during a single-well pumping test at the Pengtsuo site in Pingtung, Taiwan. Water level gauges were installed in the four wells, including P1, W1, O1 and O2, at the Pengtsuo site with different screen depths for the observation. We designed the pumping test to be executed in three phases, including the background, the stepwise pumping, and the continuous pumping phases. The survey line is crossing the four wells in order to compare the resistivity measurements with the water level records. Although the inverted resistivity images the vertical resistivity structures also reveal that the influences from the steel well casing at the well positions, the resistivity differences to the pre-pumping background show that the electrical resistivity imaging is able to resolve the change due to the dewatering from the pumping activity. We have found that the maximum resistivity increase took place at the locations in the vadose zone instead of the groundwater surface in the time-lapse images. The variation of the maximum resistivity differences in the vadose zone is consistent to the change of the groundwater level during the pumping test. We tried to use the drawdown from the time-lapse resistivity differences and the Theis equation for estimating the hydraulic transmissivity and the specific yield at the Pentsuo site. The estimated transmissivity and the specific yield is 1.01 m^2/min and 0.11, respectively. These values are close to those calculated from the measured groundwater level variations in the multiple wells. Therefore we concluded that the time-lapse resistivity imaging methods is able to help estimating and verify the transmissivity and the specific yield for the pumping test in the unconfined aquifer.

  9. Time-lapse interpretation of p-wave data for a hydraulically fractured reservoir, Wattenberg Field, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Matthew D.

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has contributed to making production from low permeability source rocks economic for oil and gas companies. However, few direct observations have been made regarding the physical modifications of the reservoir resulting from the hydraulic fracturing process. This thesis investigates the time-lapse seismic response generated by hydraulically fracturing an unconventional reservoir. Compressional seismic data sets were acquired before and after completions in a single section in Wattenberg Field, CO. Cross-equalization of the time-lapse seismic data sets was required for the comparison of seismic amplitudes. A time-shift anomaly and amplitude anomaly were observed in the reservoir interval, and time-lapse changes are spatially aligned with the wellbores. To understand the physical change that caused this seismic anomaly, percentage change of acoustic P-impedance was calculated. A decrease in the acoustic P-impedance of up to 7% was observed from the baseline to the monitor survey in the reservoir interval. This observation was put into physical context through interpretation of a structural geologic model, and completions parameter and timing. An increase in pore pressure due to hydraulic fracturing was interpreted as the physical mechanism causing the change in P-impedance. Hydraulic fracturing is highly dependent on local geology, and the integration of geoscience with parameter design is necessary for optimization. Seismic monitoring can assist assist reservoir management of Wattenberg Field.

  10. A Versatile Time-Lapse Camera System Developed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for Use at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanoes can be difficult to study up close. Because it may be days, weeks, or even years between important events, direct observation is often impractical. In addition, volcanoes are often inaccessible due to their remote location and (or) harsh environmental conditions. An eruption adds another level of complexity to what already may be a difficult and dangerous situation. For these reasons, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) have, for years, built camera systems to act as surrogate eyes. With the recent advances in digital-camera technology, these eyes are rapidly improving. One type of photographic monitoring involves the use of near-real-time network-enabled cameras installed at permanent sites (Hoblitt and others, in press). Time-lapse camera-systems, on the other hand, provide an inexpensive, easily transportable monitoring option that offers more versatility in site location. While time-lapse systems lack near-real-time capability, they provide higher image resolution and can be rapidly deployed in areas where the use of sophisticated telemetry required by the networked cameras systems is not practical. This report describes the latest generation (as of 2008) time-lapse camera system used by HVO for photograph acquisition in remote and hazardous sites on Kilauea Volcano.

  11. puffMarker: A Multi-Sensor Approach for Pinpointing the Timing of First Lapse in Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Saleheen, Nazir; Ali, Amin Ahsan; Hossain, Syed Monowar; Sarker, Hillol; Chatterjee, Soujanya; Marlin, Benjamin; Ertin, Emre; al’Absi, Mustafa; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Recent researches have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting smoking from wearable sensors, but their performance on real-life smoking lapse detection is unknown. In this paper, we propose a new model and evaluate its performance on 61 newly abstinent smokers for detecting a first lapse. We use two wearable sensors — breathing pattern from respiration and arm movements from 6-axis inertial sensors worn on wrists. In 10-fold cross-validation on 40 hours of training data from 6 daily smokers, our model achieves a recall rate of 96.9%, for a false positive rate of 1.1%. When our model is applied to 3 days of post-quit data from 32 lapsers, it correctly pinpoints the timing of first lapse in 28 participants. Only 2 false episodes are detected on 20 abstinent days of these participants. When tested on 84 abstinent days from 28 abstainers, the false episode per day is limited to 1/6. PMID:26543927

  12. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Distributed Temperature Measurements in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, Giorgio; Boaga, Jacopo; Busato, Laura; Perri, Maria Teresa; Putti, Mario; Pasetto, Damiano; Majone, Bruno; Bellin, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical and biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones. We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream, plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed Raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  13. Enhanced imaging of CO2 at the Ketzin storage site: Inversion of 3D time-lapse seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, M.; Götz, J.; Ivanova, A.; Juhlin, C.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Lüth, S.; Yang, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Ketzin test site, located near Berlin, is Europe's longest-operating on-shore CO2 storage site. As of December 2011, more than 56,000 tons of food grade CO2 has been injected since June 2008 in an anticlinal structure of the Northeast German Basin. The target reservoir consists of porous, brine bearing sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation at approximately 630 to 650 m depth. In order to enhance the understanding of the structural geometry of the site and to investigate the extension of the CO2-plume, several geophysical monitoring methods are being applied at Ketzin, among these are active seismic measurements, geoelectrics and borehole measurements. Among the various seismic techniques (e.g. 2D reflection surveys, crosshole tomography, Vertical Seismic Profiling, 2D- and 3D-Moving Source Profiling) employed at this pilot site, 3D time-lapse reflection surveys are an important component. The baseline 3D survey was acquired in 2005 and the first repeat measurements were performed in 2009 after injection of about 22,000 tons of CO2. The second repeat survey is planned to be carried out in fall 2012. These measurements allow the time-lapse signature of the injected CO2 to be imaged. The time-lapse amplitude variation attributed to the injected CO2 in the reservoir matches, considering detection limits of seismic surface measurements, the expected distribution of the CO2 plume derived from reservoir simulations. Previous attempts towards a quantitative interpretation were based on integrative considerations of different types of geophysical measurements using strict assumptions and characterized by large error bars. In order to increase the resolution and reliability of the data and to improve estimation of rock properties and especially to enhance the imaging resolution of the CO2-plume, the time-lapse 3D seismic data have now been inverted for seismic impedances with different methods, which is the focus of this presentation. One difficulty

  14. Oil Sands Characteristics and Time-Lapse and P-SV Seismic Steam Monitoring, Athabasca, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kashihara, K.; Skinner, L.; Kato, A.

    2008-12-01

    -injection. The differences of the seismic responses between the time-lapse seismic volumes can be quantitatively explained by P-wave velocity decrease of the oil sands layers due to steam-injection. In addition, the data suggests that a larger area would be influenced by pressure than temperature. We calculate several seismic attributes such as RMS values of amplitude difference, maximum cross correlations, and interval velocity differences. These attributes are integrated by using self-organization maps (SOM) and K-means methods. By this analysis, we are able to distinguish areas of steam chamber growth from transitional and non-affected areas. In addition, 3D P-SV converted-wave processing and analysis are applied on the second 3D data set (recorded with three-component digital sensor). Low Vp/Vs values in the P-SV volume show areas of steam chamber development, and high Vp/Vs values indicate transitional zones. Our analysis of both time-lapse 3D seismic and 3D P-SV data along with the rock physics model can be used to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively the rock property changes of the inter-well reservoir sands in the field.

  15. Overland flow dynamics through visual observation using time-lapse photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Overland flow process on agricultural land is important to be investigated as it affects the stream discharge and water quality assessment. During rainfall events the formation of overland flow may happen through different processes (i.e. Hortonian or saturation excess overland flow) based on the governing soil hydraulic parameters (i.e. soil infiltration rate, soil water capacity). The dynamics of the soil water state and the processes will affect the surface runoff response which can be analyzed visually by observing the saturation patterns with a camera. Although visual observation was proven useful in laboratory experiments, the technique is not yet assessed for natural rainfall events. The aim of this work is to explore the use of time-lapse photographs of naturally occurring-saturation patterns in understanding the threshold processes of overland flow generation. The image processing produces orthographic projection of the saturation patterns which will be used to assess the dynamics of overland flow formation in relation with soil moisture state and rainfall magnitude. The camera observation was performed at Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) catchment at Petzenkirchen, Lower Austria. The catchment covers an area of 66 ha dominated with agricultural land (87%). The mean annual precipitation and mean annual flow at catchment outlet are 750 mm and 4 l/s, respectively. The camera was set to observe the overland flow along a thalweg on an arable field which was drained in 1950s and has advantages of: (1) representing agricultural land as the dominant part of the catchment, (2) adjacent to the stream with clear visibility (no obstructing objects, such as trees), (3) drained area provides extra cases in understanding the response of tile drain outflow to overland flow formation and vice versa, and (4) in the vicinity of TDT soil moisture stations. The camera takes a picture with 1280 x 720 pixels resolution every minute and sends it directly in a PC via fiber

  16. Time-lapse multi-offset imaging of infiltration in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Reflection profiling with ground-penetrating radar has proven to be a useful and efficient tool for mapping the shallow subsurface. Though less extensively used, multi-offset GPR data can provide additional information about EM wave velocity needed for depth registration of the images and estimation of water content. Such information is particularly useful for time-lapse imaging of hydrologic events, like infiltration. We present examples where time-lapse multi-offset GPR data are used to image changes in a sand tank during controlled flux infiltration experiments for the following conditions: 1) homogeneous sand, 2) sand with a buried land mine surrogate, and 3) sand with an embedded thin layer of low permeability silica flour. The tank measures 1.5m x 1.5m x 0.8m and is filled with 0.6m of sand underlain by 0.2m of gravel for drainage. A network of 15 soil moisture probes embedded in the sand measure water content continuously throughout the experiment at 10 second intervals. In each experiment we collected over 6000 traces of 900MHz multi-offset ground-penetrating radar data using an automated motion control system, yielding a multi-offset section across the tank every 20 seconds. The data are organized into a cube with axes of elapsed time since the start of infiltration, GPR travel time, and antenna offset. Conceptualizing the data as a cube allows us to evaluate the consistency of patterns in the multi-offset and common offset gathers. Clearly visible in all data are the airwave, groundwave, and bottom of tank reflection. Also present in the radar data is an arrival associated with the wetting front. Normal move-out analysis of arrivals for the homogeneous tank allow us to evaluate water content changes throughout the experiments, which were found to be in good agreement with results from HYDRUS-1D model simulations and the in-situ moisture probes. Arrivals associated with the land mine and thin layer are also observed in the additional experiments. Radar

  17. Time-lapse 3-D seismic imaging of shallow subsurface contaminant flow.

    PubMed

    McKenna, J; Sherlock, D; Evans, B

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents a physical modelling study outlining a technique whereby buoyant contaminant flow within water-saturated unconsolidated sand was remotely monitored utilizing the time-lapse 3-D (TL3-D) seismic response. The controlled temperature and pressure conditions, along with the high level of acquisition repeatability attainable using sandbox physical models, allow the TL3-D seismic response to pore fluid movement to be distinguished from all other effects. TL3-D seismic techniques are currently being developed to monitor hydrocarbon reserves within producing reservoirs in an endeavour to improve overall recovery. However, in many ways, sandbox models under atmospheric conditions more accurately simulate the shallow subsurface than petroleum reservoirs. For this reason, perhaps the greatest application for analogue sandbox modelling is to improve our understanding of shallow groundwater and environmental flow mechanisms. Two fluid flow simulations were conducted whereby air and kerosene were injected into separate water-saturated unconsolidated sand models. In both experiments, a base 3-D seismic volume was recorded and compared with six later monitor surveys recorded while the injection program was conducted. Normal incidence amplitude and P-wave velocity information were extracted from the TL3-D seismic data to provide visualization of contaminant migration. Reflection amplitudes displayed qualitative areal distribution of fluids when a suitable impedance contrast existed between pore fluids. TL3-D seismic reflection tomography can potentially monitor the change in areal distribution of fluid contaminants over time, indicating flow patterns. However, other research and this current work have not established a quantifiable relationship between either normal reflection amplitudes and attenuation and fluid saturation. Generally, different pore fluids will have unique seismic velocities due to differences in compressibility and density. The predictable

  18. Time lapse inversion of 2D ERT data for monitoring river water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. L.; Johnson, T. C.; Greenwood, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium transport in the 300 area is driven by both the chemical and physical effects of stage fluctuations in the Columbia River and resulting river water, ground water interaction. Because river water is less conductive than groundwater, it serves as a natural tracer that can be imaged using surface ERT. We've monitored 4 lines for 4 months over the high stage spring runoff interval to identify preferred flowpaths for river water intrusion. The four lines overlay former waste disposal sites including the processing ponds and sanitary leach trenches. We have used this ERT data set to investigate two methods of time lapse inversion, sequential and all-at-once. Each technique is a model difference approach as opposed to a data difference inversion approach. Both use a regularized inversion with model constraints that regularize spatially and temporally. For the sequential inversion, the starting and reference models are taken from the previous inversion. Both starting and reference models are taken from the first inversion for the all-at-once method. In either case an inversion is triggered if data misfit from the starting model exceeds the chi-squared convergence criteria. It was found that starting with a relatively smooth model provided better visualization of temporal conductivity changes when inverting all data sets with the same initial model, while an initial model exhibiting smaller data misfit may be used successfully as the starting point for sequential inversion. Inland conductivity changes within model cells were found to be highly correlated with river stage, and when paired with the characterization model, provide evidence of waste trenches, the processing pond, as well as the existence of a paleo-channel incised into the Ringold Formation and dipping structures on the Hanford-Ringold contact that provide preferred pathways for river water intrusion.

  19. Time Lapse Storey Building Early Monitoring Based on Rapid Seismic Response Analysis in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julius, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Within the last decade, advances in the acquisition, processing and transmission of data from seismic monitoring has contributed to the growth in the number structures instrumented with such systems. An equally important factor for such growth can be attributed to the demands by stakeholders to find rapid answers to important questions related to the functionality or state of "health" of structures during and immediately of a seismic events. Consequently, this study aims to monitor the storey building based on seismic response i. e. earthquake and tremor analysis at short time lapse using accelerographs data. This study used one of storey building (X) in Jakarta city that suffered the effects of Kebumen earthquake January 25th 2014, Pandeglang earthquake July 9th 2014, and Lebak earthquake November 8th 2014. Tremors used in this study are tremors after the three following earthquakes. Data processing used to determine peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), spectral acceleration (SA), spectral velocity (SV), spectral displacement (SD), A/V ratio, acceleration amplification and effective duration (te). Then determine the natural frequency (f0) and peak of H/V ratio using H/V ratio method. The earthquakes data processing result shows the value of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio and acceleration amplification increases with height, while the value of the effective duration decreases. Then, tremors data processing result one month after each earthquakes shows the natural frequency of building in constant value. Increasing of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio, acceleration amplification, then decrease of effective duration following the increase of building floors shows that the building construction supports the increasing of shaking and strongly influenced by local site effect. The constant value of building natural frequency shows the building still in good performance. This

  20. Characterization of Protein Structural Changes in Living Cells Using Time-Lapsed FTIR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Paul; Smith, Randy J.; Stavitski, Eli; Borchelt, David R.; Miller, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is a widely used method for studying the chemistry of proteins, lipids, and DNA in biological systems without the need for additional tagging or labeling. This technique can be especially powerful for spatially resolved, temporal studies of dynamic changes such as in vivo protein folding in cell culture models. However, FTIR imaging experiments have typically been limited to dry samples as a result of the significant spectral overlap between water and the protein Amide I band centered at 1650 cm−1. Here, we demonstrate a method to rapidly obtain high quality FTIR spectral images at submicron pixel resolution in vivo over a duration of 18 h and longer through the development and use of a custom-built, demountable, microfluidic-incubator and a FTIR microscope coupled to a focal plane array (FPA) detector and a synchrotron light source. The combined system maximizes ease of use by allowing a user to perform standard cell culture techniques and experimental manipulation outside of the microfluidic-incubator, where assembly can be done just before the start of experimentation. The microfluidic-incubator provides an optimal path length of 6–8 μm and a submillimeter working distance in order to obtain FTIR images with 0.54–0.77 μm pixel resolution. In addition, we demonstrate a novel method for the correction of spectral distortions caused by varying concentrations of water over a subconfluent field of cells. Lastly, we use the microfluidic-incubator and time-lapsed FTIR imaging to determine the misfolding pathway of mutant copper–zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), the protein known to be a cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). PMID:25965274

  1. Using electromagnetic conductivity imaging to generate time-lapse soil moisture estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingyi; Scuderio, Elia; Corwin, Dennis; Triantafilis, John

    2015-04-01

    Irrigated agriculture is crucial to the agricultural productivity of the Moreno valley. To maintain profitability, more will need to be done by irrigators with less water, owing to competing demands from rapidly expanding urbanisation in southern California. In this regard, irrigators need to understand the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture to discern inefficiencies. However, soil moisture is difficult to measure and monitor, unless a large bank of soil sensors are installed and at various depths in the profile. In order to value add to the limited amount of information, geophysical techniques, such as direct current resisivity (DCR) arrays are used to develop electrical resistivity images (ERI). Whilst successful the approach is time consuming and labour intensive. In this research we describe how equivalent data can be collected using a proximal sensing electromagnetic (EM) induction instrument (i.e. DUALEM-421) and inversion software (EM4Soil) to generate EM conductivity images (EMCI). Figure 1 shows the EMCI generated from DUALEM-421 data acquired at various days of a time-lapse experiment and including; day a) 0, b) 1, c) 2, d) 3, e) 5, f) 7 and g) 11. We calibrate the estimates of true electrical conductivity (sigma - mS/m) with volumetric moisture content and show with good accuracy the spatial and temporal variation of soil moisture status and over 12 day period. The results show clearly that the pivot sprinkler irrigation system is effective at providing sufficient amounts of water to the top 0.5 m of a Lucerne crop (i.e. red shaded areas of high sigma). However, in some places faulty sprinklers are evident owing to the lack of wetting (i.e. blue shaded areas of low sigma). In addition, and over time, our approach shows clearly the effect the Lucerne crop has in drying the soil profile and using the soil moisture.

  2. Microwells support high-resolution time-lapse imaging and development of preimplanted mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yu-Hsiang; Hsiao, Yi-Hsing; Kao, Wei-Lun; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Chihchen

    2015-01-01

    A vital aspect affecting the success rate of in vitro fertilization is the culture environment of the embryo. However, what is not yet comprehensively understood is the affect the biochemical, physical, and genetic requirements have over the dynamic development of human or mouse preimplantation embryos. The conventional microdrop technique often cultures embryos in groups, which limits the investigation of the microenvironment of embryos. We report an open microwell platform, which enables micropipette manipulation and culture of embryos in defined sub-microliter volumes without valves. The fluidic environment of each microwell is secluded from others by layering oil on top, allowing for non-invasive, high-resolution time-lapse microscopy, and data collection from each individual embryo without confounding factors. We have successfully cultured mouse embryos from the two-cell stage to completely hatched blastocysts inside microwells with an 89% success rate (n = 64), which is comparable to the success rate of the contemporary practice. Development timings of mouse embryos that developed into blastocysts are statistically different to those of embryos that failed to form blastocysts (p–value < 10−10, two-tailed Student's t-test) and are robust indicators of the competence of the embryo to form a blastocyst in vitro with 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Embryos at the cleavage- or blastocyst-stage following the normal development timings were selected and transferred to the uteri of surrogate female mice. Fifteen of twenty-two (68%) blastocysts and four of ten (40%) embryos successfully developed into normal baby mice following embryo transfer. This microwell platform, which supports the development of preimplanted embryos and is low-cost, easy to fabricate and operate, we believe, opens opportunities for a wide range of applications in reproductive medicine and cell biology. PMID:26015830

  3. Assessing spatial and temporal snowpack evolution and melt with time-lapse photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, C. E.; Ewers, B. E.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Hyde, K.; Ohara, N.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack supplies and stores water for many ecosystems of the greater Rocky Mountain region. In Wyoming the snowpack supplies water to 18 states east and west of the Continental Divide. The spatial variability in physical and biological processes creates a heterogeneous pattern of snow evolution. Understanding these processes within individual plots and throughout the entire watershed increases the predictive power of snow distribution, melt rates and contribution to streamflow. However, on site sampling of snow can be an expensive and arduous process. The objective of this experiment was to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of snowpack evolution and melt rates while minimizing perturbations to snowpack through the use of time-lapse photography via trail cameras. Field cameras were assessed as a method to quantify snow depths throughout the 120 ha No Name watershed at approximately 3000 m elevation in central Wyoming. RGB trail cameras were installed at three systematically chosen sites within the watershed to correlate physical and biological drivers of snow distribution. Five stakes were placed in each site in heterogeneous spots that remained in the frame of the camera. Stakes were divided into five centimeter increments, alternating black and white bars, with red bars denoting each half meter. Images were then taken at two-hour intervals over a period of three-months and analyzed with the ImageJ program. Snowpack distributions, as well as melt rates, were variable at both the plot and watershed scales. Meteorological and physical drivers, primarily topography and radiation, accounted for the greatest variability when comparing among plot across the watershed; however, LAI and soil and air temperature were the most significant drivers within plots. Snow-melt rate increased as soils and course woody debris became exposed increasing ground and soil temperature. These data will improve process model predictions of streamflow from the watershed.

  4. Time-lapse imaging reveals stereotypical patterns of Drosophila midline glial migration.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Scott R; Pearson, Joseph C; Crews, Stephen T

    2012-01-15

    The Drosophila CNS midline glia (MG) are multifunctional cells that ensheath and provide trophic support to commissural axons, and direct embryonic development by employing a variety of signaling molecules. These glia consist of two functionally distinct populations: the anterior MG (AMG) and posterior MG (PMG). Only the AMG ensheath axon commissures, whereas the function of the non-ensheathing PMG is unknown. The Drosophila MG have proven to be an excellent system for studying glial proliferation, cell fate, apoptosis, and axon-glial interactions. However, insight into how AMG migrate and acquire their specific positions within the axon-glial scaffold has been lacking. In this paper, we use time-lapse imaging, single-cell analysis, and embryo staining to comprehensively describe the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the Drosophila MG. We identified 3 groups of MG that differed in the trajectories of their initial inward migration: AMG that migrate inward and to the anterior before undergoing apoptosis, AMG that migrate inward and to the posterior to ensheath commissural axons, and PMG that migrate inward and to the anterior to contact the commissural axons before undergoing apoptosis. In a second phase of their migration, the surviving AMG stereotypically migrated posteriorly to specific positions surrounding the commissures, and their final position was correlated with their location prior to migration. Most noteworthy are AMG that migrated between the commissures from a ventral to a dorsal position. Single-cell analysis indicated that individual AMG possessed wide-ranging and elaborate membrane extensions that partially ensheathed both commissures. These results provide a strong foundation for future genetic experiments to identify mutants affecting MG development, particularly in guidance cues that may direct migration. Drosophila MG are homologous in structure and function to the glial-like cells that populate the vertebrate CNS floorplate, and study

  5. Tracking snowmelt in the subsurface: time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging on an alpine hill slope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, D.; Parsekian, A.; Hyde, K.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    In the mountain West region the winter snowpack provides more than 70% of our annual water supply. Modeling and predicting the timing and magnitude of snowmelt-driven water yield is difficult due to the complexities of hydrologic systems that move meltwater from snow to rivers. Particular challenges are understanding the temporal and spatial domain of subsurface hydraulic processes at relevant scales, which range from points to catchments. Subsurface characterization often requires borehole instrumentation, which is expensive and extremely difficult to install in remote, rugged terrain. Advancements in non-invasive geophysical methods allow us to monitor changes in geophysical parameters over time and infer changes in hydraulic processes. In the No-Name experimental catchment in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, we are conducting a multi-season, time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging survey on a sub-alpine hill slope. This south-facing, partially forested slope ranges from 5 degrees to 35 degrees in steepness and consists of a soil mantle covering buried glacial talus deposits of unknown depth. A permanent grid of down-slope and cross-slope electrode arrays is monitored up to four times a day. The arrays span the entire vertical distance of the slope, from an exposed bedrock ridge to a seasonal drainage below, and cover treed and non-treed areas. Geophysical measurements are augmented by temperature and moisture time-series instrumented below the surface in a contiguous 3 meter borehole. A time-series of multiple resistivity models each day from May to July shows the changing distribution of subsurface moisture during a seasonal drying sequence punctuated by isolated rain events. Spatial patterns of changing moisture indicate that soil and gravel in the top two meters drain into a saturated layer parallel to the slope which overlies less saturated material. These results suggest that water from snowmelt and rain events tends to move down-slope beneath

  6. A Local Index of Cloud Immersion in Tropical Forests Using Time-Lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiouni, M.; Scholl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Data on the frequency, duration and elevation of cloud immersion is essential to improve estimates of cloud water deposition in water budgets in cloud forests. Here, we present a methodology to detect local cloud immersion in remote tropical forests using time-lapse photography. A simple approach is developed to detect cloudy conditions in photographs within the canopy where image depth during clear conditions may be less than 10 meters and moving leaves and branches and changes in lighting are unpredictable. A primary innovation of this study is that cloudiness is determined from images without using a reference clear image and without minimal threshold value determination or human judgment for calibration. Five sites ranging from 600 to 1000 meters elevation along a ridge in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico were each equipped with a trail camera programmed to take an image every 30 minutes since March 2014. Images were classified using four selected cloud-sensitive image characteristics (SCICs) computed for small image regions: contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of the luminance of each image pixel, and image colorfulness. K-means clustering provided reasonable results to discriminate cloudy from clear conditions. Preliminary results indicate that 79-94% (daytime) and 85-93% (nighttime) of validation images were classified accurately at one open and two closed canopy sites. The euclidian distances between SCICs vectors of images during cloudy conditions and the SCICs vector of the centroid of the cluster of clear images show potential to quantify cloud density in addition to immersion. The classification method will be applied to determine spatial and temporal patterns of cloud immersion in the study area. The presented approach offers promising applications to increase observations of low-lying clouds at remote mountain sites where standard instruments to measure visibility and cloud base may not be practical.

  7. Time-lapse Imaging Reveals Stereotypical Patterns of Drosophila Midline Glial Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Scott R.; Pearson, Joseph C.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila CNS midline glia (MG) are multifunctional cells that ensheath and provide trophic support to commissural axons, and direct embryonic development by employing a variety of signaling molecules. These glia consist of two functionally distinct populations: the anterior MG (AMG) and posterior MG (PMG). Only the AMG ensheath axon commissures, whereas the function of the non-ensheathing PMG is unknown. The Drosophila MG have proven to be an excellent system for studying glial proliferation, cell fate, apoptosis, and axon-glial interactions. However, insight into how AMG migrate and acquire their specific positions within the axon-glial scaffold has been lacking. In this paper, we use time-lapse imaging, single-cell analysis, and embryo staining to comprehensively describe the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the Drosophila MG. We identified 3 groups of MG that differed in the trajectories of their initial inward migration: AMG that migrate inward and to the anterior before undergoing apoptosis, AMG that migrate inward and to the posterior to ensheath commissural axons, and PMG that migrate inward and to the anterior to contact the commissural axons before undergoing apoptosis. In a second phase of their migration, the surviving AMG stereotypically migrated posteriorly to specific positions surrounding the commissures, and their final position was correlated with their location prior to migration. Most noteworthy are AMG that migrated between the commissures from a ventral to a dorsal position. Single-cell analysis indicated that individual AMG possessed wide-ranging and elaborate membrane extensions that partially ensheathed both commissures. These results provide a strong foundation for future genetic experiments to identify mutants affecting MG development, particularly in guidance cues that may direct migration. Drosophila MG are homologous in structure and function to the glial-like cells that populate the vertebrate CNS floorplate, and study

  8. Time-Lapse Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Field Degeneration Imaged in Organotypic Retinal Explant Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Cone-Kimball, Elizabeth; Jefferys, Joan; Quigley, Harry A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an ex vivo organotypic retinal explant culture system suitable for multiple time-point imaging of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendritic arbors over a period of 1 week, and capable of detecting dendrite neuroprotection conferred by experimental treatments. Methods Thy1-YFP mouse retinas were explanted and maintained in organotypic culture. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic arbors were imaged repeatedly using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximal projection z-stacks were traced by two masked investigators and dendritic fields were analyzed for characteristics including branch number, size, and complexity. One group of explants was treated with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) added to the culture media. Changes in individual dendritic fields over time were detected using pair-wise comparison testing. Results Retinal ganglion cells in mouse retinal explant culture began to degenerate after 3 days with 52.4% surviving at 7 days. Dendritic field parameters showed minimal change over 8 hours in culture. Intra- and interobserver measurements of dendrite characteristics were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlations consistently > 0.80). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) dendritic tree degeneration was detected following 7 days in culture including: 40% to 50% decreases in number of branch segments, number of junctions, number of terminal branches, and total branch length. Scholl analyses similarly demonstrated a significant decrease in dendritic field complexity. Treatment of explants with BDNF+CNTF significantly attenuated dendritic field degeneration. Conclusions Retinal explant culture of Thy1-YFP tissue provides a useful model for time-lapse imaging of RGC dendritic field degeneration over a course of several days, and is capable of detecting neuroprotective amelioration of dendritic pruning within individual RGCs. PMID:26811145

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  10. Time Lapse Gravity and Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Injection at the West Hastings Field, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. F.; Richards, T.; Klopping, F.; MacQueen, J.; Hosseini, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Time lapse or 4D gravity and seismic reflection surveys are being conducted at the West Hastings Field near Houston, Texas to monitor the progress of CO2 injection. This Department of Energy supported CO2 sequestration experiment is conducted in conjunction with a Denbury Onshore, LLC tertiary recovery project. The reservoir is at a depth of 1.8 km in the Oligocene Frio sands and has been produced since the 1930s. Goals are an accounting and mapping of the injected CO2 and to determine if migration occurs along intra-reservoir faults. An integrated interpretation of the geophysical surveys will be made together with well logs and engineering data. Gravity monitoring of water versus gas replacement has been very successful, but liquid phase CO2 monitoring is problematic due to the smaller density contrast with respect to oil and water. This reservoir has a small volume to depth ratio and hence only a small gravity difference signal is expected on the surface. New borehole gravity technology introduced by Micro-g-Lacoste can make gravity measurements at near reservoir depths with a much higher signal to noise ratio. This method has been successfully evaluated on a simulation of the Hastings project. Field operations have been conducted for repeated surface and borehole gravity surveys beginning in 2013. The surface survey of 95 stations covers an area of 3 by 5 km and 22 borehole gravity logs are run in the interval above the Frio formation. 4D seismic reflection surveys are being made at 6 month intervals on the surface and in 3 VSP wells. CO2 injection into the targeted portion of the reservoir only began in early 2015 and monitoring will continue into 2017. To date only the baseline reservoir conditions have been assessed. The overall success of the gravity monitoring will not be determined until 2017.

  11. Variogram-based inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity data: development and application to a thermal tracing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Thomas; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a popular imaging methodology in a broad range of applications given its large sensitivity to subsurface parameters and its relative simplicity to implement. More particularly, time-lapse ERT is now increasingly used for monitoring purposes in many contexts such as water content, permafrost, landslide, seawater intrusion, solute transport or heat transport experiments. Specific inversion schemes have been developed for time-lapse data sets. However, in contrast with static inversions for which many techniques including geostatistical, minimum support or structural inversion are commonly applied, most of the methodologies for time-lapse inversion still rely on non-physically based spatial and/or temporal smoothing of the parameters or parameter changes. In this work, we propose a time-lapse ERT inversion scheme based on the difference inversion scheme. We replace the standard smoothness-constraint regularization operator by the parameter change covariance matrix. The objective function can be expressed as ψdiff(Δm ) = ||Wd [d - d0 + f(m0)- f(m )]||2 + λ ||||C-Δ0m.5Δm ||||2 where Wd is the data weighting matrix, d and d0 are the data sets corresponding to the considered time-step and to the background, f() is the forward operator, m and m0 are the models corresponding to the considered time-step and to the background, Δm is the parameter change (resistivity), CΔm is the parameter change covariance matrix and λ the regularization parameter. This operator takes into account the correlation between changes in resistivity at different locations through a variogram computed using independent data (e.g., electromagnetic logs). It may vary for subsequent time-steps if the correlation length is time-dependent. The methodology is first validated and compared to the standard smoothness-constraint inversion using a synthetic benchmark simulating the injection of a conductive tracer into a homogeneous aquifer inducing

  12. Time-lapse and UAV Thermal Imaging of Glacial and Periglacial Environments in the Peruvian Andes (Cordillera Blanca, Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, J. M.; Wigmore, O.; Aubry-Wake, C.; Mark, B. G.; Hellstrom, R. A.; Lautz, L.

    2015-12-01

    In the tropics, the acquisition of high-resolution geospatial data of high-mountain glacial and periglacial systems presents unique challenges due to remote site access and very high elevations. For glaciers and hydrologic systems, a key variable of interest is surface temperature as it constrains glacier melt rates, traces hydrologic processes, and is needed for the calibration of energy budget models. We present results from two studies that acquired high resolution temperature data from the Cuchillacocha Glacier, Peru (9.24°S, 77.21°W). The glacier resides on the western drainage of the Cordillera Blanca with an elevation range of 4700 to 6096 m. In the first study we use high resolution time-lapse infrared imagery (5-10 minute interval over 3 days; 0.6 m2 pixel size) to observe diel changes in the surface energy budget of the glacier and to demonstrate how radiation from bare rock adjacent to the glacier may affect melt rates. In the second study we use a newly developed, inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for high resolution multispectral mapping of the glacier (2 cm resolution orthomosaic and 5 cm resolution DEM). We present results showing how the time-lapse and the high-resolution UAV imagery can be combined to further strengthen our understanding of the Cuchillacocha Glacier's energy budget and possible insights about turbulent heat fluxes. While the new instruments provide unprecedented data acquisition capabilities, there is an outstanding need for proper data correction. Spatial/thermal control points and post-processing algorithms are needed to produce quantifiable datasets. For example, our post-processed time-lapse imagery has an r2 > 0.9 after emissivity, transmissivity and offset corrections.

  13. Development and Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial of a Distress Tolerance Treatment for Smokers With a History of Early Lapse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An inability to tolerate distress is a significant predictor of early smoking lapse following a cessation attempt. We conducted a preliminary randomized controlled trial to compare a distress tolerance (DT) treatment that incorporated elements of exposure-based therapies and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to standard smoking cessation treatment (ST). Methods: Smokers with a history of early lapse in prior quit attempts received either DT (N = 27; 9 2-hr group and 6 50-min individual sessions) or ST (N = 22; 6 90-min group and 1 20-min individual session), plus 8 weeks of transdermal nicotine patch. Results: At the end of behavioral treatment, odds of abstinence among participants receiving DT were 6.46 times greater than among participants receiving ST (66.7% vs. 31.8%), equivalent to a medium- to large-effect size. Odds of abstinence for DT were still 1.73 times greater at 8 weeks, corresponding to a small- to medium-effect size, although neither this difference nor those at 13 and 26 weeks were statistically significant. Furthermore, of those who lapsed to smoking during the first week postquit, DT participants had more than 4 times greater odds of abstinence than ST participants at the end of treatment. Relative to ST, DT participants also reported a larger decrease in experiential avoidance, a hypothesized DT treatment mediator, prior to quit day. The trajectory of negative mood and withdrawal symptoms in DT differed from ST and was largely consistent with hypotheses. Conclusions: Reasons for the decrease in abstinence in DT after treatment discontinuation and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:23884317

  14. In vivo Postnatal Electroporation and Time-lapse Imaging of Neuroblast Migration in Mouse Acute Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine Julie; Doherty, Patrick; Lalli, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main neurogenic niches in the postnatal brain. Here, neural progenitors proliferate and give rise to neuroblasts able to move along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) towards the olfactory bulb (OB). This long-distance migration is required for the subsequent maturation of newborn neurons in the OB, but the molecular mechanisms regulating this process are still unclear. Investigating the signaling pathways controlling neuroblast motility may not only help understand a fundamental step in neurogenesis, but also have therapeutic regenerative potential, given the ability of these neuroblasts to target brain sites affected by injury, stroke, or degeneration. In this manuscript we describe a detailed protocol for in vivo postnatal electroporation and subsequent time-lapse imaging of neuroblast migration in the mouse RMS. Postnatal electroporation can efficiently transfect SVZ progenitor cells, which in turn generate neuroblasts migrating along the RMS. Using confocal spinning disk time-lapse microscopy on acute brain slice cultures, neuroblast migration can be monitored in an environment closely resembling the in vivo condition. Moreover, neuroblast motility can be tracked and quantitatively analyzed. As an example, we describe how to use in vivo postnatal electroporation of a GFP-expressing plasmid to label and visualize neuroblasts migrating along the RMS. Electroporation of shRNA or CRE recombinase-expressing plasmids in conditional knockout mice employing the LoxP system can also be used to target genes of interest. Pharmacological manipulation of acute brain slice cultures can be performed to investigate the role of different signaling molecules in neuroblast migration. By coupling in vivo electroporation with time-lapse imaging, we hope to understand the molecular mechanisms controlling neuroblast motility and contribute to the development of novel approaches to promote brain repair. PMID:24326479

  15. Near real-time imaging of molasses injections using time-lapse electrical geophysics at the Brandywine DRMO, Brandywine, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Major, B.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced bioremediation, which involves introduction of amendments to promote biodegradation, increasingly is used to accelerate cleanup of recalcitrant compounds and has been identified as the preferred remedial treatment at many contaminated sites. Although blind introduction of amendments can lead to sub-optimal or ineffective remediation, the distribution of amendment throughout the treatment zone is difficult to measure using conventional sampling. Because amendments and their degradation products commonly have electrical properties that differ from those of ambient soil, time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring has the potential to verify amendment emplacement and distribution. In order for geophysical monitoring to be useful, however, results of the injection ideally should be accessible in near real time. In August 2010, we demonstrated the feasibility of near real-time, autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment injections at the former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) in Brandywine, Maryland. Two injections of about 1000 gallons each of molasses, a widely used amendment for enhanced bioremediation, were monitored using measurements taken with borehole and surface electrodes. During the injections, multi-channel resistance data were recorded; data were transmitted to a server and processed using a parallel resistivity inversion code; and results in the form of time-lapse imagery subsequently were posted to a website. This process occurred automatically without human intervention. The resulting time-lapse imagery clearly showed the evolution of the molasses plume. The delay between measurements and online delivery of images was between 45 and 60 minutes, thus providing actionable information that could support decisions about field procedures and a check on whether amendment reached target zones. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using electrical imaging as a monitoring tool both during amendment emplacement

  16. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  17. Effect of Time Lapse on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Vertical Root Fractures.

    PubMed

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Asl, Amin Mahdavi; Jalalzadeh, Mohsen; Tayari, Maryam; Hosseinipanah, Mohammad; Fardmal, Javad; Shokri, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and early diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) is imperative to prevent extensive bone loss and unnecessary endodontic and prosthodontic treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of time lapse on the diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for VRFs in endodontically treated dog's teeth. Forty-eight incisors and premolars of three adult male dogs underwent root canal therapy. The teeth were assigned to two groups: VRFs were artificially induced in the first group (n=24) while the teeth in the second group remained intact (n=24). The CBCT scans were obtained by NewTom 3G unit immediately after inducing VRFs and after one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks. Three oral and maxillofacial radiologists blinded to the date of radiographs assessed the presence/absence of VRFs on CBCT scans. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values were calculated and data were analyzed using SPSS v.16 software and ANOVA. The total accuracy of detection of VRFs immediately after surgery, one, two, three, four, eight, 12 and 16 weeks was 67.3%, 68.7%, 66.6%, 64.6%, 64.5%, 69.4%, 68.7%, 68% respectively. The effect of time lapse on detection of VRFs was not significant (p>0.05). Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT for detection of VRFs were 74.3%, 62.2%, 67.2% respectively. Cone beam computed tomography is a valuable tool for detection of VRFs. Time lapse (four months) had no effect on detection of VRFs on CBCT scans. PMID:27007339

  18. Analysis of Zebrafish Kidney Development with Time-lapse Imaging Using a Dissecting Microscope Equipped for Optical Sectioning.

    PubMed

    Perner, Birgit; Schnerwitzki, Danny; Graf, Michael; Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand organogenesis, the spatial and temporal alterations that occur during development of tissues need to be recorded. The method described here allows time-lapse analysis of normal and impaired kidney development in zebrafish embryos by using a fluorescence dissecting microscope equipped for structured illumination and z-stack acquisition. To visualize nephrogenesis, transgenic zebrafish (Tg(wt1b:GFP)) with fluorescently labeled kidney structures were used. Renal defects were triggered by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide against the Wilms tumor gene wt1a, a factor known to be crucial for kidney development. The advantage of the experimental setup is the combination of a zoom microscope with simple strategies for re-adjusting movements in x, y or z direction without additional equipment. To circumvent focal drift that is induced by temperature variations and mechanical vibrations, an autofocus strategy was applied instead of utilizing a usually required environmental chamber. In order to re-adjust the positional changes due to a xy-drift, imaging chambers with imprinted relocation grids were employed. In comparison to more complex setups for time-lapse recording with optical sectioning such as confocal laser scanning or light sheet microscopes, a zoom microscope is easy to handle. Besides, it offers dissecting microscope-specific benefits such as high depth of field and an extended working distance. The method to study organogenesis presented here can also be used with fluorescence stereo microscopes not capable of optical sectioning. Although limited for high-throughput, this technique offers an alternative to more complex equipment that is normally used for time-lapse recording of developing tissues and organ dynamics. PMID:27078207

  19. Characterization of groundwater and surface water mixing in a semiconfined karst aquifer using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhoff, Steven B.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Revil, André; Martin, Jonathan B.; Karaoulis, Marios; Graham, Wendy D.

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater flow in karst includes exchange of water between large fractures, conduits, and the surrounding porous matrix, which impacts both water quality and quantity. Electrical resistivity tomography combined with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) and numerical flow and transport modeling was used to study mixing of karst conduit and matrix waters to understand spatial and temporal patterns of mixing during high flow and base flow conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time EMMA and synthetic geophysical simulations have been combined. Here we interpret an 8 week time-lapse electrical resistivity data set to assess groundwater-surface mixing. We simulate flow between the karst conduits and the porous matrix to determine fractions of water recharged to conduits that has mixed with groundwater stored in the pore space of the matrix using a flow and transport model in a synthetic time-lapse resistivity inversion. Comparing the field and synthetic inversions, our results enable us to estimate exchange dynamics, spatial mixing, and flow conditions. Results showed that mixing occurred at a volumetric flux of 56 m3/d with a dispersivity around 1.69 m during the geophysical experiment. For these conditions, it was determined that conduit water composition ranged from 75% groundwater during base flow conditions to less than 50% groundwater in high flow conditions. Though subject to some uncertainties, the time-lapse inversion process provides a means to predict changing hydrologic conditions, leading to mixing of surface water and ground water and thus changes to water quantity and quality, as well as potential for water-rock reactions, in a semiconfined, sink-rise system.

  20. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Distributed Temperature Measurements and Modeling in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Perri, M. T.; Strapazzon, G.; Pasetto, D.; Putti, M.; Cano Paoli, K.; Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Cassiani, G.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Modeling may offer an opportunity to deepen our understanding on how these important ecosystems work. However this is only possible if hydrological and biogeochemical models are coupled to measurements that can constrain the model predictions and lead to robust estimates of the system key parameters and processes. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones.We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream,plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  1. Globally referenced real time monitoring of mass movements using monoscopic time-lapse photography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenner, Robert; Phillips, Marcia; Buchroithner, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    The creep movement of a rock glacier was monitored in daily resolution using images of an automatic in-situ time-lapse camera (AC). Displacements were calculated between the images in 2D image coordinates using the imaging velocimetry algorithm of Roesgen and Totaro, 1995. To georeference and scale these displacements, a creep velocity field captured once by a terrestrial laser scan (TLS) repeat measurement was used. The laser scan point cloud and the creep velocity vector field were projected in image coordinates of the AC to obtain a georeferencing mask, a scale mask and an azimuth mask for the 2D displacements calculated between two images. The scale mask was obtained by comparing the TLS derived displacement vectors with those of the AC, referring to a common measurement period. The automatic procedure includes the following work steps: 1. Offsets between two images are identified and corrected based on image parts representing unchanged terrain. 2. 2D displacements are calculated between all chronological image sequences. 3. Faulty displacement vectors are eliminated based on a predefined threshold for spatial direction differences. 4. The remaining displacements are georeferenced, scaled and attributed with individual displacement directions (azimuths) in global coordinates. 5. In addition to the displacement values, displacement velocities and accelerations are calculated using the date of the images. 6. For chronologically successive displacement vector fields, the spatial mean of the relative velocity is defined and expressed as a percentage of the first displacement velocity in the series. The time series of the relative velocities is expressed in chart form. 7. The spatial resolution of all georeferenced output data sets is homogenized, as they were influenced by the central projection of the photos. The described procedure proved to be a reliable, low cost method to monitor mass wasting processes. Even under difficult conditions, like thin snow coverage

  2. Estimating rheological properties of lava flows using high-resolution time lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Applegarth, L. J.; Pinkerton, H.; Fryer, T.

    2011-12-01

    During effusive eruptions, property and infrastructure can be threatened by lava flow inundation. In order to maximise the effectiveness of the response to such an event, it is necessary to be able to reliably forecast the area that will be affected. One of the major controls on the advance of a lava flow is its rheology, which is spatially and temporally variable, and depends on many underlying factors. Estimating the rheological properties of a lava flow, and the change in these over space and time is therefore of the utmost importance. Here we report estimates of rheological properties made from geometric and velocity measurements on integrated topographic and image data using the method of Ellis et al. (2004) (Ellis B, Wilson L & Pinkerton H (2004) Estimating the rheology of basaltic lava flows. Lunar & Planetary Science XXXV Abst. 1550). These are then compared to the viscosity predicted from composition and temperature by the GRD model (Giordano D, Russell JK, & Dingwell DB (2008) Viscosity of Magmatic Liquids: A Model. Earth & Planetary Science Letters, 271, 123-134). During the 13 May 2008 - 6 July 2009 eruption of Mt Etna, Sicily, lava flows were emplaced into the Valle del Bove, reaching a maximum length of >6 km. Towards the end of the eruption, multiple channelized aa flows were active simultaneously, reaching tens to hundreds of metres in length. Flow lifetimes were of the order hours to days. In the last month of the eruption, we installed a Canon EOS 450D camera at Pizzi Deneri, on the north side of the Valle del Bove, to collect visible images at 15-minute intervals. On one day, topographic data (using a Riegl LPM-321 terrestrial laser scanner) and thermal images (using a FLIR Thermacam S40) were also collected from this location. The fronts of some of the larger flows were tracked through the time lapse image sequence. Using knowledge of the camera imaging geometry, the pixel tracks were reprojected onto the topographic surface to determine flow

  3. Time-lapse, Distributed Microgravity Observations as a Tool to Inform Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Majone, B.; Palmieri, F.; Cassiani, G.; Bellin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to significant advances in technology and modeling capabilities, the use of geophysical monitoring techniques in support of hydrological modeling showed a rapid growth over the last decades. However, at the catchment scale, the payoff in terms of model reliability has not always justified the increased experimental efforts needed in order to collect useful additional information. The objective of this work is to evaluate the advantage gained by coupling traditional hydrological data with unconventional geophysical information in inverse modeling of a complex hydrological system. In particular, we explored how the use of time-lapsed, spatially distributed micro-gravity measurements may improve the conceptual modeling of a complex catchment, allowing for an unambiguous identification of the more appropriate model and a general reduction of uncertainty. The study area is the Vermigliana catchment, a small alpine watershed located in the South-Eastern Alps, Italy. The morphology is relatively complex, being characterized by several minor valleys and ridges with elevation ranging from 950 m a.s.l. to 3558 m a.s.l. The catchment has been monitored by 13 micro-gravity stations (part of a network covering a larger area), where extensive micro-gravity measurements have been performed during 6 field campaign between 2009 and 2011. Sub-daily streamflow data are available at the Vermiglio stream gauging station (with a contributing area of 79 km2) for the same period. Once corrected to remove the effect of ocean tides and instrumental drift, micro-gravity measurements have been used as proxy of changes in the total water storage, including soil moisture, groundwater and snowpack. These data have been combined with streamflow measurements in a multi-objective optimization approach, coupling a semi-distributed hydrological model (GEOTRANSF) with a gravity model. The inclusion of microgravity data resulted in a better constraint of the inversion procedure and an improved

  4. Time-lapse electromagnetic induction surveys under olive tree canopies reveal soil moisture dynamics and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Gonzalo; Giraldez Cervera, Juan Vicente; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture (θ) is a critical variable that exerts an important control on plant status and development. Soil sampling, neutron attenuation and electromagnetic methods such as TDR or FDR have been used widely to measure θ and provide point data at a possible range of temporal resolutions. However, these methods require either destructive sampling or permanently installed devices with often limiting measurement depths, or are extremely time-consuming. Moreover, the small support of such measurements compromises its value in heterogeneous soils. To overcome such limitations electromagnetic induction (EMI) can be tested to monitor θ at different spatial and temporal scales. This work investigates the potential of EMI to characterize the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture from apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) under the canopy of individual olive trees. During one year we measured θ with a frequency of 5 min and ECa on an approximately weekly basis along transects from the tree trunk towards the inter-row area. CS-616 soil moisture sensors where horizontally installed in the walls of a trench at depths of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m at five locations along the transect, with a separation of 0.8 m. The Dualem-21S sensor was used to measure weekly the ECa at 0.2 m increments, from the tree trunk to a distance of 4.4 m. The results showed similar drying and wetting patterns for θ and ECa. Both variables showed a decreasing pattern from the tree trunk towards the drip line, followed by a sharp increment and constant values towards the center of the inter-row space. This pattern reflects clearly the influence of root-zone water uptake under the tree canopy and higher θ values in the inter-row area where root-water uptake is smaller. Time-lapse ECa data responded to evaporation and infiltration fluxes with the highest sensitivity for the 1 and 1.5 m ECa signals, as compared to the 0.5 and 3.0 m signals. Overall these preliminary results revealed the

  5. Multiple Lapse Time Window Analysis Study Using Single Earthquake in the South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachman, A. N.; Chung, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Single earthquake data was used to separate Qi-1 and Qs-1 for South Korea (S. Korea) with the Multiple Lapse Time Window Analysis (MLTWA). The MLTWA method have been used numerous earthquake data at once to simulate the energy of observed seismic envelopes with theoretical values obtained by a single source assumption. The theoretical values of MLTWA method is normally obtained by numerical method such as Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method due to availability for various source depth. One of the major concerns with the MLTWA method is that, it normally shows a large observational scatter caused by the multiple use of earthquakes which have different radiation pattern and focal depth, and the regional alteration of local structure. Recently our study of MLTWA using single event showed realistic results when the number of recorded station was more than 8, without consideration of radiation pattern in DSMC method (Asep et al., 2015). In particular, Asep et al. (2015) found the significant effect of source depth which had been neglected by the previous MLTWA studies (Asep et al. (2015). This study, therefore, focused on the depth effect of MLTWA by relocation of 53 earthquakes occurred in S. Korea from March 2003 to December 2014. To obtain reliable depths of these events, seven crustal models (Fig. 1) were constructed based on two refraction profiles across the Korean Peninsula. The Vp/Vs ratio and the preliminary origin time (POT) was obtained by the Wadati plot. Since focal depth and origin time is a coupled data, a series of inversions using HYPO71 were performed for only three parameters (latitude, longitude, and origin time) of earthquakes while keeping its depth fixed each time. The residuals were calculated for varied focal depth from 0 to 30 km with an increment of 0.5 km, and depth range of minimum rms residual (minimum rms residual plus 0.05) was selected. For the minimum depth range of seven models, the closest range with the POT was selected as

  6. Penicillin Induced Persistence in Chlamydia trachomatis: High Quality Time Lapse Video Analysis of the Developmental Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, David; Wang, Yibing; Salim, Omar; Lambden, Paul R.; Clarke, Ian N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen with a unique obligate intracellular developmental cycle that takes place inside a modified cytoplasmic structure known as an inclusion. Following entry into a cell, the infectious elementary body (EB) differentiates into a non - infectious replicative form known as a reticulate body (RB). RBs divide by binary fission and at the end of the cycle they redifferentiate into EBs. Treatment of C.trachomatis with penicillin prevents maturation of RBs which survive and enlarge to become aberrant RBs within the inclusion in a non - infective persistent state. Persistently infected individuals may be a reservoir for chlamydial infection. The C.trachomatis genome encodes the enzymes for peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis but a PG sacculus has never been detected. This coupled to the action of penicillin is known as the chlamydial anomaly. We have applied video microscopy and quantitative DNA assays to the chlamydial developmental cycle to assess the effects of penicillin treatment and establish a framework for investigating penicillin induced chlamydial persistence. Principal Findings Addition of penicillin at the time of cell infection does not prevent uptake and the establishment of an inclusion. EB to RB transition occurs but bacterial cytokinesis is arrested by the second binary fission. RBs continue to enlarge but not divide in the presence of penicillin. The normal developmental cycle can be recovered by the removal of penicillin although the large, aberrant RBs do not revert to the normal smaller size but remain present to the completion of the developmental cycle. Chromosomal and plasmid DNA replication is unaffected by the addition of penicillin but the arrest of bacterial cytokinesis under these conditions results in RBs accumulating multiple copies of the genome. Conclusions We have applied video time lapse microscopy to the study of the chlamydial developmental cycle. Linked with accurate measures of genome

  7. Time-lapse 3D electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil-plant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present the application of time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro- electrical tomography (ERT) to monitor soil-plant interactions in the root zone in the framework of the FP7 Project CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins). The goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of the soil-vegetation interactions by the use of non-invasive techniques. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus for the monitoring of the root zone of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region, Northern Italy. The micro-ERT apparatus consists of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. We collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements for one year and performed two different controlled irrigation tests: one during a very dry Summer and one during a very wet and highly dynamic plant growing Spring period. We also ran laboratory analyses on soil specimens, in order to evaluate the electrical response at different saturation steps. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In particular, we note that in very dry conditions, 3D micro ERT can image water plumes in the shallow subsoil produced by a drip irrigation system. In the very dynamic growing season, under abundant irrigation, micro 3D ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity. Even though the quantitative use of this technique for moisture content balance suffers from well-known inversion difficulties, even the pure imaging of the active root zone is a valuable contribution. However the integration of the measurements in a fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion is the way forward for a better understanding of subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  8. Time-lapse Geophysical Monitoring of the Subsurface Hydrology at Kings Park, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekoya, Tunde; McGrath, Gavan; Leopold, Matthias; Shragge, Jeffrey; Challis, Anthea; Stevens, Jason; Miller, Ben

    2015-04-01

    The increasing occurrence of drought stress throughout Southwestern Western Australia is postulated to have contributed to the decline of Banksia populations both in Kings Park, Perth, and in the Banksia woodlands in the greater Swan Coastal Plain region. To help quantify these assertions, there is an urgent need to better understand the base levels of soil moisture content - as well as seasonal variations thereof - in these geographical regions. We conducted time-lapse (TL) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods on a monthly basis (May-August 2014). In addition, at each site we hand-augured test holes to a depth of 3-4 m and collected samples at 20-cm intervals to enable grain-size analysis, soil moisture content and water retention tests. PR2 capacitance probe measurements were also acquired when augering to enable a moisture content comparison study. The acquired TL ERT datasets were inverted using 2D EarthImager software and the temporal variations in resistivity were interpreted in terms of changes in moisture content. The TL ERT data reveal significant calendar variations in the spatial distribution of moisture content. The TL ERT inversions also detected isolated less resistive lithologies and the depth to groundwater. Processed TL GPR data were interpreted to show vertical variations in the vadose zone moisture content. The water content variations were consistent with the rainfall data. The grain-size distributions of the samples were analysed statistically. The apparent resistivity values from the analysed samples and observed volumetric water content are strongly correlated (R2=0.84) as may be expected from Archie's law. Soil moisture content analysis results including the PR2 probe measurements were plotted as a function of depth, the result shows vertical variations in moisture content with depth. The hydrological tests indicated the properties of the subsurface lithologies and confirm the responses of the

  9. Soundscape and Noise Exposure Monitoring in a Marine Protected Area Using Shipping Data and Time-Lapse Footage.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work that developed new techniques for underwater noise assessment that integrate acoustic monitoring with automatic identification system (AIS) shipping data and time-lapse video, meteorological, and tidal data. Two sites were studied within the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation (SAC) for bottlenose dolphins, where increased shipping traffic is expected from construction of offshore wind farms outside the SAC. Noise exposure varied markedly between the sites, and natural and anthropogenic contributions were characterized using multiple data sources. At one site, AIS-operating vessels accounted for total cumulative sound exposure (0.1-10 kHz), suggesting that noise modeling using the AIS would be feasible. PMID:26611022

  10. 3D time-lapse analysis of Rab11/FIP5 complex: spatiotemporal dynamics during apical lumen formation.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging of fixed cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures is one of the most widely used techniques for observing protein localization and distribution within cells. Although this technique can also be applied to polarized epithelial cells that form three-dimensional (3D) cysts when grown in a Matrigel matrix suspension, there are still significant limitations in imaging cells fixed at a particular point in time. Here, we describe the use of 3D time-lapse imaging of live cells to observe the dynamics of apical membrane initiation site (AMIS) formation and lumen expansion in polarized epithelial cells. PMID:25800842

  11. Time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle domain for monitoring CO2 injection at the SACROC EOR field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Huang, H.

    2012-12-01

    Time-lapse walkaway vertical seismic profiling (VSP) surveys can reveal important reservoir changes caused by CO2 injection. We study the capability of time-lapse walkaway VSP imaging using reverse-time migration in the angle-domain for monitoring CO2 injection. During the Phase II project of the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration, one baseline and one repeat walkaway VSP surveys were conducted in 2008 and 2009, respectively, at the SACROC enhanced oil recovery (EOR) field for monitoring CO2 injection. The datasets were acquired by Baker Atlas in collaboration with Kinder Morgan. In this study, we apply reverse-time migration in the angle domain to the time-lapse walkaway VSP datasets from the SACROC EOR field, and conduct detailed analyses of common-image gathers. Our migration results demonstrate that reverse-time migration in the angle domain produces images of time-lapse walkaway VSP data with a better image quality compared to those obtained using conventional reverse-time migration. The time-lapse image difference along the bottom of the reservoir where CO2 is injected is much more significant than that along the top of the reservoir. This is partially because we use the same baseline velocity model for migrations of both datasets. The reservoir velocity decreases during CO2 injection, leading to slightly change in the migration image location along the bottom of the reservoir for the repeat VSP data.

  12. The Use of Time-Lapse Optical Coherence Tomography to Image the Effects of Microapplied Toxins on the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Majdi, Joseph A.; Qian, Haohua; Li, Yichao; Langsner, Robert J.; Shea, Katherine I.; Agrawal, Anant; Hammer, Daniel X.; Hanig, Joseph P.; Cohen, Ethan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We developed a novel technique for accelerated drug screening and retinotoxin characterization using time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) and a drug microapplication device. Methods. Using an ex vivo rabbit eyecup preparation, we studied retinotoxin effects in real-time by microperfusing small retinal areas under a transparent fluoropolymer tube. Known retinotoxic agents were applied to the retina for 5-minute periods, while changes in retinal structure, thickness, and reflectance were monitored with OCT. The OCT images of two agents with dissimilar mechanisms, cyanide and kainic acid, were compared to their structural changes seen histologically. Results. We found the actions of retinotoxic agents tested could be classified broadly into two distinct types: (1) agents that induce neuronal depolarization, such as kainic acid, causing increases in OCT reflectivity or thickness of the inner plexiform and nuclear layers, and decreased reflectivity of the outer retina; and (2) agents that disrupt mitochondrial function, such as cyanide, causing outer retinal structural changes as evidenced by a reduction in the OCT reflectivity of the photoreceptor outer segment and pigment epithelium layers. Conclusions. Retinotoxin-induced changes in retinal layer reflectivity and thickness under the microperfusion tube in OCT images closely matched the histological evidence of retinal injury. Time-lapse OCT imaging of the microperfused local retina has the potential to accelerate drug retinotoxicological screening and expand the use of OCT as an evaluation tool for preclinical animal testing. PMID:25525175

  13. Characterising fjord circulation patterns and ice flux from time-lapse imagery at Sermilik Fjord, southeast Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, T.; Drocourt, Y. J. R.; Ayoub, F.; Murray, T.; Hughes, A. L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence suggests that the synchronous acceleration and thinning in the early 2000s of Greenland's southeast glaciers were triggered by increased submarine melting. This important control on the region's mass balance is influenced by changes in the strength of coastal currents, which are also believed to be the cause of the subsequent slowdown of the mid-2000s. While warming of the subpolar North Atlantic and increased runoff are blamed for the enhanced submarine melting at the glacier margins, the physical processes that connect them remain largely unknown. Our lack of understanding of coastal currents and associated fluxes is due largely to a lack of observations of a complex system. Typically, data in these regions, if available at all, consist of point measurements at sparse moorings or 2D profiles of a snapshot in time. Here we present a methodology using monoscopic time-lapse imagery to characterise fjord circulation at the mouth of Sermillik Fjord near Helheim Glacier in southeast Greenland. Image resection methods are used to assign a 3D coordinate system to the 6-minute time-lapse images and the movement of icebergs and sea ice are mapped using feature tracking. Along with local wind data, these results will provide much needed information about the patterns of circulation at the fjord's mouth on the surface and at depth, ice fluxes and the influence of wind.

  14. IP4DI: A software for time-lapse 2D/3D DC-resistivity and induced polarization tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Tsourlos, P.; Werkema, D. D.; Minsley, B. J.

    2013-04-01

    We propose a 2D/3D forward modelling and inversion package to invert direct current (DC)-resistivity, time-domain induced polarization (TDIP), and frequency-domain induced polarization (FDIP) data. Each cell used for the discretization of the 2D/3D problems is characterized by a DC-resistivity value and a chargeability or complex conductivity for TDIP/FDIP problems, respectively. The governing elliptic partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method, which can be applied for both real and complex numbers. The inversion can be performed either for a single snapshot of data or for a sequence of snapshots in order to monitor a dynamic process such as a salt tracer test. For the time-lapse inversion, we have developed an active time constrained (ATC) approach that is very efficient in filtering out noise in the data that is not correlated over time. The forward algorithm is benchmarked with simple analytical solutions. The inversion package IP4DI is benchmarked with three tests, two including simple geometries. The last one corresponds to a time-lapse resistivity problem for cross-well tomography during enhanced oil recovery. The algorithms are based on MATLAB® code package and a graphical user interface (GUI).

  15. High-resolution Time-lapse Imaging and Automated Analysis of Microtubule Dynamics in Living Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Braun, Alexander; Caesar, Nicole M; Dang, Kyvan; Myers, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    The physiological process by which new vasculature forms from existing vasculature requires specific signaling events that trigger morphological changes within individual endothelial cells (ECs). These processes are critical for homeostatic maintenance such as wound healing, and are also crucial in promoting tumor growth and metastasis. EC morphology is defined by the organization of the cytoskeleton, a tightly regulated system of actin and microtubule (MT) dynamics that is known to control EC branching, polarity and directional migration, essential components of angiogenesis. To study MT dynamics, we used high-resolution fluorescence microscopy coupled with computational image analysis of fluorescently-labeled MT plus-ends to investigate MT growth dynamics and the regulation of EC branching morphology and directional migration. Time-lapse imaging of living Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) was performed following transfection with fluorescently-labeled MT End Binding protein 3 (EB3) and Mitotic Centromere Associated Kinesin (MCAK)-specific cDNA constructs to evaluate effects on MT dynamics. PlusTipTracker software was used to track EB3-labeled MT plus ends in order to measure MT growth speeds and MT growth lifetimes in time-lapse images. This methodology allows for the study of MT dynamics and the identification of how localized regulation of MT dynamics within sub-cellular regions contributes to the angiogenic processes of EC branching and migration. PMID:27584860

  16. Use of Time-lapse Mise-á-la-Masse Measurements to Monitor a Saline Tracer Test: Advantages and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, M. T.; De Vita, P.; Cassiani, G.; Masciale, R.; Portoghese, I.; Chirico, G. B.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents the results of a saline tracer test conducted on an alluvial aquifer placed in the Alento River Valley (Campania region, Southern Italy) and monitored by time-lapse Mise-á-la-Masse measurements. The principal aim of this study is the characterization of the groundwater flow field, both in velocity and direction. The results of the geophysical survey are described and compared to several simulated datasets conducted on a 3D model simulating flow, transport and electrical current. In this manner it is possible to assess the information content of the Mise-á-la-Masse dataset with respect to the groundwater field characteristics. The study shows how a combination of three-dimensional time-lapse modelling of flow, tracer transport and electrical current can substantially contribute towards a quantitative interpretation of Mise-á-la-Masse measurements during saline tracer tests. This approach can thus revive the use of Mise-á-la-Masse as a practical, low cost field technique for tracer test monitoring, particularly for shallow aquifers, providing critical information concerning the natural groundwater flow direction and velocity.

  17. Fluorescence time-lapse imaging of single cells targeted with a focused scanning charged-particle microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourret, Stéphane; Vianna, François; Devès, Guillaume; Atallah, Vincent; Moretto, Philippe; Seznec, Hervé; Barberet, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Charged particle microbeams provide unique features to study targeted and non-targeted radiation response and have recently emerged as a powerful tool to investigate radiation-induced DNA damage and repair. We have developed a charged particle microbeam delivering protons and alpha particles in the MeV energy range equipped with online time-lapse imaging capabilities. The beam is focused to a sub-micrometer beam spot under vacuum by means of a triplet of magnetic quadrupoles and extracted in air through a 200 nm Si3N4 window. The end-station is equipped with an automated fluorescence microscope used for single cell targeting and online time-lapse imaging. Cells are kept in their medium during the irradiation procedure and the sample temperature is regulated to 37 °C. An overall targeting accuracy of 2.0 ± 0.7 μm has been measured by tracking the re-localization of the XRCC1 protein. First measurements of this re-localization shows the ability of our system to follow online the radiation-induced re-localization of proteins in the first minutes after irradiation.

  18. On the possibility of time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography for bladder cancer grading

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhijia; Chen, Bai; Ren, Hugang; Pan, Yingtian

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the cellular details of bladder epithelium embedded in speckle noise can be uncovered with time-lapse ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (TL-uOCT) by proper time-lapse frame averaging that takes advantage of cellular micromotion in fresh biological tissue ex vivo. Here, spectral-domain 3-D TL-uOCT is reported to further improve the image fidelity, and new experimental evidence is presented to differentiate normal and cancerous nuclei of rodent bladder epithelia. Results of animal cancer study reveal that despite a slight overestimation (e.g., <10%) of nuclear size (DN) to histological evaluation, TL-uOCT is capable of distinguishing normal (DN≈7 μm) and cancerous (e.g., high-grade DN″≈13 μm) urothelia, which may potentially be very useful for enhancing the diagnosis of nonpapillary bladder cancer. More animal study is being conducted to examine the utility to differentiate hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. PMID:19895098

  19. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  20. Time-lapse imaging of primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah L; Cabrera, M Carla; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Furth, Priscilla A

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to compare behavior of cultured primary preneoplastic mammary epithelial cells derived from different genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer. For example, time between cell divisions (cell lifetimes), apoptotic cell numbers, evolution of morphological changes, and mechanism of colony formation can be quantified and compared in cells carrying specific genetic lesions. Primary mammary epithelial cell cultures are generated from mammary glands without palpable tumor. Glands are carefully resected with clear separation from adjacent muscle, lymph nodes are removed, and single-cell suspensions of enriched mammary epithelial cells are generated by mincing mammary tissue followed by enzymatic dissociation and filtration. Single-cell suspensions are plated and placed directly under a microscope within an incubator chamber for live-cell imaging. Sixteen 650 μm x 700 μm fields in a 4x4 configuration from each well of a 6-well plate are imaged every 15 min for 5 days. Time-lapse images are examined directly to measure cellular behaviors that can include mechanism and frequency of cell colony formation within the first 24 hr of plating the cells (aggregation versus cell proliferation), incidence of apoptosis, and phasing of morphological changes. Single-cell tracking is used to generate cell fate maps for measurement of individual cell lifetimes and investigation of cell division patterns. Quantitative data are statistically analyzed to assess for significant differences in behavior correlated with specific genetic lesions. PMID:23425702

  1. Optical Flow Applied to Time-Lapse Image Series to Estimate Glacier Motion in the Southern Patagonia Ice Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannutti, E.; Lenzano, M. G.; Toth, C.; Lenzano, L.; Rivera, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we assessed the feasibility of using optical flow to obtain the motion estimation of a glacier. In general, former investigations used to detect glacier changes involve solutions that require repeated observations which are many times based on extensive field work. Taking into account glaciers are usually located in geographically complex and hard to access areas, deploying time-lapse imaging sensors, optical flow may provide an efficient solution at good spatial and temporal resolution to describe mass motion. Several studies in computer vision and image processing community have used this method to detect large displacements. Therefore, we carried out a test of the proposed Large Displacement Optical Flow method at the Viedma Glacier, located at South Patagonia Icefield, Argentina. We collected monoscopic terrestrial time-lapse imagery, acquired by a calibrated camera at every 24 hour from April 2014 until April 2015. A filter based on temporal correlation and RGB color discretization between the images was applied to minimize errors related to changes in lighting, shadows, clouds and snow. This selection allowed discarding images that do not follow a sequence of similarity. Our results show a flow field in the direction of the glacier movement with acceleration in the terminus. We analyzed the errors between image pairs, and the matching generally appears to be adequate, although some areas show random gross errors related to the presence of changes in lighting. The proposed technique allowed the determination of glacier motion during one year, providing accurate and reliable motion data for subsequent analysis.

  2. Understanding infiltration and groundwater flow at an artificial recharge facility using time-lapse gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey

    Groundwater provides a fundamental resource for modern life. Throughout the world, groundwater is managed by storing (recharging) it underground in natural aquifers for future withdrawal and consumptive use. In Arizona, over 4 million people benefit from managed aquifer storage, but little effort is made to track the movement of recharged water through the subsurface. Motivated by current limitations in our ability to monitor percolation and groundwater movement at the scale of a recharge facility, an effort to collect time-lapse gravity data was carried out at the Southern Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) operated by the City of Tucson, Arizona. In addition to collecting water-level data 12 wells, there were three primary gravity experiments: (1) five continuously-recording gravity meters (2 iGrav superconducting gravity meters and 3 gPhone gravity meters) were installed semi-permanently in control buildings adjacent to the recharge basins, (2) absolute gravity measurements were made at nine locations over a 17 month period, and (3) three relative-gravity campaigns were carried out on a network of 70 stations. This large-scale controlled experiment, with known infiltration and pumping rates, resulted in one of the most comprehensive datasets of its kind. Gravity data led to several hydrologic insights, both through direct measurement and modeling. First, the infiltration rate could be estimated accurately based on the initial rate of gravity change during infiltration, regardless of the specific yield. Using two gravity meters, the depth, and therefore speed, of the wetting front beneath a recharge basin was observed, including the time at which the water table was reached. Spatial maps of gravity change from relative gravity surveys show areas where infiltration efficiency is highest, and where groundwater accumulates; storage accumulated preferentially to the west of the recharge basins, away from pumping wells. Such information would be

  3. Intense dust episodes in the Mediterranean and possible effects on atmospheric lapse rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Gkikas, Antonis; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gavrouzou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Dust aerosols are major contributor to the atmospheric particulate matter, having significant effects on climate and weather patterns as well as on human health, not to mention others like agriculture or ocean chlorophyll. Moreover, these effects are maximized under conditions of massive dust concentration in the atmosphere, namely dust episodes or events. Such events are caused by uplifting and transport of dust from arid and semi-arid areas under favorable synoptic conditions. The Mediterranean basin, nearby to the greatest world deserts of North Africa and Middle East, frequently undergoes dust episodes. During such Mediterranean episodes, the number and mass concentration of dust is high, due to the proximity of its source areas. The dust episodes, through the direct interaction of dust primarily withthe shortwave but also with longwave radiation can lead to strong local warming in the atmosphere, possibly causing temperature inversion during daytime. The existence of such temperature inversions, associated with intense dust episodes in the Mediterranean, is the focus in this study. The methodology followed to achieve the scientific goal of the study consists in the use of a synergy of different data. This synergy enables: (i) the determination of intense dust episodes over the Mediterranean, (ii) the investigation and specification of temperature lapse rates and inversions during the days of dust episodes and (iii) the identification of vertical distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere over specific locations during the days of the episodes. These objectives are achieved through the use of data from: (i) the AERosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) network, (ii) the Upper Air Observations (radiosondes) database of the University of Wyoming (UoW) and (iii) the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) database. The study period spans the years from 2000 to 2013, constrained by the data availability of the databases. A key element of the methodology is the

  4. Separating climate change signals into thermodynamic, lapse-rate and circulation effects: theory and application to the European summer climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröner, Nico; Kotlarski, Sven; Fischer, Erich; Lüthi, Daniel; Zubler, Elias; Schär, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Climate models robustly project a strong overall summer warming across Europe showing a characteristic north-south gradient with enhanced warming and drying in southern Europe. However, the processes that are responsible for this pattern are not fully understood. We here employ an extended surrogate or pseudo-warming approach to disentangle the contribution of different mechanisms to this response pattern. The basic idea of the surrogate technique is to use a regional climate model and apply a large-scale warming to the lateral boundary conditions of a present-day reference simulation, while maintaining the relative humidity (and thus implicitly increasing the specific moisture content). In comparison to previous studies, our approach includes two important extensions: first, different vertical warming profiles are applied in order to separate the effects of a mean warming from lapse-rate effects. Second, a twin-design is used, in which the climate change signals are not only added to present-day conditions, but also subtracted from a scenario experiment. We demonstrate that these extensions provide an elegant way to separate the full climate change signal into contributions from large-scale thermodynamic (TD), lapse-rate (LR), and circulation and other remaining effects (CO). The latter in particular include changes in land-ocean contrast and spatial variations of the SST warming patterns. We find that the TD effect yields a large-scale warming across Europe with no distinct latitudinal gradient. The LR effect, which is quantified for the first time in our study, leads to a stronger warming and some drying in southern Europe. It explains about 50 % of the warming amplification over the Iberian Peninsula, thus demonstrating the important role of lapse-rate changes. The effect is linked to an extending Hadley circulation. The CO effect as inherited from the driving GCM is shown to further amplify the north-south temperature change gradient. In terms of mean summer

  5. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Z; Terry, N; Hubbard, S S; Csatho, B

    2013-02-12

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability distribution functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSim) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes

  6. Entropy-Bayesian Inversion of Time-Lapse Tomographic GPR data for Monitoring Dielectric Permittivity and Soil Moisture Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Terry, Neil C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-02-22

    In this study, we evaluate the possibility of monitoring soil moisture variation using tomographic ground penetrating radar travel time data through Bayesian inversion, which is integrated with entropy memory function and pilot point concepts, as well as efficient sampling approaches. It is critical to accurately estimate soil moisture content and variations in vadose zone studies. Many studies have illustrated the promise and value of GPR tomographic data for estimating soil moisture and associated changes, however, challenges still exist in the inversion of GPR tomographic data in a manner that quantifies input and predictive uncertainty, incorporates multiple data types, handles non-uniqueness and nonlinearity, and honors time-lapse tomograms collected in a series. To address these challenges, we develop a minimum relative entropy (MRE)-Bayesian based inverse modeling framework that non-subjectively defines prior probabilities, incorporates information from multiple sources, and quantifies uncertainty. The framework enables us to estimate dielectric permittivity at pilot point locations distributed within the tomogram, as well as the spatial correlation range. In the inversion framework, MRE is first used to derive prior probability density functions (pdfs) of dielectric permittivity based on prior information obtained from a straight-ray GPR inversion. The probability distributions are then sampled using a Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, and the sample sets provide inputs to a sequential Gaussian simulation (SGSIM) algorithm that constructs a highly resolved permittivity/velocity field for evaluation with a curved-ray GPR forward model. The likelihood functions are computed as a function of misfits, and posterior pdfs are constructed using a Gaussian kernel. Inversion of subsequent time-lapse datasets combines the Bayesian estimates from the previous inversion (as a memory function) with new data. The memory function and pilot point design takes advantage of

  7. Modeling of time-lapse seismic reflection data from CO2 sequestration at West Pearl Queen Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, L. C.; Haney, M. M.; Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Elbring, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs, saline aquifers, or unminable coal sequences may prove to be an economical and environmentally safe means for long-term removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Requirements for storage of CO2 in subsurface geologic repositories (e.g., less than 0.1% per year leakage) pose significant challenges for geophysical remote sensing techniques. The many issues relevant to successful CO2 sequestration (volume in place, migration, leakage rate) require improved understanding of the advantages and pitfalls of potential monitoring methods. Advanced numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic reflection responses offers a controlled environment for testing hypotheses and exploring alternatives. The U.S. Department of Energy has conducted CO2 sequestration and monitoring tests at West Pearl Queen (WPQ) field in southeastern New Mexico. High-quality 9C/3D seismic reflection data were acquired before and after injection of ~2 kt of CO2 into a depleted sandstone unit at ~4200 ft depth. Images developed from time- lapse seismic data appear to reveal strong reflectivity changes attributed to displacement of brine by CO2. We are pursuing seismic numerical modeling studies with the goal of understanding and assessing the reliability and robustness of the time-lapse reflection responses. A 3D time-domain finite-difference isotropic elastic wave propagation algorithm generates realistic synthetic data. With this capability, we examine how various types of errors and noise in the 4D data degrade the ability to image a deep CO2 plume. Source/receiver sampling, subsurface illumination, correlated geologic heterogeneity, and static shifts are considered. As a result, we are able to make quantitative estimates of the tolerable errors for monitoring CO2 injection at WPQ field. Future plans include incorporating 3D poroelastic wave propagation modeling into the analysis. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram science and engineering facility

  8. Highlights from the SoilCAM project: Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Toscano, G.

    2012-04-01

    The SoilCAM project (Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring 2008-2012, EU-FP7-212663) is aimed at improving current methods for monitoring contaminant distribution and biodegradation in the subsurface. At two test sites, Oslo airport Gardermoen in Norway and the Trecate site in Italy, a number of geophysical techniques, lysimeter and other soil and water sampling techniques as well as numerical flow and transport modelling have been combined at different scales in order to characterise flow transport processes in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Laboratory experiments have provided data on physical and bio-geo-chemical parameters for use in models and to select remediation methods. The geophysical techniques were used to map geological heterogeneities and also conduct time-lapse measurements of processes in the unsaturated zone. Both cross borehole and surface electrodes were used for electrical resistivity and induced polarisation surveys. The geophysical surveys showed clear indications of areas highly affected by de-icing chemicals along the runway at Oslo airport. The time lapse measurements along the runway at the airport show infiltration patterns during snowmelt and are used to validate 2D unsaturated flow and transport simulations using SUTRA. The Orchestra model is used to describe the complex interaction between bio-geo-chemical processes in a 1D profile along the runway. The presence of installations such as a membrane along the runway highly affects the flow pattern and challenges the capacity of the numerical code. Smaller scale field site measurements have revealed the increase of iron and manganese during degradation of de-icing chemicals. The use of Nitrate to increase red-ox potential was tested, but results have not been analysed yet. So far it cannot be concluded that degradation process can be quantified indirectly by geophysical monitoring. At the Trecate site a combination of georadar, electrical

  9. Identifying unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters using integrated hydrogeophysical inversion approach on time-lapse ground-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadoon, K. Z.; Weihermüller, L.; Scharnagl, B.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Bechtold, M.; Hubbard, S. S.; Vereecken, H.; Lambot, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has proven to have a great potential for high resolution, non-invasive mapping of the soil hydrogeophysical properties at the scale of interest. Common GPR techniques are usually based on ray-based travel time or reflection analyses to retrieve soil dielectric permittivity, which is strongly correlated to soil water content. These methods suffer, however, from two major limitations. First, only a part of the information in the GPR signal is considered (e.g., propagation time). Second, the forward model describing the radar data is subject to relatively strong simplifications with respect to electromagnetic wave propagation phenomena. These limitations typically results in errors in the reconstructed water content images and, moreover, this does not permit to exploit all information contained in the radar data. We explored an alternative method by using full-waveform hydrogeophysical inversion of time-lapse, proximal GPR data to remotely estimate the unsaturated soil hydraulic properties. The radar system is based on international standard vector network analyzer technology and a full-waveform model is used to describe wave propagation in the antenna-air-soil system, including antenna-soil interactions. A hydrodynamic model is used to constrain the inverse electromagnetic problem in reconstructing continuous vertical water content profiles. In that case the estimated parameters reduce to the soil hydraulic properties, thereby strongly reducing the dimensionality of the inverse problem. In this study, we present an application of the proposed method to a data set collected in a field experiment. The GPR model involves a full-waveform frequency-domain solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The hydrodynamic model used in this work is based on a one-dimensional solution of Richards equation and the hydrological simulator HYDRUS 1-D was used with a single- and dual

  10. Rapid and retrievable recording of big data of time-lapse 3D shadow images of microbial colonies.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Nasu, Senshi; Takeshige, Motomu; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    We formerly developed an automatic colony count system based on the time-lapse shadow image analysis (TSIA). Here this system has been upgraded and applied to practical rapid decision. A microbial sample was spread on/in an agar plate with 90 mm in diameter as homogeneously as possible. We could obtain the results with several strains that most of colonies appeared within a limited time span. Consequently the number of colonies reached a steady level (Nstdy) and then unchanged until the end of long culture time to give the confirmed value (Nconf). The equivalence of Nstdy and Nconf as well as the difference of times for Nstdy and Nconf determinations were statistically significant at p < 0.001. Nstdy meets the requirement of practical routines treating a large number of plates. The difference of Nstdy and Nconf, if any, may be elucidated by means of retrievable big data. Therefore Nconf is valid for official documentation. PMID:25975590

  11. Do animal models provide a valid analogue for human drug lapse and relapse? Comment on Leri and Stewart (2002).

    PubMed

    Marlatt, G Alan

    2002-11-01

    Prior research on animal models of drug relapse has demonstrated that passive exposure to an addictive substance following acquisition and extinction of drug self-administration has a "priming effect" on subsequent drug use. The validity of this animal analogue of human relapse can be criticized, however, because most human drug relapses are precipitated by the user's voluntary self-administration of a substance. The results of the present study by F. Leri and J. Stewart (2002) clearly show that if the initial heroin lapse is self-administered by rats, subsequent heroin seeking during the relapse test is significantly greater than if the heroin is externally administered. These results help bridge the gap between animal and human models of drug use and highlight the significance of both behavioral and environmental determinants of relapse. PMID:12498331

  12. Validation of snow depth reconstruction from lapse-rate webcam images against terrestrial laser scanner measurements in centrel Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revuelto, Jesús; Jonas, Tobias; López-Moreno, Juan Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Snow distribution in mountain areas plays a key role in many processes as runoff dynamics, ecological cycles or erosion rates. Nevertheless, the acquisition of high resolution snow depth data (SD) in space-time is a complex task that needs the application of remote sensing techniques as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS). Such kind of techniques requires intense field work for obtaining high quality snowpack evolution during a specific time period. Combining TLS data with other remote sensing techniques (satellite images, photogrammetry…) and in-situ measurements could represent an improvement of the available information of a variable with rapid topographic changes. The aim of this study is to reconstruct daily SD distribution from lapse-rate images from a webcam and data from two to three TLS acquisitions during the snow melting periods of 2012, 2013 and 2014. This information is obtained at Izas Experimental catchment in Central Spanish Pyrenees; a catchment of 33ha, with an elevation ranging from 2050 to 2350m a.s.l. The lapse-rate images provide the Snow Covered Area (SCA) evolution at the study site, while TLS allows obtaining high resolution information of SD distribution. With ground control points, lapse-rate images are georrectified and their information is rasterized into a 1-meter resolution Digital Elevation Model. Subsequently, for each snow season, the Melt-Out Date (MOD) of each pixel is obtained. The reconstruction increases the estimated SD lose for each time step (day) in a distributed manner; starting the reconstruction for each grid cell at the MOD (note the reverse time evolution). To do so, the reconstruction has been previously adjusted in time and space as follows. Firstly, the degree day factor (SD lose/positive average temperatures) is calculated from the information measured at an automatic weather station (AWS) located in the catchment. Afterwards, comparing the SD lose at the AWS during a specific time period (i.e. between two TLS

  13. A BETHNIC BIOASSAY USING TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY TO MEASURE THE EFFECT OF TOXICANTS ON THE FEEDING BEHAVIOR OF LUGWORMS (POLYCHAETA:ARENICOLIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A benthic assay was developed utilizing time-lapse photography to measure the feeding activity of a lugworm, Arenicola cristata. Automated 35 mm cameras were used to record formation of feeding funnels at 12-hour intervals. Substrate surface area reworked by lugworms held under i...

  14. Monitoring channel head erosion processes in response to an artificially induced abrupt base level change using time-lapse photography 2301

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Headcut and channel extension in response to an abrupt base level change in 2004 of approximately 1m was studied in a 1.29 ha semiarid headwater drainage on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona, USA. Field observations and time-lapse photography were coupled with hy...

  15. Stimulant Treatment Reduces Lapses in Attention among Children with ADHD: The Effects of Methylphenidate on Intra-Individual Response Time Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Sarah V.; Hawk, Larry W., Jr.; Richards, Jerry B.; Shiels, Keri; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Waxmonsky, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that intra-individual variability in reaction time (RT) distributions of children with ADHD is characterized by a particularly large rightward skew that may reflect lapses in attention. The purpose of the study was to provide the first randomized, placebo-controlled test of the effects of the stimulant methylphenidate…

  16. Time-lapse Monitoring of Two-dimensional Non-uniform Unsaturated Flow Processes Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, B. A.; Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in the vadose zone often manifests as preferential flow resulting in transport of water and solutes through the soil much faster than would occur for uniform matrix flow. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) monitoring shows significant potential for identifying the presence of non-uniform flow and quantitative monitoring of the hydrologic response of a soil system. We investigate non-uniform flow in the vadose zone for an infiltration experiment performed in a 60 cm deep sand-filled tank that is continuously monitored with 1000 MHz reflection GPR. During the experiment, 100 constant offset and 300 common mid-point (CMP) time-lapse radar profiles were collected using an automated gantry system to rapidly position the antennas, allowing for a set of 1 constant offset and 3 CMP profiles to be collected every 13 seconds. The constant offset profiles were interpreted to evaluate spatial and temporal changes of reflected arrivals over the course of the experiment, whereas the CMPs were used to estimate the initial EM wave velocity in the tanks using a normal moveout analysis. Changes in traveltime to a static reflector were used to estimate spatial changes in velocity and to create two-dimensional velocity models. The GPR data were then migrated using the estimated 2D velocity model to improve GPR reflection images, which could then be interpreted to identify evidence of non-uniform flow phenomena. To verify the approach, the methodology was also applied to GPR data simulated using transient water contents generated by the unsaturated flow simulator HYDRUS2D given lab-measured hydraulic properties for the soil. For both the empirical and simulated data, we found that the 2D velocity analysis was effective in monitoring changes in the wetting front and that migration of the reflection profiles was able to improve the interpretation of non-uniform flow.

  17. Technical Note: Semi-automated classification of time-lapse RGB imagery for a remote Greenlandic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-01-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwest Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two RGB cameras were installed in July of 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g. shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6%) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10% of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  18. Technical Note: Semi-automated effective width extraction from time-lapse RGB imagery of a remote, braided Greenlandic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, C. J.; Smith, L. C.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Chu, V. W.

    2015-06-01

    River systems in remote environments are often challenging to monitor and understand where traditional gauging apparatus are difficult to install or where safety concerns prohibit field measurements. In such cases, remote sensing, especially terrestrial time-lapse imaging platforms, offer a means to better understand these fluvial systems. One such environment is found at the proglacial Isortoq River in southwestern Greenland, a river with a constantly shifting floodplain and remote Arctic location that make gauging and in situ measurements all but impossible. In order to derive relevant hydraulic parameters for this river, two true color (RGB) cameras were installed in July 2011, and these cameras collected over 10 000 half hourly time-lapse images of the river by September of 2012. Existing approaches for extracting hydraulic parameters from RGB imagery require manual or supervised classification of images into water and non-water areas, a task that was impractical for the volume of data in this study. As such, automated image filters were developed that removed images with environmental obstacles (e.g., shadows, sun glint, snow) from the processing stream. Further image filtering was accomplished via a novel automated histogram similarity filtering process. This similarity filtering allowed successful (mean accuracy 79.6 %) supervised classification of filtered images from training data collected from just 10 % of those images. Effective width, a hydraulic parameter highly correlated with discharge in braided rivers, was extracted from these classified images, producing a hydrograph proxy for the Isortoq River between 2011 and 2012. This hydrograph proxy shows agreement with historic flooding observed in other parts of Greenland in July 2012 and offers promise that the imaging platform and processing methodology presented here will be useful for future monitoring studies of remote rivers.

  19. Time-lapse ERT and DTS for seasonal and short-term monitoring of an alpine river hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Laura, Busato; Mariateresa, Perri; Giorgio, Cassiani

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the area located beneath and adjacent to rivers and streams, where the interactions between surface water and groundwater take place. This complex physical domain allows the transport of several substances from a stream to the unconfined aquifer below, and vice versa, thus playing a fundamental role in the river ecosystem. The importance of the hyporheic zone makes its characterization a goal shared by several disciplines, which range from applied geophysics to biogeochemistry, from hydraulics to ecology. The frontier field of HZ characterization stays in applied non-invasive methodologies as Electrical Resistivity Tomography - ERT - and Distributed Temperature Sensing - DTS. ERT is commonly applied in cross-well configuration or with a superficial electrodes deployment while DTS is used in hydro-geophysics in the last decade, revealing a wide applicability to the typical issues of this field of study. DTS for hydro-geophysics studies is based on Raman scattering and employs heat as tracer and uses a fiber-optic cable to acquire temperature values. We applied both techniques for an alpine river case studies located in Val di Sole, TN, Italy. The collected measurements allow high-resolution characterization of the hyporheic zone, overcoming the critical problem of invasive measurements under riverbeds. In this work, we present the preliminary results regarding the characterization of the hyporheic zone of the alpine river obtained combining ERT and DTS time-lapse measurements. The data collection benefits from an innovative instrumentation deployment, which consists of both an ERT multicore cable and a DTS fiber-optic located in two separated boreholes drilled 5m under the watercourse and perpendicular to it. In particular we present the first year monitoring results and a short time-lapse monitoring experiment conducted during summer 2015. The site and the results here described are part of the EU FP7 CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the

  20. Application of an extended Kalman filter approach to inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging data for monitoring recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenna, Vanessa; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2011-10-01

    We apply an extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach to inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) field data. The EKF is a method of time series signal processing that incorporates both a state evolution model, describing changes in the physical system, and an observation model, incorporating the physics of the electrical resistivity measurement. We test the feasibility of using an EKF approach to inverting ERI data collected with 2-D surface array geometries. As a first test, we invert synthetic data generated using a simulated recharge event and water saturation distributions converted to electrical conductivity values using an Archie's law relationship. In the synthetic example we demonstrate the impact that the noise structure of the state evolution and the regularization weight have on EKF-estimated model parameters and errors. We then apply the method to inversion of field data collected to monitor changes in electrical conductivity beneath a recharge pond that is part of an aquifer storage and recovery project in northern California. Using lines of electrodes buried at a depth of 0.25 m when the base of the pond is dry, we monitor the wetting front associated with the diversion of stormflow runoff to the pond. Using field data, we demonstrate that by oversampling in time, we are able to apply the so-called random walk model for the state evolution and to build the model of observation noise directly from collected data. EKF-estimated values track changes in conductivity associated with both increasing water content in subsurface sediments and changes in the properties of the pore water, showing the method is a feasible approach for inversion of time-lapse ERI field data.

  1. Monitoring the geothermal fluid using time lapse electrical resistivity tomography: The Pisciarelli fumarolic field test site (Campi Flegrei, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Alessandro; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Somma, Reanto; Caputo, Teresa; Patella, Domenico; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Pisciarelli area is a fumarolic field subject to very short time morphological changes. A number of critical problems affect this area, i.e. increase of temperature of the fumaroles above the average background temperature, local seismicity and occurrence of fumaroles mixed with jets of boiling water. The presence of a very shallow aquifer seem to have the control on the behavior and composition of the fumaroles. This fumarolic field is still largely unknown regarding geophysical surveys mainly because of its limited space, surrounded on the eastern side by intense urbanization inside the large Agnano crater (Troiano et al. 2014). Currently is mainly affected by geochemical, thermal and seismic monitoring which may not fully explain the behaviour of fluids surface. Many monitoring or time lapse (TL) applications are discussed in literature (e.g., White, 1994; Daily et al., 1995; Barker and Moore, 1998; Ramirez and Daily, 2001; Carter, 2002; Slater et al., 2002; Singha and Gorelick, 2005; Cassiani et al., 2006; Swarzenski et al., 2006; de Franco et al., 2009). However all these experiments are devoted to the use of the ERT for tracer tests or in contaminant hydrology and are characterized by a short monitoring period due to the complexity and problems of long-time instrument maintenance. We propose and present a first approach of a geophysical monitoring by time lapse electrical resistivity in a fumarolic field. The profiles were acquired in January 2013, in January, March, May, July, September and November 2014 respectively. They cross the Pisciarelli area following approximately the NS direction and were characterized by a 2.5 m electrode spacing and maximum penetration depth of about 20 m. and will supply fundamental evidences on the possible seasonal resistivity fluctuations or if the resistivity changes are indicative of an increase in volcanic gases present in the hydrothermal system.

  2. Pembina Cardium CO2-EOR monitoring project: Integrated surface seismic and VSP time-lapse seismic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshuhail, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the Pembina field in west-central Alberta, Canada, approximately 40,000 tons of supercritical CO2 was injected into the 1650 m deep, 20 m thick upper-Cretaceous Cardium Fm. between March 2005 and 2007. A time-lapse seismic program was designed and incorporated into the overall measurement, monitoring and verification program. The objectives were to track the CO2 plume within the reservoir, and to evaluate the integrity of storage. Fluid replacement modeling predicts a decrease in the P-wave velocity and bulk density in the reservoir by about 4% and 1%, respectively. Synthetic seismograms show subtle reflectivity changes at the Cardium Fm. and a traveltime delay at the later high-amplitude Viking event of less than 1 ms. The time-lapse datasets, however, show no significant anomalies in the P-wave seismic data that can be attributed to supercritical CO2 injected into the Cardium Fm. (Figure 1). The converted-wave (P-S) data, on the other hand, showed small traveltime anomalies. The most coherent results were those obtained by the fixed-array VSP dataset (Figure 2) due to higher frequency bandwidth and high signal to noise ratio. The amplitude and traveltime changes observed in the VSP dataset are small but are consistent in magnitude with those predicted from rock physics modeling. The analysis suggests that the inability to clearly detect the CO2 plume in surface seismic data is likely due to the CO2 being contained in thin permeable sandstone members of the Cardium Formation. The seismic signature of the Cardium Fm. in this area may also be degraded by multiples and strong attenuation involving the shallow Ardley coals. However, the lack of a 4D seismic changes above the reservoir indicates that the injected CO2 is not migrating through the caprock into shallower formations.

  3. Acute effects of low and high dose alcohol on smoking lapse behavior in a laboratory analogue task

    PubMed Central

    Kahler, Christopher W.; Metrik, Jane; Spillane, Nichea S.; Day, Anne; Leventhal, Adam M.; McKee, Sherry A.; Tidey, Jennifer W.; McGeary, John E.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Smoking lapses (i.e., returns to smoking after quitting) often occur following alcohol consumption with observational data suggesting greater quantities of alcohol lead to greater risk. However, a causal dose-dependent effect of alcohol consumption on smoking lapse behavior has not been established, and the mechanisms that might account for such an effect have not been tested. Objectives In a within-subjects design, we examined effects of low (0.4 g/kg) and high (0.8 g/kg) dose alcohol, relative to placebo, on smokers’ ability to resist initiating smoking after acute smoking abstinence. Methods Participants were 100 heavy alcohol drinkers, smoking 10–30 cigarettes per day. Across three separate days, participants consumed placebo, low, or high dose alcohol following 3 h of smoking abstinence, and 35 min later were offered the opportunity to smoke while resisting smoking was monetarily reinforced proportional to the amount of time delayed. Results Consistent with a dose-response effect, participants smoked 3.35 min (95% CI [−7.09, 0.40], p=.08) earlier following low dose alcohol and 6.36 min (95% CI [−9.99, −2.73], p=.0006) earlier following high dose alcohol compared to drinking a placebo beverage. Effects of dose on smoking behavior were partially mediated by increases in urge to smoke. There was no evidence that alcohol’s effects on urge to smoke or ability to resist smoking were mediated through its stimulating or sedating effects. Conclusions Alcohol can reduce the ability to resist smoking in a dose-dependent fashion, in part, due to its effect on increasing the intensity of smoking urges. PMID:24858377

  4. Analysis of Snow Line and Albedo Conditions By Means of Time-Lapse Photography on Tapado Glacier, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivero, S.; MacDonell, S.; McPhee, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In the semiarid Coquimbo Region of Chile, high-altitude glaciers and seasonal snow are important sources of freshwater for irrigated agriculture and urban consumption. Due to the aridity of the environment, losses due to sublimation are large which means that accurate melt modelling is essential in order to reliably estimate streamflow. Since 2008, the CEAZA glaciology group has been studying the energy and mass balance of the largest glacier in the catchment, the Tapado Glacier using field and remote sensing measurements, and numerical modelling. The Tapado glacier system (30°08' S, 69°55' W) is a complex assemblage of uncovered and debris-covered ice located at the head of the Elqui basin between 4500 and 5536 m a.s.l. Energy balance modelling studies at the site have been limited in scope due to the development of ice pinnacles or penitentes on snow and ice surfaces. These features complicate energy distribution across the surface, due to modifications of parameters such as albedo. In this paper, we use time-lapse photography and automatic weather station (AWS) measurements to investigate how the development of penitentes impacts the spatial and temporal variability of albedo across the glacier surface and whether terrestrial photography is appropriate for use at such locations. Oblique photographs obtained from a high vantage point were georeferenced using a high resolution digital elevation model available for the entire glacier and its environs. By comparing the photographic data with point albedo measurements made at an AWS, distributed albedo maps were produced. Preliminary results suggest that distributed albedo values may be underestimated by the formation and development of penitentes during the ablation season. Moreover, it was observed that the evolution of the snow line during summer was not only topographically controlled but also modified by occasional convective snowfalls. Time-lapse photography provided to be a cost-effective tool for monitoring

  5. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  6. Calibration of a distributed ablation model for Zhadang Glacier, Tibetan Plateau,using a time lapse camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Huintjes, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sauter, T.; Yang, W.; Bolch, T.; Pieczonka, T.; Maussion, F.; Kang, S.; Buchroithner, M.; Scherer, D.; Yao, T.

    2011-12-01

    A 1-dimensional energy balance model for calculation of snow melt including sub-surface refreezing has been applied in a simplified version for distributed ablation modeling on Zhadang Glacier, Nyainqentanglha Range, Tibetan Plateau. The model includes a distributed computation of short-wave radiation on a digital elevation model. Reduction of short-wave radiation due to cloud cover has been accounted for by comparing calculated radiation against measurements at an automatic weather station (AWS) on the glacier. Air temperature was distributed using the lapse rate as derived from AWS measurements in different altitudes along the Zhadang Valley. Specific humidity and wind speed were assumed to be spatially invariant. Also, ice temperature in spring at 10 m depth was assumed to be equal all over the glacier. In the same way, accumulation as measured at the AWS using an ultra-sonic ranging system was assumed to be the same for the whole glacier surface. Snow accumulation was corrected using daily imagery obtained from an automatic time lapse camera system installed outside the glacier. The same time series of pictures allows for detailed spatial and temporal observation of the transient snow line. Gaps in AWS data are filled by downscaling of the output of WRF numerical atmospheric model output to the AWS location on the glacier. The runs of the ablation model are initialized using spatially distributed snow depth measured at a series of ablation stakes on the glacier. From the model results the location of the transient snow line can be precisely located. The findings are compared to the transient snow line as derived from the picture series. Besides the possibility of post-calibrating the spatially distributed ablation model, the results of this approach also allow for identifying further relevant spatial processes that are not yet considered.

  7. Characteristics of liquid product from the pyrolysis of waste plastic mixture at low and high temperatures: Influence of lapse time of reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyong-Hwan . E-mail: khwanlee@kier.re.kr; Shin, Dae-Hyun

    2007-07-01

    Pyrolysis of a waste plastic mixture (high-density polyethylene: low-density polyethylene: polypropylene: polystyrene = 3:2:3:1) into a liquid product was carried out in a stirred semi-batch reactor at low (350 deg. C) and high (400 deg. C) temperatures. The effect of lapse time of reaction in the reactor and also degradation temperature on the characteristics of the liquid product from pyrolysis of the mixture was investigated. Liquid products were described by cumulative amount distribution, paraffin, olefin, naphthene and aromatic (PONA) distribution and molecular weight distribution. Their characteristic was quite differed with a lapse time of reaction and also at a low and high degradation temperatures, because of the different physicochemical properties of the plastic types in the mixture. With increase of lapse time of reaction, the order for the main products in PONA components obtained at 350 deg. C was firstly aromatic products and then olefin products, while at 400 deg. C the order was firstly aromatic products, then olefin products and finally paraffin products. The experiments also showed from the molecular weight distribution of liquid PONA components that the paraffin and olefin products had a wide distribution by mainly random scission of polymer, but in the case of olefin products were produced by an end-chain scission mechanism as well as random scission mechanism, as evidenced by much more light olefin products. This phenomenon was evident at a higher degradation temperature. Also, both the light olefin and naphthene products with a molecular weight of around 120, as a main product, showed a similar trend as a function of lapse time, which had a maximum fraction at 343 min (at 350 deg. C) and 83 min (at 400 deg. C). Among PONA components, the highest concentrations of aromatic products were obtained with a molecular weight of around 100 at the fastest lapse time of reaction, regardless of degradation temperature. It was concluded that the

  8. CO2 mass estimation visible in time-lapse 3D seismic data from a saline aquifer and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A.; Lueth, S.; Bergmann, P.; Ivandic, M.

    2014-12-01

    At Ketzin (Germany) the first European onshore pilot scale project for geological storage of CO2 was initiated in 2004. This project is multidisciplinary and includes 3D time-lapse seismic monitoring. A 3D pre-injection seismic survey was acquired in 2005. Then CO2 injection into a sandstone saline aquifer started at a depth of 650 m in 2008. A 1st 3D seismic repeat survey was acquired in 2009 after 22 kilotons had been injected. The imaged CO2 signature was concentrated around the injection well (200-300 m). A 2nd 3D seismic repeat survey was acquired in 2012 after 61 kilotons had been injected. The imaged CO2 signature further extended (100-200 m). The injection was terminated in 2013. Totally 67 kilotons of CO2 were injected. Time-lapse seismic processing, petrophysical data and geophysical logging on CO2 saturation have allowed for an estimate of the amount of CO2 visible in the seismic data. This estimate is dependent upon a choice of a number of parameters and contains a number of uncertainties. The main uncertainties are following. The constant reservoir porosity and CO2 density used for the estimation are probably an over-simplification since the reservoir is quite heterogeneous. May be velocity dispersion is present in the Ketzin reservoir rocks, but we do not consider it to be large enough that it could affect the mass of CO2 in our estimation. There are only a small number of direct petrophysical observations, providing a weak statistical basis for the determination of seismic velocities based on CO2 saturation and we have assumed that the petrophysical experiments were carried out on samples that are representative for the average properties of the whole reservoir. Finally, the most of the time delay values in the both 3D seismic repeat surveys within the amplitude anomaly are near the noise level of 1-2 ms, however a change of 1 ms in the time delay affects significantly the mass estimate, thus the choice of the time-delay cutoff is crucial. In spite

  9. Field measurement of erosion rates: time-lapse monitoring of rapid stone flaking at Howden Minster, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehne, E.; Pinchin, S.

    2012-04-01

    The use of a solar-powered, field time-lapse camera and environmental monitoring system enabled measurements of the pattern and rate of loss of stone from the surface of Howden Minster, an abandoned monastery in Yorkshire dating to 1380 AD. Acquiring a photograph every 1-3 hours allowed the stone damage to be correlated with local environmental conditions. Image comparison techniques borrowed from observational astronomy, such as blink comparison, were used to determine what elements had changed from image to image. Results indicate that loss is episodic rather than continuous and in several cases is related to specific environmental conditions, such as condensation/dew formation or high winds. Damage was found also to be synchronous, with surface change (flaking, granular disintegration, and loss of flakes) occurring at the same time on different stone blocks. Crystallization pressure from magnesium sulfate phase transitions appear to be the main cause of the loss of stone surfaces. Significant variation in surface loss rates was observed and appears to be related to variations in salt concentration. An examination of stone texture by ESEM/EDS revealed signification variations and suggests that salt concentrations are controlled in part by stone micromorphology. Quantitative data on rates of surface loss are not available from most monuments. Time-lapse methods permit the relatively inexpensive acquisition of this type of data, which is needed to aid conservation decision-making and the evaluation of interventions. Such tools should also prove useful to geomorphologists studying honeycomb weathering, the moving rocks on Death Valley's Racetrack Playa, and other phenomena that are otherwise difficult to study. Context: The rapid deterioration of magnesian limestone structures in the north of England has been a serious problem for more than one hundred years. While air quality in England has improved during this period, the rate of stone loss in these carved stone

  10. Exploring what lies behind public preferences for avoiding health losses caused by lapses in healthcare safety and patient lifestyle choices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although many studies have identified public preferences for prioritising health care interventions based on characteristics of recipient or care, very few of them have examined the reasons for the stated preferences. We conducted an on-line person trade-off (PTO) study (N=1030) to investigate whether the public attach a premium to the avoidance of ill health associated with alternative types of responsibilities: lapses in healthcare safety, those caused by individual action or lifestyle choice; or genetic conditions. We found that the public gave higher priority to prevention of harm in a hospital setting such as preventing hospital associated infections than genetic disorder but drug administration errors were valued similar to genetic disorders. Prevention of staff injuries, lifestyle diseases and sports injuries, were given lower priority. In this paper we aim to understand the reasoning behind the responses by analysing comments provided by respondents to the PTO questions. Method A majority of the respondents who participated in the survey provided brief comments explaining preferences in free text responses following PTO questions. This qualitative data was transformed into explicit codes conveying similar meanings. An overall coding framework was developed and a reliability test was carried out. Recurrent patterns were identified in each preference group. Comments which challenged the assumptions of hypothetical scenarios were also investigated. Results NHS causation of illness and a duty of care were the most cited reasons to prioritise lapses in healthcare safety. Personal responsibility dominated responses for lifestyle related contexts, and many respondents mentioned that health loss was the result of the individual’s choice to engage in risky behaviour. A small proportion of responses questioned the assumptions underlying the PTO questions. However excluding these from the main analysis did not affect the conclusions. Conclusion Although

  11. Sequential digital elevation models of active lava flows from ground-based stereo time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a framework for deriving sequences of digital elevation models (DEMs) for the analysis of active lava flows using oblique stereo-pair time-lapse imagery. A photo-based technique was favoured over laser-based alternatives due to low equipment cost, high portability and capability for network expansion, with images of advancing flows captured by digital SLR cameras over durations of up to several hours. However, under typical field scale scenarios, relative camera orientations cannot be rigidly maintained (e.g. through the use of a stereo bar), preventing the use of standard stereo time-lapse processing software. Thus, we trial semi-automated DEM-sequence workflows capable of handling the small camera motions, variable image quality and restricted photogrammetric control that result from the practicalities of data collection at remote and hazardous sites. The image processing workflows implemented either link separate close-range photogrammetry and traditional stereo-matching software, or are integrated in a single software package based on structure-from-motion (SfM). We apply these techniques in contrasting case studies from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii and Mount Etna, Sicily, which differ in scale, duration and image texture. On Kilauea, the advance direction of thin fluid lava lobes was difficult to forecast, preventing good distribution of control. Consequently, volume changes calculated through the different workflows differed by ∼10% for DEMs (over ∼30 m2) that were captured once a minute for 37 min. On Mt. Etna, more predictable advance (∼3 m h-1 for ∼3 h) of a thicker, more viscous lava allowed robust control to be deployed and volumetric change results were generally within 5% (over ∼500 m2). Overall, the integrated SfM software was more straightforward to use and, under favourable conditions, produced results comparable to those from the close-range photogrammetry pipeline. However, under conditions with limited options for photogrammetric

  12. 4D Time-Lapse Seismic Analysis of Active Gas Seepage Systems on the Vestnesa Ridge, Offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunz, S.; Hurter, S.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Mienert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Active gas venting occurs on the Vestnesa Ridge, an elongated sediment drift north of the Molloy Transform and just east of the Molloy Ridge, one of the shortest segments of the slow spreading North-Atlantic Ridge system. The crest of the Vestnesa Ridge at water depth between 1200-1300 m is pierced with fluid-flow features. Seafloor pockmarks vary in size up to 1 km in diameter with significant morphological features consisting of small ridges, diapiric structures and small pits. Detailed hydro-acoustic surveying shows that gas mostly emanates from the small-scale pits, where also hydrates have been recovered by sediment sampling. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data acquired in 2012 show vertical focused fluid flow features beneath the seafloor pockmarks. These co-called chimneys extend down to the free-gas zone underneath a bottom-simulating reflection (BSR). Here, they link up with small fault systems that might provide pathways to the deeper subsurface. The chimney features show a high variability in their acoustic characteristics with alternating blanked or masked zones and high-amplitude anomalies scattered through the whole vertical extent of the chimneys. The amplitude anomalies indicate high-impedance contrasts due to the likely presence of gas or a high-velocity material like gas hydrates or carbonates. In most cases, the high-amplitude anomalies line up along specific vertical pathways that connect nicely with the small-scale pits at the surface where gas bubbles seep from the seafloor. We re-acquired the 3D seismic survey in 2013 for time-lapse seismic studies in order to better understand the origin of the amplitude anomalies and in order to track potentially migrating gas fronts up along the chimney structure. The time-lapse seismic analysis indicates several areas, where gas migration may have led to changes in acoustic properties of the subsurface. These areas are located along chimney structures and the BSR. This work provides a basis for better

  13. An automatic time lapse camera setup for multi-vision 3D-reconstruction of morphological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Vláčilová, Markéta; Haas, Florian; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    In the cause of a five year monitoring campaign on an Alpine slope in the Lainbach catchment, Southern Germany, high erosion rates were documented by terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) and unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV). As a result of different denudation processes erosion rates differ between summer and winter periods. The latter became evident after comparing both TLS-measured time spans. However, process differentiation and their contribution to the overall denudation remained challenging due to the discontinuous data collection every few weeks. In order to record these erosion processes an array of four automatically triggered cameras was installed capturing frames in ten minutes time steps as long as there is daylight. This work in progress aims to produce long term time series of morphodynamic changes in an active catchment by applying multi-vision structure from motion algorithms from a set of four cameras. Geomorphic processes caused by special weather phenomena can thus be interpreted in combination with climatic data acquired right next to the slope. Preliminary model calculations from the chosen perspectives produced adequate results with point counts of around 5.5 Mio for the 120m² slope. The point density proved to be dependent on the weather conditions, thus foggy and dull images will be excluded. A validation of the approach will be achieved by comparison of the time lapse point clouds with the TLS scans and UAV surveys as the monitoring will continue.

  14. A generic methodological framework for studying single cell motility in high-throughput time-lapse data

    PubMed Central

    Schoenauer Sebag, Alice; Plancade, Sandra; Raulet-Tomkiewicz, Céline; Barouki, Robert; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Walter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Motility is a fundamental cellular attribute, which plays a major part in processes ranging from embryonic development to metastasis. Traditionally, single cell motility is often studied by live cell imaging. Yet, such studies were so far limited to low throughput. To systematically study cell motility at a large scale, we need robust methods to quantify cell trajectories in live cell imaging data. Results: The primary contribution of this article is to present Motility study Integrated Workflow (MotIW), a generic workflow for the study of single cell motility in high-throughput time-lapse screening data. It is composed of cell tracking, cell trajectory mapping to an original feature space and hit detection according to a new statistical procedure. We show that this workflow is scalable and demonstrates its power by application to simulated data, as well as large-scale live cell imaging data. This application enables the identification of an ontology of cell motility patterns in a fully unsupervised manner. Availability and implementation: Python code and examples are available online (http://cbio.ensmp.fr/∼aschoenauer/motiw.html) Contact: thomas.walter@mines-paristech.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072499

  15. Time-lapse analysis of tangential migration in Sema6A and PlexinA2 knockouts.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Julie; Chédotal, Alain

    2014-11-01

    In the developing cerebellum, granule cells migrate tangentially in the external granule cell layer and then radially and inward, across the molecular layer and Purkinje cell layer. We showed previously that the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A and its receptor PlexinA2 control the ability of migrating granule cells to switch from one mode of migration to the other. In both Sema6A and PlexinA2 knockouts, a large number of granule cells remain in the molecular layer, a defect that is most likely due to abnormal nuclear translocation. We show here that the lack of Sema6A or PlexinA2 preferentially much more severely perturbs the migration of later-born granule cells than early-born ones. We also use a cerebellum slice model system and electroporation to perform time-lapse analysis of granule cell migration in wild-type mice, Sema6A and PlexinA2 knockouts. This study reveals that defects of tangential migration can be detected in bipolar granule cells before the initiation of radial migration. Our results also directly confirm that the absence of Sema6A does not perturb radial migration. PMID:25284064

  16. Automated segmentation and tracking of non-rigid objects in time-lapse microscopy videos of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Susanne; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-02-01

    Time-lapse microscopy is an important technique to study the dynamics of various biological processes. The labor-intensive manual analysis of microscopy videos is increasingly replaced by automated segmentation and tracking methods. These methods are often limited to certain cell morphologies and/or cell stainings. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation and tracking framework that does not have these restrictions. In particular, our framework handles highly variable cell shapes and does not rely on any cell stainings. Our segmentation approach is based on a combination of spatial and temporal image variations to detect moving cells in microscopy videos. This method yields a sensitivity of 99% and a precision of 95% in object detection. The tracking of cells consists of different steps, starting from single-cell tracking based on a nearest-neighbor-approach, detection of cell-cell interactions and splitting of cell clusters, and finally combining tracklets using methods from graph theory. The segmentation and tracking framework was applied to synthetic as well as experimental datasets with varying cell densities implying different numbers of cell-cell interactions. We established a validation framework to measure the performance of our tracking technique. The cell tracking accuracy was found to be >99% for all datasets indicating a high accuracy for connecting the detected cells between different time points. PMID:25465844

  17. In vivo time-lapse imaging shows diverse niche engagement by quiescent and naturally activated hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Narges M.; Scott, Mark K.; Scherf, Nico; Krinner, Axel; Kalchschmidt, Jens S.; Gounaris, Kleoniki; Selkirk, Murray E.; Roeder, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain the turnover of mature blood cells during steady state and in response to systemic perturbations such as infections. Their function critically depends on complex signal exchanges with the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in which they reside, but the cellular mechanisms involved in HSC-niche interactions and regulating HSC function in vivo remain elusive. We used a natural mouse parasite, Trichinella spiralis, and multipoint intravital time-lapse confocal microscopy of mouse calvarium BM to test whether HSC-niche interactions may change when hematopoiesis is perturbed. We find that steady-state HSCs stably engage confined niches in the BM whereas HSCs harvested during acute infection are motile and therefore interact with larger niches. These changes are accompanied by increased long-term repopulation ability and expression of CD44 and CXCR4. Administration of a CXCR4 antagonist affects the duration of HSC-niche interactions. These findings suggest that HSC-niche interactions may be modulated during infection. PMID:24850759

  18. Prospective Memory in Substance Abusers at Treatment Entry: Associations with Education, Neuropsychological Functioning, and Everyday Memory Lapses

    PubMed Central

    Weinborn, Michael; Woods, Steven Paul; O'Toole, Stephanie; Kellogg, Emily J.; Moyle, Jonson

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) commonly report lapses in prospective memory (PM) in their daily lives; however, our understanding of the profile and predictors of laboratory-based PM deficits in SUDs and their associations with everyday PM failures is still very preliminary. The current study examined these important questions using well-validated measures of self-report and laboratory-based PM in a mixed cohort of 53 SUD individuals at treatment entry and 44 healthy adults. Consistent with prior research, the SUD group endorsed significantly more self-cued and environmentally based PM failures in their daily lives. Moreover, the SUD group demonstrated significantly lower time-based PM performance, driven largely by cue detection errors. The effect of SUDs on PM was particularly strong among participants with fewer years of education. Within the SUD cohort, time-based PM was correlated with clinical measures assessing executive functions, retrospective memory, and psychomotor speed. Importantly, time-based PM was uniquely associated with elevated PM failures in daily lives of the SUD participants, independent of current affective distress and other neurocognitive deficits. Findings suggest that individuals with SUD are vulnerable to deficits in PM, which may in turn increase their risk for poorer everyday functioning outcomes (e.g., treatment non-compliance). PMID:21903701

  19. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events. PMID:27286574

  20. Automated tracking of temporal displacements of a red blood cell obtained by time-lapse digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu; Rappaz, Benjamin

    2016-01-20

    Red blood cell (RBC) phase images that are numerically reconstructed by digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can describe the cell structure and dynamics information beneficial for a quantitative analysis of RBCs. However, RBCs investigated with time-lapse DHM undergo temporal displacements when their membranes are loosely attached to the substrate during sedimentation on a glass surface or due to the microscope drift. Therefore, we need to develop a tracking algorithm to localize the same RBC among RBC image sequences and dynamically monitor its biophysical cell parameters; this information is helpful for studies on RBC-related diseases and drug tests. Here, we propose a method, which is a combination of the mean-shift algorithm and Kalman filter, to track a single RBC and demonstrate that the optical path length of the single RBC can be continually extracted from the tracked RBC. The Kalman filter is utilized to predict the target RBC position in the next frame. Then, the mean-shift algorithm starts execution from the predicted location, and a robust kernel, which is adaptive to changes in the RBC scale, shape, and direction, is designed to improve the accuracy of the tracking. Finally, the tracked RBC is segmented and parameters such as the RBC location are extracted to update the Kalman filter and the kernel function for mean-shift tracking; the characteristics of the target RBC are dynamically observed. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26835962

  1. A computational 3D model for reconstruction of neural stem cells in bright-field time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerman, J.; Winterfors, E.; Faijerson, J.; Gustavsson, T.

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a computational model for image formation of in-vitro adult hippocampal progenitor (AHP) cells, in bright-field time-lapse microscopy. Although this microscopymodality barely generates sufficient contrast for imaging translucent cells, we show that by using a stack of defocused image slices it is possible to extract position and shape of spherically shaped specimens, such as the AHP cells. This inverse problem was solved by modeling the physical objects and image formation system, and using an iterative nonlinear optimization algorithm to minimize the difference between the reconstructed and measured image stack. By assuming that the position and shape of the cells do not change significantly between two time instances, we can optimize these parameters using the previous time instance in a Bayesian estimation approach. The 3D reconstruction algorithm settings, such as focal sampling distance, and PSF, were calibrated using latex spheres of known size and refractive index. By using the residual between reconstructed and measured image intensities, we computed a peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) to 28 dB for the sphere stack. A biological specimen analysis was done using an AHP cell, where reconstruction PSNR was 28 dB as well. The cell was immuno-histochemically stained and scanned in a confocal microscope, in order to compare our cell model to a ground truth. After convergence the modelled cell volume had an error of less than one percent.

  2. Monitoring the impact of de-icing salt on roadside soils with time-lapse resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, Bo; Lundmark, Annika

    2009-03-01

    Monitoring systems along roads are needed to facilitate decisions on improving protection of water resources and decreasing the impact of road-related pollutants on the roadside environment. This paper presents a monitoring system using permanently installed electrodes and monthly measurements of resistivity at a motorway in Sweden with heavy loads of de-icing salt. A significant increase in resistivity in the vadose zone with increasing distance from the road was shown in both sand and glacial till areas during the whole year. By measuring temporal variations in a less affected environment further from the road, a distinction could be made between more natural variations and variations due to de-icing salt and melting of roadside snowbanks. The highest resistivities occurred in October-November and the lowest in January-March, while the more natural resistivities showed an opposing temporal variation. The difference was up to 35% on a log-scale in the sand area during the latter period. Hence, the time-lapse resistivity measurements clearly showed a strong influence of de-icing salt on roadside soils and groundwater during winter and spring. The measurement system and the analysis methods proved useful for monitoring both the spatial and seasonal variation in resistivity.

  3. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-01-01

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls. PMID:27213923

  4. [Time lapse (Embryoscope®) as a routine technique in the IVF laboratory: a useful tool for better embryo selection?].

    PubMed

    Freour, T; Lammers, J; Splingart, C; Jean, M; Barriere, P

    2012-09-01

    Among all the strategies available in order to improve success rates in IVF cycles, a lot of work has been done on embryo culture conditions and embryo quality evaluation. Most IVF centres use conventional incubators and select embryo according to punctual morphological evaluation, but this strategy has several limitations. Recently developed commercial devices associating more stable culture conditions and time lapse observation of embryo development provide new insights into early embryo development in IVF cycles. Among them, the Embryoscope(®) appears to be the most user-friendly, performing and suited for routine daily practice. The first Embryoscope(®) for France was installed in the University Hospital of Nantes in 2011. In our experience, it takes relatively a short time to get used to this system. Moreover, its integration in routine process yielded several advantages, such as better embryo selection according to kinetic parameters and observation of abnormal cleavage events, continuing education and training, quality control and flexibility. This leaded to an overall increase in success rates in IVF cycles. PMID:22901784

  5. Time-lapse atomic force microscopy in the characterization of amyloid-like fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Green, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) images the topography of biological structures adsorbed to surfaces with nanometer to angstrom scale resolution. Amyloid-like fibrils and oligomers can be imaged in buffer solutions, allowing the samples to retain physiological-like properties while temporal changes in structure are monitored, e.g., the elongation of fibrils or the growth of single oligomers. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, i.e., electron microscopy (EM). However, AFM is limited in that the specimen must be firmly attached to a solid support for measurement and that time-lapse imaging of individual assemblies can thus only be achieved for fibrils and oligomers growing on this support. Nevertheless, AFM has provided several insights into the in vitro assembly mechanism and structures of amyloid-like fibrils. The first section of this chapter provides a methodological introduction to AFM, whilst the second details the application of this technique to the investigation of amyloidogenic proteins, specifically amylin and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. PMID:15980598

  6. Comparative effects of ionizing radiation on cycle time and mitotic duration. A time-lapse cinematography study

    SciTech Connect

    D'Hooghe, M.C.; Hemon, D.; Valleron, A.J.; Malaise, E.P.

    1980-03-01

    The effects of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays on the length of the intermitotic period, the duration of mitosis, and the division probability of EMT6 cells have been studied in vitro using time-lapse cinematography. Irradiation increases the duration of the mitosis and of the cycle in comparable proportions: both parameters are practically doubled by a dose of 10 Gy. When daughters of irradiated cells die, the mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis of their mother cells are longer than average. Mitotic delay and lengthening of mitosis depend on the age of cells at the moment of irradiation. The mitotic delay increases progressively when cells are irradiated during the first 8 h of their cycle (i.e., before the transition point), whereas mitosis is slightly prolonged. On the other hand, when the cells are irradiated after this transition point the mitotic delay decreases markedly, whereas the lengthening of mitosis increases sharply. These results tend to indicate that two different mechanisms are responsible for mitotic delay and prolongation of mitosis observed after irradiation.

  7. Lapses, infidelities, and creative adaptations: lessons from evaluation of a participatory market development approach in the Andes.

    PubMed

    Horton, Douglas; Rotondo, Emma; Paz Ybarnegaray, Rodrigo; Hareau, Guy; Devaux, André; Thiele, Graham

    2013-08-01

    Participatory approaches are frequently recommended for international development programs, but few have been evaluated. From 2007 to 2010 the Andean Change Alliance evaluated an agricultural research and development approach known as the "Participatory Market Chain Approach" (PMCA). Based on a study of four cases, this paper examines the fidelity of implementation, the factors that influenced implementation and results, and the PMCA change model. We identify three types of deviation from the intervention protocol (lapses, creative adaptations, and true infidelities) and five groups of variables that influenced PMCA implementation and results (attributes of the macro context, the market chain, the key actors, rules in use, and the capacity development strategy). There was insufficient information to test the validity of the PMCA change model, but results were greatest where the PMCA was implemented with highest fidelity. Our analysis suggests that the single most critical component of the PMCA is engagement of market agents - not just farmers - throughout the exercise. We present four lessons for planning and evaluating participatory approaches related to the use of action and change models, the importance of monitoring implementation fidelity, the limits of baseline survey data for outcome evaluation, and the importance of capacity development for implementers. PMID:23619235

  8. Intracellular accumulation and dissolution of silver nanoparticles in L-929 fibroblast cells using live cell time-lapse microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wildt, Bridget E; Celedon, Alfredo; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Casey, Brendan J; Nagy, Amber M; Hussain, Saber M; Goering, Peter L

    2016-08-01

    Cytotoxicity assessments of nanomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles, are challenging due to interferences with test reagents and indicators as well uncertainties in dosing as a result of the complex nature of nanoparticle intracellular accumulation. Furthermore, current theories suggest that silver nanoparticle cytotoxicity is a result of silver nanoparticle dissolution and subsequent ion release. This study introduces a novel technique, nanoparticle associated cytotoxicity microscopy analysis (NACMA), which combines fluorescence microscopy detection using ethidium homodimer-1, a cell permeability marker that binds to DNA after a cell membrane is compromised (a classical dead-cell indicator dye), with live cell time-lapse microscopy and image analysis to simultaneously investigate silver nanoparticle accumulation and cytotoxicity in L-929 fibroblast cells. Results of this method are consistent with traditional methods of assessing cytotoxicity and nanoparticle accumulation. Studies conducted on 10, 50, 100 and 200 nm silver nanoparticles reveal size dependent cytotoxicity with particularly high cytotoxicity from 10 nm particles. In addition, NACMA results, when combined with transmission electron microscopy imaging, reveal direct evidence of intracellular silver ion dissolution and possible nanoparticle reformation within cells for all silver nanoparticle sizes. PMID:26643278

  9. In situ monitoring of corrosion mechanisms and phosphate inhibitor surface deposition during corrosion of zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloys using novel time-lapse microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, James; Cooze, Nathan; Gallagher, Callum; Lewis, Tom; Prosek, Tomas; Thierry, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In situ time-lapse optical microscopy was used to examine the microstructural corrosion mechanisms in three zinc-magnesium-aluminium (ZMA) alloy coated steels immersed in 1% NaCl pH 7. Preferential corrosion of MgZn(2) lamellae within the eutectic phases was observed in all the ZMA alloys followed by subsequent dissolution of Zn rich phases. The total extent and rate of corrosion, measured using time-lapse image analysis and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) estimated mass loss, decreased as Mg and Al alloying additions were increased up to a level of 3 wt% Mg and 3.7 wt% Al. This was probably due to the increased presence of MgO and Al(2)O(3) at the alloy surface retarding the kinetics of cathodic oxygen reduction. The addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to 1% NaCl pH 7 had a dramatic influence on the corrosion mechanism for a ZMA with passivation of anodic sites through phosphate precipitation observed using time-lapse image analysis. Intriguing rapid precipitation of filamentous phosphate was also observed and it is postulated that these filaments nucleate and grow due to super saturation effects. Polarisation experiments showed that the addition of 1 × 10(-2) mol dm(-3) Na(3)PO(4) to the 1% NaCl electrolyte promoted an anodic shift of 50 mV in open circuit potential for the ZMA alloy with a reduction in anodic current of 2.5 orders of magnitude suggesting that it was acting primarily as an anodic inhibitor supporting the inferences from the time-lapse investigations. These phosphate additions resulted in a 98% reduction in estimated mass loss as measured by SVET demonstrating the effectiveness of phosphate inhibitors for this alloy system. PMID:25912828

  10. Presentation of a High Resolution Time Lapse 3D Groundwater Model of Metsähovi for Calculating the Gravity Effect of Groundwater in Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokkanen, T. M.; Hartikainen, A.; Raja-Halli, A.; Virtanen, H.; Makinen, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study is to construct a fine resolution time lapse groundwater (GW) model of Metsähovi (MH). GW, geological, and soil moisture (SM) data were collected for several years to achieve the goal. The knowledge of the behavior of the GW at local scale is essential for superconductive gravimeter (SG) investigations performing in MH. DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA Almost 50 sensors have been recorded SM data some 6 years with 1 to 5 minutes sampling frequency. The GW table has been monitored, both in bedrock and in soil, in many stages with all together 15 piezometers. Two geological sampling campaigns were conducted to get the knowledge of hydrological properties of soil in the study area of 200×200 m2 around SG station in MH. PRINCIPLE OF TIME LAPSE 3D HYDROGEOLOGICAL MODEL The model of study site consists of the surfaces of ground and bedrock gridded with 2×2 m2 resolution. The height of GW table was interpolated to 2×2×0.1 m3 grid between GW and SM monitoring points. Close to the outline of the study site and areas lacking of sensors GW table was defined by extrapolation and considering the geological information of the area. The bedrock porosity is 2% and soil porosity determined by geological information and SM recordings is from 5 to 35%. Only fully saturated media is considered in the time lapse model excluding unsaturated one. BENEFICIERS With a new model the fluctuation of GW table can be followed with ranging time lapses from 1 minute to 1 month. The gravity effect caused by the variation of GW table can be calculated more accurate than before in MH. Moreover, the new model can be validated and refined by measured gravity, i.e. hydrological model can be improved by SG recordings (Figure 1).

  11. Imaging high stage river-water intrusion into a contaminated aquifer along a major river corridor using 2D time-lapse surface electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Erin L.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Greenwood, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-03-29

    The Hanford 300 Area is located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington State, USA, and was a former site for nuclear fuel processing operations. Waste disposal practices resulted in persistent unsaturated zone and groundwater contamination, the primary contaminant of concern being uranium. Uranium behavior at the site is intimately linked with river stage driven groundwater-river water exchange such that understanding the nature of river water intrusion into the 300 Area is critical for predicting uranium desorption and transport. In this paper we use time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to image the inland intrusion of river during high stage conditions. We demonstrate a modified time-lapse inversion approach, whereby the transient water table elevation is explicitly modeled by removing regularization constraints across the water table boundary. This implementation was critical for producing meaningful imaging results. We inverted approximately 1200 data sets (400 per line over 3 lines) using high performance computing resources to produce a time-lapse sequence of changes in bulk conductivity caused by river water intrusion during the 2011 spring runoff cycle over approximately 125 days. The resulting time series for each mesh element was then analyzed using common time series analysis to reveal the timing and location of river water intrusion beneath each line. The results reveal non-uniform flows characterized by preferred flow zones where river water enters and exits quickly with stage increase and decrease, and low permeability zones with broader bulk conductivity ‘break through’ curves and longer river water residence times. The time-lapse ERT inversion approach removes the deleterious effects of changing water table elevation and enables remote and spatial continuous groundwater-river water exchange monitoring using surface based ERT arrays under conditions where groundwater and river water conductivity are in contrast.

  12. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Boundary Layer Lapse Rate and Cloud-top-height Observed from MODIS, CALIPSO and AMSR-E over Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L.; Xie, F.; Winning, T.

    2015-12-01

    The strong free tropospheric subsidence and the cool sea surface temperatures over the subtropical eastern Pacific Ocean often lead to a shallow and cloudy planetary boundary layer (PBL) capped by a strong inversion. These low PBL clouds are crucial for understanding the ocean-atmosphere interaction and the cloud-radiation feedback processes. However, accurate identification/representation of these clouds remains a key challenge in both satellite observations and global climate model simulations. Specifically, the cloud transition from the near-shore stratocumulus to trade-cumulus remains a huge challenge in climate models and warrants high-quality PBL observations from space. The MODIS collection 6 cloud top height vastly improves the global PBL cloud top heights (CTH) compared to collection 5. However, the MODIS collection 6 CTH still shows systematic higher CTH than CALIPSO in the subtropical subsidence region, which is likely due to the underestimation of lapse rate. This study presents the seasonal climatology of PBL lapse rate derived from multi-year CALIPSO with co-incident MODIS CTT and AMSR-E SST measurements. The lapse rate climatology is validated by the high-resolution radiosonde observations and then used to derive the CTH from MODIS measurements. Comparison of the new lapse rate based MODIS CTH with CALIPSO CTH will be presented. The PBL height derived from the COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) GPS radio occultation (RO) will be used to evaluate the MODIS CTH as an independent dataset. The discrepancies over the transition from stratus to trade-cumuli regions (broken clouds) will also be discussed.

  13. Double-Difference Waveform Inversion with a Modified Total-Variation Regularization Scheme: Application to Time-Lapse Walkaway VSP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying reservoir changes is crucial for safe and long-term geologic carbon storage. We develop a new double-difference waveform inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme to jointly invert time-lapse seismic data for geophysical properties changes in reservoirs/target monitoring regions. Our new method avoids the non-differentiability of the total-variation regularization scheme, and improves the robustness of waveform inversion. We use time-lapse seismic data for joint inversion to reduce inversion artifacts outside target monitoring regions. Two walkaway vertical seismic profiling (VSP) datasets were acquired at the SACROC enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) field in Texas in 2008 and 2009 for monitoring CO2 injection and migration. We apply our new double-difference waveform inversion method to the SACROC time-lapse VSP datasets. Our joint inversion result reveals a region with seismic-wave velocities lower than the other regions in the reservoir. This velocity decrease is caused by CO2 injection and migration.

  14. Selection of competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening: a prospective study with sibling oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in time-lapse monitoring in IVF treatment have provided new morphokinetic markers for embryonic competence. However, there is still very limited information about the relationship between morphokinetic parameters, chromosomal compositions and implantation potential. Accordingly, this study aimed at investigating the effects of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing on pregnancy and implantation outcomes for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Methods A total of 1163 metaphase II (MII) oocytes were retrieved from 138 PGS patients at a mean age of 36.6 ± 2.4 years. These sibling MII oocytes were then randomized into two groups after ICSI: 1) Group A, oocytes (n = 582) were cultured in the time-lapse system and 2) Group B, oocytes (n = 581) were cultured in the conventional incubator. For both groups, whole genomic amplification and array CGH testing were performed after trophectoderm biopsy on day 5. One to two euploid blastocysts within the most predictive morphokinetic parameters (Group A) or with the best morphological grade available (Group B) were selected for transfer to individual patients on day 6. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two groups. Results There were significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates between Group A and Group B (71.1% vs. 45.9%, respectively, p = 0.037). The observed implantation rate per embryo transfer significantly increased in Group A compared to Group B (66.2% vs. 42.4%, respectively, p = 0.011). Moreover, a significant increase in ongoing pregnancy rates was also observed in Group A compared to Group B (68.9% vs. 40.5%. respectively, p = 0.019). However, there was no significant difference in miscarriage rate between the time-lapse system and the conventional incubator (3.1% vs. 11.8%, respectively, p = 0.273). Conclusions This is the first prospective investigation using

  15. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brian E. Toelle

    2006-02-28

    The ''Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations'' project is investigating the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This project will involve the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) to try to observe the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through the reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, will be used to detect and map the movement of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in EOR projects such as Weyborne. The project is being conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in northern Michigan Basin which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that has completed its primary production. This field is now undergoing enhanced oil recovery using CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} flood was initiated the end of 2005 when the injection of small amounts of CO{sub 2} begin in the A1 Carbonate. This injection was conducted for 2 months before being temporarily halted in order for pressure measurements to be conducted. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution is proving to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model had to be developed. From this model, an accurate determination of porosity within the carbonate reservoir must be obtained. For this certain seismic attributes have been investigated. The study reservoirs in the Charlton 30/31 field range from 50 to 400 acres in size. The relatively small area to image makes 3-D seismic data acquisition reasonably cost effective. Permeability and porosity vary considerably throughout the reef, thus it is essential to perform significant reservoir characterization and modeling prior to

  16. Regularized focusing inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity data: an approach to parametrize the minimum gradient support functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Frédéric; Hermans, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Inversion of time-lapse resistivity data allows obtaining 'snapshots' of changes occurring in monitored systems for applications such as aquifer storage, geothermal heat exchange, site remediation or tracer tests. Based on these snapshots, one can infer qualitative information on the location and morphology of changes occurring in the subsurface but also quantitative estimates on the degree of changes in certain property such as temperature or total dissolved solid content. Analysis of these changes can provide direct insight into flow and transport and associated processes and controlling parameters. However, the reliability of the analysis is dependent on survey geometry, measurement schemes, data error, and regularization. Survey design parameters may be optimized prior to the monitoring survey. Regularization, on the other hand, may be chosen depending on available information collected during the monitoring. Common approaches consider smoothing model changes both in space and time but it is often needed to obtain a sharp temporal anomaly, for example in fractured aquifers. We here propose to use the alternative regularization approach based on minimum gradient support (MGS) (Zhdanov, 2002) for time-lapse surveys which will focus the changes in tomograms snapshots. MGS will limit the occurrences of changes in electrical resistivity but will also restrict the variations of these changes inside the different zones. A commonly encountered difficulty by practitioners in this type of regularization is the choice of an additional parameter, the so-called β, required to define the MGS functional. To the best of our knowledge, there is no commonly accepted or standard methodology to optimize the MGS parameter β. The inversion algorithm used in this study is CRTomo (Kemna 2000). It uses a Gauss-Newton scheme to iteratively minimize an objective function which consists of a data misfit functional and a model constraint functional. A univariate line search is performed

  17. Measuring groundwater flow at the Sanford Laboratory with coupled surface/subsurface time-lapse gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murdoch, L.; Long, A. J.; Koth, K.

    2011-12-01

    Limited options exist to measure groundwater processes, particularly at large depths. Coupled time-lapse gravity measurements at the surface and underground are one possibility, but despite recent advances in borehole instruments, no repeat underground gravity measurements of water-mass change have been reported. At the Sanford Laboratory-located at the Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, and site of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)-the U.S. Geological Survey has established a network of 19 surface and 5 underground gravity stations to monitor groundwater-storage change over the projected 20-year existence of the underground laboratory. Continuous pumping is planned to dewater the mine to a depth of 2,500 m; the current pumping regime began in 2007 and current water levels (2011) are at a depth of about 1,700 m. Measurements using a field-portable A-10 absolute gravimeter have been made approximately annually at surface stations since 2007. Underground stations forming a vertical profile along the Ross Shaft on the 300, 800, 2000, 4100, and 4850 levels (numbers indicate approximate depth in feet) were established in 2011, and it is expected all stations will be surveyed annually. To date, surface time-lapse measurements show gravity increases of 50 to 100 nm/s^2 (10 nm/s^2 = 1 microgal) at some stations and equivalent decreases at others, indicating little evidence of water-mass change from pumping. Preliminary modeling, in which the dewatered zone is represented by a series of horizontal prisms that undergo mass change equal to the porosity (assumed 0.005, an average of rock porosity and mined-out voids), indicates that this is the expected result. At pumping rates required to maintain drawdown to a depth of 2,500 m, however, the expected gravity change increases from about 50 nm/s^2 at the surface to 250 nm/s^2 at the 4850 level. Gravity stations in the subsurface are advantageous because they are both closer to the water

  18. Time-lapse analysis reveals a series of events by which cranial neural crest cells reroute around physical barriers.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; Lu, Carole C; Fraser, Scott E

    2005-01-01

    Segmentation is crucial to the development of the vertebrate body plan. Underlying segmentation in the head is further revealed when cranial neural crest cells emerge from even numbered rhombomeres in the hindbrain to form three stereotypical migratory streams that lead to the peripheral branchial arches. To test the role of intrinsic versus extrinsic cues in influencing an individual cell's trajectory, we implanted physical barriers in the chick mesoderm, distal to emerging neural crest cell stream fronts. We analyzed the spatio-temporal dynamics as individual neural crest cells encountered and responded to the barriers, using time-lapse confocal imaging. We find the majority of neural crest cells reach the branchial arch destinations following a repeatable series of events by which the cells overcome the barriers. Even though the lead cells become temporarily blocked by a barrier, cells that follow from behind find a novel pathway around a barrier and become de novo leaders of a new stream. Surprisingly, quantitative analyses of cell trajectories show that cells that encounter an r3 barrier migrate significantly faster but less directly than cells that encounter an r4 barrier, which migrate normally. Interestingly, we also find that cells temporarily blocked by the barrier migrate slightly faster and change direction more often. In addition, we show that cells can be forced to migrate into normally repulsive territory. These results suggest that cranial neural crest cell trajectories are not intrinsically determined, that cells can respond to minor alterations in the environment and re-target a peripheral destination, and that both intrinsic and extrinsic cues are important in patterning. PMID:16254414

  19. Long-term in vivo time-lapse imaging of synapse development and plasticity in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Naoko; Colonna, Jeremy; Shen, Elise; Carrillo, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are continuously formed and eliminated throughout life in the mammalian brain, and emerging evidence suggests that this structural plasticity underlies experience-dependent changes of brain functions such as learning and long-term memory formation. However, it is generally difficult to understand how the rewiring of synaptic circuitry observed in vivo eventually relates to changes in animal's behavior. This is because afferent/efferent connections and local synaptic circuitries are very complicated in most brain regions, hence it is largely unclear how sensorimotor information is conveyed, integrated, and processed through a brain region that is imaged. The cerebellar cortex provides a particularly useful model to challenge this problem because of its simple and well-defined synaptic circuitry. However, owing to the technical difficulty of chronic in vivo imaging in the cerebellum, it remains unclear how cerebellar neurons dynamically change their structures over a long period of time. Here, we showed that the commonly used method for neocortical in vivo imaging was not ideal for long-term imaging of cerebellar neurons, but simple optimization of the procedure significantly improved the success rate and the maximum time window of chronic imaging. The optimized method can be used in both neonatal and adult mice and allows time-lapse imaging of cerebellar neurons for more than 5 mo in ∼80% of animals. This method allows vital observation of dynamic cellular processes such as developmental refinement of synaptic circuitry as well as long-term changes of neuronal structures in adult cerebellum under longitudinal behavioral manipulations. PMID:24133221

  20. Time-lapse tracking of barley androgenesis reveals position-determined cell death within pro-embryos.

    PubMed

    de F Maraschin, Simone; Vennik, Marco; Lamers, Gerda E M; Spaink, Herman P; Wang, Mei

    2005-02-01

    Following abiotic stress to induce barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) androgenesis, the development of 794 enlarged microspores in culture was monitored by time-lapse tracking. In total, 11% of the microspores tracked developed into embryo-like structures (type-I pathway), 36% formed multicellular structures (type-II pathway) and 53% of the microspores followed gametophytic divisions, accumulated starch and died in the first days of tracking (type-III pathway). Despite the microspore fate, enlarged microspores showed similar morphologies directly after stress treatment. Ultrastructural analysis, however, revealed two morphologically distinct cell types. Cells with a thin intine layer and an undifferentiated cytoplasm after stress treatment were associated with type-I and type-II pathways, whereas the presence of differentiated amyloplasts and a thick intine layer were associated with the type-III pathway. Tracking revealed that the first morphological change associated with embryogenic potential was a star-like morphology, which was a transitory stage between uninucleate vacuolated microspores after stress and the initiation of cell division. The difference between type-I and type-II pathways was observed during the time they displayed the star-like morphology. During the transition phase, embryo-like structures in the type-I pathway were always released out of the exine wall at the opposite side of the pollen germ pore, whereas in the type-II pathway multicellular structures were unable to break the exine and to release embryo-like structures. Moreover, by combining viability studies with cell tracking, we show that release of embryo-like structures was preceded by a decrease in viability of the cells positioned at the site of exine wall rupture. These cells were also positively stained by Sytox orange, a cell death indicator. Thereby, we demonstrate, for the first time, that a position-determined cell death process marks the transition from a multicellular structure

  1. 3D full-waveform inversion of time-lapse horizontal borehole GPR data to map soil water content variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzsche, A.; Van Der Kruk, J.; Oberroehrmann, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key state variable that controls water and mass fluxes in soil-plant systems and is variable in space and time. Over the last year's, hydrogeophysical methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) have been used to determine electromagnetic properties as proxies for soil water content (SWC). Here, we combined zero-offset-profiles (ZOP) GPR measurements within multiple horizontal minirhizotubes at different depths to determine the spatial and temporal variability of SWC under a winter wheat stand at the Selhausen test site (Germany). We studied spatio-temporal variations of SWC under three different treatments: rainfed, irrigated and sheltered. We acquired 15 time-lapse ZOP GPR dataset during the growing season of the wheat in the rhizotron facility using horizontal boreholes with a separation of 0.75m and a length of 6m at six depths between 0.1-1.2m. The obtained radar velocities were converted to SWC using the 4-phase volumetric complex refractive index model. SWC values obtained using standard ray-based processing methods were not reliable close to the surface (0.1-0.2m depth) because of the inference of the critically refracted air wave and the direct wave through the subsurface. Therefore, we implemented a full-waveform inversion that uses accurate 3D forward modeling of GPRMax that incorporates the air and soil interactions. The shuffled complex evolution (SCE) method allowed us to retrieve quantitative medium properties that explained the measured data with a R² of at least 0.95, and improved SWC estimates at all depths. The final SWC distributions for wet and dry conditions showed that the vertical variability is significantly larger than the lateral variability caused by strong influence of precipitation and irrigation events.

  2. Slow cellular dynamics in MDCK and R5 cells monitored by time-lapse atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

    1994-01-01

    We have examined dynamic events that occur on a time scale of minutes in an epithelial monolayer of Madine-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and in ras-transformed MDCK cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells were imaged under physiological conditions, and time-lapse movies representing approximately 60 s real time per frame were assembled. In normal MDCK cells, two types of protrusions in the apical plasma membrane exhibit dynamic behavior. First, smooth bulges formed transiently over the time scale of minutes to tens of minutes. Second, spike-like protrusions appear initially as bulges, extend well above the apical surface and, finally, seem to detach. R5, an oncogenic transformant derived from MDCK cells, grows very flat on glass. During AFM imaging, these cells sometimes round up and detach from the substrate. In light microscopic observations of parallel preparations, cells rarely detach, suggesting that this is an active response of these cells to irritation by the AFM tip. R5 cells often extend processes that are supported by actin stress fibers. During imaging with the AFM, these processes withdraw at a rate of 1-5 microns/min, similar to that observed by light microscopy. During the withdrawal, movement of the stress fibers can be clearly seen. In the flat periphery of these cells, the transport of intracellular particles along cytoskeletal elements was seen. In addition, we have observed two types of wave-like movements through the cell, which appear to be an organized rearrangement of cytoplasm. One type of wave moves radially out from center of the cell while the other moves circularly along the cell periphery. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948707

  3. Dynamics of the Sanières rockslide from the time-lapse analysis of airborne and terrestrial point clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Jean-Philippe; Skupinsky, Gregorz; Guérin, Antoine; Derron, Marc-Henri; Bornemann, Pierrick

    2015-04-01

    The Roche-Plombée rocsklide (South French Alps) has been triggered in early August 2013 in the lower part of the Sanières catchment as a result of undercutting of the torrent banks after a debris flow event. During several days, a large amount of debris have been mobilised along a 300m length cliff. Deposits have reached and filled the torrential channel downslope. Several field observations carried out in the following weeks have shown the progressive opening of fissures along the main scarp. Today, large volumes of unstable debris are still available on the slope. Local stakeholders are now expecting the formation of a debris-dam in the channel which could lead to a debris flow in case of failure. This work is focused on the use of remote sensing techniques (terrestrial photogrammetry, airborne and terrestrical LiDAR) to detect and quantify spatial and temporal distribution of materials on the slope. The Structure From Motion (SFM) technique is used to generate multi-date high-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEMs) in order to quantify volumes changes; a time-lapse image correlation analysis of four terrestrial LiDAR scans is used to estimate displacements at the surface. The analysis of the point cloud dataset indicates a global deformation of the rockslope along several slip surfaces. The progressive development of the main scarp with velocity of a few cm.month-1 is also monitored. The analysis of an airborne LiDAR point cloud allows to characterize the main discontinuities. The possibility of extension of the rockslide is discussed.

  4. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  5. Application of time-lapse ERT to Characterize Soil-Water-Disease Interactions of Citrus Orchard - Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kbvn, D. P.; Ranjan, S.; Suradhaniwar, S.; J, P. A.; R M, G.

    2015-12-01

    Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India (home for mandarin Orange) experience severe climatic uncertainties resulting in crop failure. Phytopthora are the soil-borne fungal species that accumulate in the presence of moisture, and attack the root / trunk system of Orange trees at any stage. A scientific understanding of soil-moisture-disease relations within the active root zone under different climatic, irrigation, and crop cycle conditions can help in practicing management activities for improved crop yield. In this study, we developed a protocol for performing 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at micro scale resolution to monitor the changes in resistivity distribution within the root zone of Orange trees. A total of 40 electrodes, forming a grid of 3.5 m x 2 m around each Orange tree were used in ERT survey with gradient and Wenner configurations. A laboratory test on un-disturbed soil samples of the region was performed to plot the variation of electrical conductivity with saturation. Curve fitting techniques were applied to get the modified Archie's model parameters. The calibrated model was further applied to generate the 3-D soil moisture profiles of the study area. The point estimates of soil moisture were validated using TDR probe measurements at 3 different depths (10, 20, and 40 cm) near to the root zone. In order to understand the effect of soil-water relations on plant-disease relations, we performed ERT analysis at two locations, one at healthy and other at Phytopthora affected Orange tree during the crop cycle, under dry and irrigated conditions. The degree to which an Orange tree is affected by Phytopthora under each condition is evaluated using 'grading scale' approach following visual inspection of the canopy features. Spatial-temporal distribution of moisture profiles is co-related with grading scales to comment on the effect of climatic and irrigation scenarios on the degree and intensity of crop disease caused by Phytopthora.

  6. Time-lapse downhole electrical resistivity monitoring of subsurface CO2 storage at the Maguelone shallow experimental site (Languedoc, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denchik, Nataliya; Pezard, Philippe; Lofi, Johanna; Perroud, Hervé; Neyens, Denis; Luquot, Linda

    2015-04-01

    A shallow field experimental site for CO2 injection was established at Maguelone (Languedoc,France), in order to test in an integrated manner a suite of surface and downhole hydrogeophysical monitoring methods. The objective is to improve our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface and to determine the sensitivity of CO2 monitoring systems for leakage detection. The site offers a natural laboratory to study the processes associated with CO2 injection in a clastic and clay-rich context saturated with saline fluids. Prior to CO2injection, three nitrogen (N2) injections were undertaken in 2012 to measure the site response to neutral gas injection. In 2013, a volume of 111 m3 of CO2 was injected during 3.5 hours at 15 meter depth. During each experiment, the gas plumes were successfully detected from pressure monitoring, time-lapse induction logging and downhole resistivity monitoring with downhole dipole-dipole arrays. Increases in resistivity are attributed to free gas propagation (either N2 or CO2) whereas decreases in resistivity correlate with CO2 dissolution in the pore fluid. Chemical analyses confirm this hypothesis with a decrease in pH and an increase in the concentration of dissolved species in the later case. The next stage of the project will be performing the CO2 injection experiments with improved monitoring schema using results of the present study. In perspective, besides of improving our understanding of gas transport in the shallow subsurface, the additional issues could not just show a capability of used geophysical and geochemical techniques to monitor the CO2 plume and to detect near-surface CO2 migration pathways, but to help quantifying potential CO2 migration.

  7. Theoretical analysis of long offset time-lapse frequency domain controlled source electromagnetic signals using the method of moments: Application to the monitoring of a land oil reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamper, C.; Rejiba, F.; Tabbagh, A.; Spitz, S.

    2011-03-01

    We present a sensitivity study applied to water front monitoring of an onshore oil reservoir, using a remote controlled source electromagnetic method (CSEM) with electric dipoles and a borehole-to-surface configuration. We have developed an optimized and parallelized code based on the method of moments, in order to study the influence of several static or time-varying background uncertainties on the time-lapse CSEM signal (also called 4-D CSEM). Analysis of the relative and absolute variations in phase or quadrature of the time-lapse signal induced by the fluid substitution process, inside the reservoir, has shown that the vertical electric dipole allows the shape of the water front to be monitored, while remaining less sensitive (compared to a horizontal electric source dipole) to the total volume of substituted fluid. We have examined the influence of missed anomalies (1-D/3-D), with more or less conductive properties, near to the ground surface or the reservoir, and with or without time-varying properties. In most cases, the 4-D signal behaves like a reliable filter, canceling almost all response anomalies. However, it can also lead to strong, local perturbations of the time-lapse signal. We have also shown that in the presence of steel cased boreholes at the source location, or with outlying steel cased boreholes, the recording of exploitable data does not present insurmountable difficulties at low frequencies (˜1 Hz), and for a dense array of surface receivers. These positive results with CSEM monitoring suggest that minimal, coarse-time 3-D explorations should be used to ensure reliable interpretation of the monitored data.

  8. In vivo time-lapse imaging reveals extensive neural crest and endothelial cell interactions during neural crest migration and formation of the dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    George, Lynn; Dunkel, Haley; Hunnicutt, Barbara J; Filla, Michael; Little, Charles; Lansford, Rusty; Lefcort, Frances

    2016-05-01

    During amniote embryogenesis the nervous and vascular systems interact in a process that significantly affects the respective morphogenesis of each network by forming a "neurovascular" link. The importance of neurovascular cross-talk in the central nervous system has recently come into focus with the growing awareness that these two systems interact extensively both during development, in the stem-cell niche, and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. With respect to the peripheral nervous system, however, there have been no live, real-time investigations of the potential relationship between these two developing systems. To address this deficit, we used multispectral 4D time-lapse imaging in a transgenic quail model in which endothelial cells (ECs) express a yellow fluorescent marker, while neural crest cells (NCCs) express an electroporated red fluorescent marker. We monitored EC and NCC migration in real-time during formation of the peripheral nervous system. Our time-lapse recordings indicate that NCCs and ECs are physically juxtaposed and dynamically interact at multiple locations along their trajectories. These interactions are stereotypical and occur at precise anatomical locations along the NCC migratory pathway. NCCs migrate alongside the posterior surface of developing intersomitic vessels, but fail to cross these continuous streams of motile ECs. NCCs change their morphology and migration trajectory when they encounter gaps in the developing vasculature. Within the nascent dorsal root ganglion, proximity to ECs causes filopodial retraction which curtails forward persistence of NCC motility. Overall, our time-lapse recordings support the conclusion that primary vascular networks substantially influence the distribution and migratory behavior of NCCs and the patterned formation of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia. PMID:26988118

  9. Roles of inter-individual differences and intra-individual acute elevations in early smoking lapse in people with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Dedert, Eric A; Hicks, Terrell A; Dennis, Paul A; Calhoun, Patrick S; Beckham, Jean C

    2016-09-01

    Existing models of the role of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and smoking have almost exclusively examined mean symptom levels, rather than the acute elevations that might trigger smoking lapse immediately or increase risk of a smoking lapse in the next few hours. We examined ecological momentary assessments (EMA) of PTSD symptom clusters and smoking in the first week of a quit attempt in 52 people with PTSD. In multilevel models including PTSD symptom means, acute elevations, and lagged acute elevations together as simultaneous predictors of odds of smoking in the same models, pre-quit smoking occasions were significantly related to acute elevations in symptoms, including PTSD totals (OR=1.20; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.31), PTSD re-experiencing symptoms (OR=1.16; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.27), PTSD avoidance symptoms (OR=1.20; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.31), PTSD numbing symptoms (OR=1.14; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.24), and PTSD hyperarousal symptoms (OR=1.20; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.31). In contrast, post-quit smoking was related to lagged acute elevations in PTSD re-experiencing (OR=1.24, 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50) avoidance (OR=1.27, 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.53), and numbing symptoms (OR=1.24, 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.51). During a quit attempt, individuals with PTSD delayed smoking in response to acute elevations in PTSD re-experiencing and Avoidance. This period presents an opportunity to use mobile health interventions to prevent smoking lapse and to use coping skills acquired in trauma-focused therapy to respond to acute PTSD symptom elevation. PMID:27155244

  10. Modeling and mapping the effects of heat and pressure outside a SAGD steam chamber using time-lapse multicomponent seismic data, Athabasca oil sands, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, Loren Michelle

    The field of study is a bitumen producing reservoir within the McMurray Formation. The deposit is a part of the Athabasca oil sands trend in Northeastern Alberta, Canada. This field contains 16 well pads that are, combined, producing more than 41,000 BOPD. Bitumen reservoirs are unique as a result of their high viscosity, low API gravity oil. This oil in this field has been produced by means of a method called Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD), since 2007. In this method, two vertically stacked, horizontal wells are drilled. The upper well injects high temperature, high pressure steam and as the viscosity of the bitumen decreases it will begin to flow, via gravity, down to the lower producing well. Reservoir monitoring in this field is very important for multiple reasons, including the shallow depth and the large velocity changes that result from SAGD production. In order to map these changes, time-lapse multicomponent data were incorporated with rock physics modeling in order to map and interpret changes in Vp/Vs with production. When fluid substitution results and pressure estimations are combined, the resulting velocities are consistent with the core sample modeling done by Kato et al. (2008). These results were then compared with the seismic data in order to identify areas affected by steam, heat, and pressure within the reservoir through time-lapse Vp/Vs. PP time-lapse results show the location of the steam chamber within the reservoir, however these data do not give any information about the effects of pressure or heat. Converted-wave (PS) data can be used to image pressure and viscosity changes in the reservoir. When these data are combined into a Vp/Vs volume, the effects of steam, heat and pressure can be identified. Vp/Vs areas of little to no difference indicate steamed zones while the surrounding areas with large differences indicate heated and pressured zones.

  11. Dynamic interactions of snow and plants in the boreal forest, winter 2011-2012 revealed by time-lapse photography and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filhol, S. V.; Sturm, M.

    2012-12-01

    The winter blanket of snow in the boreal forest is anything but still. In winter 2011-2012 we followed the evolution of a snowpack on a boreal forest plot (0.5 ha) from first snowfall to the beginning of the melt in springtime. We used multiple methods such as time-lapse ground-based LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), time-lapse photography, imagery from a suspended cableway, snow-depth sensors, and frequent manual snow-pits. The experimental site is located near Fairbanks, Alaska, a typical boreal forest underlain by permafrost with sparse black spruce, larch, willow, and dwarf birch. We observed snowpack properties to be greatly affected by the vegetation substrate. Interactions between snow and plants are mainly dependent on falling snow properties (rate, wetness), plant heights and stiffness, plant canopy structure (leaves, number of branches, density), succession of weather events (wind before or after snow, thaw events) and pre-existing snow depth. Time-lapse imagery shows interception of snow by trees and shrubs controlled by air-temperature and wind events. LiDAR and snow pit measurements show one class of flexible shrubs (i.e. dwarf birch) bending under load, while a second class (willows) were far stiffer and resisted bending. Where dwarf birch branches were dense, it prevented snow from reaching the ground, leaving a significant air space under the snowpack. This vertical air gap can be as high as 10% of the total snow depth by the end of winter. Improving our understanding of the dynamic relationships between plants and snow is a fundamental key for studying boreal snow physics and snow ecology.

  12. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  13. Integrating Terrestrial Time-Lapse Photography with Laser Scanning to Distinguish the Drivers of Movement at Sólheimajökull, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, P.; James, M. R.; Wynn, P.

    2014-12-01

    Glacier movement is attributed to a sensitive configuration of driving forces. Here, we present an approach designed to evaluate the drivers of movement at Sólheimajökull, an outlet glacier from the Myrdalsjökull ice cap, Iceland, through combining terrestrial time-lapse photography and laser scanning (TLS). A time-lapse camera (a dSLR with intervalometer and solar-recharged battery power supply) collected hourly data over the summer of 2013. The data are subject to all the difficulties that are usually present in long time-lapse sequences, such as highly variable illumination and visibility conditions, evolving surfaces, and camera instabilities. Feature-tracking software [1] was used to: 1) track regions of static topography (e.g. the skyline) from which camera alignment could be continuously updated throughout the sequence; and 2) track glacial surface features for velocity estimation. Absolute georeferencing of the image sequence was carried out by registering the camera to a TLS survey acquired at the beginning of the monitoring period. A second TLS survey (July 2013) provided an additional 3D surface. By assuming glacial features moved in approximately planimetrically straight lines between the two survey dates, combining the two TLS surfaces with the monoscopic feature tracking allows 3D feature tracks to be derived. Such tracks will enable contributions from different drivers (e.g. surface melting) to be extracted, even in imagery that is acquired not perpendicular to glacier motion. At Sólheimajökull, our aim is to elucidate any volcanic contribution to the observed movement.[1] http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/pointcatcher.htm

  14. Time lapse imaging of water content with geoelectrical methods: on the interest of working with absolute water content data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Robert, Tanguy; Hermans, Thomas; Garré, Sarah; Nguyen, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography is a suitable method to estimate the water content of a waste material and detect changes in water content. Various ERT profiles, both static data and time-lapse, where acquired on a landfill during the Minerve project. In the literature, the relative change of resistivity (Δρ/ρ) is generally computed. For saline or heat tracer tests in the saturated zone, the Δρ/ρ can be easily translated into pore water conductivity or underground temperature changes (provided that the initial salinity or temperature condition is homogeneous over the ERT panel extension). For water content changes in the vadose zone resulting of an infiltration event or injection experiment, many authors also work with the Δρ/ρ or relative changes of water content Δθ/θ (linked to the change of resistivity through one single parameter: the Archie's law exponent "m"). This parameter is not influenced by the underground temperature and pore fluid conductivity (ρ¬w) condition but is influenced by the initial water content distribution. Therefore, you never know if the loss of Δθ/θ signal is representative of the limit of the infiltration front or more humid initial condition. Another approach for the understanding of the infiltration process is the assessment of the absolute change of water content (Δθ). This requires the direct computation of the water content of the waste from the resistivity data. For that purpose, we used petrophysical laws calibrated with laboratory experiments and our knowledge of the in situ temperature and pore fluid conductivity parameters. Then, we investigated water content changes in the waste material after a rainfall event (Δθ= Δθ/θ* θ). This new observation is really representatives of the quantity of water infiltrated in the waste material. However, the uncertainty in the pore fluid conductivity value may influence the computed water changes (Δθ=k*m√(ρw) ; where "m" is the Archie's law exponent

  15. Soil-plant-atmosphere water balance via time-lapse 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, J.; Consoli, S.; Papa, R.; Cassiani, G.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere (SPA) is a key component for the characterization of the critical zone, housing a number of important mechanisms controlling hydrology, biota and climate. This understanding requires reliable methods for the quantification of these mass and energy exchanges encompassing possibly all three major components, i.e. soil, plants and atmosphere. In this work we present an attempt to characterize jointly the soil state changes and the energy and mass fluxes above a heterogeneous canopy, both mediated by the plant activity from roots to foliage. The experiments have been conducted within an orange orchard located in Eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, has been characterized using a time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro-electrical tomography (ERT) setup. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, as well as laboratory characterization of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In terms of energy and mass fluxes, we used the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to directly measure both the sensible and latent heat fluxes exchanged between the plant-atmosphere continuum. The EC method was integrated with the surface energy balance of the SPA system. The joint availability of state changes and fluxes allows for a quantitative analysis of mass balance in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The

  16. The Relationship between Cell Number, Division Behavior and Developmental Potential of Cleavage Stage Human Embryos: A Time-Lapse Study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Fei; Lu, Changfu; Zhang, Shuoping; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Day 3 cleavage embryo transfer is routine in many assisted reproductive technology centers today. Embryos are usually selected according to cell number, cell symmetry and fragmentation for transfer. Many studies have showed the relationship between cell number and embryo developmental potential. However, there is limited understanding of embryo division behavior and their association with embryo cell number and developmental potential. A retrospective and observational study was conducted to investigate how different division behaviors affect cell number and developmental potential of day 3 embryos by time-lapse imaging. Based on cell number at day 3, the embryos (from 104 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment cycles, n = 799) were classified as follows: less than 5 cells (< 5C; n = 111); 5–6 cells (5–6C; n = 97); 7–8 cells (7–8C; n = 442), 9–10 cells (9–10C; n = 107) and more than 10 cells (>10C; n = 42). Division behavior, morphokinetic parameters and blastocyst formation rate were analyzed in 5 groups of day 3 embryos with different cell numbers. In <5C and 5–6C embryos, fragmentation (FR; 62.2% and 30.9%, respectively) was the main cause for low cell number. The majority of 7–8C embryos exhibited obvious normal behaviors (NB; 85.7%) during development. However, the incidence of DC in 9–10C and >10C embryos increased compared to 7–8C embryos (45.8%, 33.3% vs. 11.1%, respectively). In ≥5C embryos, FR and DC significantly reduced developmental potential, whereas <5C embryos showed little potential irrespective of division behaviors. In NB embryos, the blastocyst formation rate increased with cell number from 7.4% (<5C) to 89.3% (>10C). In NB embryos, the cell cycle elongation or shortening was the main cause for abnormally low or high cell number, respectively. After excluding embryos with abnormal division behaviors, the developmental potential, implantation rate and live birth rate of day 3 embryos increased with cell number

  17. Application of Surface Time-Lapse Seismic Refraction Tomography (TLSRT) to Quantifying Changes in Saturation Within the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, D. P.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.

    2009-05-01

    Seismic p-wave propagation velocity of a medium is a function of the effective elastic constants of the material, and has been previously demonstrated to be related to hydrologic parameters according to the Gassmann equation. Above the water table (i.e., in the vadose zone), seismic p-wave velocity is expected to vary linearly as a function of density. Similarly, bulk density is expected to vary linearly as a function of the porosity and the pore-fluid density, where the pore-fluid density is described as the weighted mean of the pore-fluid density and density of air, dependent upon the saturation. Thus, the equations for calculating a change in saturation given two successive seismic p-wave propagation velocity measurements at a coincident point in the vadose zone are straightforward, given a priori values for bulk density or porosity for the medium. In the absence of in situ information for a given medium, subsurface variations in density can be derived using the multi-channel analysis of shear waves (MASW) technique that yields estimates of s-wave propagation velocity (Vs). As Vs is a function of the shear modulus and density, and shear modulus is invariant due to saturation according the Gassmann equation, a direct estimate of density can be derived via MASW. Thus, using MASW to establish initial conditions, a direct measure of changes in vadose zone saturation can be estimated using time-lapse seismic refraction tomography (TLSRT). In order to validate the above approach to quantifying saturation in the vadose zone, an ephemeral perched water table at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee was monitored using TLSRT and correlated with traditional point hydrologic measurements. From October 2007 through February 2009, 35 coincident datasets were acquired along a 100-m profile. The hydrologic measurements provide a binary measure of the existence of an elevated water table, and the TLSRT data

  18. Monitoring CO2 Storage at Cranfield, Mississippi with Time-Lapse Offset VSP – Using Integration and Modeling to Reduce Uncertainty

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Daley, Thomas M.; Hendrickson, Joel; Queen, John H.

    2014-12-31

    A time-lapse Offset Vertical Seismic Profile (OVSP) data set was acquired as part of a subsurface monitoring program for geologic sequestration of CO2. The storage site at Cranfield, near Natchez, Mississippi, is part of a detailed area study (DAS) site for geologic carbon sequestration operated by the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB). The DAS site includes three boreholes, an injection well and two monitoring wells. The project team selected the DAS site to examine CO2 sequestration multiphase fluid flow and pressure at the interwell scale in a brine reservoir. The time-lapse (TL) OVSP was partmore » of an integrated monitoring program that included well logs, crosswell seismic, electrical resistance tomography and 4D surface seismic. The goals of the OVSP were to detect the CO2 induced change in seismic response, give information about the spatial distribution of CO2 near the injection well and to help tie the high-resolution borehole monitoring to the 4D surface data. The VSP data were acquired in well CFU 31-F1, which is the ~3200 m deep CO2 injection well at the DAS site. A preinjection survey was recorded in late 2009 with injection beginning in December 2009, and a post injection survey was conducted in Nov 2010 following injection of about 250 kT of CO2. The sensor array for both surveys was a 50-level, 3-component, Sercel MaxiWave system with 15 m (49 ft) spacing between levels. The source for both surveys was an accelerated weight drop, with different source trucks used for the two surveys. Consistent time-lapse processing was applied to both data sets. Time-lapse processing generated difference corridor stacks to investigate CO2 induced reflection amplitude changes from each source point. Corridor stacks were used for amplitude analysis to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each shot point. Spatial variation in reflectivity (used to ‘map’ the plume) was similar in magnitude to the

  19. Monitoring CO2 Storage at Cranfield, Mississippi with Time-Lapse Offset VSP – Using Integration and Modeling to Reduce Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Thomas M.; Hendrickson, Joel; Queen, John H.

    2014-12-31

    A time-lapse Offset Vertical Seismic Profile (OVSP) data set was acquired as part of a subsurface monitoring program for geologic sequestration of CO2. The storage site at Cranfield, near Natchez, Mississippi, is part of a detailed area study (DAS) site for geologic carbon sequestration operated by the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB). The DAS site includes three boreholes, an injection well and two monitoring wells. The project team selected the DAS site to examine CO2 sequestration multiphase fluid flow and pressure at the interwell scale in a brine reservoir. The time-lapse (TL) OVSP was part of an integrated monitoring program that included well logs, crosswell seismic, electrical resistance tomography and 4D surface seismic. The goals of the OVSP were to detect the CO2 induced change in seismic response, give information about the spatial distribution of CO2 near the injection well and to help tie the high-resolution borehole monitoring to the 4D surface data. The VSP data were acquired in well CFU 31-F1, which is the ~3200 m deep CO2 injection well at the DAS site. A preinjection survey was recorded in late 2009 with injection beginning in December 2009, and a post injection survey was conducted in Nov 2010 following injection of about 250 kT of CO2. The sensor array for both surveys was a 50-level, 3-component, Sercel MaxiWave system with 15 m (49 ft) spacing between levels. The source for both surveys was an accelerated weight drop, with different source trucks used for the two surveys. Consistent time-lapse processing was applied to both data sets. Time-lapse processing generated difference corridor stacks to investigate CO2 induced reflection amplitude changes from each source point. Corridor stacks were used for amplitude analysis to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each shot point. Spatial variation in

  20. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted

  1. An ensemble Kalman filter approach to identify the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution from electrical resistivity tomography time-lapse monitoring of three-dimensional tracer test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Perri, M. T.; Salandin, P.

    2012-04-01

    An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) images generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. Assuming that the solute spreads as a passive tracer, for high Peclet numbers the spatial moments of the evolving plume are dominated by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. The assimilation of the electrical conductivity 4D images allows updating both the hydrological state in terms of solute concentration and the spatial distribution of K. Thus, delineation of the tracer plume and estimation of the aquifer heterogeneity at the local scale can be achieved at the same time by means of this interpretation of time-lapse electrical images from tracer tests. We assess the impact on the performance of the hydrological inversion of the uncertainty inherently affecting ERT inversions in terms of tracer concentration and the choice of the prior statistics of K. The results show that realistic ERT images can be integrated into a hydrological model even within an uncoupled inverse modeling framework, the reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution being satisfactory in the portion of the domain directly covered by the passage of the tracer. Aside from the issues commonly affecting inverse models, the proposed approach is subject to the problem of the filter inbreeding and the retrieval performance is sensitive to the choice of K prior geostatistical parameters.

  2. In-vivo third-harmonic generation microscopy at 1550nm three-dimensional long-term time-lapse studies in living C. elegans embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Santos, Susana I. C. O.; Brodschelm, Andreas; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.; Alonso-Ortega, Cesar; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    In-vivo microscopic long term time-lapse studies require controlled imaging conditions to preserve sample viability. Therefore it is crucial to meet specific exposure conditions as these may limit the applicability of established techniques. In this work we demonstrate the use of third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy for long term time-lapse three-dimensional studies (4D) in living Caenorhabditis elegans embryos employing a 1550 nm femtosecond fiber laser. We take advantage of the fact that THG only requires the existence of interfaces to generate signal or a change in the refractive index or in the χ3 nonlinear coefficient, therefore no markers are required. In addition, by using this wavelength the emitted THG signal is generated at visible wavelengths (516 nm) enabling the use of standard collection optics and detectors operating near their maximum efficiency. This enables the reduction of the incident light intensity at the sample plane allowing to image the sample for several hours. THG signal is obtained through all embryo development stages, providing different tissue/structure information. By means of control samples, we demonstrate that the expected water absorption at this wavelength does not severely compromise sample viability. Certainly, this technique reduces the complexity of sample preparation (i.e. genetic modification) required by established linear and nonlinear fluorescence based techniques. We demonstrate the non-invasiveness, reduced specimen interference, and strong potential of this particular wavelength to be used to perform long-term 4D recordings.

  3. Peculiar lapse of periodic eclipsing event at low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 during Suzaku observation in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Mori, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-03-01

    GRS 1747-312 is a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary in the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. During its outbursts, periodic eclipses were known to occur. Observations for the outbursts were performed with Chandra in 2004 and Swift in 2013. XMM-Newton observed its quiescent state in 2004. In addition, when Suzaku observed it in 2009 as a part of Galactic center mapping observations, GRS 1747-312 was found to be in a low-luminosity state with Lx ˜ 1.2 × 1035 erg s-1. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found clear flux decreases at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no clear signs for the predicted eclipses. The lapse of the predicted eclipses during the Suzaku observation can be explained by a contaminant source quite close to GRS 1747-312. When GRS 1747-312 is in the quiescent state, we observe X-rays from the contaminant source rather than from GRS 1747-312. However, we have no clear evidence for the contaminant source in our data. The lapse might also be explained by thick material (NH > 1024 cm-2) between the neutron star and the companion star, though the origin of the thick material is not clear.

  4. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes. PMID:26543581

  5. Peculiar lapse of periodic eclipsing event at low-mass X-ray binary GRS 1747-312 during Suzaku observation in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Mori, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    GRS 1747-312 is a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary in the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. During its outbursts, periodic eclipses were known to occur. Observations for the outbursts were performed with Chandra in 2004 and Swift in 2013. XMM-Newton observed its quiescent state in 2004. In addition, when Suzaku observed it in 2009 as a part of Galactic center mapping observations, GRS 1747-312 was found to be in a low-luminosity state with Lx ˜ 1.2 × 1035 erg s-1. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found clear flux decreases at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no clear signs for the predicted eclipses. The lapse of the predicted eclipses during the Suzaku observation can be explained by a contaminant source quite close to GRS 1747-312. When GRS 1747-312 is in the quiescent state, we observe X-rays from the contaminant source rather than from GRS 1747-312. However, we have no clear evidence for the contaminant source in our data. The lapse might also be explained by thick material (NH > 1024 cm-2) between the neutron star and the companion star, though the origin of the thick material is not clear.

  6. Study of time-lapse processing for dynamic hydrologic conditions. [electronic satellite image analysis console for Earth Resources Technology Satellites imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serebreny, S. M.; Evans, W. E.; Wiegman, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The usefulness of dynamic display techniques in exploiting the repetitive nature of ERTS imagery was investigated. A specially designed Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC) was developed and employed to process data for seven ERTS principal investigators studying dynamic hydrological conditions for diverse applications. These applications include measurement of snowfield extent and sediment plumes from estuary discharge, Playa Lake inventory, and monitoring of phreatophyte and other vegetation changes. The ESIAC provides facilities for storing registered image sequences in a magnetic video disc memory for subsequent recall, enhancement, and animated display in monochrome or color. The most unique feature of the system is the capability to time lapse the imagery and analytic displays of the imagery. Data products included quantitative measurements of distances and areas, binary thematic maps based on monospectral or multispectral decisions, radiance profiles, and movie loops. Applications of animation for uses other than creating time-lapse sequences are identified. Input to the ESIAC can be either digital or via photographic transparencies.

  7. Incubator-independent cell-culture perfusion platform for continuous long-term microelectrode array electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging.

    PubMed

    Saalfrank, Dirk; Konduri, Anil Krishna; Latifi, Shahrzad; Habibey, Rouhollah; Golabchi, Asiyeh; Martiniuc, Aurel Vasile; Knoll, Alois; Ingebrandt, Sven; Blau, Axel

    2015-06-01

    Most in vitro electrophysiology studies extract information and draw conclusions from representative, temporally limited snapshot experiments. This approach bears the risk of missing decisive moments that may make a difference in our understanding of physiological events. This feasibility study presents a simple benchtop cell-culture perfusion system adapted to commercial microelectrode arrays (MEAs), multichannel electrophysiology equipment and common inverted microscopy stages for simultaneous and uninterrupted extracellular electrophysiology and time-lapse imaging at ambient CO2 levels. The concept relies on a transparent, replica-casted polydimethylsiloxane perfusion cap, gravity- or syringe-pump-driven perfusion and preconditioning of pH-buffered serum-free cell-culture medium to ambient CO2 levels at physiological temperatures. The low-cost microfluidic in vitro enabling platform, which allows us to image cultures immediately after cell plating, is easy to reproduce and is adaptable to the geometries of different cell-culture containers. It permits the continuous and simultaneous multimodal long-term acquisition or manipulation of optical and electrophysiological parameter sets, thereby considerably widening the range of experimental possibilities. Two exemplary proof-of-concept long-term MEA studies on hippocampal networks illustrate system performance. Continuous extracellular recordings over a period of up to 70 days revealed details on both sudden and gradual neural activity changes in maturing cell ensembles with large intra-day fluctuations. Correlated time-lapse imaging unveiled rather static macroscopic network architectures with previously unreported local morphological oscillations on the timescale of minutes. PMID:26543581

  8. Time-Lapse Analysis of Methane Quantity in the Mary Lee Group of Coal Seams Using Filter-Based Multiple-Point Geostatistical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Olea, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its success are important for controlling methane, and thus for the health and safety of coal miners. During the course of degasification, properties of coal seams change. Thus, the changes in coal reservoir conditions and in-place gas content as well as methane emission potential into mines should be evaluated by examining time-dependent changes and the presence of major heterogeneities and geological discontinuities in the field. In this work, time-lapsed reservoir and fluid storage properties of the New Castle coal seam, Mary Lee/Blue Creek seam, and Jagger seam of Black Warrior Basin, Alabama, were determined from gas and water production history matching and production forecasting of vertical degasification wellbores. These properties were combined with isotherm and other important data to compute gas-in-place (GIP) and its change with time at borehole locations. Time-lapsed training images (TIs) of GIP and GIP difference corresponding to each coal and date were generated by using these point-wise data and Voronoi decomposition on the TI grid, which included faults as discontinuities for expansion of Voronoi regions. Filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulations, which were preferred in this study due to anisotropies and discontinuities in the area, were used to predict time-lapsed GIP distributions within the study area. Performed simulations were used for mapping spatial time-lapsed methane quantities as well as their uncertainties within the study area. The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition

  9. Using High-Resolution, Surface Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography to Characterize and Monitor Subsurface Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, A. L.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Gasperikova, E.; Gaines, D. P.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P.

    2008-12-01

    The application of surface time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Field Research Center (ORNL FRC) site is being used to monitor contaminant plume migration, assess contaminant response to remediation, and characterize the subsurface processes associated with natural episodic, seasonal, and annual recharge. A majority of the migration pathways governing the transportation of the mixed-waste contaminant plume occur in the high-permeability transition-zones of the underlying saprolite and more competent shale bedrock. It is known that transportation mechanisms along these conduits are influenced by natural recharge, especially severe storm events, but the degree of importance is unknown. The fast and efficient collection of datasets ideal for observing the dynamics and effects of groundwater recharge on the overall hydrology is accomplished using a permanently installed AGI SuperSting R8/IP system with 112 surface-based electrodes having 0.75m spacing and an overall line length of 84m. The north-south oriented profile borders the primary source of preferential recharge--an unlined drainage ditch and permeable fill material--and runs perpendicular to both the direction of ground water flow and the strike of the structural bedding in the underlying rock. With an observed imaging depth of 15-20m, intense and multifaceted surveying has imaged the transient perched water table and likely preferential flowpaths, as well as permit the detailed monitoring of temporal and spatial variations. The surface profile traverses wellbores where electrodes are also permanently installed and a multi-level sampler well that is used to provide hydrogeochemical measurements. While TLERT is known to be a useful tool for this type of problem and many studies have examined the most effective and efficient methodology for data acquisition, they have not sufficiently been able to identify or observe the subsurface processes associated with

  10. Time-lapse imagery of the breaching of Marmot Dam, Oregon, and subsequent erosion of sediment by the Sandy River, October 2007 to May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, Jon J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Collins, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, was removed and a temporary cofferdam standing in its place was breached, allowing the river to flow freely along its entire length. Time-lapse imagery obtained from a network of digital single-lens reflex cameras placed around the lower reach of the sediment-filled reservoir behind the dam details rapid erosion of sediment by the Sandy River after breaching of the cofferdam. Within hours of the breaching, the Sandy River eroded much of the nearly 15-m-thick frontal part of the sediment wedge impounded behind the former concrete dam; within 24-60 hours it eroded approximately 125,000 m3 of sediment impounded in the lower 300-meter-reach of the reservoir. The imagery shows that the sediment eroded initially through vertical incision, but that lateral erosion rapidly became an important process.

  11. LONG-TERM OBSERVATIONS OF BOTTOM CONDITIONS AND SEDIMENT MOVEMENT ON THE ATLANTIC CONTINENTAL SHELF: TIME-LAPSE PHOTOGRAPHY FROM INSTRUMENTED TRIPODS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Bryden, Cynthia G.; Pfirman, Stephanie L.; Strahle, William J.; Noble, Marlene A.

    1984-01-01

    An instrument system that measures bottom current, temperature, light transmission, and pressure, and that photographs the bottom at 2- to 6-hour intervals has been developed to study sediment transport on the Atlantic Continental Shelf. Instruments have been deployed extensively along the United States East Coast Continental Shelf for periods of from 2 to 6 months to study the frequency, direction, and rate of bottom sediment movement, and the processes causing movement. The time-lapse photographs are used to (1) characterize the bottom benthic community and surface microtopography; (2) monitor changes in the bottom topography and near-bottom water column caused by currents and storms (for example, ripple generation and migration, sediment resuspension); and (3) monitor seasonal changes in the bottom benthic community and qualitative effects of this community on the bottom sediments.

  12. Probing the immune and healing response of murine intestinal mucosa by time-lapse 2-photon microscopy of laser-induced lesions with real-time dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Orzekowsky-Schroeder, Regina; Klinger, Antje; Freidank, Sebastian; Linz, Norbert; Eckert, Sebastian; Hüttmann, Gereon; Gebert, Andreas; Vogel, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Gut mucosa is an important interface between body and environment. Immune response and healing processes of murine small intestinal mucosa were investigated by intravital time-lapse two-photon excited autofluorescence microscopy of the response to localized laser-induced damage. Epithelial lesions were created by 355-nm, 500-ps pulses from a microchip laser that produced minute cavitation bubbles. Size and dynamics of these bubbles were monitored using a novel interferometric backscattering technique with 80 nm resolution. Small bubbles (< 2.5 µm maximum radius) merely resulted in autofluorescence loss of the target cell. Larger bubbles (7-25 µm) affected several cells and provoked immigration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear leucocytes). Damaged cells were expelled into the lumen, and the epithelium healed within 2 hours by stretching and migration of adjacent epithelial cells. PMID:25360369

  13. Label Free Cell-Tracking and Division Detection Based on 2D Time-Lapse Images For Lineage Analysis of Early Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Cicconet, Marcelo; Gutwein, Michelle; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Geiger, Davi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report a database and a series of techniques related to the problem of tracking cells, and detecting their divisions, in time-lapse movies of mammalian embryos. Our contributions are: (1) a method for counting embryos in a well, and cropping each individual embryo across frames, to create individual movies for cell tracking; (2) a semi-automated method for cell tracking that works up to the 8-cell stage, along with a software implementation available to the public (this software was used to build the reported database); (3) an algorithm for automatic tracking up to the 4-cell stage, based on histograms of mirror symmetry coefficients captured using wavelets; (4) a cell-tracking database containing 100 annotated examples of mammalian embryos up to the 8-cell stage; (5) statistical analysis of various timing distributions obtained from those examples. PMID:24873887

  14. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  15. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  16. Preliminary Seismic Time-lapse Results of the First Post-injection Monitoring at the Ketzin Pilot Site for CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Monika, Ivandic; Julin, Christopher; Lüth, Stefan; Bergmann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse surface seismic monitoring methods have proven to be notably successful in imaging the development of the CO2 plume injected into the 630-650 meters deep saline aquifer at the Ketzin pilot site. A 3D baseline survey was acquired in the autumn of 2005 prior to CO2 injection, followed by two 3D repeat surveys conducted in the same season of 2009 and 2012 after injection of about 22 and 61 kt of CO2, respectively. These repeat surveys showed that the CO2 plume was concentrated around the injection well with a preferred WNW propagating trend due to reservoir heterogeneity. The CO2 induced amplitude anomaly continued to grow with more CO2 injected into the reservoir. The CO2 injection ended on August 29, 2013 after a total of about 67 kt injected CO2. In the autumn of 2015, a third 3D repeat survey with a nominal fold of 25 was acquired during the post-injection phase. The acquisition was implemented with an identical template scheme and acquisition parameters as in the previous surveys. About 5500 source points were acquired during the 57 days of active acquisition. The same processing steps as used before were carried out from pre-stack to post-stack. In order to minimize changes unrelated to the site operations, cross-calibration was applied to the data. Preliminary results of the time-lapse analysis show that the obtained amplitude anomaly at the reservoir level is smaller in size than the one observed at the time of the second repeat survey. This may indicate that CO2 dissolution is active, especially east of the injection site, where permeability and flow rate appear to be lower. In comparison to the previous surveys, the maximum amplitude anomaly has moved towards the west, which is consistent with the previously observed propagating tendency of the CO2 plume within the reservoir. No CO2 leakage is observed within the overburden.

  17. In Vivo Time-Lapse Imaging in the Zebrafish Lateral Line: A Flexible, Open-Ended Research Project for an Undergraduate Neurobiology Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Molly H.; Tobias, Zachary J.C.; Cohen, Hannah R.; Glover, Greta; Weissman, Tamily A.

    2015-01-01

    The lateral line sensory system in fish detects movements in the water and allows fish to respond to predators, prey, and other stimuli. As the lateral line forms in the first two days of zebrafish development, axons extend caudally along the lateral surface of the fish, eventually forming synapses with hair cells of neuromasts. Growing lateral line axons are located superficially under the skin and can be labeled in living zebrafish using fluorescent protein expression. This system provides a relatively straightforward approach for in vivo time-lapse imaging of neuronal development in an undergraduate setting. Here we describe an upper-level neurobiology laboratory module in which students investigate aspects of axonal development in the zebrafish lateral line system. Students learn to handle and image living fish, collect time-lapse videos of moving mitochondria, and quantitatively measure mitochondrial dynamics by generating and analyzing kymographs of their movements. Energy demands may differ between axons with extending growth cones versus axons that have already reached their targets and are forming synapses. Since relatively little is known about this process in developing lateral line axons, students generate and test their own hypotheses regarding how mitochondrial dynamics may differ at two different time points in axonal development. Students also learn to incorporate into their analysis a powerful yet accessible quantitative tool, the kymograph, which is used to graph movement over time. After students measure and quantify dynamics in living fish at 1 and 2 days post fertilization, this module extends into independent projects, in which students can expand their studies in a number of different, inquiry-driven directions. The project can also be pared down for courses that wish to focus solely on the quantitative analysis (without fish handling), or vice versa. This research module provides a useful approach for the design of open-ended laboratory

  18. An efficient method of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion using a finite-difference injection method for time-lapse imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Dmitry; Singh, Satish C.; Fuji, Nobuaki

    2015-09-01

    Seismic full waveform inversion is an objective method to estimate elastic properties of the subsurface and is an important area of research, particularly in seismic exploration community. It is a data-fitting approach, where the difference between observed and synthetic data is minimized iteratively. Due to a very high computational cost, the practical implementation of waveform inversion has so far been restricted to a 2-D geometry with different levels of physics incorporated in it (e.g. elasticity/viscoelasticity) or to a 3-D geometry but using an acoustic approximation. However, the earth is three-dimensional, elastic and heterogeneous and therefore a full 3-D elastic inversion is required in order to obtain more accurate and valuable models of the subsurface. Despite the recent increase in computing power, the application of 3-D elastic full waveform inversion to real-scale problems remains quite challenging on the current computer architecture. Here, we present an efficient method to perform 3-D elastic full waveform inversion for time-lapse seismic data using a finite-difference injection method. In this method, the wavefield is computed in the whole model and is stored on a surface above a finite volume where the model is perturbed and localized inversion is performed. Comparison of the final results using the 3-D finite-difference injection method and conventional 3-D inversion performed within the whole volume shows that our new method provides significant reductions in computational time and memory requirements without any notable loss in accuracy. Our approach shows a big potential for efficient reservoir monitoring in real time-lapse experiments.

  19. In Vivo Time-Lapse Imaging in the Zebrafish Lateral Line: A Flexible, Open-Ended Research Project for an Undergraduate Neurobiology Laboratory Course.

    PubMed

    Marra, Molly H; Tobias, Zachary J C; Cohen, Hannah R; Glover, Greta; Weissman, Tamily A

    2015-01-01

    The lateral line sensory system in fish detects movements in the water and allows fish to respond to predators, prey, and other stimuli. As the lateral line forms in the first two days of zebrafish development, axons extend caudally along the lateral surface of the fish, eventually forming synapses with hair cells of neuromasts. Growing lateral line axons are located superficially under the skin and can be labeled in living zebrafish using fluorescent protein expression. This system provides a relatively straightforward approach for in vivo time-lapse imaging of neuronal development in an undergraduate setting. Here we describe an upper-level neurobiology laboratory module in which students investigate aspects of axonal development in the zebrafish lateral line system. Students learn to handle and image living fish, collect time-lapse videos of moving mitochondria, and quantitatively measure mitochondrial dynamics by generating and analyzing kymographs of their movements. Energy demands may differ between axons with extending growth cones versus axons that have already reached their targets and are forming synapses. Since relatively little is known about this process in developing lateral line axons, students generate and test their own hypotheses regarding how mitochondrial dynamics may differ at two different time points in axonal development. Students also learn to incorporate into their analysis a powerful yet accessible quantitative tool, the kymograph, which is used to graph movement over time. After students measure and quantify dynamics in living fish at 1 and 2 days post fertilization, this module extends into independent projects, in which students can expand their studies in a number of different, inquiry-driven directions. The project can also be pared down for courses that wish to focus solely on the quantitative analysis (without fish handling), or vice versa. This research module provides a useful approach for the design of open-ended laboratory

  20. Realtime infiltration process monitoring in macroporous soil - a plot-scale experiment accompanied by high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    Infiltration and quick vertical redistribution of event water through rapid subsurface flow in soil structures is one of the key issues in hydrology. Although the importance of preferential flow is broadly recognised, our theories, observation techniques and modelling approaches lose grounds when the assumption of well-mixed states in REVs collapses. To characterise the combination of advective and diffusive flow is especially challenging. We have shown in earlier studies that a combination of TDR monitoring, dye- and salt-tracer recovery and time-lapse 3D GPR in irrigation experiments provides means to characterise infiltration dynamics at the plot- and hillslope-scale also in highly structured soils. We pinpointed that the spatial and temporal resolution requires special attention and improvement - particularly owing to the facts of high velocity (10‑3 ms‑1) of advective flow and small scale (10‑2 m) of the respective flow structures. We present insights from a novel technique of continuous high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR measurements during and after a plot-scale (1 m x 1 m) irrigation experiment. Continuous TDR soil moisture measurements, dye tracer excavation and salt-tracer samples are used as qualitative and quantitative references. While classical infiltration experiments either look at spatial patterns or temporal dynamics at singular gauges, we highlight the advantage of combining both to achieve a more complete image of the infiltration process. Although operating at the limits of the techniques this setup enables non-invasive observation of preferential flow processes in the field and allows to explore and characterise macropore matrix exchange.

  1. Combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, suction cup and tensiometer measurements to monitor snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloem, Esther; French, Helen K.

    2013-04-01

    Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than traditional techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding on the resistivity effects from infiltrating snowmelt and contaminant movement to the methods suitable for monitoring resistivity changes over time at contaminated sites. Electrical and electromagnetic methods are widely applied for soil mapping and detecting of contaminated plumes. Time-lapse measurements have become a common method to characterize changes in water saturation and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (French and Binley, 2004; French et al. 2002). The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent measurements along the same profile. Such measurements include soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the

  2. Insights and questions raised from a multi-tracer plot-scale sprinkler experiment with time-lapse 3D GPR in a structured forested soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Sprenger, Matthias; Allroggen, Niklas; van Schaik, Loes; Weiler, Markus; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotopes appear as ideal tracer commonly applied in preferential flow analyses. At the same time, central assumptions about signature mixing and propagation are founded on effective parameters merging advective and diffusive flow domains. However, in structured soils conditions are often far from well-mixed and some established assumptions may need to be reconsidered. We conducted a multi-tracer sprinkler experiment at a forested hillslope in the Attert Basin in Luxembourg with prevailing geogenic and biogenic preferential flow structures. At plot scale of 1x1 m2 we sprinkled two plots with 50 mm and one plot with 30 mm Brilliant Blue and Bromide enriched water for 1 hour. The experiments were accompanied by a high resolution 3D time-lapse GPR (Ground-Penetrating Radar) survey scanning 3x3 m2 before, directly after sprinkling and before excavation one day after sprinkling. Soil moisture was monitored with a TDR tube probe. Soil profiles were excavated and recorded for dye flow paths and for one medium resolution Bromide profile. In addition one core for pore water stable isotope analysis was taken before the sprinkling as reference and at each plot after sprinkling. We present the results with focus on the found evidence of preferential flow and the signals of the different tracers - especially the stable isotopes. While all other methods clearly show that only minor proportions of the soil took part in the infiltration process and that the sprinkler water has largely advectively propagated to the saprolite layer at about 80-100 cm depth, the stable isotopes signals from the cores indicate more intense interaction between the soil matrix and macropores, especially in the top 50 cm. This leads to the question of how the isotope signal could mix well, when most of the pore-water did not directly interact with the infiltration-water. Further questions arise to the use of tracers in general, due to the known limitations of excavation itself and rather coarse

  3. In vivo micro-computed tomography allows direct three-dimensional quantification of both bone formation and bone resorption parameters using time-lapsed imaging.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2011-03-01

    Bone is a living tissue able to adapt its structure to external influences such as altered mechanical loading. This adaptation process is governed by two distinct cell types: bone-forming cells called osteoblasts and bone-resorbing cells called osteoclasts. It is therefore of particular interest to have quantitative access to the outcomes of bone formation and resorption separately. This article presents a non-invasive three-dimensional technique to directly extract bone formation and resorption parameters from time-lapsed in vivo micro-computed tomography scans. This includes parameters such as Mineralizing Surface (MS), Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR), and Bone Formation Rate (BFR), which were defined in accordance to the current nomenclature of dynamic histomorphometry. Due to the time-lapsed and non-destructive nature of in vivo micro-computed tomography, not only formation but also resorption can now be assessed quantitatively and time-dependent parameters Eroded Surface (ES) as well as newly defined indices Mineral Resorption Rate (MRR) and Bone Resorption Rate (BRR) are introduced. For validation purposes, dynamic formation parameters were compared to the traditional quantitative measures of dynamic histomorphometry, where MAR correlated with R = 0.68 and MS with R = 0.78 (p < 0.05). Reproducibility was assessed in 8 samples that were scanned 5 times and errors ranged from 0.9% (MRR) to 6.6% (BRR). Furthermore, the new parameters were applied to a murine in vivo loading model. A comparison of directly extracted parameters between formation and resorption within each animal revealed that in the control group, i.e., during normal remodeling, MAR was significantly lower than MRR (p < 0.01), whereas MS compared to ES was significantly higher (p < 0.0001). This implies that normal remodeling seems to take place by many small formation packets and few but large resorption volumes. After 4 weeks of mechanical loading, newly extracted trabecular BFR and MS were

  4. Time-lapse imaging and cell-specific expression profiling reveal dynamic branching and molecular determinants of a multi-dendritic nociceptor in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cody J.; Watson, Joseph D.; Spencer, W. Clay; O’Brien, Tim; Cha, Byeong; Albeg, Adi; Treinin, Millet

    2010-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons innervate the skin with complex dendritic arbors that respond to pain-evoking stimuli such as harsh mechanical force or extreme temperatures. Here we describe the structure and development of a model nociceptor, the PVD neuron of C. elegans, and identify transcription factors that control morphogenesis of the PVD dendritic arbor. The two PVD neuron cell bodies occupy positions on either the right (PVDR) or left (PVDL) sides of the animal in posterior lateral locations. Imaging with a GFP reporter revealed a single axon projecting from the PVD soma to the ventral cord and an elaborate, highly-branched arbor of dendritic processes that envelop the animal with a web-like array directly beneath the skin. Dendritic branches emerge in a step-wise fashion during larval development and may use an existing network of peripheral nerve cords as guideposts for key branching decisions. Time-lapse imaging revealed that branching is highly dynamic with active extension and withdrawal and that PVD branch overlap is prevented by a contact-dependent self-avoidance, a mechanism that is also employed by sensory neurons in other organisms. With the goal of identifying genes that regulate dendritic morphogenesis, we used the mRNA tagging method to produce a gene expression profile of PVD during late larval development. This microarray experiment identified > 2,000 genes that are 1.5 X elevated relative to all larval cells. The enriched transcripts encode a wide range of proteins with potential roles in PVD function (e.g., DEG/ENaC and Trp channels) or development (e.g., UNC-5 and LIN-17/frizzled receptors). We used RNAi and genetic tests to screen 86 transcription factors from this list and identified eleven genes that specify PVD dendritic structure. These transcription factors appear to control discrete steps in PVD morphogenesis and may either promote or limit PVD branching at specific developmental stages. For example, time-lapse imaging revealed that the MEC-3

  5. A Functional Genomic Screen Combined with Time-Lapse Microscopy Uncovers a Novel Set of Genes Involved in Dorsal Closure of Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jankovics, Ferenc; Henn, László; Bujna, Ágnes; Vilmos, Péter; Kiss, Nóra; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis, the establishment of the animal body, requires the coordinated rearrangement of cells and tissues regulated by a very strictly-determined genetic program. Dorsal closure of the epithelium in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo is one of the best models for such a complex morphogenetic event. To explore the genetic regulation of dorsal closure, we carried out a large-scale RNA interference-based screen in combination with in vivo time-lapse microscopy and identified several genes essential for the closure or affecting its dynamics. One of the novel dorsal closure genes, the small GTPase activator pebble (pbl), was selected for detailed analysis. We show that pbl regulates actin accumulation and protrusion dynamics in the leading edge of the migrating epithelial cells. In addition, pbl affects dorsal closure dynamics by regulating head involution, a morphogenetic process mechanically coupled with dorsal closure. Finally, we provide evidence that pbl is involved in closure of the adult thorax, suggesting its general requirement in epithelial closure processes. PMID:21799798

  6. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    This review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions. The addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway. To ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [H+] concentration with that of the cell compartments. This review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature (37°C) versus room temperature (25°C), (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H+ ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH. The versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design. PMID:22778738

  7. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected. PMID:27095292

  8. Effects of methylmercury on human fetal neurons and astrocytes in vitro: a time-lapse cinematographic, phase and electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B.H.; Cho, K.H.; Lapham, L.W.

    1981-02-01

    Time-lapse cinematography of organotypic cultures of human fetal cerebrum demonstrated cessation of neuronal migration following the addition of 0.02 mM methylmercuric chloride (MMC) to the culture medium. This was due to rapid cytotoxic effects of MMC characterized by cessation of filopodial activity, focal swelling, and partial fragmentation of neurites. Separation of the membrane from neurites associated with marked swelling of the matrix was prominent, especially at growth cones. Soon total fragmentation occurred at these sites resulting in separation of degenerated neurites from neuronal cell bodies in 1 to 4 h. Addition of 0.1 mM MMC caused fragmentation and separation of neurites from most neuronal cell bodies in approximately 40 min while exposures to 0.2 mM MMC caused a similar phenomenon in approximately 20 min. The cytotoxic effect of MMC was stopped immediately and further degeneration did not occur when cultures exposed to MMC were washed and replaced with normal complete culture medium. When mercury was given in a highly polar sulfonic acid form (p-chloromercuriphenyl sulfonic acid) the membrane of neurites and astrocytes remained intact, indicating that penetration of the membrane by mercury is necessary to initiate the toxic effects of MMC. At the ultrastructural level damage to plasma membranes and neurotubular injury are conspicuous early features of methylmercurytoxicity, taking place more rapidly in neurons than astrocytes, and eventuating in irreversible degeneration of both cell types.

  9. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » his review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions.he addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway.o ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [ H + ] concentration with that of the cell compartments.his review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature ( 37 ° C ) versus room temperature ( 25 ° C ) , (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H + ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na + / H + exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH.he versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design.« less

  10. Time-lapse ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements for exploring biogenic gas distribution and releases from peat soils in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Comas, X.; Berber, M.

    2013-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and the triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most peatland gas dynamics research has historically been focused on high latitude peatlands, while recent works have suggested that gas production rates from low-latitude peat soils may be higher than those from colder climates. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical tool that has successfully been used in the past to non-invasively investigate the release of biogenic gasses from peat soils. This study is conducted in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 HA) model of the Florida Everglades. Here, temporal and spatial heterogeneity of gas releases from peat soil at the plot scale (<100 m2) are shown using a time series of three-dimensional (3D) GPR measurements. GPR data are supported by direct gas flux measurements using flux chambers combined with time-lapse photography, and surface deformation measurements using terrestrial LiDAR scanning and differential leveling.

  11. 4D analysis of the microstructural evolution of Si-based electrodes during lithiation: Time-lapse X-ray imaging and digital volume correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Garcia, J. M.; Taiwo, O. O.; Tudisco, E.; Finegan, D. P.; Shearing, P. R.; Brett, D. J. L.; Hall, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon is a promising candidate to substitute or complement graphite as anode material in Li-ion batteries due, mainly, to its high energy density. However, the lithiation/delithiation processes of silicon particles are inherently related to drastic volume changes which, within a battery's physically constrained case, can induce significant deformation of the fundamental components of the battery that can eventually cause it to fail. In this work, we use non-destructive time-lapse X-ray imaging techniques to study the coupled electrochemo-mechanical phenomena in Li-ion batteries. We present X-ray computed tomography data acquired at different times during the first lithiation of custom-built silicon-lithium battery cells. Microstructural volume changes have been quantified using full 3D strain field measurements from digital volume correlation analysis. Furthermore, the extent of lithiation of silicon particles has been quantified in 3D from the grey-scale of the tomography images. Correlation of the volume expansion and grey-scale changes over the silicon-based electrode volume indicates that the process of lithiation is kinetically affected by the reaction at the Si/LixSi interface.

  12. The time lapse experiment in Al Wasse water pumping field in Saudi Arabia by an ultra-stable seismic source (ACROSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAnezi, Ghunaim; Kasahara, Junzo; AlDamegh, Khaled S.; Lafouza, Omar; AlYousef, Khaled; Almalki, Fahad; Nishiyama, Eichiro

    2015-04-01

    We have developed the time lapse technology for EOR (enhanced oil recovery) and CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) using a very stable and continuous seismic source called ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) with multi-geophones. Since 2011, we have tested this technology in the context of carbonate rocks in Saudi Arabia. The Al Wasee water pumping site approximately 120 km east of Riyadh city has been selected as a trail-site. The intention is to observe the changes in aquifers induced by pumping operations. One ACROSS source unit was installed at the Al Wasee site in December 2011 and we are continuing the field test. The instrument has been operated from 10 to 50 Hz with 40 tons-f at 50 Hz. Using alternatively clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations we can synthesize vertical and horizontal forces, respectively. 31 3C-geophones in 2 km x 3 km area and four nearby 3Cgeophones have been used to monitor the seismic changes from pumping the water. The one and half month data between December 2012 and February 2013 show continuous and clear change of observed waveforms for all 31 stations while the source signature did not change. The change is closest and fastest at the station #42. The cause of continuous change with time is interpreted as pumping of water by 64 wells located in this field.

  13. CellDyM: A room temperature operating cryogenic cell for the dynamic monitoring of snow metamorphism by time-lapse X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, N.; Flin, F.; Lesaffre, B.; Dufour, A.; Roulle, J.; Puglièse, P.; Philip, A.; Lahoucine, F.; Geindreau, C.; Panel, J.-M.; Roscoat, S. Rolland; Charrier, P.

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring the time evolution of snow microstructure in 3-D is crucial for a better understanding of snow metamorphism. We, therefore, designed a cryogenic cell that precisely controls the experimental conditions of a sample while it is scanned by X-ray tomography. Based on a thermoelectrical regulation and a vacuum insulation, the cell operates at room temperature. It is, thus, adaptable to diverse scanners, offering advantages in terms of imaging techniques, resolution, and speed. Three-dimensional time-lapse series were obtained under equitemperature and temperature gradient conditions at a 7.8 μm precision. The typical features of each metamorphism and the anisotropic faceting behavior between the basal and prismatic planes, known to occur close to -2°C, were observed in less than 30 h. These results are consistent with the temperature fields expected from heat conduction simulations through the cell. They confirm the cell's accuracy and the interest of relatively short periods to study snow metamorphism.

  14. Three distinct stages of apoptotic nuclear condensation revealed by time-lapse imaging, biochemical and electron microscopy analysis of cell-free apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tone, Shigenobu Sugimoto, Kenji; Tanda, Kazue; Suda, Taiji; Uehira, Kenzo; Kanouchi, Hiroaki; Samejima, Kumiko; Minatogawa, Yohsuke; Earnshaw, William C.

    2007-10-01

    During apoptotic execution, chromatin undergoes a phase change from a heterogeneous, genetically active network to an inert highly condensed form that is fragmented and packaged into apoptotic bodies. We have previously used a cell-free system to examine the roles of caspases or other proteases in apoptotic chromatin condensation and nuclear disassembly. But so far, the role of DNase activity or ATP hydrolysis in this system has not yet been elucidated. Here, in order to better define the stages of nuclear disassembly in apoptosis, we have characterized the apoptotic condensation using a cell-free system and time-lapse imaging. We demonstrated that the population of nuclei undergoing apoptosis in vitro appears to follow a reproducible program of nuclear condensation, suggesting the existence of an ordered biochemical pathway. This enabled us to define three stages of apoptotic chromatin condensation: stage 1 ring condensation; stage 2 necklace condensation; and stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. Electron microscopy revealed that neither chromatin nor detectable subnuclear structures were present inside the stage 1 ring-condensed structures. DNase activity was not essential for stage 1 ring condensation, which could occur in apoptotic extracts depleted of all detectable DNase activity. However, DNase(s) were required for stage 2 necklace condensation. Finally, we demonstrated that hydrolyzable ATP is required for stage 3 nuclear collapse/disassembly. This requirement for ATP hydrolysis further distinguished stage 2 from stage 3. Together, these experiments provide the first steps towards a systematic biochemical characterization of chromatin condensation during apoptosis.

  15. Computer-automated time-lapse analysis results correlate with embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy: a blinded, multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    VerMilyea, Matthew D; Tan, Lei; Anthony, Joshua T; Conaghan, Joe; Ivani, Kristen; Gvakharia, Marina; Boostanfar, Robert; Baker, Valerie L; Suraj, Vaishali; Chen, Alice A; Mainigi, Monica; Coutifaris, Christos; Shen, Shehua

    2014-12-01

    Computer-automated time-lapse analysis has been shown to improve embryo selection by providing quantitative and objective information to supplement traditional morphology. In this multi-centre study, the relationship between such computer-derived outputs (High, Medium, Low scores), embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy were examined. Data were collected from six clinics, including 205 patients whose embryos were imaged by the Eeva(TM) System. The Eeva scores were blinded and not considered during embryo selection. Embryos with High and Medium scores had significantly higher implantation rates than those with Low scores (37% and 35% versus 15%; P < 0.0001; P = 0.0004). Similar trends in implantation rates were observed in different IVF centres each using their own protocols. Further analysis revealed that patients with at least one High embryo transferred had significantly higher clinical pregnancy rates than those with only Low embryos transferred (51% versus 34%; P = 0.02), although patients' clinical characteristics across groups were comparable. These data, together with previous research and clinical studies, confirm that computer-automated Eeva scores provide valuable information, which may improve the clinical outcome of IVF procedures and ultimately facilitate the trend of single embryo selection. PMID:25444507

  16. Neural crest cell behavior in white and dark larvae of Ambystoma mexicanum: time-lapse cinemicrographic analysis of pigment cell movement in vivo and in culture.

    PubMed

    Keller, R E; Spieth, J

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of migration and motile activity of developing pigment cells of the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, were analyzed by time-lapse cinemicrography in vivo and in culture. In vivo, melanocytes of dark (D/-) larvae migrate from dorsal to ventral in a highly directional manner. They are elongated and aligned parallel to the direction of migration. Nearly all protrusive activity occurs at their ventral, leading edges. Translocation occurs at a mean rate of 0.7 micron/min and involves alternate or simultaneous advance of the leading and trailing edges of the cell. Indirect evidence suggests that cytoplasmic flow is common. Directional migration occurs in apparent absence of contact between melanocytes. In white (d/d) larvae, protrusive activity is infrequent and the melanocytes move slowly or not at all. Explanted neural crest cells of dark and white larvae attach, spread, and differentiate into melanophores and xanthophores in culture. Individual cultured cells are unbiased in direction of protrusive activity and path of migration. Centrifugal spreading occurs by contacting inhibition of movement. Distribution of protrusive activity, polarity, and contact behavior changes with developmental age in vivo and in culture in ways that may be important in establishing the pigment pattern. PMID:6699589

  17. New Algorithm to Determine True Colocalization in Combination with Image Restoration and Time-Lapse Confocal Microscopy to Map Kinases in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Iacaruso, María Florencia; Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Poderoso, Juan José; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth Andrea; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images. PMID:21559502

  18. Time-lapse analysis of methane quantity in Mary Lee group of coal seams using filter-based multiple-point geostatistical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karacan, C. Özgen; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic approach presented in this paper is the first time in literature that history matching, TIs of GIPs and filter simulations are used for degasification performance evaluation and for assessing GIP for mining safety. Results from this study showed that using production history matching of coalbed methane wells to determine time-lapsed reservoir data could be used to compute spatial GIP and representative GIP TIs generated through Voronoi decomposition. Furthermore, performing filter simulations using point-wise data and TIs could be used to predict methane quantity in coal seams subjected to degasification. During the course of the study, it was shown that the material balance of gas produced by wellbores and the GIP reductions in coal seams predicted using filter simulations compared very well, showing the success of filter simulations for continuous variables in this case study. Quantitative results from filter simulations of GIP within the studied area briefly showed that GIP was reduced from an initial ∼73 Bcf (median) to ∼46 Bcf (2011), representing a 37 % decrease and varying spatially through degasification. It is forecasted that there will be an additional ∼2 Bcf reduction in methane quantity between 2011 and 2015. This study and presented results showed that the applied methodology and utilized techniques can be used to map GIP and its change within coal seams after degasification, which can further be used for ventilation design for methane control in coal mines.

  19. Significantly improved precision of cell migration analysis in time-lapse video microscopy through use of a fully automated tracking system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell motility is a critical parameter in many physiological as well as pathophysiological processes. In time-lapse video microscopy, manual cell tracking remains the most common method of analyzing migratory behavior of cell populations. In addition to being labor-intensive, this method is susceptible to user-dependent errors regarding the selection of "representative" subsets of cells and manual determination of precise cell positions. Results We have quantitatively analyzed these error sources, demonstrating that manual cell tracking of pancreatic cancer cells lead to mis-calculation of migration rates of up to 410%. In order to provide for objective measurements of cell migration rates, we have employed multi-target tracking technologies commonly used in radar applications to develop fully automated cell identification and tracking system suitable for high throughput screening of video sequences of unstained living cells. Conclusion We demonstrate that our automatic multi target tracking system identifies cell objects, follows individual cells and computes migration rates with high precision, clearly outperforming manual procedures. PMID:20377897

  20. Multi-Target Tracking With Time-Varying Clutter Rate and Detection Profile: Application to Time-Lapse Cell Microscopy Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rezatofighi, Seyed Hamid; Gould, Stephen; Vo, Ba Tuong; Vo, Ba-Ngu; Mele, Katarina; Hartley, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of the dynamics of tiny cellular and sub-cellular structures, known as particles, in time-lapse cell microscopy sequences requires the development of a reliable multi-target tracking method capable of tracking numerous similar targets in the presence of high levels of noise, high target density, complex motion patterns and intricate interactions. In this paper, we propose a framework for tracking these structures based on the random finite set Bayesian filtering framework. We focus on challenging biological applications where image characteristics such as noise and background intensity change during the acquisition process. Under these conditions, detection methods usually fail to detect all particles and are often followed by missed detections and many spurious measurements with unknown and time-varying rates. To deal with this, we propose a bootstrap filter composed of an estimator and a tracker. The estimator adaptively estimates the required meta parameters for the tracker such as clutter rate and the detection probability of the targets, while the tracker estimates the state of the targets. Our results show that the proposed approach can outperform state-of-the-art particle trackers on both synthetic and real data in this regime. PMID:25594963

  1. Gigavision - A weatherproof, multibillion pixel resolution time-lapse camera system for recording and tracking phenology in every plant in a landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T.; Borevitz, J. O.; Zimmermann, C.

    2010-12-01

    retrieved at bi-weekly intervals. Our longer-term goal is to make gigapixel time-lapse datasets available online in an interactive interface that layers plant-level phenology data with gigapixel resolution images, genomic sequence data from individual plants with weather and other abitotic sensor data. Co-visualization of all of these data types provides researchers with a powerful new tool for examining complex ecological interactions across scales from the individual to the ecosystem. We will present detailed phenostage data from more than 100 plants of multiple species from our Gigavision timelapse camera at our “Big Blowout East” field site in the Indiana Dunes State Park, IN. This camera has been recording three to four 700 million pixel images a day since February 28, 2010. The camera field of view covers an area of about 7 hectares resulting in an average image resolution of about 1 pixel per centimeter over the entire site. We will also discuss some of the many technological challenges with developing and maintaining these types of hardware systems, collecting quantitative data from gigapixel resolution time-lapse data and effectively managing terabyte-sized datasets of millions of images.

  2. Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring using a Sparse Seismic Array: Pre-Injection Assessment of Repeatability at the Aquistore CO2 Storage Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, L. A.; White, D.; Roberts, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aquistore is a deep saline geological storage project. An estimated 2000 tonnes/day of CO2 will be captured and injected at approximately 3200m - 3350m into a sandstone reservoir. CO2 injection is expected to create a measurable change in the seismic properties within the reservoir. Our goal is to utilize a sparse seismic array to improve cost effectiveness and time-lapse SNR by improved repeatability. A permanent surface seismic array has been deployed at the Aquistore CO2 storage site comprising 630 vertical-component geophones deployed at a depth of 20m over a 2.5 x 2.5 km grid. Receiver lines are spaced at intervals of 144m, with an in-line geophone spacing of 72m and with geophones along adjacent lines staggered by 32m in the in-line direction. To assess the repeatability of seismic data acquired using this sparse seismic array, two 3D seismic surveys were conducted prior to the start of CO2 injection. The baseline survey was acquired in March, 2012 with a subsequent monitor survey in April, 2013. Sources consisted of 1kg dynamite shots detonated at 15m depth over a 3 x 3 km grid, with 12 shot lines spaced at 288m and 144m in-line spacing. The permanent receiver array provided for 100% collocated receiver positions, while 90% of the shot points of the repeat survey were placed within 2m of the shots of the baseline survey. These elements of the survey design serve to reduce the non-repeatability that may be related to acquisition effects and seasonal variations. Before processing, the datasets were matched so that the number of common shots and receivers was 256 and 599 respectively which results in a nominal fold of 40. Our preliminary approach of 3D time-lapse processing was to process each vintage separately while applying identical flows with the same parameters (e.g. mutes and time gates) to the repeat dataset. The normalized root-mean-square (nRMS) of the difference of the two data sets was used as the metric for repeatability in assessing the similarity

  3. Fighting for territories: time-lapse analysis of dental pulp and dental follicle stem cells in co-culture reveals specific migratory capabilities.

    PubMed

    Schiraldi, C; Stellavato, A; D'Agostino, A; Tirino, V; d'Aquino, R; Woloszyk, A; De Rosa, A; Laino, L; Papaccio, G; Mitsiadis, T A

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell migration is a critical step during the repair of damaged tissues. In order to achieve appropriate cell-based therapies for tooth and periodontal ligament repair it is necessary first to understand the dynamics of tissue-specific stem cell populations such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) and dental follicle stem cells (DFSC). Using time-lapse imaging, we analysed migratory and proliferative capabilities of these two human stem cell lines in vitro. When cultured alone, both DPSC and DFSC exhibited low and irregular migration profiles. In co-cultures, DFSC, but not DPSC, spectacularly increased their migration activity and velocity. DFSC rapidly surrounded the DPSC, thus resembling the in vivo developmental process, where follicle cells encircle both dental epithelium and pulp. Cell morphology was dependent on the culture conditions (mono-culture or co-culture) and changed over time. Regulatory genes involved in dental cell migration and differentiation such as TWIST1, MSX1, RUNX2, SFRP1 and ADAM28, were also evaluated in co-cultures. MSX1 up-regulation indicates that DPSC and DFSC retain their odontogenic potential. However, DPSC lose their capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts in the presence of DFSC, as suggested by RUNX2 up-regulation and TWIST1 down-regulation. In contrast, the unchanged levels of SFRP1 expression suggest that DFSC retain their potential to form periodontal tissues even in the presence of DPSC. These findings demonstrate that stem cells behave differently according to their environment, retain their genetic memory, and compete with each other to acquire the appropriate territory. Understanding the mechanisms involved in stem cell migration may lead to new therapeutic approaches for tooth repair. PMID:23180452

  4. NeuronGrowth, a software for automatic quantification of neurite and filopodial dynamics from time-lapse sequences of digital images.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Zian; Martinez-Perez, M Elena; De-Miguel, Francisco F

    2011-10-01

    We developed NeuronGrowth, a software for the automatic quantification of extension and retraction of neurites and filopodia, from time-lapse sequences of two-dimensional digital micrographs. NeuronGrowth requires a semiautomatic characterization of individual neurites in a reference frame, which is then used for automatic tracking and measurement of every neurite over the whole image sequence. Modules for sequence alignment, background subtraction, flat field correction, light normalization, and cropping have been integrated to improve the quality of the analysis. Moreover, NeuronGrowth incorporates a deconvolution filter that corrects the shadow-cast effect of differential interference contrast (DIC) images. NeuronGrowth was tested by analyzing the formation of outgrowth patterns by individual leech neurons cultured under two different conditions. Phase contrast images were obtained from neurons plated on CNS homogenates and DIC images were obtained from similar neurons plated on ganglion capsules as substrates. Filopodia were measured from fluorescent growth-cones of chick dorsal root ganglion cells. Quantitative data of neurite extension and retraction obtained by three different users applying NeuronGrowth and two other manually operated software packages were similar. However, NeuronGrowth required less user participation and had a better time performance when compared with the other software packages. NeuronGrowth may be used in general to quantify the dynamics of tubular structures such as blood vessels. NeuronGrowth is a free plug-in for the free software ImageJ and can be downloaded along with a user manual, a troubleshooting section and other information required for its use from http://www.ifc.unam.mx or http://www.ifc.unam.mx/ffm/index.html. PMID:21913334

  5. Time-lapse monitoring reveals that vitrification increases the frequency of contraction during the pre-hatching stage in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yuki; Kumagai, Jin; Anzai, Mibuki; Kabashima, Katsuya; Togashi, Kazue; Miura, Yasuko; Shirasawa, Hiromitsu; Sato, Wataru; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-04-22

    Contraction during the blastocyst stage is observed during embryonic development of various mammals, including humans, but the physiological role of this process is not well understood. Using time-lapse monitoring (TLM), we studied the influence of vitrification and contractions on embryonic development in mice. Mouse embryos were cultured at the 2-cell stage. At the 8-cell stage, embryos were randomly divided into a fresh group (FG) and vitrified group (VG) and observed for up to 144 h. Strong contractions (i.e., contractions causing a decrease in volume of more than 20% and expansion of the perivitelline space) occurred significantly more often in unhatched embryos than hatching embryos in both groups. Regarding hatching embryos, contractions in the pre-hatching stage were significantly more frequent in the VG than the FG. Furthermore, mRNA expression levels of genes related to contractions were determined at three time points, the 8-cell stage, early blastocyst stage, and 20 h after blastocoel formation, with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was no significant difference in Hspa1a expression between the FG and VG, but Hspa1a overexpression was observed just after thawing and tended to decrease gradually thereafter in some blastocysts. Furthermore, in the VG, Atp1a1 tended to show higher expression in the strong contraction group than in the weak contraction group. Overall, vitrification is an excellent method for cryopreservation but could increase contractions in the pre-hatching stage and may increase energy demands of the embryo. Observation of contraction by TLM may improve the evaluation of embryo quality. PMID:26806421

  6. Assessing clogging processes caused by biofilm growth and organic particle accumulation in constructed wetlands using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Himi; Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Rivero, Lluís; Font, Xavier; Casas, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Constructed wetlands for removing pollutants from wastewater in small communities are growing rapidly in many regions of the world. The advantages over conventional mechanical sanitation systems, where land availability is not a limiting factor, are low energy requirements, easy operation and maintenance, low sludge production and cost-effectivity. Nevertheless, with time the cleaning process can result in gradual clogging of the porous layer by suspended solids, bacterial film, chemical precipitates and compaction. The clogging development causes decrease of hydraulic conductivity, reduced oxygen supply and further leads to a rapid decrease of the treatment performance. As the investment involved in reversing clogging can represent a substantial fraction of the cost of a new system it is essential to assess in advance the evolution of clogging process and detect potential failures in the system. Since there is a lack of experiences for monitoring the functionality of constructed wetlands time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography studies have been conducted at horizontal sub-surface flow municipal wastewater treatment wetlands of Catalonia (Spain). The results of this research show that electrical resistivity tomography can be a very useful technique for assessing the extent of silting up processes that clog the subsurface flow constructed wetlands through the gravel layer. In the unsaturated zone, the electrical resistivity is greater at the end of the filter, since the pores contains air which is dielectric, while at the beginning of the filter the resistivity is lower because the electrical conduction of organic matter around the mineral grains. Conversely, in the saturated zone, the electrical resistivity is lower at the end of the filter, since pores contain a higher proportion of high ionic conductivity wastewater, while at the beginning of the filter the electrical resistivity is higher because of the lower porosity due to the clogging process.

  7. Analysis and trends of precipitation lapse rate and extreme indices over north Sikkim eastern Himalayas under CMIP5ESM-2M RCPs experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishal; Goyal, Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws attention to highlight the spatial and temporal variability in precipitation lapse rate (PLR) and precipitation extreme indices (PEIs) through the mesoscale characterization of Teesta river catchment, which corresponds to north Sikkim eastern Himalayas. A PLR rate is an important variable for the snowmelt runoff models. In a mountainous region, the PLR could be varied from lower elevation parts to high elevation parts. In this study, a PLR was computed by accounting elevation differences, which varies from around 1500 m to 7000 m. A precipitation variability and extremity were analysed using multiple mathematical functions viz. quantile regression, spatial mean, spatial standard deviation, Mann-Kendall test and Sen's estimation. For this reason, a daily precipitation, in the historical (years 1980-2005) as measured/observed gridded points and projected experiments for the 21st century (years 2006-2100) simulated by CMIP5 ESM-2 M model (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 Earth System Model 2) employing three different radiative forcing scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways), utilized for the research work. The outcomes of this study suggest that a PLR is significantly varied from lower elevation to high elevation parts. The PEI based analysis showed that the extreme high intensity events have been increased significantly, especially after 2040s. The PEI based observations also showed that the numbers of wet days are increased for all the RCPs. The quantile regression plots showed significant increments in the upper and lower quantiles of the various extreme indices. The Mann-Kendall test and Sen's estimation tests clearly indicated significant changing patterns in the frequency and intensity of the precipitation indices across all the sub-basins and RCP scenario in an intra-decadal time series domain. The RCP8.5 showed extremity of the projected outcomes.

  8. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the dependence of time-lapse localization of talaporfin sodium on the cell death phenotypes in rat cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Matsuo, H.; Suenari, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Takatsuki, S.; Ogawa, S.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have proposed a new type of atrial fibrillation treatment with the early state photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is shorter than that in conventional way. We had demonstrated the acute electrical blockade by the PDT with talaporfin sodium and a red (670 nm) diode laser in ex vivo and in vivo experiment using rat normal myocardial tissue. The previous study of intracellular Ca2+ concentration measurement in rat cardiac myocytes during the PDT indicated that Ca2+ influx induced by the plasma membrane damage might be the main cause of the acute reaction of myocardial tissue. We found that the cell damage of cardiac myocytes triggered by the PDT was mainly influenced by the site where the photosensitizer exists. In this study, we examined the relationship between the sites of talaporfin sodium existing and cell death phenotypes in response to the PDT, in order to clarify the mechanism of the acute electrical blockade induced by the PDT in myocardial tissue. The talaporfin sodium fluorescence was observed after the various incubation times to visualize the time-lapse intracellular photosensitizer localization. The distribution of the photosensitizer was dependent on the incubation time. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the PDT was examined with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator by a high-speed Nipkow confocal laser microscope (CSU-X1, Yokogawa Electric Company). We obtained the Ca2+ dynamics during the PDT which can explain the PDT-induced cell death pathways. We concluded that the Ca2+ influx induced by plasma membrane damage is the possible mechanism of the electrical blockade by the early state PDT.

  9. Diffusion of solutes inside bacterial colonies immobilized in model cheese depends on their physicochemical properties: a time-lapse microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Floury, Juliane; El Mourdi, Ilham; Silva, Juliana V. C.; Lortal, Sylvie; Thierry, Anne; Jeanson, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    During cheese processing and ripening, bacteria develop as colonies. Substrates and metabolites must then diffuse either from or into the colonies. Exploring how the inner cells of the colony access the substrates or get rid of the products leads to study the diffusion of solutes inside bacterial colonies immobilized in cheese. Diffusion limitations of substrates within the bacterial colony could lead to starvation for the cells in the center of the colony. This study aimed at better understands ripening at the colony level, by investigating how diffusion phenomena inside colonies vary depending on both the physicochemical properties of the solutes and Lactococcus lactis strain. Dextrans (4, 70, and 155 kDa) and milk proteins (BSA, lactoferrin and αS1-casein) of different sizes and physicochemical properties were chosen as model of diffusing solutes, and two L. lactis strains presenting different surface properties were immobilized as colonies in a model cheese. Diffusion of solutes inside and around colonies was experimentally followed by time-lapse confocal microscopy. Dextran solutes diffused inside both lactococci colonies with a non-significantly different effective diffusion coefficient, which depended mainly on size of the solute. However, whereas flexible and neutral hydrophilic polymers such as dextran can diffuse inside colonies whatever its size, none of the three proteins investigated in this study could penetrate inside lactococci colonies. Therefore, the diffusion behavior of macromolecules through bacterial colonies immobilized in a model cheese did not only depends on the size of the diffusing solutes, but also and mainly on their physicochemical properties. Milk caseins are probably first hydrolyzed by the cell wall proteases of L. lactis and/or other proteases present in the cheese, and then the generated peptides diffuse inside colonies to be further metabolized into smaller peptides and amino acids by all the cells located inside the colonies

  10. Time-Lapse Geophysical Measurements targeting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Production from Peat Soils in a Hydrologically Controlled Wetland in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. J.; Shahan, T.; Sharp, N.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Peat soils are known to release globally significant amounts of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, uncertainties still remain regarding the spatio-temporal distribution of gas accumulations and triggering mechanisms of gas releasing events. Furthermore, most research on peatland gas dynamics has traditionally been focused on high latitude peatlands. Therefore, understanding gas dynamics in low-latitude peatlands (e.g. the Florida Everglades) is key to global climate research. Recent studies in the Everglades have demonstrated that biogenic gas flux values may vary when considering different temporal and spatial scales of measurements. The work presented here targets spatial variability in gas production and release at the plot scale in an approximately 85 m2 area, and targets temporal variability with data collected during the spring months of two different years. This study is located in the Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA), a hydrologically controlled, landscape scale (30 Ha) model of the Florida Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been used in the past to investigate biogenic gas dynamics in peat soils, and is used in this study to monitor changes of in situ gas storage. Each year, a grid of GPR profiles was collected to image changes in gas distribution in 2d on a weekly basis, and several flux chambers outfitted with time-lapse cameras captured high resolution (hourly) gas flux measurements inside the GPR grid. Combining these methods allows us to use a mass balance approach to estimate spatial variability in gas production rates, and capture temporal variability in gas flux rates.

  11. 4-D imaging of seepage in earthen embankments with time-lapse inversion of self-potential data constrained by acoustic emissions localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Planes, T.; Mooney, M. A.; Koelewijn, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    New methods are required to combine the information contained in the passive electrical and seismic signals to detect, localize and monitor hydromechanical disturbances in porous media. We propose a field experiment showing how passive seismic and electrical data can be combined together to detect a preferential flow path associated with internal erosion in a Earth dam. Continuous passive seismic and electrical (self-potential) monitoring data were recorded during a 7-d full-scale levee (earthen embankment) failure test, conducted in Booneschans, Netherlands in 2012. Spatially coherent acoustic emissions events and the development of a self-potential anomaly, associated with induced concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena, were identified and imaged near the downstream toe of the embankment, in an area that subsequently developed a series of concentrated water flows and sand boils, and where liquefaction of the embankment toe eventually developed. We present a new 4-D grid-search algorithm for acoustic emissions localization in both time and space, and the application of the localization results to add spatially varying constraints to time-lapse 3-D modelling of self-potential data in the terms of source current localization. Seismic signal localization results are utilized to build a set of time-invariant yet spatially varying model weights used for the inversion of the self-potential data. Results from the combination of these two passive techniques show results that are more consistent in terms of focused ground water flow with respect to visual observation on the embankment. This approach to geophysical monitoring of earthen embankments provides an improved approach for early detection and imaging of the development of embankment defects associated with concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena. The same approach can be used to detect various types of hydromechanical disturbances at larger scales.

  12. Time lapse seismic response (4D) related to industrial-scale CO2 injection at an EOR and CCS site, Cranfield, MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditkof, J.; Meckel, T. A.; Zeng, H.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    4D seismic response can be used to understand reservoir fluid substitution related to multiphase fluid flow. Time lapse seismic surveys have been conducted internationally at well-known CCS field sites like Otway, Weyburn, and Sleipner as well as downhole measurements at Frio and Cranfield in the United States. We present results from the first 4D survey conducted in the U.S. for CCS purposes. Since 2008 continuous CO2 injection has occurred at an EOR project in Cranfield, Mississippi, also the location of our SECARB CCS demonstration project funded by DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. 4D response has been characterized after 3 years of injection, where >3 million tons of CO2 remain in the subsurface. Results from 4D stratal slices show a definitive but complicated CO2 response in the injection interval, and no coherent response above or below the injection interval. Clear examples of seismic amplitude response are seen near injection wells. Qualitatively, some areas that have received large amounts of CO2 do not have coherent seismic response, indicating that 4D response to injected CO2 in some parts of the field is likely to be masked by residual oil, gas, and brine related to historic production (1960's). To further quantify the seismic response, well log data shows that Vp decreases before becoming mostly constant, Vs increases linearly, and density slightly decreases in the injection zone. This is a similar expected result to that observed at other sites. Forward seismic modeling and flow simulation have been integrated to understand seismic response in relation to fluid properties and distribution. Seismic understanding may lead to improved understanding of sweep efficiency (capacity) as well as define sensitivity of seismic imaging for quantifying CO2 storage.

  13. Seismic wave attenuation in Israel region estimated from the multiple lapse time window analysis and S-wave coda decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirova, Tatiana; Pinsky, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    For the first time, a regional seismic attenuation for the Israel region is quantitatively estimated as a combination of intrinsic and scattering attenuations. We use a multiple lapse time windows analysis (MLTWA) to determinate the relative contributions of intrinsic absorption and scattering processes to the total regional attenuation in the crust. A single isotropic scattering model assuming a uniform half-space lithosphere is used to fit MLTWA predicted and measured energies from the records of 232 regional earthquakes recorded at 17 short-period and 5 broad-band local seismic stations. Analysis is performed for a set of 10 frequencies between 0.5 and 10 Hz. The frequency-dependent quality factor Q obtained by MLTWA ranges between Q = 77f0.96 in the Northern Israel and Q = 132f0.96 in Southern Israel. Independent estimates of regional coda Q value based on S-wave coda decay rate obtained by averaging of five broad-band Israel Seismic Network stations are approximated by the relation Qc = 126f1.05. As a whole, our findings indicate that in the Israel region, intrinsic absorption prevails over scattering attenuation. Separate analysis for three tectonically different regions in Israel region-Galilee-Lebanon, Judea-Samaria and Eastern Sinai-shows a regional dependence of attenuation parameters. The variation of attenuation characteristics implies different physical mechanisms of seismic attenuation in the Israel region and is related to the differences of structure in the Earth's crust beneath Israel. Such variation in the attenuation patterns is in agreement with the assumption that Northern Israel is tectonically more active than Southern Israel and that in the northern and central parts of Israel the upper crust is more heterogeneous than in the southern part.

  14. Remotely Measuring Trash Fluxes in the Flood Canals of Megacities with Time Lapse Cameras and Computer Vision Algorithms - a Case Study from Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlar, F.; Turpin, E.; Kerkez, B.

    2014-12-01

    As megacities around the world continue to develop at breakneck speeds, future development, investment, and social wellbeing are threatened by a number of environmental and social factors. Chief among these is frequent, persistent, and unpredictable urban flooding. Jakarta, Indonesia with a population of 28 million, is a prime example of a city plagued by such flooding. Yet although Jakarta has ample hydraulic infrastructure already in place with more being constructed, the increasingly severity of the flooding it experiences is not from a lack of hydraulic infrastructure but rather a failure of existing infrastructure. As was demonstrated during the most recent floods in Jakarta, the infrastructure failure is often the result of excessive amounts of trash in the flood canals. This trash clogs pumps and reduces the overall system capacity. Despite this critical weakness of flood control in Jakarta, no data exists on the overall amount of trash in the flood canals, much less on how it varies temporally and spatially. The recent availability of low cost photography provides a means to obtain such data. Time lapse photography postprocessed with computer vision algorithms yields a low cost, remote, and automatic solution to measuring the trash fluxes. When combined with the measurement of key hydrological parameters, a thorough understanding of the relationship between trash fluxes and the hydrology of massive urban areas becomes possible. This work examines algorithm development, quantifying trash parameters, and hydrological measurements followed by data assimilation into existing hydraulic and hydrological models of Jakarta. The insights afforded from such an approach allows for more efficient operating of hydraulic infrastructure, knowledge of when and where critical levels of trash originate from, and the opportunity for community outreach - which is ultimately needed to reduce the trash in the flood canals of Jakarta and megacities around the world.

  15. Time-lapse cinematography-compatible polystyrene-based microwell culture system: a novel tool for tracking the development of individual bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Satoshi; Akai, Tomonori; Somfai, Tamás; Hirayama, Muneyuki; Aikawa, Yoshio; Ohtake, Masaki; Hattori, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Shuji; Hashiyada, Yutaka; Konishi, Kazuyuki; Imai, Kei

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a polystyrene-based well-of-the-well (WOW) system using injection molding to track individual embryos throughout culture using time-lapse cinematography (TLC). WOW culture of bovine embryos following in vitro fertilization was compared with conventional droplet culture (control). No differences between control- and WOW-cultured embryos were observed during development to the blastocyst stage. Morphological quality and inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cell numbers were not different between control- and WOW-derived blastocysts; however, apoptosis in both the ICM and TE cells was reduced in WOW culture (P < 0.01). Oxygen consumption in WOW-derived blastocysts was closer to physiological level than that of control-derived blastocysts. Moreover, WOW culture improved embryo viability, as indicated by increased pregnancy rates at Days 30 and 60 after embryo transfer (P < 0.05). TLC monitoring was performed to evaluate the cleavage pattern and the duration of the first cell cycle of embryos from oocytes collected by ovum pickup; correlations with success of pregnancy were determined. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the cleavage pattern correlated with success of pregnancy (P < 0.05), but cell cycle length did not. Higher pregnancy rates (66.7%) were observed for animals in which transferred blastocysts had undergone normal cleavage, identified by the presence of two blastomeres of the same size without fragmentation, than among those with abnormal cleavage (33.3%). These results suggest that our microwell culture system is a powerful tool for producing and selecting healthy embryos and for identifying viability biomarkers. PMID:20739661

  16. Time-lapse monitoring reveals that vitrification increases the frequency of contraction during the pre-hatching stage in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    SHIMODA, Yuki; KUMAGAI, Jin; ANZAI, Mibuki; KABASHIMA, Katsuya; TOGASHI, Kazue; MIURA, Yasuko; SHIRASAWA, Hiromitsu; SATO, Wataru; KUMAZAWA, Yukiyo; TERADA, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Contraction during the blastocyst stage is observed during embryonic development of various mammals, including humans, but the physiological role of this process is not well understood. Using time-lapse monitoring (TLM), we studied the influence of vitrification and contractions on embryonic development in mice. Mouse embryos were cultured at the 2-cell stage. At the 8-cell stage, embryos were randomly divided into a fresh group (FG) and vitrified group (VG) and observed for up to 144 h. Strong contractions (i.e., contractions causing a decrease in volume of more than 20% and expansion of the perivitelline space) occurred significantly more often in unhatched embryos than hatching embryos in both groups. Regarding hatching embryos, contractions in the pre-hatching stage were significantly more frequent in the VG than the FG. Furthermore, mRNA expression levels of genes related to contractions were determined at three time points, the 8-cell stage, early blastocyst stage, and 20 h after blastocoel formation, with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was no significant difference in Hspa1a expression between the FG and VG, but Hspa1a overexpression was observed just after thawing and tended to decrease gradually thereafter in some blastocysts. Furthermore, in the VG, Atp1a1 tended to show higher expression in the strong contraction group than in the weak contraction group. Overall, vitrification is an excellent method for cryopreservation but could increase contractions in the pre-hatching stage and may increase energy demands of the embryo. Observation of contraction by TLM may improve the evaluation of embryo quality. PMID:26806421

  17. Time lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher returned from Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following two weeks of structural and other testing. The 355-foot-tall structure is to be used by the Spac...

  18. Time-lapse resistivity measurements combined with soil water sampling to characterize solute movement in the unsaturated zone at Oslo airport, Gardermoen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.; Binley, A.; Schotanus, D.; Eggen, G.

    2010-12-01

    Pollution of soils is a widespread problem and is an important part of the still to be implemented Soil Directive (EU). To improve risk assessment, monitoring, and treatment strategies for natural attenuation, we require a better understanding of the effect of soil heterogeneity on contaminant movement and methods for monitoring the effects of this heterogeneity at contaminated sites. Geophysical methods provide indirect measurements of subsurface properties over larger volumes than tradition techniques, and are potentially cost-efficient. However, the usefulness of any individual set of geophysical measurements (akin to a snapshot at one point in time) is severely limited by the problem of non-uniqueness or ambiguity when used to study contaminated sites, where the attendant processes vary in space and time. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate quasi field-scale, extensively instrumented tools, such as the multi-compartment sampler, with non-invasive (geophysical) and invasive (soil sampling, soil water sampling) methods. We illustrate this approach in an application to solute transport at Oslo airport, Norway. The impact of annual infiltration of large quantities of de-icing chemicals at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, represents common challenge for all airports with winter frost. It is also similar to the challenge posed by de-icing salt application along roads. At the research field station at Gardermoen, a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer were added to the snow cover prior to snowmelt and to the surface during an irrigation experiment performed after the snowmelt. In order to link geophysical measurements to solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone, time-lapse cross borehole resistivity as well as surface resistivity measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted. Measurements of soil temperature, and tension were also carried

  19. A low-cost landslide displacement activity assessment from time-lapse photogrammetry and rainfall data: Application to the Tessina landslide site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrieli, F.; Corain, L.; Vettore, L.

    2016-09-01

    Acquiring useful and reliable displacement data from a complex landslide site is often a problem because of large, localized and scattered erosive processes and deformations; the inaccessibility of the site; the high cost of instrumentation and maintenance. However, these data are of fundamental importance not only to hazard assessments but also to understanding the processes at the basis of slope evolution. In this framework, time-lapse photogrammetry can represent a good compromise; the low accuracy is compensated for by the wide-ranging and dense spatial displacement information that can be obtained with inexpensive equipment. Nevertheless, when large displacement monitoring data sets become available, the problem becomes the choice of the most suitable statistical model to describe the probability of movement and adequately simplify the complexity of a scattered, intermittent, and spatially inhomogeneous displacement field. In this paper, an automated displacement detection method, which is based on the absolute image differences and digital correlations from a sequence of photos, was developed and applied to a photographic survey activity at the head of the Tessina landslide (northeastern Italy). The method allowed us to simplify and binarize the displacement field and to recognize the intermittent activity and the peculiar behaviours of different parts of the landslide, which were identified and classified by combining geomorphological and geological information. Moreover, for the first time, sliding correlations between these areas were quantitatively estimated using time-series-based binary logistic regression and the definition of a probability-based directed graph of displacement occurrence that connected the source zones to the lower depletion basin and the main collector channel. Using rainfall data, event-based logistic and Poisson regression models were applied to the upper zones of the landslide to estimate the probability of movement of each scarp

  20. Application of quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI) for evaluation of Mrp2-based drug–drug interaction induced by liver metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Ikenaga, Miho; Fukuda, Hajime; Matsunaga, Norikazu; Tamai, Ikumi

    2012-09-01

    We previously reported a quantitative time-lapse imaging (QTLI)-based analysis method to assess drug–drug interactions (DDI) at multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) in rat sandwich-cultured hepatocyte (SCH) system, utilizing the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, 5-(and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (CDF). Here, we aimed to examine the feasibility of using QTLI to evaluate DDI involving drug metabolite(s) generated in hepatocytes. We used estradiol (E2) and bilirubin as model compounds; both are not substrates of MRP2, whereas their hepatic metabolites, estradiol-17β-glucuronide (E17G) or bilirubin glucuronides, are known to be its substrates as well as inhibitors. When rat SCHs were pre-exposed with E2, fluorescence of CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi decreased depending upon both the duration of pre-exposure and the concentration of extracellular E2. The decrease corresponded with the increase in intracellular concentration of E17G in hepatocytes. Furthermore, cytotoxicity of vinblastine, a substrate of MRP2, was enhanced in SCHs treated with E2. Similarly, CDF accumulated in bile canaliculi was significantly reduced in rat SCHs pre-exposed with bilirubin. In conclusion, these results suggest that phase II biotransformation of a competitor is reflected in alteration of MRP2-mediated CDF transport detected in QTLI. The QTLI might provide a convenient platform to evaluate transporter-based DDIs involving hepatic metabolites of drug candidates without the need to identify the metabolites. -- Highlights: ► Mrp2-mediated CDF transport is inhibited by E2, but not E17G in vesicle study. ► Both E2 and E17G do not compromise CDF formation from CDFDA in hepatocytes. ► CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi is inhibited by E2 or E17G in QTLI. ► Increasing exposure to E2 decreases CDF accumulation in bile canaliculi in QTLI. ► QTLI is feasible to assess Mrp2-based DDI involving drug metabolite in hepatocytes.

  1. Evaluation of a distributed energy balance model for a high-altitude glacier on the Tibetan Plateau using a time lapse camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huintjes, Eva; Sauter, Tobias; Krenscher, Tobias; Maussion, Fabien; Kropacek, Jan; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Guoshuai; Kang, Shichang; Buchroithner, Manfred; Scherer, Dieter; Schneider, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    In the remote and high-altitude mountain areas of the Tibetan Plateau, climate observations as well as glacier-wide mass and energy balance determinations are scarce. Therefore, the application of models to determine reliable information on mass balance and runoff is important. Simultaneously, these circumstances make it difficult to evaluate the models. Since 2009, we operate an automatic weather station (AWS) in the ablation zone of Zhadang Glacier (5.665 m a.s.l.). The glacier is easily accessible. It is situated in the southern-central part of the Tibetan Plateau (30.5°N) in the Nam Co drainage basin and ranges between 5.400 and 5.900 m a.s.l. Based on these measurements over 2009-2012, we run and evaluate a physically based, distributed energy and mass balance model. The applied model couples an energy balance to a multilayer snow model and therefore accounts for subsurface processes like refreezing, subsurface melt and densification of the snowpack. First, the model is evaluated at point scale against measurements from the AWS. The results show that modelled accumulation and ablation patterns reproduce the observed changes in surface height very well. To evaluate the distributed model, we use daily images of a time lapse camera system installed nearby the glacier over 2010-2012. Therefore the non calibrated slope images had to be orthorectified using ground control points measured during field campaigns. The temporally and spatially highly resolved time series allows a detailed evaluation of the distributed energy balance model by analyzing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the snow line during the ablation season. First results show that the model captures the observed spatial heterogeneity of melt on the glacier surface. Subsequently to the evaluation the model will be applied on several glaciers and small ice caps in remote areas on the Tibetan Plateau to determine the linkages between climate fluctuations and glacier variability. The work is part

  2. Monitoring snowmelt and solute transport at Oslo airport by combining time-lapse electrical resistivity, soil water sampling and tensiometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring contaminant transport at contaminated sites requires optimization of the configuration of a limited number of samplings points combined with heterogeneous flow and preferential flowpaths. Especially monitoring processes in the unsaturated zone is a major challenge due to the limited volume monitored by for example suction cups and their risk to clog in a highly active degradation zone. To make progress on soil contamination assessment and site characterization there is a strong need to integrate field-sale extensively instrumented tools, with non-invasive (geophysical) methods which provide spatially integrated measurements also in the unsaturated zone. Examples of sites that might require monitoring activities in the unsaturated zone are airports with winter frost where large quantities of de-icing chemicals are used each winter; salt and contaminant infiltration along roads; constructed infiltration systems for treatment of sewerage or landfill seepage. Electrical resistivity methods have proved to be useful as an indirect measurement of subsurface properties and processes at the field-scale. The non-uniqueness of the interpretation techniques can be reduced by constraining the inversion through the addition of independent geophysical measurements along the same profile. Or interpretation and understanding of geophysical images can be improved by the combination with classical measurements of soil physical properties, soil suction, contaminant concentration and temperatures. In our experiment, at the research field station at Gardermoen, Oslo airport, we applied a degradable de-icing chemical and an inactive tracer to the snow cover prior to snowmelt. To study the solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone time-lapse cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements were conducted at the same time as soil water samples were extracted at multiple depths with suction cups. Measurements of soil temperature, and soil tension were

  3. Developments and field tests of low-frequency portable acoustic transducers for a mobile exploration and time lapse experiment of a sea-bottom reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kondo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Depth, scale and resolutions of geophysical explorations for mineral resources are controlled by transmitted seismic energy and wavelength (frequency range). Most explorations in marine have been conducted by survey ship system with arrayed acoustic sources whose dominant frequency range is about 10 to 500 Hz. On the other hand, for shallow parts of sea bottom structure survey, some sub-bottom profilers with frequency range around 3.5kHz are used. To monitor a time lapse of a sea bottom reservoir such as an oil, gas, or methane hydrate reservoir as well as to exploit a mobile survey near a sea bottom by AUVs, it is necessary to use a broadband portable acoustic transducer with a dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 5 kHz. We have been developing several types of portable acoustic transducers and a transmitting and recording system which is accurately controlled by a GPS clock (Tsuruga et al., 2012). In this pater, we report the new broadband acoustic portable transducers which have larger power than the original cylindrical acoustic transducers in a low frequency range (<5 kHz), partly funded by JOGMEC, and show the preliminary results of field tests at the shallow sea bottom around 32 m deep by means of the transducers and hydrophone receivers array. Each transducer repeatedly transmitted Chirp signals with a unit period of 500 msec in two frequency ranges of 0.5k-4.5kHz and 4k-16kHz . We stacked 500-ms data by 28 times to obtain a transfer function of each source-receiver pair in the time and frequency domains. The preliminary results suggest as the follows: (i) it is successful to broaden the frequency bandwidth (i.e., 2k-10kHz) by extending a geometrical resonance length of a cylindrical acoustic transducers, and (ii) the observation at the sea bottom with accurately controlled timing systems of transmitter and data-logger is very useful to identify the stable and/or unstable seismic phases, that is, waves propagating in a underground and/or in a sea water as

  4. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. PMID:27103399

  5. Characterizing a Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir for CO2-EOR and Carbon Geosequestration: Applicability of Existing Rock Physics Models and Implications to Feasibility of a Time Lapse Monitoring Program in the Wellington Oil Field, Sumner County, Kansas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, A. J.; Raef, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study will focus on characterizing subsurface rock formations of the Wellington Field, in Sumner County, Kansas, for both geosequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the saline Arbuckle formation and enhanced oil recovery of a depleting Mississippian oil reservoir. Multi-scale data including lithofacies core samples, X-ray diffraction, digital rock physics scans, scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, well log data including sonic and dipole sonic, and surface 3D seismic reflection data will be integrated to establish and/or validate a new or existing rock physics model that best represents our reservoir rock types and characteristics. We will acquire compressional wave velocity and shear wave velocity data from Mississippian and Arbuckle cores by running ultrasonic tests using an Ult 100 Ultrasonic System and a 12 ton hydraulic jack located in the geophysics lab in Thompson Hall at Kansas State University. The elastic constants Young's Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Shear (Rigidity) Modulus and Poisson's Ratio will be extracted from these velocity data. Ultrasonic velocities will also be compared to sonic and dipole sonic log data from the Wellington 1-32 well. These data will be integrated to validate a lithofacies classification statistical model, which will be and partially has been applied to the largely unknown saline Arbuckle formation, with hopes for a connection, perhaps via Poisson's ratio, allowing a time-lapse seismic feasibility assessment and potentially developing a transformation of compressional wave sonic velocities to shear wave sonic for all wells, where compressional wave sonic is available. We will also be testing our rock physics model by predicting effects of changing effective (brine + CO2 +hydrocarbon) fluid composition on seismic properties and the implications on feasibility of seismic monitoring. Lessons learned from characterizing the Mississippian are essential to understanding the potential of utilizing similar workflows for the

  6. Time Lapse Photography From Arctic Buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentic, T. A.; Matrai, P.; Woods, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    We have equipped a number of buoys with cameras that have been deployed throughout the Arctic. These systems need to be simple, reliable and low power. The images are transmitted over an Iridium satellite link and assembled into long running movies. We have captured a number of interesting events, observed the ice dynamics through the year and visits by local wildlife. Each of the systems have been deployed for periods of up to a year, with images every hour. The cameras have proved to be a great outreach tool and are routinely watched by number of people on our websites. This talk will present the techniques used in developing these camera systems, the methods used for reliably transmitting the images and the process for generating the movies.

  7. Endeavour Mated to SCA Time-Lapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is mounted atop NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, or SCA, in preparation for its ferry flight to Ca...

  8. Noradrenergic Genotype Predicts Lapses in Sustained Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ciara M.; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Gill, Michael; Robertson, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    Sustained attention is modulated by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. The balance of dopamine and noradrenaline in the cortex is controlled by the DBH gene. The principal variant in this gene is a C/T change at position-1021, and the T allele at this locus is hypothesised to result in a slower rate of dopamine to noradrenaline conversion than…

  9. Things Forgotten: Simple Lapse or Serious Problem?

    MedlinePlus

    ... concentration problems that concern you Web Sites Understanding Memory Loss Forgetfulness: Knowing When to Ask for Help Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery ... of Communications and Public Liaison

  10. Time-lapse seismic tomography using the data of microseismic monitoring network and analysis of mine-induced events, seismic tomography results and technological data in Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevalainen, Jouni; Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2016-04-01

    We present results of a seismic travel-time tomography applied to microseismic data from the Pyhäsalmi mine, Finland. The data about microseismic events in the mine is recorded since 2002 when the passive microseismic monitoring network was installed in the mine. Since that over 130000 microseismic events have been observed. The first target of our study was to test can the passive microseismic monitoring data be used with travel-time tomography. In this data set the source-receiver geometry is based on non-even distribution of natural and mine-induced events inside and in the vicinity of the mine and hence, is a non-ideal one for the travel-time tomography. The tomographic inversion procedure was tested with the synthetic data and real source-receiver geometry from Pyhäsalmi mine and with the real travel-time data of the first arrivals of P-waves from the microseismic events. The results showed that seismic tomography is capable to reveal differences in seismic velocities in the mine area corresponding to different rock types. For example, the velocity contrast between the ore body and surrounding rock is detectable. The velocity model recovered agrees well with the known geological structures in the mine area. The second target of the study was to apply the travel-time tomography to microseismic monitoring data recorded during different time periods in order to track temporal changes in seismic velocities within the mining area as the excavation proceeds. The result shows that such a time-lapse travel-time tomography can recover such changes. In order to obtain good ray coverage and good resolution, the time interval for a single tomography round need to be selected taking into account the number of events and their spatial distribution. The third target was to compare and analyze mine-induced event locations, seismic tomography results and mining technological data (for example, mine excavation plans) in order to understand the influence of mining technology

  11. Imaging Mouse Development with Confocal Time-Lapse Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowotschin, Sonja; Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The gene expression, signaling, and cellular dynamics driving mouse embryo development have emerged through embryology and genetic studies. However, since mouse development is a temporally regulated three-dimensional process, any insight needs to be placed in this context of real-time visualization. Live imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent protein reporters is pushing the envelope of our understanding by uncovering unprecedented insights into mouse development and leading to the formulation of quantitative accurate models. PMID:20691876

  12. Optimal experiment design for time-lapse traveltime tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ajo-Franklin, J.B.

    2009-10-01

    Geophysical monitoring techniques offer the only noninvasive approach capable of assessing both the spatial and temporal dynamics of subsurface fluid processes. Increasingly, permanent sensor arrays in boreholes and on the ocean floor are being deployed to improve the repeatability and increase the temporal sampling of monitoring surveys. Because permanent arrays require a large up-front capital investment and are difficult (or impossible) to re-configure once installed, a premium is placed on selecting a geometry capable of imaging the desired target at minimum cost. We present a simple approach to optimizing downhole sensor configurations for monitoring experiments making use of differential seismic traveltimes. In our case, we use a design quality metric based on the accuracy of tomographic reconstructions for a suite of imaging targets. By not requiring an explicit singular value decomposition of the forward operator, evaluation of this objective function scales to problems with a large number of unknowns. We also restrict the design problem by recasting the array geometry into a low dimensional form more suitable for optimization at a reasonable computational cost. We test two search algorithms on the design problem: the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex method and the Multilevel Coordinate Search algorithm. The algorithm is tested for four crosswell acquisition scenarios relevant to continuous seismic monitoring, a two parameter array optimization, several scenarios involving four parameter length/offset optimizations, and a comparison of optimal multi-source designs. In the last case, we also examine trade-offs between source sparsity and the quality of tomographic reconstructions. One general observation is that asymmetric array lengths improve localized image quality in crosswell experiments with a small number of sources and a large number of receivers. Preliminary results also suggest that high-quality differential images can be generated using only a small number of optimally positioned sources.

  13. Time-Lapse View of Earth's Limb from the ISS

    NASA Video Gallery

    Bright swaths of red in the upper atmosphere, known as airglow, can be seen in this video captured by the International Space Station. NASA's ICON mission, with a planned launch for the summer of 2...

  14. Speeding in school zones: violation or lapse in prospective memory?

    PubMed

    Gregory, Bree; Irwin, Julia D; Faulks, Ian J; Chekaluk, Eugene

    2014-09-01

    Inappropriate speed is a causal factor in around one third of fatal accidents (OECD/ECMT, 2006). But are drivers always consciously responsible for their speeding behavior? Two studies are reported which show that an interruption to a journey, caused by stopping at a red traffic light, can result in failure to resume the speed of travel prior to the interruption (Study 1). In Study 2 we showed that the addition of a reminder cue could offset this interruption. These studies were conducted in a number of Australian school zone sites subject to a 40 km/h speed limit, requiring a reduction of between 20 km/h and 40 km/h. Motorists who had stopped at a red traffic signal sped on average, 8.27 km/h over the speed limit compared with only 1.76 km/h over the limit for those who had not been required to stop. In the second study a flashing "check speed" reminder cue, placed 70 m after the traffic lights, in the same school zones as those in Study 1 eliminated the interruptive effect of stopping with drivers resuming their journey at the legal speed. These findings have practical implications for the design of road environments, enforcement of speed limits, and the safety of pedestrians. PMID:24884545

  15. Spatially Locating Time-Lapsed Relative Velocity Changes in Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seats, K.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we examine temporal subsurface relative velocity variations in Yellowstone. This project region has a much larger spatial scaling, as well as a much longer, less abrupt, temporal change than most of the other active settings in which ambient noise temporal velocity variations are measured. By examining the time lag of the ambient Noise Correlation Function (NCF) for a given station pair, we can extract relative velocity variations. These changes represent either subsurface velocity changes (in active settings) or changes due to the seasonal variation in the ambient seismic field. We improve the temporal and spectral stability of the NCFs through a new filter (the adaptive covariance filter - ACF), which allows us to evaluate the main Rayleigh wave arrival rather than coda. By making use of the main arrival the spatial location of these changes can be better understood. We examine all of the available data near the Yellowstone National Park area, including the USArray and the NOISY networks. Using the ACF, we calculate robust NCFs for all station pairs (overlapping in time). We then obtain time-lag estimates of the main arrival for various calendar times throughout the data availability. These lags are then compared to the lags observed at all other spatial station pairs. Using these many combinations of station pairs and lags, we build and perform an inversion, where these relative velocities are compared to a background velocity at subsequently different times. The spatial location of the velocity changes can be observed over time, and it can be ascertained as to whether these observed velocity variations are due to subsurface changes (such as the inflationary uplift from 2004-2010 in Yellowstone), or whether the observed changes are more indicative of the regional changes in the ambient seismic field.

  16. Integrated time-lapse geoelectrical imaging of wetland hydrological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S. S.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; House, A. R.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Roberts, C.; Gooddy, D. C.; Binley, A. M.; Chambers, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    Wetlands provide crucial habitats, are critical in the global carbon cycle, and act as key biogeochemical and hydrological buffers. The effectiveness of these services is mainly controlled by hydrological processes, which can be highly variable both spatially and temporally due to structural complexity and seasonality. Spatial analysis of 2-D geoelectrical monitoring data integrated into the interpretation of conventional hydrological data has been implemented to provide a detailed understanding of hydrological processes in a riparian wetland. A two-layered hydrological system was observed in the peat. In the lower part of the peat, upwelling of deeper groundwater from underlying deposits was considered the driver for a 30% increase in peat resistivity during Winter/Spring. In Spring/Summer there was a 60% decrease in resistivity in the near-surface peats due to plant transpiration and/or microbial activity. Water exchange between the layers only appeared to be initiated following large drops in the encircling surface water stage. For the first time, we demonstrated that automated interpretation of geoelectrical data can be used to quantify ground movement in the vertical direction. Here, we applied this method to quantify shrink-swell of expandable soils, affecting hydrological parameters, such as, porosity and permeability. This study shows that an integrated interpretation of hydrological and geophysical data can significantly improve the understanding of wetland hydrological processes. Potentially, this approach can provide the basis for the evaluation of ecosystem services and may aid in the optimization of wetland management strategies.

  17. Union faces trial for accusing employer of HIV safety lapses.

    PubMed

    1999-09-17

    The Service Employees International Union faces defamation charges after accusing Intercity Maintenance Co. of violating safety laws by not providing workers with gloves and other protection from HIV and hepatitis B. Intercity provides janitorial services for commercial buildings, including hospitals. During the heat of a campaign to organize its workers, the union made statements concerning safety violations which Intercity claimed interfered with the company's business relationship with a health-care insurer. The suit claims a violation of the Rhode Island Privacy Act because Intercity was placed in a false light. The judge found that the union's chief organizer, [name removed], may have acted with malice by accusing Intercity of violating State and Federal laws without proof. PMID:11366822

  18. Novel instrumentation for multifield time-lapse cinemicrography.

    PubMed

    Kallman, R F; Blevins, N; Coyne, M A; Prionas, S D

    1990-04-01

    The most significant feature of the system that is described is its ability to image essentially simultaneously the growth of up to 99 single cells into macroscopic colonies, each in its own microscope field. Operationally, fields are first defined and programmed by a trained observer. All subsequent steps are automatic and under computer control. Salient features of the hardware are stepper motor-controlled movement of the stage and fine adjustment of an inverted microscope, a high-quality 16-mm cine camera with light meter and controls, and a miniature incubator in which cells may be grown under defined conditions directly on the microscope stage. This system, termed MUTLAS, necessitates reordering of the primary images by rephotographing them on fresh film. Software developed for the analysis of cell and colony growth requires frame-by-frame examination of the secondary film and the use of a mouse-driven cursor to trace microscopically visible (4X objective magnification) events. PMID:2185920

  19. 26 CFR 25.2704-1 - Lapse of certain rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... previously valued under section 2701 to the extent necessary to prevent double taxation (taking into account... reason of the transfer. Example 5. D and D's two children, A and B, are partners in Partnership X. Each... agreement provides that when a general partner withdraws or dies, X must redeem the general...

  20. 26 CFR 25.2704-1 - Lapse of certain rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... previously valued under section 2701 to the extent necessary to prevent double taxation (taking into account... reason of the transfer. Example 5. D and D's two children, A and B, are partners in Partnership X. Each... agreement provides that when a general partner withdraws or dies, X must redeem the general...

  1. Time-Lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher that will host NASA's Space Launch System and new Orion spacecraft was moved to Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to begin two weeks of structural and sys...

  2. Opioid Abstinence Reinforcement Delays Heroin Lapse during Buprenorphine Dose Tapering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Mark K.

    2008-01-01

    A positive reinforcement contingency increased opioid abstinence during outpatient dose tapering (4, 2, then 0 mg/day during Weeks 1 through 3) in non-treatment-seeking heroin-dependent volunteers who had been maintained on buprenorphine (8 mg/day) during an inpatient research protocol. The control group (n = 12) received $4.00 for completing…

  3. Time-Lapse Photography in Recording Classroom Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Rob; Adelman, Clem

    An observational recording system was devised to record and to replay the stream of classroom events--nonverbal events, as well as verbal. Although videotape recording/closed circuit television has been used in similar systems, the one here used selected 35mm. stills made from 16mm. film. The stills were then synchronized with tape recordings and…

  4. Reclaiming Instructional Integrity: Probing Ethical Lapses in College Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Jon E.; Scott, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    Suffering from chronic underfunding and in a headlong race to compete with for-profit higher education, institutions across America are struggling to maintain their operations, and some are forced into desperate measures just to survive. Administrators and faculty faced with these challenges are not immune to compromising the quality of…

  5. 78 FR 32632 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...-36B Infrared Decoy Flares, 30,000 RR-188 w/BBU-35B Training Chaff, 3,750 BDU-33D/B w/lugs/ Mk4 spot... (RNLAF) F-16 Formal Training Unit (FTU), 50,000 MJU-7B w/BBU-36B Infrared Decoy Flares, 30,000 RR-188...

  6. Data link relay design. [space probe with entry at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, P.

    1974-01-01

    The data link for the Ames baseline probe as applied to the MJU spacecraft specifically with an entry at Uranus is analyzed. A frequency analysis, a trajectory analysis, and a discussion of the effects on the spacecraft design by the data link are presented. The possibilities of a two-way link are considered.

  7. Time-lapsed integrated Raman and angular scattering microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, Dustin W.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Integrated Raman- and Angular-scatteringMicroscopy (IRAM) combines two light scattering techniques to make chemical and morphological measurements of intact, single cells without the use of external labeling. IRAM has previously demonstrated its ability to differentiate between activated and non-activated CD8+ T cells based on both chemical and morphological differences. Activated cells showed an increase in protein and lipid content as well as an increase in the size and number of 0.5-1.0 μm diameter scatterers (likely lysosomes). Recent improvements to the IRAM system enable studies over an extended period of time. The applications of IRAM to chemical and structural changes of single cells during biological processes and treatments will be discussed.

  8. Time-lapse imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Khlghatyan, Jivan; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2012-01-01

    There is a substantial body of evidence indicating that new functional neurons are constitutively generated from an endogenous pool of neural stem cells in restricted areas of the adult mammalian brain. Newborn neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to their final destination in the olfactory bulb (OB). In the RMS, neuroblasts migrate tangentially in chains ensheathed by astrocytic processes using blood vessels as a structural support and a source of molecular factors required for migration. In the OB, neuroblasts detach from the chains and migrate radially into the different bulbar layers where they differentiate into interneurons and integrate into the existing network. In this manuscript we describe the procedure for monitoring cell migration in acute slices of the rodent brain. The use of acute slices allows the assessment of cell migration in the microenvironment that closely resembling to in vivo conditions and in brain regions that are difficult to access for in vivo imaging. In addition, it avoids long culturing condition as in the case of organotypic and cell cultures that may eventually alter the migration properties of the cells. Neuronal precursors in acute slices can be visualized using DIC optics or fluorescent proteins. Viral labeling of neuronal precursors in the SVZ, grafting neuroblasts from reporter mice into the SVZ of wild-type mice, and using transgenic mice that express fluorescent protein in neuroblasts are all suitable methods for visualizing neuroblasts and following their migration. The later method, however, does not allow individual cells to be tracked for long periods of time because of the high density of labeled cells. We used a wide-field fluorescent upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera to achieve a relatively rapid acquisition interval (one image every 15 or 30 sec) to reliably identify the stationary and migratory phases. A precise identification of the duration of the stationary and migratory phases is crucial for the unambiguous interpretation of results. We also performed multiple z-step acquisitions to monitor neuroblasts migration in 3D. Wide-field fluorescent imaging has been used extensively to visualize neuronal migration. Here, we describe detailed protocol for labeling neuroblasts, performing real-time video-imaging of neuroblast migration in acute slices of the adult mouse forebrain, and analyzing cell migration. While the described protocol exemplified the migration of neuroblasts in the adult RMS, it can also be used to follow cell migration in embryonic and early postnatal brains. PMID:23007608

  9. Mind wandering minimizes mind numbing: Reducing semantic-satiation effects through absorptive lapses of attention.

    PubMed

    Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-08-01

    Mind wandering is associated with perceptual decoupling: the disengagement of attention from perception. This decoupling is deleterious to performance in many situations; however, we sought to determine whether it might occur in the service of performance in certain circumstances. In two studies, we examined the role of mind wandering in a test of "semantic satiation," a phenomenon in which the repeated presentation of a word reduces semantic priming for a subsequently presented semantic associate. We posited that the attentional and perceptual decoupling associated with mind wandering would reduce the amount of satiation in the semantic representations of repeatedly presented words, thus leading to a reduced semantic-satiation effect. Our results supported this hypothesis: Self-reported mind-wandering episodes (Study 1) and behavioral indices of decoupled attention (Study 2) were both predictive of maintained semantic priming in situations predicted to induce semantic satiation. Additionally, our results suggest that moderate inattention to repetitive stimuli is not sufficient to enable "dishabituation": the refreshment of cognitive performance that results from diverting attention away from the task at hand. Rather, full decoupling is necessary to reap the benefits of mind wandering and to minimize mind numbing. PMID:26739259

  10. 26 CFR 1.83-5 - Restrictions that will never lapse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determined under the formula price will be considered to be the fair market value of the property unless... transferee to sell such stock only at a formula price based on book value, a reasonable multiple of earnings... circumstances the formula price will not be considered to be the fair market value of property subject to such...

  11. 26 CFR 1.83-5 - Restrictions that will never lapse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determined under the formula price will be considered to be the fair market value of the property unless... transferee to sell such stock only at a formula price based on book value, a reasonable multiple of earnings... circumstances the formula price will not be considered to be the fair market value of property subject to such...

  12. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Surveys of the Intertidal Zone: Implications for Submarine Groundwater Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, J. M.; Wong, T.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is now widely recognized as a crucial contributor to surface water as it provides a pathway for nutrients and contaminants that can significantly impact coastal ecosystems. Field measurements in the vicinity of the freshwater/seawater interface (FSI) have shown that the spatio-temporal distribution of SGD can be highly heterogeneous. Some numerical models have identified 3 regions (a density-driven circulation cell offshore, an upper saline plume and a freshwater tube in the intertidal zone) which seem to persist over time, such that the distinct regions can be recognized in simulations that average the numerically predicted salinity profiles over the tidal phases. The size and shape of each region are influenced by factors such as the tidal and wave loading, inland hydraulic gradient, beach geometry and aquifer properties. There is a paucity of field data at the FSI on the evolution of the salinity profile during a tidal cycle. To characterize the spatio-temporal heterogeneities of the FSI and compare with numerical predictions, we used electrical resistivity as a proxy for salinity. Electrical resistivity surveys were acquired during a 12-hour cycle in a tidally dominated environment. On September 12 2012, at West Neck Bay (Shelter Island, NY), a 33.4 m long stationary cable with 56 electrodes was extended over land and sea to image the intertidal zone. Hourly measurements were conducted over a full tidal cycle. Our measurements indicate fundamentally different scenarios during high and low tide. At low tide, our resistivity data suggest a strong influx of freshwater from land, forming a plume that rises up and contributes significantly to SGD in the intertidal zone. We also observed the occurrence of 3 regions somewhat analogous to the numerical predictions. However, at high tide, instead of these distinct regions, we observed a diffuse mixing zone that extended along the water/sediment interface and overlaid the freshwater from land. Point measurements of seepage rates and salinity are in basic agreement with the two scenarios. It should also be noted that the phase-averaged section obtained with the resistivity surveys resembles the high tide scenario and therefore differs from the phase-averaged simulations.

  13. In situ visualization of magma deformation at high temperature using time-lapse 3D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Lee, Peter; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Von-Aulock, Felix

    2016-04-01

    We use synchrotron based x-ray computed micro-tomography (sCT) to visualize, in situ, the microstructural evolution of magma samples 3 mm diameter with a resolution of 3 μm during heating and uniaxial compression at temperatures up to 1040 °C. The interaction between crystals, melt and gas bubbles is analysed in 4D (3D + time) during sample deformation. The ability to observe the changes of the microstructure as a function of time allow us to: a) study the effect of temperature in the ability of magma to fracture or deform; b) quantify bubble nucleation and growth rates during heating; c) study the relation between crystal displacement and volatile exsolution. We will show unique beautiful videos of how bubbles grow and coalescence, how samples and crystals within the sample fracture, heal and deform. Our study establishes in situ sCT as a powerful tool to quantify and visualize with micro-scale resolution fast processes taking place in magma that are essential to understand ascent in a volcanic conduit and validate existing models for determining the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Tracking simultaneously the time and spatial changes of magma microstructures is shown to be primordial to study disequilibrium processes between crystals, melt and gas phases.

  14. Very high resolution time-lapse photography for plant and ecosystems research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very high resolution gigapixel photography increasingly is being used to support a broad range of ecosystem and physical process research because it offers an inexpensive means of simultaneously collecting information at a range of spatial scales. Recently, methods have been developed to incorporate...

  15. Morphological Changes of Tidal Headland Connected Sandbanks infered from Time Lapse Multibeam Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, T.; Mitchell, N. C.; Ramsay, T.

    2003-04-01

    Sandbanks are commonly found near irregularities of the coastline. A popular hypothesis for their origin states that interaction of tidal currents with a coastal headland induces vortices in residual currents downstream of it. Such vortices lead to the development and maintenance of such sandbanks (Pingree and Maddock, 1979). We have surveyed two headland-connected sandbanks in the Bristol Channel (South Wales, UK), the Helwick and the Nash Sand Banks, using a new Reson Seabat 8101 multibeam echo-sounder owned by Cardiff University. Around the Helwick sand bank, we surveyed an area encompassing the connection of the bank with the south Gower coast, the headland (Port Eynon Point) and the offshore part of a bay (Port Eynon Bay) to infer the distribution of bedforms and to test the above hypothesis. On the southern side of the bank, close to its connection with the coastline, an area has been surveyed on two occasions separated by a year to infer the ability of multibeam sonar to track the mobility of the bedforms around the bank. Sandwaves of ~5 m high and 100-200 m spacing are superimposed on the bank. Their lee sides, on the southern side of the bank, point to the west, indicating an ebb-dominated sediment movement, whereas their shape changes towards the crest of the bank to a more symmetrical form. On the northern side of the bank their orientations indicate that they are dominated by flood flow. Hence the sandwaves orientations suggest a circular flow pattern around the bank, as expected. This study forms part of a time-series comparison of successive multibeam surveys of this area. Preliminary comparisons of the two first surveys (September 2001-August 2002) indicates a differential migration of the bedforms of ~40m on the northern flank of the bank towards the east and ~80m on the southern side towards the west. Such migration of the sandwaves is similar to the direction of the residual currents downstream of the headland mentioned by the Pingree and Maddock

  16. Time-lapse Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data and its Applications to Geothermal Prospecting - GEODE

    SciTech Connect

    Revil, Andre

    2015-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to develop new algorithms to decrease the cost of drilling for geothermal targets during the exploration phase of a hydrothermal field and to improve the monitoring of a geothermal field to better understand its plumbing system and keep the resource renewable. We developed both new software and algorithms for geothermal explorations (that can also be used in other areas of interest to the DOE) and we applied the methods to a geothermal field of interest to ORMAT in Nevada.

  17. Time-Lapse Monitoring for Detection of Transient Stress Changes in Geysers Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.

    2011-12-01

    Temporal changes in the properties of seismic structures are indicators of stress changes at depth, providing a means of continually monitoring the state of stress at seismogenic depth. At the Geysers geothermal field, we investigate stress-induced structural changes by making use of continuous seismic data at high sampling rates from dense seismic networks operated by LBNL and USGS. Our principal focus is on the imaging of time-varying properties of the seismic noise wavefield. Following Bensen et al. (2007) and Brenguier et al. (2008), we analyzed data from August to December 2006, spanning the time of the 20 October 2006 Mw 4.6 Geysers earthquake. A reference Green's function was computed for each station pair by stacking the daily cross-correlations for the entire 5-month period. The changes in seismic structure were determined by measuring time delays between the reference Green's function and 30-day stacks of cross-correlation functions in the frequency range from 0.1 to 0.9 Hz. Our preliminary result shows a change in cross-correlation function immediately after the 2006 Mw 4.6 Geysers earthquake, indicating that the delay time was increased by 0.08 s. We infer the increased delay time to be a change in seismic velocity structure due to a fluid redistribution around the fault resulting from a combination of both post-seismic stress relaxation and fault-zone damage induced by the Mw 4.6 earthquake. The preliminary seismic moment tensor analysis indicates a non double-couple component (40% explosive isotropic component) in the source process of the Mw 4.6 Geysers earthquake, which could also indicate a migration of fluid flow accompanying this Geysers event. Following Peng and Zhao (2009), we have additionally been identifying undetected early aftershocks with a cross-correlation based approach. We use waveforms from 200 Geysers earthquakes detected by the Northern California Seismic Network System during a 2-day period spanning the 2006 Geysers earthquake as templates to identify additional, previously undetected earthquakes. Using continuous data recorded from broadband stations, our preliminary analysis has detected ~500 individual earthquakes during the 1 day following the 2006 mainshock, with the averaged cross-correlation threshold of 0.65. We have identified two times more aftershocks than listed in the Northern California earthquake catalog. Moreover, we explore changes in seismic anisotropy properties through rotation of quasi-Rayleigh and quasi-Love wave polarization angels. Our result shows that a strong Rayleigh pulse at 0.4 s for both the vertical and radial point-force sources and a Love pulse at 0.3 s for the transverse point-force source are retrieved from data recorded at LBNL three-component geophones (about 2 km station distance), which will allow us to investigate temporal changes in seismic anisotropy in this area.

  18. 26 CFR 1.83-5 - Restrictions that will never lapse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., in the case of property subject to a nonlapse restriction (as defined in § 1.83-3(h)), the price determined under the formula price will be considered to be the fair market value of the property unless... transferee to sell such stock only at a formula price based on book value, a reasonable multiple of...

  19. 75 FR 68038 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Reinstatement (Insurance Lapsed More than 6 Months...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... comment. The PRA submission describes the nature of the information collection and its expected cost and...), Government Life Insurance and/or Total Disability Income Provision, VA Form 29-352. b. Application for Reinstatement (Non Medical--Comparative Health ] Statement), Government Life Insurance, VA Form 29-353....

  20. Time-lapse contact microscopy of cell cultures based on non-coherent illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marion; Balle, Dorothée; Bigault, Stéphanie; Pornin, Cyrille; Gétin, Stéphane; Perraut, François; Block, Marc R.; Chatelain, François; Picollet-D’hahan, Nathalie; Gidrol, Xavier; Haguet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Video microscopy offers outstanding capabilities to investigate the dynamics of biological and pathological mechanisms in optimal culture conditions. Contact imaging is one of the simplest imaging architectures to digitally record images of cells due to the absence of any objective between the sample and the image sensor. However, in the framework of in-line holography, other optical components, e.g., an optical filter or a pinhole, are placed underneath the light source in order to illuminate the cells with a coherent or quasi-coherent incident light. In this study, we demonstrate that contact imaging with an incident light of both limited temporal and spatial coherences can be achieved with sufficiently high quality for most applications in cell biology, including monitoring of cell sedimentation, rolling, adhesion, spreading, proliferation, motility, death and detachment. Patterns of cells were recorded at various distances between 0 and 1000 μm from the pixel array of the image sensors. Cells in suspension, just deposited or at mitosis focalise light into photonic nanojets which can be visualised by contact imaging. Light refraction by cells significantly varies during the adhesion process, the cell cycle and among the cell population in connection with every modification in the tridimensional morphology of a cell. PMID:26459014

  1. Background intensity correction for terabyte-sized time-lapse images.

    PubMed

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Bhadriraju, K; Lund, S; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-03-01

    Several computational challenges associated with large-scale background image correction of terabyte-sized fluorescent images are discussed and analysed in this paper. Dark current, flat-field and background correction models are applied over a mosaic of hundreds of spatially overlapping fields of view (FOVs) taken over the course of several days, during which the background diminishes as cell colonies grow. The motivation of our work comes from the need to quantify the dynamics of OCT-4 gene expression via a fluorescent reporter in human stem cell colonies. Our approach to background correction is formulated as an optimization problem over two image partitioning schemes and four analytical correction models. The optimization objective function is evaluated in terms of (1) the minimum root mean square (RMS) error remaining after image correction, (2) the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reached after downsampling and (3) the minimum execution time. Based on the analyses with measured dark current noise and flat-field images, the most optimal GFP background correction is obtained by using a data partition based on forming a set of submosaic images with a polynomial surface background model. The resulting image after correction is characterized by an RMS of about 8, and an SNR value of a 4 × 4 downsampling above 5 by Rose criterion. The new technique generates an image with half RMS value and double SNR value when compared to an approach that assumes constant background throughout the mosaic. We show that the background noise in terabyte-sized fluorescent image mosaics can be corrected computationally with the optimized triplet (data partition, model, SNR driven downsampling) such that the total RMS value from background noise does not exceed the magnitude of the measured dark current noise. In this case, the dark current noise serves as a benchmark for the lowest noise level that an imaging system can achieve. In comparison to previous work, the past fluorescent image background correction methods have been designed for single FOV and have not been applied to terabyte-sized images with large mosaic FOVs, low SNR and diminishing access to background information over time as cell colonies span entirely multiple FOVs. The code is available as open-source from the following link https://isg.nist.gov/. PMID:25623496

  2. Sea-floor-mounted rotating side-scan sonar for making time-lapse sonographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; McCulloch, David S.; Hill, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    Records that are collected with this system offer several advantages over records that are collected with towed systems. Bottom features are presented in nearly true plan geometry, and transducer yaw, pitch, and roll are eliminated. Most importantly, repeated observations can be made from a single point, and bedform movements of <50 cm can be measured. In quiet seas the maximum useful range of the system varies from 30 m (for mapping ripples) to 200 m (for mapping 10-m wavelength sand waves) to 450 m or more (for mapping gravel patches).

  3. Surface velocities at Engabreen produced from time-lapse feature tracking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerli, Alexandra; Grinsted, Aslak; Jackson, Miriam; Karlsson, Nanna; Lefeuvre, Pierre-Marie

    2014-05-01

    A six month long time series of images was collected from an automated camera located on the valley sides at Engabreen, northern Norway. The viewshed of the camera overlooks the dominant icefall of Engabreen. This viewshed was chosen for a number of reasons, namely that the icefall is punctuated by deep crevasses and easily tracked features. It is also difficult to instrument the icefall and so alternative methods were needed to obtain velocity measurements, and finally there was already an existing solid mast for mounting in place. Here we present velocity fields over the icefall from 2013 and compare these to SAR produced velocity fields. The velocity fields are produced for periods where interesting subglacial and hydrological events have been identified. We detect the events from various discharge records at the glacier and pressure cells at the base of the glacier, located in the Svartisen Subglacial Laboratory (SSL).

  4. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  5. Estimating spatial variations in water content of clay soils from time-lapse electrical conductivity surveys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content (theta) is one of the most important drivers for many biogeochemical fluxes at different temporal and spatial scales. Hydrogeophysical non-invasive sensors that measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) have been widely used to infer spatial and temporal patterns of...

  6. A time-lapse lidar survey of the Mam Tor landslide, Derbyshire, UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Rutter, Ernest

    2013-04-01

    Since 2004 a terrestrial lidar survey of the Mam Tor landslide in Castleton, Derbyshire, has been undertaken each year. Using a Riegl LMSZ420i laser scanner, the data has been collected during the winter months, while the vegetation is at a minimum, to ensure the surveys record a surface as close to the true geometry of the landslip as possible. These surveys, when combined and viewed in sequence provide an accurate record of the landslides movement over this time. The main challenge in comparing yearly scans of a progressively moving feature (at up to 500mm/year) is to ensure that each year's scan is in the correct place relative to the others, to this end features outside of the landslip are used as reference points to ensure consistent cross referencing of the landslip scans. In addition to this each year the laser scanner is sited in the same position within the study area, to ensure the same areal coverage over consecutive years. In-house software called Virtual Reality Geological Studio (VRGS) is used to interpret and analyse the landslip data (in both point cloud and triangulated mesh form), providing tools for comparing surface elevation, but also to tracking individual features (such as individual boulders) from year to year allowing movement vectors to be mapped across the area of the landslip. These vectors can then be compared with other measurements from total-station surveys to act as a check on the validity of the lidar mapping approach. Topographic sections will be shown through several parts of the slip to facilitate year by year comparison. The landslide itself has formed within the Carboniferous Edale Mudstone Formation, is approximately 900m long, 270 to 300m wide and up to 20m thick. The landslip is estimated to be over 3200 years old.