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Sample records for arf immersion lithography

  1. Defectivity reduction studies for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Kentaro; Kondoh, Takehiro; Kato, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Yuuji; Hayasaki, Kei; Ito, Shinichi; Yoshida, Akira; Shimura, Satoru; Kawasaki, Tetsu; Kyoda, Hideharu

    2007-03-01

    Immersion lithography is widely expected to meet the manufacturing requirements of future device nodes. A critical development in immersion lithography has been the construction of a defect-free process. Two years ago, the authors evaluated the impact of water droplets made experimentally on exposed resist films and /or topcoat. (1) The results showed that the marks of drying water droplet called watermarks became pattern defects with T-top profile. In the case that water droplets were removed by drying them, formation of the defects was prevented. Post-exposure rinse process to remove water droplets also prevented formation of the defects. In the present work, the authors evaluated the effect of pre- and post-exposure rinse processes on hp 55nm line and space pattern with Spin Rinse Process Station (SRS) and Post Immersion Rinse Process Station (PIR) modules on an inline lithography cluster with the Tokyo Electron Ltd. CLEAN TRACK TM LITHIUS TM i+ and ASML TWINSCAN XT:1700Fi , 193nm immersion scanner. It was found that total defectivity is decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. In particular, bridge defects and large bridge defects were decreased by pre- and post-exposure rinse. Pre- and post-exposure rinse processes are very effective to reduce the bridge and large bridge defects of immersion lithography.

  2. Ecology and high-durability injection locked laser with flexible power for double-patterning ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hidenori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masaya; Matsumoto, Shinich; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kurosu, Akihiko; Kawasuji, Yasufumi; Matsunaga, Takashi; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2011-04-01

    ArF immersion technology has been used widely in volume production for 45nm node. For 32nm node and beyond, double patterning technology with ArF immersion lithography is considered to be the main stream solution until EUV is ready. Our target is to reduce CoO(Cost of ownership) and we aim to develop for ecology and high durability laser. We will introduce the latest performance data of the laser built for ArF immersion lithography under the EcoPhoton concept. Eco-photon concept: -CoC (Cost of Consumable) -CoD (Cost of Downtime) -CoE(Cost of Energy & Environment) We have developed flexible and high power injection-lock ArF excimer laser for double patterning, GT62A-1SxE (Max90W/6000Hz/Flexible power with 10-15mJ/0.30pm (E95)) based on the GigaTwin platform5). A number of innovative and unique technologies are implemented on GT62A-1SxE. In addition, GT62A-1SxE is the laser matching the enhancement technology of advanced illumination systems. For example, in order to provide illumination power optimum for resist sensitivity, it has extendable power from 60W to 90W. We have confirmed durability under these concept with the regulated operation condition with flexible power 60-90W. We show the high durability data of GT62A-1SxE with Eco-Photon concept. In addition to the results the field reliability and availability of our Giga Twin series (GT6XA). We also show technologies which made these performances and its actual data. A number of innovative and unique technologies are implemented on GT62A.

  3. Understanding the photoresist surface-liquid interface for ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Will; LeSuer, Robert J.; Fan, Frank F.; Bard, Allen J.; Taylor, Chris; Tsiartas, Pavlos; Willson, Grant; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph

    2005-05-01

    Extraction of small molecule components into water from photoresist materials designed for 193 nm immersion lithography has been observed. Leaching of photoacid generator (PAG) has been monitored using three techniques: liquid scintillation counting (LSC); liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS); and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). LSC was also used to detect leaching of residual casting solvent (RCS) and base. The amount of PAG leaching from the resist films, 30 - 50 ng/cm2, was quantified using LSC. Both LSC and LCMS results suggest that PAG and photoacid leach from the film only upon initial contact with water (within 10 seconds) and minimal leaching occurs thereafter for immersion times up to 30 minutes. Exposed films show an increase in the amount of photoacid anion leaching by upwards of 20% relative to unexposed films. Films pre-rinsed with water for 30 seconds showed no further PAG leaching as determined by LSC. No statistically significant amount of residual casting solvent was extracted after 30 minutes of immersion. Base extraction was quantified at 2 ng/cm2 after 30 seconds. The leaching process is qualitatively described by a model based on the stratigraphy of resist films.

  4. Green solution: 120W ArF immersion light source supporting the next-generation multiple-pattering lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazaki, Takahito; Ohta, Takeshi; Ishida, Keisuke; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Kurosu, Akihiko; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2015-03-01

    The difficulty of EUV lithography system development has prolonged the industry's dependence on ArF excimer lasers to realize further advancements in lithography process technologies. Smaller CD with reduced cost requires tighter specifications, and the potential extension to 450mm wafers introduces extremely difficult performance challenges on lasers. One of the most important features of the next generation lasers will be the ability to support green operations while further improving cost of ownership and performance. For example, electricity consumption costs and the dependence on rare gases, such as neon and helium, will become critical considerations for HVM process going forward. As a laser vendor, Gigaphoton continues to innovate and develop solutions that address these important issues. The latest model GT64A with its field-proven, twin-chamber platform has reduced environmental impact while upgrading performance and power. A variety of green technologies are employed on the GT64A. The first is the reduction of gas usage. Parameters, such as input power and gas pressure are closely monitored during operations and fed back to the injection/exhaust gas controller system. By applying a special algorithm, the laser gas consumption can be reduced by up to 50%. More than 96% of the gas used by the lasers is neon. Another rare gas that requires attention is Helium. Recently the unstable supply of helium became a serious worldwide issue. To cope with this situation, Gigaphoton is developing lasers that support completely helium-free operations.

  5. Study of the mask materials for PTD process and NTD process in practical ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Takashi; Tani, Ayako; Hayano, Katsuya; Takamizawa, Hideyoshi

    2014-07-01

    In this report, we compared the lithographic performances between the conventional positive tone development (PTD) process and the negative tone development (NTD) process, using the lithography simulation. We selected the MoSi-binary mask and conventional 6% attenuated phase shift mask as mask materials. The lithographic performance was evaluated and compared after applying the optical proximity correction (OPC). The evaluation items of lithographic performance were the aerial image profile, the aerial image contrast, normalized image log slope (NILS), mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), and the bossung curves, etc. The designs for the evaluation were selected the simple contact hole and the metal layer sample design.

  6. Immersion lithography bevel solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Len; Tamada, Osamu; Sanada, Masakazu; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    The introduction of Immersion lithography, combined with the desire to maximize the number of potential yielding devices per wafer, has brought wafer edge engineering to the forefront for advanced semiconductor manufactures. Bevel cleanliness, the position accuracy of the lithography films, and quality of the EBR cut has become more critical. In this paper, the effectiveness of wafer track based solutions to enable state-of-art bevel schemes is explored. This includes an integrated bevel cleaner and new bevel rinse nozzles. The bevel rinse nozzles are used in the coating process to ensure a precise, clean film edge on or near the bevel. The bevel cleaner is used immediately before the wafer is loaded into the scanner after the coating process. The bevel cleaner shows promise in driving down defectivity levels, specifically printing particles, while not damaging films on the bevel.

  7. High-n immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; Mulkens, Jan; Graeupner, Paul; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Donders, Sjoerd; Cortie, Rogier; Meijers, Ralph; Evangelista, Fabrizio; Samarakone, Nandarisi

    2008-03-01

    A two-year study on the feasibility of High-n Immersion Lithography shows very promising results. This paper reports the findings of the study. The evaluation shows the tremendous progress made in the development of second-generation immersion fluid technology. Candidate fluids from several suppliers have been evaluated. All the commercial fluids evaluated are viable, so there are a number of options. Life tests have been conducted on bench top fluid-handling systems and the results referenced to full-scale systems. Parameters such as Dose per Laser Pulse, Pulse Rate, Fluid Flow Rate, and Fluid Absorbency at 193nm, and Oxygen/Air Contamination Levels were explored. A detailed evaluation of phenomena such as Last Lens Element (LLE) contamination has been conducted. Lens cleaning has been evaluated. A comparison of High-n fluid-based technology and water-based immersion technology shows interesting advantages of High-n fluid in the areas of Defect and Resist Interaction. Droplet Drying tests, Resist Staining evaluations, and Resist Contrast impact studies have all been run. Defect-generating mechanisms have been identified and are being eliminated. The lower evaporation rate of the High-n fluids compared with water shows the advantages of High-n Immersion. The core issue for the technology, the availability of High-n optical material for use as the final lens element, is updated. Samples of LuAG material have been received from development partners and have been evaluated. The latest status of optical materials and the technology timelines are reported. The potential impact of the availability of the technology is discussed. Synergy with technologies such as Double Patterning is discussed. The prospects for <22nm (hp) are evaluated.

  8. Self-segregating materials for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Daniel P.; Sundberg, Linda K.; Brock, Phillip J.; Ito, Hiroshi; Truong, Hoa D.; Allen, Robert D.; McIntyre, Gregory R.; Goldfarb, Dario L.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we employ the self-segregating materials approach used in topcoat-free resists for water immersion lithography to extend the performance of topcoat materials for water immersion and to increase the contact angles of organic fluids on topcoat-free resists for high index immersion lithography. By tailoring polymers that segregate to the air and resist interfaces of the topcoat, high contact angle topcoats with relatively low fluorine content are achieved. While graded topcoats may extend the performance and/or reduce the cost of topcoat materials, the large amount of unprotected acidic groups necessary for TMAH development prevent them from achieving the high contact angles and low hysteresis exhibited by topcoat-free resists. Another application of this self-segregating approach is tailoring resist surfaces for high index immersion. Due to the low surface tension and higher viscosities of organic fluids relative to water and their lower contact angles on most surfaces, film pulling cannot be prevented without dramatically reducing wafer scan rates; however, tuning the surface energy of the resist may be important to control stain morphology and facilitate fluid removal from the wafer. By tailoring fluoropolymer additives for high contact angles with second generation organic high index immersion fluids, we show herein that topcoat-free resists can be developed specifically for high index immersion lithography with good contact angles and lithographic imaging performance.

  9. Immersion and dry ArF scanners enabling 22nm HP production and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Yusaku; Ishikawa, Jun; Kohno, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Ohba, Masanori; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2012-03-01

    Pattern shrinks using multiple patterning techniques will continue to the 22nm half pitch (HP) node and beyond. The cutting-edge Nikon NSR-S621D immersion lithography tool, which builds upon the technology advancements of the NSR-S620D [1], was developed to satisfy the aggressive requirements for the 22 nm HP node and subsequent generations. The key design challenge for the S621D was to deliver further improvements to product overlay performance and CD uniformity, while also providing increased productivity. Since many different products are made within an IC manufacturing facility, various wafer process-related issues, including the flatness or grid distortion of the processed wafers and exposure-induced heating had to be addressed. Upgrades and enhancements were made to the S620D hardware and software systems to enable the S621D to minimize these process-related effects and deliver the necessary scanner performance. To enable continued process technology advancements, in addition to pattern shrinks at the most critical layers, resolution for less critical layers must also be improved proportionally. As a result, increased demand for dry ArF instead of KrF scanners is expected for less critical layers, and dry ArF tools are already being employed for some of these applications. Further, multiple patterning techniques, such as sidewall double patterning, actually enable use of dry ArF instead of immersion scanners for some critical layers having relaxed pattern resolution requirements. However, in order for this to be successful, the ArF dry tool must deliver overlay performance that is comparable to the latest generation immersion systems. Understanding these factors, an ArF dry scanner that has excellent overlay performance could be used effectively for critical layers and markedly improve cost of ownership (CoO). Therefore, Nikon has developed the NSR-S320F, a new dry ArF scanner also built upon the proven S620D Streamlign platform. By incorporating the

  10. Material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid (HIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamatsu, Takashi; Wang, Yong; Shima, Motoyuki; Kusumoto, Shiro; Chiba, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Hieda, Katsuhiko; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    ArF immersion lithography is considered as the most promising next generation technology which enables to a 45 nm node device manufacturing and below. Not only depth of focus enlargement, immersion lithography enables to use hyper numerical aperture (NA) larger than 1.0 and achieve higher resolution capability. For 193nm lithography, water is an ideal immersion fluid, providing suitable refractive index and transmission properties. Furthermore the higher refractive index fluid is expected to provide a potential extension of optical lithography to the 32 nm node. This paper describes the material design for immersion lithography with high refractive index fluid. We have developed promising high refractive index fluids which satisfy the requirement for immersion fluid by screening wide variety of organic compounds. The physical and chemical properties of this high refractive index fluid are discussed in detail. Also the topcoat material which has good matching with high refractive index fluid is developed. While this topcoat material is soluble into aqueous TMAH developer, it does not dissolve into water or high refractive index fluid and gives suitable contact angle for immersion scan exposure. Immersion exposure experiments using high refractive index fluid with and w/o topcoat material was carried out and its lithographic performance is presented in this paper.

  11. Comparison study for sub-0.13-μm lithography between ArF and KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok-Kyun; Kim, YoungSik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Ham, Young-Mog; Baik, Ki-Ho

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we investigated the feasibility of printing sub-0.13 micrometers device patterns with ArF and KrF lithography by using experiment and simulation. To do this we evaluated various cell structures with different sizes from 0.26 micrometers to 0.20 micrometers pitch. In experiment 0.60NA ArF and 0.70NA KrF exposure tools, commercial and in house resists and bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) materials are used. To predict and compare with experimental data we also used our developed simulation tool HOST base don diffused aerial iamge model. We found that ArF lithography performance is a little bit better than KrF and therefore 0.70NA KrF lithography can be used up to 0.12 micrometers design rule device and 0.60NA ArF lithography can be used up to 0.11 micrometers . But to get more than 10 percent expose latitude, 0.13 micrometers with KrF and 0.12 micrometers with ArF are the minimum design rule size. However to obtain process margin we had to use extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) which results in large isolated- dense bias and poor linearity including isolated pattern. Using higher NA can reduce ID bias and mask error factor. For contact hole it is more effective to use KrF lithography because resist thermal flow process can be used to shrink C/H size. Our developed ArF resist and BARC shows good performance and we can reduce k1 value up to 0.34. Through this study we verified again that ArF lithography can be applied for sub-0.13 micrometers device through sub-0.10 micrometers with high contrast resist and 0.75NA exposure tool.

  12. Development of cleaning process for immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching Yu; Yu, D. C.; Lin, John C.; Lin, Burn J.

    2006-03-01

    In immersion lithography, DI water fills the space between the resist surface and the last lens element. However water is also a good solvent for most of the leaching compounds from resists. The leaching materials from the resist and the original impurities in the water from pipelines pose a significant risk on bottom lens deterioration, wafer surface particles, and facility contamination. If the bottom lens surface deteriorates, it can cause flare and reduce transparency. Particles on the wafer surface can degrade image formation. In addition to contaminating the facility, the impurity inside the water can cause stains or defects after the water is evaporated from the wafer surface. In order to reduce the impact of such contamination, we have evaluated many chemicals for removing organic contamination as well as particles. We have collected and characterized immersion-induced particles from cleaning studies on bare silicon wafers. We have also used oxide wafers to simulate the lens damage caused by the cleaning chemicals. In case, a mega sonic power is not suitable for scanners last lens element in production FABs, the emulsion concept has also been adopted to remove the lens organic contaminants. We have studied many chemical and mechanical methods for tool cleaning, and identified those that possess good organic solubility and particle removal efficiency. These cleaning methods will be used in periodic maintenance procedures to ensure freedom from defects in immersion lithography.

  13. Film stacking architecture for immersion lithography process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Sanada, Masakazu; Miyagi, Tadashi; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Tamada, Osamu; Asai, Masaya

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary due to film peeling. However, the architecture will restrict lithographic area within a wafer due to top side EBR accuracy In this paper, we report an effective film stacking architecture that also allows maximum lithographic area. This study used a new bevel rinse system on RF3 for all materials to make suitable film stacking on the top side bevel. This evaluation showed that the new bevel rinse system allows the maximum lithographic area and a clean wafer edge. Patterning defects were improved with suitable film stacking.

  14. Evolution of light source technology to support immersion and EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Meinert, Christine; Farrar, Nigel R.; Yen, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Since the early 1980's, the resolution of optical projection lithography has improved dramatically primarily due to three factors: increases in projection lens numerical aperture, reduction of the imaging source wavelength, and continued reduction of the k1 factor. These three factors have been enabled by the concurrent improvements in lens making technology, DUV light sources, photoresist technology, and resolution enhancement techniques. The DUV light source, excimer KrF and ArF lasers, has entered main stream production and now images more than 50% of the critical layers in today's leading edge devices. Looking forward to both immersion lithography and beyond to EUV lithography, new light source technologies must be created to enable the continued progression of shrinking feature sizes embodied by Moore's law.

  15. CD metrology for avoiding shrinkage of ArF resist patterns in 100 nm ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tae-Jun; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    ML 4689-80 CD Metrology for Avoiding Shrinkage of ArF Resist Patterns in 100nm ArF Lithography Tae-Jun You, Cheolkyu Bok, Ki-Soo Shin Hynix Semiconductor, San 136-1 Amiri, Bubal-eub, Ichon-si, Kyongki-do 467-701, Korea We have observed CD(Critical Dimension) shrinkage of acrylate type ArF resist patterns during SEM measurement. CD change was 30% shrinkage for line pattern and 10% expansion for contact hole patterns after 30 times measurement. CD shrinkage was proportion to line pattern size but no relation with LER(Line Edge Roughness). We confirm that CD shrinkage different from resist to resist and SEM measurement condition. CD shrinkage was bigger for acrylate type resist than COMA(Cyclo Olefin Maleic Anhydride) type resist and smaller at lower electron voltage and current conditions. In order to get the improvement of CD shrinkage, we performed electron-beam curing before SEM measurement. Above (see paper for formula) electron-beam dose condition, CD shrinkage improved from 10% to 3%. However, this method caused OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) issue as CD also changed after electron-beam curing. Therefore, we tried to develop a new measurement method instead of applying additional process technique. In this paper, we will describe our CD measurement method, Off-Site measurement technique, for 100nm DRAM lithography. The Off-Site CD measurement repeatability (formula available in paper) was controlled below (see paper).

  16. Evaluation of ArF lithography for 45-nm node implant layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, T. C.; Maynollo, J.; Perez, J. J.; Popova, I.; Zhang, B.

    2007-03-01

    Scaling of designs to the 45nm or future nodes presents challenges for KrF lithography. The purpose of this work was to explore several aspects of ArF lithography for implant layers. A comparison of dark loss seen in a KrF resist and TARC system to that seen in an ArF system showed significant differences. While the KrF resist yielded dark loss that varied with CD and pitch, the ArF resist showed very little dark loss and no significant variation through the design space. ArF resist were observed to have marginal adhesion to various substrates. Improvements in adhesion performance were shown by pre-treating the substrate with various processes, of which an ozone clean provided the best results. Optimization of the HMDS priming conditions also improved adhesion, and it was observed that the HMDS reaction proceeds at different rates on different subsatrates, which is particularly important for implant layers where the resist must adhere to both Si and SiO II. The effect of ArF resist profile with varying reflectivity swing position is shown, and some investigation into reflectivity optimization techniques was performed. Low-index ArF TARC was shown to reduce the CD variation over polysilicon topography, and wet developable BARC was demonstrated to provide consistent profiles on both Si and SiO II substrates. Finally, a comparison of ArF and KrF resists after As implant indicates that the ArF resist showed similar shrinkage performance to the KrF resist.

  17. Double patterning combined with shrink technique to extend ArF lithography for contact holes to 22nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiangqun; Huli, Lior; Chen, Hao; Xu, Xumou; Woo, Hyungje; Bencher, Chris; Shu, Jen; Ngai, Chris; Borst, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Lithography becomes much more challenging when CD shrinks to 22nm nodes. Since EUV is not ready, double patterning combined with Resolution Enhancement Technology (RET) such as shrink techniques seems to be the most possible solution. Companies such as TSMC [1] and IBM [2] etc. are pushing out EUV to extend immersion ArF lithography to 32nm/22nm nodes. Last year, we presented our development work on 32nm node contact (50nm hole at 100nm pitch) using dry ArF lithography by double patterning with SAFIER shrink process[3]. To continue the work, we further extend our dry litho capability towards the 22nm node. We demonstrated double patterning capability of 40nm holes at 80nm pitch using ASML XT1400E scanner. It seems difficult to print pitches below 140nm on dry scanner in single exposure which is transferred into 70nm pitch with double patterning. To push the resolution to 22nm node and beyond, we developed ArF immersion process on ASML XT1700i-P system at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (Albany, NY) combined with a SAFIER process. We achieved single exposure process capability of 25nm holes at 128nm pitch after shrink. It enables us to print ~25nm holes at pitch of 64nm with double patterning. Two types of hard mask (HM), i.e. TIN and a-Si were used in both dry and immersion ArF DP processes. The double patterning process consists of two HM litho-shrink-etch steps. The dense feature is designed into two complementary parts on two masks such that the density is reduced by half and minimum pitch is increased by at least a factor of 21/2 depending on design. The complete pattern is formed after the two HM litho-shrink-etch steps are finished.

  18. Resolution enhancement technology for ArF dry lithography at 65 nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Songbo; Li, Yanqui

    2007-12-01

    The performance of ArF dry lithography at 65 nm node was studied together with RET. Commercial software Prolith 9.0 and in-house-software MicroCruiser 5.0 were used for simulation and mass data process. The combination of different phase shift mask (PSM), off axis illumination and patterns were chosen for this research. The image contrast, nominal image log-slope (NILS), depth of focus (DOF) and resist profile were considered to judge the lithography performance. The results show that the combination of small sigma conventional illumination and alternating phase shift mask (alt- PSM) is the best choice for Line/Space (L/S) patterns of different pitches. The isolate L/S pattern can be imaged with a large image contrast and DOF if alt-PSM and several kinds of illumination (such as small sigma, annular, and quasar illumination) are joined together. For semi-dense and dense L/S pattern, good lithography performance can be reached by using only small sigma illumination and alt-PSM. The impact of polarization illumination was also considered. Y-polarization illumination enhances the image contrast, NILS and the DOF for most conditions. The Z-orientation resist image fidelity was studied by optimization of the double bottom anti-reflection coating (DBARC) and resist thickness. This research predicts that 65 nm L/S pattern can be fabricated by current ArF dry lithography system.

  19. Inorganic immersion fluids for ultrahigh numerical aperture 193 nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianming; Fan, Yongfa; Bourov, Anatoly; Smith, Bruce W.

    2006-05-01

    Immersion lithography has become attractive since it can reduce critical dimensions by increasing numerical aperture (NA) beyond unity. Among all the candidates for immersion fluids, those with higher refractive indices and low absorbance are desired. Characterization of the refractive indices and absorbance of various inorganic fluid candidates has been performed. To measure the refractive indices of these fluids, a prism deviation angle method was developed. Several candidates have been identified for 193 nm application with refractive indices near 1.55, which is approximately 0.1 higher than that of water at this wavelength. Cauchy parameters of these fluids were generated and approaches were investigated to tailor the fluid absorption edges to be close to 193 nm. The effects of these fluids on photoresist performance were also examined with 193 nm immersion lithography exposure at various NAs. Half-pitch 32 nm lines were obtained with phosphoric acid as the immersion medium at 1.5 NA. These fluids are potential candidates for immersion lithography technology.

  20. Modular Polymer Biosensors by Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Jayven S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Gratton, Enrico; Vasdekis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a rapid benchtop microsystem prototyping technique, including polymer functionalization, imprinting and bonding. Here, we focus on the realization of planar polymer sensors using SIIL through simple solvent immersion without imprinting. We describe SIIL’s impregnation characteristics, including an inherent mechanism that not only achieves practical doping concentrations, but their unexpected 4-fold enhancement compared to the immersion solution. Subsequently, we developed and characterized optical sensors for detecting molecular O2. To this end, a high dynamic range is reported, including its control through the immersion duration, a manifestation of SIIL’s modularity. Overall, SIIL exhibits the potential of improving the operating characteristics of polymer sensors, while significantly accelerating their prototyping, as it requires a few seconds of processing and no need for substrates or dedicated instrumentation. These are critical for O2 sensing as probed by way of example here, as well as any polymer permeable reactant.

  1. Nanocomposite liquids for 193 nm immersion lithography: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, George; Evanoff, David D., Jr.; Luzinov, Igor; Klep, Viktor; Zdryko, Bogdan; Conley, Will; Zimmerman, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Immersion lithography is a new promising approach capable of further increasing the resolution of semiconductor devices. This technology requires the development of new immersion media that satisfy the following conditions: the media should have high refractive index, be transparent and photochemically stable in DUV spectral range. They should also be inert towards photoresists and optics and be liquid to permit rapid scanning. Here we propose and explore a novel strategy in which high refractive index medium is made of small solid particles suspended in liquid phases (nanocomposite liquids). The dielectric particles have high refractive index and the refractive index of nanocomposite liquids becomes volume weighted average between refractive indices of nanoparticles and the liquid phase. We investigate aluminum oxide (alumina) nanoparticles suspended in water. Alumina is known to have high (1.95) refractive index and low absorption coefficient at 193 nm. Alumina nanoparticles were prepared by chemical methods followed by removal of organic molecules left after hydrolysis reactions. Measurements of optical and reological properties of the nanocomposite liquid demonstrated potential advantage of this approach for 193 nm immersion lithography.

  2. 32 nm logic patterning options with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, K.; Burns, S.; Halle, S.; Zhuang, L.; Colburn, M.; Allen, S.; Babcock, C.; Baum, Z.; Burkhardt, M.; Dai, V.; Dunn, D.; Geiss, E.; Haffner, H.; Han, G.; Lawson, P.; Mansfield, S.; Meiring, J.; Morgenfeld, B.; Tabery, C.; Zou, Y.; Sarma, C.; Tsou, L.; Yan, W.; Zhuang, H.; Gil, D.; Medeiros, D.

    2008-03-01

    The semiconductor industry faces a lithographic scaling limit as the industry completes the transition to 1.35 NA immersion lithography. Both high-index immersion lithography and EUV lithography are facing technical challenges and commercial timing issues. Consequently, the industry has focused on enabling double patterning technology (DPT) as a means to circumvent the limitations of Rayleigh scaling. Here, the IBM development alliance demonstrate a series of double patterning solutions that enable scaling of logic constructs by decoupling the pattern spatially through mask design or temporally through innovative processes. These techniques have been successfully employed for early 32nm node development using 45nm generation tooling. Four different double patterning techniques were implemented. The first process illustrates local RET optimization through the use of a split reticle design. In this approach, a layout is decomposed into a series of regions with similar imaging properties and the illumination conditions for each are independently optimized. These regions are then printed separately into the same resist film in a multiple exposure process. The result is a singly developed pattern that could not be printed with a single illumination-mask combination. The second approach addresses 2D imaging with particular focus on both line-end dimension and linewidth control [1]. A double exposure-double etch (DE2) approach is used in conjunction with a pitch-filling sacrificial feature strategy. The third double exposure process, optimized for via patterns also utilizes DE2. In this method, a design is split between two separate masks such that the minimum pitch between any two vias is larger than the minimum metal pitch. This allows for final structures with vias at pitches beyond the capability of a single exposure. In the fourth method,, dark field double dipole lithography (DDL) has been successfully applied to BEOL metal structures and has been shown to be

  3. Novel high refractive index fluids for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, Julius; Otoguro, Akihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi; Kagayama, Akifumi; Nakano, Takashi; Nakayama, Norio; Tamatani, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Shin

    2006-03-01

    Despite the early skepticism towards the use of 193-nm immersion lithography as the next step in satisfying Moore's law, it continuous to meet expectations on its feasibility in achieving 65-nm nodes and possibly beyond. And with implementation underway, interest in extending its capability for smaller pattern sizes such as the 32-nm node continues to grow. In this paper, we will discuss the optical, physical and lithographic properties of newly developed high index fluids of low absorption coefficient, 'Babylon' and 'Delphi'. As evaluated in a spectroscopic ellipsometer in the 193.39nm wavelength, the 'Babylon' and 'Delphi' high index fluids were evaluated to have a refractive index of 1.64 and 1.63 with an absorption coefficient of 0.05/cm and 0.08/cm, respectively. Lithographic evaluation results using a 193-nm 2-beam interferometric exposure tool show the imaging capability of both high index fluids to be 32-nm half pitch lines and spaces.

  4. Solvent immersion nanoimprint lithography of fluorescent conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, G. L.; Zhang, S.; Stevenson, J. R. Y.; Ebenhoch, B.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Turnbull, G. A.

    2015-10-19

    Solvent immersion imprint lithography (SIIL) was used to directly nanostructure conjugated polymer films. The technique was used to create light-emitting diffractive optical elements and organic semiconductor lasers. Gratings with lateral features as small as 70 nm and depths of ∼25 nm were achieved in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl). The angular emission from the patterned films was studied, comparing measurement to theoretical predictions. Organic distributed feedback lasers fabricated with SIIL exhibited thresholds for lasing of ∼40 kW/cm{sup 2}, similar to those made with established nanoimprint processes. The results show that SIIL is a quick, convenient and practical technique for nanopatterning of polymer photonic devices.

  5. High-index optical materials for 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, John H.; Kaplan, Simon G.; Shirley, Eric L.; Horowitz, Deane; Clauss, Wilfried; Grenville, Andrew; Van Peski, Chris

    2006-03-01

    We report on our comprehensive survey of high-index UV optical materials that may enable extension of immersion lithography beyond a numerical aperture of 1.45. Band edge, refractive index, and intrinsic birefringence (IBR) at 193 nm determine basic viability. Our measurements of these properties have reduced the list of potential candidates to: ceramic spinel, lutetium aluminum garnet, and a class of germanium garnets. We discuss our measurements of the intrinsic properties of these materials and assess the present status of their material quality relative to requirements. Ceramic spinel has no significant IBR, but transmission and scatter for the best samples remain at least two orders of magnitude from specifications. Improving these would require a major development effort. Presently available lutetium aluminum garnet has material quality much closer to the specifications. However, the IBR is about three times the required value. The germanium garnets offer the possibility of a lower IBR, but a suitable candidate material has yet to be established.

  6. Immersion defectivity study with volume production immersion lithography tool for 45 nm node and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Katsushi; Nagaoka, Shiro; Yoshida, Masato; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Shiraishi, Kenichi; Owa, Soichi

    2008-03-01

    Volume production of 45nm node devices utilizing Nikon's S610C immersion lithography tool has started. Important to the success in achieving high-yields in volume production with immersion lithography has been defectivity reduction. In this study we evaluate several methods of defectivity reduction. The tools used in our defectivity analysis included a dedicated immersion cluster tools consisting of a Nikon S610C, a volume production immersion exposure tool with NA of 1.3, and a resist coater-developer LITHIUS i+ from TEL. In our initial procedure we evaluated defectivity behavior by comparing on a topcoat-less resist process to a conventional topcoat process. Because of its simplicity the topcoatless resist shows lower defect levels than the topcoat process. In a second study we evaluated the defect reduction by introducing the TEL bevel rinse and pre-immersion bevel cleaning techniques. This technique was shown to successfully reduce the defect levels by reducing the particles at the wafer bevel region. For the third defect reduction method, two types of tool cleaning processes are shown. Finally, we discuss the overall defectivity behavior at the 45nm node. To facilitate an understanding of the root cause of the defects, defect source analysis (DSA) was applied to separate the defects into three classes according to the source of defects. DSA analysis revealed that more than 99% of defects relate to material and process, and less than 1% of the defects relate to the exposure tool. Material and process optimization by collaborative work between exposure tool vendors, track vendors and material vendors is a key for success of 45nm node device manufacturing.

  7. A method for compensating the polarization aberration of projection optics in immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yue; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Lihui; Han, Chunying; Liu, Xiaolin

    2014-08-01

    As the numerical aperture (NA) of 193nm immersion lithography projection optics (PO) increasing, polarization aberration (PA) leads to image quality degradation seriously. PA induced by large incident angle of light, film coatings and intrinsic birefringence of lens materials cannot be ignored. An effective method for PA compensation is to adjust lens position in PO. However, this method is complicated. Therefore, in this paper, an easy and feasible PA compensation method is proposed: for ArF lithographic PO with hyper NA (NA=1.2), which is designed by our laboratory, the PA-induced critical dimension error (CDE) can be effectively reduced by optimizing illumination source partial coherent factor σout. In addition, the basic idea of our method to suppress pattern placement error (PE) is to adopt anti-reflection (AR) multi-layers MgF2/LaF3/MgF2 and calcium fluoride CaF2 of [111] crystal axes. Our simulation results reveal that the proposed method can effectively and quantificationally compensate large PA in the optics. In particular, our method suppresses the dynamic range of CDE from -12.7nm ~ +4.3nm to -1.1nm ~ +1.2nm, while keeping PE at an acceptable level.

  8. High performance Si immersion gratings patterned with electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully-Santiago, Michael A.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Muller, Richard E.

    2014-07-01

    Infrared spectrographs employing silicon immersion gratings can be significantly more compact than spectro- graphs using front-surface gratings. The Si gratings can also offer continuous wavelength coverage at high spectral resolution. The grooves in Si gratings are made with semiconductor lithography techniques, to date almost entirely using contact mask photolithography. Planned near-infrared astronomical spectrographs require either finer groove pitches or higher positional accuracy than standard UV contact mask photolithography can reach. A collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin Silicon Diffractive Optics Group and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory has experimented with direct writing silicon immersion grating grooves with electron beam lithography. The patterning process involves depositing positive e-beam resist on 1 to 30 mm thick, 100 mm diameter monolithic crystalline silicon substrates. We then use the facility JEOL 9300FS e-beam writer at JPL to produce the linear pattern that defines the gratings. There are three key challenges to produce high-performance e-beam written silicon immersion gratings. (1) E- beam field and subfield stitching boundaries cause periodic cross-hatch structures along the grating grooves. The structures manifest themselves as spectral and spatial dimension ghosts in the diffraction limited point spread function (PSF) of the diffraction grating. In this paper, we show that the effects of e-beam field boundaries must be mitigated. We have significantly reduced ghost power with only minor increases in write time by using four or more field sizes of less than 500 μm. (2) The finite e-beam stage drift and run-out error cause large-scale structure in the wavefront error. We deal with this problem by applying a mark detection loop to check for and correct out minuscule stage drifts. We measure the level and direction of stage drift and show that mark detection reduces peak-to-valley wavefront error

  9. ArF processing of 90-nm design rule lithography achieved through enhanced thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagerer, Markus; Miller, Daniel; Chang, Wayne; Williams, Daniel J.

    2006-03-01

    As the lithography community has moved to ArF processing on 300 mm wafers for 90 nm design rules the process characterization of the components of variance continues to highlight the thermal requirements for the post exposure bake (PEB) processing step. In particular as the thermal systems have become increasingly uniform, the transient behavior of the thermal processing system has received the focus of attention. This paper demonstrates how a newly designed and patented thermal processing system was optimized for delivering improved thermal uniformity during a typical 90 second PEB processing cycle, rather than being optimized for steady state performance. This was accomplished with the aid of a wireless temperature measurement wafer system for obtaining real time temperature data and by using a response surface model (RSM) experimental design for optimizing parameters of the temperature controller of the thermal processing system. The new units were field retrofitted seamlessly in <2 days at customer sites without disruption to process recipes or flows. After evaluating certain resist parameters such as PEB temperature sensitivity and post exposure delay (PED) - stability of the baseline process, the new units were benchmarked against the previous PEB plates by processing a split lot experiment. Additional hardware characterization included environmental factors such as air velocity in the vicinity of the PEB plates and transient time between PEB and chill plate. At the completion of the optimization process, the within wafer CD uniformity displayed a significant improvement when compared to the previous hardware. The demonstrated within wafer CD uniformity improved by 27% compared to the initial hardware and baseline process. ITRS requirements for the 90 nm node were exceeded.

  10. Low leaching and low LWR photoresist development for 193 nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Nobuo; Lee, Youngjoon; Miyagawa, Takayuki; Edamatsu, Kunishige; Takemoto, Ichiki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchida, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Keiko; Konishi, Shinji; Nakano, Katsushi; Tomoharu, Fujiwara

    2006-03-01

    With no apparent showstopper in sight, the adoption of ArF immersion technology into device mass production is not a matter of 'if' but a matter of 'when'. As the technology matures at an unprecedented speed, many of initial technical difficulties have been cleared away and the use of a protective layer known as top coat, initially regarded as a must, now becomes optional, for example. Our focus of interest has also sifted to more practical and production related issues such as defect reducing and performance enhancement. Two major types of immersion specific defects, bubbles and a large number of microbridges, were observed and reported elsewhere. The bubble defects seem to decrease by improvement of exposure tool. But the other type defect - probably from residual water spots - is still a problem. We suspect that the acid leaching from resist film causes microbridges. When small water spots were remained on resist surface after exposure, acid catalyst in resist film is leaching into the water spots even though at room temperature. After water from the spot is dried up, acid molecules are condensed at resist film surface. As a result, in the bulk of resist film, acid depletion region is generated underneath the water spot. Acid catalyzed deprotection reaction is not completed at this acid shortage region later in the PEB process resulting in microbridge type defect formation. Similar mechanism was suggested by Kanna et al, they suggested the water evaporation on PEB plate. This hypothesis led us to focus on reducing acid leaching to decrease residual water spot-related defect. This paper reports our leaching measurement results and low leaching photoresist materials satisfying the current leaching requirements outlined by tool makers without topcoat layer. On the other hand, Nakano et al reported that the higher receding contact angle reduced defectivity. The higher receding contact angle is also a key item to increase scan speed. The effort to increase the

  11. Simultaneous optimization of dose and focus controls in advanced ArF immersion scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Tsuyoshi; Izikson, Pavel; Kosugi, Junichi; Sakasai, Naruo; Saotome, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuaki; Kandel, Daniel; Robinson, John C.; Koyanagi, Yuji

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a new scheme of process control combining a CD metrology system and an exposure tool. A new model based on Neural Networks has been created in KLA-Tencor's "KT Analyzer" which calculates the dose and focus errors simultaneously from CD parameters, such as mid CD and height information, measured by a scatterometry (OCD) measurement tool. The accuracy of this new model was confirmed by experiment. Nikon's "CDU master" then calculated the control parameters for dose and focus per each field from the dose and focus error data of a reference wafer provided by KT Analyzer. Using the corrected parameters for dose and focus from CDU master, we exposed wafers on an NSR-S610C (ArF immersion scanner), and measured the CDU on a KLA SCD100 (OCD tool). As a result, we confirmed that CDU in the entire wafer can be improved more than 60% (from 3.36nm (3σ) to 1.28nm (3σ)).

  12. Extending immersion lithography with high-index materials: results of a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Harry; Mulkens, Jan; Graeupner, Paul; McCafferty, Diane; Markoya, Louis; Donders, Sjoerd; Samarakone, Nandasiri; Duesing, Rudiger

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we report the status of our feasibility work on high index immersion. The development of high index fluids (n>1.64) and high index glass materials (n>1.9) is reported. Questions answered are related to the design of a high NA optics immersion system for fluid containment and fluid handling, and to the compatibility of the fluid with ArF resist processes. Optical design and manufacturing challenges are related to the use of high index glass materials such as crystalline LuAG or ceramic Spinel. Progress on the material development will be reviewed. Progress on immersion fluids development has been sustained. Second-generation fluids are available from many suppliers. For the practical use of second-generation fluids in immersion scanners, we have evaluated and tested fluid recycling concepts in combination with ArF radiation of the fluids. Results on the stability of the fluid and the fluid glass interface will be reported. Fluid containment with immersion hood structures under the lens has been evaluated and tested for several scan speeds and various fluids. Experimental results on scan speed limitations will be presented. The application part of the feasibility study includes the imaging of 29nm L/S structures on a 2-beam interference printer, fluid/resist interaction testing with pre- and post-soak testing. Immersion defect testing using a fluid misting setup was also carried out. Results of these application-related experiments will be presented and discussed.

  13. Defectivity reduction by optimization of 193-nm immersion lithography using an interfaced exposure-track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcasi, Michael; Hatakeyama, Shinichi; Nafus, Kathleen; Moerman, Richard; van Dommelen, Youri; Huisman, Peter; Hooge, Joshua; Scheer, Steven; Foubert, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    As the integration of semiconductor devices continues, pattern sizes required in lithography get smaller and smaller. To achieve even more scaling down of these patterns without changing the basic infrastructure technology of current cutting-edge 193-nm lithography, 193-nm immersion lithography is being viewed as a powerful technique that can accommodate next-generation mass productions needs. Therefore this technology has been seriously considered and after proof of concept it is currently entering the stage of practical application. In the case of 193-nm immersion lithography, however, because liquid fills the area between the projection optics and the silicon wafer, several causes of concern have been raised - namely, diffusion of moisture into the resist film due to direct resist-water interaction during exposure, dissolution of internal components of the resist into the de-ionized water, and the influence of residual moisture generated during exposure on post-exposure processing. To prevent these unwanted effects, optimization of the three main components of the lithography system: materials, track and scanner, is required. For the materials, 193nm resist formulation improvements specifically for immersion processing have reduced the leaching and the sensitivity to water related defects, further benefits can be seen by the application of protective top coat materials. For the track component, optimization of the processing conditions and immersion specific modules are proven to advance the progress made by the material suppliers. Finally, by optimizing conditions on the 3 rd generation immersion scanner with the latest hardware configuration, defectivity levels comparable to dry processing can be achieved. In this evaluation, we detail the improvements that can be realized with new immersion specific track rinse modules and formulate a hypothesis for the improvements seen with the rinsing process. Additionally, we show the current status of water induced

  14. Performance of immersion lithography for 45-nm-node CMOS and ultra-high density SRAM with 0.25um2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimotogi, Shoji; Uesawa, Fumikatsu; Tominaga, Makoto; Fujise, Hiroharu; Sho, Koutaro; Katsumata, Mikio; Hane, Hiroki; Ikegami, Atsushi; Nagahara, Seiji; Ema, Tatsuhiko; Asano, Masafumi; Kanai, Hideki; Kimura, Taiki; Iwai, Masaaki

    2007-03-01

    Immersion lithography was applied to 45nm node logic and 0.25um2 ultra-high density SRAM. The predictable enhancement of focus margin and resolution were obtained for all levels which were exposed by immersion tool. In particular, the immersion lithography enabled to apply the attenuating phase shift mask to the gate level. The enough lithography margin for the alternating phase shift mask was also obtained by using not only immersion tool but also dry tool for gate level. The immersion lithography shrunk the minimum hole pitch from 160nm to 140nm. Thus, the design rule for 45nm node became available by using immersion lithography.

  15. Design and performance of photoresist materials for ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Dong-Won; Lee, Sook; Choi, Sang-Jun; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Barclay, George G.; Blacksmith, Robert F.; Kang, Doris; Pohlers, Gerd; Cameron, James F.; Mattia, Joe; Caporale, Stefan; Penniman, Thomas; Joesten, Lori A.; Thackeray, James W.

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we review the design and performance of ArF resists developed from various polymer platforms. Inadequate etch performance of early ArF acrylate platforms necessitated the development of new etch resistant platforms, in terms of both etch rate and etch uniformity. Two resist platforms were developed to address etch resistance: 1) alternating copolymers of cyclic olefins and maleic anhydride (COMA); and 2) polycycloolefin polymers (CO). Improvements have been made in the imaging performance of these resists, such that they now approach the lithographic performance of acrylate based resists. Recently, a third platform based on polymerization of vinyl ethers with maleic anhydride (VEMA), which has excellent etch performance, was developed by Samsung. Here we will focus our discussion on acrylate, COMA and VEMA based resists.

  16. Directed Self Assembly (DSA) compliant flow with immersion lithography: from material to design and patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuansheng; Wang, Yan; Word, James; Lei, Junjiang; Mitra, Joydeep; Torres, J. Andres; Hong, Le; Fenger, Germain; Khaira, Daman; Preil, Moshe; Yuan, Lei; Kye, Jongwook; Levinson, Harry J.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a DSA compliant flow for contact/via layers with immersion lithography assuming the grapho-epitaxy process for cylinders' formation. We demonstrate that the DSA technology enablement needs co-optimization among material, design, and lithography. We show that the number of DSA grouping constructs is countable for the gridded-design architecture. We use Template Error Enhancement Factor (TEEF) to choose DSA material, determine grouping design rules, and select the optimum guiding patterns. Our post-pxOPC imaging data shows that it is promising to achieve 2-mask solution with DSA for the contact/via layer using 193i at 5nm node.

  17. New ArF immersion light source introduces technologies for high-volume 14nm manufacturing and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacouris, T.; Conley, W.; Thornes, J.; Bibby, T.; Melchior, J.; Aggarwal, T.; Gross, E.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor market demand for improved performance at lower cost continues to drive enhancements in excimer light source technologies. Multi-patterning lithography solutions to extend deep-UV (DUV) immersion have driven requirements such as higher throughput and higher efficiencies to maximize the utilization of leading-edge lithography equipment. Three key light source parameters have direct influence on patterning performance - energy, wavelength and bandwidth stability - and they have been the primary areas of continuous improvement. With 14nm node development, a number of studies have shown the direct influence of bandwidth stability on CD uniformity for certain patterns and geometries, leading to the desire for further improvements in this area. More recent studies also examined the impact of bandwidth on 10nm logic node patterning [1]. Alongside these drivers, increasing cost per patterning layer continues to demand further improvements in operating costs and efficiencies from the lithography tools, and the light source can offer further gains in these areas as well. This paper introduces several light source technologies that are embodied in a next-generation light source, the Cymer XLR® 700ix, which is an extension of the ring laser architecture introduced 8 years ago. These technologies enable a significant improvement in bandwidth stability as well as notable reductions in operating costs through more efficient gas management algorithms and lower facilities costs.

  18. Polarization aberration compensation method by adjusting illumination partial coherent factors in immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yue; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Lihui; Han, Chunying; Liu, Xiaolin

    2014-11-01

    As the numerical aperture (NA) increasing and process factor k1 decreasing in 193nm immersion lithography, polarization aberration (PA) of projection optics leads to image quality degradation seriously. Therefore, this work proposes a new scheme for compensating polarization aberration. By simulating we found that adjusting the illumination source partial coherent factors σout is an effective method for decreasing the PA induced pattern critical dimension (CD) error while keeping placement error (PE) within an acceptable range. Our simulation results reveal that the proposed method can effectively compensate large PA in actual optics.

  19. 193nm immersion lithography for high-performance silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraja, Shankar K.; Winroth, Gustaf; Locorotondo, Sabrina; Murdoch, Gayle; Milenin, Alexey; Delvaux, Christie; Ong, Patrick; Pathak, Shibnath; Xie, Weiqiang; Sterckx, Gunther; Lepage, Guy; Van Thourhout, Dries; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Campenhout, Joris; Absil, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale photonics integration has been proposed for many years to support the ever increasing requirements for long and short distance communications as well as package-to-package interconnects. Amongst the various technology options, silicon photonics has imposed itself as a promising candidate, relying on CMOS fabrication processes. While silicon photonics can share the technology platform developed for advanced CMOS devices it has specific dimension control requirements. Though the device dimensions are in the order of the wavelength of light used, the tolerance allowed can be less than 1% for certain devices. Achieving this is a challenging task which requires advanced patterning techniques along with process control. Another challenge is identifying an overlapping process window for diverse pattern densities and orientations on a single layer. In this paper, we present key technology challenges faced when using optical lithography for silicon photonics and advantages of using the 193nm immersion lithography system. We report successful demonstration of a modified 28nm- STI-like patterning platform for silicon photonics in 300mm Silicon-On-Insulator wafer technology. By careful process design, within-wafer CD variation (1sigma) of <1% is achieved for both isolated (waveguides) and dense (grating) patterns in silicon. In addition to dimensional control, low sidewall roughness is a crucial to achieve low scattering loss in the waveguides. With this platform, optical propagation loss as low as ~0.7 dB/cm is achieved for high-confinement single mode waveguides (450x220nm). This is an improvement of >20 % from the best propagation loss reported for this cross-section fabricated using e-beam lithography. By using a single-mode low-confinement waveguide geometry the loss is further reduced to ~0.12 dB/cm. Secondly, we present improvement in within-device phase error in wavelength selective devices, a critical parameter which is a direct measure of line

  20. Point-of-use filtration strategy for negative tone developer in extended immersion and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urzo, L.; Foubert, P.; Stokes, H.; Thouroude, Y.; Xia, A.; Wu, Aiwen

    2015-03-01

    Negative tone development (NTD) has dramatically gained popularity in 193 nm dry and immersion lithography, due to their superior imaging performance [1, 2 and 3]. Popular negative tone developers are organic solvents such as n- butyl acetate (n-BA), aliphatic ketones, or high-density alcohols such as Methyl Isobutyl Carbinol (MIBC). In this work, a comparative study between ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UPE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) POU filtration for n-BA based NTD has been carried out. Results correlate with the occurrence or the mitigation of micro bridges in a 45 nm dense line pattern created through immersion lithography as a function of POU membrane.

  1. Developing an integrated imaging system for the 70-nm node using high numerical aperture ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, John S.; Beach, James V.; Gerold, David J.; Maslow, Mark J.

    2002-07-01

    At its conception, 193 nm lithography was thought to be the best way to take optical lithography to the 180 nm node. It was expected that 193 nm could support the now-defunct 160 nm node before optical lithography would have to yield to an undetermined non-optical solution. Today, 193 nm must compete with 248 nm for the 130 nm node and is expected to support lithography until it is replaced by 157 nm at the 70 nm node. Given the challenges facing 157 nm, it is likely that lithographers will attempt to extend the utility of 193 nm to its theoretical limits.

  2. High refractive index Fresnel lens on a fiber fabricated by nanoimprint lithography for immersion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Alexander; Calafiore, Giuseppe; Piña-Hernandez, Carlos; Allen, Frances I.; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Wong, Edward; Lum, Paul; Munechika, Keiko; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter we present a Fresnel lens fabricated on the end of an optical fiber. The lens is fabricated using nanoimprint lithography of a functional high refractive index material, which is suitable for mass production. The main advantage of the presented Fresnel lens compared to a conventional fiber lens is its high refractive index (n=1.69), which enables efficient light focusing even inside other media such as water or adhesive. Measurement of the lens performance in an immersion liquid (n=1.51) shows a near diffraction limited focal spot of 810 nm in diameter at the 1/e2 intensity level for a wavelength of 660 nm. Applications of such fiber lenses include integrated optics, optical trapping and fiber probes.

  3. High refractive index Fresnel lens on a fiber fabricated by nanoimprint lithography for immersion applications.

    PubMed

    Koshelev, Alexander; Calafiore, Giuseppe; Piña-Hernandez, Carlos; Allen, Frances I; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Wong, Edward; Lum, Paul; Munechika, Keiko; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we present a Fresnel lens fabricated on the end of an optical fiber. The lens is fabricated using nanoimprint lithography of a functional high refractive index material, which is suitable for mass production. The main advantage of the presented Fresnel lens compared to a conventional fiber lens is its high refractive index (n=1.68), which enables efficient light focusing even inside other media, such as water or an adhesive. Measurement of the lens performance in an immersion liquid (n=1.51) shows a near diffraction limited focal spot of 810 nm in diameter at the 1/e2 intensity level for a wavelength of 660 nm. Applications of such fiber lenses include integrated optics, optical trapping, and fiber probes. PMID:27472584

  4. Birefringence issues with uniaxial crystals as last lens elements for high-index immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, John H.; Benck, Eric C.; Kaplan, Simon G.; Sirat, Gabriel Y.; Mack, Chris

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the birefringence issues associated with use of crystalline sapphire, with uniaxial crystal structure, as a last lens element for high-index 193 nm immersion lithography. Sapphire is a credible high-index lens material candidate because with appropriate orientation and TE polarization the ordinary ray exhibits the required isotropic optical properties. Also, its material properties may give it higher potential to meet the stringent optical requirements compared to the potential of the principal candidate materials, cubic-symmetry LuAG and ceramic spinel. The TE polarization restriction is required anyway for hyper-NA imaging, due to TM-polarization contrast degradation effects. Further, the high uniaxial-structure birefringence of sapphire may offer the advantage that any residual TM polarization results in a relatively-uniform flare instead of contrast degradation. One issue with this concept is that spatial-dispersion-induced effects should cause some index anisotropy of the ordinary rays, in a way similar to the intrinsic birefringence (IBR) effects in cubic crystals, except that there is no ray splitting. We present the theory of this effect for the trigonal crystal structure of sapphire and discuss its implications for lithography optics. For this material the spatial-dispersion-induced effects are characterized by eight material parameters, of which three contribute to index anisotropy of the ordinary rays. Only one gives rise to azimuthal distortions, and may present challenges for correction. To assess the consequences of using sapphire as a last element, neglecting any IBR effects, we use lithography simulations to characterize the lithographic performance for a 1.7 NA design, and compare to that for LuAG.

  5. Solutions with precise prediction for thermal aberration error in low-k1 immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Kazuya; Mimotogi, Akiko; Kono, Takuya; Aoyama, Hajime; Ogata, Taro; Kita, Naonori; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2013-04-01

    Thermal aberration becomes a serious problem in the production of semiconductors for which low-k1 immersion lithography with a strong off-axis illumination, such as dipole setting, is used. The illumination setting localizes energy of the light in the projection lens, bringing about localized temperature rise. The temperature change varies lens refractive index and thus generates aberrations. The phenomenon is called thermal aberration. For realizing manufacturability of fine patterns with high productivity, thermal aberration control is important. Since heating areas in the projection lens are determined by source shape and distribution of diffracted light by a mask, the diffracted pupilgram convolving illumination source shape with diffraction distribution can be calculated using mask layout data for the thermal aberration prediction. Thermal aberration is calculated as a function of accumulated irradiation power. We have evaluated the thermal aberration computational prediction and control technology "Thermal Aberration Optimizer" (ThAO) on a Nikon immersion system. The thermal aberration prediction consists of two steps. The first step is prediction of the diffraction map on the projection pupil. The second step is computing thermal aberration from the diffraction map using a lens thermal model and an aberration correction function. We performed a verification test for ThAO using a mask of 1x-nm memory and strong off-axis illumination. We clarified the current performance of thermal aberration prediction, and also confirmed that the impacts of thermal aberration of NSR-S621D on CD and overlay for our 1x-nm memory pattern are very small. Accurate thermal aberration prediction with ThAO will enable thermal aberration risk-free lithography for semiconductor chip production.

  6. Double-exposure strategy using OPC and simulation and the performance on wafer with sub-0.10-μm design rule in ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se-Young; Kim, Wan-Ho; Yune, Hyoung-Soon; Kim, Hee-Bom; Kim, Seo-Min; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    As the pattern size becomes smaller, double or multi exposure is required unless the epochal solutions for overcoming the limits of present lithography system do appear or are discovered. ArF DET (double exposure technology) strategy based on manual OPC with in-house simulation tool, HOST (Hynix OPC simulation tool), is suggested as a possible exposure method to extend the limitation of current lithography. HOST requires no additional procedures and separate layout optimizations of each region in terms of OPC are enough. Furthermore, it is possible to change illumination condition of each region and the overlap between two regions with ease. The results from the simulation are pattern size and profile of each condition according to the defous and misregistration. 0.63 NA ArF Scanner and Clariant resist is used for wafer process. The resist was coated on Clariant organic BARC using 0.24 um thickness. Dipole illumination for cell region and annular illumination for peripheral region are used. Cell region contains 0.20 um pitch duty pattern and peripheral region 0.24 um pitch duty pattern. The boundary of two regions is investigated in view of validity of stitching itself. The layout of reticles used as the cell and peripheral region are optimized by OPC, respectively and then, additional OPC was treated to the boundary, i.e., stitching area to compensate the cross term of the boundary caused by separate and independent optimization with OPC in the cell and the peripheral regime. The final patterns were acquired by defining the cell at first and the peripheral region secondly with different defocus and registration in respect to the cell. The actual data on wafer are presented according to defocus and one region's overlay offset relatively to the other region. And the outstanding matching between simulation results and in-line data are shown. Lithography process window for stable patterning is thoroughly investigated in view of depth of focus, energy latitude

  7. Towards ultimate optical lithography with NXT:1950i dual stage immersion platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castenmiller, Tom; van de Mast, Frank; de Kort, Toine; van de Vin, Coen; de Wit, Marten; Stegen, Raf; van Cleef, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Optical lithography, currently being used for 45-nm semiconductor devices, is expected to be extended further towards the 32-nm and 22-nm node. A further increase of lens NA will not be possible but fortunately the shrink can be enabled with new resolution enhancement methods like source mask optimization (SMO) and double patterning techniques (DPT). These new applications lower the k1 dramatically and require very tight overlay control and CD control to be successful. In addition, overall cost per wafer needs to be lowered to make the production of semiconductor devices acceptable. For this ultimate era of optical lithography we have developed the next generation dual stage NXT:1950i immersion platform. This system delivers wafer throughput of 175 wafers per hour together with an overlay of 2.5nm. Several extensions are offered enabling 200 wafers per hour and improved imaging and on product overlay. The high productivity is achieved using a dual wafer stage with planar motor that enables a high acceleration and high scan speed. With the dual stage concept wafer metrology is performed in parallel with the wafer exposure. The free moving planar stage has reduced overhead during chuck exchange which also improves litho tool productivity. In general, overlay contributors are coming from the lithography system, the mask and the processing. Main contributors for the scanner system are thermal wafer and stage control, lens aberration control, stage positioning and alignment. The back-bone of the NXT:1950i enhanced overlay performance is the novel short beam fixed length encoder grid-plate positioning system. By eliminating the variable length interferometer system used in the previous generation scanners the sensitivity to thermal and flow disturbances are largely reduced. The alignment accuracy and the alignment sensitivity for process layers are improved with the SMASH alignment sensor. A high number of alignment marker pairs can be used without throughput loss, and

  8. SEM metrology for advanced lithographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Rice, Bryan J.; Byers, Jeff; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-zvi, Maayan; Adan, Ofer; Swyers, John; Shneck, Roni Z.

    2007-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle for keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. The industry standard lithographic wavelength has evolved many times, from G-line to I-line, deep ultraviolet (DUV) based on KrF, and 193nm based on ArF. At each of these steps, new photoresist materials have been used. For the 45nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques are being considered, including immersion ArF lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability of printing 45nm node (and beyond) feature widths and pitches. This paper will show results of an evaluation of the critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM)-based metrology capabilities and limitations for the 193nm immersion and EUV lithography techniques that are suggested in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. In this study, we will print wafers with these emerging technologies and evaluate the performance of SEM-based metrology on these features. We will conclude with preliminary findings on the readiness of SEM metrology for these new challenges.

  9. Lithography imaging control by enhanced monitoring of light source performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Lalovic, Ivan; Seong, Nakgeuon; Rechsteiner, Gregory; Thornes, Joshua; D'havé, Koen; Van Look, Lieve; Bekaert, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Reducing lithography pattern variability has become a critical enabler of ArF immersion scaling and is required to ensure consistent lithography process yield for sub-30nm device technologies. As DUV multi-patterning requirements continue to shrink, it is imperative that all sources of lithography variability are controlled throughout the product life-cycle, from technology development to high volume manufacturing. Recent developments of new ArF light-source metrology and monitoring capabilities have been introduced in order to improve lithography patterning control.[1] These technologies enable performance monitoring of new light-source properties, relating to illumination stability, and enable new reporting and analysis of in-line performance.

  10. Determination of mask induced polarization effects occurring in hyper NA immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, Silvio; Bubke, Karsten; Hollein, Ingo; Ziebold, Ralf; Peters, Jan H.

    2005-05-01

    As the lithographic projection technology of the future will require higher numerical aperture (NA) values, new physical effects will have to be taken into consideration. Immersion lithography will result in NA values of up to 1.2 and above. New optical effects like 3D shadowing, effects from oblique incident angles, mask-induced polarization of the transmitted light and birefringence from the substrate should be considered when the masks optical performance is evaluated. This paper addresses mask induced polarization effects from dense lines-and-space structures of standard production masks. On a binary and on an attenuated phase-shifting mask, which were manufactured at the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) transmission experimental investigations were performed. Measurements of diffraction efficiencies for TE- and TM-polarized light using three different incident angles are presented for all considered mask types and compared to simulations. The structures under investigation include line-space-pattern with varying pitches as well as varying duty cycles. Experimental results show good agreement with simulations.

  11. Study of barrier coats for application in immersion 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlihan, Francis; Kim, Wookyu; Sakamuri, Raj; Hamilton, Keino; Dimerli, Alla; Abdallah, David; Romano, Andrew; Dammel, Ralph R.; Pawlowski, Georg; Raub, Alex; Brueck, Steve

    2005-05-01

    We will describe our barrier coat approach for use in immersion 193 nm lithography. These barrier coats may act as either simple barriers providing protection against loss of resist components into water or in the case of one type of these formulations which have a refractive index at 193 nm which is the geometric mean between that of the resist and water provide, also top antireflective properties. Either type of barrier coat can be applied with a simple spinning process compatible with PGMEA based resin employing standard solvents such as alcohols and be removed during the usual resist development process with aqueous 0.26 N TMAH. We will discuss both imaging results with these materials on acrylate type 193 nm resists and also show some fundamental studies we have done to understand the function of the barrier coat and the role of differing spinning solvents and resins. We will show LS (55 nm) and Contact Hole (80 nm) resolved with a 193 nm resist exposed with the interferometric tool at the University of New Mexico (213 nm) with and without the use of a barrier coat.

  12. Charting CEBL's role in mainstream semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.

    2013-09-01

    historically kept it out of mainstream fabs. Thanks to continuing EBDW advances combined with the industry's move to unidirectional (1D) gridded layout style, EBDW promises to cost-efficiently complement 193nm ArF immersion (193i) optical lithography in high volume manufacturing (HVM). Patterning conventional 2D design layouts with 193i is a major roadblock in device scaling: the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment have led to higher mask cost and increased lithography complexity. To overcome the challenge, IC designers have used 1D layouts with "lines and cuts" in critical layers.1 Leading logic and memory chipmakers have been producing advanced designs with lines-and-cuts in HVM for several technology nodes in recent years. However, cut masks in multiple optical patterning are getting extremely costly. Borodovsky proposes Complementary Lithography in which another lithography technology is used to pattern line-cuts in critical layers to complement optical lithography.2 Complementary E-Beam Lithography (CEBL) is a candidate to pattern the Cuts of optically printed Lines. The concept of CEBL is gaining acceptance. However, challenges in throughput, scaling, and data preparation rate are threatening to deny CEBL's role in solving industry's lithography problem. This paper will examine the following issues: The challenges of massively parallel pixel writing The solutions of multiple mini-column design/architecture in: Boosting CEBL throughput Resolving issues of CD control, CDU, LER, data rate, higher resolution, and 450mm wafers The role of CEBL in next-generation solution of semiconductor lithography

  13. Programmed defects study on masks for 45nm immersion lithography using the novel AIMS 45-193i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherübl, Thomas; Dürr, Arndt C.; Böhm, Klaus; Birkner, Robert; Richter, Rigo; Strößner, Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Mask manufacturing for the 45nm node for hyper NA lithography requires tight defect and printability control at small features sizes. The AIMS TM1 technology is a well established methodology to analyze printability of mask defects, repairs and critical features by scanner emulation. With the step towards hyper NA imaging by immersion lithography the AIMS TM technology has been faced with new challenges like vector effects, polarized illumination and tighter specs for repeatability and tool stability. These requirements pushed the development of an entirely new AIMS TM generation. The AIMS TM 45-193i has been designed and developed by Carl Zeiss to address these challenges. A new mechanical platform with a thermal and environmental control unit enables high tool stability. Thus a new class of specification becomes available. The 193nm optical beam path together with an improved beam homogenizer is dedicated to emulate scanners up to 1.4 NA. New features like polarized illumination and vector effect emulation make the AIMS TM 45- 193i a powerful tool for defect disposition and scanner emulation for 45nm immersion lithography. In this paper results from one of the first production tools will be presented. Aerial images from phase shifting and binary masks with different immersion relevant settings will be discussed. Also, data from a long term repeatability study performed on masks with programmed defects will be shown. This study demonstrates the tool's ability to perform defect disposition with high repeatability. It is found that the tool will fulfill the 45nm node requirements to perform mask qualification for production use.

  14. Massively-parallel FDTD simulations to address mask electromagnetic effects in hyper-NA immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu Azpiroz, Jaione; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Hibbs, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In the Hyper-NA immersion lithography regime, the electromagnetic response of the reticle is known to deviate in a complicated manner from the idealized Thin-Mask-like behavior. Already, this is driving certain RET choices, such as the use of polarized illumination and the customization of reticle film stacks. Unfortunately, full 3-D electromagnetic mask simulations are computationally intensive. And while OPC-compatible mask electromagnetic field (EMF) models can offer a reasonable tradeoff between speed and accuracy for full-chip OPC applications, full understanding of these complex physical effects demands higher accuracy. Our paper describes recent advances in leveraging High Performance Computing as a critical step towards lithographic modeling of the full manufacturing process. In this paper, highly accurate full 3-D electromagnetic simulation of very large mask layouts are conducted in parallel with reasonable turnaround time, using a Blue- Gene/L supercomputer and a Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code developed internally within IBM. A 3-D simulation of a large 2-D layout spanning 5μm×5μm at the wafer plane (and thus (20μm×20μm×0.5μm at the mask) results in a simulation with roughly 12.5GB of memory (grid size of 10nm at the mask, single-precision computation, about 30 bytes/grid point). FDTD is flexible and easily parallelizable to enable full simulations of such large layout in approximately an hour using one BlueGene/L "midplane" containing 512 dual-processor nodes with 256MB of memory per processor. Our scaling studies on BlueGene/L demonstrate that simulations up to 100μm × 100μm at the mask can be computed in a few hours. Finally, we will show that the use of a subcell technique permits accurate simulation of features smaller than the grid discretization, thus improving on the tradeoff between computational complexity and simulation accuracy. We demonstrate the correlation of the real and quadrature components that comprise the

  15. Simultaneous fluorescence and breakdown spectroscopy of fresh and aging transformer oil immersed in paper using ArF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, P.; Shoursheini, S. Z.; Khalilinejad, F.; Bavali, A.; Moshgel Gosha, M.; Mansouri, B.

    2012-11-01

    HV transformers are taken into account as the heart of the power distribution system. The on-line monitoring based on the oil analysis offers a rapid diagnostic technique to detect the probable faults. In fact, the transformer malfunctions can be detected using UV laser spectroscopic methods. Here, a novel technique is presented based on simultaneous laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser induced breakdown (LIB) spectroscopy for hyper sensitive identification of the oil degradation. Oil is mainly degraded due to the internal transformer faults such as overheating and partial discharge. The spectroscopic characteristics of oil in paper substrate were obtained due to ArF laser irradiation. It was shown that the amplitude of fluorescence signal increases when the oil suffers aging and degradation. A couple of additional characteristic carbon and Hα emissions appear in the corresponding breakdown spectra too.

  16. High hydrophobic topcoat approach for high volume production and yield enhancement of immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagawa, Natsuko; Nakano, Katsushi; Ishii, Yuuki; Kusabiraki, Kazunori; Shima, Motoyuki

    2012-03-01

    Immersion scanner performance is being improved generation by generation. Faster scan speed is required to increase scanner productivity. There are, however, several papers reporting defect increase with higher scan speed1, 2, 3. To overcome this challenge, both material and immersion scanner requires special tuning and optimization. This high stage speed is possible by employing topcoats that have higher hydrophobicity. In general, blob defect are generated at a higher rate with increase in hydrophobicity of topcoat. Nikon and JSR have collaborated to address this challenge by using next generation scanner and a newly developed topcoat material, respectively. JSR, as a topcoat supplier, introduces a new topcoat (TCX279), which shows low blob defects even with very high hydrophobicity. Nikon's latest immersion scanner S621D, equipped with latest nozzle design for optimizing immersion water flow, and an improved tandem stage system to reduce edge particles, resulted in achieving 5x defect reduction compared to S620D. Ultimately, zero immersion defects were realized by a combination of Nikon's S621D scanner and JSR's new topcoat, TCX279.

  17. ITRS lithography roadmap: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neisser, Mark; Wurm, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Recent ITRS lithography roadmaps show a big technology decision approaching the semiconductor industry about how to do leading edge lithography. The need is rapidly approaching for the industry to select an option for the 22-nm half pitch, but no decision has been made yet. The main options for the 22-nm half pitch are extreme ultraviolet (EUV), ArF immersion lithography with multiple patterning, and maskless lithography. For the 16-nm half pitch, directed self-assembly (DSA) is also an option. The EUV has the most industry investment and is the closest to current lithography in the way it works but still faces challenges in tool productivity and defect-free masks. The nanoimprint needs to overcome the defect, contamination, and overlay challenges before it can be applied to the semiconductor production. Maskless lithography may be used first for prototyping and small volume products where mask costs per chip produced would be very high. Double patterning could be extended to multiple pattering, but would give tremendous process complexity and exponentially rising mask costs due to the many exposures needed per level. The DSA, which only recently has emerged from the research stage, has the potential for very high resolution but represents a huge change in how critical dimensions are formed and controlled.

  18. Using scanning electrochemical microscopy to probe chemistry at the solid-liquid interface in chemically amplified immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeSuer, Robert J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Bard, Allen J.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Tsiartas, Pavlos; Willson, Grant; Conley, Willard E.; Feit, Gene; Kunz, Roderick R.

    2004-05-01

    Three modes of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) - voltammetry, pH, and conductivity - have been used to better understand the chemistry at, and diffusion through, the solid/liquid interface formed between a resist film and water in 193 nm immersion lithography. Emphasis has been placed on investigating the photoacid generator (PAG), triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate, and the corresponding photoacid. The reduction of triphenylsulfonium at a hemispherical Hg microelectrode was monitored using square wave voltammetry to detect trace amounts of the PAG leaching from the surface. pH measurements at a 100 μm diameter Sb microelectrode show the formation of acid in the water layer above a resist upon exposure with UV irradiation. Bipolar conductance measurements at a 100 μm Pt tip positioned 100 μm from the surface indicate that the conductivity of the solution during illumination is dependent upon the percentage of PAG in the film. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of water samples in contact with resist films has been used to quantify the amounts (< 10 ng/cm2) of PAG leaching from the film in the dark which occurs within the first 30 seconds of contact time. Washing the film removes approximately 80% of the total leachable PAG.

  19. Experimental demonstration of line-width modulation in plasmonic lithography using a solid immersion lens-based active nano-gap control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won-Sup; Kim, Taeseob; Choi, Guk-Jong; Lim, Geon; Joe, Hang-Eun; Gang, Myeong-Gu; Min, Byung-Kwon; Park, No-Cheol; Moon, Hyungbae; Kim, Do-Hyung; Park, Young-Pil

    2015-02-02

    Plasmonic lithography has been used in nanofabrication because of its utility beyond the diffraction limit. The resolution of plasmonic lithography depends on the nano-gap between the nanoaperture and the photoresist surface—changing the gap distance can modulate the line-width of the pattern. In this letter, we demonstrate solid-immersion lens based active non-contact plasmonic lithography, applying a range of gap conditions to modulate the line-width of the pattern. Using a solid-immersion lens-based near-field control system, the nano-gap between the exit surface of the nanoaperture and the media can be actively modulated and maintained to within a few nanometers. The line-widths of the recorded patterns using 15- and 5-nm gaps were 47 and 19.5 nm, respectively, which matched closely the calculated full-width at half-maximum. From these results, we conclude that changing the nano-gap within a solid-immersion lens-based plasmonic head results in varying line-width patterns.

  20. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  1. Mask defect printing mechanisms for future lithography generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Andreas; Graf, Thomas; Bubke, Karsten; Höllein, Ingo; Teuber, Silvio

    2006-03-01

    Mask defects are of increasing concern for future lithography generations. The improved resolution capabilities of immersion and EUV systems increase also the sensitivity of these systems with respect to small imperfections of the mask. Advanced mask technologies such as alternating phase shift masks (AltPSM), chromeless phase shift lithography (CPL), or "thick" absorbers on EUV masks introduce new defect types. The paper presents an application of rigorous electromagnetic field modeling for the study of typical defect printing mechanisms in ArF immersion lithography and in EUV lithography. For standard imaging and mask technologies, such as binary masks or attenuated phase shift masks, small defects usually print as linewidth or critical dimension (CD) errors with the largest effect at best focus. For AltPSM, CPL masks, and EUV masks this is not always the case. Several unusual printing scenarios were observed: placement errors due to defects can become more critical than CD-errors, defects may print more critical at defocus positions different from the center of the process window, the defect printing may become asymmetric through focus, and the risk of defect printing depends on the polarization of the used light source. Several simulation examples will demonstrate these effects. Rigorous EMF simulations in combination with vector imaging simulations are very useful to understand the origins of the observed defect printing mechanisms.

  2. Designing dual-trench alternating phase-shift masks for 140-nm and smaller features using 248-nm KrF and 193-nm ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, John S.; Socha, Robert J.; Naderi, Alex R.; Baker, Catherine A.; Rizvi, Syed A.; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Kachwala, Nishrin; Chen, J. Fung; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Caldwell, Roger F.; Takeuchi, Susumu; Yamada, Yoshiro; Senoh, Takashi; McCallum, Martin

    1998-09-01

    One method for making the alternating phase-shift mask involves cutting a trench into the quartz of the mask using an anisotropic dry etch, followed by an isotropic etch to move the corners of the trench underneath the chrome to minimize problems caused by diffraction at the bottom corners of the phase-trench. This manufacturing method makes the addition of subresolution scattering bars and serifs problematic, because the amount of the undercut causes chrome lifting of these small features. Adding an additional anisotropically etched trench to both cut and uncut regions is helpful, but the etch does not move the trench corners under the chrome and result in a loss to intensity and image contrast. At 248 nm illumination and 4X magnification, our work shows that a combination of 240 nm dual-trench and 5 nm to 10 nm undercut produces images with equal intensity between shifted and unshifted regions without loss of image contrasts. This paper demonstrates optical proximity correction for doing 100 nm, 120 nm, 140 nm and 180 nm lines of varying pitch for a simple alternating phase-shift mask, with no dual-trench or undercut. Then the electromagnetic field simulator, TEMPEST, is used to find the best combination of dual-trench depth and amount of undercut for an alternating phase-shift mask. Phase measurement using 248 nm light and depth measurement of thirty-six unique combinations of dual-trench and phase-shift trench are shown. Based on modeling and experimental results, recommendations for making a fine tuned dual-trench 248 nm mask, as well as an extension of the dual-trench alternating phase-shift technique to 193 nm lithography, are made.

  3. Current Status and Perspective of EUV Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Iwao

    The EUV lithography (EUVL) utilizes 13-nm photons as a light source. Because of the short wavelength, it provides a very high resolution and is applicable to the fabrication of multiple generations of semiconductor devices from 45 nm hp down to 32 and even 22 nm hp. This makes EUVL the most promising next-generation lithography, which will follow ArF immersion lithography. However, because the wavelength is so short, bringing EUVL to the level of a practical production tool involves many difficult challenges, such as the development of a high-power light source, high-precision reflective optics, low-defect multilayer masks, a high-resolution high-sensitivity resist, and so on. To overcome the technical difficulties and accelerate the development of EUVL, various projects have been launched and are currently running under the management of SEMATECH (US), NEDEA+ (Europe), and ASET and EUVA (Japan). These activities have produced great advances in EUVL technology in the past several years. A full-field exposure tool for process development (α tool) will be delivered in 2006, and an exposure tool for mass production (γ tool) will be delivered two or three years after that. This presentation gives an overview of recent progress in EUVL.

  4. Advanced patterning approaches based on negative-tone development (NTD) process for further extension of 193nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Michihiro; Inoue, Naoki; Furutani, Hajime; Yamamoto, Kei; Goto, Akiyoshi; Fujita, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Two approaches which achieve the further evolution of NTD (Negative Tone Development) process are shown in this article. One is ACCEL (Advanced Chemical Contrast Enhancement Layer) process that can improve the lithography performance and the other is DTD (Dual Tone Development) process that can shrink patterning pitch below the limit of single exposure process. ACCEL is an additionally provided layer which is coated on a surface of NTD resist film before exposure and removed by NTD developer. ACCEL can enhance the acid distribution and dissolution contrast of the NTD resist. In fact, lithography performances such as exposure latitude (EL) and DOF improved dramatically by applying ACCEL compared to the NTD resist without ACCEL. We consider that suppression of excessive acid diffusion and material transfer between the resist layer and the ACCEL layer are the causes of the contrast enhancement. DTD process is one of the simplest pitch shrink method which is achieved by repeating PTD and NTD process. Feasibility study of DTD patterning has been demonstrated so far. However, Exposure latitude margin and CDU performance were not sufficient for applying DTD to HVM. We developed the novel DTD specific resist under a new concept, and 32 nm half pitch (hp) contact hole (CH) pattern was successfully formed with enough margins. DTD line and space (L/S) patterning are also demonstrated and 24 nm hp L/S pattern can be resolved. k1 factors of DTD CH and L/S patterns reach to 0.20 and 0.15, respectively.

  5. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  6. Optical lithography for nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Arnold, Bill

    2006-09-01

    Optical lithography is continually evolving to meet the ever demanding requirements of the micro - and nano- technology communities. Since the optical exposure systems used in lithography are some of the most advanced and complex optical instruments ever built, they involve ever more complex illuminator designs, nearly aberration free lenses, and hyper numerical apertures approaching unity and beyond. Fortunately, the lithography community has risen to the challenge by devising many inventive optical systems and various methods to use and optimize exposure systems. The recent advancement of water immersion technology into lithography for 193nm wavelengths has allowed the numerical aperture (NA) of lithographic lenses to exceed 1.0 or a hyper-NA region. This allows resolution limits to extend to the 45nm node and beyond with NA>1.3. At these extreme NAs, the imaging within the photoresist is accomplished by not only using water immersion but also using polarized light lithography. This paper will review the current state-of-the-art in immersion, hyper-NA lithography. We show the latest results and discuss the various phenomena that may arise using these systems. Furthermore, we show some of the advanced image optimization techniques that allow lithographic printing at the physical limits of resolution. In addition, we show that the future of optical lithography is likely to go well beyond the 30nm regime using advancements in 193nm double-patterning technology and/or the use of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) optical systems.

  7. Study on RLS trade-off resist upgrade for production ready EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghyung; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Seunguk; Lim, Mijung; Koo, Sunyoung; Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Young-Sik

    2016-03-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) is the most promising technology as substitute for multiple patterning based on ArF immersion lithography. If enough productivity can be accomplished, EUV will take main role in the chip manufacturing. Since the introduction of NXE3300, many significant results have been achieved in source power and availability, but lots of improvements are still required in various aspects for the implementation of EUV lithography on high volume manufacturing. Among them, it is especially important to attain high sensitivity resist without degrading other resolution performance. In this paper, performances of various resists were evaluated with real device patterns on NXE3300 scanner and technical progress of up-to-date EUV resists will be shown by comparing with the performance of their predecessors. Finally the prospect of overcoming the triangular trade-off between sensitivity, resolution, line edge roughness (LER) and achieving high volume manufacturing will be discussed.

  8. High-productivity immersion scanner enabling 1xnm hp manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirata, Yosuke; Shibazaki, Yuichi; Kosugi, Junichi; Kikuchi, Takahisa; Ohmura, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    NSR-S622D, Nikon's new ArF immersion scanner, provides the best and practicable solutions to meet the escalating requirement from device manufactures to accommodate the further miniaturization of device pattern. NSR-S622D has various additional functions compared to the previous model such as the newly developed illumination system, new projection lens, new AF system new wafer table in addition to the matured Streamlign platform. These new features will derive the outstanding performance of NSR, enabling highly controlled CD uniformity, focus accuracy and overlay accuracy. NSR-S622D will provide the adequate capabilities that are demanded from a lithography tool for production of 1x nm hp node and beyond.

  9. Lithography equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.

    1996-07-01

    Until recently, lithography capability evolved consistently with Moore's law. It appears that semiconductor manufacturers are now deviating from Moore's law, which has implications for lithography equipment. DUV lithography is moving into production in a mix-and-match environment. Step- and-scan technology is the wave of the near-future, as a way to contend with the difficulty of manufacturing wide-field lenses. Resist processing equipment will undergo few fundamental changes, but will often be integrated with steppers, particularly for DUV applications. Metrology is being stretched beyond its limits for technologies below 250 nm. The move is on to 300 m diameter wafers, and 193 nm lithography is under consideration.

  10. Future trends in high-resolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawes, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    A perennial question is "what is the future of high-resolution lithography, a key technology that drives the semiconductor industry"? The dominant technology over the last 30 years has been optical lithography, which by lowering wavelengths to 193 nm (ArF) and 157 nm (F 2) and by using optical "tricks" such as phase shift masks, off-axis illumination and phase filters, should be capable of 100 nm CMOS technology. So where does this leave the competition? The 100-nm lithography used to be the domain of electron beam lithography but only in research laboratories. Significant efforts are being made to increase throughput by electron projection (scattering with angular limitation projection electron beam lithography or SCALPEL). X-ray lithography remains a demonstrated R&D tool waiting to be commercially exploited but the initial expenditure to do so is very high. Ion beam lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ( λ<12 nm) have also received attention in recent years. This paper will concentrate on some of the key issues and speculate on how and when an alternative to optical lithography will be embraced by industry.

  11. An ice lithography instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  12. An ice lithography instrument

    PubMed Central

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  13. An ice lithography instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  14. An ice lithography instrument.

    PubMed

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J A

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines. PMID:21721733

  15. ArF photoresist system using alicyclic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Seong-Ju; Park, Sun-Yi; Lee, Hosull; Jung, Jae Chang; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Baik, Ki-Ho

    1997-07-01

    We have developed a chemically amplified photoresist for use in ArF lithography based on alicyclic polymer. 3- Bicyclo(2,2,1)hept-2-yl-3-(2-methyl allyoxy)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (BHPE) was prepared as a new kind of protected acid-labile monomer. Terpolymer, poly(BHPE-NBO-MAL), was prepared with BHPE, 5-norbornen-2-ol (NBO), and maleic anhydride (MAL) monomers by radical polymerization. Photoresist of poly(BHPE-NBO-MAL) displayed good adhesion, dry-etch resistance, and development. As a result, we obtained 0.16 micrometer line-and-space positive patterns with 2.38 wt% TMAH aqueous solution using an ArF exposure system.

  16. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Applications in Advanced Lithography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synowicki, R. A.; Pribil, Greg K.; Hilfiker, James N.; Edwards, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is an optical metrology technique widely used in the semiconductor industry. For lithography applications SE is routinely used for measurement of film thickness and refractive index of polymer photoresist and antireflective coatings. While this remains a primary use of SE, applications are now expanding into other areas of advanced lithography research. New applications include immersion lithography, phase-shift photomasks, transparent pellicles, 193 and 157 nm lithography, stepper optical coatings, imprint lithography, and even real-time monitoring of etch development rate in liquid ambients. Of recent interest are studies of immersion fluids where knowledge of the fluid refractive index and absorption are critical to their use in immersion lithography. Phase-shift photomasks are also of interest as the thickness and index of the phase-shift and absorber layers must be critically controlled for accurate intensity and phase transmission. Thin transparent pellicles to protect these masks must be also characterized for thickness and refractive index. Infrared ellipsometry is sensitive to chemical composition, film thickness, and how film chemistry changes with processing. Real-time monitoring of polymer film thickness during etching in a liquid developer allows etch rate and endpoint determination with monolayer sensitivity. This work considers these emerging applications to survey the current status of spectroscopic ellipsometry as a characterization technique in advanced lithography applications.

  17. Lithography optics: its present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Mori, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    Firstly, various technical aspects of ArF optics are surveyed. At present, the ArF excimer laser is regarded as one of the most promising candidates as a next-generation light source for optical lithography. Discussions are ranging over some critical issues of ArF optics. The lifetime of ArF optics supposedly limited by the radiation compaction of silica glass is estimated in comparison with KrF optics. Availability of calcium fluoride (CaF2) is also discussed. As a designing issue, a comparative study is made about the optical configuration, dioptric or catadioptric. In the end, our resist-based performance is shown. Secondly, estimated are the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters, such as numerical aperture and wavelength. For the estimation, simulations based on aerial images are performed, where in the resolution limit is defined as a minimum feature size which retains practical depth of focus. Pattern geometry is classified into two categories, which are dense lines and isolated lines. Available wavelengths are assumed to be KrF excimer laser ((λ =248 nm), ArF excimer laser (λ =193 nm) and F2 excimer laser (λ =157 nm). Based upon the simulation results, the resolution limit is estimated for each geometry and each wavelength.

  18. Below 70-nm contact hole pattern with RELACS process on ArF resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Mamoru; Toyoshima, Toshiyuki; Ishibashi, Takeo; Tarutani, Shinji; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Takano, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hatsuyuki

    2003-06-01

    A chemical shrink technology, RELACS (Resolution Enhancement Lithography Assisted by Chemical Shrink), utilizes the cross linking reaction catalyzed by the acid component existing in a predefined resist pattern. This "RELACS" process is a hole shrinking procedure that includes simple coating, baking, and rinsing applied after conventional photolithography. Our target is realize of sub-70nm hole pattern formation by using new RELACS for ArF resist. At present, RELACS process is introduced to mass production of KrF lithography by using AZ R200 (Product name of Clariant) mainly. Then first of all we reported process performance of conventional RELACS material, AZ R200 with ArF resist. However AZ R200 does not show satisfactory shrinkage on ArF resist. Thereupon, we started on the development of new RELACS corresponding to ArF resist. As the result, we developed new RELACS material including Cross Linking Accelerator (CLA). It was found that CLA is able to improve reactivity of RELACS with ArF-resist. By using this new RELACS, It is Realized sub-70nm hole pattern formation with ArF-Ex lithography and It is able to Control of hole size by mixing bake (MB) temperature and additive ratio of CLA. Moreover this process was realized that thickness of shrunk hole is increased.

  19. Litho-freeze-litho-etch (LFLE) enabling dual wafer flow coat/develop process and freeze CD tuning bake for >200wph immersion ArF photolithography double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczulewski, Charles N.; Rosslee, Craig A.

    2009-12-01

    The SOKUDO DUO track system incorporates a dual-path wafer flow to reduce the burden on the wafer handling unit and enables high-throughput coat/develop/bake processing in-line with semiconductor photolithography exposure (scanner) equipment. Various photolithography-based double patterning process flows were modeled on the SOKUDO DUO system and it was confirmed to be able to process both Litho-Process-Litho-Etch (LPLE)*2 and negative-tone develop process wafers at greater than 200 wafer-per-hour (wph) capability for each litho-pass through the in-line exposure tool. In addition, it is demonstrated that Biased Hot Plates (BHP) with "cdTune" software improves litho pattern #1 and litho pattern #2 within wafer CD uniformity. Based primarily on JSR Micro materials for Litho-Freeze- Litho-Etch (LFLE) the coat, develop and bake process CD uniformity improvement results are demonstrated on the SOKUDO RF3S immersion track in-line with ASML XT:1900Gi system at IMEC, Belgium.

  20. The study of lithography conditions to use advanced resist performance properly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengkai; Wang, Wuping; Chen, Quan; Aoyama, Hajime; Takemasa, Kengo; Sei, Toshihiko; Miyazawa, Tami; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki; Shao, Chun

    2015-03-01

    Correlation of resist modeling of printed features with lithographic data is a necessary part of developing new lithographic processes. Recently, we have found a case in which the most advanced resist types sometimes show better behavior than expectations from optical simulation in terms of dose latitude, MEEF (mask error enhancement factor), and even CD variation through different pitches. This superior resist performance may allow greater margin for error in each component, such as mask, scanner, and metrology in very low-k1 lithography. On the other hand, since the resist pattern CD for the most advanced resist is very much different from the prediction of optical simulation, it is a challenge to build OPC models using the exposure result with the resist. In order to solve this issue, we have tried to use several litho parameters to reduce the gap between optical simulation and resist CDs for OPC modeling. In this paper we discuss the effect of the parameters to reduce the gap between optical model and actual resist behavior with keeping superior performance as much as possible. The method we mention may be a key to use the most advanced resist in near future. As a result the life of ArF immersion lithography in the critical layer would be extended than we expect today.

  1. Theoretical study of fabrication of line-and-space patterns with 7 nm quarter-pitch using electron beam lithography with chemically amplified resist process: III. Post exposure baking on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography is a key technology for the fabrication of photomasks for ArF immersion and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography and molds for nanoimprint lithography. In this study, the temporal change in the chemical gradient of line-and-space patterns with a 7 nm quarter-pitch (7 nm space width and 21 nm line width) was calculated until it became constant, independently of postexposure baking (PEB) time, to clarify the feasibility of single nano patterning on quartz substrates using EB lithography with chemically amplified resist processes. When the quencher diffusion constant is the same as the acid diffusion constant, the maximum chemical gradient of the line-and-space pattern with a 7 nm quarter-pitch did not differ much from that with a 14 nm half-pitch under the condition described above. Also, from the viewpoint of process control, a low quencher diffusion constant is considered to be preferable for the fabrication of line-and-space patterns with a 7 nm quarter-pitch on quartz substrates.

  2. Novel ArF photoresist polymer to suppress the roughness formation in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Samukawa, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    The serious problem associated with 193-nm lithography using an ArF photoresist is roughness formation of photoresist polymer during plasma processes. We have previously investigated the mechanism of roughness formation caused by plasma. The main deciding factor for roughness formation is a chemical reaction between photoresist polymer and reactive species from plasma. The lactone group in photoresist polymer is highly chemically reactive, and shrinking the lactone structure enhances the roughness formation. In this paper, on the basis of the mechanism of roughness formation, we propose a novel ArF photoresist polymer. The roughness formation was much more suppressed in the novel photoresist polymer during plasma etching process than in the previous type. In the novel photoresist polymer, chemical reactions were spread evenly on the photoresist film surface by adding the polar structure. As a result, decreases in the lactone group were inhibited, leading to suppressing ArF photoresist roughness.

  3. Development of a computational lithography roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. Fung; Liu, Hua-Yu; Laidig, Thomas; Zuniga, Christian; Cao, Yu; Socha, Robert

    2008-03-01

    While lithography R&D community at large has already gotten the mind set for 32nm, all eyes are on 22nm node. Current consensus is to employ computational lithography to meet wafer CD uniformity (CDU) requirement. Resolution enhancement technologies (RET) and model OPC are the two fundamental components for computational lithography. Today's full-chip CDU specifications are already pushing physical limits at extreme lithography k I factor. While increasingly aggressive RET either by double exposure or double patterning are enabling imaging performance, for CDU control we need ever more accurate OPC at a greater computational efficiency. In this report, we discuss the desire for wanting more robust and accurate OPC models. One important trend is to have predictive OPC models allowing accurate OPC results to be obtained much faster, shortening the qualification process for exposure tools. We investigate several key parameters constitute to accuracy achievable in computational lithography. Such as the choice of image pixel size, numbers of terms needed for transmission cross coefficients (TCC), and "safe" ambit radius for assuring accurate CD prediction. Selections of image pixel size and "safe" ambit radius together determine % utilization for 2D fast Fourier transformation (FFT) for efficient full-chip OPC computation. For IC manufacturing beyond ArF, we made initial observations and estimations on EUV computational lithography. These discussions pave the way for developing a computational lithography roadmap extends to the end of Moore's Law. This computational lithography roadmap aims to be a complement for the current ITRS roadmap on what does it take to achieve CD correction accuracy.

  4. Mechanism for low-etching resistance and surface roughness of ArF photoresist during plasma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Koyama, Koji; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Momose, Hikaru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2009-03-01

    ArF excimer laser lithography was introduced to fabricate nanometer-scale devices and uses chemically amplified photoresist polymers including photoacid generators (PAGs). Because plasma-etching processes cause serious problems related to the use of ArF photoresists, such as line-edge roughness and low etching selectivity, we have to understand the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers. Investigating the effects of surface temperature and the irradiation species from plasma, we have found that ion irradiation by itself did not drastically increase the roughness or etching rate of ArF photoresist films unless it was combined with ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) photon irradiation. The structures of ArF photoresist polymers were largely unchanged by ion irradiation alone but were destroyed by combinations of ion and UV/VUV-photon irradiation. Our results suggested that PAG-mediated deprotection induced by UV/VUV-photon irradiation was amplified at surface temperatures above 100 deg. C. The etching rate and surface roughness of plasma-etched ArF photoresists are affected by the irradiation species and surface temperature during plasma etching. UV/VUV-photon irradiation plays a particularly important role in the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers.

  5. The Drosophila Arf1 homologue Arf79F is essential for lamellipodium formation.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Davidson, Anthony C; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2012-12-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) drives the polymerisation of actin filaments located beneath the plasma membrane to generate lamellipodia that are pivotal to cell architecture and movement. By reconstituting WRC-dependent actin assembly at the membrane, we recently discovered that several classes of Arf family GTPases directly recruit and activate WRC in cell extracts, and that Arf cooperates with Rac1 to trigger actin polymerisation. Here, we demonstrate that the Class 1 Arf1 homologue Arf79F colocalises with the WRC at dynamic lamellipodia. We report that Arf79F is required for lamellipodium formation in Drosophila S2R+ cells, which only express one Arf isoform for each class. Impeding Arf function either by dominant-negative Arf expression or by Arf double-stranded RNA interference (dsRNAi)-mediated knockdown uncovered that Arf-dependent lamellipodium formation was specific to Arf79F, establishing that Class 1 Arfs, but not Class 2 or Class 3 Arfs, are crucial for lamellipodia. Lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was restored by expressing mammalian Arf1, but not by constitutively active Rac1, showing that Arf79F does not act via Rac1. Abolition of lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was not due to Golgi disruption. Blocking Arf79F activation with guanine nucleotide exchange factor inhibitors impaired WRC localisation to the plasma membrane and concomitant generation of lamellipodia. Our data indicate that the Class I Arf GTPase is a central component in WRC-driven lamellipodium formation. PMID:22992458

  6. Implementation of assist features in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Torres, Andres; Gupta, Rachit; Word, James

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of EUV lithography will happen at a critical feature pitch which corresponds to a k1 factor of roughly 0.45. While this number seems not very aggressive compared to recent ArF lithography nodes, the number is sufficiently low that the introduction of assist features has to be considered. While the small NA makes the k1 factor larger, the depth of focus still needs to be scaled down with wavelength. However the exposure tool's focus control is not greatly improved over the ArF tools, so other solutions to improve the depth of focus, e.g. SRAFs, are needed. On the other hand, sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) require very small mask dimensions, which make masks more costly to write and inspect. Another disadvantage of SRAFs is the fact that they may cause pattern-dependent best focus shift due to thick mask effects. Those effects can be predicted, but the shift of best focus and the associated tilt of Bossung curves make the process more difficult to control. We investigate the impact of SRAFs on printing in EUV lithography and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. By using image quality parameters such as best focus (BF), and depth of focus (DOF), respectively with and without SRAFs, we will answer the question if we can gain a net benefit for 1D and 2D patterns by adding SRAFs. SRAFs will only be introduced if any net improvement in process variation (PV) outweighs the additional expense of assist patterning on the mask. In this paper, we investigate the difference in printing behavior of symmetric and asymmetric SRAF placement and whether through slit effect needs to be considered in SRAF placement for EUV lithography.

  7. Subwavelength-size solid immersion lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Haq, Mohammad Tahdiul; Nakagawa, Wataru; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2011-10-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale solid immersion lenses (nano-SILs) with sizes down to a subwavelength range. Submicrometer-scale cylinders fabricated by electron-beam lithography are thermally reflowed to form a spherical shape. Subsequent soft lithography leads to nano-SILs on transparent substrates for optical characterization. The optical characterization is performed using a high-resolution interference microscope with illumination at 642 nm wavelength. The focal spots produced by the nano-SILs show both spot-size reduction and enhanced optical intensity, which are consistent with the immersion effect. PMID:21964145

  8. Photomask cleaning process improvement to minimize ArF haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael; McDonald, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Growth of "haze" defects on photomasks exposed in ArF lithography is recognized as a serious problem. Haze defects that have grown to detectable sizes can be analysed in situ by techniques such as EDX or Raman, but to analyze at the photomask manufacturing stage requires extraction of residues by solution in DI water. The effect of extraction conditions, including surface area and material, water volume, time, and temperature, has been studied. A standard method to compare residual ion levels is proposed. Various methods for reducing residual ion levels from the photomask cleaning process have been published. These include SPM reduction, oxygen plasma, SC1 dilution, Megasonic agitation, hot rinse, UV exposure, thermal bake, ozone water, ozone gas, and hydrogenated water. Critical parameters for the cleaning process, besides residual ion levels and contamination removal efficiency, include CD shift, AR/chrome damage, scatter bar damage, and on phase shift masks, the change in phase and transmission. An optimized process combining conventional and novel techniques is described. Data is presented to show the importance of controlling all resist strip and clean processes, not just the final clean. It has achieved sulphate levels of 0.2ng/cm2 (well below the critical level for haze growth), as well as improved results for the other critical parameters. This process has been demonstrated to allow ArF exposure of large numbers of wafers without the appearance of haze defects.

  9. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, Edward V.; Oster, Yale; Mundinger, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1700-1300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850-650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask.

  10. VUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Oster, Y.; Mundinger, D.C.

    1990-12-25

    Deep UV projection lithography can be performed using an e-beam pumped solid excimer UV source, a mask, and a UV reduction camera. The UV source produces deep UV radiation in the range 1,700--1,300A using xenon, krypton or argon; shorter wavelengths of 850--650A can be obtained using neon or helium. A thin solid layer of the gas is formed on a cryogenically cooled plate and bombarded with an e-beam to cause fluorescence. The UV reduction camera utilizes multilayer mirrors having high reflectivity at the UV wavelength and images the mask onto a resist coated substrate at a preselected demagnification. The mask can be formed integrally with the source as an emitting mask. 6 figs.

  11. Maskless lithography

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for maskless lithography. A plurality of individually addressable and rotatable micromirrors together comprise a two-dimensional array of micromirrors. Each micromirror in the two-dimensional array can be envisioned as an individually addressable element in the picture that comprises the circuit pattern desired. As each micromirror is addressed it rotates so as to reflect light from a light source onto a portion of the photoresist coated wafer thereby forming a pixel within the circuit pattern. By electronically addressing a two-dimensional array of these micromirrors in the proper sequence a circuit pattern that is comprised of these individual pixels can be constructed on a microchip. The reflecting surface of the micromirror is configured in such a way as to overcome coherence and diffraction effects in order to produce circuit elements having straight sides.

  12. Beyond k1=0.25 lithography: 70-nm L/S patterning using KrF scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Takeaki; Levenson, Marc D.; Liu, Wei; He, Jim; Yeh, Wendy; Ahn, Sang; Oga, Toshihiro; Shen, Meihua; M'saad, Hichem

    2003-12-01

    The extendibility of optical lithography using KrF and ArF exposure tools is still being investigated, even, being demanded strongly now, due to the unforeseen issues, high cost, and general difficulty of NGLs - including F2 and immersion lithography. In spite of these challenges Moore's Law requires continued shrinks and the ITRS roadmap still keeps its aggressive timetable. In order to follow the ITRS roadmap, the resolution must keep improving by increasing the lens NA for optical exposure tools. However, the conventional limit of optical resolution (kpitch=0.5) is very close for the current technologies, perhaps limiting progress unless NGL becomes available quickly. Therefore we need to find a way to overcome this seemingly fundamental limit of optical resolution. In this paper, we propose two practical two-mask /double-exposure schemes for doubling resolution in future lithography. One method uses a Si-containing bi-layer resist, and the other method uses Applied Materials' APF (a removable hard mask). The basic ideas of both methods are similar: The first exposure forms 1:3 ratio L/S patterns in one resist/hard mask layer, then the second exposure images another 1:3 ratio L/S pattern in-between the two lines (or two spaces) formed by the first exposure. The combination of these two exposures can form, in theory, kpitch=0.25 patterns. In this paper, we will demonstrate 70nm L/S pattern (140nm pitch) or smaller by using a NA0.68 KrF Scanner and a strong-RET reticle, which corresponds to kpitch = 0.38 (k1=0.19). We will also investigate the critical alignment and CD control issues for these two-mask/dual-exposure schemes.

  13. EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kevin; Wurm, Stefan

    2006-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology and infrastructure development has made excellent progress over the past several years, and tool suppliers are delivering alpha tools to customers. However, requirements in source, mask, optics, and resist are very challenging, and significant development efforts are still needed to support beta and production-level performance. Some of the important advances in the past few years include increased source output power, tool and optics system development and integration, and mask blank defect reduction. For example, source power has increased to levels approaching specification, but reliable source operation at these power levels has yet to be fully demonstrated. Significant efforts are also needed to achieve the resolution, line width roughness, and photospeed requirements for EUV photoresists. Cost of ownership and extendibility to future nodes are key factors in determining the outlook for the manufacturing insertion of EUVL. Since wafer throughput is a critical cost factor, source power, resist sensitivity, and system design all need to be carefully considered. However, if the technical and business challenges can be met, then EUVL will be the likely technology of choice for semiconductor manufacturing at the 32, 22, 16 and 11 nm half-pitch nodes. To cite this article: K. Kemp, S. Wurm, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  14. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  15. Immersive video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moezzi, Saied; Katkere, Arun L.; Jain, Ramesh C.

    1996-03-01

    Interactive video and television viewers should have the power to control their viewing position. To make this a reality, we introduce the concept of Immersive Video, which employs computer vision and computer graphics technologies to provide remote users a sense of complete immersion when viewing an event. Immersive Video uses multiple videos of an event, captured from different perspectives, to generate a full 3D digital video of that event. That is accomplished by assimilating important information from each video stream into a comprehensive, dynamic, 3D model of the environment. Using this 3D digital video, interactive viewers can then move around the remote environment and observe the events taking place from any desired perspective. Our Immersive Video System currently provides interactive viewing and `walkthrus' of staged karate demonstrations, basketball games, dance performances, and typical campus scenes. In its full realization, Immersive Video will be a paradigm shift in visual communication which will revolutionize television and video media, and become an integral part of future telepresence and virtual reality systems.

  16. Immersive CAD

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.L.

    1999-02-01

    This paper documents development of a capability for performing shape-changing editing operations on solid model representations in an immersive environment. The capability includes part- and assembly-level operations, with part modeling supporting topology-invariant and topology-changing modifications. A discussion of various design considerations in developing an immersive capability is included, along with discussion of a prototype implementation we have developed and explored. The project investigated approaches to providing both topology-invariant and topology-changing editing. A prototype environment was developed to test the approaches and determine the usefulness of immersive editing. The prototype showed exciting potential in redefining the CAD interface. It is fun to use. Editing is much faster and friendlier than traditional feature-based CAD software. The prototype algorithms did not reliably provide a sufficient frame rate for complex geometries, but has provided the necessary roadmap for development of a production capability.

  17. Arf1 and Arf6 Promote Ventral Actin Structures formed by acute Activation of Protein Kinase C and Src

    PubMed Central

    Caviston, Juliane P.; Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2016-01-01

    Arf proteins regulate membrane traffic and organelle structure. Although Arf6 is known to initiate actin-based changes in cell surface architecture, Arf1 may also function at the plasma membrane. Here we show that acute activation of protein kinase C (PKC) induced by the phorbol ester PMA led to the formation of motile actin structures on the ventral surface of Beas-2b cells, a lung bronchial epithelial cell line. Ventral actin structures also formed in PMA-treated HeLa cells that had elevated levels of Arf activation. For both cell types, formation of the ventral actin structures was enhanced by expression of active forms of either Arf1 or Arf6, and by the expression of guanine nucleotide exchange factors that activate these Arfs. By contrast, formation of these structures was blocked by inhibitors of PKC and Src, and required phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate, Rac, Arf6 and Arf1. Furthermore, expression of ASAP1, an Arf1 GTPase activating protein (GAP) was more effective at inhibiting the ventral actin structures than was ACAP1, an Arf6 GAP. This study adds to the expanding role for Arf1 in the periphery and identifies a requirement for Arf1, a “Golgi Arf”, in the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton on ventral surfaces, against the substratum. PMID:24916416

  18. Investigation of cyclopolymerization for ArF positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjoon; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Fujishima, Hiroaki; Hanawa, Ryotaro; Uetani, Yasunori

    2003-06-01

    Cyclopolymerization methodology is unique because it uses a standard free radical polymerization that is free from the use of metal catalyzed chemistry while it still can provide the main chain cyclic structure. The feasibility and applicability have been examined previously, from which some of the potential opportunities have been revealed. Our initial research direction was aimed at developing robust etching resistant acrylic resins through cyclopolymerization. During the course of our investigation it came to our attention that there might be more than one benefit we could get from this approach and here in reported is our recent progress in the study. A series of diacrylic monomers and their cyclic polymers have been prepared and evaluated for ArF optical lithography applications. The reaction of acrylic esters that have essential functional groups for lithographic performances such as an acid-cleavable bulky adamantyl group and a polar lactone group with formaldehyde in the presence of diazabicyclo-(2,2,2)octane has been shown to provide access to an ether linked symmetric or asymmetric diacrylic monomer depending on the starting materials with a reasonable yield after an adequate purification procedure. While the main research focus of cyclopolymerization of diacrylic monomers has been an improvement of dry etching resistance, an equal interest was placed on enhancing homogeneity in the polymerization reaction medium.

  19. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  20. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  1. Exposure tool control for advanced semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    This is a review paper to show how we control exposure tool parameters in order to satisfy patterning performance and productivity requirements for advanced semiconductor lithography. In this paper, we will discuss how we control illumination source shape to satisfy required imaging performance, heat-induced lens aberration during exposure to minimize the aberration impact on imaging, dose and focus control to realize uniform patterning performance across the wafer and patterning position of circuit patterns on different layers. The contents are mainly about current Nikon immersion exposure tools.

  2. The structural basis of Arf effector specificity: the crystal structure of ARF6 in a complex with JIP4

    PubMed Central

    Isabet, Tatiana; Montagnac, Guillaume; Regazzoni, Karine; Raynal, Bertrand; Khadali, Fatima El; England, Patrick; Franco, Michel; Chavrier, Philippe; Houdusse, Anne; Ménétrey, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The JNK-interacting proteins, JIP3 and JIP4, are specific effectors of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6. The interaction of ARF6–GTP with the second leucine zipper (LZII) domains of JIP3/JIP4 regulates the binding of JIPs to kinesin-1 and dynactin. Here, we report the crystal structure of ARF6–GTP bound to the JIP4-LZII at 1.9 Å resolution. The complex is a heterotetramer with dyad symmetry arranged in an ARF6–(JIP4)2–ARF6 configuration. Comparison of the ARF6–JIP4 interface with the equivalent region of ARF1 shows the structural basis of JIP4's specificity for ARF6. Using site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance, we further show that non-conserved residues at the switch region borders are the key structural determinants of JIP4 specificity. A structure-derived model of the association of the ARF6–JIP3/JIP4 complex with membranes shows that the JIP4-LZII coiled-coil should lie along the membrane to prevent steric hindrances, resulting in only one ARF6 molecule bound. Such a heterotrimeric complex gives insights to better understand the ARF6-mediated motor switch regulatory function. PMID:19644450

  3. MDM2-Mediated Degradation of p14ARF: A Novel Mechanism to Control ARF Levels in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vivo, Maria; Matarese, Maria; Sepe, Maria; Di Martino, Rosaria; Festa, Luisa; Calabrò, Viola; Mantia, Girolama La; Pollice, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    We here show a new relationship between the human p14ARF oncosuppressor and the MDM2 oncoprotein. MDM2 overexpression in various cancer cell lines causes p14ARF reduction inducing its degradation through the proteasome. The effect does not require the ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 and preferentially occurs in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, treatment with inhibitors of the PKC (Protein Kinase C) pathway and use of p14ARF phosphorylation mutants indicate that ARF phosphorylation could play a role in MDM2 mediated ARF degradation reinforcing our previous observations that ARF phosphorylation influences its stability and biological activity. Our study uncovers a new potentially important mechanism through which ARF and MDM2 can counterbalance each other during the tumorigenic process. PMID:25723571

  4. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization: Enhancement of the M2 phenotype in ARF-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-11-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf(-/-) macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf(-/-) as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf(-/-) macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  5. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  6. ArF solutions for low-k1 back-end imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, Vincent; Montgomery, Patrick K.; Vandenberghe, Geert; Monnoyer, Philippe; Ronse, Kurt G.; Conley, Will; Litt, Lloyd C.; Lucas, Kevin; Finders, Jo; Socha, Robert; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.

    2003-06-01

    The requirements stated in the ITRS roadmap for back-end-of-line imaging of current and future technology nodes are very aggressive. Therefore, it is likely that high NA in combination with enhancement techniques will be necessary for the imaging of contacts and trenches, pushing optical lithography into the low-k1 regime. In this paper, we focus more specifically on imaging solutions for contact holes beyond the 90 nm node using high NA ArF lithography, as this is currently seen as one of the major challenges in optical lithography. We investigate the performance of various existing enhancement techniques in order to provide contact holes imaging solutions in a k1 range from 0.35 to 0.45, using the ASML PAS5500/1100 0.75NA ArF scanner installed at IMEC. For various resolution enhancement techniques (RET), the proof of concept has been demonstrated in literature. In this paper, we propose an experimental one-to-one comparison of these RET"s with fixed CD target, exposure tool, lithographic process, and metrology. A single exposure through pitch (dense through isolated) printing solution is preferred and is the largest challenge. The common approach using a 6% attenuated phase-shifted mask (attPSM) with a conventional illumination fails. The advantages and drawbacks of other techniques are discussed. High transmission (17%) attenuated phase shift, potentially beneficial for part of the pitch range, requires conflicting trade-offs when looking for a single exposure through pitch solution. More promising results are obtained combining a BIM or a 6% attPSM with assist slots and off-axis illumination, yielding a depth of focus (DOF) at 8% exposure latitude (EL) greater than 0.31 μm from 200 nm pitch through isolated. Chromeless phase lithography (CPL) is also discussed with promising results obtained at the densest pitch. At a 0.4 k1, an experimental extrapolation to 0.85NA demonstrates that a pitch of 180 nm can be resolved with 0.4 μm DOF at 8% EL. For all of these

  7. New 0.75 NA ArF scanning lithographic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lifeng; Cheng, Jianrui; Sun, Gang; Chen, Yonghui

    2011-04-01

    A new company in the lithography world, SMEE has developed and produced a prototype wafer exposure tool, with an ArF laser light source. This tool, SMEE SSA600/10, adopted step and scan technology to obtain a large exposure filed and to average optical aberrations for a scanned image to improve CD uniformity and reduce distortion. The maximum numerical aperture is 0.75 and the maximum coherence factor of illumination system is 0.88. The illuminator provides continuously variable conventional and off-axis illumination modes to improve resolution. In this paper, the configuration of the exposure tool is presented and design concepts of the scanner are introduced. We show actual test data such as synchronization accuracy, focus and leveling repeatability, dynamic imaging performance (resolution, depth of focus) and overlay.

  8. A Review of Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si-Bei; Xie, Zong-Zhou; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of virtually every aspect of plant growth and development from embryogenesis to senescence. Previous studies have indicated that auxin regulates these processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs). ARFs are likely components that confer specificity to auxin response through selection of target genes as transcription factors. They bind to auxin response DNA elements (AuxRE) in the promoters of auxin-regulated genes and either activate or repress transcription of these genes depending on a specific domain in the middle of the protein. Genetic studies have implicated various ARFs in distinct developmental processes through loss-of-function mutant analysis. Recent advances have provided information on the regulation of ARF gene expression, the role of ARFs in growth and developmental processes, protein–protein interactions of ARFs and target genes regulated by ARFs in plants. In particular, protein interaction and structural studies of ARF proteins have yielded novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription. These results provide the foundation for predicting the contributions of ARF genes to the biology of other plants. PMID:26870066

  9. Extremely long life and low-cost 193nm excimer laser chamber technology for 450mm wafer multipatterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, Hiroaki; Katsuumi, Hisakazu; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Asayama, Takeshi; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kurosu, Akihiko; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2014-04-01

    193nm ArF excimer lasers are widely used as light sources for the lithography process of semiconductor production. 193nm ArF exicmer lasers are expected to continue to be the main solution in photolithography, since advanced lithography technologies such as multiple patterning and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) are being developed. In order to apply these technologies to high-volume semiconductor manufacturing, the key is to reduce the total operating cost. To reduce the total operating cost, life extension of consumable part and reduction of power consumption are an important factor. The chamber life time and power consumption are a main factor to decide the total operating cost. Therefore, we have developed the new technology for extension of the chamber life time and low electricity consumption. In this paper, we will report the new technology to extend the life time of the laser chamber and to reduce the electricity consumption.

  10. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  11. Analysis of laser durability of CaF2 for optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabosch, Guenter; Parthier, Lutz; Natura, Ute; Poehl, Karin; Letz, Martin; Muehlig, Christian; Knapp, Konrad

    2005-02-01

    Photolithography is a key technolgoy for the production of semiconductor devices. It supports the continuing trend towards higher integration density of microelectronic devices. The material used in the optics of lithography tools has to be of extremely high quality to ensure the high demand of the imaging. Due to its properties CaF2 is a material of choice for the application in lithography systems. Because of the compexity of the lithography tools single lenses or lens system modules cannot be replaced. Therefore the lens material has to last the full lifetime of the tool without major degradation. According to the roadmap for next generation of optical lithography tools, like immersion lithography, the requirements of CaF2 for radiation hardness are increasing considerably. We will present a detailed analysis of the key factors influencing the laser hardness covering the complete production chain. Some aspects of the evaluation methods for testing CaF2 laser durability will be presented.

  12. Defect printability of ArF alternative phase-shift mask: a critical comparison of simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Ken; Komizo, Tooru; Ohnuma, Hidetoshi

    2002-07-01

    An alternative phase shift mask (alt-PSM) is a promising device for extending optical lithography to finer design rules. There have been few reports, however, on the mask's ability to identify phase defects. We report here an alt-PSM of a single-trench type with undercut for ArF exposure, with programmed phase defects used to evaluate defect printability by measuring aerial images with a Zeiss MSM193 measuring system. The experimental results are simulated using the TEMPEST program. First, a critical comparison of the simulation and the experiment is conducted. The actual measured topographies of quartz defects are used in the simulation. Moreover, a general simulation study on defect printability using an alt-PSM for ArF exposure is conducted. The defect dimensions, which produce critical CD errors, are determined by simulation that takes into account the full 3-dimensional structure of phase defects as well as a simplified structure. The critical dimensions of an isolated bump defect identified by the alt-PSM of a single-trench type with undercut for ArF exposure are 300 nm in bottom dimension and 74 degrees in height (phase) for the real shape, where the depth of wet-etching is 100 nm and the CD error limit is +/- 5 percent.

  13. Pellicle choice for 193-nm immersion lithography photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotte, Eric P.; Haessler, Ruediger; Utess, Benno; Antesberger, Gunter; Kromer, Frank; Teuber, Silvio

    2004-12-01

    An assessment of the mechanical performance of pellicles from different vendors was performed. Pellicle-induced distortions were experimentally measured and numerical simulations were run to predict what improvements were desirable. The experiments included mask registration measurements before and after pellicle mounting for three of the major pellicle suppliers, and adhesive gasket material properties characterization for previously untested samples. The finite element numerical simulations were verified via comparison to experimental data for pellicles with known frame bows, measured by the vendor. The models were extended to simulate the effect of the chucking of reticles in an exposure tool, as well as the various magnification correction schemes available in such tools. Results were compared to ITRS requirements to evaluate performances. This study enables the AMTC to give important feedback to pellicle suppliers and make proper recommendations to customers for future pellicle choices.

  14. Resist component leaching in 193-nm immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammel, Ralph R.; Pawlowski, Georg; Romano, Andrew; Houlihan, Frank M.; Kim, Woo-Kyu; Sakamuri, Raj; Abdallah, David

    2005-05-01

    The leaching of ionic PAGs from model resist films into a static water volume is shown to follow first order kinetics. From the saturation concentration and the leaching time constant, the leaching rate at time zero is obtained which is a highly relevant parameter for evaluating lens contamination potential. The levels of leaching seen in the model resists generally exceed both static and rate-based dynamic leaching specifications. The dependence of leaching on anion structure shows that more hydrophobic anions have lower saturation concentration; however, the time constant of leaching increases with anion chain length. Thus in our model system, the initial leaching rates of nonaflate and PFOS anions are identical. Investigation of a water pre-rinse process unexpectedly showed that some PAG can still be leached from the surface although the pre-rinse times greatly exceeded the times required for saturation of the leaching phenomenon, which are expected to correspond to complete depletion of leachable PAG from the surface. A model is proposed to explain this phenomenon through re-organization of the surface as the surface energy changes during the air/water/air contact sequence of the pre-rinse process.

  15. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  16. High-index nanocomposite photoresist for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Woo Jin; Trikeriotis, Makros; Rodriguez, Robert; Zettel, Michael F.; Piscani, Emil; Ober, Christopher K.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zimmerman, Paul

    2009-03-01

    In immersion lithography, high index fluids are used to increase the numerical aperture (NA) of the imaging system and decrease the minimum printable feature size. Water has been used in first generation immersion lithography at 193 nm to reach the 45 nm node, but to reach the 38 and 32 nm nodes, fluids and resists with a higher index than water are needed. A critical issue hindering the implementation of 193i at the 32 nm node is the availability of high refractive index (n > 1.8) and low optical absorption fluids and resists. It is critical to note that high index resists are necessary only when a high refractive index fluid is in use. High index resist improves the depth of focus (DOF) even without high index fluids. In this study, high refractive index nanoparticles have been synthesized and introduced into a resist matrix to increase the overall refractive index. The strategy followed is to synthesize PGMEA-soluble nanoparticles and then disperse them into a 193 nm resist. High index nanoparticles 1-2 nm in diameter were synthesized by a combination of hydrolysis and sol-gel methods. A ligand exchange method was used, allowing the surface of the nanoparticles to be modified with photoresist-friendly moieties to help them disperse uniformly in the resist matrix. The refractive index and ultraviolet absorbance were measured to evaluate the quality of next generation immersion lithography resist materials.

  17. Thirty years of lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.

    2005-05-01

    Thirty years ago Rick Dill and his team at IBM published the first account of lithography simulation - the accurate description of semiconductor optical lithography by mathematical equations. Since then, lithography simulation has grown dramatically in importance in four important areas: as a research tool, as a development tool, as a manufacturing tool, and as a learning tool. In this paper, the history of lithography simulations is traced from its roots to today"s indispensable tools for lithographic technology development. Along the way, an attempt will be made to define the true value of lithography simulation to the semiconductor industry.

  18. Beam pen lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei; Zheng, Gengfeng; Liao, Xing; Giam, Louise R.; Chai, Jinan; Chen, Xiaodong; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2010-09-01

    Lithography techniques are currently being developed to fabricate nanoscale components for integrated circuits, medical diagnostics and optoelectronics. In conventional far-field optical lithography, lateral feature resolution is diffraction-limited. Approaches that overcome the diffraction limit have been developed, but these are difficult to implement or they preclude arbitrary pattern formation. Techniques based on near-field scanning optical microscopy can overcome the diffraction limit, but they suffer from inherently low throughput and restricted scan areas. Highly parallel two-dimensional, silicon-based, near-field scanning optical microscopy aperture arrays have been fabricated, but aligning a non-deformable aperture array to a large-area substrate with near-field proximity remains challenging. However, recent advances in lithographies based on scanning probe microscopy have made use of transparent two-dimensional arrays of pyramid-shaped elastomeric tips (or `pens') for large-area, high-throughput patterning of ink molecules. Here, we report a massively parallel scanning probe microscopy-based approach that can generate arbitrary patterns by passing 400-nm light through nanoscopic apertures at each tip in the array. The technique, termed beam pen lithography, can toggle between near- and far-field distances, allowing both sub-diffraction limit (100 nm) and larger features to be generated.

  19. Native Language Immersion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    This paper describes the benefits of indigenous mother tongue immersion programs, examining the Total Physical Response approach to immersion for beginning learners and focusing on the development of Maori and Hawaiian mother tongue language immersion programs. The paper discusses the importance of immersing students in a language-risk…

  20. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  1. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER–mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic. PMID:25190516

  2. Colloidal pen lithography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mianqi; Cai, Xiaojing; Chen, Ghenfu

    2015-02-01

    Colloidal pen lithography, a low-cost, high-throughput scanning probe contact printing method, has been developed, which is based on self-assembled colloidal arrays embedded in a soft elastomeric stamp. Patterned protein arrays are demonstrated using this method, with a feature size ranging from 100 nm to several micrometers. A brief study into the specificity reorganization of protein gives evidence for the feasibility of this method for writing protein chips. PMID:25288364

  3. Industrial strength lithography APC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausschnitt, Christopher P.; Barker, Brian; Muth, William A.; Postiglione, Marc; Walentosky, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    Fully automated semiconductor manufacturing, becoming a reality with the ramping of 300mm fabricators throughout the world, demands the integration of advanced process control (APC). APC is particularly critical for the lithography sector, whose performance correlates to yield and whose productivity often gates the line. We describe the implementation of a comprehensive lithography APC system at the IBM Center for Nanoelectronics, a 300mm manufacturing and development facility. The base lithography APC function encompasses closed-loop run-to-run control of exposure tool inputs to sustain the overlay and critical dimension outputs consistent with product specifications. Automation demands that no decision regarding the appropriate exposure tool run-time settings be left to human judgment. For each lot, the APC system provides optimum settings based on existing data derived from pertinent process streams. In the case where insufficient prior data exists, the APC system either invokes the appropriate combination of send ahead processing and/or pre-determined defaults. We give specific examples of the application of APC to stitched field and dose control, and quantify its technical benefits. Field matching < 0.1 ppm and critical dimension control < 2.5% is achieved among multiple exposure tools and masks.

  4. Nucleostemin stabilizes ARF by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase ULF.

    PubMed

    Lo, D; Zhang, Y; Dai, M-S; Sun, X-X; Zeng, S X; Lu, H

    2015-03-26

    Upregulated expression of nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin (NS) has been associated with increased cellular proliferation potential and tumor malignancy during cancer development. Recent reports attribute the growth regulatory effects of NS protein to its role in facilitating ribosome production. However, the oncogenic potential of NS remains unclear, as imbalanced levels of NS have been reported to exert growth inhibitory effect by modulating p53 tumor-suppressor activity. It also remains in questions if aberrant NS levels might have a p53-independent role in regulation of cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis to explore protein-protein interactions influencing NS growth regulatory properties independently of p53 tumor suppressor. We identified the alternative reading frame (ARF) protein as a key protein associating with NS and further verified the interaction through in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated that NS is able to regulate cell cycle progression by regulating the stability of the ARF tumor suppressor. Furthermore, overexpression of NS suppressed ARF polyubiquitination by its E3 ligase Ubiquitin Ligase for ARF and elongated its half-life, whereas knockdown of NS led to the decrease of ARF levels. Also, we found that NS can enhance NPM stabilization of ARF. Thus, we propose that in the absence of p53, ARF can be stabilized by NS and nucleophosmin to serve as an alternative tumor-suppressor surveillance, preventing potential cellular transformation resulting from the growth-inducing effects of NS overexpression. PMID:24769896

  5. Arf6 mediates Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Tsumura, Hideki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Tanoue, Akito; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-09-25

    During development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells wrap neuronal axons, becoming the myelin sheaths that help axonal functions. While the intercellular signals controlling the myelination process between Schwann cells and peripheral neurons are well studied, the transduction of these signals in Schwann cells still remains elusive. Here, we show that Arf6, an Arf protein of the small GTPase family, is involved in promoting the myelination process. Knockdown of Arf6 with the small-interfering (si)RNA in primary Schwann cells markedly decreases dibutyl-cyclic AMP-induced myelin marker protein expression, indicating that Arf6 plays a role in differentiation-like phenotypic changes. To obtain in vivo evidence, we generated small-hairpin (sh)RNA transgenic mice targeting Arf6 for Schwann cells. Transgenic mice exhibited reduced myelin thickness compared to littermate controls, consistent with the defective myelin formation observed in the transgenic mouse-derived Schwann cell and neuronal culture system. Transgenic mice also exhibited decreased phosphorylation of myelination-related signaling molecules such as Akt kinase cascade proteins as well as downregulation of myelin marker proteins. These results suggest that signaling through Arf6 is required for Schwann cell myelination, adding Arf6 to the list of intracellular signaling molecules involved in the myelination process. PMID:26277388

  6. Microfluidic Applications of Soft Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Krulevitch, P; Hamilton, J

    2001-04-10

    The soft lithography fabrication technique was applied to three microfluidic devices. The method was used to create an original micropump design and retrofit to existing designs for a DNA manipulation device and a counter biological warfare sample preparation device. Each device presented unique and original challenges to the soft lithography application. AI1 design constraints of the retrofit devices were satisfied using PDMS devices created through variation of soft lithography methods. The micropump utilized the versatility of PDMS, creating design options not available with other materials. In all cases, the rapid processing of soft lithography reduced the fabrication time, creating faster turnaround for design modifications.

  7. Mechanism of activation of cholera toxin by ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF): both low- and high-affinity interactions of ARF with guanine nucleotides promote toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Bobak, D A; Bliziotes, M M; Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J

    1990-01-30

    Activation of adenylyl cyclase by cholera toxin A subunit (CT-A) results from the ADP-ribosylation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (GS alpha). This process requires GTP and an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein known as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF). One membrane (mARF) and two soluble forms (sARF I and sARF II) of ARF have been purified from bovine brain. Because the conditions reported to enhance the binding of guanine nucleotides by ARF differ from those observed to promote optimal activity, we sought to characterize the determinants influencing the functional interaction of guanine nucleotides with ARF. High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II (apparent KD of approximately 70 nM) required Mg2+, DMPC, and sodium cholate. sARF II, in DMPC/cholate, also enhanced CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 50 nM), although there was a delay before achievement of a maximal rate of sARF II stimulated toxin activity. The delay was abolished by incubation of sARF II with GTP at 30 degrees C before initiation of the assay. In contrast, a maximal rate of activation of toxin by sARF II, in 0.003% SDS, occurred without delay (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 5 microM). High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II was not detectable in SDS. Enhancement of CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity by sARF II, therefore, can occur under conditions in which sARF II exhibits either a relatively low affinity or a relatively high affinity for GTP. The interaction of GTP with ARF under these conditions may reflect ways in which intracellular membrane and cytosolic environments modulate GTP-mediated activation of ARF. PMID:2111167

  8. Characterization of ARF-BP1/HUWE1 Interactions with CTCF, MYC, ARF and p53 in MYC-Driven B Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Yong-Soo; Xiang, Shao; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Torrey, Ted A.; Janz, Siegfried; Kovalchuk, Alexander L.; Sun, Jiafang; Chen, Delin; Cho, William C.; Gu, Wei; Morse, Herbert C.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of MYC is a hallmark of many B cell lineage neoplasms. MYC provides a constitutive proliferative signal but can also initiate ARF-dependent activation of p53 and apoptosis. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, ARF-BP1, encoded by HUWE1, modulates the activity of both the MYC and the ARF-p53 signaling pathways, prompting us to determine if it is involved in the pathogenesis of MYC-driven B cell lymphomas. ARF-BP1 was expressed at high levels in cell lines from lymphomas with either wild type or mutated p53 but not in ARF-deficient cells. Downregulation of ARF-BP1 resulted in elevated steady state levels of p53, growth arrest and apoptosis. Co-immunoprecipitation studies identified a multiprotein complex comprised of ARF-BP1, ARF, p53, MYC and the multifunctional DNA-binding factor, CTCF, which is involved in the transcriptional regulation of MYC, p53 and ARF. ARF-BP1 bound and ubiquitylated CTCF leading to its proteasomal degradation. ARF-BP1 and CTCF thus appear to be key cofactors linking the MYC proliferative and p53-ARF apoptotic pathways. In addition, ARF-BP1 could be a therapeutic target for MYC-driven B lineage neoplasms, even if p53 is inactive, with inhibition reducing the transcriptional activity of MYC for its target genes and stabilizing the apoptosis-promoting activities of p53. PMID:22754359

  9. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf−/− macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf−/− peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf−/− as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf−/− macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  10. Ink4-Arf locus in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Three tumor suppressor genes at the small (<50 kb) INK4-ARF (CDKN2A/B) locus on human chromosome 9p21 coordinate a signaling network that depends on the activities of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and the p53 transcription factor. Disruption of this circuitry, frequently by codeletion of INK4-ARF, is a hallmark of cancer, begging the question of why the intimate genetic linkage of these tumor suppressor genes has been maintained in mammals despite the risk of their coinactivation. The INK4-ARF locus is not highly expressed under normal physiologic conditions in young mammals, but its induction becomes more pronounced as animals age. Notably, INK4-ARF is actively silenced en bloc in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells but becomes poised to respond to oncogenic stress signals as stem cells lose their self-renewal capacity and differentiate, thereby providing a potent barrier to tumor formation. Epigenetic remodeling of the locus as a whole provides a mechanism for coordinating the activities of RB and p53. A hypothesis is that the INK4-ARF locus may have evolved to physiologically restrict the self-renewal capacities and numbers of stem and progenitor cells with the attendant consequence of limiting tissue regenerative capacity, particularly as animals age. Deletion of INK4-ARF contributes to the aberrant self-renewal capacity of tumor cells and occurs frequently in many forms of human cancer. PMID:22960768

  11. SynArfGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6 and localizes preferentially at post-synaptic specializations of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Masahiro; Kamata, Akifumi; Hara, Yoshinobu; Tamaki, Hideaki; Katsumata, Osamu; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hata, Yutaka; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Harvey, Robert J; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    SynArfGEF, also known as BRAG3 or IQSEC3, is a member of the brefeldin A-resistant Arf-GEF/IQSEC family and was originally identified by screening for mRNA species associated with the post-synaptic density fraction. In this study, we demonstrate that synArfGEF activates Arf6, using Arf pull down and transferrin incorporation assays. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals that synArfGEF is present in somata and dendrites as puncta in close association with inhibitory synapses, whereas immunoelectron microscopic analysis reveals that synArfGEF localizes preferentially at post-synaptic specializations of symmetric synapses. Using yeast two-hybrid and pull down assays, we show that synArfGEF is able to bind utrophin/dystrophin and S-SCAM/MAGI-2 scaffolding proteins that localize at inhibitory synapses. Double immunostaining reveals that synArfGEF co-localizes with dystrophin and S-SCAM in cultured hippocampal neurons and cerebellar cortex, respectively. Both β-dystroglycan and S-SCAM were immunoprecipitated from brain lysates using anti-synArfGEF IgG. Taken together, these findings suggest that synArfGEF functions as a novel regulator of Arf6 at inhibitory synapses and associates with the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and S-SCAM. PMID:21198641

  12. Diamond nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Tokano, Yuji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Komuro, Masanori; Hiroshima, Hiroshi

    2002-10-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and oxygen gas reactive ion etching (RIE) were used to fabricate fine patterns in a diamond mould. To prevent charge-up during EB lithography, thin conductive polymer was spin-coated over the PMMA resist, yielding dented line patterns 2 μ m wide and 270 nm deep. The diamond mould was pressed into PMMA on a silicon substrate heated to 130, 150 and 170ºC at 43.6, 65.4 and 87.2 MPa. All transferred PMMA convex line patterns were 2 μ m wide. Imprinted pattern depth increased with rising temperature and pressure. PMMA patterns on diamond were transferred by the diamond mould at 150ºC and 65.4 MPa, yielding convex line patterns 2 μ m wide and 200 nm high. Direct aluminium and copper patterns were obtained using the diamond mould at room temperature and 130.8 MPa. The diamond mould is thus useful for replicating patterns on PMMA and metals.

  13. Bubble-Pen Lithography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N; Rajeeva, Bharath Bangalore; Perillo, Evan P; Dunn, Andrew K; Akinwande, Deji; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-01-13

    Current lithography techniques, which employ photon, electron, or ion beams to induce chemical or physical reactions for micro/nano-fabrication, have remained challenging in patterning chemically synthesized colloidal particles, which are emerging as building blocks for functional devices. Herein, we develop a new technique - bubble-pen lithography (BPL) - to pattern colloidal particles on substrates using optically controlled microbubbles. Briefly, a single laser beam generates a microbubble at the interface of colloidal suspension and a plasmonic substrate via plasmon-enhanced photothermal effects. The microbubble captures and immobilizes the colloidal particles on the substrate through coordinated actions of Marangoni convection, surface tension, gas pressure, and substrate adhesion. Through directing the laser beam to move the microbubble, we create arbitrary single-particle patterns and particle assemblies with different resolutions and architectures. Furthermore, we have applied BPL to pattern CdSe/ZnS quantum dots on plasmonic substrates and polystyrene (PS) microparticles on two-dimensional (2D) atomic-layer materials. With the low-power operation, arbitrary patterning and applicability to general colloidal particles, BPL will find a wide range of applications in microelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomedicine. PMID:26678845

  14. Extension of 193 nm dry lithography to 45-nm half-pitch node: double exposure and double processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abani M.; Li, Jianliang; Hiserote, Jay A.; Melvin, Lawrence S., III

    2006-10-01

    Immersion lithography and multiple exposure techniques are the most promising methods to extend lithography manufacturing to the 45nm node. Although immersion lithography has attracted much attention recently as a promising optical lithography extension, it will not solve all the problems at the 45-nm node. The 'dry' option, (i.e. double exposure/etch) which can be realized with standard processing practice, will extend 193-nm lithography to the end of the current industry roadmap. Double exposure/etch lithography is expensive in terms of cost, throughput time, and overlay registration accuracy. However, it is less challenging compared to other possible alternatives and has the ability to break through the κ I barrier (0.25). This process, in combination with attenuated PSM (att-PSM) mask, is a good imaging solution that can reach, and most likely go beyond, the 45-nm node. Mask making requirements in a double exposure scheme will be reduced significantly. This can be appreciated by the fact that the separation of tightly-pitched mask into two less demanding pitch patterns will reduce the stringent specifications for each mask. In this study, modeling of double exposure lithography (DEL) with att-PSM masks to target 45-nm node is described. In addition, mask separation and implementation issues of optical proximity corrections (OPC) to improve process window are studied. To understand the impact of OPC on the process window, Fourier analysis of the masks has been carried out as well.

  15. RET masks for the final frontier of optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; van den Broeke, Douglas; Hsu, Stephen; Hsu, Michael C. W.; Laidig, Tom; Shi, Xuelong; Chen, Ting; Socha, Robert J.; Hollerbach, Uwe; Wampler, Kurt E.; Park, Jungchul; Park, Sangbong; Gronlund, Keith

    2005-06-01

    With immersion and hyper numerical aperture (NA>1) optics apply to the ITRS 2003/4 roadmap scenario (Figure 1); it is very clear that the IC manufacturing has already stepped into the final frontier of optical lithography. Today"s advanced lithography for DRAM/Flash is operating at k1 close to 0.3. The manufacturing for leading edge logic devices does not follow too far behind. Patterning at near theoretical lithography imaging limit (k1=0.25) even with hyper NA optics, the attainable aerial image contrast is marginal at best for the critical feature. Thus, one of the key objectives for low k1 lithography is to ensure the printing performance of critical features for manufacturing. Resolution enhancement technology (RET) mask in combination with hyper NA and illumination optimization is one primary candidate to enable lithography manufacturing at very low k1 factor. The use of rule-based Scattering Bars (SB) for all types of phase-shifting masks has become the de facto OPC standard since 180nm node. Model-based SB OPC method derives from interference mapping lithography (IML) has shown impressive printing result for both clear (gate) and dark field (contact and via) mask types. There are four basic types of RET mask candidates for 65nm node, namely, alternating phase-shifting mask (altPSM), attenuated PSM (attPSM), chromeless phase lithography (CPL) PSM, and double dipole lithography (DDL) using binary chrome mask. The wafer printing performances from CPL and DDL have proven both are strong candidates for 45nm nodes. One concern for using RET masks to target 45 nm nodes is likely to be the scaling for SB dimension for 4X mask. To assist imaging effectively with high NA, SB cannot be too small in width. However, for SB to be larger than sub-resolution, they can easily cause unwanted SB printing. The other major concern is the unwanted side lobe printing. This may occur for semi-dense pitch ranges under high NA and strong off-axis-illumination (OAI). Looking ahead

  16. Diaphragmatic function during immersion.

    PubMed

    Minh, V D; Dolan, G F; Linaweaver, P G; Friedman, P J; Konopka, R G; Brach, B B

    1977-08-01

    Diaphragmatic function during immersion to midneck level was studied in upright mongrel dogs, using constant electrophrenic stimulation. Effectiveness of diaphragmatic contraction was analyzed in terms of inspired volume (VT) (with airways open), and change in intrathoracic pressure (Pmus) (with the respiratory system occluded). Hydrostatic compression of the immersed body decreased functional residual capacity (FRC) to 55% base-line value (FRCO), resulting in a 2.8-fold increase in Pmus. In spite of this Pmus increase, VT often decreased during immersion, averaging only 83% VTO (base-line value in air). Hence, immersion was associated with a marked stiffening of the respiratory system. The Pmus increase during immersion persisted after restoration of FRC to FRCO, and was related to diaphragmatic length being greater in water than in air under condition of iso-lung volume. In all, there were three factors affecting diaphragmatic function during immersion: FRC reduction, change in thoracic configuration, and stiffening of the respiratory system. PMID:893286

  17. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  18. Neon Ion Beam Lithography (NIBL).

    PubMed

    Winston, Donald; Manfrinato, Vitor R; Nicaise, Samuel M; Cheong, Lin Lee; Duan, Huigao; Ferranti, David; Marshman, Jeff; McVey, Shawn; Stern, Lewis; Notte, John; Berggren, Karl K

    2011-10-12

    Existing techniques for electron- and ion-beam lithography, routinely employed for nanoscale device fabrication and mask/mold prototyping, do not simultaneously achieve efficient (low fluence) exposure and high resolution. We report lithography using neon ions with fluence <1 ion/nm(2), ∼1000× more efficient than using 30 keV electrons, and resolution down to 7 nm half-pitch. This combination of resolution and exposure efficiency is expected to impact a wide array of fields that are dependent on beam-based lithography. PMID:21899279

  19. Advances in Nanoimprint Lithography.

    PubMed

    Traub, Matthew C; Longsine, Whitney; Truskett, Van N

    2016-06-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), a molding process, can replicate features <10 nm over large areas with long-range order. We describe the early development and fundamental principles underlying the two most commonly used types of NIL, thermal and UV, and contrast them with conventional photolithography methods used in the semiconductor industry. We then describe current advances toward full commercial industrialization of UV-curable NIL (UV-NIL) technology for integrated circuit production. We conclude with brief overviews of some emerging areas of research, from photonics to biotechnology, in which the ability of NIL to fabricate structures of arbitrary geometry is providing new paths for development. As with previous innovations, the increasing availability of tools and techniques from the semiconductor industry is poised to provide a path to bring these innovations from the lab to everyday life. PMID:27070763

  20. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  1. The Role of ARF6 in Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Joseph; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Min, Jun; Higgs, Brandon W.; Sun, Qing; Haberman, Kimberly; Schmitt, Lori; Vilarinho, Silvia; Mistry, Pramod K.; Vockley, Gerard; Dhawan, Anil; Gittes, George K.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Jaffe, Ronald; Subramaniam, Shankar; Shin, Donghun; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Altered extrahepatic bile ducts, gut, and cardiovascular anomalies constitute the variable phenotype of biliary atresia (BA). Methods To identify potential susceptibility loci, Caucasian children, normal (controls) and with BA (cases) at two US centers were compared at >550000 SNP loci. Systems biology analysis was carried out on the data. In order to validate a key gene identified in the analysis, biliary morphogenesis was evaluated in 2-5-day post-fertilization zebrafish embryos after morpholino-antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of the candidate gene ADP ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6, Mo-arf6). Results Among 39 and 24 cases at centers 1 and 2, respectively, and 1907 controls, which clustered together on principal component analysis, the SNPs rs3126184 and rs10140366 in a 3’ flanking enhancer region for ARF6 demonstrated higher minor allele frequencies (MAF) in each cohort, and 63 combined cases, compared with controls (0.286 vs. 0.131, P = 5.94x10-7, OR 2.66; 0.286 vs. 0.13, P = 5.57x10-7, OR 2.66). Significance was enhanced in 77 total cases, which included 14 additional BA genotyped at rs3126184 only (p = 1.58x10-2, OR = 2.66). Pathway analysis of the 1000 top-ranked SNPs in CHP cases revealed enrichment of genes for EGF regulators (p<1 x10-7), ERK/MAPK and CREB canonical pathways (p<1 x10-34), and functional networks for cellular development and proliferation (p<1 x10-45), further supporting the role of EGFR-ARF6 signaling in BA. In zebrafish embryos, Mo-arf6 injection resulted in a sparse intrahepatic biliary network, several biliary epithelial cell defects, and poor bile excretion to the gall bladder compared with uninjected embryos. Biliary defects were reproduced with the EGFR-blocker AG1478 alone or with Mo-arf6 at lower doses of each agent and rescued with arf6 mRNA. Conclusions The BA-associated SNPs identify a chromosome 14q21.3 susceptibility locus encompassing the ARF6 gene. arf6 knockdown in zebrafish implicates early biliary

  2. Expression of the Arf tumor suppressor gene is controlled by Tgfβ2 during development

    PubMed Central

    Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E.; Zheng, Yanbin; McCalla-Martin, Amy C.; Treanor, Louise M.; Zhao, Yi D.; Garfin, Phillip M.; He, Tong-Chuan; Mary, Michelle N.; Thornton, J. Derek; Anderson, Colleen; Gibbons, Melissa; Saab, Raya; Baumer, Shannon H.; Cunningham, John M.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Arf tumor suppressor (also known as Cdkn2a) acts as an oncogene sensor induced by `abnormal' mitogenic signals in incipient cancer cells. It also plays a crucial role in embryonic development: newborn mice lacking Arf are blind due to a pathological process resembling severe persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), a human eye disease. The cell-intrinsic mechanism implied in the oncogene sensor model seems unlikely to explain Arf regulation during embryo development. Instead, transforming growth factor β2 (Tgfβ2) might control Arf expression, as we show that mice lacking Tgfβ2 have primary vitreous hyperplasia similar to Arf-/- mice. Consistent with a potential linear pathway, Tgfβ2 induces Arf transcription and p19Arf expression in cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs); and Tgfβ2-dependent cell cycle arrest in MEFs is maintained in an Arf-dependent manner. Using a new model in which Arf expression can be tracked by β-galactosidase activity in ArflacZ/+ mice, we show that Tgfβ2 is required for Arf transcription in the developing vitreous as well as in the cornea and the umbilical arteries, two previously unrecognized sites of Arf expression. Chemical and genetic strategies show that Arf promoter induction depends on Tgfβ receptor activation of Smad proteins; the induction correlates with Smad2 phosphorylation in MEFs and Arf-expressing cells in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that Smads bind to genomic DNA proximal to Arf exon 1β. In summary, Tgfβ2 and p19Arf act in a linear pathway during embryonic development. We present the first evidence that p19Arf expression can be coupled to extracellular cues in normal cells and suggest a new mechanism for Arf control in tumor cells. PMID:19465598

  3. Localization and characterization of the human ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) gene

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E. |; Daiger, S.P.; Green, E.D.

    1997-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) is a member of the ARF gene family. The ARF proteins stimulate the in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and appear to play a role in vesicular trafficking in vivo. We have mapped ARF5, one of the six known mammalian ARF genes, to a well-defined yeast artificial chromosome contig on human chromosome 7q31.3. In addition, we have isolated and sequenced an {approximately}3.2-kb genomic segment that contains the entire ARF5 coding region, revealing the complete intron-exon structure of the gene. With six coding exons and five introns, the genomic structure of ARF5 is unique among the mammalian ARF genes and provides insight about the evolutionary history of this ancient gene family. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. p53 and ARF: Unexpected players in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Balaburski, Gregor M.; Hontz, Robert D.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2010-01-01

    p53 and ARF are well-established tumor suppressor proteins that function together in the negative regulation of cancer. Recently, both of these proteins were found to play surprising roles in autophagy. Autophagy (“self-eating”) is a critical response of eukaryotic cells to metabolic and other stress. During this process, portions of the cytosol are sequestered into characteristic double membrane vesicles that are delivered to the lysosome for degradation, leading to the release of free amino acids and subsequent survival. The mechanisms whereby p53 and ARF control autophagy are only now becoming elucidated. An emerging question is whether we can develop metabolic poisons that preferentially destroy tumor cells depending on their reliance on autophagy for survival, and on their p53 and ARF status. PMID:20303758

  5. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  6. SmARF8, a transcription factor involved in parthenocarpy in eggplant.

    PubMed

    Du, Liming; Bao, Chonglai; Hu, Tianhua; Zhu, Qinmei; Hu, Haijiao; He, Qunyan; Mao, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Parthenocarpic fruit is a very attractive trait for consumers and especially in eggplants where seeds can lead to browning of the flesh and bitterness. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying parthenocarpy in eggplant still remain unknown. Some auxin response factors have been previously shown in model species, such as Arabidopsis and tomato, to play an important role in such a process. Here, we have identified a natural parthenocarpic mutant and showed that ARF8 from eggplant (SmARF8), is down-regulated in buds compared to wild-type plants. Further characterization of SmARF8 showed that it is a nuclear protein and an active transcriptional regulator. We determined that amino acids 629-773 of SmARF8 act as the transcriptional activation domain, the C terminus of SmARF8 is the protein-binding domain, and that SmARF8 might form homodimers. Expression analysis in eggplant showed that SmARF8 is expressed ubiquitously in all tissues and organs and is responsive to auxin. Eggplant transgenic lines harboring RNA interference of SmARF8 exhibited parthenocarpy in unfertilized flowers, suggesting that SmARF8 negatively regulates fruit initiation. Interestingly, SmARF8-overexpressing Arabidopsis lines also induced parthenocarpy. These results indicate that SmARF8 could affect the dimerization of auxin/indole acetic acid repressors with SmARF8 via domains III and IV and thus induce fruit development. Furthermore, the introduction of SmARF8 full-length cDNA could partially complement the parthenocarpic phenotypes in Arabidopsis arf8-1 and arf8-4 mutants. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SmARF8 may act as a key negative regulator involved in parthenocarpic fruit development of eggplant. These findings give more insights into the conserved mechanisms leading to parthenocarpy in which auxin signaling plays a pivotal role, and provide potential target for eggplant breeding. PMID:26174736

  7. Aspergillus nidulans ArfB Plays a Role in Endocytosis and Polarized Growth ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Chan; Schmidtke, Sabrina N.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Shaw, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo polarized growth throughout most of their life cycles. The Spitzenkörper is an apical organelle composed primarily of vesicles that is unique to filamentous fungi and is likely to act as a vesicle supply center for tip growth. Vesicle assembly and trafficking are therefore important for hyphal growth. ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs), a group of small GTPase proteins, play an important role in nucleating vesicle assembly. Little is known about the role of Arfs in filamentous hyphal growth. We found that Aspergillus nidulans is predicted to encode six Arf family proteins. Analysis of protein sequence alignments suggests that A. nidulans ArfB shares similarity with ARF6 of Homo sapiens and Arf3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An arfB null allele (arfB disrupted by a transposon [arfB::Tn]) was characterized by extended isotropic growth of germinating conidia followed by cell lysis or multiple, random germ tube emergence, consistent with a failure to establish polarity. The mutant germ tubes and hyphae that do form initially meander abnormally off of the axis of polarity and frequently exhibit dichotomous branching at cell apices, consistent with a defect in polarity maintenance. FM4-64 staining of the arfB::Tn strain revealed that another phenotypic characteristic seen for arfB::Tn is a reduction and delay in endocytosis. ArfB is myristoylated at its N terminus. Green fluorescent protein-tagged ArfB (ArfB::GFP) localizes to the plasma membrane and endomembranes and mutation (ArfBG2A::GFP) of the N-terminal myristoylation motif disperses the protein to the cytoplasm rather than to the membranes. These results demonstrate that ArfB functions in endocytosis to play important roles in polarity establishment during isotropic growth and polarity maintenance during hyphal extension. PMID:18539885

  8. LENS (lithography enhancement toward nano scale): a European project to support double exposure and double patterning technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Pietro; Baldi, Livio; Piacentini, Paolo; Sytsma, Joost; Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Gaugiran, Stéphanie; Wong, Patrick; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Atzei, Luisa R.; Buch, Xavier; Verkleij, Dick; Toublan, Olivier; Perez-Murano, Francesco; Mecerreyes, David

    2010-04-01

    In 2009 a new European initiative on Double Patterning and Double Exposure lithography process development was started in the framework of the ENIAC Joint Undertaking. The project, named LENS (Lithography Enhancement Towards Nano Scale), involves twelve companies from five different European Countries (Italy, Netherlands, France, Belgium Spain; includes: IC makers (Numonyx and STMicroelectronics), a group of equipment and materials companies (ASML, Lam Research srl, JSR, FEI), a mask maker (Dai Nippon Photomask Europe), an EDA company (Mentor Graphics) and four research and development institutes (CEA-Leti, IMEC, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, CIDETEC). The LENS project aims to develop and integrate the overall infrastructure required to reach patterning resolutions required by 32nm and 22nm technology nodes through the double patterning and pitch doubling technologies on existing conventional immersion exposure tools, with the purpose to allow the timely development of 32nm and 22nm technology nodes for memories and logic devices, providing a safe alternative to EUV, Higher Refraction Index Fluids Immersion Lithography and maskless lithography, which appear to be still far from maturity. The project will cover the whole lithography supply chain including design, masks, materials, exposure tools, process integration, metrology and its final objective is the demonstration of 22nm node patterning on available 1.35 NA immersion tools on high complexity mask set.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  10. Nanowire lithography on silicon.

    PubMed

    Colli, Alan; Fasoli, Andrea; Pisana, Simone; Fu, Yongqing; Beecher, Paul; Milne, William I; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2008-05-01

    Nanowire lithography (NWL) uses nanowires (NWs), grown and assembled by chemical methods, as etch masks to transfer their one-dimensional morphology to an underlying substrate. Here, we show that SiO2 NWs are a simple and compatible system to implement NWL on crystalline silicon and fabricate a wide range of architectures and devices. Planar field-effect transistors made of a single SOI-NW channel exhibit a contact resistance below 20 kOmega and scale with the channel width. Further, we assess the electrical response of NW networks obtained using a mask of SiO2 NWs ink-jetted from solution. The resulting conformal network etched into the underlying wafer is monolithic, with single-crystalline bulk junctions; thus no difference in conductivity is seen between a direct NW bridge and a percolating network. We also extend the potential of NWL into the third dimension, by using a periodic undercutting that produces an array of vertically stacked NWs from a single NW mask. PMID:18386934

  11. Scanning probe nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinelli, F.; Menozzi, C.; Baschieri, P.; Facci, P.; Pingue, P.

    2010-02-01

    The present paper reports on a novel lithographic approach at the nanoscale level, which is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The experimental set-up consists of an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated via software specifically developed for the purpose. In particular, this software allows one to apply a predefined external load for a given lapse of time while monitoring in real-time the relative distance between the tip and the sample as well as the normal and lateral force during the embossing process. Additionally, we have employed AFM tips sculptured by means of focused ion beam in order to create indenting tools of the desired shape. Anti-sticking layers can also be used to functionalize the tips if one needs to investigate the effects of different treatments on the indentation and de-molding processes. The lithographic capabilities of this set-up are demonstrated on a polystyrene NIL-patterned sample, where imprinted features have been obtained upon using different normal load values for increasing time intervals, and on a thermoplastic polymer film, where the imprint process has been monitored in real-time.

  12. Demonstration of lithography patterns using reflective e-beam direct write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Regina; Sun, Jeff; Brodie, Alan; Petric, Paul; McCord, Mark; Ronse, Kurt; Haspeslagh, Luc; Vereecke, Bart

    2011-04-01

    Traditionally, e-beam direct write lithography has been too slow for most lithography applications. E-beam direct write lithography has been used for mask writing rather than wafer processing since the maximum blur requirements limit column beam current - which drives e-beam throughput. To print small features and a fine pitch with an e-beam tool requires a sacrifice in processing time unless one significantly increases the total number of beams on a single writing tool. Because of the uncertainty with regards to the optical lithography roadmap beyond the 22 nm technology node, the semiconductor equipment industry is in the process of designing and testing e-beam lithography tools with the potential for high volume wafer processing. For this work, we report on the development and current status of a new maskless, direct write e-beam lithography tool which has the potential for high volume lithography at and below the 22 nm technology node. A Reflective Electron Beam Lithography (REBL) tool is being developed for high throughput electron beam direct write maskless lithography. The system is targeting critical patterning steps at the 22 nm node and beyond at a capital cost equivalent to conventional lithography. Reflective Electron Beam Lithography incorporates a number of novel technologies to generate and expose lithographic patterns with a throughput and footprint comparable to current 193 nm immersion lithography systems. A patented, reflective electron optic or Digital Pattern Generator (DPG) enables the unique approach. The Digital Pattern Generator is a CMOS ASIC chip with an array of small, independently controllable lens elements (lenslets), which act as an array of electron mirrors. In this way, the REBL system is capable of generating the pattern to be written using massively parallel exposure by ~1 million beams at extremely high data rates (~ 1Tbps). A rotary stage concept using a rotating platen carrying multiple wafers optimizes the writing strategy of

  13. Feasibility study of optical/e-beam complementary lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Freitag, Martin; Gutsch, Manuela; Jaschinsky, Philipp; Kahlenberg, Frank; Klein, Christof; Klikovits, Jan; Paul, Jan; Rudolph, Matthias; Thrun, Xaver

    2012-03-01

    Using electron beam direct write (EBDW) as a complementary approach together with standard optical lithography at 193nm or EUV wavelength has been proposed only lately and might be a reasonable solution for low volume CMOS manufacturing and special applications as well as design rule restrictions. Here, the high throughput of the optical litho can be combined with the high resolution and the high flexibility of the e-beam by using a mix & match approach (Litho- Etch-Litho-Etch, LELE). Complementary Lithography is mainly driven by special design requirements for unidirectional (1-D gridded) Manhattan type design layouts that enable scaling of advanced logic chips. This requires significant data prep efforts such as layout splitting. In this paper we will show recent results of Complementary Lithography using 193nm immersion generated 50nm lines/space pattern addressing the 32nm logic technology node that were cut with electron beam direct write. Regular lines and space arrays were patterned at GLOBALFOUNDRIES Dresden and have been cut in predefined areas using a VISTEC SB3050DW e-beam direct writer (50KV Variable Shaped Beam) at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT), Dresden, as well as on the PML2 tool at IMS Nanofabrication, Vienna. Two types of e-beam resists were used for the cut exposure. Integration issues as well as overlay requirements and performance improvements necessary for this mix & match approach will be discussed.

  14. Holographic lithography for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankevicius, E.; Balciunas, E.; Malinauskas, M.; Raciukaitis, G.; Baltriukiene, D.; Bukelskiene, V.

    2012-06-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds for cell growth with appropriate mechanical characteristics is top-most important for successful creation of tissue. Due to ability of fast fabrication of periodic structures with a different period, the holographic lithography technique is a suitable tool for scaffolds fabrication. The scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography can be used in various biomedical investigations such as the cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. These investigations allow selection of the suitable material and geometry of scaffolds which can be used in creation of tissue. Scaffolds fabricated from di-acrylated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-DA-258) over a large area by holographic lithography technique are presented in this paper. The PEG-DA scaffolds fabricated by holographic lithography showed good cytocompatibility for rabbit myogenic stem cells. It was observed that adult rabbit muscle-derived myogenic stem cells grew onto PEG-DA scaffolds. They were attached to the pillars and formed cell-cell interactions. It demonstrates that the fabricated structures have potential to be an interconnection channel network for cell-to-cell interactions, flow transport of nutrients and metabolic waste as well as vascular capillary ingrowth. These results are encouraging for further development of holographic lithography by improving its efficiency for microstructuring three-dimensional scaffolds out of biodegradable hydrogels

  15. Photoinhibition superresolution lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Darren Lawrence

    While the prospect of nanoscale manufacturing has generated tremendous excitement, arbitrary patterning at nanometer length scales cannot be brought about with current photolithography---the technology that for decades has driven electronics miniaturization and enabled mass production of digital logic, memory, MEMS and flat-panel displays. This is due to the relatively long wavelength of light and diffraction, which imposes a physical not technological limit on the resolution of a far-field optical pattern. Photoinhibited superresolution (PInSR) lithography is a new scheme designed to beat the diffraction limit through two-color confinement of photopolymerization and, via efficient single-photon absorption kinetics, also be high-throughput capable. This thesis describes development of an integrated optical and materials system for investigating spatiotemporal dynamics of photoinhibited superresolution lithography, with a demonstrated 3x superresolution beyond the diffraction limit. The two-color response, arising from orthogonal photogeneration of species that participate in competing reactions, is shown to be highly complex. This is both a direct and indirect consequence of mobility. Interesting trade-offs arise: thin-film resins (necessitated by single-photon absorption kinetics) require high viscosity for film stability, but the photoinhibition effect is suppressed in viscous resins. Despite this apparent suppression, which can be overcome with high excitation of the photoinhibition system, the low mobility afforded by viscous materials is beneficial for confinement of active species. Diffusion-induced blurring of patterned photoinhibition is problematic in a resin with viscosity = 1,000 cP, and overcome in a resin with viscosity eta = 500,000 cP. Superresolution of factor 3x beyond the diffraction limit is demonstrated at 0.2 NA, with additional results indicating superresolution ability at 1.2 NA. Investigating the effect of diminished photoinhibition efficacy

  16. French Immersion Weekends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mydlarski, Donna; Klinck, Pat

    1983-01-01

    Describes immersion weekends sponsored by the University of Calgary. The discussion includes examples from actual weekends to describe the planning and implementation. A qualitative evaluation is also discussed. (Author/AMH)

  17. Short Mitochondrial ARF Triggers Parkin/PINK1-dependent Mitophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Karl; Kontogiannea, Maria; Fon, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Multiple genes have been associated with PD, including Parkin and PINK1. Recent studies have established that the Parkin and PINK1 proteins function in a common mitochondrial quality control pathway, whereby disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential leads to PINK1 stabilization at the mitochondrial outer surface. PINK1 accumulation leads to Parkin recruitment from the cytosol, which in turn promotes the degradation of the damaged mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy). Most studies characterizing PINK1/Parkin mitophagy have relied on high concentrations of chemical uncouplers to trigger mitochondrial depolarization, a stimulus that has been difficult to adapt to neuronal systems and one unlikely to faithfully model the mitochondrial damage that occurs in PD. Here, we report that the short mitochondrial isoform of ARF (smARF), previously identified as an alternate translation product of the tumor suppressor p19ARF, depolarizes mitochondria and promotes mitophagy in a Parkin/PINK1-dependent manner, both in cell lines and in neurons. The work positions smARF upstream of PINK1 and Parkin and demonstrates that mitophagy can be triggered by intrinsic signaling cascades. PMID:25217637

  18. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  19. Therapeutic Targets in the ARF Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    One of the outstanding fundamental questions in cancer cell biology concerns how cells coordinate cellular growth (or macromolecular synthesis) with cell cycle progression and mitosis. Intuitively, rapidly dividing cells must have some control over these processes; otherwise cells would continue to shrink in volume with every passing cycle, similar to the cytoreductive divisions seen in the very early stages of embryogenesis. The problem is easily solved in unicellular organisms, such as yeast, as their growth rates are entirely dependent on nutrient availability. Multicellular organisms such as mammals, however, must have acquired additional levels of control, as nutrient availability is seldom an issue and the organism has a prodigious capacity to store necessary metabolites in the form of glycogen, lipids, and protein. Furthermore, the specific needs and specialized architecture of tissues must constrain growth for growth’s sake; if not, the necessary function of the organ could be lost. While certainly a myriad of mechanisms for preventing this exist via initiating cell death (e.g. apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis), these all depend on some external cue, such as death signals, hypoxia, lack of nutrients or survival signals. However there must also be some cell autonomous method for surveying against inappropriate growth signals (such as oncogenic stress) that occur in a stochastic fashion, possibly as a result of random mutations. The ARF tumor suppressor seems to fulfill that role, as its expression is near undetectable in normal tissues, yet is potently induced by oncogenic stress (such as overexpression of oncogenic Ras or myc). As a result of induced expression of ARF, the tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized and promotes cell cycle arrest. Mutations or epigenetic alterations of the INK4a/Arf locus are second only to p53 mutations in cancer cells, and in some cancers, alterations in both Arf and p53 observed, suggesting that these two tumor

  20. Demonstration of EDA flow for massively parallel e-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P.; Belledent, J.; Tranquillin, C.; Figueiro, T.; Meunier, S.; Bayle, S.; Fay, A.; Milléquant, M.; Icard, B.; Wieland, M.

    2014-03-01

    Today's soaring complexity in pushing the limits of 193nm immersion lithography drives the development of other technologies. One of these alternatives is mask-less massively parallel electron beam lithography, (MP-EBL), a promising candidate in which future resolution needs can be fulfilled at competitive cost. MAPPER Lithography's MATRIX MP-EBL platform has currently entered an advanced stage of development. The first tool in this platform, the FLX 1200, will operate using more than 1,300 beams, each one writing a stripe 2.2μm wide. 0.2μm overlap from stripe to stripe is allocated for stitching. Each beam is composed of 49 individual sub-beams that can be blanked independently in order to write in a raster scan pixels onto the wafer.

  1. Sub-20nm hybrid lithography using optical, pitch-division, and e-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belledent, J.; Smayling, M.; Pradelles, J.; Pimenta-Barros, P.; Barnola, S.; Mage, L.; Icard, B.; Lapeyre, C.; Soulan, S.; Pain, L.

    2012-03-01

    A roadmap extending far beyond the current 22nm CMOS node has been presented several times. [1] This roadmap includes the use of a highly regular layout style which can be decomposed into "lines and cuts."[2] The "lines" can be done with existing optical immersion lithography and pitch division with self-aligned spacers.[3] The "cuts" can be done with either multiple exposures using immersion lithography, or a hybrid solution using either EUV or direct-write ebeam.[ 4] The choice for "cuts" will be driven by the availability of cost-effective, manufacturing-ready equipment and infrastructure. Optical lithography improvements have enabled scaling far beyond what was expected; for example, soft x-rays (aka EUV) were in the semiconductor roadmap as early as 1994 since optical resolution was not expected for sub-100nm features. However, steady improvements and innovations such as Excimer laser sources and immersion photolithography have allowed some manufacturers to build 22nm CMOS SOCs with single-exposure optical lithography. With the transition from random complex 2D shapes to regular 1D-patterns at 28nm, the "lines and cuts" approach can extend CMOS logic to at least the 7nm node. The spacer double patterning for lines and optical cuts patterning is expected to be used down to the 14nm node. In this study, we extend the scaling to 18nm half-pitch which is approximately the 10-11nm node using spacer pitch division and complementary e-beam lithography. For practical reasons, E-Beam lithography is used as well to expose the "mandrel" patterns that support the spacers. However, in a production mode, it might be cost effective to replace this step by a standard 193nm exposure and applying the spacer technique twice to divide the pitch by 3 or 4. The Metal-1 "cut" pattern is designed for a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops. Since the final conductor is defined by a Damascene process, the "cut" patterns become islands

  2. Arf1-GTP-induced Tubule Formation Suggests a Function of Arf Family Proteins in Curvature Acquisition at Sites of Vesicle Budding*

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Michael; Jia, Jun-Yong; Roux, Aurélien; Beck, Rainer; Wieland, Felix T.; De Camilli, Pietro; Haucke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and related small GTPases play crucial roles in membrane traffic within the exo- and endocytic pathways. Arf proteins in their GTP-bound state are associated with curved membrane buds and tubules, frequently together with effector coat proteins to which they bind. Here we report that Arf1 is found on membrane tubules originating from the Golgi complex where it colocalizes with COPI and GGA1 vesicle coat proteins. Arf1 also induces tubulation of liposomes in vitro. Mutations within the amino-terminal amphipathic helix (NTH) of Arf1 affect the number of Arf1-positive tubules in vivo and its property to tubulate liposomes. Moreover, hydrophilic substitutions within the hydrophobic part of its NTH impair Arf1-catalyzed budding of COPI vesicles in vitro. Our data indicate that GTP-controlled local induction of high curvature membranes is an important property of Arf1 that might be shared by a subgroup of Arf/Arl family GTPases. PMID:18693248

  3. HuR Maintains a Replicative Life Span by Repressing the ARF Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L.

    2013-01-01

    p19ARF plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19ARF but not p16Ink4a levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19ARF expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19ARF is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  4. HuR maintains a replicative life span by repressing the ARF tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Sugimoto, Masataka

    2013-05-01

    p19(ARF) plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19(ARF) but not p16(Ink4a) levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19(ARF) expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19(ARF) is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  5. Hypergrowth mTORC1 Signals Translationally Activate the ARF Tumor Suppressor Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Alexander P.; Saporita, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor is a potent sensor of hyperproliferative cues emanating from oncogenic signaling. ARF responds to these cues by eliciting a cell cycle arrest, effectively abating the tumorigenic potential of these stimuli. Prior reports have demonstrated that oncogenic RasV12 signaling induces ARF through a mechanism mediated by the Dmp1 transcription factor. However, we now show that ARF protein is still induced in response to RasV12 in the absence of Dmp1 through the enhanced translation of existing Arf mRNAs. Here, we report that the progrowth Ras/tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)/mTORC1 signaling pathway regulates ARF protein expression and triggers ARF-mediated tumor suppression through a novel translational mechanism. Hyperactivation of mTORC1 through Tsc1 loss resulted in a significant increase in ARF expression, activation of the p53 pathway, and a dramatic cell cycle arrest, which were completely reversed upon Arf deletion. ARF protein induced from RasV12 in the absence of Dmp1 repressed anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor burden in an allograft model. Taken together, our data demonstrate the ability of the ARF tumor suppressor to respond to hypergrowth stimuli to prevent unwarranted tumor formation. PMID:22064482

  6. Isolation and characterization of mammalian cells expressing the Arf promoter during eye development

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida S.; Xu, Lin; Devitt, Caitlin C.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2015-01-01

    Although many researchers have successfully uncovered novel functions of the tumor suppressor p19Arf utilizing various types of cultured cancer cells and immortalized fibroblasts, these systems do not accurately reflect the endogenous environment in which Arf is developmentally expressed. We addressed this by isolating perivascular cells from the primary vitreous of the mouse eye. These cells represent a rare cell type that normally expresses the p19Arf tumor suppressor in a non-pathological, developmental context. We utilized fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify the cells by virtue of a GFP reporter driven by the native Arf promoter, and characterized their morphology and gene expression pattern. We further examined the effects of reintroduction of Arf in the PVCs to verify expected downstream effectors of p19Arf as well as uncover novel functions as a regulator of vasculogenesis. This methodology and cell culture model should serve as a useful tool to examine p19Arf biology. PMID:24806224

  7. p53-independent functions of the p19ARF tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jason D.; Jeffers, John R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Randle, David H.; Lozano, Guillermina; Roussel, Martine F.; Sherr, Charles J.; Zambetti, Gerard P.

    2000-01-01

    The p19ARF tumor suppressor antagonizes Mdm2 to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Individual TKO (triple knock out) mice nullizygous for ARF, p53, and Mdm2 develop multiple tumors at a frequency greater than those observed in animals lacking both p53 and Mdm2 or p53 alone, demonstrating that p19ARF can act independently of the Mdm2-p53 axis in tumor surveillance. Reintroduction of ARF into TKO mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), but not into those lacking both p53 and ARF, arrested the cell division cycle in the G1 phase. Inhibition of the retinoblastoma protein had no effect on the ability of ARF to arrest TKO MEFs. Thus, in the absence of Mdm2, p19ARF interacts with other targets to inhibit cell proliferation. PMID:10995391

  8. Polymer nanofibers by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisignano, Dario; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Mele, Elisa; Persano, Luana; Di Benedetto, Francesca; Cingolani, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    The fabrication of polymeric fibers by soft lithography is demonstrated. Polyurethane, patterned by capillarity-induced molding with high-resolution elastomeric templates, forms mm-long fibers with a diameter below 0.3μm. The Young's modulus of the fabricated structures, evaluated by force-distance scanning probe spectroscopy, has a value of 0.8MPa. This is an excellent example of nanostructures feasible by the combination of soft nanopatterning and high-resolution fabrication approaches for master templates, and particularly electron-beam lithography.

  9. Porphyrin-Based Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J; Stone, G; Christian, A; Dugan, L; Hiddessen, A; Wu, K J; Wu, L; Hamilton, J; Stockton, C; Hubbell, J

    2007-10-15

    Photocatalytic lithography is an emerging technique that couples light with coated mask materials in order to pattern surface chemistry. We excite porphyrins to create radical species that photocatalytically oxidize, and thereby pattern, chemistries in the local vicinity. The technique advantageously does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, it is fast and robust and the wavelength of light does not limit the resolution of patterned features. We have patterned proteins and cells in order to demonstrate the utility of photocatalytic lithography in life science applications.

  10. Optical characterization of subwavelength-scale solid immersion lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Haq, Mohammad Tahdiul; Nakagawa, Wataru; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-03-01

    We present the fabrication and optical characterization of nano-scale solid immersion lenses (nano-SILs) with sizes down to a subwavelength range. Submicron-scale cylinders fabricated by electron-beam lithography (EBL) are thermally reflowed to form a spherical shape. Subsequent soft lithography leads to nano-SILs on transparent substrates, i.e. glass, for optical characterization with visible light. The optical characterization is performed using a high-resolution interference microscope (HRIM) with illumination at 642 nm wavelength. The measurements of the 3D amplitude and phase fields provide information on the spot size and the peak intensity. In particular, the phase measurement is a more convincing proof of the Airy disc size reduction rather than the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) spot size. The focal spots produced by the nano-SILs show both spot-size reduction and enhanced optical intensity, which are consistent with the immersion effect. In this way, we experimentally confirm the immersion effect of a subwavelength-size SIL (d = 530 nm and h = 45 nm) with a spot reduction ratio of 1.35, which is less than the expected value of 1.5, most likely due to the slightly non-ideal shape of the nano-SIL.

  11. CD and defect improvement challenges for immersion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehara, Keisuke; Ema, Tatsuhiko; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Nakagawa, Seiji; Ishitani, Seiji; Morita, Akihiko; Kim, Jeonghun; Kanaoka, Masashi; Yasuda, Shuichi; Asai, Masaya

    2009-03-01

    The intention of this study is to develop an immersion lithography process using advanced track solutions to achieve world class critical dimension (CD) and defectivity performance in a state of the art manufacturing facility. This study looks at three important topics for immersion lithography: defectivity, CD control, and wafer backside contamination. The topic of defectivity is addressed through optimization of coat, develop, and rinse processes as well as implementation of soak steps and bevel cleaning as part of a comprehensive defect solution. Develop and rinse processing techniques are especially important in the effort to achieve a zero defect solution. Improved CD control is achieved using a biased hot plate (BHP) equipped with an electrostatic chuck. This electrostatic chuck BHP (eBHP) is not only able to operate at a very uniform temperature, but it also allows the user to bias the post exposure bake (PEB) temperature profile to compensate for systematic within-wafer (WiW) CD non-uniformities. Optimized CD results, pre and post etch, are presented for production wafers. Wafer backside particles can cause focus spots on an individual wafer or migrate to the exposure tool's wafer stage and cause problems for a multitude of wafers. A basic evaluation of the cleaning efficiency of a backside scrubber unit located on the track was performed as a precursor to a future study examining the impact of wafer backside condition on scanner focus errors as well as defectivity in an immersion scanner.

  12. Microfabrication using soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    Soft Lithography is a group of non-photolithographic techniques currently being explored in our group. Four such techniques-microcontact printing (μCP), replica molding (REM), micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC), and microtransfer molding (μTM)-have been demonstrated for fabricating micro- and nanostructures of a variety of materials with dimension >=30 nm. Part I (Chapters 1-5) reviews several aspects of the three molding techniques REM, MIMIC, and μTM. Chapters 1-3 describe μTM and MIMIC, and the use of these techniques in the fabrication of functional devices. μTM is capable of generating μm-scale structures over large areas, on both planar and contoured surfaces, and is able to make 3-dimensional structures layer by layer. The capability of μTM and MIMIC has been demonstrated in the fabrication of single-mode waveguides, waveguide couplers and interferometers. The coupling between waveguides can be tailored by waveguide spacing or the differential in curing time between the waveguides and the cladding. Chapters 4-5 demonstrate the combination of REM and shrinkable polystyrene (PS) films to reduce the feature size of microstructures and to generate microstructures with high aspect ratios on both planar and curved surfaces. A shrinkable PS film is patterned with relief structures, and then heated and shrinks. Thermal shrinkage results in a 100-fold increase in the aspect ratio of the patterned microstructures in the PS film. The microstructures in the shrunken PS films can be transferred to many other materials by REM. Part II (Chapters 6-7) focuses on two issues in the microfabrication using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin resists. Chapter 6 describes a selective etching solution for transferring patterns of SAMs of alkanethiolates into the underlying layers (e.g., gold, silver, and copper). This etching solution uses thiosulfate as the ligand that coordinates to the metal ions, and ferricyanide as the oxidant. It has been demonstrated to be

  13. Fundamental study of droplet spray characteristics in photomask cleaning for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C. L.; Yu, C. H.; Liu, W. H.; Hsu, Luke; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Lee, Gaston; Dress, Peter; Singh, Sherjang; Dietze, Uwe

    2010-09-01

    The fundamentals of droplet-based cleaning of photomasks are investigated and performance regimes that enable the use of binary spray technologies in advanced mask cleaning are identified. Using phase Doppler anemometry techniques, the effect of key performance parameters such as liquid and gas flow rates and temperature, nozzle design, and surface distance on droplet size, velocity, and distributions were studied. The data are correlated to particle removal efficiency (PRE) and feature damage results obtained on advanced photomasks for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  14. Immersive cyberspace system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian V. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An immersive cyberspace system is presented which provides visual, audible, and vibrational inputs to a subject remaining in neutral immersion, and also provides for subject control input. The immersive cyberspace system includes a relaxation chair and a neutral immersion display hood. The relaxation chair supports a subject positioned thereupon, and places the subject in position which merges a neutral body position, the position a body naturally assumes in zero gravity, with a savasana yoga position. The display hood, which covers the subject's head, is configured to produce light images and sounds. An image projection subsystem provides either external or internal image projection. The display hood includes a projection screen moveably attached to an opaque shroud. A motion base supports the relaxation chair and produces vibrational inputs over a range of about 0-30 Hz. The motion base also produces limited translation and rotational movements of the relaxation chair. These limited translational and rotational movements, when properly coordinated with visual stimuli, constitute motion cues which create sensations of pitch, yaw, and roll movements. Vibration transducers produce vibrational inputs from about 20 Hz to about 150 Hz. An external computer, coupled to various components of the immersive cyberspace system, executes a software program and creates the cyberspace environment. One or more neutral hand posture controllers may be coupled to the external computer system and used to control various aspects of the cyberspace environment, or to enter data during the cyberspace experience.

  15. ITRS lithography roadmap: 2015 challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neisser, Mark; Wurm, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    In the past few years, novel methods of patterning have made considerable progress. In 2011, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography was the front runner to succeed optical lithography. However, although EUV tools for pilot production capability have been installed, its high volume manufacturing (HVM) readiness continues to be gated by productivity and availability improvements taking longer than expected. In the same time frame, alternative and/or complementary technologies to EUV have made progress. Directed self-assembly (DSA) has demonstrated improved defectivity and progress in integration with design and pattern process flows. Nanoimprint improved performance considerably and is pilot production capable for memory products. Maskless lithography has made progress in tool development and could have an α tool ready in the late 2015 or early 2016. But they all have to compete with multiple patterning. Quadruple patterning is already demonstrated and can pattern lines and spaces down to close to 10-nm half pitch. The other techniques have to do something better than quadruple patterning does to be chosen for implementation. DSA and NIL promise a lower cost. EUV promises a simpler and shorter process and the creation of 2-D patterns more easily with much reduced complexity compared to multiple patterning. Maskless lithography promises to make chip personalization easy and to be particularly cost effective for low-volume chip designs. Decision dates for all of the technologies are this year or next year.

  16. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  17. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Markle, David A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies.

  18. Maskless, reticle-free, lithography

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Markle, D.A.

    1997-11-25

    A lithography system in which the mask or reticle, which usually carries the pattern to be printed onto a substrate, is replaced by a programmable array of binary (i.e. on/off) light valves or switches which can be programmed to replicate a portion of the pattern each time an illuminating light source is flashed. The pattern of light produced by the programmable array is imaged onto a lithographic substrate which is mounted on a scanning stage as is common in optical lithography. The stage motion and the pattern of light displayed by the programmable array are precisely synchronized with the flashing illumination system so that each flash accurately positions the image of the pattern on the substrate. This is achieved by advancing the pattern held in the programmable array by an amount which corresponds to the travel of the substrate stage each time the light source flashes. In this manner the image is built up of multiple flashes and an isolated defect in the array will only have a small effect on the printed pattern. The method includes projection lithographies using radiation other than optical or ultraviolet light. The programmable array of binary switches would be used to control extreme ultraviolet (EUV), x-ray, or electron, illumination systems, obviating the need for stable, defect free masks for projection EUV, x-ray, or electron, lithographies. 7 figs.

  19. Graphic Arts/Offset Lithography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoisington, James; Metcalf, Joseph

    This revised curriculum for graphic arts is designed to provide secondary and postsecondary students with entry-level skills and an understanding of current printing technology. It contains lesson plans based on entry-level competencies for offset lithography as identified by educators and industry representatives. The guide is divided into 15…

  20. E-beam to complement optical lithography for 1D layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, David K.; Liu, Enden D.; Smayling, Michael C.; Prescop, Ted

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is moving to highly regular designs, or 1D gridded layouts, to enable scaling to advanced nodes, as well as improve process latitude, chip size and chip energy consumption. The fabrication of highly regular ICs is straightforward. Poly and metal layers are arranged into 1D layouts. These 1D layouts facilitate a two-step patterning approach: a line-creation step, followed by a line-cutting step, to form the desired IC pattern (See Figure 1). The first step, line creation, can be accomplished with a variety of lithography techniques including 193nm immersion (193i) and Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP). It appears feasible to create unidirectional parallel lines to at least 11 nm half-pitch, with two applications of SADP for pitch division by four. Potentially, this step can also be accomplished with interference lithography or directed self assembly in the future. The second step, line cutting, requires an extremely high-resolution lithography technique. At advanced nodes, the only options appear to be the costly quadruple patterning with 193i, or EUV or E-Beam Lithography (EBL). This paper focuses on the requirements for a lithography system for "line cutting", using EBL to complement Optical. EBL is the most cost-effective option for line cutting at advanced nodes for HVM.

  1. An Effector Domain Mutant of Arf6 Implicates Phospholipase D in Endosomal Membrane RecyclingD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Olivera A.; Brown, Fraser D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of phospholipase D (PLD) in mediating Arf6 function in cells. Expression of Arf6 mutants that are defective in activating PLD, Arf6N48R and Arf6N48I, inhibited membrane recycling to the plasma membrane (PM), resulting in an accumulation of tubular endosomal membranes. Additionally, unlike wild-type Arf6, neither Arf6 mutant could generate protrusions or recruit the Arf6 GTPase activating protein (GAP) ACAP1 onto the endosome in the presence of aluminum fluoride. Remarkably, all of these phenotypes, including accumulated tubular endosomes, blocked recycling, and failure to make protrusions and recruit ACAP effectively, could be recreated in either untransfected cells or cells expressing wild-type Arf6 by treatment with 1-butanol to inhibit the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA), the product of PLD. Moreover, most of the defects present in cells expressing Arf6N48R or N48I could be reversed by treatment with agents expected to elevate PA levels in cells. Together, these observations provide compelling evidence that Arf6 stimulation of PLD is required for endosomal membrane recycling and GAP recruitment. PMID:16280360

  2. Differential effects on ARF stability by normal vs. oncogenic levels of c-Myc expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delin; Kon, Ning; Zhong, Jiayun; Zhang, Pingzhao; Yu, Long; Gu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY ARF suppresses aberrant cell growth upon c-Myc overexpression through activating p53 responses. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which ARF specifically, restrains the oncogenic potential of c-Myc without affecting its normal physiological function is not well understood. Here, we show that low levels of c-Myc expression stimulate cell proliferation whereas high levels inhibit through activating the ARF-p53 response. Although the mRNA levels of ARF are induced under both scenarios, the accumulation of ARF protein occurs only when ULF-mediated degradation of ARF is inhibited by c-Myc overexpression. Moreover, the levels of ARF are reduced through ULF-mediated ubiquitination upon DNA damage. Blocking ARF degradation by c-Myc overexpression dramatically stimulates the apoptotic responses. Our study reveals that ARF stability control is crucial for differentiating normal (low) vs. oncogenic (high) levels of c-Myc expression and suggests that differential effects on ULF- mediated ARF ubiquitination by c-Myc levels act as a barrier in oncogene-induced stress responses. PMID:23747016

  3. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  4. Gasoline immersion injury

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, L.A.; Cruse, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical burns and pulmonary complications are the most common problems encountered in the patient immersed in gasoline. Our patient demonstrated a 46-percent total-body-surface area, partial-thickness chemical burn. Although he did not develop bronchitis or pneumonitis, he did display persistent atelectasis, laryngeal edema, and subsequent upper airway obstruction. This had not previously been reported in gasoline inhalation injuries. Hydrocarbon hepatitis secondary to the vascular endothelial damage is apparently a reversible lesion with no reported long-term sequelae. Gasoline immersion injuries may be a series multisystem injury and require the burn surgeon to take a multisystem approach to its diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Evolution of the ARF gene family in land plants: old domains, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Finet, Cédric; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Scutt, Charles P; Marlétaz, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARF) are key players in plant development. They mediate the cellular response to the plant hormone auxin by activating or repressing the expression of downstream developmental genes. The pivotal activation function of ARF proteins is enabled by their four-domain architecture, which includes both DNA-binding and protein dimerization motifs. To determine the evolutionary origin of this characteristic architecture, we built a comprehensive data set of 224 ARF-related protein sequences that represents all major living divisions of land plants, except hornworts. We found that ARFs are split into three subfamilies that could be traced back to the origin of the land plants. We also show that repeated events of extensive gene duplication contributed to the expansion of those three original subfamilies. Further examination of our data set uncovered a broad diversity in the structure of ARF transcripts and allowed us to identify an additional conserved motif in ARF proteins. We found that additional structural diversity in ARF proteins is mainly generated by two mechanisms: genomic truncation and alternative splicing. We propose that the loss of domains from the canonical, four-domain ARF structure has promoted functional shifts within the ARF family by disrupting either dimerization or DNA-binding capabilities. For instance, the loss of dimerization domains in some ARFs from moss and spikemoss genomes leads to proteins that are reminiscent of Aux/IAA proteins, possibly providing a clue on the evolution of these modulators of ARF function. We also assessed the functional impact of alternative splicing in the case of ARF4, for which we have identified a novel isoform in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analysis showed that these two transcripts exhibit markedly different developmental roles in A. thaliana. Gene duplications, domain rearrangement, and post-transcriptional regulation have thus enabled a subtle control of auxin signaling through ARF proteins

  6. Lithography of choice for the 45-nm node: new medium, new wavelength, or new beam?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesawa, Fumikatsu; Katsumata, Mikio; Ogawa, Kazuhisa; Takeuchi, Koichi; Omori, Shinji; Yoshizawa, Masaki; Kawahira, Hiroichi

    2004-05-01

    In order to clarify the direction of the lithography for the 45 nm node, the feasibilities of various lithographic techniques for gate, metal, and contact layers are studied by using experimental data and aerial image simulations. The focus and exposure budget have been determined from the actual data and the realistic estimation such as the focus distributions across a wafer measured by the phase shift focus monitor (PSFM), the focus and exposure reproducibility of the latest exposure tools, and the anticipated 45 nm device topography, etc. 193 nm lithography with a numerical aperture (NA) of 0.93 achieves the half pitch of 70 nm (hp70) by using an attenuated phase shift mask (att-PSM) and annular illumination. 193 nm immersion lithography has the possibility to achieve the hp60 without an alternative PSM (alt-PSM). For a gate layer, 50-nm/130-nm line-and-space (L/S) patterns as well as 50 nm isolated lines can be fabricated by an alt-PSM. Although specific aberrations degrade the critical dimension (CD) variation of an alt-PSM, +/-2.6 nm CD uniformity (CDU) is demonstrated by choosing the well-controlled projection lens and using a high flatness wafer. For a contact layers, printing 90 nm contacts is very critical by optical lithography even if the aggressive resolution enhancement technique (RET) is used. Especially for dense contact, the mask error factor (MEF) increases to around 10 and practical process margin is not available at all. On the other hand, low-energy electron-beam proximity-projection lithography (LEEPL) can fabricate 80 nm contact with large process margin. As a lithography tool for the contact layers of the 45 nm node devices, LEEPL is expected to replace 193 nm lithography.

  7. Novel strategy for the design of highly transparent ArF resists with excellent dry etch resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenwei; Ohfuji, Takeshi; Sasago, Masaru; Tagawa, Seiichi

    1998-06-01

    To circumvent the difficulty in seeking a balance between dry etch resistance and the transparency at 193 nm in the design of a single-layer-resist for ArF lithography, a new strategy based on the de-coupling of these two criteria from each other is presented. The possibility of the de-coupling has been demonstrated by imparting dry etch resistance to resist matrix after the exposure step. Imparting of dry etch resistance can be achieved with the utilization of thermal- activated reactions during post exposure bake or plasma- activated reactions during etching. Specifically, copolymers containing acrylonitrile were synthesized and evaluated as a demonstration. Chemical reactions, especially cyclization reaction, in the copolymers upon heating were investigated. Intramolecular cyclization of the nitrile groups, which is electrophilic reagent catalyzed, starts at about 130 degree(s)C in a copolymer of acrylonitrile containing 50 mol% methacrylic acid. The reaction results in rigid ring structures with satisfying dry etch resistance. Dry etch resistance of the copolymer after thermal treatment was measured to be up to the same level of a poly(hydroxystyrene)-based commercial resist. Partially protection of the acid component by introducing tertiary- butyl ester groups provides new chemically amplified resist candidates. The materials based on terpolymers of acrylonitrile, tertiary-butyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid well satisfy the basic requirements for ArF resists with high transparency at 193 nm and excellent dry etch resistance after prolonged post exposure bake. Lithographic performance of the newly designed materials are currently under further assessments..

  8. STAT3 regulated ARF expression suppresses prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pencik, Jan; Schlederer, Michaela; Gruber, Wolfgang; Unger, Christine; Walker, Steven M.; Chalaris, Athena; Marié, Isabelle J.; Hassler, Melanie R.; Javaheri, Tahereh; Aksoy, Osman; Blayney, Jaine K.; Prutsch, Nicole; Skucha, Anna; Herac, Merima; Krämer, Oliver H.; Mazal, Peter; Grebien, Florian; Egger, Gerda; Poli, Valeria; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Eferl, Robert; Esterbauer, Harald; Kennedy, Richard; Fend, Falko; Scharpf, Marcus; Braun, Martin; Perner, Sven; Levy, David E.; Malcolm, Tim; Turner, Suzanne D.; Haitel, Andrea; Susani, Martin; Moazzami, Ali; Rose-John, Stefan; Aberger, Fritz; Merkel, Olaf; Moriggl, Richard; Culig, Zoran; Dolznig, Helmut; Kenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer in men. Hyperactive STAT3 is thought to be oncogenic in PCa. However, targeting of the IL-6/STAT3 axis in PCa patients has failed to provide therapeutic benefit. Here we show that genetic inactivation of Stat3 or IL-6 signalling in a Pten-deficient PCa mouse model accelerates cancer progression leading to metastasis. Mechanistically, we identify p19ARF as a direct Stat3 target. Loss of Stat3 signalling disrupts the ARF–Mdm2–p53 tumour suppressor axis bypassing senescence. Strikingly, we also identify STAT3 and CDKN2A mutations in primary human PCa. STAT3 and CDKN2A deletions co-occurred with high frequency in PCa metastases. In accordance, loss of STAT3 and p14ARF expression in patient tumours correlates with increased risk of disease recurrence and metastatic PCa. Thus, STAT3 and ARF may be prognostic markers to stratify high from low risk PCa patients. Our findings challenge the current discussion on therapeutic benefit or risk of IL-6/STAT3 inhibition. PMID:26198641

  9. ArF pellicle degradation mechanism for resolving CD variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyungseok; Ahn, Yohan; Ryu, Jua; Lee, Yangkoo; An, Bumhyun; Lee, Seokryeol

    2007-03-01

    With the introduction of ArF laser, a binary mask is preferred because a PSM mask is still weak to the crystal defect called as photomask haze although extensive studies trying to resolve the haze impact to a photomask have been performed by various researchers in company and school. However, a new problem was happened after a binary mask introduction that CD variation in an exposure shot is appeared and is gradually increased. And finally, CD variation considerably causes defects in wafer level. It was proven that CD variation is closely related to the change of the reticle transmittance by a lot of researches. In this study, the mechanism of ArF pellicle degradation is focused on because the pellicle degradation affects a reticle transmittance in direct. The components outgassed from a pellicle by the high photon energy of ArF laser, for example carbon or fluorine, are absorbed on the surface of the reticle, so that the transmittance of the reticle is decreased. The phenomena of the pellicle degradation have been studied by the various viewpoints, theoretical background, experiment and results tested in mass production line in this study. Therefore, this study has the important meaning by providing the substantial clues to resolve CD variation problem in a near future.

  10. p19(Arf) is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bieging-Rolett, K T; Johnson, T M; Brady, C A; Beaudry, V G; Pathak, N; Han, S; Attardi, L D

    2016-08-18

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19(Arf) tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19(Arf)-independent. Accordingly, p19(Arf)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19(Arf) is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19(Arf)-/- MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19(Arf) is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19(Arf) has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19(Arf) in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA-damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 G y γ-irradiation daily or 150 μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19(Arf) in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19(Arf) in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA-damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19(Arf) in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19(Arf) for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19(Arf) serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports

  11. Total Technology Immersion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sandy

    2010-01-01

    Total technology immersion doesn't happen overnight, but with vision and determination, transformation can take hold and start to grow. Floydada Independent School District (FISD), winner of the 2010 Sylvia Charp Award for District Innovation in Technology, is a great example of what a district can achieve when starting with a modest tech…

  12. Microfabricated rubber microscope using soft solid immersion lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Yann; Legrand, Olivier; Quake, Stephen R.

    2006-04-01

    We show here a technique of soft lithography to microfabricate efficient solid immersion lenses (SIL) out of rubber elastomers. The light collection efficiency of a lens system is described by its numerical aperture (NA), and is critical for applications as epifluorescence microscopy [B. Herman, Fluorescence Microscopy (BIOS Scientific, Oxford/Springer, United Kingdom, 1998). While most simple lens systems have numerical apertures less than 1, the lenses described here have NA =1.25. Better performance can be engineered though the use of compound designs; we used this principle to make compound solid immersion lenses (NA=1.32). An important application of these lenses will be as integrated optics for microfluidic devices. We incorporated them into a handheld rubber microscope for microfluidic flow cytometry and imaged single E. Coli cells by fluorescence.

  13. ArF scanner performance improvement by using track integrated CD optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jacky; Yu, Shinn-Sheng; Ke, Chih-Ming; Wu, Timothy; Wang, Yu-Hsi; Gau, Tsai-Sheng; Wang, Dennis; Li, Allen; Yang, Wenge; Kaoru, Araki

    2006-03-01

    In advanced semiconductor processing, shrinking CD is one of the main objectives when moving to the next generation technology. Improving CD uniformity (CDU) with shrinking CD is one of the biggest challenges. From ArF lithography CD error budget analysis, PEB (post exposure bake) contributes more than 40% CD variations. It turns out that hot plate performance such as CD matching and within-plate temperature control play key roles in litho cell wafer per hour (WPH). Traditionally wired or wireless thermal sensor wafers were used to match and optimize hot plates. However, sensor-to-sensor matching and sensor data quality vs. sensor lifetime or sensor thermal history are still unknown. These concerns make sensor wafers more suitable for coarse mean-temperature adjustment. For precise temperature adjustment, especially within-hot-plate temperature uniformity, using CD instead of sensor wafer temperature is a better and more straightforward metrology to calibrate hot plates. In this study, we evaluated TEL clean track integrated optical CD metrology (IM) combined with TEL CD Optimizer (CDO) software to improve 193-nm resist within-wafer and wafer-to-wafer CD uniformity. Within-wafer CD uniformity is mainly affected by the temperature non-uniformity on the PEB hot plate. Based on CD and PEB sensitivity of photo resists, a physical model has been established to control the CD uniformity through fine-tuning PEB temperature settings. CD data collected by track integrated CD metrology was fed into this model, and the adjustment of PEB setting was calculated and executed through track internal APC system. This auto measurement, auto feed forward, auto calibration and auto adjustment system can reduce the engineer key-in error and improve the hot plate calibration cycle time. And this PEB auto calibration system can easily bring hot-plate-to-hot-plate CD matching to within 0.5nm and within-wafer CDU (3σ) to less than 1.5nm.

  14. [Basic principles for setting acute reference dose, ARfD in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Basic principles for simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) setting were defined based on the work of Solecki et al. (2005). The principles are: (1) Appearance of acute toxicity within 24 h after oral administration. (2) Rationale for setting toxicity that appears or could appear after single oral administration. (3) ARfD setting is assumed to be necessary for all pesticides. (4) ARfD setting is not necessary when the value is at or above the cutoff level. (5) The setting basically applies to the general population. (6) ARfD is set based on the lowest NOAEL among all the available study data concerning endpoints for acute effects. (7) Effects of exposure during critical periods should be considered as endpoints for ARfD setting. (8) The approach for the safety coefficient is the same as that for acceptable daily intake. (9) If available, human data are acceptable as an endpoint for ARfD setting. PMID:24025213

  15. Membrane curvature induced by Arf1-GTP is essential for vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Rainer; Sun, Zhe; Adolf, Frank; Rutz, Chistoph; Bassler, Jochen; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed; Brügger, Britta; Béthune, Julien; Wieland, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The GTPase Arf1 is considered as a molecular switch that regulates binding and release of coat proteins that polymerize on membranes to form transport vesicles. Here, we show that Arf1-GTP induces positive membrane curvature and find that the small GTPase can dimerize dependent on GTP. Investigating a possible link between Arf dimerization and curvature formation, we isolated an Arf1 mutant that cannot dimerize. Although it was capable of exerting the classical role of Arf1 as a coat receptor, it could not mediate the formation of COPI vesicles from Golgi-membranes and was lethal when expressed in yeast. Strikingly, this mutant was not able to deform membranes, suggesting that GTP-induced dimerization of Arf1 is a critical step inducing membrane curvature during the formation of coated vesicles. PMID:18689681

  16. Direct write electron beam lithography: a historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2010-09-01

    of opportunity for EPL had closed with the quick implementation of immersion lithography and the interest of the industry has since shifted back to maskless lithography (ML2). This historical overview of EBDW will highlight opportunities and limitation of the technology with particular focus on technical challenges facing the current ML2 development efforts in Europe and the US. A brief status report and risk assessment of the ML2 approaches will be provided.

  17. Mask technology for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujak, M.; Burkhart, Scott C.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Kearney, Patrick A.; Moore, Craig E.; Prisbrey, Shon T.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Tong, William M.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Walton, Christopher C.; Warrick, Abbie L.; Weber, Frank J.; Wedowski, Marco; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Jeong, Sungho; Cardinale, Gregory F.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Stivers, Alan R.; Tejnil, Edita; Yan, Pei-yang; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.

    1999-04-01

    Extreme UV Lithography (EUVL) is one of the leading candidates for the next generation lithography, which will decrease critical feature size to below 100 nm within 5 years. EUVL uses 10-14 nm light as envisioned by the EUV Limited Liability Company, a consortium formed by Intel and supported by Motorola and AMD to perform R and D work at three national laboratories. Much work has already taken place, with the first prototypical cameras operational at 13.4 nm using low energy laser plasma EUV light sources to investigate issues including the source, camera, electro- mechanical and system issues, photoresists, and of course the masks. EUV lithograph masks are fundamentally different than conventional photolithographic masks as they are reflective instead of transmissive. EUV light at 13.4 nm is rapidly absorbed by most materials, thus all light transmission within the EUVL system from source to silicon wafer, including EUV reflected from the mask, is performed by multilayer mirrors in vacuum.

  18. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography for microfluidics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreindl, Gerald; Matthias, Thorsten

    2013-12-01

    The history of imprint technology as lithography method for pattern replication can be traced back to 1970's but the most significant progress has been made by the research group of S. Chou in the 1990's. Since then, it has become a popular technique with a rapidly growing interest from both research and industrial sides and a variety of new approaches have been proposed along the mainstream scientific advances. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a novel method for the fabrication of micro/nanometer scale patterns with low cost, high throughput and high resolution. Unlike traditional optical lithographic approaches, which create pattern through the use of photons or electrons to modify the chemical and physical properties of the resist, NIL relies on direct mechanical deformation of the resist and can therefore achieve resolutions beyond the limitations set by light diffraction or beam scattering that are encountered in conventional lithographic techniques. The ability to fabricate structures from the micro- to the nanoscale with high precision in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance to the advancement of micro- and nanotechnology and the biotech- sciences as a whole and will be discussed in this paper. Nanoimprinting can not only create resist patterns, as in lithography, but can also imprint functional device structures in various polymers, which can lead to a wide range of applications in electronics, photonics, data storage, and biotechnology.

  1. Ral-Arf6 crosstalk regulates Ral dependent exocyst trafficking and anchorage independent growth signalling.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Archana; Meier, Jeremy A; Dasgupta, Anwesha; Diwanji, Neha; Deshpande, Neha; Saxena, Kritika; Buwa, Natasha; Inchanalkar, Siddhi; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj

    2016-09-01

    Integrin dependent regulation of growth factor signalling confers anchorage dependence that is deregulated in cancers. Downstream of integrins and oncogenic Ras the small GTPase Ral is a vital mediator of adhesion dependent trafficking and signalling. This study identifies a novel regulatory crosstalk between Ral and Arf6 that controls Ral function in cells. In re-adherent mouse fibroblasts (MEFs) integrin dependent activation of RalA drives Arf6 activation. Independent of adhesion constitutively active RalA and RalB could both however activate Arf6. This is further conserved in oncogenic H-Ras containing bladder cancer T24 cells, which express anchorage independent active Ral that supports Arf6 activation. Arf6 mediates active Ral-exocyst dependent delivery of raft microdomains to the plasma membrane that supports anchorage independent growth signalling. Accordingly in T24 cells the RalB-Arf6 crosstalk is seen to preferentially regulate anchorage independent Erk signalling. Active Ral we further find uses a Ral-RalBP1-ARNO-Arf6 pathway to mediate Arf6 activation. This study hence identifies Arf6, through this regulatory crosstalk, to be a key downstream mediator of Ral isoform function along adhesion dependent pathways in normal and cancer cells. PMID:27269287

  2. Progress toward developing high performance immersion compatible materials and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Karen; Patel, Kaushal; Chen, Rex; Li, Wenjie; Kwong, Ranee; Lawson, Peggy; Varanasi, Rao; Robinson, Chris; Holmes, Steven J.; Gil, Dario; Kimmel, Kurt; Slezak, Mark; Dabbagh, Gary; Chiba, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tsutomu

    2005-05-01

    To make immersion lithography a reality in manufacturing, several challenges related to materials and defects must be addressed. Two such challenges include the development of water immersion compatible materials, and the vigorous pursuit of defect reduction with respect to both the films and the processes. Suitable resists and topcoats must be developed to be compatible with the water-soaked environment during exposure. Going beyond the requisite studies of component leaching from films into the water, and absorption of water into the films, application-specific optimization of photoresists and top coats will be required. This would involve an understanding of how a wide array of resist chemistry and formulations behave under immersion conditions. The intent of this paper is to compare lithographic performance under immersion and dry conditions of resists containing different polymer platforms, protecting groups, and formulations. The compatibility of several developer-soluble top-coat materials with a variety of resists is also studied with emphasis on profile control issues. With respect to defects, the sources are numerous. Bubbles and particles created during the imaging process, material remnants from incomplete removal of topcoats, and image collapse as related to resist swelling from water infusion are all sources of yield-limiting defects. Parallel efforts are required in the material development cycle focusing both on meeting the lithographic requirements, and on understanding and eliminating sources of defects. In this paper, efforts in the characterization and reduction of defects as related to materials chemistry and processing effects will be presented.

  3. Tissue optical immersion clearing.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we discuss the optical immersion method based on refractive index matching of scatterers (e.g., collagen, elastin fibers, cells and cell compartments) and the ground material (interstitial fluid and/or cytoplasm) of tissue and blood under the action of exogenous optical clearing agents. We analyze the optical clearing of fibrous and cell-structured tissues and blood from the point of view of receiving more valuable, normally hidden, information from spectroscopic and polarization measurements, confocal microscopy, optical coherence and optical projection tomography, as well as from nonlinear spectroscopies, such as two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation techniques. Some important applications of the immersion technique to glucose sensing, drug delivery monitoring, improvements of image contrast and imaging depth, nondistortive delivery of laser radiation and precision tissue laser photodisruption, among others, are also described. PMID:21050092

  4. Overlay progress in EUV lithography towards adoption for manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Jan V.; Laidler, David; Pigneret, Charles; van Dijk, Andre; Voznyi, Oleg; Dusa, Mircea; Hendrickx, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) lithography is a candidate for semiconductor manufacturing for the 16nm technology node and beyond. Due to the very short wavelength of 13.5nm, EUV lithography provides the capability to continue single exposure scaling with improved resolution and higher pattern fidelity compared to 193nm immersion lithography. However, reducing the wavelength brings new equipment and process challenges. To enable EUV photon transmission through the optical system, the entire optical path of an EUV exposure tool operates under vacuum, and in addition reticle and optics are reflective. To obtain the required CD and overlay performance, both wafer and reticle front surfaces need to have near-perfect flatness, as non-flatness directly contributes to focus and image placement errors, in the case of the reticle due to non-telecentricity. Traditional vacuum chucks, both for reticle and wafer, cannot be used and are replaced by electrostatic chucks. Any contribution of this new clamping method on CD and overlay control therefore needs to be investigated, including avoidance of particle contamination over time. This work was performed on ASML's EUV Alpha Demo Tool (ADT). We investigated the different, non-conventional contributions to overlay control on the ADT, with particular attention to the wafer clamping performance of the exposure chuck. We demonstrate that we were able to improve the overlay performance by compensating for the wafer clamping error during the wafer alignment sequence. The impact of different wafer types on overlay was also evaluated. In addition to clamping effects, thermal effects have also been shown to impact overlay and were evaluated by monitoring the thermal behavior of a wafer during exposure on the ADT and correlating to the resulting overlay.

  5. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features

  6. Extending single-exposure patterning towards 38-nm half-pitch using 1.35 NA immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoms, Igor; Engelen, Andre; Mulkens, Jan; Boom, Herman; Moerman, Richard; Liebregts, Paul; de Graaf, Roelof; van Veen, Marieke; Thomassen, Patrick; Emer, Wolfgang; Sperling, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Immersion lithography started to become the main workhorse for volume production of 45-nm devices, and while waiting for EUV lithography, immersion will continue to be the main technology for further shrinks. In a first step single exposure can be stretched towards the 0.25 k1 limit, after which various double patterning methods are lining up to print 32-nm and even 22-nm devices. The immersion exposure system plays a key role here, and continuous improvement steps are required to support tighter CD and overlay budgets. Additionally cost of ownership (COO) needs to be reduced and one important way to achieve this is to increase the wafer productivity. In this paper we discuss the design and performance of a new improved immersion exposure system XT:1950i. This system will extend immersion towards 38-nm half pitch resolution using a 1.35 NA lens and extreme off axis illumination (e.g. dipole). The system improvements result in better CDU, more accurate overlay towards 4-nm and higher wafer productivity towards 148- wph. Last but not least a next step in immersion technology is implemented. A novel immersion hood is introduced giving more robust low and stable defects performance.

  7. Abnormalities of the ARF-p53 pathway in primary angiosarcomas of the liver.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Markus; Markwarth, Anett; Lehnert, Gerhard; Wittekind, Christian; Wrbitzky, Renate; Tannapfel, Andrea

    2002-09-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus, located on chromosome 9p21, encodes 2 cell cycle-regulatory proteins, p16(INKa) and p14(ARF), acting through the Rb-CDK4 and p53 pathways. This study was done to investigate the contribution of the INK4a-ARF locus in tumorigenesis of angiosarcoma of the liver. Alterations of p14(ARF), p16(INKa), and p53 in primary liver angiosarcoma from 19 patients were analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), restriction enzyme-related polymerase chain reaction (RE-PCR), microsatellite analysis, and DNA sequencing. As a control group, 12 angiosarcomas from other organs were analyzed. Promoter methylation of p14(ARF) was found in 5 of 19 cases (26%), and p16(INKa) showed aberrant promoter methylation in 12 of 19 cases (63%). One tumor (5%) had homozygous deletion of the INK4a-ARF locus. Methylation and deletion correlated with loss of mRNA transcription. Methylated p14(ARF) appeared in the context of a methylated p16(INKa) promoter in 3 cases of the 5 angiosarcomas methylated at p14(ARF). p14(ARF) aberrant methylation was not related to the presence of p53 mutations, which was detected in 6 of 19 (32%) cases. Alterations of the INK4a-ARF locus or p53 as were not established independent prognostic factors in these tumors. In conclusion, our data indicate that the INK4a-ARF locus is frequently inactivated in angiosarcoma of the liver and occurs independently of p53 mutations. PMID:12378512

  8. Molecular design and synthesis of 3-oxocyclohexyl methacrylate for ArF and KrF excimer laser resist

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaki, Koji; Kaimoto, Yuko; Takahashi, Makoto

    1994-09-01

    The authors originally designed 3-oxocyclohexyl methacrylate (OCMA) for an acid-labile component in chemical amplification. The key concept of the molecular design of the 3-oxocyclohexyl substituent was the introduction of acidic protons at the {alpha}-position of the elimination site by using a ketone functional group. OCMA was synthesized by esterification of 1,3-cyclohexanediol and methacryloyl chloride followed by pyridinium dichromate oxidation. Using AIBN as an initiator, the authors also prepared poly(OCMA-co-AdMA) (AdMA: adamantyl methacrylate) by a thermally induced radical copolymerization of OCMA and AdMA. The resist comprises the copolymer and 10 wt % of triphenylsulfonium hexafluoroantimonate as a photoacid generator (PAG). This resist has high sensitivity, good thermal stability, good dry etch resistance, and good postexposure delay durability. Using a KrF excimer laser stepper (NA = 0.45) and 2-propanol mixed aqueous alkali developer, the authors obtained 0.3-{mu}m line and space patterns with this resist. A resist with 1 wt % of the PAG has an acceptable transmittance at 193 nm, proving that this resist is suitable for ArF excimer lithography. 29 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Arf6 plays an early role in platelet activation by collagen and convulxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wangsun; Karim, Zubair A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2006-04-15

    Small GTPases play critical roles in hemostasis, though the roster of such molecules in platelets is not complete. In this study, we report the presence of Ras-related GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family. Platelets contain Arf1 or 3 and Arf6, with the latter being predominantly membrane associated. Using effector domain pull-down assays, we show, counter to other GTPases, that Arf6-GTP is present in resting platelets and decreases rapidly upon activation with collagen or convulxin. This decrease does not completely rely on secondary agonists (ADP and thromboxane A2) or require integrin signaling. The decrease in free Arf6-GTP temporally precedes activation of Rho family GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1). Using a membrane-permeant, myristoylated peptide, which mimics the N-terminus of Arf6, we show that the Arf6-GTP decrease is essential for collagen- and convulxin-induced aggregation, platelet adherence, and spreading on collagen-coated glass. Treatment with this peptide also affects the activation of Rho family GTPases, but has little effect on RalA and Rap1 or on agonist-induced calcium mobilization. These data show that Arf6 is a key element in activation through GPVI, and is required for activation of the Rho family GTPases and the subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangements needed for full platelet function. PMID:16352809

  10. Nuclear trafficking of EGFR by Vps34 represses Arf expression to promote lung tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Dayde, D; Guerard, M; Perron, P; Hatat, A-S; Barrial, C; Eymin, B; Gazzeri, S

    2016-07-28

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell surface receptor that has an essential role in cell proliferation and survival, and overexpression of EGFR is a common feature of human cancers. In Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), activating mutations of EGFR have also been described. We recently showed that mutant EGFR-L858R inhibits the expression of the p14ARF tumor-suppressor protein to promote cell survival. In this study, we defined the molecular bases by which EGFR controls Arf expression. Using various lung tumor models, we showed that EGF stimulation inhibits Arf transcription by a mechanism involving the nuclear transport and recruitment of EGFR to the Arf promoter. We unraveled the vesicular trafficking protein Vps34 as a mediator of EGFR nuclear trafficking and showed that its neutralization prevents the accumulation of EGFR to the Arf promoter in response to ligand activation. Finally, in lung tumor cells that carry mutant EGFR-L858R, we demonstrated that inhibition of Vps34 using small interfering RNA restrains nuclear EGFR location and restores Arf expression leading to apoptosis. These findings identify the Arf tumor suppressor as a new transcriptional target of nuclear EGFR and highlight Vps34 as an important regulator of the nuclear EGFR/Arf survival pathway. As a whole, they provide a mechanistic explanation to the inverse correlation between nuclear expression of EGFR and overall survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:26686095

  11. Simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) settings for pesticides in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop guidelines for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) for pesticides in Japan, we conducted simulations of ARfD settings based on evaluation reports for 201 pesticides assessed by the Food Safety Commission (FSC) in Japan over the last 8 years. Our conceptual principles were based on the concepts written by Solecki et al. (2005) and were adapted for toxicological data required in Japan. Through this process, we were able to set the ARfDs for over 90% of the 201 pesticides tested. The studies that provided the rationale for ARfD setting were primarily reproductive and developmental toxicity studies, acute neurotoxicity studies, and pharmacology studies. For approximately 30% of the pesticides simulated in the present study, it was not necessary to establish ARfDs. Some of the simulated ARfDs resulting from their endpoints may be conservative estimates, because the evaluation reports were written for acceptable daily intake settings. Thus, it was sometimes difficult to distinguish acute toxic alerts from repeated toxicities. We were unable to set an ARfD for 14 pesticides because of insufficient data on acute toxicities. This could be improved by more complete recordkeeping. Furthermore, we categorized the 201 pesticides by mechanism of action or chemical structure. Our simulation indicates that the conceptual framework presented here can be used as a basis for the development of guidelines on ARfD settings for pesticides in Japan. PMID:23535399

  12. Centaurin-alpha1 and KIF13B kinesin motor protein interaction in ARF6 signalling.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, V

    2005-12-01

    The ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) family of small GTPases regulate intracellular membrane trafficking by cycling between an inactive GDP- and an active GTP-bound form. Among the six known mammalian ARFs (ARF1-ARF6), ARF6 is the least conserved and plays critical roles in membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics near the cell surface. Since ARFs have undetectable levels of intrinsic GTP binding and hydrolysis, they are totally dependent on extrinsic GEFs (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors) for GTP binding and GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for GTP hydrolysis. We have recently isolated a novel KIF (kinesin) motor protein (KIF13B) that binds to centaurin-alpha1, an ARF6GAP that binds to the second messenger PIP3 [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3]. KIFs transport intracellular vesicles and recognize their cargo by binding to proteins (receptors) localized on the surface of the cargo vesicles. Identification of centaurin-alpha1 as a KIF13B interactor suggests that KIF13B may transport ARF6 and/or PIP3 using centaurin-alpha1 as its receptor. This paper reviews the studies carried out to assess the interaction and regulation of centaurin-alpha1 by KIF13B. PMID:16246098

  13. p14(ARF) Prevents Proliferation of Aneuploid Cells by Inducing p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Veneziano, Lorena; Barra, Viviana; Lentini, Laura; Spatafora, Sergio; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Weakening the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint by reduced expression of its components induces chromosome instability and aneuploidy that are hallmarks of cancer cells. The tumor suppressor p14(ARF) is overexpressed in response to oncogenic stimuli to stabilize p53 halting cell progression. Previously, we found that lack or reduced expression of p14(ARF) is involved in the maintenance of aneuploid cells in primary human cells, suggesting that it could be part of a pathway controlling their proliferation. To investigate this aspect further, p14(ARF) was ectopically expressed in HCT116 cells after depletion of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint MAD2 protein that was used as a trigger for aneuploidy. p14(ARF) Re-expression reduced the number of aneuploid cells in MAD2 post-transcriptionally silenced cells. Also aberrant mitoses, frequently displayed in MAD2-depleted cells, were decreased when p14(ARF) was expressed at the same time. In addition, p14(ARF) ectopic expression in MAD2-depleted cells induced apoptosis associated with increased p53 protein levels. Conversely, p14(ARF) ectopic expression did not induce apoptosis in HCT116 p53KO cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the tumor suppressor p14(ARF) may have an important role in counteracting proliferation of aneuploid cells by activating p53-dependent apoptosis. PMID:25752701

  14. Pathological functions of the small GTPase Arf6 in cancer progression: Tumor angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hongu, Tsunaki; Yamauchi, Yohei; Funakoshi, Yuji; Katagiri, Naohiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although several lines of evidence have shown that the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) plays pivotal roles in cancer progression of several types of cancers, little is known about the functions of Arf6 in tumor microenvironment. We demonstrated that Arf6 in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) plays a crucial role in tumor angiogenesis and growth using endothelial cell-specific Arf6 conditional knockout mice into which B16 melanoma and Lewis lung carcinoma cells were implanted. It was also found that Arf6 in VECs positively regulates hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced β1 integrin recycling, which is a critical event for tumor angiogenesis by promoting cell migration. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HGF-induced Arf6 activation significantly suppresses tumor angiogenesis and growth in mice, suggesting that Arf6 signaling would be a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. In this manuscript, we summarize the multiple roles of Arf6 in cancer progression, particularly in cancer cell invasion/metastasis and our recent findings on tumor angiogenesis, and discuss a possible approach to develop innovative anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26909552

  15. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  16. Why bother with x-ray lithography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Henry I.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1992-07-01

    The manufacture of state-of-the-art integrated circuits uses UV optical projection lithography. Conventional wisdom (i.e., the trade journals) holds that this technology will take the industry to quarter-micrometer minimum features sizes and below. So, why bother with X-ray lithography? The reason is that lithography is a 'system problem', and proximity X-ray lithography is better matched to that system problem than any other technology, once the initial investment is surmounted. X-ray lithography offers the most cost-effective path to the future of ultra-large-scale integrated circuits with feature sizes of tenth micrometer and below (i.e., gigascale electronics and quantum-effect electronics).

  17. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; DiFazio, Stephen P; Brunner, A.; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  18. Performance overview and outlook of EUV lithography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirati, Alberto; Peeters, Rudy; Smith, Daniel; Lok, Sjoerd; Minnaert, Arthur; van Noordenburg, Martijn; Mallmann, Jörg; Harned, Noreen; Stoeldraijer, Judon; Wagner, Christian; Zoldesi, Carmen; van Setten, Eelco; Finders, Jo; de Peuter, Koen; de Ruijter, Chris; Popadic, Milos; Huang, Roger; Lin, Martin; Chuang, Frank; van Es, Roderik; Beckers, Marcel; Brandt, David; Farrar, Nigel; Schafgans, Alex; Brown, Daniel; Boom, Herman; Meiling, Hans; Kool, Ron

    2015-03-01

    Multiple NXE:3300 are operational at customer sites. These systems, equipped with a Numerical Aperture (NA) of 0.33, are being used by semiconductor manufacturers to support device development. Full Wafer Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) of 1.0 nm for 16nm dense lines and 1.1 nm for 20nm isolated space and stable matched overlay performance with ArF immersion scanner of less than 4nm provide the required lithographic performance for these device development activities. Steady progresses in source power have been achieved in the last 12 months, with 100Watts (W) EUV power capability demonstrated on multiple machines. Power levels up to 90W have been achieved on a customer machine, while 110W capability has been demonstrated in the ASML factory. Most NXE:3300 installed at customers have demonstrated the capability to expose 500 wafers per day, and one field system upgraded to the 80W configuration has proven capable of exposing 1,000 wafers per day. Scanner defectivity keeps being reduced by a 10x factor each year, while the first exposures obtained with full size EUV pellicles show no appreciable difference in CDU when compared to exposures done without pellicle. The 4th generation EUV system, the NXE: 3350, is being qualified in the ASML factory.

  19. EUV lithography performance for manufacturing: status and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirati, Alberto; Peeters, Rudy; Smith, Daniel; Lok, Sjoerd; van Noordenburg, Martijn; van Es, Roderik; Verhoeven, Eric; Meijer, Henk; Minnaert, Arthur; van der Horst, Jan-Willem; Meiling, Hans; Mallmann, Joerg; Wagner, Christian; Stoeldraijer, Judon; Fisser, Geert; Finders, Jo; Zoldesi, Carmen; Stamm, Uwe; Boom, Herman; Brandt, David; Brown, Daniel; Fomenkov, Igor; Purvis, Michael

    2016-03-01

    NXE:3300B scanners have been operational at customer sites since almost two years, and the NXE:3350B, the 4th generation EUV system, has started shipping at the end of 2015. All these exposure tools operate using MOPA pre-pulse source technology, which enabled significant productivity scaling, demonstrated at customers and at ASML. Having achieved the required throughput to support device development, the main priority of the ASML EUV program has shifted towards improving stability and availability. Continuous progresses in defectivity reduction and in the realization of a reticle pellicle are taking place at increased speed. Today's overlay and imaging results are in line with the requirements of 7nm logic devices; Matched Machine overlay to ArF immersion below 2.5 nm and full wafer CDU performance of less than 1.0nm are regularly achieved. The realization of an intensity loss-less illuminator and improvements in resist formulation are significant progress towards enabling the use of EUV technology for 5nm logic devices at full productivity. This paper will present an overview of the status of the ASML EUV program and product roadmap by reviewing the current performance and on-going developments in productivity, imaging, overlay and mask defectivity reduction.

  20. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology. PMID:26609537

  1. Next-generation 193-nm laser for sub-100-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Thomas P.; Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Pan, Xiaojiang; Newman, Peter C.; Glatzel, Holger; Watson, Tom A.; Erxmeyer, J.; Kuschnereit, Ralf; Weigl, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    The next generation 193 nm (ArF) laser has been designed and developed for high-volume production lithography. The NanoLithTM 7000, offering 20 Watts average output power at 4 kHz repetition rates is designed to support the highest exposure tool scan speeds for maximum productivity and wafer throughput. Fundamental design changes made to the laser core technologies are described. These advancements in core technology support the delivery of highly line-narrowed light with lithography, meeting specifications for bandwidth, dose stability (+/- 0.3% in 20 ms window) and wavelength stability (+/- 0.05 pm average line center error in 20 ms window) across 2 - 4 kHz repetition rates. Improvements in optical materials and coatings have led to increased lifetime of optics modules. Optimization of the discharge electrode design has increased chamber lifetime. Early life-testing indicates that the NanoLithTM core technologies have the potential for 400% reduction of cost of consumables as compared to its predecessor, the ELX-5000A and has been discussed elsewhere.

  2. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  3. Kinetic analysis of GTP hydrolysis catalysed by the Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruibai; Ahvazi, Bijan; Amariei, Diana; Shroder, Deborah; Burrola, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) are enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the small GTP-binding protein Arf. They have also been proposed to function as Arf effectors and oncogenes. We have set out to characterize the kinetics of the GAP-induced GTP hydrolysis using a truncated form of ASAP1 [Arf GAP with SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, ankyrin repeats and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains 1] as a model. We found that ASAP1 used Arf1-GTP as a substrate with a kcat of 57±5 s−1 and a Km of 2.2±0.5 μM determined by steady-state kinetics and a kcat of 56±7 s−1 determined by single-turnover kinetics. Tetrafluoroaluminate (AlF4−), which stabilizes complexes of other Ras family members with their cognate GAPs, also stabilized a complex of Arf1-GDP with ASAP1. As anticipated, mutation of Arg-497 to a lysine residue affected kcat to a much greater extent than Km. Changing Trp-479, Iso-490, Arg-505, Leu-511 or Asp-512 was predicted, based on previous studies, to affect affinity for Arf1-GTP. Instead, these mutations primarily affected the kcat. Mutants that lacked activity in vitro similarly lacked activity in an in vivo assay of ASAP1 function, the inhibition of dorsal ruffle formation. Our results support the conclusion that the Arf GAP ASAP1 functions in binary complex with Arf1-GTP to induce a transition state towards GTP hydrolysis. The results have led us to speculate that Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 undergoes a significant conformational change when transitioning from the ground to catalytically active state. The ramifications for the putative effector function of ASAP1 are discussed. PMID:17112341

  4. Enabling immersive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Josh; Mateas, Michael; Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  5. 65-nm full-chip implementation using double dipole lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D.; Chen, J. Fung; Cororan, Noel; Knose, William T.; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.; Laidig, Thomas L.; Wampler, Kurt E.; Shi, Xuelong; Hsu, Michael; Eurlings, Mark; Finders, Jo; Chiou, Tsann-Bim; Socha, Robert J.; Conley, Will; Hsieh, Yen W.; Tuan, Steve; Hsieh, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Double Dipole Lithography (DDL) has been demonstrated to be capable of patterning complex 2D patterns. Due to inherently high aerial imaging contrast, especially for dense features, we have found that it has a very good potential to meet manufacturing requirements for the 65nm node using ArF binary chrome masks. For patterning in the k1<0.35 regime without resorting to hard phase-shift masks (PSMs), DDL is one unique Resolution Enhancement Technique (RET) which can achieve an acceptable process window. To utilize DDL for printing actual IC devices, the original design data must be decomposed into "vertical (V)" and "horizontal (H)" masks for the respective X- and Y-dipole exposures. An improved two-pass, model-based, DDL mask data processing methodology has been established. It is capable of simultaneously converting complex logic and memory mask patterns into DDL compatible mask layout. To maximize the overlapped process window area, we have previously shown that the pattern-shielding algorithm must be intelligently applied together with both Scattering Bars (SBs) and model-based OPC (MOPC). Due to double exposures, stray light must be well-controlled to ensure uniform printing across the entire chip. One solution to minimize stray light is to apply large patches of solid chrome in open areas to reduce the background transmission during exposure. Unfortunately, this is not feasible for a typical clear-field poly gate masks to be patterned by a positive resist process. In this work, we report a production-worthy DDL mask pattern decomposition scheme for full-chip application. A new generation of DDL technology reticle set has been developed to verify the printing performance. Shielding is a critical part of the DDL. An innovative shielding scheme has been developed to protect the critical features and minimize the impact of stray light during double exposure.

  6. p19Arf is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Brady, Colleen A.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Pathak, Navneeta; Han, Shuo; Attardi, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19Arf tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19Arf-independent. Accordingly, p19Arf-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19Arf is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19Arf−/− MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19Arf is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19Arf has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19Arf in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 Gy γ-irradiation daily or 150μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress-inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19Arf in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19Arf in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19Arf−/− MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19Arf in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19Arf for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19Arf serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports suggesting crucial

  7. Phase-shifted assist feature OPC for sub-45-nm node optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hee-Bom; Lee, Jeung-Woo; Choi, Seong-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung

    2007-03-01

    Hyper numerical aperture (NA) implemented in immersion exposure system makes the semiconductor business enable to enter sub-45nm node optical lithography. Optical proximity correction(OPC) utilizing SRAF has been an essential technique to control critical dimension (CD) and to enhance across pitch performance in sub-wavelength lithography. Mask lithography, however, is getting more challenging with respect to patterning and processing sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs): the higher aspect ratio of mask structure, the more vulnerable. Mask manufacturing environment for DRAM and Flash becomes harsher mainly due to mask patterning problem especially pattern linearity, which causes pattern broken, inspection issue, and finally CD issue on wafer. When a pattern in relatively isolated pitches has small or large assist features, the assist features may bring unexpected CD or print on wafer. A frequency-preserving assist bar solution is the most preferred one, but it is difficult to realize for opaque assist features due to printability. In this paper, we propose a new type assist feature dubbed "Phase-shifted Assist Bar" to improve process window and to solve the resolution constraint of mask at sub-45nm manufacturing process node. The concept of phase-shift assist bar is applying phase-shift to SRAF realized with trench structure on general mask, such as Binary and Attenuated Phase-Shifted Mask (Att.PSM). The characteristics of phase-shift assist bar are evaluated with rigorous 3D lithography simulation and analyzed through verification mask, which is containing hugely various size and placement of main and assist feature. The analysis of verification mask has been done with aerial image verification tool. This work focuses on the performance of phase-shift assist bar as a promising OPC technique for "immersion era" in terms of resolution enhancement technique, optical proximity correction, and patterning on mask.

  8. Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulko, Oleksandra

    The present work describes a novel imaging technique for label-free no-UV vibration-insensitive imaging of live cells in an epi-illumination geometry. This technique can be implemented in a variety of imaging applications. For example, it can be used for cell targeting as a part of a platform for targeted cell irradiations - single-cell microbeam. The goal of microbeam facilities is to provide biological researchers with tools to study the effects of ionizing radiation on live cells. A common way of cell labeling - fluorescent staining - may alter cellular metabolism and UV illumination presents potential damage for the genetic material. The new imaging technique will allow the researchers to separate radiation-induced effects from the effects caused by confounding factors like fluorescent staining or UV light. Geometry of irradiation endstations at some microbeam facilities precludes the use of transmitted light, e.g. in the Columbia University's Radiological Research Accelerator Facility microbeam endstation, where the ion beam exit window is located just below the sample. Imaging techniques used at such endstations must use epi-illumination. Mirau Interferometry is an epi-illumination, non-stain imaging modality suitable for implementation at a microbeam endstation. To facilitate interferometry and to maintain cell viability, it is desirable that cells stay in cell growth medium during the course of an experiment. To accommodate the use of medium, Immersion Mirau Interferometry has been developed. A custom attachment for a microscope objective has been designed and built for interferometric imaging with the possibility of immersion of the apparatus into cell medium. The implemented data collection algorithm is based on the principles of Phase-Shifting Interferometry. The largest limitation of Phase-Shifting Interferometry is its sensitivity to the vertical position of the sample. In environments where vibration isolation is difficult, this makes image

  9. Directed Self-assembly for Lithography Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joy

    2010-03-01

    Economics dictated that semiconductor devices need to be scaled approximately to 70 percent linearly in order to follow the pace of Moore's law and maintain cost effectiveness. Optical lithography has been the driving force for scaling; however, it approaches its physical limit to print patterns beyond 22nm node. Directed self-assembly (DSA), which combines ``bottom-up'' self-assembled polymers and ``top-down'' lithographically defined substrates, has been considered as a potential candidate to extend optical lithography. Benefit from nanometer-scale self-assembly features and the registration precision of advanced lithography, DSA provides precise and programmable nanopatterns beyond the resolution limit of conventional lithography. We have demonstrated DSA concepts including frequency multiplication and pattern rectification using guiding prepattern with proper chemical and topographical information generated by e-beam lithography. In addition, we seek to integrate DSA with 193 nm optical lithography in a straightforward manner in order to move DSA from the research stage to a viable manufacturing technology. Recently, we implemented various integration strategies using photolithography to produce guiding patterns for DSA. This new ability enables DSA to be applied to large areas with state-of-the-art lithography facilities.

  10. Broadcasting presence: immersive television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, David; Lodge, Nicholas

    2000-06-01

    Being present at a live event is undeniably the most exciting way to experience any entertainment. This is true whether we are talking about a musical concert, a theatrical performance, a cricket match, or even a firework display. The ability to direct your gaze where you wish, to hear sounds from all around you, to experience the immediacy and expectation of an unscripted happening, to feel the buzz of the crowd and to smell the grass or smoke, are all sensory cues which contribute to the powerful experience of being there. This paper examines the ways in which entertainment media have attempted to recreate experiences which encourage the viewer to suspend disbelief and become part of a remote or recorded event. We introduce the concept of immersive television and look at some of the research, spanning many disciplines of science and art, which the ITC is conducting to explore the potential of this new medium.

  11. Immersion echelle spectrograph

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A small spectrograph containing no moving components and capable of providing high resolution spectra of the mid-infrared region from 2 microns to 4 microns in wavelength. The resolving power of the spectrograph exceeds 20,000 throughout this region and at an optical throughput of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.2 sr. The spectrograph incorporates a silicon immersion echelle grating operating in high spectral order combined with a first order transmission grating in a cross-dispersing configuration to provide a two-dimensional (2-D) spectral format that is focused onto a two-dimensional infrared detector array. The spectrometer incorporates a common collimating and condensing lens assembly in a near aberration-free axially symmetric design. The spectrometer has wide use potential in addition to general research, such as monitoring atmospheric constituents for air quality, climate change, global warming, as well as monitoring exhaust fumes for smog sources or exhaust plumes for evidence of illicit drug manufacture.

  12. An ARF6/Rab35 GTPase cascade for endocytic recycling and successful cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Chesneau, Laurent; Dambournet, Daphné; Machicoane, Mickaël; Kouranti, Ilektra; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Goud, Bruno; Echard, Arnaud

    2012-01-24

    Cytokinesis bridge instability leads to binucleated cells that can promote tumorigenesis in vivo. Membrane trafficking is crucial for animal cell cytokinesis, and several endocytic pathways regulated by distinct GTPases (Rab11, Rab21, Rab35, ARF6, RalA/B) contribute to the postfurrowing steps of cytokinesis. However, little is known about how these pathways are coordinated for successful cytokinesis. The Rab35 GTPase controls a fast endocytic recycling pathway and must be activated for SEPTIN cytoskeleton localization at the intercellular bridge, and thus for completion of cytokinesis. Here, we report that the ARF6 GTPase negatively regulates Rab35 activation and hence the Rab35 pathway. Human cells expressing a constitutively activated, GTP-bound ARF6 mutant display identical endocytic recycling and cytokinesis defects as those observed upon overexpression of the inactivated, GDP-bound Rab35 mutant. As a molecular mechanism, we identified the Rab35 GAP EPI64B as an effector of ARF6 in negatively regulating Rab35 activation. Unexpectedly, this regulation takes place at clathrin-coated pits, and activated ARF6 reduces Rab35 loading into the endocytic pathway. Thus, an effector of an ARF protein is a GAP for a downstream Rab protein, and we propose that this hierarchical ARF/Rab GTPase cascade controls the proper activation of a common endocytic pathway essential for cytokinesis. PMID:22226746

  13. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  14. ArfGAP1 interacts with coat proteins through tryptophan-based motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Rawet, Moran; Levi-Tal, Sharon; Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Parnis, Anna; Cassel, Dan

    2010-04-09

    The Arf1 GTPase-activating protein ArfGAP1 regulates vesicular traffic through the COPI system. This protein consists of N-terminal catalytic domain, lipid packing sensors (the ALPS motifs) in the central region, and a carboxy part of unknown function. The carboxy part contains several diaromatic sequences that are reminiscent of motifs known to interact with clathrin adaptors. In pull-down experiments using GST-fused peptides from rat ArfGAP1, a peptide containing a {sup 329}WETF sequence interacted strongly with clathrin adaptors AP1 and AP2, whereas a major coatomer-binding determinant was identified within the extreme carboxy terminal peptide ({sup 405}AADEGWDNQNW). Mutagenesis and peptide competition experiments revealed that this determinant is required for coatomer binding to full-length ArfGAP1, and that interaction is mediated through the {delta}-subunit of the coatomer adaptor-like subcomplex. Evidence for a role of the carboxy motif in ArfGAP1-coatomer interaction in vivo is provided by means of a reporter fusion assay. Our findings point to mechanistic differences between ArfGAP1 and the other ArfGAPs known to function in the COPI system.

  15. The Ink4a/Arf Locus Is a Barrier to Direct Neuronal Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Price, James D.; Park, Ki-Youb; Chen, Jiadong; Salinas, Ryan D.; Cho, Mathew J.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-neurogenic cell types, such as cortical astroglia and fibroblasts, can be directly converted into neurons by the overexpression of defined transcription factors. Normally, the cellular phenotype of such differentiated cells is remarkably stable and resists direct cell transdifferentiation. Here we show that the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus is a developmental barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation induced by transcription factor overexpression. With serial passage in vitro, wild-type postnatal cortical astroglia become progressively resistant to Dlx2-induced neuronal transdifferentiation. In contrast, the neurogenic competence of Ink4a/Arf-deficient astroglia is both greatly increased and does not diminish through serial cell culture passage. Electrophysiological analysis further demonstrates the neuronal identity of cells induced from Ink4a/Arf-null astroglia, and short hairpin RNA-mediated acute knockdown of p16Ink4a and p19Arf p16Ink4a and p19Arf indicates that these gene products function postnatally as a barrier to cellular transdifferentiation. Finally, we found that mouse fibroblasts deficient for Ink4a/Arf also exhibit greatly enhanced transcription factor-induced neuronal induction. These data indicate that Ink4a/Arf is a potent barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation and further suggest that this locus functions normally in the progressive developmental restriction of postnatal astrocytes. PMID:25209293

  16. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  17. Scaling behavior in interference lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Agayan, R.R.; Banyai, W.C.; Fernandez, A.

    1998-02-27

    Interference lithography is an emerging, technology that provides a means for achieving high resolution over large exposure areas (approximately 1 m{sup 2}) with virtually unlimited depth of field. One- and two-dimensional arrays of deep submicron structures can be created using near i-line wavelengths and standard resist processing. In this paper, we report on recent advances in the development of this technology, focusing, in particular, on how exposure latitude and resist profile scale with interference period We present structure width vs dose curves for periods ranging from 200 nm to 1 um, demonstrating that deep submicron structures can be generated with exposure latitudes exceeding 30%. Our experimental results are compared to simulations based on PROLITIV2.

  18. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  19. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  20. Miniature electron microscopes for lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, Alan D.; Crewe, David A.; Perng, Dung-Ching; Spindt, Capp A.; Schwoebel, Paul R.; Crewe, Albert V.

    1994-05-01

    Two inexpensive and extremely accurate methods for fabricating miniature 10 - 50 kV and 0.5 - 10 kV electron beam columns have been developed: `slicing,' and `stacking.' Two or three miniature columns could be used to perform a 20 nm or better alignment of an x-ray mask to a substrate. An array of miniature columns could be used for rapid wafer inspection and high throughput electron beam lithography. The column fabrication methods combine the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies to create macroscopic structures consisting of charged particle sources, deflecting and focusing electrodes, and detectors. The overall performance of the miniature column also depends on the emission characteristics of the micromachined electron source which is currently being investigated.

  1. French Immersion Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanaimo School District #68 (British Columbia).

    The Nanaimo (British Columbia) school district's French immersion program is evaluated. An introductory section gives background on the evaluation, outlines the evaluation process used, and offers brief comments on its outcome. The second section describes the immersion program's history and its current status in terms of enrollment, class size,…

  2. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor (ARF) gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si-Bei; OuYang, Wei-Zhi; Hou, Xiao-Jin; Xie, Liang-Liang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologs of ARFs. A total of 19 nonredundant ARF genes (CiARF) were found and validated from the sweet orange. A comprehensive overview of the CiARFs was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and cis-elements in promoters of CiARF. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members during citrus growth and development process. PMID:25870601

  3. Proteobacterial ArfA peptides are synthesized from non-stop messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Poole, Stephen J; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Benbow, Sarah; Hayes, Christopher S

    2012-08-24

    The translation of non-stop mRNA (which lack in-frame stop codons) represents a significant quality control problem for all organisms. In eubacteria, the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) system facilitates recycling of stalled ribosomes from non-stop mRNA in a process termed trans-translation or ribosome rescue. During rescue, the nascent chain is tagged with the tmRNA-encoded ssrA peptide, which promotes polypeptide degradation after release from the stalled ribosome. Escherichia coli possesses an additional ribosome rescue pathway mediated by the ArfA peptide. The E. coli arfA message contains a hairpin structure that is cleaved by RNase III to produce a non-stop transcript. Therefore, ArfA levels are controlled by tmRNA through ssrA-peptide tagging and proteolysis. Here, we examine whether ArfA homologues from other bacteria are also regulated by RNase III and tmRNA. We searched 431 arfA coding sequences for mRNA secondary structures and found that 82.8% of the transcripts contain predicted hairpins in their 3'-coding regions. The arfA hairpins from Haemophilus influenzae, Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio fischeri, and Pasteurella multocida are all cleaved by RNase III as predicted, whereas the hairpin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions as an intrinsic transcription terminator to generate non-stop mRNA. Each ArfA homologue is ssrA-tagged and degraded when expressed in wild-type E. coli cells, but accumulates in mutants lacking tmRNA. Together, these findings show that ArfA synthesis from non-stop mRNA is a conserved mechanism to regulate the alternative ribosome rescue pathway. This strategy ensures that ArfA homologues are only deployed when the tmRNA system is incapacitated or overwhelmed by stalled ribosomes. PMID:22791716

  4. Interaction of serologically defined colon cancer antigen-3 with Arf6 and its predominant expression in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small GTPase that regulates endosomal trafficking and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here, we identified the serologically defined colon antigen-3 (SDCCAG3) as an Arf6-interacting protein by yeast two-hybrid screening with a constitutively active Arf6 mutant. SDCCAG3 interacts specifically with Arf6 among the Arf family members through its 101  C-terminal amino acids. SDCCAG3 is expressed most intensely in the testis at the mRNA and protein levels. In the testis, SDCCAG3 is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids. We also show that full-length SDCCAG3, but not a mutant lacking the ability to interact with Arf6, is recruited to the midbody during cytokinesis when expressed exogenously in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that SDCCAG3 might function in endosomal trafficking downstream of Arf6. PMID:27373827

  5. Design, synthesis, and characterization of fluorine-free PAGs for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sen; Glodde, Martin; Varanasi, Pushkara R.

    2010-04-01

    Photoacid generators (PAGs) are a key component in chemically amplified resists used in photolithography. Perfluorooctanesulfonates (PFOS) and other perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFAS) have been well adopted as PAGs in 193 nm photoresist. Recently, concerns have been raised about their environmental impact due to their chemical persistency, bioaccumulation and toxicity. It is a general interest to find environmentally benign PAGs that are free of fluorine atoms. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of novel fluorine-free onium salts as PAGs for 193 nm photoresists. These PAGs demonstrated desirable physical and lithography properties when compared with PFAS-based PAGs for both dry and immersion exposures.

  6. Arf Induction by Tgfβ Is Influenced by Sp1 and C/ebpβ in Opposing Directions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanbin; Devitt, Caitlin; Liu, Jing; Iqbal, Nida; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that Arf, a bona fide tumor suppressor, also plays an essential role during mouse eye development. Tgfβ is required for Arf promoter activation in developing mouse eyes, and its capacity to induce Arf depends on Smads 2/3 as well as p38 Mapk. Substantial delay between activation of these pathways and increased Arf transcription imply that changes in the binding of additional transcription factors help orchestrate changes in Arf expression. Focusing on proteins with putative DNA binding elements near the mouse Arf transcription start, we now show that Tgfβ induction of this gene correlated with decreased expression and DNA binding of C/ebpβ to the proximal Arf promoter. Ectopic expression of C/ebpβ in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) blocked Arf induction by Tgfβ. Although basal levels of Arf mRNA were increased by C/ebpβ loss in MEFs and in the developing eye, Tgfβ was still able to increase Arf, indicating that derepression was not the sole factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed increased Sp1 binding to the Arf promotor at 24 and 48 hours after Tgfβ treatment, at which time points Arf expression was significantly induced by Tgfβ. Chemical inhibition of Sp1 and its knockdown by RNA interference blocked Arf induction by Tgfβ in MEFs. In summary, our results indicate that C/ebpβ and Sp1 are negative and positive Arf regulators that are influenced by Tgfβ. PMID:23940569

  7. Immersion echelle spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.G.; Thomas, N.L.

    2000-06-20

    A small spectrograph is disclosed containing no moving components and capable of providing high resolution spectra of the mid-infrared region from 2 microns to 4 microns in wavelength. The resolving power of the spectrograph exceeds 20,000 throughout this region and at an optical throughput of about 10{sup {minus}5}cm{sup 2}sr. The spectrograph incorporates a silicon immersion echelle grating operating in high spectral order combined with a first order transmission grating in a cross-dispersing configuration to provide a two-dimensional (2-D) spectral format that is focused onto a two-dimensional infrared detector array. The spectrometer incorporates a common collimating and condensing lens assembly in a near aberration-free axially symmetric design. The spectrometer has wide use potential in addition to general research, such as monitoring atmospheric constituents for air quality, climate change, global warming, as well as monitoring exhaust fumes for smog sources or exhaust plumes for evidence of illicit drug manufacture.

  8. Thermal comfort following immersion.

    PubMed

    Guéritée, Julien; Redortier, Bernard; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Unlike thermal comfort in air, little research has been undertaken exploring thermal comfort around water sports. We investigated the impact of swimming and cooling in air after swimming on thermal comfort. After 10 min of swimming-and-resting cycles in 28°C water, volunteers wearing two types of garments or in swim briefs, faced winds in 24°C air, at rest or when stepping. Thermal comfort was significantly higher during swimming than resting. Post-immersion, following maximum discomfort, in 45 of 65 tests thermal comfort improved although mean skin temperature was still cooling (0.26 [SD 0.19] °C·min(-1) - max was 0.89°C·min(-1)). When thermal comfort was re-established mean skin temperature was lower than at maximal discomfort in 39 of 54 tests (0.81 [SD 0.58] °C - max difference was 2.68°C). The reduction in thermal discomfort in this scenario could be due to the adaptation of thermoreceptors, or to reductions in cooling rates to levels where discomfort was less stimulated. The relief from the recent discomfort may explain why, later, thermal comfort returned to initial levels in spite of poorer thermal profiles. PMID:25485520

  9. Immersed interface methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeVeque, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Bube, K.P.

    1996-11-01

    Cartesian grid methods encompass a wide variety of techniques used to solve partial differential equations in more than one space dimension on uniform Cartesian grids even when the underlying geometry is complex and not aligned with the grid. The authors` groups work on Immersed Interface Methods (IIM) was originally motivated by the desire to understand and improve the ``Immersed Boundary Method``, developed by Charles Peskin to solve incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in complicated geometries with moving elastic boundaries. This report briefly discusses the development of the Immersed Interface Methods and gives examples of application of the method in solving several partial differential equations.

  10. Magnetic nanostructures by colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Frank Qing

    Structural, magnetic and in some cases magneto-transport properties of (1) symmetric and asymmetric ferromagnetic nanorings and (2) single layer, multilayer, and exchange biased ferromagnetic nanodots prepared by colloidal lithography are presented. A fast, reliable and cost effective method has been developed to fabricate large number (˜ 109) of magnetic nanorings over macroscopic areas (˜ cm2) with large areal densities (up to 45 rings/mum 2). Cobalt nanorings with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 500 nm have been fabricated by sputtering Co onto nanosphere-coated substrates followed by ion beam etching. X-ray diffraction verifies that the Co nanorings still have hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the cross-section of the symmetric nanoring is tapered and uniform along the circumference, and the cross-section of the asymmetric nanoring changes progressively along the circumference. Two magnetic reversal processes have been found in magnetic nanorings---the vortex formation process and the onion rotation process. The co-existence of these two processes is the manifestation of the competition between the exchange energy and the magnetostatic energy in the nanorings. Micromagnetics simulations have been carried out to reveal the details of the magnetic reversals. The experimental and the computed hysteresis loops agree both qualitatively and quantitatively. For the 100 nm symmetric Co nanorings, the vortex formation process has a probability of about 40%, while the onion rotation process has 60% chances. To increase the probability of vortex formation process, a desirable process for application, asymmetric nanorings have been fabricated by ion beam etching at oblique angles. Unlike the symmetric nanorings, the probability of the vortex formation process in asymmetric nanorings can be controlled by the direction of the external field. For the 100 nm asymmetric nanorings, the fraction of the vortex formation process