Science.gov

Sample records for argemone mexicana tissues

  1. Effect of Argemone mexicana (L.) against lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus and oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Asuntha, G; Raju, Y Prasanna; Sundaresan, C R; Rasheed, Arun; Chowdary, V Harini; Vandana, K R; Babu, K Satish; Prasad, K V S R G

    2015-01-01

    Argemone mexicana (L.) has a role in the treatment of epileptic disorders in Indian traditional system of medicine. We studied its effect on induced status epilepticus (SE) and oxidative stress in rats. SE was induced in male albino rats by administration of pilocarpine (30 mg/kg, ip) 24 h after injection of lithium chloride (3 mEq/kg, ip). Different doses of the ethanol extract of A. mexicana were administered orally 1 h before the injection of pilocarpine. The severity of SE was observed and recorded every 15 min for 90 min and thereafter at every 30 min for another 90 min, using the Racine scoring system. In vivo lipid peroxidation of rat brain tissue was measured utilizing thiobarbiturate-reactive substances. Both in vitro free radical nitric oxide and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl scavenging activities of the extract were also determined. The SE severity was significantly reduced following oral administration of the extract at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses. None of the animals from groups 3 to 5 (with A. mexicana extract) have exhibited forelimb clonus of stage 4 seizure. The extract also exhibited both in vivo and in vitro antioxidant activities. PMID:25675709

  2. Anxiolytic-like effect of ethanolic extract of Argemone mexicana and its alkaloids in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Arcos-Martínez, Aideé Itzel; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar David; Domínguez-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel; Saavedra-Vélez, Margarita Virginia; Vázquez-Hernández, Maribel; Alcántara-López, María Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Argemone mexicana is a Papaveracea plant; some reports have shown their antibacterial, anti-cancer, sedative and probably anti-anxiety properties. From their aerial parts, flavonoids and alkaloids have been isolated, which are intrinsically related to some actions on the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic-like effects of the plant, using its ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract obtained from fresh leaves. Material and Methods: Phytochemical screening was carried out together with evaluation of antioxidant capacity and the enrichment of alkaloids present in the extract. Subsequently, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses of ethanolic extract and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered to female Wistar rats, which were exposed to elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Picrotoxin (1 mg/kg), a non-competitive gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) chloride channel antagonist, was used in experimental procedures to evaluate if this receptor is involved in the anxiolytic-like effects of A. mexicana. To discard motor effects associated with the treatments, the rats were evaluated by the locomotor activity test. Results: Only the ethanolic extract at 200 mg/kg and alkaloid-enriched extract (200 µg/kg) produced anxiolytic-like effects similarly to diazepam 2 mg/kg on EPM test, without affecting locomotor activity. Meanwhile, the administration of picrotoxin blocked anti-anxiety effect of alkaloid-enriched extract of the plant. Conclusion: These results showed that A. mexicana is a potential anxiolytic agent and we suggest that this effect is mediated by the GABAA receptor. These effects are related to the presence of alkaloids. PMID:27516989

  3. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Hostettmann, Kurt; Haouala, Amina; Cuendet, Muriel; Falquet, Jacques; Graz, Bertrand; Christen, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Classical pharmacology has been the basis for the discovery of new chemical entities with therapeutic effects for decades. In natural product research, compounds are generally tested in vivo only after full in vitro characterization. However drug screening using this methodology is expensive, time-consuming and very often inefficient. Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodiumfalciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant. PMID:25516845

  4. Application of hydrostatic CCC-TLC-HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS for the bioguided fractionation of anticholinesterase alkaloids from Argemone mexicana L. roots.

    PubMed

    Kukula-Koch, Wirginia; Mroczek, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    A rapid hydrostatic counter-current chromatography-thin-layer chromatography-electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CCC-TLC-ESI-TOF-MS) technique was established for use in seeking potent anti-Alzheimer's drugs among the acethylcholinesterase inhibitors in Argemone mexicana L. underground parts, with no need to isolate components in pure form. The dichloromethane extract from the roots of Mexican prickly poppy that was most rich in secondary metabolites was subjected to hydrostatic-CCC-based fractionation in descending mode, using a biphasic system composed of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at the ratio of 1.5:3:2.1:2 (v/v). The obtained fractions were analyzed in a TLC-based AChE-inhibition "Fast Blue B" test. All active components in the fractions, including berberine, protopine, chelerithrine, sanguinarine, coptisine, palmatine, magnoflorine, and galanthamine, were identified in a direct TLC-HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS assay with high accuracy. This is the first time galanthamine has been reported in the extract of Mexican prickly poppy and the first time it has been identified in any member of the Papaveraceae family, in the significant quantity of 0.77%. PMID:25618762

  5. Antioxidant status of erythrocytes and their response to oxidative challenge in humans with argemone oil poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Challagundla K.; Khanna, Subhash K.; Das, Mukul

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative damage of biomolecules and antioxidant status in erythrocytes of humans from an outbreak of argemone oil (AO) poisoning in Kannauj (India) and AO intoxicated experimental animals was investigated. Erythrocytes of the dropsy patients and AO treated rats were found to be more susceptible to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induced peroxidative stress. Significant decrease in RBC glutathione (GSH) levels (46, 63%) with concomitant enhancement in oxidized glutathione (172, 154%) levels was noticed in patients and AO intoxicated animals. Further, depletion of glutathione reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (42-52%) was observed in dropsy patients. Oxidation of erythrocyte membrane lipids and proteins was increased (120-144%) in patients and AO treated animals (112-137%) along with 8-OHdG levels in whole blood (180%) of dropsy patients. A significant reduction in {alpha}-tocopherol content (68%) was noticed in erythrocytes of dropsy patients and hepatic, plasma and RBCs of AO treated rats (59-70%) thereby indicating the diminished antioxidant potential to scavenge free radicals or the limited transport of {alpha}-tocopherol from liver to RBCs leading to enhanced oxidation of lipids and proteins in erythrocytes. These studies implicate an important role of erythrocyte degradation in production of anemia and breathlessness in epidemic dropsy.

  6. Leishmania (L.) mexicana Infected Bats in Mexico: Novel Potential Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel; González-Salazar, Constantino; Stephens, Christopher R.; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea; Marina, Carlos F.; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Bailón-Martínez, Dulce; Balcells, Cristina Domingo; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Becker, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana causes cutaneous leishmaniasis, an endemic zoonosis affecting a growing number of patients in the southeastern states of Mexico. Some foci are found in shade-grown cocoa and coffee plantations, or near perennial forests that provide rich breeding grounds for the sand fly vectors, but also harbor a variety of bat species that live off the abundant fruits provided by these shade-giving trees. The close proximity between sand flies and bats makes their interaction feasible, yet bats infected with Leishmania (L.) mexicana have not been reported. Here we analyzed 420 bats from six states of Mexico that had reported patients with leishmaniasis. Tissues of bats, including skin, heart, liver and/or spleen were screened by PCR for Leishmania (L.) mexicana DNA. We found that 41 bats (9.77%), belonging to 13 species, showed positive PCR results in various tissues. The infected tissues showed no evidence of macroscopic lesions. Of the infected bats, 12 species were frugivorous, insectivorous or nectarivorous, and only one species was sanguivorous (Desmodus rotundus), and most of them belonged to the family Phyllostomidae. The eco-region where most of the infected bats were caught is the Gulf Coastal Plain of Chiapas and Tabasco. Through experimental infections of two Tadarida brasiliensis bats in captivity, we show that this species can harbor viable, infective Leishmania (L.) mexicana parasites that are capable of infecting BALB/c mice. We conclude that various species of bats belonging to the family Phyllostomidae are possible reservoir hosts for Leishmania (L.) mexicana, if it can be shown that such bats are infective for the sand fly vector. Further studies are needed to determine how these bats become infected, how long the parasite remains viable inside these potential hosts and whether they are infective to sand flies to fully evaluate their impact on disease epidemiology. PMID:25629729

  7. Leishmania (L.) mexicana infected bats in Mexico: novel potential reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel; González-Salazar, Constantino; Stephens, Christopher R; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea; Marina, Carlos F; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A; Bailón-Martínez, Dulce; Balcells, Cristina Domingo; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Becker, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana causes cutaneous leishmaniasis, an endemic zoonosis affecting a growing number of patients in the southeastern states of Mexico. Some foci are found in shade-grown cocoa and coffee plantations, or near perennial forests that provide rich breeding grounds for the sand fly vectors, but also harbor a variety of bat species that live off the abundant fruits provided by these shade-giving trees. The close proximity between sand flies and bats makes their interaction feasible, yet bats infected with Leishmania (L.) mexicana have not been reported. Here we analyzed 420 bats from six states of Mexico that had reported patients with leishmaniasis. Tissues of bats, including skin, heart, liver and/or spleen were screened by PCR for Leishmania (L.) mexicana DNA. We found that 41 bats (9.77%), belonging to 13 species, showed positive PCR results in various tissues. The infected tissues showed no evidence of macroscopic lesions. Of the infected bats, 12 species were frugivorous, insectivorous or nectarivorous, and only one species was sanguivorous (Desmodus rotundus), and most of them belonged to the family Phyllostomidae. The eco-region where most of the infected bats were caught is the Gulf Coastal Plain of Chiapas and Tabasco. Through experimental infections of two Tadarida brasiliensis bats in captivity, we show that this species can harbor viable, infective Leishmania (L.) mexicana parasites that are capable of infecting BALB/c mice. We conclude that various species of bats belonging to the family Phyllostomidae are possible reservoir hosts for Leishmania (L.) mexicana, if it can be shown that such bats are infective for the sand fly vector. Further studies are needed to determine how these bats become infected, how long the parasite remains viable inside these potential hosts and whether they are infective to sand flies to fully evaluate their impact on disease epidemiology. PMID:25629729

  8. Leishmania mexicana mexicana: quantitative analysis of the intracellular cycle.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P S; Engel, J C; Gam, A A; Dvorak, J A

    1989-12-01

    The complete intracellular cycle of the Leishmania mexicana mexicana G. S. strain was quantified in human macrophages and in the mouse IC-21 macrophage line utilizing a culture system that allows the direct observation of individual intracellular parasites. A wide range of pre-replicative lag periods exists, implying that promastigotes may be in any phase of their DNA synthetic cycle when phagocytosed by the macrophage. Amastigotes replicated 2-3 times, after which the host cell died and liberated amastigotes that were taken up by other macrophages and continued to replicate. The mean amastigote population-doubling time in human macrophages (17.5 h) was not statistically different from promastigotes growing in axenic culture (16.4 h), but was nearly 2-fold less than amastigotes growing in mouse-derived IC-21 macrophages (33.7 h). These observations are markedly different from cover-glass culture assays of Leishmania-macrophage interactions and provide an unambiguous description of the intracellular cycle of Leishmania mexicana mexicana. PMID:2608309

  9. Immunoregulatory pathways in murine leishmaniasis: different regulatory control during Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major infections.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J; Kaye, P M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole body sublethal gamma irradiation on the subsequent growth of Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major was studied in CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Whereas BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to both parasites developing non healing progressively growing lesions at the site of cutaneous infection, CBA/Ca mice develop small healing cutaneous ulcers following subcutaneous infection with L. major but non healing lesions following subcutaneous infection with L.m. mexicana. Prior whole body sublethal irradiation of CBA/Ca mice, but not BALB/c mice, resulted in strong resistance against infection with L.m. mexicana: no lesions developed at the site of cutaneous infection. Irradiated BALB/c mice did, however, develop small lesions which healed when infected with L. major. The protective effects of irradiation coincided with the development of delayed type hypersensitivity. Both naive and sensitized nylon wool purified lymphocytes could restore susceptibility to L. major in irradiated BALB/c mice but only lymphocytes from long term infected donor mice adoptively transferred a non healing response to irradiated CBA/Ca mice infected with L.m. mexicana. Non-irradiated, L. major infected, CBA/Ca mice, but not similarly treated BALB/c mice, were found to be resistant to subsequent infection with L.m. mexicana. On the other hand, irradiated BALB/c mice infected with L. major were resistant to subsequent infectious challenge with L.m. mexicana. We suggest that the susceptibility of CBA/Ca mice to L.m. mexicana is under the control of an as yet unidentified gene which is not dependent on the generation of T suppressor cells and is bypassed by previous infection with L. major. Therefore, BALB/c mice immunized against L. major by prior sublethal irradiation are also resistant to L.m. mexicana. PMID:3907906

  10. Differences in Lsh gene control over systemic Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani or Leishmania mexicana mexicana infections are caused by differential targeting to infiltrating and resident liver macrophage populations.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E V; Singleton, A M; Blackwell, J M

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that the viscerotropic NIH 173 strain of cutaneous Leishmania major fails to come under Lsh gene control. Visceral Leishmania donovani LV9 and another viscerotropic cutaneous strain, Leishmania mexicana mexicana LV4, are controlled by Lsh. The results of double-infection experiments presented here show that expression of Lsh resistance against L. mexicana mexicana was enhanced in the presence of L. donovani, whereas L. major still failed to come under Lsh gene control, even in the presence of L. donovani. Prior irradiation (850 rads) of mice showed that in the absence of infiltrating monocytes, Lsh did exert some influence over L. major. The presence of a higher infiltrate of fresh monocytes after L. major infection was confirmed in liver macrophage populations isolated from mice after infection in vivo and in liver cryosections immunostained with monoclonal antibody M1/70 directed against the type 3 complement receptor CR3. The results support the hypothesis that Lsh is expressed maximally in the resident tissue macrophages and poorly in the immature macrophages preferentially infected by L. major amastigotes. Images PMID:3356462

  11. Purification, partial characterization and immunolocalization of a proteophosphoglycan secreted by Leishmania mexicana amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Stierhof, Y D; McConville, M J; Overath, P

    1995-02-01

    The intracellular amastigote form of the parasitic protozoon Leishmania mexicana expresses a high-molecular weight phosphoglycan, which is antigenically related to the surface glycolipid lipophosphoglycan and the secreted enzyme acid phosphatase of Leishmania promastigotes. This antigen was purified from a cell-free homogenate of infected mouse tissue and from amastigotes. Compositional and immunological analysis of the purified components indicate a proteophosphoglycan structure consisting of serine-rich polypeptide chains and mild acid-labile phosphooligosaccharides capped by mannooligosaccharides. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy of parasitized mouse peritoneal macrophages and infected mouse tissue suggest that the proteophosphoglycan is secreted in large amounts by amastigotes via their flagellar pockets into the parasitophorous vacuoles of host cells. In some infected macrophages proteophosphoglycan is also located in vesicles apparently originating from the parasitophorous vacuole, which demonstrates redistribution of a secreted amastigote antigen in parasitized host cells. PMID:7774606

  12. The histopathology of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Medina-Peralta, Salvador; Vargas-Gonzalez, Alberto; Canto-Lara, Silvia B; Estrada-Parra, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (LCL) known as "chiclero's ulcer" in southeast Mexico, was described by SEIDELIN in 1912. Since then the sylvatic region of the Yucatan peninsula has been documented as an endemic focus of LCL. This study of 73 biopsies from parasitological confirmed lesions of LCL cases of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana infection was undertaken: 1) to examine host response at tissue level; and 2) to relate manifestations of this response to some characteristics of clinical presentation. Based on Magalhães' classification we found that the most common pattern in our LCL cases caused by L. (L.) mexicana was predominantly characterized by the presence of unorganized granuloma without necrosis, (43.8%). Another important finding to be highlighted is the fact that in 50/73 (68.5%) parasite identification was positive. There was direct relation between the size of the lesion and time of evolution (rs = 0.3079, p = 0.03), and inverse correlation between size of the lesion and abundance of amastigotes (rs = -0.2467, p = 0.03). In view of the complexity of clinical and histopathological findings, cell-mediated immune response of the disease related to clinical and histopathological features, as so genetic background should be studied. PMID:16138198

  13. Photoacoustic monitoring of life cycles of Leishmania Mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, C.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Vargas, H.

    1999-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is used to monitor in situ, the difference between the two forms of the protozoan Leishmania Mexicana. Differences are the result of changes in the respiratory chain and could be attributed, according to our results, to the presence of cytochrome b in promastigotes and cytochrome c in amastigotes.

  14. Disease Severity in Patients Infected with Leishmania mexicana Relates to IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Figueroa, Edith A.; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Espinosa-Mateos, Valeria; Carrillo-Sánchez, Karol; Salaiza-Suazo, Norma; Carrada-Figueroa, Georgina; March-Mifsut, Santiago; Becker, Ingeborg

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania mexicana can cause both localized (LCL) and diffuse (DCL) cutaneous leishmaniasis, yet little is known about factors regulating disease severity in these patients. We analyzed if the disease was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL-1β (−511), CXCL8 (−251) and/or the inhibitor IL-1RA (+2018) in 58 Mexican mestizo patients with LCL, 6 with DCL and 123 control cases. Additionally, we analyzed the in vitro production of IL-1β by monocytes, the expression of this cytokine in sera of these patients, as well as the tissue distribution of IL-1β and the number of parasites in lesions of LCL and DCL patients. Our results show a significant difference in the distribution of IL-1β (−511 C/T) genotypes between patients and controls (heterozygous OR), with respect to the reference group CC, which was estimated with a value of 3.23, 95% CI = (1.2, 8.7) and p-value = 0.0167), indicating that IL-1β (−511 C/T) represents a variable influencing the risk to develop the disease in patients infected with Leishmania mexicana. Additionally, an increased in vitro production of IL-1β by monocytes and an increased serum expression of the cytokine correlated with the severity of the disease, since it was significantly higher in DCL patients heavily infected with Leishmania mexicana. The distribution of IL-1β in lesions also varied according to the number of parasites harbored in the tissues: in heavily infected LCL patients and in all DCL patients, the cytokine was scattered diffusely throughout the lesion. In contrast, in LCL patients with lower numbers of parasites in the lesions, IL-1β was confined to the cells. These data suggest that IL-1β possibly is a key player determining the severity of the disease in DCL patients. The analysis of polymorphisms in CXCL8 and IL-1RA showed no differences between patients with different disease severities or between patients and controls. PMID:22629474

  15. Pentalinon andrieuxii root extract is effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Lezama-Dávila, Claudio M.; Pan, Li; Isaac-Márquez, Angelica P.; Terrazas, Cesar; Oghumu, Steve; Isaac-Márquez, Ricardo; Pech-Dzib, MY; Barbi, Joseph; Calomeni, Edward; Parinandi, Narasimham; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) manifests as localized skin lesions, which lead to significant tissue destruction and disfigurement. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mayan traditional healers use Pentalinon andrieuxii Muell.-Arg. (Apocynaceae) roots for the topical treatment of CL. Here, we studied the effect of P. andrieuxii root hexane extract (PARE) on the parasites and host cells in vitro and examined its efficacy in the topical treatment of CL caused by L. mexicana. PARE exhibited potent antiparasitic activity in vitro against promastigotes as well as amastigotes residing in macrophages. Electron microscopy of PARE-treated parasites revealed direct membrane damage. PARE also activated NF-κB and enhanced IFN-γR and MHC class II expression and TNF-α production in macrophages. In addition, PARE induced production of the Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12 in dendritic cells as well as enhanced expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86. In vivo studies showed that L. mexicana-infected mice treated by topical application of PARE resulted in the significant reduction in lesion size and parasite burden compared to controls. These findings indicate that PARE could be used as an alternative therapy for the topical treatment of CL. PMID:24347110

  16. Pentalinon andrieuxii root extract is effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Lezama-Dávila, Claudio M; Pan, Li; Isaac-Márquez, Angelica P; Terrazas, Cesar; Oghumu, Steve; Isaac-Márquez, Ricardo; Pech-Dzib, M Y; Barbi, Joseph; Calomeni, Edward; Parinandi, Narasimham; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) manifests as localized skin lesions, which lead to significant tissue destruction and disfigurement. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mayan traditional healers use Pentalinon andrieuxii Muell.-Arg. (Apocynaceae) roots for the topical treatment of CL. Here, we studied the effect of P. andrieuxii root hexane extract (PARE) on the parasites and host cells in vitro and examined its efficacy in the topical treatment of CL caused by Leishmania mexicana. PARE exhibited potent antiparasitic activity in vitro against promastigotes as well as amastigotes residing in macrophages. Electron microscopy of PARE-treated parasites revealed direct membrane damage. PARE also activated nuclear factor kappaB and enhanced interferon-γ receptor and MHC class II expression and TNF-α production in macrophages. In addition, PARE induced production of the Th1 promoting cytokine IL-12 in dendritic cells as well as enhanced expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86. In vivo studies showed that L. mexicana-infected mice treated by topical application of PARE resulted in the significant reduction in lesion size and parasite burden compared to controls. These findings indicate that PARE could be used as an alternative therapy for the topical treatment of CL. PMID:24347110

  17. Natural Sesquiterpene Lactones Induce Oxidative Stress in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Patricia; Sülsen, Valeria P.; Lozano, Esteban; Rivera, Mónica; Beer, María Florencia; Tonn, Carlos; Martino, Virginia S.; Sosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, caused by monoflagellate parasites of the genus Leishmania. In the search for more effective agents against these parasites, the identification of molecular targets has been attempted to ensure the efficiency of drugs and to avoid collateral damages on the host's cells. In this work, we have investigated some of the mechanisms of action of a group of natural sesquiterpene lactones that are effective against Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes. We first observed that the antiproliferative effect of mexicanin I (Mxc), dehydroleucodine (DhL), psilostachyin (Psi), and, at lesser extent, psilostachyin C (Psi C) is blocked by 1.5 mM reduced glutathione. The reducing agent was also able to reverse the early effect of the compounds, suggesting that lactones may react with intracellular sulfhydryl groups. Moreover, we have shown that all the sesquiterpene lactones, except Psi C, significantly decreased the endogenous concentration of glutathione within the parasite. Consistent with these findings, the active sesquiterpene lactones increased between 2.7 and 5.4 times the generation of ROS by parasites. These results indicate that the induction of oxidative stress is at least one of the mechanisms of action of DhL, Mxc, and Psi on parasites while Psi C would act by another mechanism. PMID:23861697

  18. Immunogenicity of a Salmonella typhi CVD 908 candidate vaccine strain expressing the major surface protein gp63 of Leishmania mexicana mexicana.

    PubMed

    González, C R; Noriega, F R; Huerta, S; Santiago, A; Vega, M; Paniagua, J; Ortiz-Navarrete, V; Isibasi, A; Levine, M M

    1998-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhi are attractive for use as live vector vaccines to express protozoal antigens and deliver them to the human immune system. The gene encoding the mature form of Leishmania mexicana mexicana gp63 under control of tac promoter was integrated into the delta aroC locus of the chromosome of attenuated delta aroC, delta aroD S. typhi strain CVD 908. After oral immunization of BALB/c mice with two 1 x 10(9) colony forming unit doses given 21 days apart, CVD 908 omega (delta aroC::Ptac-gp63) elicited a broad T cell-mediated immune response against L. m. mexicana gp63 as demonstrated by: (1) lymphoproliferative response to fixed whole L. m. mexicana promastigotes; (2) activation of IL-2 (but not IL-4)-producing lymphocytes; (3) appearance of cytotoxic T cells against mouse mastocytoma cells expressing gp63. This T-cell mediated immune response was associated with significant protection in F1 (BALB/cXC57Bl/6) mice challenged in their footpads with a wild type strain of L. m. mexicana. PMID:9682357

  19. BIOADHESION IN CAULERPA MEXICANA (CHLOROPHYTA): RHIZOID-SUBSTRATE ADHESION(1).

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Wayne R; Towle, Jennifer; Dawes, Clinton J; Böttger, Anne

    2012-04-01

    The attachment of the psammophytic alga Caulerpa mexicana Sond. ex Kütz., a coenocytic green alga, to crushed CaCO3 particles was examined utilizing the scanning electron microscope and fluorescently tagged antivitronectin antibodies. Plants attached to the substrate through morphologically variable tubular rhizoidal extensions that grew from the stolon. In this study, we describe two means of attachment: (i) the rhizoid attachment to limestone gravel by thigmoconstriction, where tubular extensions of the rhizoid wrapped tightly around the substrate and changed morphology to fit tightly into crevices in the limestone, and (ii) through adhesion pads that formed in contact with the limestone granules. Flattened rhizoidal pads were observed to secrete a fibrillar material that contained vitronectin-like proteins identified through immunolocialization and that facilitated binding of the rhizoid to the substrate. PMID:27009715

  20. Genetic characterization of glucose transporter function in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; McBride, Kathleen; Barrett, Michael P.; Modi, Govind; Sacks, David; Landfear, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    Both insect and mammalian life cycle stages of Leishmania mexicana take up glucose and express all three isoforms encoded by the LmGT glucose transporter gene family. To evaluate glucose transporter function in intact parasites, a null mutant line has been created by targeted disruption of the LmGT locus that encompasses the LmGT1, LmGT2, and LmGT3 genes. This Δlmgt null mutant exhibited no detectable glucose transport activity. The growth rate of the Δlmgt knockout in the promastigote stage was reduced to a rate comparable with that of WT cells grown in the absence of glucose. Δlmgt cells also exhibited dramatically reduced infectivity to macrophages, demonstrating that expression of LmGT isoforms is essential for viability of amastigotes. Furthermore, WT L. mexicana were not able to grow as axenic culture form amastigotes if glucose was withdrawn from the medium, implying that glucose is an essential nutrient in this life cycle stage. Expression of either LmGT2 or LmGT3, but not of LmGT1, in Δlmgt null mutants significantly restored growth as promastigotes, but only LmGT3 expression substantially rescued amastigote growth in macrophages. Subcellular localization of the three isoforms was investigated in Δlmgt cells expressing individual LmGT isoforms. Using anti-LmGT antiserum and GFP-tagged LmGT fusion proteins, LmGT2 and LmGT3 were localized to the cell body, whereas LmGT1 was localized specifically to the flagellum. These results establish that each glucose transporter isoform has distinct biological functions in the parasite. PMID:12651954

  1. Localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (chiclero's ulcer) in Mexico: sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for IgG antibodies to Leishmania mexicana mexicana.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Miss, M R; Andrade-Narvaez, F J; Esquivel-Viñas, R E; Simmonds-Diaz, E B; Canto-Lara, S B; Cruz-Ruiz, A L

    1990-01-01

    Sera from 223 human beings were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin G antibodies to Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes. 76% of 74 sera from patients with chiclero's ulcer gave positive reactions at a titre of 1:40; the positivity rate was lower in patients with long-standing infections. False positive reactions were obtained with only 7% of 56 sera from healthy individuals with positive Montenegro tests and with 6 of 7 sera from patients with Chagas disease. It is concluded that this method would be a useful contributory diagnostic method in cases of suspected chiclero's ulcer. PMID:2124389

  2. Lipophosphoglycan is not required for infection of macrophages or mice by Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Cell surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is commonly regarded as a multifunctional Leishmania virulence factor required for survival and development of these parasites in mammals. In this study, the LPG biosynthesis gene lpg1 was deleted in Leishmania mexicana by targeted gene replacement. The resulting mutants are deficient in LPG synthesis but still display on their surface and secrete phosphoglycan-modified molecules, most likely in the form of proteophosphoglycans, whose expression appears to be up-regulated. LPG-deficient L.mexicana promastigotes show no significant differences to LPG-expressing parasites with respect to attachment to, uptake into and multiplication inside macrophages. Moreover, in Balb/c and C57/BL6 mice, LPG-deficient L.mexicana clones are at least as virulent as the parental wild-type strain and lead to lethal disseminated disease. The results demonstrate that at least L.mexicana does not require LPG for experimental infections of macrophages or mice. Leishmania mexicana LPG is therefore not a virulence factor in the mammalian host. PMID:10790362

  3. Lipophosphoglycan is not required for infection of macrophages or mice by Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T

    2000-05-01

    Cell surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is commonly regarded as a multifunctional Leishmania virulence factor required for survival and development of these parasites in mammals. In this study, the LPG biosynthesis gene lpg1 was deleted in Leishmania mexicana by targeted gene replacement. The resulting mutants are deficient in LPG synthesis but still display on their surface and secrete phosphoglycan-modified molecules, most likely in the form of proteophosphoglycans, whose expression appears to be up-regulated. LPG-deficient L.mexicana promastigotes show no significant differences to LPG-expressing parasites with respect to attachment to, uptake into and multiplication inside macrophages. Moreover, in Balb/c and C57/BL6 mice, LPG-deficient L.mexicana clones are at least as virulent as the parental wild-type strain and lead to lethal disseminated disease. The results demonstrate that at least L. mexicana does not require LPG for experimental infections of macrophages or mice. Leishmania mexicana LPG is therefore not a virulence factor in the mammalian host. PMID:10790362

  4. The Mexican Seismic Network (Red Sísmica Mexicana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.; Arreola-Manzano, J.; Castelan-Pescina, G.; Alonso-Rivera, P.; Saldivar-Rangel, M. A.; Rodriguez-Arteaga, O. O.; Lopez-Lena-Villasana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexican Seismic Network (Red Sísmica Mexicana) was created to give sufficient information and opportune to make decisions in order to mitigate seismic and tsunami risk. This was a Mexican government initiative headed by CENAPRED (National Disaster Prevention Center) who made an effort to integrated academic institutions and civil agencies to work together through a collaboration agreement. This network is supported by Universidad National Autónoma de México (UNAM) and its seismic networks (Broad Band and Strong Motion), the Centro de Instrumentación y Registro Sismico (CIRES) with its Earthquake Early Warning System that covers the Guerrero Gap and Oaxaca earthquakes, The Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE) with the support of its expertise in tsunami observation and the Secretaria de Marina (SEMAR) to monitor the sea level and operate the Mexican Tsunami Warning Center. The institutions involved in this scope have the compromise to interchange and share the data and advice to the Civil Protection authorities.

  5. Glycosomal membrane proteins and lipids from Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Wilfredo; Cáceres, Ana J; Ruiz, Maria Tibisay; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2015-04-01

    Constituents of the glycosomal membrane from Leishmania mexicana should play a critical role in the coordination of metabolic processes occurring in the cytosol and those compartmentalized within glycosomes. We have made an inventory of glycosomal membrane-associated proteins using approaches specific for enriching both integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Surprisingly, 70% of the proteins were recovered in the hydrophobic fraction of membranes solubilized with Triton X-114, while 20% were present in the soluble fraction obtained upon treatment with Na2CO3. 14 major polypeptides, ranging in molecular weight from 65 to 16 kDa, were found to be associated with the membrane, nine of them behaving as integral membrane proteins. Assessment of their topology in the membrane indicated that the polypeptides of 56, 50, 46 and 32 kDa have no domains exposed to the cytosol. The 50 kDa protein is the most abundant one of the glycosomal membrane, where it is peripherically located at the matrix face. The major phospholipids of glycosomal membranes are phosphatidyl-ethanolamine, phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-serine, with smaller proportions of sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl-inositol. The sterols found were of 5-dehydroepisterol, ergosta-5,7,24(24(1))-trien-3β-ol, and also their precursors, consistent with the notion that these organelles are involved in de novo biosynthesis of sterols in trypanosomatids. PMID:25499533

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds isolated from the flowers of Nymphaea mexicana Zucc.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Lin; Fang, Song-Chwan; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2013-08-01

    Nymphaea mexicana Zucc. is an aquatic plant species which belongs to the family Nymphaea and is commonly known as the yellow water lily. The aim of this work was to study the in vitro antiinflammatory effects of phenolic compounds isolated from the flowers of Nymphaea mexicana Zucc. Seven phenolic compounds including vanillic acid, 4-methoxy-3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, (2R,3R)-3,7-dihydroxyflavanone, naringenin (4), kaempferol 3-O-(3-O-acetyl-a-L-rhamnopyranoside), kaempferol 3-O-(2-O-acetyl-a-L-rhamnopyranoside), and quercetin 3-(30 0-acetylrhamnoside) (7) were isolated from the flowers of Nymphaea mexicana Zucc. These results revealed that compound 4 has the most prominent inhibitory effect on the LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, compound 4 also inhibited LPS-mediated induction of protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and phospho-ERK in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, compound 4 from the flowers of Nymphaea mexicana Zucc. may provide a potential therapeutic approach for inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:23727892

  7. "La Hermandad" and Chicanas Organizing: The Community Rhetoric of the "Comision Femenil Mexicana Nacional" Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Kendall Marie

    2013-01-01

    To address the need for situated accounts of community rhetoric, this article examines the legacy of the first Chicana feminist organization, the "Comision Femenil Mexicana Nacional (CFMN)." The CFMN and their archival collection provide[d] Chicanas an education about how to interpret, be and act in the world. To invent a rhetorical…

  8. Counterstories of College Persistence by Undocumented Mexicana Students: Navigating Race, Class, Gender, and Legal Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Susana Maria; Maldonado, Marta Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws from four sets of four in-depth interviews and one subsequent focus group to examine how undocumented Mexicana students navigate identities and the meanings of race, gender, class, and legal status. We mobilize a critical race theory framework to center and explore the content of students' counterstories. While majoritarian…

  9. The california poppy (eschscholtzia mexicana) as a copper indicator plant - a new example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Gale, C.W., III

    1976-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of the California poppy (Eschscholtzia mexicana) correlates closely with the copper-rich outcrop of a small porphyry-type deposit in Arizona. Chemical factors are probably more important than physical factors in determining why this species is sometimes found as a copper indicator plant. ?? 1976.

  10. Phosphoglycan repeat-deficient Leishmania mexicana parasites remain infectious to macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Demar, M; Harbecke, D

    2001-02-16

    The human pathogen Leishmania synthesizes phosphoglycans (PGs) formed by variably modified phosphodisaccharide [6-Galbeta1-4Manalpha1-PO(4)] repeats and mannooligosaccharide phosphate [(Manalpha1-2)(0-5)Manalpha1-PO(4)] caps that occur lipid-bound on lipophosphoglycan, protein-bound on proteophosphoglycans, and as an unlinked form. PG repeat synthesis has been described as essential for survival and development of Leishmania throughout their life cycle, including for virulence to the mammalian host. In this study, this proposal was investigated in Leishmania mexicana using a spontaneous mutant that was fortuitously isolated from an infected mouse, and by generating a lmexlpg2 gene deletion mutant (Deltalmexlpg2), that lacks a Golgi GDP-Man transporter. The spontaneous mutant lacks PG repeats but synthesizes normal levels of mannooligosaccharide phosphate caps, whereas the Deltalmexlpg2 mutant is deficient in PG repeat synthesis and down-regulates cap expression. In contrast to expectations, both L. mexicana mutants not only retain their ability to bind to macrophages, but are also indistinguishable from wild type parasites with respect to colonization of and multiplication within host cells. Moreover, in mouse infection studies, the spontaneous L. mexicana repeat-deficient mutant and the Deltalmexlpg2 mutant showed no significant difference to a wild type strain with respect to the severity of disease caused by these parasites. Therefore, at least in Leishmania mexicana, PG repeat synthesis is not an absolute requirement for virulence. PMID:11071892

  11. Differential phagocytosis of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes by monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Argueta-Donohué, Jesús; Wilkins-Rodríguez, Arturo A; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, Laila

    2016-06-01

    Leishmania species are dimorphic protozoan parasites that live and replicate in the gut of sand flies as promastigotes or in mammalian hosts as amastigotes. Different immune cells, including DCs, and receptors differ in their involvement in phagocytosis of promastigotes and amastigotes and in recognition of different Leishmania species. In the case of L. mexicana, differences in phagocytosis of promastigotes and amastigotes by DCs and participation of C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) have not been established. In the present study, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy were used to investigate the phagocytosis by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes in the presence or absence of immune serum during various periods of time. Blocking antibodies against mannose receptors and DC-SIGN were used to explore the participation of these receptors in the phagocytosis of L. mexicana by moDC. The major differences in interactions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes with moDC were found to occur within the first 3 hr, during which phagocytosis of promastigotes predominated as compared with opsonization of promastigotes and amastigotes. However, after 6 hr of incubation, opsonized promastigotes were preferentially phagocytosed as compared with unopsonized promastigotes and amastigotes and after 24 hr of incubation there were no differences in the phagocytosis of promastigotes and amastigotes. Finally, after 3 hr incubation, DC-SIGN was involved in the phagocytosis of promastigotes, but not of amastigotes. PMID:26399218

  12. β-Adrenergic blockade protects BALB/c mice against infection with a small inoculum of Leishmania mexicana mexicana (LV4).

    PubMed

    García-Miss, María del R; Mut-Martín, Mirza C; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2015-01-01

    In order to test the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on Leishmania mexicana infection, groups of female BALB/c mice were treated (i.p.) with the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonist (S)-propranolol (5mg/kg thrice a day), the β2-AR agonist clenbuterol (1mg/kg once a day) or the α2-AR antagonist yohimbine (2mg/kg twice a day) during 5days. During the second day of treatments, mice were inoculated in the footpad with 1×10(6) or 1×10(3) metacyclic promastigotes of L. mexicana mexicana (LV4). The lesion size was measured weekly, and parasite burden on week 12. In mice treated with (S)-propranolol, the percentage of splenic T lymphocytes producing IFN-γ after antigen challenge was determined by flow cytometry. In mice infected with 1×10(6) parasites, only (S)-propranolol caused a reduction of footpad swelling (p<0.05, weeks 11-12), without effects on parasite burden, or in the percentage of IFN-γ-immunopositive CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes. In mice infected with 1×10(3) parasites, the effects of treatments vs. control group were as follows: (a) inhibition of footpad swelling by (S)-propranolol (p<0.01, weeks 3-12), clenbuterol (p<0.05, weeks 7-10), and yohimbine (p<0.01, week 7); (b) a decrease of the parasite burden by (S)-propranolol (p<0.01) and yohimbine (p<0.05); (c) in control mice the percentage of CD4(+) T-cells producing IFN-γ was 6.2±0.5%, while in those treated with (S)-propranolol it increased to 8.7±0.6% (p<0.01); (d) in control mice the percentage of CD8(+) T-cells producing IFN-γ was 3.1±0.4%, while in those treated with (S)-propranolol it increased to 10.4±0.2% (p<0.01). These results indicate that the blockade of β-ARs during infection of BALB/c mice with an inoculum of L. mexicana mexicana similar to that delivered by the bite of a sand fly produces a Th1 bias in the immune response, favoring an increment of T lymphocytes secreting IFN-γ, which correlated with a reduced parasite burden (p<0.05, Spearman

  13. Recurrence of Mexican long-tongued bats (Choeronycteris mexicana) at historical sites in Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cryan, P.M.; Bogan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mexican long-tongued bat (Choeronycteris mexicana) is 1 of 3 migratory, nectarivorous bats that seasonally occur in the extreme southwestern United States (US); the other 2 species are Leptonycteris curasoae and L. nivalis. Unlike the species of Leptonycteris, C. mexicana is not known to form large maternity colonies and is rarely encountered in groups of more than 12 individuals (Hoffmeister 1986). Possibly because of a propensity to form small roosting groups, the number of C. mexicana historically encountered is relatively low compared to other bat species. Although the range of C. mexicana extends from the southwestern United States into Honduras, less than 1500 individuals have been documented since its discovery in 1844 (Petryszyn and Cockrum In Press). Roosting and habitat needs of C. mexicana are poorly understood and it is unclear how such requirements might influence the apparent scarcity of these bats. Choeronycteris mexicana is known to roost in a variety of situations, typically in shallow caves or near the entrances of more extensive structures (Arroyo-Cabrales et al. 1987). Roost sites have been reported from various vegetation zones, including tropical deciduous forests at southern latitudes (Davis and Russell 1954), but roosts are frequently found in oak-conifer woodlands in the northern part of its range (Hoffmeister 1986). Mexican long-tongued bats are known to feed on nectar, pollen, or fruit of various flowering plants throughout their range (Gardner 1977). Although mutualistic relationships likely exist between C. mexicana and its food plants, very little is known about the role that this species plays as a pollinator or seed disperser of such plants. The identification and elucidation of mutualistic relationships are necessary steps toward effectively conserving ecosystems in the southwestern US (Allen-Wardell et al. 1998). Given the potential importance of C. mexicana as a pollinator and its apparent scarcity in the southwest US, current

  14. Molecular diagnosis of Leishmania mexicana in a cutaneous leishmaniasis case in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Diaz, Yssete O; Lopez-Moreno, Carmina Y; Rendon-Maldonado, Jose G; Lopez-Moreno, Hector S

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis has been considered endemic in Sinaloa, Mexico, since 1994. Despite that Leishmania mexicana is the main etiological agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in other regions of Mexico, the species causing CL in patients from Sinaloa state has not been previously established, although Leishmania braziliensis has been found in the neighboring southern state, Nayarit. L. braziliensis is also associated with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, which is a more complicated clinical variant. Due to the implications on individual and public health, the objective of this report was to identify the Leishmania species present in Sinaloa, Mexico. Using the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, we identified L. mexicana in a CL patient from Sinaloa and confirmed the extended distribution of this parasite in Mexico. PMID:21923263

  15. Spectroscopic study of antileishmanial drug incubated in the promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.; Castillo, J.; Jiménez, G.; Hasegawa, M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2003-11-01

    In this work we present spectroscopic study of Boldine (aporphine alkaloid) that possesses important biological activities, in particular, in interaction with the promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. The results show the applicability of autofluorescence of this drug to determinate the possible mechanism of its biological action. The blue shift and hyperchromic effect in the emission spectrum of the drug in interaction with the parasite cells indicate an energy transference process between them. The morphological change of cell shape of the promastigotes treated with the drug is observed using confocal microscopy. This morphological cell-shape transformation evidences an important interaction between the drug studied and some protein of the parasite cell. Here we describe for the first time the fluorescence properties of the Boldine in the promastigotes of L. mexicana.

  16. Past, Present and Future: Forty Years of Revista Mexicana de Astronomia y Astrofisica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine; Torres-Peimbert, Silvia

    2015-08-01

    We cast a retrospective view on 40 years of publishing the Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica, founded in 1974. The journal is peer-reviewed, has appeared regularly since its foundation, and continues to attract original research papers, mostly by Mexican and Latin American authors. We share some musings about the future of our journal, in view of recent developments in the scientific publishing field.

  17. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of essential oil of Chrysactinia mexicana gray.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Ortega, Norma C; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel A; Aguirre-Rivera, J Rogelio; Pérez-González, Cuauhtémoc; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud

    2005-06-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of Chysactinia mexicana was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seventeen compounds were characterized; eucalyptol (41.3%), piperitone (37.7%), and linalyl acetate (9.1%) were found as the major components. The essential oil of leaves and piperitone completely inhibited Aspergillus flavus growth at relatively low concentrations (1.25 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively). PMID:15913293

  18. Mg/Ca temperature calibration for the benthic foraminifers Bulimina inflata and Bulimina mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, Patrick; Rosenthal, Yair; Jorissen, Frans; Holbourn, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Bulimina inflata Seguenza 1862 and Bulimina mexicana Cushman 1922 are cosmopolitan, shallow infaunal benthic foraminifers which are common in the fossil record throughout the Neogene and Quaternary. The closely related species share a similar costate shell morphology that differs in the presence or absence of an apical spine. In the present study, we evaluate the temperature dependency of Mg/Ca ratios of these species from an extensive set of core-top samples from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The results show no significant offset in Mg/Ca values between B. inflata, B. mexicana, and two other costate morphospecies when present in the same sample. The apparent lack of significant inter-specific/inter-morphotype differences amongst the analysed costate buliminds allows for the combined use of their data-sets for our core-top calibration. Over a bottom-water temperature range of 3-14°C, the Bulimina inflata/mexicana group shows a sensitivity of ˜0.12 mmol/mol/°C which is comparable to the epifaunal Cibicidoides pachyderma and higher than for the shallow infaunal Uvigerina spp., the most commonly used taxa in Mg/Ca-based palaeotemperature reconstruction. B. inflata and B. mexicana might thus be a valuable alternative in mesotrophic settings where many of the commonly used species are diminished or absent, and particularly useful in hypoxic settings where costate buliminds may dominate foraminiferal assemblages. This study was financially supported by the Max-Kade-Foundation and contributes to project P25831-N29 of the Austrian Science Fund (FWF).

  19. Nitric oxide production by Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia) infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Villanueva-Lizama, Liliana Estefanía; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Canto-Lara, Silvia Beatriz; Batún-Cutz, José Luis; Andrade-Narváez, Fernando José

    2013-01-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is a primary reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Nitric oxide (NO) generally plays a crucial role in the containment and elimination of Leishmania. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of NO produced by P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Subclinical and clinical infections were established in P. yucatanicus through inoculation with 1 x 102 and 2.5 x 106 promastigotes, respectively. Peritoneal macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with lymphocytes with or without soluble Leishmania antigen. The level of NO production was determined using the Griess reaction. The amount of NO produced was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.0001) in co-cultured macrophages and lymphocytes than in macrophages cultured alone. No differences in NO production were found between P. yucatanicus with subclinical L. (L.) mexicana infections and animals with clinical infections. These results support the hypothesis that the immunological mechanisms of NO production in P. yucatanicus are similar to those described in mouse models of leishmaniasis and, despite NO production, P. yucatanicus is unable to clear the parasite infection. PMID:23579796

  20. Variation and Genetic Structure in Platanus mexicana (Platanaceae) along Riparian Altitudinal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Hernández, Dulce M.; Lozada-García, J. Armando; Flores-Estévez, Norma; Galindo-González, Jorge; Vázquez-Torres, S. Mario

    2015-01-01

    Platanus mexicana is a dominant arboreal species of riparian ecosystems. These ecosystems are associated with altitudinal gradients that can generate genetic differences in the species, especially in the extremes of the distribution. However, studies on the altitudinal effect on genetic variation to riparian species are scarce. In Mexico, the population of P. mexicana along the Colipa River (Veracruz State) grows below its reported minimum altitude range, possibly the lowest where this tree grows. This suggests that altitude might be an important factor in population genetics differentiation. We examined the genetic variation and population structuring at four sites with different altitudes (70, 200, 600 and 1700 m a.s.l.) using ten inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. The highest value for Shannon index and Nei’s gene diversity was obtained at 1700 m a.s.l. (He = 0.27, Ne = 1.47, I = 0.42) and polymorphism reached the top value at the middle altitude (% p = 88.57). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and STRUCTURE analysis indicated intrapopulation genetic differentiation. The arithmetic average (UPGMA) dendrogram identified 70 m a.s.l. as the most genetically distant site. The genetic structuring resulted from limited gene flow and genetic drift. This is the first report of genetic variation in populations of P. mexicana in Mexico. This research highlights its importance as a dominant species, and its ecological and evolutionary implications in altitudinal gradients of riparian ecosystems. PMID:25607732

  1. Transplacental Transmission of Cutaneous Leishmania mexicana Strain in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Avila-García, Miroslava; Mancilla-Ramírez, Javier; Segura-Cervantes, Enrique; Farfan-Labonne, Blanca; Ramírez-Ramírez, Alicia; Galindo-Sevilla, Norma

    2013-01-01

    The vertical transmission of leishmaniasis has been reported in species that cause visceral leishmaniasis. However, this condition has scarcely been documented in species that cause cutaneous leishmaniasis. The aim of this study was to determine experimentally whether L. mexicana is transmitted vertically. A control group of BALB/c mice and a group infected with L. mexicana were mated, the gestation was monitored, and females were killed before delivery. Four resorptions (P = 0.023) and eight fetal deaths (P = 0.010) were observed in the infected female group; furthermore, the offspring body weight of the infected group was lower than the body weight of the healthy group (P = 0.009). DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed that all placentas and maternal spleens as well as 39 of 110 fetal spleens obtained from the offspring of infected mothers tested positive for Leishmania. In conclusion, L. mexicana is transmitted transplacentally and causes fetal death, resorption, and reduction in offspring body weight. PMID:23798582

  2. Effect of neonatal injection with antibodies to Leishmania mexicana on its growth in adult infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M

    1988-01-01

    Mice inoculated with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) directed to Leishmania mexicana antigens were not protected from growth of a subsequent challenge infection; this was the case even when those antibodies were capable of inhibiting parasite growth in vitro. However F(ab')2 fragments of one antibody (1E1) were protective in vivo. When neonatal mice were injected with MAb and subsequently infected as adults, the animals were more susceptible to parasite growth than uninjected controls. This increased susceptibility could be adoptively transferred with Lyt-1+ cells. Separate groups of animals were immunized with different MAb to L. mexicana, and parasite growth in these animals was studied. In no case was parasite growth altered, though these mice did produce specific antibodies directed against the immunizing MAb (anti-idiotypic antibodies). When neonatal mice were injected with these latter reagents, they were found to be more resistant to challenge infection than control animals. This resistance was associated with an enhanced ability of spleen cells from these mice to produce, on stimulation with parasite antigens in vitro, a factor rendering normal macrophages cytocidal for L. mexicana. PMID:2965682

  3. Cysteine Peptidase B Regulates Leishmania mexicana Virulence through the Modulation of GP63 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Casgrain, Pierre-André; Martel, Caroline; McMaster, W. Robert; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Olivier, Martin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases play a central role in the biology of Leishmania. In this work, we sought to further elucidate the mechanism(s) by which the cysteine peptidase CPB contributes to L. mexicana virulence and whether CPB participates in the formation of large communal parasitophorous vacuoles induced by these parasites. We initially examined the impact of L. mexicana infection on the trafficking of VAMP3 and VAMP8, two endocytic SNARE proteins associated with phagolysosome biogenesis and function. Using a CPB-deficient mutant, we found that both VAMP3 and VAMP8 were down-modulated in a CPB-dependent manner. We also discovered that expression of the virulence-associated GPI-anchored metalloprotease GP63 was inhibited in the absence of CPB. Expression of GP63 in the CPB-deficient mutant was sufficient to down-modulate VAMP3 and VAMP8. Similarly, episomal expression of GP63 enabled the CPB-deficient mutant to establish infection in macrophages, induce the formation of large communal parasitophorous vacuoles, and cause lesions in mice. These findings implicate CPB in the regulation of GP63 expression and provide evidence that both GP63 and CPB are key virulence factors in L. mexicana. PMID:27191844

  4. Cytokine mRNA expression in Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana.

    PubMed

    Loria-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Saldarriaga, Omar Abdul; Melby, Peter C; Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando Jose

    2016-07-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus, the main reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, reproduces clinical and histological pictures of LCL in human as well as subclinical infection. Thus, we used this rodent as a novel experimental model. In this work, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression in P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Animals were inoculated with either 2.5×10(6) or 1×10(2) promastigotes and cytokine expressions were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in skin at 4 and 12weeks post-infection (wpi). Independently of the parasite inoculum none of the infected rodents had clinical signs of LCL at 4wpi and all expressed high IFN-γ mRNA. All P. yucatanicus inoculated with 2.5×10(6) promastigotes developed signs of LCL at 12wpi while the mice inoculated with 1×10(2) remained subclinical. At that time, both IFN-γ and IL-10 were expressed in P. yucatanicus with clinical and subclinical infections. Expressions of TNF-α and IL-4 were significantly higher in clinical animals (2.5×10(6)) compared with subclinical ones (1×10(2)). High TGF-β expression was observed in P. yucatanicus with clinical signs when compared with healthy animals. Results suggested that the clinical course of L. (L.) mexicana infection in P. yucatanicus was associated with a specific local pattern of cytokine production at 12wpi. PMID:27155064

  5. Antispasmodic Effects and Action Mechanism of Essential Oil of Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray on Rabbit Ileum.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Grasa, Laura; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Murillo, María Divina

    2016-01-01

    The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana) plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of C. mexicana (EOCM) on the contractility of rabbit ileum and the mechanisms of action involved. Muscle contractility studies in vitro in an organ bath to evaluate the response to EOCM were performed in the rabbit ileum. EOCM (1-100 µg·mL(-1)) reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of spontaneous contractions of the ileum. The contractions induced by carbachol 1 µM, potassium chloride (KCl) 60 mM or Bay K8644 1 µM were reduced by EOCM (30 µg·mL(-1)). Apamin 1 µM and charybdotoxin 0.01 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. The d-cAMP 1 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. l-NNA 10 µM, Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS 1 µM, d,l-propargylglycine 2 mM, or aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride 2 mM did not modify the EOCM effect. In conclusion, EOCM induces an antispasmodic effect and could be used in the treatment of intestinal spasms or diarrhea processes. This effect would be mediated by Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-activated K⁺ channels and cAMP. PMID:27322223

  6. Specific immunization of mice against Leishmania mexicana amazonensis using solubilized promastigotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral-Netto, M.; Sadigursky, M.; Reed, S. G.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, it was demonstrated that mice (BALB/c strain) highly susceptible to Leishmania mexicana amazonensis can be protected against infection by this parasite by being preimmunized with whole solubilized (in a buffer that contained EDTA, NP-40, and SDS) promastigotes; the use of adjuvant or intact inactivated parasite cells is shown to be not necessary. The best immunization schedule consisted of three intravenous injections of 5 x 10 to the 7th parasite equivalents, administered one to eight weeks before infection. Immunized mice exhibited a marked inhibition of primary lesion development, reduced numbers of parasites in the spleen, and reduced death rate.

  7. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme. PMID:22543019

  8. Dronedarone, an Amiodarone Analog with Improved Anti-Leishmania mexicana Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Paola; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Vanessa; Mujica-Gonzalez, Sheira; Parra-Gimenez, Nereida; Plaza-Rojas, Lourdes; Concepcion, Juan Luis; Liu, Yi-Liang; Oldfield, Eric; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Suarez, Alirica I.

    2014-01-01

    Dronedarone and amiodarone are cationic lipophilic benzofurans used to treat cardiac arrhythmias. They also have activity against the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. They function by disrupting intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis of the parasite and by inhibiting membrane sterol (ergosterol) biosynthesis. Amiodarone also has activity against Leishmania mexicana, suggesting that dronedarone might likewise be active against this organism. This might be of therapeutic interest, since dronedarone is thought to have fewer side effects in humans than does amiodarone. We show here that dronedarone effectively inhibits the growth of L. mexicana promastigotes in culture and, more importantly, has excellent activity against amastigotes inside infected macrophages (the clinically relevant form) without affecting the host cell, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations against amastigotes being 3 orders of magnitude lower than those obtained previously with T. cruzi amastigotes (0.65 nM versus 0.75 μM). As with amiodarone, dronedarone affects intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in the parasite, inducing an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. This is achieved by rapidly collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing an alkalinization of acidocalcisomes at a rate that is faster than that observed with amiodarone. We also show that dronedarone inhibits parasite oxidosqualene cyclase, a key enzyme in ergosterol biosynthesis known to be vital for survival. Overall, our results suggest the possibility of repurposing dronedarone as a treatment for cutaneous, and perhaps other, leishmaniases. PMID:24492373

  9. Identification of Semicarbazones, Thiosemicarbazones and Triazine Nitriles as Inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Jörg; Noack, Sandra; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Coombs, Graham H.; Selzer, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases. PMID:24146999

  10. Vegetation patches improve the establishment of Salvia mexicana seedlings by modifying microclimatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Hernández, Pedro E.; Rosete-Rodríguez, Alejandra; Sánchez-Coronado, María E.; Orozco, Susana; Pedrero-López, Luis; Méndez, Ignacio; Orozco-Segovia, Alma

    2014-07-01

    Human disturbance has disrupted the dynamics of plant communities. To restore these dynamics, we could take advantage of the microclimatic conditions generated by remaining patches of vegetation and plastic mulch. These microclimatic conditions might have great importance in restoring disturbed lava fields located south of Mexico City, where the rock is exposed and the soil is shallow. We evaluated the effects of both the shade projected by vegetation patches and plastic mulch on the mean monthly soil surface temperature ( T ss) and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and on the survival and growth of Salvia mexicana throughout the year. This species was used as a phytometer of microsite quality. Shade reduced the T ss to a greater extent than mulch did. Both survival and growth were enhanced by shade and mulch, and the PPFD was related with seedling growth. During the dry season, plant biomass was lost, and there was a negative effect of PPFD on plant growth. At micro-meteorological scales, the use of shade projected by patches of vegetation and mulch significantly reduced the mortality of S. mexicana and enhanced its growth. Survival and growth of this plant depended on the environmental quality of microsites on a small scale, which was determined by the environmental heterogeneity of the patches and the landscape. For plant restoration, microsite quality must be evaluated on small scales, but on a large scale it may be enough to take advantage of landscape shade dynamics and the use of mulch to increase plant survival and growth.

  11. Vegetation patches improve the establishment of Salvia mexicana seedlings by modifying microclimatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Hernández, Pedro E.; Rosete-Rodríguez, Alejandra; Sánchez-Coronado, María E.; Orozco, Susana; Pedrero-López, Luis; Méndez, Ignacio; Orozco-Segovia, Alma

    2013-04-01

    Human disturbance has disrupted the dynamics of plant communities. To restore these dynamics, we could take advantage of the microclimatic conditions generated by remaining patches of vegetation and plastic mulch. These microclimatic conditions might have great importance in restoring disturbed lava fields located south of Mexico City, where the rock is exposed and the soil is shallow. We evaluated the effects of both the shade projected by vegetation patches and plastic mulch on the mean monthly soil surface temperature (T ss) and photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and on the survival and growth of Salvia mexicana throughout the year. This species was used as a phytometer of microsite quality. Shade reduced the T ss to a greater extent than mulch did. Both survival and growth were enhanced by shade and mulch, and the PPFD was related with seedling growth. During the dry season, plant biomass was lost, and there was a negative effect of PPFD on plant growth. At micro-meteorological scales, the use of shade projected by patches of vegetation and mulch significantly reduced the mortality of S. mexicana and enhanced its growth. Survival and growth of this plant depended on the environmental quality of microsites on a small scale, which was determined by the environmental heterogeneity of the patches and the landscape. For plant restoration, microsite quality must be evaluated on small scales, but on a large scale it may be enough to take advantage of landscape shade dynamics and the use of mulch to increase plant survival and growth.

  12. Experience, but not distance, influences the recruitment precision in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Hernández, Manuel De Jesús; Vandame, Rémy

    2007-07-01

    Recruitment precision, i.e. the proportion of recruits that reach an advertised food source, is a crucial adaptation of social bees to their environment. Studies with honeybees showed that recruitment precision is not a fixed feature, but it may be enhanced by factors like experience and distance. However, little is known regarding the recruitment precision of stingless bees. Hence, in this study, we examined the effects of experience and spatial distance on the precision of the food communication system of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana. We conducted the experiments by training bees to a three-dimensional artificial patch at several distances from the colony. We recorded the choices of individual recruited foragers, either being newcomers (foragers without experience with the advertised food source) or experienced (foragers that had previously visited the feeder). We found that the average precision of newcomers (95.6 ± 2.61%) was significantly higher than that of experienced bees (80.2 ± 1.12%). While this might seem counter-intuitive on first sight, this “loss” of precision can be explained by the tendency of experienced recruits to explore nearby areas to find new rewarding food sources after they had initially learned the exact location of the food source. Increasing the distance from the colony had no significant effect on the precision of the foraging bees. Thus, our data show that experience, but not the distance of the food source, affected the patch precision of S. mexicana foragers.

  13. Parasitophorous vacuoles of Leishmania mexicana acquire macromolecules from the host cell cytosol via two independent routes.

    PubMed

    Schaible, U E; Schlesinger, P H; Steinberg, T H; Mangel, W F; Kobayashi, T; Russell, D G

    1999-03-01

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania survives and proliferates in host macrophages. In this study we show that parasitophorous vacuoles of L. mexicana gain access to cytosolic material via two different routes. (1) Small anionic molecules such as Lucifer Yellow are rapidly transported into the vacuoles by an active transport mechanism that is sensitive to inhibitors of the host cell's organic anion transporter. (2) Larger molecules such as fluorescent dextrans introduced into the host cell cytosol are also delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles. This transport is slower and sensitive to modulators of autophagy. Infected macrophages were examined by two novel assays to visualize and quantify this process. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells loaded with digoxigenin-dextran revealed label in multivesicular endosomes, which appeared to fuse with parasitophorous vacuoles. The inner membranes of the multivesicular vesicles label strongly with antibodies against lysobisphosphatidic acid, suggesting that they represent a point of confluence between the endosomal and autophagosomal pathways. Although the rate of autophagous transfer was comparable in infected and uninfected cells, infected cells retained hydrolyzed cysteine proteinase substrate to a greater degree. These data suggest that L. mexicana-containing vacuoles have access to potential nutrients in the host cell cytosol via at least two independent mechanisms. PMID:9973603

  14. The role of phosphomannose isomerase in Leishmania mexicana glycoconjugate synthesis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Garami, A; Ilg, T

    2001-03-01

    Phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) catalyzes the reversible interconversion of fructose 6-phosphate and mannose 6-phosphate, which is the first step in the biosynthesis of activated mannose donors required for the biosynthesis of various glycoconjugates. Leishmania species synthesize copious amounts of mannose-containing glycolipids and glycoproteins, which are involved in virulence of these parasitic protozoa. To investigate the role of PMI for parasite glycoconjugate synthesis, we have cloned the PMI gene (lmexpmi) from Leishmania mexicana, generated gene deletion mutants (Delta lmexpmi), and analyzed their phenotype. Delta lmexpmi mutants lack completely the high PMI activity found in wild type parasites, but are, in contrast to fungi, able to grow in media deficient for free mannose. The mutants are unable to synthesize phosphoglycan repeats [-6-Gal beta 1-4Man alpha 1-PO(4)-] and mannose-containing glycoinositolphospholipids, and the surface expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored dominant surface glycoprotein leishmanolysin is strongly decreased, unless the parasite growth medium is supplemented with mannose. The Delta lmexpmi mutant is attenuated in infections of macrophages in vitro and of mice, suggesting that PMI may be a target for anti-Leishmania drug development. L. mexicana Delta lmexpmi provides the first conditional mannose-controlled system for parasite glycoconjugate assembly with potential applications for the investigation of their biosynthesis, intracellular sorting, and function. PMID:11084042

  15. Dronedarone, an amiodarone analog with improved anti-Leishmania mexicana efficacy.

    PubMed

    Benaim, Gustavo; Casanova, Paola; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Vanessa; Mujica-Gonzalez, Sheira; Parra-Gimenez, Nereida; Plaza-Rojas, Lourdes; Concepcion, Juan Luis; Liu, Yi-Liang; Oldfield, Eric; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Suarez, Alirica I

    2014-01-01

    Dronedarone and amiodarone are cationic lipophilic benzofurans used to treat cardiac arrhythmias. They also have activity against the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. They function by disrupting intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis of the parasite and by inhibiting membrane sterol (ergosterol) biosynthesis. Amiodarone also has activity against Leishmania mexicana, suggesting that dronedarone might likewise be active against this organism. This might be of therapeutic interest, since dronedarone is thought to have fewer side effects in humans than does amiodarone. We show here that dronedarone effectively inhibits the growth of L. mexicana promastigotes in culture and, more importantly, has excellent activity against amastigotes inside infected macrophages (the clinically relevant form) without affecting the host cell, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations against amastigotes being 3 orders of magnitude lower than those obtained previously with T. cruzi amastigotes (0.65 nM versus 0.75 μM). As with amiodarone, dronedarone affects intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in the parasite, inducing an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. This is achieved by rapidly collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing an alkalinization of acidocalcisomes at a rate that is faster than that observed with amiodarone. We also show that dronedarone inhibits parasite oxidosqualene cyclase, a key enzyme in ergosterol biosynthesis known to be vital for survival. Overall, our results suggest the possibility of repurposing dronedarone as a treatment for cutaneous, and perhaps other, leishmaniases. PMID:24492373

  16. Aqueous and Methanolic Extracts of Caulerpa mexicana Suppress Cell Migration and Ear Edema Induced by Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Mariana Angelica Oliveira; Dantas, Gracielle Rodrigues; Lira, Daysianne Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; de Miranda, George Emmanuel Cavalcanti; de Oliveira Santos, Barbara Viviana; Souto, Janeusa Trindade

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of the inflammatory response is essential to maintaining homeostasis. Several studies have investigated new drugs that may contribute to avoiding or minimizing excessive inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracts of green algae Caulerpa mexicana on models inflammation. In mice, the inflammatory peritonitis model is induced by zymosan. Previous treatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic extracts of C. mexicana was able to suppress the cell migration to the peritoneal cavity, in a time-dependent but not in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of mice with C. mexicana extracts also decreased the xylene-induced ear edema, exerting strong inhibitory leukocyte migration elicited by zymosan into the air pouch. We concluded that administration of the extracts resulted in a reduction of cell migration to different sites as well as a decrease in edema formation induced by chemical irritants. This study demonstrates for the first time the anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts from the green marine algae Caulerpa mexicana. PMID:21892348

  17. Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica, a real option for astronomical publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, S.; Allen, C.

    2011-10-01

    We present statistical data about the Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica. We consider that this journal is well positioned in the international astronomical literature. Similarly we present information about the Serie de Conferencias, which also has a wide level of acceptance by the astronomical community.

  18. α-Ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    PubMed Central

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinyl sulfone based cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs), a series of α-ketoheterocycles 1-15 has been developed as reversible inhibitors of a recombinant L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8. The isoxazoles 1-3 and especially the oxadiazole 15 are potent reversible inhibitors of CPB2.8, however, in vitro whole-organism screening against a panel of protozoan parasites did not fully correlate with the observed inhibition of the cysteine protease. PMID:20799311

  19. Peltomexicanin, a Peltogynoid Quinone Methide from Peltogyne Mexicana Martínez Purple Heartwood.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Macías, Paulina; Peralta-Cruz, Javier; Borja-de-la-Rosa, Amparo; Barragán-Huerta, Blanca E

    2016-01-01

    Peltomexicanin (7,10-dihydroxy-6,12-dioxa-5H-tetraphen-3-one) is a new peltogynoid quinone methide isolated from Palo Morado (Peltogyne mexicana Martínez) heartwood by column chromatography. Its chemical structure was elucidated by IR, NMR (¹H, (13)C), 2D NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMQC, and HSQC), ESI-MS, and UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis. According to HPLC quantification, this compound is the main pigment and accounts for 1.21% of Palo Morado heartwood material. The antioxidant activity of peltomexicanin and dried methanolic extract (DEx) of purple heartwood was evaluated using the radical of 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assay, and the corresponding values expressed as Trolox equivalents (µmol TE/mg sample) were 4.25 and 4.57, respectively. PMID:26861267

  20. Tourism values for Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) viewing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Widerholdt, Ruscena

    2013-01-01

    Migratory species provide diverse ecosystem services to people, but these values have seldom been estimated rangewide for a single species. In this article, we summarize visitation and consumer surplus for recreational visitors to viewing sites for the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) throughout the Southwestern United States. Public bat viewing opportunities are available at 17 of 25 major roosts across six states; on an annual basis, we estimate that over 242,000 visitors view bats, gaining over $6.5 million in consumer surplus. A better understanding of spatial mismatches between the areas where bats provide value to people and areas most critical for maintaining migratory populations can better inform conservation planning, including economic incentive systems for conservation.

  1. Inhibition profile of Leishmania mexicana arginase reveals differences with human arginase I

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Eric; Roberts, Sigrid C.; Ullman, Buddy

    2011-01-01

    Arginase (ARG), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, is the first and committed step in polyamine biosynthesis in Leishmania. The creation of a conditionally lethal Δarg null mutant in Leishmania mexicana has established that ARG is an essential enzyme for the promastigote form of the parasite and that the enzyme provides an important defense mechanism for parasite survival in the eukaryotic host. Furthermore, human ARGI (HsARGI) has also been implicated as a key factor in parasite proliferation. Thus, inhibitors of ARG offer a rational paradigm for drug design. To initiate a search for inhibitors of the L. mexicana ARG (LmARG), recombinant LmARG and HsARGI enzymes were purified from Escherichia coli. Both LmARG and HsARGI were specific for L-arginine and exhibited no activity with either D-arginine or agmatine as possible substrates. LmARG exhibited a Km of 25 ± 4 mM for L-arginine, a pH optimum ~9.0, and was dependent upon the presence of a divalent cation, preferentially manganese. A Km of 13.5 ± 2 mM for L-arginine was calculated for the HsARGI. A collection of 37 compounds was evaluated against both enzymes. Twelve of these compounds were identified as being either strong inhibitors of both LmARG and HsARGI or differential inhibitors between the two enzymes. Of the 12 compounds, six were selected for further analysis and the type and extent of inhibition determined. PMID:21232540

  2. Coxiella burnetii and Leishmania mexicana residing within similar parasitophorous vacuoles elicit disparate host responses

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Jess A.; Valdés, Raquel; Kacharia, Fenil R.; Landfear, Scott M.; Cambronne, Eric D.; Raghavan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a bacterium that thrives in an acidic parasitophorous vacuole (PV) derived from lysosomes. Leishmania mexicana, a eukaryote, has also independently evolved to live in a morphologically similar PV. As Coxiella and Leishmania are highly divergent organisms that cause different diseases, we reasoned that their respective infections would likely elicit distinct host responses despite producing phenotypically similar parasite-containing vacuoles. The objective of this study was to investigate, at the molecular level, the macrophage response to each pathogen. Infection of THP-1 (human monocyte/macrophage) cells with Coxiella and Leishmania elicited disparate host responses. At 5 days post-infection, when compared to uninfected cells, 1057 genes were differentially expressed (746 genes up-regulated and 311 genes down-regulated) in C. burnetii infected cells, whereas 698 genes (534 genes up-regulated and 164 genes down-regulated) were differentially expressed in L. mexicana infected cells. Interestingly, of the 1755 differentially expressed genes identified in this study, only 126 genes (~7%) are common to both infections. We also discovered that 1090 genes produced mRNA isoforms at significantly different levels under the two infection conditions, suggesting that alternate proteins encoded by the same gene might have important roles in host response to each infection. Additionally, we detected 257 micro RNAs (miRNAs) that were expressed in THP-1 cells, and identified miRNAs that were specifically expressed during Coxiella or Leishmania infections. Collectively, this study identified host mRNAs and miRNAs that were influenced by Coxiella and/or Leishmania infections, and our data indicate that although their PVs are morphologically similar, Coxiella and Leishmania have evolved different strategies that perturb distinct host processes to create and thrive within their respective intracellular niches. PMID:26300862

  3. Effect of ketoconazole on lethal action of amphotericin B on Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, H; Saint-Pierre-Chazalet, M; Bolard, J; Cohen, B E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ergosterol depletion by ketoconazole on the leishmanicidal activity of the pore-forming antibiotic amphotericin B (AmB) was investigated. Leishmania mexicana promastigotes were lysed within minutes by the addition of micromolar concentrations of AmB (0.5 microM) but became insensitive to AmB after growth in the presence of ketoconazole (0.25 microM, 90 h). Lipid chromatographic analysis indicated that under such conditions, ketoconazole depleted the major Leishmania sterols, dehydroepisterol and ergosterol. Plasma membrane vesicles prepared from ketoconazole-treated promastigotes exhibited a much reduced enhancement of their salt permeability after the addition of AmB at concentrations as high as 5 microM. This finding clearly indicates that upon ketoconazole treatment, the capacity of pore formation by the antibiotic is substantially impaired. The reduction of desmethyl sterols by ketoconazole was accompanied by a significant increase of 14-alpha-methyl sterols, but exogenous cholesterol remained unchanged. This ability of Leishmania promastigotes to incorporate cholesterol from the external medium may explain why ketoconazole-treated cells exhibited a much decreased but significative response to AmB when they were exposed to high AmB concentrations (2.5 or 5.0 microM). Parallel measurements by using a fluorescence energy transfer method indicated that binding of AmB to ketoconazole-treated Leishmania promastigotes and heat-transformed leishmanias was also decreased but to different extents, a finding that may be related to the differences in their sterol content. The results obtained clearly indicate that the specific interaction of AmB with desmethyl sterols, such as dehydroepisterol, ergosterol, and even exogenous cholesterol, is an absolute requirement for the lethal action exerted by this polyene antibiotic on L. mexicana promastigotes. PMID:8067741

  4. [Infection of skin fibroblasts in animals with different levels of sensitivity to Leishmania infantum and Leishmania mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae)].

    PubMed

    Minero, Miguel Angel; Chinchilla, Misael; Guerrero, Olga Marta; Castro, Alfredo

    2004-03-01

    Infection and multiplication of Leishmania infantum and L. mexicana inside of skin fibroblasts from hamsters, mice and rats was achieved. This process was demonstrated either by counting parasites inside the stained cells or by electronic microscopy studies. In addition multiplication rate differences in the cells from these rodent species were determined, for L. infantum as well as for L. mexicana. Parasite development in hamsters and mice fibroblasts was evident but there was not multiplication in rat cells showing that apparently they are refractory to Leishmania infection. These results suggest that the parasite affinity for each animal, as well as any intracellular environment resistance, could involve genetic factors in the parasite multiplication. On the other hand, presence of amastigote multiplication inside of parasitophorus vacuole, showed by electronic microscopy images, probes a true parasite transformation. Therefore it is suggested that fibroblasts could work as host cells for parasite survival and permanency in the infected animals. PMID:17357424

  5. Expression of lipophosphoglycan, high-molecular weight phosphoglycan and glycoprotein 63 in promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Bahr, V; Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T; Demar, M; Quinten, M; Overath, P

    1993-03-01

    The abundant surface glycoconjugate of Leishmania promastigotes, lipophosphoglycan (LPG), forms a blue-colored complex (lambda max = 649 nm) with the cationic dye Stains-all, which can be quantitated densitometrically on polyacrylamide gels of cell lysates. Promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani yield values of 1-3 x 10(6) LPG molecules cell-1. In amastigotes the LPG content is down-regulated below the detection limit (< 10(3) molecules cell-1) in L. mexicana and L. donovani, but remains significant in L. major (2 x 10(3) molecules cell-1). In the case of L. mexicana, these results are supported by immunological studies. Using several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, LPG is undetectable by immunoblotting in lysates of either amastigotes or infected macrophages and the amastigote surface is devoid of LPG as judged by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoblotting experiments demonstrate that amastigotes synthesize hydrophilic high-molecular weight compounds which stain blue with Stains-all and cross-react with the monoclonal and polyvalent antibodies suggesting the presence of similar phosphoglycan structures as in LPG. The high-molecular weight phosphoglycan appears to be located in the lumen of the flagellar pocket of mouse lesion amastigotes and may be secreted from there into the lumen of the parasitophorous vacuole of parasitized macrophages. In L. mexicana promastigotes the surface protease gp63 is amphiphilic and comprises about 1% of the cellular proteins. In contrast, in amastigotes gp63-related proteins are predominantly hydrophilic; they amount to only about 0.1% of the cellular proteins and are mainly located in the lumen of the extended lysosomes (megasomes) characteristic for this species. PMID:8459823

  6. Glycosylation defects and virulence phenotypes of Leishmania mexicana phosphomannomutase and dolicholphosphate-mannose synthase gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Garami, A; Mehlert, A; Ilg, T

    2001-12-01

    Leishmania parasites synthesize an abundance of mannose (Man)-containing glycoconjugates thought to be essential for virulence to the mammalian host and for viability. These glycoconjugates include lipophosphoglycan (LPG), proteophosphoglycans (PPGs), glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPLs), and N-glycans. A prerequisite for their biosynthesis is an ample supply of the Man donors GDP-Man and dolicholphosphate-Man. We have cloned from Leishmania mexicana the gene encoding the enzyme phosphomannomutase (PMM) and the previously described dolicholphosphate-Man synthase gene (DPMS) that are involved in Man activation. Surprisingly, gene deletion experiments resulted in viable parasite lines lacking the respective open reading frames (DeltaPMM and DeltaDPMS), a result against expectation and in contrast to the lethal phenotype observed in gene deletion experiments with fungi. L. mexicana DeltaDPMS exhibits a selective defect in LPG, protein GPI anchor, and GIPL biosynthesis, but despite the absence of these structures, which have been implicated in parasite virulence and viability, the mutant remains infectious to macrophages and mice. By contrast, L. mexicana DeltaPMM are largely devoid of all known Man-containing glycoconjugates and are unable to establish an infection in mouse macrophages or the living animal. Our results define Man activation leading to GDP-Man as a virulence pathway in Leishmania. PMID:11689705

  7. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana: contribution of glycerol kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-11-21

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. PMID:25288791

  8. In vitro activity of synthetic tetrahydroindeno[2,1-c]quinolines on Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Chinea, Concepción; Carbajo, Erika; Sojo, Felipe; Arvelo, Francisco; Kouznetsov, Vladimir V; Romero-Bohórquez, Arnold R; Romero, Pedro J

    2015-12-01

    New synthetic compounds based on tetrahydroindenoquinoline structure were evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activities. The seven compounds assayed have antiproliferative activities against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. Compound 1 and 3 were the most active (IC50 1.0 μg/ml) and showed high selectivity towards the parasite. These compounds were selected to evaluate their effect on promastigote morphology and mitochondrial transmembrane potential as well as on the amastigote capability to survive into macrophages J774 cell line. Whereas compound 1 affected the promastigote cell cycle, compound 3 induced morphological changes and the total collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, a hallmark of apoptosis. Both compounds also affected the amastigote form of the parasite, decreasing their survival rate in J774 macrophages. Due to the greatest selectivity index, the apparent effect as apoptotic inducer and its sustained inhibition on intracellular amastigote replication, compound 3 is the best candidate to be tested in vivo. This compound is worth considering for the development of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:26148815

  9. Complete set of mitochondrial pan-edited mRNAs in Leishmania mexicana amazonensis LV78

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Editing of mRNA transcribed from the mitochondrial cryptogenes ND8 (G1), ND9 (G2), G3, G4, ND3 (G5), RPS12 (G6) was investigated in Leishmania mexicana amazonensis, strain LV78, by amplification of the cDNA, cloning and sequencing. For each of these genes, extensively and partially edited transcripts were found to be relatively abundant compared to the respective pre-edited molecules. Moreover, the editing patterns observed in a majority of transcripts of each gene were consistent among themselves which allowed for inferring consensus editing sequences. The open reading frames contained in the consensus sequences were predicted to encode polypeptides that were highly similar to their counterparts in other species of Trypanosomatidae. Several kinetoplast DNA minicircles from this species available in the public domain were found to contain genes for guide RNAs which mediate editing of some of the mRNAs. The results indicate that the investigated strain of L. m. amazonensis has preserved its full editing capacity in spite of the long-term maintenance in culture. This property differs drastically from the other Leishmania species which lost some or all of the G1–G5 mRNA editing ability in culture. PMID:20546801

  10. Fatal anemia and dermatitis in captive agoutis (Dasyprocta mexicana) infested with Echidnophaga fleas.

    PubMed

    Cucchi-Stefanoni, Karina; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Parás, Alberto; Garner, Michael M

    2008-08-17

    Two captive agoutis (Dasyprocta mexicana) died of anemia with centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis (2/2), severe flea ectoparasitism (2/2), and cardiomegaly attributed to anemia (1/2). Other agoutis were similarly parasitized and one had anemia. Fleas were manually removed and all agoutis treated topically with propoxur and selamectin and moved to another enclosure. No additional cases of fatal anemia were seen. Cutaneous lesions suggestive of hypersensitivity were observed in three additional agoutis with dorsal alopecia (3/3), a penetrating wound associated with pruritus and self-mutilation in the flank (2/3), flea ectoparasitism at the time of morphologic diagnosis (1/3), and hyperplastic perivascular dermatitis (3/3). One of these died of bacterial infection of the wound. Similar but milder skin disease was seen in 3 out of over 30 maras (Dolichotis patagonum) housed in the same exhibit. Fleas collected from all the fatal agouti cases and maras were classified in the genus Echidnophaga based on the angular front margin of head, contracted thorax, absence of genal and pronotal combs, and the fact that fleas did not jump. These findings suggest that flea ectoparasitism may be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in captive rodents. PMID:18556127

  11. Microhabitat use, population densities, and size distributions of sulfur cave-dwelling Poecilia mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Bierbach, David; Riesch, Rüdiger; Schießl, Angela; Wigh, Adriana; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber; Klaus, Sebastian; Zimmer, Claudia; Plath, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Cueva del Azufre in Tabasco, Mexico, is a nutrient-rich cave and its inhabitants need to cope with high levels of dissolved hydrogen sulfide and extreme hypoxia. One of the successful colonizers of this cave is the poeciliid fish Poecilia mexicana, which has received considerable attention as a model organism to examine evolutionary adaptations to extreme environmental conditions. Nonetheless, basic ecological data on the endemic cave molly population are still missing; here we aim to provide data on population densities, size class compositions and use of different microhabitats. We found high overall densities in the cave and highest densities at the middle part of the cave with more than 200 individuals per square meter. These sites have lower H2S concentrations compared to the inner parts where most large sulfide sources are located, but they are annually exposed to a religious harvesting ceremony of local Zoque people called La Pesca. We found a marked shift in size/age compositions towards an overabundance of smaller, juvenile fish at those sites. We discuss these findings in relation to several environmental gradients within the cave (i.e., differences in toxicity and lighting conditions), but we also tentatively argue that the annual fish harvest during a religious ceremony (La Pesca) locally diminishes competition (and possibly, cannibalism by large adults), which is followed by a phase of overcompensation of fish densities. PMID:25083351

  12. Characterization of polymer release from the flagellar pocket of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T; Russell, D G; Hohenberg, H; Overath, P

    1994-04-01

    Trypanosomatids contain a unique compartment, the flagellar pocket, formed by an invagination of the plasma membrane at the base of the flagellum, which is considered to be the sole cellular site for endocytosis and exocytosis of macromolecules. The culture supernatant of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes, the insect stage of this protozoan parasite, contains two types of polymers: a filamentous acid phosphatase (sAP) composed of a 100-kD phosphoglycoprotein with non-covalently associated proteo high molecular weight phosphoglycan (proteo-HMWPG) and fibrous material termed network consisting of complex phosphoglycans. Secretion of both polymers is investigated using mAbs and a combination of light and electron microscopic techniques. Long filaments of sAP are detectable in the lumen of the flagellar pocket. Both sAP filaments and network material emerge from the ostium of the flagellar pocket. While sAP filaments detach from the cells, the fibrous network frequently remains associated with the anterior end of the parasites and can be found in the center of cell aggregates. The related species L. major forms similar networks. Since polymeric structures cannot be detected in intracellular compartments, it is proposed that monomeric or, possibly, oligomeric subunits synthesized in the cells are secreted into the flagellar pocket. Polymer formation from subunits is suggested to occur in the lumen of the pocket before release into the culture medium or, naturally, into the gut of infected sandflies. PMID:8163549

  13. ‘Transient’ Genetic Suppression Facilitates Generation of Hexose Transporter Null Mutants in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiuhong; Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Polley, Tamsen; Lye, Lon-Fye; Scott, David; Burchmore, Richard J.S.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Landfear, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The genome of Leishmania mexicana encompasses a cluster of three glucose transporter genes designated LmxGT1, LmxGT2, and LmxGT3. Functional and genetic studies of a cluster null mutant (Δlmxgt1-3) have dissected the roles of these proteins in Leishmania metabolism and virulence. However, null mutants were recovered at very low frequency, and comparative genome hybridizations revealed that Δlmxgt1-3 mutants contained a linear extrachromosomal 40 kb amplification of a region on chromosome 29 not amplified in WT parasites. These data suggested a model where this 29–40k amplicon encoded a second site suppressor contributing to parasite survival in the absence of GT1-3 function. To test this, we quantified the frequency of recovery of knockouts in the presence of individual overexpressed ORFs covering the 29–40k amplicon. The data mapped the suppressor activity to PIFTC3, encoding a component of the intraflagellar transport pathway. We discuss possible models by which PIFTC3 might act to facilitate loss of GTs specifically. Surprisingly, by plasmid segregation we showed that continued PIFTC3 overexpression was not required for Δlmxgt1-3 viability. These studies provide the first evidence that genetic suppression can occur by providing critical biological functions transiently. This novel form of genetic suppression may extend to other genes, pathways and organisms. PMID:23170981

  14. Regulatory volume decrease in Leishmania mexicana: effect of anti-microtubule drugs.

    PubMed

    Dagger, Francehuli; Valdivieso, Elizabeth; Marcano, Ana K; Ayesta, Carlos

    2013-02-01

    The trypanosomatid cytoskeleton is responsible for the parasite's shape and it is modulated throughout the different stages of the parasite's life cycle. When parasites are exposed to media with reduced osmolarity, they initially swell, but subsequently undergo compensatory shrinking referred to as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). We studied the effects of anti-microtubule (Mt) drugs on the proliferation of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and their capacity to undergo RVD. All of the drugs tested exerted antiproliferative effects of varying magnitudes [ansamitocin P3 (AP3)> trifluoperazine > taxol > rhizoxin > chlorpromazine]. No direct relationship was found between antiproliferative drug treatment and RVD. Similarly, Mt stability was not affected by drug treatment. Ansamitocin P3, which is effective at nanomolar concentrations, blocked amastigote-promastigote differentiation and was the only drug that impeded RVD, as measured by light dispersion. AP3 induced 2 kinetoplasts (Kt) 1 nucleus cells that had numerous flagella-associated Kts throughout the cell. These results suggest that the dramatic morphological changes induced by AP3 alter the spatial organisation and directionality of the Mts that are necessary for the parasite's hypotonic stress-induced shape change, as well as its recovery. PMID:23440120

  15. Regulation and biological function of a flagellar glucose transporter in Leishmania mexicana: a potential glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Aslan, Hamide; Feng, Xiuhong; Tran, Khoa; Yates, Phillip A; Kamhawi, Shaden; Landfear, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    In Leishmania mexicana parasites, a unique glucose transporter, LmxGT1, is selectively targeted to the flagellar membrane, suggesting a possible sensory role that is often associated with ciliary membrane proteins. Expression of LmxGT1 is down-regulated ∼20-fold by increasing cell density but is up-regulated ∼50-fold by depleting glucose from the medium, and the permease is strongly down-regulated when flagellated insect-stage promastigotes invade mammalian macrophages and transform into intracellular amastigotes. Regulation of LmxGT1 expression by glucose and during the lifecycle operates at the level of protein stability. Significantly, a ∆lmxgt1 null mutant, grown in abundant glucose, undergoes catastrophic loss of viability when parasites deplete glucose from the medium, a property not exhibited by wild-type or add-back lines. These results suggest that LmxGT1 may function as a glucose sensor that allows parasites to enter the stationary phase when they deplete glucose and that in the absence of this sensor, parasites do not maintain viability when they run out of glucose. However, alternate roles for LmxGT1 in monitoring glucose availability are considered. The absence of known sensory receptors with defined ligands and biologic functions in Leishmania and related kinetoplastid parasites underscores the potential significance of these observations. PMID:25300620

  16. Proteophosphoglycans of Leishmania mexicana. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Leishmania mexicana ppg2 gene encoding the proteophosphoglycans aPPG and pPPG2 that are secreted by amastigotes and promastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, U; Goehring, N; Klein, C; Ilg, T

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular amastigotes of the pathogenic protozoon Leishmania mexicana secrete an extensively phosphoglycosylated proteophosphoglycan (aPPG) into the phagolysosome of mammalian host macrophages, that appears to fulfil important functions for the parasites. Promastigotes (the sandfly vector forms) of the same species secrete a proteophosphoglycan with identical protein backbone but exhibiting stage-specific phosphoglycosylation patterns [Klein, Göpfert, Goehring, Stierhof and Ilg (1999) Biochem. J. 344, 775-786]. In this study we report the cloning of the novel repeat-containing proteophosphoglycan gene ppg2 by antibody screening of a Leishmania mexicana amastigote cDNA expression library. ppg2 is equally expressed in promastigotes and amastigotes at the mRNA level. Targeted gene replacement of both alleles of the single copy gene ppg2 results in the loss of pPPG2 expression in promastigotes. Antisera against Escherichia coli-expressed ppg2 recognize the deglycosylated forms of aPPG as well as pPPG2. These results confirm that ppg2 encodes the protein backbones of aPPG and pPPG2. An unusual finding is that ppg2 exhibits two stable allelic forms, ppg2a and ppg2b. Their main difference lies in the number of central 72 bp DNA repeats (7 versus 8). ppg2a and ppg2b encode polypeptide chains of 574 and 598 amino acids, respectively, that show no homology to known proteins. The novel 24 amino acid Ser-rich peptide repeats encoded by the 72 bp DNA repeats are targets for Ser phosphoglycosylation in Leishmania mexicana. PMID:10585865

  17. Transgenic, Fluorescent Leishmania mexicana Allow Direct Analysis of the Proteome of Intracellular Amastigotes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Daniel; Lippuner, Christoph; Schmid, Monika; Ackermann, Renate; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E.; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Brinkmann, Volker; Arndt, Benjamin; Pleissner, Klaus Peter; Jungblut, Peter R.; Aebischer, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Investigating the proteome of intracellular pathogens is often hampered by inadequate methodologies to purify the pathogen free of host cell material. This has also precluded direct proteome analysis of the intracellular, amastigote form of Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases that affect some 12 million patients worldwide. Here a method is presented that combines classic, isopycnic density centrifugation with fluorescent particle sorting for purification by exploiting transgenic, fluorescent parasites to allow direct proteome analysis of the purified organisms. By this approach the proteome of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amastigotes was compared with that of extracellular promastigotes that are transmitted by insect vectors. In total, 509 different proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database search. This number corresponds to ∼6% of gene products predicted from the reference genome of Leishmania major. Intracellular amastigotes synthesized significantly more proteins with basic pI and showed a greater abundance of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism, which may reflect their living in acidic habitats and metabolic adaptation to nutrient availability, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses of the genes corresponding to the protein data sets produced clear evidence for skewed codon usage and translational bias in these organisms. Moreover analysis of the subset of genes whose products were more abundant in amastigotes revealed characteristic sequence motifs in 3′-untranslated regions that have been linked to translational control elements. This suggests that proteome data sets may be used to identify regulatory elements in mRNAs. Last but not least, at 6% coverage the proteome identified all vaccine antigens tested to date. Thus, the present data set provides a valuable resource for selection of candidate vaccine antigens. PMID:18474515

  18. Variation in ectomycorrhizal fungal communities associated with Oreomunnea mexicana (Juglandaceae) in a Neotropical montane forest.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Adriana; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Ferrer, Astrid; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-01-01

    Neotropical montane forests are often dominated by ectomycorrhizal (EM) tree species, yet the diversity of their EM fungal communities remains poorly explored. In lower montane forests in western Panama, the EM tree species Oreomunnea mexicana (Juglandaceae) forms locally dense populations in forest otherwise characterized by trees that form arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations. The objective of this study was to compare the composition of EM fungal communities associated with Oreomunnea adults, saplings, and seedlings across sites differing in soil fertility and the amount and seasonality of rainfall. Analysis of fungal nrITS DNA (nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers) revealed 115 EM fungi taxa from 234 EM root tips collected from adults, saplings, and seedlings in four sites. EM fungal communities were equally species-rich and diverse across Oreomunnea developmental stages and sites, regardless of soil conditions or rainfall patterns. However, ordination analysis revealed high compositional turnover between low and high fertility/rainfall sites located ca. 6 km apart. The EM fungal community was dominated by Russula (ca. 36 taxa). Cortinarius, represented by 14 species and previously reported to extract nitrogen from organic sources under low nitrogen availability, was found only in low fertility/high rainfall sites. Phylogenetic diversity analyses of Russula revealed greater evolutionary distance among taxa found on sites with contrasting fertility and rainfall than was expected by chance, suggesting that environmental differences among sites may be important in structuring EM fungal communities. More research is needed to evaluate whether EM fungal taxa associated with Oreomunnea form mycorrhizal networks that might account for local dominance of this tree species in otherwise diverse forest communities. PMID:25940407

  19. Isolation and partial characterization of a broad specificity aminotransferase from Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Vernal, J; Cazzulo, J J; Nowicki, C

    1998-10-30

    A broad specificity aminotransferase (BSAT), with high activity with both, aromatic amino acids and aspartate as substrates, was purified to homogeneity from promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana by a method involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Red-120-Sepharose and Mono Q, and gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme showed a single band in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa. Since the apparent molecular mass of the native enzyme, determined by gel filtration, was 90 kDa, the native enzyme is a dimer of similar subunits. The amino acid composition was determined, as well as the sequence of four internal peptides obtained by tryptic digestion. Two of these peptides, consisting of 49 amino acid residues in total, showed high similarity (57%) with corresponding sequences of plant aspartate aminotransferases, whereas they had only 33% identity with the aromatic aminotransferase of Escherichia coli, and 16% identity with the tyrosine aminotransferase from the related parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The BSAT contained only one 1/2 Cys residue per monomer. The optimal pH for the enzyme reaction, with tyrosine and alpha-oxoglutarate as substrates, was 7.0. The apparent Km values for tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and glutamate, with oxaloacetate as co-substrate, were 1.3, 0.9, 0.9 and 171.8 mM, respectively; the value for aspartate with alpha-oxoglutarate as co-substrate was 2.5 mM, and that for alanine with alpha-oxoglutarate as co-substrate was 216 mM. The values for pyruvate, alpha-oxoglutarate and oxaloacetate, with tyrosine as co-substrate, were 5.6, 0.71 and 0.12 mM, respectively. These results suggest that the enzyme is a broad-specificity aminotransferase, able to transaminate the aromatic amino acids, aspartate, and to a lower extent alanine, with high sequence similarity to aspartate aminotransferases. PMID:9851609

  20. Outbreeding and lack of temporal genetic structure in a drone congregation of the neotropical stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Matthias Y; Moritz, Robin Fa; Kraus, F Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    Drone aggregations are a widespread phenomenon in many stingless bee species (Meliponini), but the ultimate and proximate causes for their formation are still not well understood. One adaptive explanation for this phenomenon is the avoidance of inbreeding, which is especially detrimental for stingless bees due to the combined effects of the complementary sex-determining system and the small effective population size caused by eusociality and monandry. We analyzed the temporal genetic dynamics of a drone aggregation of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana with microsatellite markers over a time window of four weeks. We estimated the drones of the aggregation to originate from a total of 55 colonies using sibship re-construction. There was no detectable temporal genetic differentiation or sub-structuring in the aggregation. Most important, we could exclude all colonies in close proximity of the aggregation as origin of the drones in the aggregation, implicating that they originate from more distant colonies. We conclude that the diverse genetic composition and the distant origin of the drones of the S. mexicana drone congregation provides an effective mechanism to avoid mating among close relatives. PMID:22833802

  1. Leishmania mexicana: promastigotes and amastigotes secrete protein phosphatases and this correlates with the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Escalona-Montaño, A R; Ortiz-Lozano, D M; Rojas-Bernabé, A; Wilkins-Rodriguez, A A; Torres-Guerrero, H; Mondragón-Flores, R; Mondragón-Gonzalez, R; Becker, I; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, L; Aguirre-Garcia, M M

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatase activity of Leishmania spp. has been shown to deregulate the signalling pathways of the host cell. We here show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes secrete proteins with phosphatase activity to the culture medium, which was higher in the Promastigote Secretion Medium (PSM) as compared with the Amastigote Secretion Medium (ASM) and was not due to cell lysis, since parasite viability was not affected by the secretion process. The biochemical characterization showed that the phosphatase activity present in PSM was higher in dephosphorylating the peptide END (pY) INASL as compared with the peptide RRA (pT)VA. In contrast, the phosphatase activity in ASM showed little dephosphorylating capacity for both peptides. Inhibition assays demonstrated that the phosphatase activity of both PSM and ASM was sensible only to protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitors. An antibody against a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) of Leishmania major cross-reacted with a 44·9 kDa molecule in different cellular fractions of L. mexicana promastigotes and amastigotes, however, in PSM and ASM, the antibody recognized a protein about 70 kDa. By electron microscopy, the PP2C was localized in the flagellar pocket of amastigotes. PSM and ASM induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, IL-12p70 and IL-10 in human macrophages. PMID:27220404

  2. Morphological and molecular identification of the ectomycorrhizal association of Lactarius fumosibrunneus and Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana trees in eastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garay-Serrano, Edith; Bandala, Victor Manuel; Montoya, Leticia

    2012-11-01

    A population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana (covering ca. 4.7 ha) is established in a montane cloud forest refuge at Acatlan Volcano in eastern Mexico (Veracruz State), and it represents one of only ten populations of this species known to occur in the country (each stand covers ca. 2-35 ha in extension) and one of the southernmost in the continent. Sporocarps of several ectomycorrhizal macrofungi have been observed in the area, and among them, individuals of the genus Lactarius are common in the forest. However, the morphological and molecular characterization of ectomycorrhizae is still in development. Currently, two species of Lactarius have been previously documented in the area. Through the phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizae, we identified the Lactarius fumosibrunneus ectomycorrhiza. The host, F. grandifolia var. mexicana, was determined comparing the amplified ITS sequence from ectomycorrhizal root tips in the GenBank database with Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. The mycorrhizal system of L. fumosibrunneus is monopodial-pyramidal, characterized by its shiny, white to silver and pruinose surface, secreting a white latex when damaged, composed of three plectenchymatous mantle layers, with diverticulated terminal elements at the outer mantle. It lacks emanating hyphae, rhizomorphs, and sclerotia. A detailed morphological and anatomical description, illustrations, and photographs of the ectomycorrhiza are presented. The comparison of L. fumosibrunneus and other Lactarius belonging to subgenus Plinthogalus is presented. PMID:22402818

  3. High precision during food recruitment of experienced (reactivated) foragers in the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Daniel; Nieh, James C.; Hénaut, Yann; Cruz, Leopoldo; Vandame, Rémy

    Several studies have examined the existence of recruitment communication mechanisms in stingless bees. However, the spatial accuracy of location-specific recruitment has not been examined. Moreover, the location-specific recruitment of reactivated foragers, i.e., foragers that have previously experienced the same food source at a different location and time, has not been explicitly examined. However, such foragers may also play a significant role in colony foraging, particularly in small colonies. Here we report that reactivated Scaptotrigona mexicana foragers can recruit with high precision to a specific food location. The recruitment precision of reactivated foragers was evaluated by placing control feeders to the left and the right of the training feeder (direction-precision tests) and between the nest and the training feeder and beyond it (distance-precision tests). Reactivated foragers arrived at the correct location with high precision: 98.44% arrived at the training feeder in the direction trials (five-feeder fan-shaped array, accuracy of at least +/-6° of azimuth at 50 m from the nest), and 88.62% arrived at the training feeder in the distance trials (five-feeder linear array, accuracy of at least +/-5 m or +/-10% at 50 m from the nest). Thus, S. mexicana reactivated foragers can find the indicated food source at a specific distance and direction with high precision, higher than that shown by honeybees, Apis mellifera, which do not communicate food location at such close distances to the nest.

  4. Outbreeding and lack of temporal genetic structure in a drone congregation of the neotropical stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Matthias Y; Moritz, Robin FA; Kraus, F Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Drone aggregations are a widespread phenomenon in many stingless bee species (Meliponini), but the ultimate and proximate causes for their formation are still not well understood. One adaptive explanation for this phenomenon is the avoidance of inbreeding, which is especially detrimental for stingless bees due to the combined effects of the complementary sex-determining system and the small effective population size caused by eusociality and monandry. We analyzed the temporal genetic dynamics of a drone aggregation of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana with microsatellite markers over a time window of four weeks. We estimated the drones of the aggregation to originate from a total of 55 colonies using sibship re-construction. There was no detectable temporal genetic differentiation or sub-structuring in the aggregation. Most important, we could exclude all colonies in close proximity of the aggregation as origin of the drones in the aggregation, implicating that they originate from more distant colonies. We conclude that the diverse genetic composition and the distant origin of the drones of the S. mexicana drone congregation provides an effective mechanism to avoid mating among close relatives. PMID:22833802

  5. PPAR activation induces M1 macrophage polarization via cPLA₂-COX-2 inhibition, activating ROS production against Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gandarilla, J A; Osorio-Trujillo, C; Hernández-Ramírez, V I; Talamás-Rohana, P

    2013-01-01

    Defence against Leishmania depends upon Th1 inflammatory response and, a major problem in susceptible models, is the turnoff of the leishmanicidal activity of macrophages with IL-10, IL-4, and COX-2 upregulation, as well as immunosuppressive PGE2, all together inhibiting the respiratory burst. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) activation is responsible for macrophages polarization on Leishmania susceptible models where microbicide functions are deactivated. In this paper, we demonstrated that, at least for L. mexicana, PPAR activation, mainly PPAR γ , induced macrophage activation through their polarization towards M1 profile with the increase of microbicide activity against intracellular pathogen L. mexicana. PPAR activation induced IL-10 downregulation, whereas the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF- α , IL-1 β , and IL-6 remained high. Moreover, PPAR agonists treatment induced the deactivation of cPLA2-COX-2-prostaglandins pathway together with an increase in TLR4 expression, all of whose criteria meet the M1 macrophage profile. Finally, parasite burden, in treated macrophages, was lower than that in infected nontreated macrophages, most probably associated with the increase of respiratory burst in these treated cells. Based on the above data, we conclude that PPAR agonists used in this work induces M1 macrophages polarization via inhibition of cPLA2 and the increase of aggressive microbicidal activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PMID:23555077

  6. Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally adapted Poecilia mexicana (Poeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Riesch, R; Plath, M; Schlupp, I

    2011-03-01

    Chronic environmental stress is known to induce evolutionary change. Here, we assessed male life-history trait divergence in the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana from a system that has been described to undergo incipient ecological speciation in adjacent, but reproductively isolated toxic/nontoxic and surface/cave habitats. Examining both field-caught and common garden-reared specimens, we investigated the extent of differentiation and plasticity of life-history strategies employed by male P. mexicana. We found strong site-specific life-history divergence in traits such as fat content, standard length and gonadosomatic index. The majority of site-specific life-history differences were also expressed under common garden-rearing conditions. We propose that apparent conservatism of male life histories is the result of other (genetically based) changes in physiology and behaviour between populations. Together with the results from previous studies, this is strong evidence for local adaptation as a result of ecologically based divergent selection. PMID:21159007

  7. Two Lactarius species associated with a relict Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana population in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Montoya, L; Haug, I; Bandala, V M

    2010-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fleshy fungi are being monitored in a population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana persisting in a montane cloud forest refuge on a volcano in a subtropical region of central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). The population of Fagus studied represents one of the 10 recognized forest fragments still housing this tree genus in Mexico. This is the first attempt to document EM fungi associated with this tree species in Mexico. We present evidence of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus with this endemic tree. Species identification of Lactarius on Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana was based on the comparison of DNAsequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). The occurrence of Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus populations in the area of study represent the southernmost record known to date of these two species in North America and are new for the Neotropical Lactarius mycota. Descriptions coupled with illustrations of macro- and micromorphological features of basidiomes as well as photographs of ectomycorrhizas are presented. PMID:20120238

  8. Homology modeling of LmxMPK4 of Leishmania mexicana and virtual screening of potent inhibitors against it.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chhedi Lal; Khan, Mohd Kalim Ahmad; Khan, Mohd Faheem; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2013-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most important diseases of mankind. In the life cycle of Leishmania mexicana, two most important developmental stages are observed. In insect vector it is in promastigote form and in mammalian macrophages is the amastigote form. The family of protein kinases are extremely important regulators of many different cellular processes such as transcriptional control, cell cycle development and differentiation, and also draw much attention as possible drug targets for protozaon parasites. Leishmania mexicana mitogen activated protein kinase 4 (LmxMPK4) is essential for proliferation and survival of the parasite promastigote and amastigote forms and is a potential drug target for leishmaniasis. The existing therapy for leishmaniasis is not enough due to host toxicity and drug resistance. The experimental 3D structure of this protein has not yet been determined. In this study, we have used homology modelling techniques to generate the 3D structure of LmxMPK4 and selected effective inhibitors by ZINC database on the basis of structure of berberine alkaloid for molecular docking studies with LmxMPK4. The inhibitors ZINC05999210, ZINC40402312 and ZINC40977377 were found to be more potent for inhibition of leishmaniasis due to the robust binding affinity and strong inhibition constant (Ki) of the protein-ligand interactions. This finding may help to understand the nature of MAP kinase and development of specific anti-leishmanial therapies. PMID:23740395

  9. Leishmania mexicana promastigotes down regulate JNK and p-38 MAPK activation: Role in the inhibition of camptothecin-induced apoptosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Jorge; Wilkins-Rodríguez, Arturo; Argueta-Donohué, Jesús; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Gutiérrez-Kobeh, Laila

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are one of the principal host cells of the obligate intracellular parasite Leishmania. Inhibition of host cell apoptosis is a strategy employed by multiple pathogens to ensure their survival in the infected cell. We have previously shown that the infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) with Leishmania mexicana inhibits campthotecin-induced apoptosis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of apoptosis of dendritic cells by Leishmania have not been established. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are key participants in the process of apoptosis and different species of Leishmania have been shown to regulate these kinases. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of L. mexicana promastigotes in the activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase and their participation in the inhibition of apoptosis. The infection of moDC with L. mexicana promastigotes diminished significantly the phosphorylation of the MAP kinases JNK and p38. The inhibition of both kinases diminished DNA fragmentation, but in a major extent was the reduction of DNA fragmentation when JNK was inhibited. The capacity of L. mexicana promastigotes to diminish MAP kinases activation is probably one of the strategies employed to delay apoptosis induction in the infected moDC and may have implications for Leishmania pathogenesis by favoring the invasion of its host and the persistence of the parasite in the infected cells. PMID:26777406

  10. The role of androgens in species recognition and sperm production in Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Gabor, Caitlin R; Aspbury, Andrea S; Ma, Jacqueline; Nice, Chris C

    2012-02-01

    Much is known about the role of hormones in the regulation of vertebrate mating behavior, including receptivity, and several components of mate choice. Hormones may modulate reproductive behavior in such a way to increase or decrease the individual's motivation, and therefore hormones may be important in mediating behavior associated with reproductive isolation. The mating complex of the all female gynogenetic Amazon mollies, Poecilia formosa, and their parental species (sailfin mollies, P. latipinna, and Atlantic mollies, P. mexicana) is a model system for studying ultimate mechanisms of species recognition. However, proximate mechanisms, such as variation in hormone levels, and the effect of hormones on sperm production have not been extensively examined. We predict that one or more of the sex steroid hormones in teleost fish (11-ketotestosterone (KT), testosterone (T), and estradiol (E)) will play a role in species recognition (during mate choice and/or sperm priming) for Atlantic mollies (the maternal parental species) that are sympatric with Amazon mollies. We sequentially paired male Atlantic mollies with female conspecifics and Amazon mollies and obtained water-borne hormone samples before and after mating for all fish. We measured circulating KT, T, and E from the water samples. Although we did not find an overall KT response to mating with conspecifics as has been found previously in sailfin mollies, male Atlantic mollies that mated more with conspecific females had lower postmating T levels. Additionally, males attempted to mate more with conspecific females that had lower postmating E levels, but attempted to mate more with Amazon mollies that had higher postmating KT levels. We also examined the effect of KT on sperm priming (a mechanism of premating mate choice), and found that KT levels of male Atlantic mollies prior to mating are correlated with the sperm priming response when males were paired with conspecific females, but this correlation was not

  11. Characterization of a novel GDP-mannose:Serine-protein mannose-1-phosphotransferase from Leishmania mexicana.

    PubMed

    Moss, J M; Reid, G E; Mullin, K A; Zawadzki, J L; Simpson, R J; McConville, M J

    1999-03-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania secrete a number of glycoproteins and mucin-like proteoglycans that appear to be important parasite virulence factors. We have previously proposed that the polypeptide backbones of these molecules are extensively modified with a complex array of phosphoglycan chains that are linked to Ser/Thr-rich domains via a common Manalpha1-PO4-Ser linkage (Ilg, T., Overath, P., Ferguson, M. A. J., Rutherford, T., Campbell, D. G., and McConville, M. J. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 24073-24081). In this study, we show that Leishmania mexicana promastigotes contain a peptide-specific mannose-1-phosphotransferase (pep-MPT) activity that adds Manalpha1-P to serine residues in a range of defined peptides. The presence and location of the Manalpha1-PO4-Ser linkage in these peptides were determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemical and enzymatic treatments. The pep-MPT activity was solubilized in non-ionic detergents, was dependent on Mn2+, utilized GDP-Man as the mannose donor, and was expressed in all developmental stages of the parasite. The pep-MPT activity was maximal against peptides containing Ser/Thr-rich domains of the endogenous acceptors and, based on competition assays with oligosaccharide acceptors, was distinct from other leishmanial MPTs involved in the initiation and elongation of lipid-linked phosphoglycan chains. In subcellular fractionation experiments, pep-MPT was resolved from the endoplasmic reticulum marker BiP, but had an overlapping distribution with the cis-Golgi marker Rab1. Although Man-PO4 residues in the mature secreted glycoproteins are extensively modified with mannose oligosaccharides and phosphoglycan chains, similar modifications were not added to peptide-linked Man-PO4 residues in the in vitro assays. Similarly, Man-PO4 residues on endogenous polypeptide acceptors were also poorly extended, although the elongating enzymes were still active, suggesting that the pep-MPT activity and

  12. DIABETES MELLITUS COMO FACTOR DE RIESGO DE DEMENCIA EN LA POBLACIÓN ADULTA MAYOR MEXICANA

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Mejía-Arango; Clemente, y Zúñiga-Gil

    2012-01-01

    Introduccion La diabetes mellitus y las demencias constituyen dos problemas crecientes de salud entre la población adulta mayor del mundo y en particular de los paises en desarrollo. Hacen falta estudios longitudinales sobre el papel de la diabetes como factor de riesgo para demencia. Objetivo Determinar el riesgo de demencia en sujetos Mexicanos con diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Materiales y Metodos Los sujetos diabéticos libres de demencia pertenecientes al Estudio Nacional de Salud y Envejecimiento en México fueron evaluados a los dos años de la línea de base. Se estudió el papel de los factores sociodemográficos, de otras comorbilidades y del tipo de tratamiento en la conversión a demencia. Resultados Durante la línea de base 749 sujetos (13.8%) tuvieron diabetes. El riesgo de desarrollar demencia en estos individuos fue el doble (RR, 2.08 IC 95%, 1.59–2.73). Se encontró un riesgo mayor en individuos de 80 años y más (RR 2.44 IC 95%, 1.46–4.08), en los hombres (RR, 2.25 IC 95%, 1.46–3.49) y en sujetos con nivel educativo menor de 7 años. El estar bajo tratamiento con insulina incrementó el riesgo de demencia (RR, 2.83, IC 95%, 1.58–5.06). Las otras comorbilidades que aumentaron el riesgo de demencia en los pacientes diabéticos fueron la hipertensión (RR, 2.75, IC 95%, 1.86–4.06) y la depresión (RR, 3.78, 95% IC 2.37–6.04). Conclusión Los sujetos con diabetes mellitus tienen un riesgo mayor de desarrollar demencia, La baja escolaridad y otras comorbilidades altamente prevalentes en la población Mexicana contribuyen a la asociación diabetes-demencia. PMID:21948010

  13. Scanning and three-dimensional electron microscopy methods for the study of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana flagella

    PubMed Central

    Gluenz, Eva; Wheeler, Richard John; Hughes, Louise; Vaughan, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy tools have revolutionized our understanding of cell structure and molecular complexes in biology. Here, we describe methods for studying flagellar ultrastructure and biogenesis in two unicellular parasites—Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana. We describe methods for the preparation of these parasites for scanning electron microscopy cellular electron tomography, and serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM). These parasites have a highly ordered cell shape and form, with a defined positioning of internal cytoskeletal structures and organelles. We show how knowledge of these can be used to dissect cell cycles in both parasites and identify the old flagellum from the new in T. brucei. Finally, we demonstrate the use of SBFSEM three-dimensional models for analysis of individual whole cells, demonstrating the excellent potential this technique has for future studies of mutant cell lines. PMID:25837406

  14. Surface Zn-proteinase as a molecule for defense of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis promastigotes against cytolysis inside macrophage phagolysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Seay, M B; Heard, P L; Chaudhuri, G

    1996-01-01

    The role of the surface membrane Zn-proteinase in protecting the cellular integrity of the macrophage parasite Leishmania mexicana amazonensis from intraphagolysosomal cytolysis was studied. These cells lose their infectivity to host macrophages after prolonged cultivation in axenic growth medium. The virulent and attenuated variants of the parasite cells were cloned. Failure of these attenuated parasite cells to survive inside macrophage phagolysosomes is associated with 20- to 50-fold reduction in the expression of surface gp63 protein. In situ inhibition of gp63 proteinase activity inside Leishmania-infected macrophage phagolysosomes with targeted delivery of an inhibitor of gp63 proteinase activity, 1,10-phenanthroline, selectively eliminated intracellular Leishmania amastigotes, further suggesting the importance of this proteinase in phagolysosomal survival of the parasite. An upstream sequence (US) of the gp63 gene was cloned in front of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene in plasmid pCATbasic. Transfection of L. mexicana amazonensis cells with this recombinant plasmid showed that expression of the CAT gene from this US is 15- to 20-fold higher in virulent clones than in avirulent clones of the parasite. Band shift analysis with the cloned US also showed that binding of protein(s) was 15- to 20-fold higher in virulent cell extract than in avirulent cell extract. Coating of attenuated cells or liposomes with proteolytically active gp63 protects them from degradation inside macrophage phagolysosomes. These results suggest a novel mechanism of survival of this phagolysosomal parasite with the help of its surface Zn-proteinase. PMID:8945556

  15. Naturally azole-resistant Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes are rendered susceptible in the presence of terbinafine: comparative study with azole-susceptible Leishmania mexicana promastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, H; Dagger, F; Hernandez, A; Liendo, A; Urbina, J A

    1996-01-01

    Leishmania braziliensis (isolate 2903) was naturally resistant to ketoconazole or the bis-triazole D0870, inhibitors of sterol C-14 demethylase, which produced only moderate effects on the proliferation of promastigotes at 10 microM. In contrast, Leishmania mexicana (isolate NR) was extremely susceptible to the azoles, as complete growth arrest and cell lysis were induced by incubation of the parasites with 0.05 microM concentrations of the drugs for 72 h. The opposite response was observed with terbinafine, an inhibitor of squalene epoxidase: L. braziliensis 2903 was three times more susceptible to the drug than L. mexicana NR (MICs of 5 and 15 microM, respectively). However, when the L. braziliensis stock was grown in the presence of 1 microM terbinafine, which by itself produced only marginal (< 10%) effects on growth, it became highly susceptible to the azoles, with an MIC of 0.03 microM. Analysis of cellular free sterols by high-resolution capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry showed that 14-methyl sterols can support normal growth of L. braziliensis 2903 but not of L. mexicana NR. On the other hand, the higher susceptibility of the L. braziliensis isolate to terbinafine was correlated with a massive accumulation of squalene in the presence of the allylamine while no significant effects on L. mexicana sterol composition were observed at drug concentrations up to 1 microM. Thus, the > 300-fold increase in the susceptibility of L. braziliensis promastigotes to azoles in the presence of terbinafine was attributed to the combined effect of squalene and the methylated sterol precursors on the physical properties of the cell's membranes, leading to the loss of cell viability. Combination therapy with azoles and terbinafine in the treatment of human L. braziliensis infections deserves further study. PMID:9124841

  16. The role of Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica Serie de Conferencias in the world of astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Peimbert, Silvia; Allen, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Forty years ago Revista Mexicana de Astronomía y Astrofísica decided to include the proceedings of astronomical meetings in Mexico and Latin America. In 1995 it became necessary to found the Serie de Conferencias to better differentiate proceedings from refereed papers.So far there have been 58 astronomical meetings published and there are several more in store for the coming years

  17. Synthetic fragments of antigenic lipophosphoglycans from Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana and their use for characterisation of the Leishmania elongating alpha-D-mannopyranosylphosphate transferase.

    PubMed

    Higson, Adrian P; Ross, Andrew J; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Routier, Françoise H; Sizova, Olga V; Ferguson, Michael A J; Nikolaev, Andrei V

    2005-03-18

    The phosphorylated branched heptasaccharides 7 and 8, the octasaccharide 9 and the phosphorylated trisaccharides 5 and 6, which are fragments of the phosphoglycan portion of the surface lipophosphoglycans from Leishmania mexicana (5) or L. major (6-9), were synthesised by using the glycosyl hydrogenphosphonate method for the preparation of phosphodiester bridges. The compounds were tested as acceptor substrates/putative inhibitors for the Leishmania elongating alpha-D-mannosylphosphate transferase. PMID:15685582

  18. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  19. Comparison of small mammal prevalence of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in five foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the State of Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Van Wynsberghe, N R; Canto-Lara, S B; Sosa-Bibiano, E I; Rivero-Cárdenas, N A; Andrade-Narváez, F J

    2009-01-01

    In the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, 95% of the human cases of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis are caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana with an incidence rate of 5.08 per 100,000 inhabitants. Transmission is limited to the winter months (November to March). One study on wild rodents has incriminated Ototylomys phyllotis and Peromyscus yucatanicus as primary reservoirs of L. (L.) mexicana in the focus of La Libertad, Campeche. In the present study, the prevalence of both infection and disease caused by L. (L.) mexicana in small terrestrial mammals were documented during five transmission seasons (1994-2004) in five foci of Leishmaniasis in the state of Campeche. Foci separated by only 100 km, with similar relative abundances of small mammals, were found to differ significantly in their prevalence of both symptoms and infection. Transmission rates and reservoir species seemed to change in space as well as in time which limited the implementation of effective control measures of the disease even in a small endemic area such as the south of the Yucatan Peninsula. PMID:19390737

  20. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  1. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  2. The glycoinositol phospholipids of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Evidence for the presence of three distinct pathways of glycolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    McConville, M J; Collidge, T A; Ferguson, M A; Schneider, P

    1993-07-25

    Most macromolecules at the cell surface of parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania, including the major surface glycoproteins and a complex lipophosphoglycan (LPG), are attached to the plasma membrane via glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. Free glycoinositol phospholipids (GIPLs) which are not linked to protein or phosphoglycan have also been found. In this study, we show that L. mexicana promastigotes synthesize two distinct GIPL lineages, comprising at least 10 glycolipid species. These structures were characterized using a combination of gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, methylation linkage analysis, and chemical and exoglycosidase sequencing. The major lineage contains GIPLs with the glycan structures Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-4GlcN (iM2), Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-3)Man alpha 1-4GlcN (iM3), and Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-6(Man alpha 1-3)Man alpha 1-4GlcN (iM4), which are linked to alkylacyl-PI containing predominantly C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids and C18:0 alkyl chains (referred to as the hybrid type GIPLs). A proportion of the iM3 and iM4 species (32 and 4%, respectively) are substituted with an ethanolamine-phosphate residue. The location of this residue on the core glucosamine residue was inferred from the results of methylation analyses and alpha-mannosidase digestion. The minor GIPL lineage contains GIPLs with the same glycan sequences as the glycolipid anchor of LPG (referred to as the type-2 GIPLs). The alkylacyl-PI or lyso-alkyl-PI lipid moieties of these GIPLs differ from those of the hybrid type GIPLs and from the main pool of alkylacyl-PI in containing significant levels of C24:0 and C26:0 alkyl chains. The most polar of these GIPLs, LPGp, has the properties expected of a biosynthetic precursor to the LPG, having the structure, [formula: see text] Finally, the GPI anchors of the major promastigote proteins were found to contain the glycan sequence Man alpha 1-2Man alpha 1-6Man alpha 1-4GlcN, and an alkylacyl-PI lipid moiety which

  3. The effect of chemical processing on the δ 13C value of plant tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Water, Peter K.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of standard processing techniques on the δ 13C value of plant tissue was tested using species representing the three photosynthetic pathways, including angiosperms and gymnosperms within the C 3 taxonomic division. The species include Cowania mexicana (C 3 angiosperm), Juniperus osteosperma (C 3 gymnosperm), Opuntia spp. (crassulacean acid metabolism [CAM] angiosperm), and Atriplex canescens (C 4 angiosperm). Each species is represented by 5 plants collected at two different sites, for a total of 10 samples. The samples were processed to whole plant tissue, holocellulose, α-cellulose, and nitrocellulose. An additional process was added with the discovery of residual Ca-oxalate crystals in holocellulose samples. Both C 3 species show δ 13C values becoming 13C enriched with increased processing. The CAM representative shows the opposite trend, with 13C depletion during the progression of treatments. The greatest range of values and most inconsistent trends occur in the C 4 representative. Removal of the Ca-oxalate fraction resulted in different mean weight percentages and δ 13C values among the species. Calculated δ 13C values of the Ca-oxalate crystals show depletion from the tissue values in the two C 3 species and enrichment in the C 4 and CAM representatives. The C. mexicana samples show the greatest change between the tissue and Ca-oxalates (7.3‰) but the least mean weight percentage (11%), whereas A. canescens shows the greatest overall change, with a -2.8‰ isotopic shift and over 48% mean weight percentage. Variability within the samples undergoing each treatment remained relatively unchanged even with increased cellulose purity. This paper provides estimates of isotopic offsets necessary to correct from one treatment to another. Significant differences in δ 13C among different treatments confirm the need to state the tissue fraction analyzed when reporting δ 13C results.

  4. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  5. Sex-specific local life-history adaptation in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Reznick, David N; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Cavefishes have long been used as model organisms showcasing adaptive diversification, but does adaptation to caves also facilitate the evolution of reproductive isolation from surface ancestors? We raised offspring of wild-caught surface- and cave-dwelling ecotypes of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to sexual maturity in a 12-month common garden experiment. Fish were raised under one of two food regimes (high vs. low), and this was crossed with differences in lighting conditions (permanent darkness vs. 12:12 h light:dark cycle) in a 2 × 2 factorial design, allowing us to elucidate potential patterns of local adaptation in life histories. Our results reveal a pattern of sex-specific local life-history adaptation: Surface molly females had the highest fitness in the treatment best resembling their habitat of origin (high food and a light:dark cycle), and suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, while cave molly females were not similarly affected in any treatment. Males of both ecotypes, on the other hand, showed only weak evidence for local adaptation. Nonetheless, local life-history adaptation in females likely contributes to ecological diversification in this system and other cave animals, further supporting the role of local adaptation due to strong divergent selection as a major force in ecological speciation. PMID:26960566

  6. Sex-specific local life-history adaptation in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana)

    PubMed Central

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Reznick, David N.; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Cavefishes have long been used as model organisms showcasing adaptive diversification, but does adaptation to caves also facilitate the evolution of reproductive isolation from surface ancestors? We raised offspring of wild-caught surface- and cave-dwelling ecotypes of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to sexual maturity in a 12-month common garden experiment. Fish were raised under one of two food regimes (high vs. low), and this was crossed with differences in lighting conditions (permanent darkness vs. 12:12 h light:dark cycle) in a 2 × 2 factorial design, allowing us to elucidate potential patterns of local adaptation in life histories. Our results reveal a pattern of sex-specific local life-history adaptation: Surface molly females had the highest fitness in the treatment best resembling their habitat of origin (high food and a light:dark cycle), and suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, while cave molly females were not similarly affected in any treatment. Males of both ecotypes, on the other hand, showed only weak evidence for local adaptation. Nonetheless, local life-history adaptation in females likely contributes to ecological diversification in this system and other cave animals, further supporting the role of local adaptation due to strong divergent selection as a major force in ecological speciation. PMID:26960566

  7. Kharon1 Null Mutants of Leishmania mexicana Are Avirulent in Mice and Exhibit a Cytokinesis Defect within Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Marco A.; Valli, Jessica; Gluenz, Eva; Landfear, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis. PMID:26266938

  8. Assessing the importance of four sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) as vectors of Leishmania mexicana in Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pech-May, A; Peraza-Herrera, G; Moo-Llanes, D A; Escobedo-Ortegón, J; Berzunza-Cruz, M; Becker-Fauser, I; Montes DE Oca-Aguilar, A C; Rebollar-Téllez, E A

    2016-09-01

    Localized cutaneous leishmaniasis represents a public health problem in many areas of Mexico, especially in the Yucatan Peninsula. An understanding of vector ecology and bionomics is of great importance in evaluations of the transmission dynamics of Leishmania parasites. A field study was conducted in the county of Calakmul, state of Campeche, during the period from November 2006 to March 2007. Phlebotomine sandfly vectors were sampled using Centers for Disease Control light traps, baited Disney traps and Shannon traps. A total of 3374 specimens were captured in the two villages of Once de Mayo (93.8%) and Arroyo Negro (6.1%). In Once de Mayo, the most abundant species were Psathyromyia shannoni, Lutzomyia cruciata, Bichromomyia olmeca olmeca and Psychodopygus panamensis (all: Diptera: Psychodidae). The Shannon trap was by far the most efficient method of collection. The infection rate, as determined by Leishmania mexicana-specific polymerase chain reaction, was 0.3% in Once de Mayo and infected sandflies included Psy. panamensis, B. o. olmeca and Psa. shannoni. There were significant differences in human biting rates across sandfly species and month of sampling. Ecological niche modelling analyses showed an overall overlap of 39.1% for the four species in the whole state of Campeche. In addition, the finding of nine vector-reservoir pairs indicates a potential interaction. The roles of the various sandfly vectors in Calakmul are discussed. PMID:27040367

  9. Choosy males from the underground: male mating preferences in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies ( Poecilia mexicana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, Martin; Seggel, Uta; Burmeister, Heike; Heubel, Katja U.; Schlupp, Ingo

    2006-03-01

    Atlantic mollies ( Poecilia mexicana) inhabit a variety of surface habitats, but they also occur in a sulfur cave in southern Mexico. We examined male mate choice relative to female body size in the cave population and in the most closely related surface-dwelling population from a nearby river. Males from both populations were either light- or dark-reared and could choose between two differently sized females either on the basis of visual cues in light or on the basis of solely nonvisual cues in darkness. Sexual preferences were estimated from the degree of association. Cave molly males always showed a preference for the larger female, both in light and in darkness. Among the surface males, only light-reared males showed a preference in the visual cues test, but not in darkness. In a control experiment, we demonstrated that male association preferences directly translate into actual mating preferences. Apparently, using visual cues for mate choice is the ancestral state in this system, and using nonvisual cues has evolved as a novel trait in the cave population. We discuss the evolution of nonvisual male mate choice in the context of changed environmental conditions, namely the absence of light, hypoxia, and toxic hydrogen sulfide in the cave.

  10. Toxic hydrogen sulfide and dark caves: life-history adaptations in a livebearing fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2010-05-01

    Life-history traits are very sensitive to extreme environmental conditions, because resources that need to be invested in somatic maintenance cannot be invested in reproduction. Here we examined female life-history traits in the Mexican livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana from a variety of benign surface habitats, a creek with naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a sulfidic cave, and a non-sulfidic cave. Previous studies revealed pronounced genetic and morphological divergence over very small geographic scales in this system despite the absence of physical barriers, suggesting that local adaptation to different combinations of two selection factors, toxicity (H2S) and darkness, is accompanied by very low rates of gene flow. Hence, we investigated life-history divergence between these populations in response to the selective pressures of darkness and/or toxicity. Our main results show that toxicity and darkness both select for (or impose constraints on) the same female trait dynamics: reduced fecundity and increased offspring size. Since reduced fecundity in the sulfur cave population was previously shown to be heritable, we discuss how divergent life-history evolution may promote further ecological divergence: for example, reduced fecundity and increased offspring autonomy are clearly beneficial in extreme environments, but fish with these traits are outcompeted in benign habitats. PMID:20503881

  11. Choosy males from the underground: male mating preferences in surface- and cave-dwelling Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Plath, Martin; Seggel, Uta; Burmeister, Heike; Heubel, Katja U; Schlupp, Ingo

    2006-03-01

    Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana) inhabit a variety of surface habitats, but they also occur in a sulfur cave in southern Mexico. We examined male mate choice relative to female body size in the cave population and in the most closely related surface-dwelling population from a nearby river. Males from both populations were either light- or dark-reared and could choose between two differently sized females either on the basis of visual cues in light or on the basis of solely nonvisual cues in darkness. Sexual preferences were estimated from the degree of association. Cave molly males always showed a preference for the larger female, both in light and in darkness. Among the surface males, only light-reared males showed a preference in the visual cues test, but not in darkness. In a control experiment, we demonstrated that male association preferences directly translate into actual mating preferences. Apparently, using visual cues for mate choice is the ancestral state in this system, and using nonvisual cues has evolved as a novel trait in the cave population. We discuss the evolution of nonvisual male mate choice in the context of changed environmental conditions, namely the absence of light, hypoxia, and toxic hydrogen sulfide in the cave. PMID:16404589

  12. Toxic hydrogen sulfide and dark caves: phenotypic and genetic divergence across two abiotic environmental gradients in Poecilia mexicana.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Dewitt, Thomas J; Schlupp, Ingo; García de León, Francisco J; Herrmann, Roger; Feulner, Philine G D; Tiedemann, Ralph; Plath, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Divergent natural selection drives evolutionary diversification. It creates phenotypic diversity by favoring developmental plasticity within populations or genetic differentiation and local adaptation among populations. We investigated phenotypic and genetic divergence in the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana along two abiotic environmental gradients. These fish typically inhabit nonsulfidic surface rivers, but also colonized sulfidic and cave habitats. We assessed phenotypic variation among a factorial combination of habitat types using geometric and traditional morphometrics, and genetic divergence using quantitative and molecular genetic analyses. Fish in caves (sulfidic or not) exhibited reduced eyes and slender bodies. Fish from sulfidic habitats (surface or cave) exhibited larger heads and longer gill filaments. Common-garden rearing suggested that these morphological differences are partly heritable. Population genetic analyses using microsatellites as well as cytochrome b gene sequences indicate high population differentiation over small spatial scale and very low rates of gene flow, especially among different habitat types. This suggests that divergent environmental conditions constitute barriers to gene flow. Strong molecular divergence over short distances as well as phenotypic and quantitative genetic divergence across habitats in directions classic to fish ecomorphology suggest that divergent selection is structuring phenotypic variation in this system. PMID:18637957

  13. Ser/Thr-rich repetitive motifs as targets for phosphoglycan modifications in Leishmania mexicana secreted acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wiese, M; Ilg, T; Lottspeich, F; Overath, P

    1995-03-15

    The insect stage of the protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana secretes a phosphomonoesterase in the form of a filamentous complex. The polypeptide subunits of this polymer are modified by phosphoglycans and/or oligomannosyl residues linked to phosphoserine. Based on peptide sequence data of a predominant 100 kDa protein of the filamentous complex, two tandemly arranged, single copy genes, lmsap1 and lmsap2, were cloned and sequenced. lmsap1 predicts a protein with features characteristic of acid phosphatases and a remarkable serine- and threonine-rich region of 32 amino acids close to the C-terminus. In the otherwise identical lmsap2 product, this region is extended to 383 amino acids and is composed of short Ser/Thr-rich repeats. Deletion analysis demonstrates that lmsap1 encodes the major 100 kDa protein of the complex while a minor 200 kDa component is derived from the lmsap2 gene. Null mutants of either gene retain the ability to secrete acid phosphatase filaments, while a deletion of both genes results in Leishmania defective in enzyme formation. The Ser/Thr-rich domains are the targets for phosphoglycan modifications as shown by the expression of secreted fusion proteins composed of these C-terminal regions and the N-terminal domain of a lysosomal acid phosphatase. PMID:7720697

  14. An Evaluation of the Effects of Soil Characteristics on Mitigation and Restoration Involving Blue Elderberry, Sambucus mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Munz, Molly; Holyoak, Marcel

    2008-07-01

    We conducted field surveys and laboratory analyses to test the effects of soil characteristics in habitat mitigation sites and natural sites on the growth and condition of blue elderberry ( Sambucus mexicana), which is the sole host plant for the federally threatened Valley elderberry longhorn beetle ( Desmocerus californicus dimorphus). Thirty mitigation and 16 natural sites were selected throughout the range of the beetle. We found that although plant relative growth rates were comparable between mitigation sites and a natural site, mitigation sites contained substantially less soil nutrients than mitigation sites. Within mitigation sites, elderberry health and growth were positively correlated with the amount of total nitrogen in soils and less strongly with other soil nutrients and soil moisture. Analyses demonstrated reductions in the relative growth rate of elderberry as mitigation sites aged, and that soil nutrients and soil moisture became depleted over time. For mitigation sites, it took approximately seven years to develop basal stem diameters that have been linked to successful beetle colonization. Mitigation sites have smaller shrubs than natural sites and growth slows as mitigation sites age, thus delaying convergence of conditions between natural and mitigation sites. Analyses of soil particle size and whether sites were within the 100-year floodplain (as an indicator of riparian conditions) were inconclusive. We recommend investigating fertilizing and optimum planting densities for elderberry at restoration and mitigation sites, as well as increasing the duration of irrigation and monitoring.

  15. Crystal Structure of Arginase from Leishmania mexicana and Implications for the Inhibition of Polyamine Biosynthesis in Parasitic Infections†

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Edward L.; Ullman, Buddy; Roberts, Sigrid C.; Dixit, Upasna Gaur; Wilson, Mary E.; Hai, Yang; Christianson, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase from parasitic protozoa belonging to the genus Leishmania is a potential drug target for the treatment of leishmaniasis because this binuclear manganese metalloenzyme catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of polyamines that enable cell growth and survival. The high resolution X-ray crystal structures of the unliganded form of Leishmania mexicana arginase (LmARG) and four inhibitor complexes are now reported. These complexes include the reactive substrate analogue 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) and the hydroxylated substrate analogue nor-Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), which are the most potent arginase inhibitors known to date. Comparisons of the LmARG structure with that of the archetypal arginase, human arginase I, reveal that all residues important for substrate binding and catalysis are strictly conserved. However, three regions of tertiary structure differ between the parasitic enzyme and the human enzyme corresponding to the G62 – S71, L161 – C172, and I219 – V230 segments of LmARG. Additionally, variations are observed in salt link interactions that stabilize trimer assembly in LmARG. We also report biological studies in which we demonstrate that localization of LmARG to the glycosome, a unique subcellular organelle peculiar to Leishmania and related parasites, is essential for robust pathogenesis. PMID:23583962

  16. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500 Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300 Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior. PMID:20430090

  17. Leishmania mexicana Infection Induces IgG to Parasite Surface Glycoinositol Phospholipids that Can Induce IL-10 in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana causes chronic disease in C57BL/6 mice, in which cutaneous lesions persist for many months with high parasite burdens (107–108 parasites). This chronic disease process requires host IL-10 and FcγRIII. When Leishmania amastigotes are released from cells, surface-bound IgG can induce IL-10 and suppress IL-12 production from macrophages. These changes decrease IFN-γ from T cells and nitric oxide production in infected cells, which are both required for Leishmania control. However, antibodies targets and the kinetics of antibody production are unknown. Several groups have been unsuccessful in identifying amastigote surface proteins that bind IgG. We now show that glycoinositol phospholipids (GIPLs) of L. mexicana are recognized by mouse IgG1 by 6 weeks of infection, with a rapid increase between 12 and 16 weeks, consistent with the timing of chronic disease in C57BL/6 mice vs. healing in FcγRIII-deficient mice. A single prominent spot on TLC is recognized by IgG, and the glycolipid is a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol containing a branched mannose structure. We show that the lipid structure of the GIPL (the sn-2 fatty acid) is required for antibody recognition. This GIPL is abundant in L. mexicana amastigotes, rare in stationary-phase promastigotes, and absent in L. major, consistent with a role for antibodies to GIPLs in chronic disease. A mouse monoclonal anti-GIPL IgG recognizes GIPLs on the parasite surface, and induces IL-10 from macrophages. The current work also extends this mouse analysis to humans, finding that L. mexicana-infected humans with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis have antibodies that recognize GIPLs, can bind to the surface of amastigotes, and can induce IL-10 from human monocytes. Further characterization of the target glycolipids will have important implications for drug and vaccine development and will elucidate the poorly understood role of glycolipids in

  18. Isolation of Leishmania (L.) mexicana from wild rodents and their possible role in the transmission of localized cutaneous leishmaniasis in the state of Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Chable-Santos, J B; Van Wynsberghe, N R; Canto-Lara, S B; Andrade-Narvaez, F J

    1995-08-01

    Leishmania parasites were isolated from four of seven small rodent species captured in the State of Campeche, Mexico. Signs and/or symptoms of leishmanial infection were restricted to the tail of the mice. Peromyscus yucatanicus endemic to the peninsula of Yucatan and Oryzomys melanotis were added to the list of carriers of Leishmania. Leishmania (L.) mexicana, characterized by an indirect immunofluorescence antibody method using monoclonal antibodies, was identified in one Sigmodon hispidus and one Or. melanotis. The possible role of the different species as primary reservoirs of Leishmania in the peninsula of Yucatan is discussed. PMID:7677214

  19. Crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana phosphoglycerate mutase suggest a one-metal mechanism and a new enzyme subclass.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Matthew W; Kuaprasert, Buabarn; McNae, Iain W; Morgan, Hugh P; Harding, Marjorie M; Michels, Paul A M; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D

    2009-12-01

    The structures of Leishmania mexicana cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (Lm iPGAM) crystallised with the substrate 3-phosphoglycerate at high and low cobalt concentrations have been solved at 2.00- and 1.90-A resolutions. Both structures are very similar and the active site contains both 3-phosphoglycerate and 2-phosphoglycerate at equal occupancies (50%). Lm iPGAM co-crystallised with the product 2-phosphoglycerate yields the same structure. Two Co(2+) are coordinated within the active site with different geometries and affinities. The cobalt at the M1 site has a distorted octahedral geometry and is present at 100% occupancy. The M2-site Co(2+) binds with distorted tetrahedral geometry, with only partial occupancy, and coordinates with Ser75, the residue involved in phosphotransfer. When the M2 site is occupied, the side chain of Ser75 adopts a position that is unfavourable for catalysis, indicating that this site may not be occupied under physiological conditions and that catalysis may occur via a one-metal mechanism. The geometry of the M2 site suggests that it is possible for Ser75 to be activated for phosphotransfer by H-bonding to nearby residues rather than by metal coordination. The 16 active-site residues of Lm iPGAM are conserved in the Mn-dependent iPGAM from Bacillus stearothermophilus (33% overall sequence identity). However, Lm iPGAM has an inserted tyrosine (Tyr210) that causes the M2 site to diminish in size, consistent with its reduced metal affinity. Tyr210 is present in trypanosomatid and plant iPGAMs, but not in the enzymes from other organisms, indicating that there are two subclasses of iPGAMs. PMID:19781556

  20. Anticonvulsant and Antioxidant Effects of Tilia americana var. mexicana and Flavonoids Constituents in the Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; González-Trujano, María Eva; Aguirre-Hernández, Eva; Ruíz-García, Matilde; Sampieri, Aristides; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Tilia genus is commonly used around the world for its central nervous system properties; it is prepared as tea and used as tranquilizing, anticonvulsant, and analgesic. In this study, anticonvulsant activity of the Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences and leaves was investigated by evaluating organic and aqueous extracts (100, 300, and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) and some flavonoids in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice. Moreover, antioxidant effect of these extracts and flavonoids was examined in an in vitro study by using spectrophotometric technique. Significant activity was observed in the methanol extract from inflorescences. An HPLC analysis of the methanol extract from inflorescences and leaves of Tilia allowed demonstrating the respective presence of some partial responsible flavonoid constituents: quercetin (20.09 ± 1.20 μg/mg and 3.39 ± 0.10 μg/mg), rutin (3.52 ± 0.21 μg/mg and 8.94 ± 0.45 μg/mg), and isoquercitrin (1.74 ± 0.01 μg/mg and 1.24 ± 0.13 μg/mg). In addition, significant but different antioxidant properties were obtained among the flavonoids and the extracts investigated. Our results provide evidence of the anticonvulsant activity of Tilia reinforcing its utility for central nervous system diseases whose mechanism of action might involve partial antioxidant effects due to the presence of flavonoids. PMID:25197430

  1. Comparative Life Cycle Transcriptomics Revises Leishmania mexicana Genome Annotation and Links a Chromosome Duplication with Parasitism of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Fiebig, Michael; Kelly, Steven; Gluenz, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are protozoan parasites that have two principal life cycle stages: the motile promastigote forms that live in the alimentary tract of the sandfly and the amastigote forms, which are adapted to survive and replicate in the harsh conditions of the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages. Here, we used Illumina sequencing of poly-A selected RNA to characterise and compare the transcriptomes of L. mexicana promastigotes, axenic amastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. These data allowed the production of the first transcriptome evidence-based annotation of gene models for this species, including genome-wide mapping of trans-splice sites and poly-A addition sites. The revised genome annotation encompassed 9,169 protein-coding genes including 936 novel genes as well as modifications to previously existing gene models. Comparative analysis of gene expression across promastigote and amastigote forms revealed that 3,832 genes are differentially expressed between promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. A large proportion of genes that were downregulated during differentiation to amastigotes were associated with the function of the motile flagellum. In contrast, those genes that were upregulated included cell surface proteins, transporters, peptidases and many uncharacterized genes, including 293 of the 936 novel genes. Genome-wide distribution analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed that the tetraploid chromosome 30 is highly enriched for genes that were upregulated in amastigotes, providing the first evidence of a link between this whole chromosome duplication event and adaptation to the vertebrate host in this group. Peptide evidence for 42 proteins encoded by novel transcripts supports the idea of an as yet uncharacterised set of small proteins in Leishmania spp. with possible implications for host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26452044

  2. Anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects of Tilia americana var. mexicana and flavonoids constituents in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; González-Trujano, María Eva; Aguirre-Hernández, Eva; Ruíz-García, Matilde; Sampieri, Aristides; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Tilia genus is commonly used around the world for its central nervous system properties; it is prepared as tea and used as tranquilizing, anticonvulsant, and analgesic. In this study, anticonvulsant activity of the Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences and leaves was investigated by evaluating organic and aqueous extracts (100, 300, and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) and some flavonoids in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice. Moreover, antioxidant effect of these extracts and flavonoids was examined in an in vitro study by using spectrophotometric technique. Significant activity was observed in the methanol extract from inflorescences. An HPLC analysis of the methanol extract from inflorescences and leaves of Tilia allowed demonstrating the respective presence of some partial responsible flavonoid constituents: quercetin (20.09 ± 1.20 μg/mg and 3.39 ± 0.10 μg/mg), rutin (3.52 ± 0.21 μg/mg and 8.94 ± 0.45 μg/mg), and isoquercitrin (1.74 ± 0.01 μg/mg and 1.24 ± 0.13 μg/mg). In addition, significant but different antioxidant properties were obtained among the flavonoids and the extracts investigated. Our results provide evidence of the anticonvulsant activity of Tilia reinforcing its utility for central nervous system diseases whose mechanism of action might involve partial antioxidant effects due to the presence of flavonoids. PMID:25197430

  3. Heparin Modulates the Endopeptidase Activity of Leishmania mexicana Cysteine Protease Cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8

    PubMed Central

    Judice, Wagner A. S.; Manfredi, Marcella A.; Souza, Gerson P.; Sansevero, Thiago M.; Almeida, Paulo C.; Shida, Cláudio S.; Gesteira, Tarsis F.; Juliano, Luiz; Westrop, Gareth D.; Sanderson, Sanya J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Tersariol, Ivarne L. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity. Methodology/Principal Findings The data analysis revealed that the presence of heparin affects all steps of the enzyme reaction: (i) it decreases 3.5-fold the k1 and 4.0-fold the k−1, (ii) it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k2 (2.7-fold), and also decrease in k3 (3.5-fold). The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys25)-S−/(His163)-Im+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface. PMID:24278253

  4. Unique evolutionary trajectories in repeated adaptation to hydrogen sulphide-toxic habitats of a neotropical fish (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Pfenninger, Markus; Patel, Simit; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Feldmeyer, Barbara; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Replicated ecological gradients are prime systems to study processes of molecular evolution underlying ecological divergence. Here, we investigated the repeated adaptation of the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana to habitats containing toxic hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) and compared two population pairs of sulphide-adapted and ancestral fish by sequencing population pools of >200 individuals (Pool-Seq). We inferred the evolutionary processes shaping divergence and tested the hypothesis of increase of parallelism from SNPs to molecular pathways. Coalescence analyses showed that the divergence occurred in the face of substantial bidirectional gene flow. Population divergence involved many short, widely dispersed regions across the genome. Analyses of allele frequency spectra suggest that differentiation at most loci was driven by divergent selection, followed by a selection-mediated reduction of gene flow. Reconstructing allelic state changes suggested that selection acted mainly upon de novo mutations in the sulphide-adapted populations. Using a corrected Jaccard index to quantify parallel evolution, we found a negligible proportion of statistically significant parallel evolution of Jcorr  = 0.0032 at the level of SNPs, divergent genome regions (Jcorr  = 0.0061) and genes therein (Jcorr  = 0.0091). At the level of metabolic pathways, the overlap was Jcorr  = 0.2545, indicating increasing parallelism with increasing level of biological integration. The majority of pathways contained positively selected genes in both sulphide populations. Hence, adaptation to sulphidic habitats necessitated adjustments throughout the genome. The largely unique evolutionary trajectories may be explained by a high proportion of de novo mutations driving the divergence. Our findings favour Gould's view that evolution is often the unrepeatable result of stochastic events with highly contingent effects. PMID:26405850

  5. Comparative analysis of the gonadal transcriptomes of the all-female species Poecilia formosa and its maternal ancestor Poecilia mexicana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Amazon molly, Poecilia formosa (Teleostei: Poeciliinae) is an unisexual, all-female species. It evolved through the hybridisation of two closely related sexual species and exhibits clonal reproduction by sperm dependent parthenogenesis (or gynogenesis) where the sperm of a parental species is only used to activate embryogenesis of the apomictic, diploid eggs but does not contribute genetic material to the offspring. Here we provide and describe the first de novo assembled transcriptome of the Amazon molly in comparison with its maternal ancestor, the Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana. The transcriptome data were produced through sequencing of single end libraries (100 bp) with the Illumina sequencing technique. Results 83,504,382 reads for the Amazon molly and 81,625,840 for the Atlantic molly were assembled into 127,283 and 78,961 contigs for the Amazon molly and the Atlantic molly, respectively. 63% resp. 57% of the contigs could be annotated with gene ontology terms after sequence similarity comparisons. Furthermore, we were able to identify genes normally involved in reproduction and especially in meiosis also in the transcriptome dataset of the apomictic reproducing Amazon molly. Conclusions We assembled and annotated the transcriptome of a non-model organism, the Amazon molly, without a reference genome (de novo). The obtained dataset is a fundamental resource for future research in functional and expression analysis. Also, the presence of 30 meiosis-specific genes within a species where no meiosis is known to take place is remarkable and raises new questions for future research. PMID:24742317

  6. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  7. Chemical compositions and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oils from Magnolia grandiflora, Chrysactinia mexicana, and Schinus molle found in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Boone, Laura; Alvarez-Román, Rocío; Salazar-Aranda, Ricardo; Torres-Cirio, Anabel; Rivas-Galindo, Verónica Mayela; Waksman de Torres, Noemí; González González, Gloria María; Pérez-López, Luis Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The essential oils from Magnolia grandiflora and Chrysactinia mexicana leaves, and from Schinus molle leaves and fruit, were characterized by gas chromatography/flame-ionization detection and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight compounds from M. grandiflora leaves were identified (representing 93.6% of the total area of the gas chromatogram), with the major component being bornyl acetate (20.9%). Colorless and yellow oils were obtained from the C. mexicana leaves with 18 (86.7%) and 11 (100%) compounds identified, respectively. In both fractions, the principal component was sylvestrene (36.8% and 41.1%, respectively). The essential oils ofS. molle leaves and fruit were each separated into colorless and yellow fractions, in which 14 (98.2) and 20 (99.8%) compounds were identified. The main component was alpha-phellandrene in all fractions (between 32.8% and 45.0%). The M. grandiflora oil displayed antifungal activity against five dermatophyte strains. The oils from S. molle and M. grandiflora leaves had antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, which cause skin infections that potentially may lead to sepsis. However, the antioxidant activities of all oils were small (half maximal effective concentration values >250 microg/mL). PMID:23472479

  8. Conditional gene deletion with DiCre demonstrates an essential role for CRK3 in L eishmania mexicana cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Samuel M.; Myburgh, Elmarie; Philipon, Cintia; Brown, Elaine; Meissner, Markus; Brewer, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Leishmania mexicana has a large family of cyclin‐dependent kinases (CDKs) that reflect the complex interplay between cell cycle and life cycle progression. Evidence from previous studies indicated that Cdc2‐related kinase 3 (CRK3) in complex with the cyclin CYC6 is a functional homologue of the major cell cycle regulator CDK1, yet definitive genetic evidence for an essential role in parasite proliferation is lacking. To address this, we have implemented an inducible gene deletion system based on a dimerised Cre recombinase (diCre) to target CRK3 and elucidate its role in the cell cycle of L. mexicana. Induction of diCre activity in promastigotes with rapamycin resulted in efficient deletion of floxed CRK3, resulting in G2/M growth arrest. Co‐expression of a CRK3 transgene during rapamycin‐induced deletion of CRK3 resulted in complementation of growth, whereas expression of an active site CRK3 T178E mutant did not, showing that protein kinase activity is crucial for CRK3 function. Inducible deletion of CRK3 in stationary phase promastigotes resulted in attenuated growth in mice, thereby confirming CRK3 as a useful therapeutic target and diCre as a valuable new tool for analyzing essential genes in Leishmania. PMID:26991545

  9. PPAR Activation Induces M1 Macrophage Polarization via cPLA2-COX-2 Inhibition, Activating ROS Production against Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Gandarilla, J. A.; Osorio-Trujillo, C.; Hernández-Ramírez, V. I.; Talamás-Rohana, P.

    2013-01-01

    Defence against Leishmania depends upon Th1 inflammatory response and, a major problem in susceptible models, is the turnoff of the leishmanicidal activity of macrophages with IL-10, IL-4, and COX-2 upregulation, as well as immunosuppressive PGE2, all together inhibiting the respiratory burst. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) activation is responsible for macrophages polarization on Leishmania susceptible models where microbicide functions are deactivated. In this paper, we demonstrated that, at least for L. mexicana, PPAR activation, mainly PPARγ, induced macrophage activation through their polarization towards M1 profile with the increase of microbicide activity against intracellular pathogen L. mexicana. PPAR activation induced IL-10 downregulation, whereas the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 remained high. Moreover, PPAR agonists treatment induced the deactivation of cPLA2-COX-2-prostaglandins pathway together with an increase in TLR4 expression, all of whose criteria meet the M1 macrophage profile. Finally, parasite burden, in treated macrophages, was lower than that in infected nontreated macrophages, most probably associated with the increase of respiratory burst in these treated cells. Based on the above data, we conclude that PPAR agonists used in this work induces M1 macrophages polarization via inhibition of cPLA2 and the increase of aggressive microbicidal activity via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PMID:23555077

  10. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  11. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  12. Ursolic acid from Agastache mexicana aerial parts produces antinociceptive activity involving TRPV1 receptors, cGMP and a serotonergic synergism.

    PubMed

    Verano, Jazmín; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Pellicer, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Agastache mexicana is a plant that has long been used in large demands in Mexican folk medicine to treat anxiety, insomnia and pain, among others affections. Chromatographic technique was used to identify ursolic acid (UA), 130.7 mg/g and 20.3 mg/g, as an antinociceptive active compound identified in ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of A. mexicana aerial parts, respectively. Temporal course curves of the antinociceptive response demonstrated a dose-dependent and significant activity of UA (1 to 100 mg/kg, i.p.) with an ED50=2 mg/kg in comparison to the efficacy of diclofenac (1 or 30 to 100 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, with an ED50=11.56 mg/kg. The antinociceptive response consisted in the reduction of abdominal constrictions induced with 1% acetic acid in mice. Similarly, UA at 2 mg/kg produced significant antinociception in the intracolonic administration of 0.3% capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in mice. It has been reported the inhibition produced by UA on the calcium-flux induced by capsaicin on TRPV1 receptor suggesting the antagonistic activity of this receptor. Finally, an ED50=44 mg/kg was calculated in the neurogenic and inflammatory nociception induced in the formalin test in rats. The antinociceptive response of UA in the formalin test was not modified in presence of naloxone, flumazenil or L-arginine. Nevertheless, it was reverted in presence of 1-H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazolo(4,2-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and increased in presence of N(G)-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase), theophylline (inhibitor of phosphodiesterase) and WAY100635 (an antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors). Current results provide evidence that the antinociceptive response of A. mexicana depends in part on the presence of UA. Moreover, this triterpene may exerts its antinociceptive effect mediated by the presence of cGMP and an additive synergism with 5HT1A receptors, but also an antagonistic

  13. Tissue Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Tissue lithography will enable physicians and researchers to obtain macromolecules with high purity (greater than 90 percent) from desired cells in conventionally processed, clinical tissues by simply annotating the desired cells on a computer screen. After identifying the desired cells, a suitable lithography mask will be generated to protect the contents of the desired cells while allowing destruction of all undesired cells by irradiation with ultraviolet light. The DNA from the protected cells can be used in a number of downstream applications including DNA sequencing. The purity (i.e., macromolecules isolated form specific cell types) of such specimens will greatly enhance the value and information of downstream applications. In this method, the specific cells are isolated on a microscope slide using photolithography, which will be faster, more specific, and less expensive than current methods. It relies on the fact that many biological molecules such as DNA are photosensitive and can be destroyed by ultraviolet irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to protect the contents of desired cells, yet destroy undesired cells. This approach leverages the technologies of the microelectronics industry, which can make features smaller than 1 micrometer with photolithography. A variety of ways has been created to achieve identification of the desired cell, and also to designate the other cells for destruction. This can be accomplished through chrome masks, direct laser writing, and also active masking using dynamic arrays. Image recognition is envisioned as one method for identifying cell nuclei and cell membranes. The pathologist can identify the cells of interest using a microscopic computerized image of the slide, and appropriate custom software. In one of the approaches described in this work, the software converts the selection into a digital mask that can be fed into a direct laser writer, e.g. the Heidelberg DWL66. Such a machine uses a metalized glass plate (with

  14. Coordinate regulation of a family of promastigote-enriched mRNAs by the 3′UTR PRE element in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Timothy R.; Mishra, Krishna K.; LeBowitz, Jonathan H.; Forney, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a key feature controlling gene expression in the protozoan parasite Leishmania. The nine-nucleotide paraflagellar rod regulatory element (PRE) in the 3′UTR of L. mexicana PFR2 is both necessary and sufficient for the observed ten-fold higher level of PFR2 mRNA in promastigotes compared to amastigotes. It is also found in the 3′UTRs of all known PFR genes. A search of the L. major Friedlin genomic database revealed several genes that share this cis element including a homolog of a heterotrimeric kinesin II subunit, and a gene that shares identity to a homolog of a Plasmodium antigen. In this study, we show that genes that harbor the PRE display promastigote-enriched transcript accumulation ranging from 4 – 15 fold. Northern analysis on episomal block substitution constructs revealed that the regulatory element is necessary for the proper steady-state accumulation of mRNA in L. mexicana paraflagellar rod gene 4 (PFR4). Also we show that the PRE plays a major role in the proper steady-state mRNA accumulation of PFR1, but may not account for the full regulatory mechanism acting on this mRNA. Our evidence suggests that the PRE coordinately regulates the mRNA abundance of not only the PFR family of genes, but in a larger group of genes that have unrelated functions. Although the PRE alone can regulate some mRNAs, it may also act in concert with additional elements to control other RNA transcripts. PMID:18023890

  15. Down-Regulation of TLR and JAK/STAT Pathway Genes Is Associated with Diffuse Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Gene Expression Analysis in NK Cells from Patients Infected with Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Fernández, Juan E.; Miranda-Ortíz, Haydee; Fernández-López, Juan C.; Becker, Ingeborg; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    An important NK-cell inhibition with reduced TNF-α, IFN-γ and TLR2 expression had previously been identified in patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL) infected with Leishmania mexicana. In an attempt to pinpoint alterations in the signaling pathways responsible for the NK-cell dysfunction in patients with DCL, this study aimed at identifying differences in the NK-cell response towards Leishmania mexicana lipophosphoglycan (LPG) between patients with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis through gene expression profiling. Our results indicate that important genes involved in the innate immune response to Leishmania are down-regulated in NK cells from DCL patients, particularly TLR and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. This down-regulation showed to be independent of LPG stimulation. The study sheds new light for understanding the mechanisms that undermine the correct effector functions of NK cells in patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis contributing to a better understanding of the pathobiology of leishmaniasis. PMID:27031998

  16. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very severe and usually deadly form of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to the ...

  17. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD) Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... L. Goldstein, MD, MMSc (February 01, 2016) Undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease. This ...

  18. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePlus

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes , which is sometimes called "flesh-eating bacteria." Necrotizing soft tissue infection develops when ...

  19. Tissue oxygen measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, Babs R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A device and method in accordance with the invention for determining the oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2) of a tissue by irradiating the tissue with optical radiation such that the light is emitted from the tissue, and by collecting the reflected or transmitted light from the tissue to form an optical spectrum. A spectral processor determines the PO.sub.2 level in tissue by processing this spectrum with a previously-constructed spectral calibration model. The tissue may, for example, be disposed underneath a covering tissue, such as skin, of a patient, and the tissue illuminated and light collected through the skin. Alternatively, direct tissue illumination and collection may be effected with a hand-held or endoscopic probe. A preferred system also determines pH from the same spectrum, and the processor may determine critical conditions and issue warnings based on parameter values.

  20. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  1. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  2. Connective Tissue Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the "cellular ... their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective ...

  3. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  4. Development of tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Narayan, R P

    2012-05-01

    The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole. PMID:23162240

  5. Tissue engineering of reproductive tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Atala, Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may soon offer new hope for patients with serious injuries and end-stage reproductive organ failure. Scientists are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured reproductive tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is advancing, and new discoveries in this field will lead to new therapeutic strategies. For example, newly discovered types of stem cells have been retrieved from uterine tissues such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous adult cells have already entered the clinic. This article discusses these tissue engineering strategies for various organs in the male and female reproductive tract. PMID:22748231

  6. Adipose tissue fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. Thereby adipose tissue growth is limited and excess triglycerides are stored in ectopic tissues. Stressed adipocytes and hypoxia contribute to immune cell immigration and activation which further aggravates adipose tissue fibrosis. There is substantial evidence that adipose tissue fibrosis is linked to metabolic dysfunction, both in rodent models and in the clinical setting. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonists and adiponectin both reduce adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Current knowledge suggests that antifibrotic drugs, increasing adipose tissue oxygen supply or HIF-1 antagonists will improve adipose tissue function and thereby ameliorate metabolic diseases. PMID:25987952

  7. A galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose epitope on phospholipids of Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis is recognized by trypanosomatid-infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M

    1990-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M antibody reactive with galactosyl(alpha 1-3)mannose [Gal(alpha 1-3)Man] residues present on phospholipids extracted from Leishmania mexicana and L. braziliensis was found to be present in high titer in the serum of every normal individual studied. Periodate oxidation, acid hydrolysis, or acetylation suppressed immunoreactivity, suggesting that an oligosaccharide chain was responsible for antibody binding. Interaction occurs only with alpha-Gal terminal residues, since treatment of purified glycophospholipids with alpha-galactosidase but not with beta-galactosidase abolished it. Antibody bound to galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose-linked synthetic antigens but did not bind to the same residues present in rabbit, rat, and guinea pig erythrocytes or in murine laminin. Antigen-antibody binding was strongly blocked with Gal(alpha 1-3)Man and Gal(beta 1-4)Man. These results plus inhibition studies with several oligosaccharides suggest that they are indeed different from antibodies against the galactosyl(alpha 1-3)galactose residue. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody values were significantly elevated in 89% of patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, 84% of patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, 69% of patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, and 44 and 62% of patients with Trypanosoma cruzi or T. rangeli infection, respectively, but not in patients with 15 other different infectious and inflammatory diseases. Anti-Gal(alpha 1-3)Man antibody readily absorbed to American Leishmania and Trypanosoma culture forms, suggesting a surface membrane localization of reactive epitope. Gal(alpha 1-3)Man-bearing glycophospholipid was easily extracted from American Leishmania promastigotes and T. cruzi trypomastigotes as well as from American Trypanosoma culture forms. The possibility that this antibody arises against parasitic glycophospholipid-linked Gal(alpha 1-3)Man terminal residues is proposed. PMID:1696285

  8. NK cell activity differs between patients with localized and diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis infected with Leishmania mexicana: a comparative study of TLRs and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cañeda-Guzmán, Isabel Cristina; Salaiza-Suazo, Norma; Fernández-Figueroa, Edith A; Carrada-Figueroa, Georgina; Aguirre-García, Magdalena; Becker, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania mexicana causes localized (LCL) or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). The cause of dissemination in DCL remains unknown, yet NK cells possibly play a role in activating leishmanicidal mechanisms during innate and adaptive immune responses. We had previously shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a ligand for TLR2, activating human NK cells. We have now analyzed NK cells in LCL and DCL patients. NK numbers and effector mechanisms differed drastically between both groups of patients: DCL patients showed reduced NK cell numbers; diminished IFN-γ and TNF-α production; and lower TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 expression as compared to LCL patients. The altered protein expression found in NK cells of DCL patients correlated with their down-regulation of IFN-γ gene expression in LPG-stimulated and non-stimulated cells as compared to LCL patients. NK cell response was further analyzed according to gender, age, and disease evolution in LCL patients showing that female patients produced higher IFN-γ levels throughout the disease progression, whereas TLR2 expression diminished in both genders with prolonged disease evolution and age. We furthermore show the activation pathway of LPG binding to TLR2 and demonstrated that TLR2 forms immunocomplexes with TLR1 and TLR6. In addition to the reduced NK cell numbers in peripheral blood, DCL patients also showed reduced NK cell numbers in the lesions. They were randomly scattered within the lesions, showing diminished cytokine production, which contrasts with those of LCL lesions, where NK cells produced IFN-γ and TNF-α and were found within organized granulomas. We conclude that in DCL patients the reduced NK-cell numbers and their diminished activity, evidenced by low TLR expression and low cytokine production, are possibly involved in the severity of the disease. Our results provide new information on the contribution of NK cells in Leishmania infections of the human host. PMID:25397678

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban tunnels of Guanajuato city (Mexico) measured in deposited dust particles and in transplanted lichen Xanthoparmelia mexicana (Gyeln.) Hale.

    PubMed

    Puy-Alquiza, María Jesús; Reyes, Veridiana; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Torres Elguera, Julio César; Miranda-Aviles, Raúl

    2016-06-01

    Sixteen priority PAHs were determined in five urban tunnels of Guanajuato city, through which about 4 % of population walks and about 25,000 vehicles pass daily. Xanthoparmelia mexicana (Gyeln.) Hale, highly abundant lichen in this region, was exposed during 6 months and then the samples were collected together with the wall dust; both materials were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total PAH concentrations in dust and in lichen samples were in the range 1392-7961 ng g(-1) (average per tunnel 4637 ng g(-1)) and 522-3571 ng g(-1) (average 2587 ng g(-1)), respectively. In dust, the highest concentrations corresponded to PYR, FLA, BaA, CHR, BaP, and PHE, whereas in lichens the most abundant were DahA, IcdP, BghiP, and PYR. The obtained results suggested passive deposition of PAHs on lipophilic lichen surface rather than phenomena associated with metabolic activity of the exposed organisms. Application of seven different molecular diagnostic ratios pointed to gasoline-operated cars as the principal source of PAHs. Based on the obtained results and their comparison with data reported for other geographical regions, Guanajuato tunnels were considered moderately contaminated with PAHs; however toxic BaP equivalent concentrations integrated for seven carcinogenic compounds presented relatively high values in four tunnels: 567-1051 ngBaPeq g(-1) as evaluated for dust samples. Since up to 7000 persons walk daily through tunnels, the obtained data call for more detailed study evaluating PAHs toxicity in Guanajuato population. PMID:26961526

  10. Molecular Diversity between Salivary Proteins from New World and Old World Sand Flies with Emphasis on Bichromomyia olmeca, the Sand Fly Vector of Leishmania mexicana in Mesoamerica

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Shannon; Pasos-Pinto, Silvia; Sanchez, Laura; Rasouli, Manoochehr; B. Guimaraes-Costa, Anderson; Aslan, Hamide; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Oliveira, Fabiano; Becker, Ingeborg; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Jochim, Ryan C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sand fly saliva has been shown to have proteins with potent biological activities, salivary proteins that can be used as biomarkers of vector exposure, and salivary proteins that are candidate vaccines against different forms of leishmaniasis. Sand fly salivary gland transcriptomic approach has contributed significantly to the identification and characterization of many of these salivary proteins from important Leishmania vectors; however, sand fly vectors in some regions of the world are still neglected, as Bichromomyia olmeca (formerly known as Lutzomyia olmeca olmeca), a proven vector of Leishmania mexicana in Mexico and Central America. Despite the importance of this vector in transmitting Leishmania parasite in Mesoamerica there is no information on the repertoire of B. olmeca salivary proteins and their relationship to salivary proteins from other sand fly species. Methods and Findings A cDNA library of the salivary glands of wild-caught B. olmeca was constructed, sequenced, and analyzed. We identified transcripts encoding for novel salivary proteins from this sand fly species and performed a comparative analysis between B. olmeca salivary proteins and those from other sand fly species. With this new information we present an updated catalog of the salivary proteins specific to New World sand flies and salivary proteins common to all sand fly species. We also report in this work the anti-Factor Xa activity of Lofaxin, a salivary anticoagulant protein present in this sand fly species. Conclusions This study provides information on the first transcriptome of a sand fly from Mesoamerica and adds information to the limited repertoire of salivary transcriptomes from the Americas. This comparative analysis also shows a fast degree of evolution in salivary proteins from New World sand flies as compared with Old World sand flies. PMID:27409591

  11. Engineering Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  12. New neotropical species of Opiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae) reared from fruit-infesting and leaf-mining Tephritidae (Diptera) with comments on the  Diachasmimorpha mexicana species group and the genera Lorenzopius and Tubiformopius

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Robert; Ward, Lauren; Miko, Istvan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Four new species of opiine Braconidae are described from Mexico. These are Diachasmimorpha martinalujai Wharton reared from Rhagoletis infesting fruits of Crataegus spp., Diachasmimorpha norrbomi Wharton reared from Euphranta mexicana infesting fruits of Ribes pringlei, Eurytenes (Stigmatopoea) norrbomi Wharton reared from Trypeta concolor mining leaves of Barkleyanthus salicifolia and Eurytenes (Stigmatopoea) maya Wharton reared from Rhagoletis pomonella infesting apples and fruits of Crataegus spp. Morphological features of the first metasomal segment and occipital carina, useful for placement of these species, are discussed relative to the genera Diachasmimorpha, Eurytenes, Lorenzopius, Tubiformopius, and Opius s.l. Descriptions and diagnoses are referenced to the Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology. The following represent new combinations: Diachasmimorpha hildagensis, Lorenzopius euryteniformis, and Tubiformopius tubibasis. Revised diagnoses are provided for Diachasmimorpha hildagensis, Diachasmimorpha mexicana, Diachasmimorpha sanguinea, Eurytenes (Stigmatopoea), Lorenzopius, Lorenzopius euryteniformis, Tubiformopius, Tubiformopius tubigaster, Tubiformopius tubibasis, Opius incoligma, and Opius rugicoxis. Two species groups are delineated within Lorenzopius and a key to species of Diachasmimorpha occurring in the New World is provided. PMID:23818811

  13. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  14. [Bone tissue engineering scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Fang, Liru; Weng, Wenjian; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong; Santos, J D; Du, Peiyi

    2003-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to the repairs to skeletal defects resulting from disease, trauma or surgery. Scaffold has played an important role in bone tissue engineering, which functions as the architecture for bone in growth. In this paper, the authors gave a brief introduction about the requirement of bone tissue engineering scaffold, the key of the design of scaffolds and the current research on this subject. PMID:12744187

  15. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  16. Clarifying Tissue Clearing

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas S.; Lichtman, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Biological specimens are intrinsically three dimensional; however because of the obscuring effects of light scatter, imaging deep into a tissue volume is problematic. Although efforts to eliminate the scatter by “clearing” the tissue have been ongoing for over a century, there have been a large number of recent innovations. This review introduces the physical basis for light-scatter in tissue, describes the mechanisms underlying various clearing techniques, and discusses several of the major advances in light microscopy for imaging cleared tissue. PMID:26186186

  17. O- and N-glycosylation of the Leishmania mexicana-secreted acid phosphatase. Characterization of a new class of phosphoserine-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Ilg, T; Overath, P; Ferguson, M A; Rutherford, T; Campbell, D G; McConville, M J

    1994-09-30

    The protozoan parasite Leishmania mexicana secretes a heavily glycosylated 100-kDa acid phosphatase (sAP) which is associated with one or more polydisperse proteophosphoglycans. Most of the glycans in this complex were released using mild acid hydrolysis conditions that preferentially cleave phosphodiester linkages. The released saccharides were shown to consist of monomeric mannose and a series of neutral and phosphorylated glycans by Dionex high performance liquid chromatography, methylation analysis, exoglycosidase digestions, and one-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy. The neutral species comprised a linear series of oligosaccharides with the structures [Man alpha 1-2]1-5Man. The phosphorylated oligosaccharides were characterized as PO4-6Gal beta 1-4Man and PO4-6[Glc beta 1-3]Gal beta 1-4Man. The attachment of these glycans to the polypeptide backbone via the linkage, Man alpha 1-PO4-Ser, is suggested by: 1) the finding that more than 60% of the serine residues in the polypeptide are phosphorylated and 2) the resistance of the phosphoserine residues to alkaline phosphatase digestion unless the sAP was first treated with either mild acid (to release all glycans) or jack bean alpha-mannosidase (to release neutral mannose glycans). Analysis of the partially resolved components of the complex indicated that the most of the O-linked glycans on the 100-kDa phosphoglycoprotein comprised mannose and the mannose-oligosaccharides. In contrast the major O-linked glycans on the proteophosphoglycan were short phosphoglycan chains, containing on average two repeat units per chain. In addition to the O-linked glycans, both components in the sAP complex contained N-linked glycans. The N-glycanase F-released glycans were characterized by Bio-Gel P4 chromatography and exoglycosidase digestions to be the biantennary oligomannose type with the structures Glc1Man6GlcNAc2 and Man6GlcNAc2. The O-linked glycans of the sAP complex are similar to those found in the phosphoglycan chains of

  18. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  19. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    PubMed

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer. PMID:25900048

  20. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed. PMID:26611927

  1. Leaf Tissue Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Peter J.; Goldthwaite, Jonathan

    1975-01-01

    During winter, excised leaf tissue from Rumex obtusifolius degrades chlorophyll at twice the summer rate but the plant hormones, gibberellic acid and zeatin, inhibit the senescence rate by a constant percentage, regardless of season. PMID:16659225

  2. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... called voluntary) muscles that move the skeleton, and smooth muscle, such as the muscles that surround the stomach. Nerve tissue is made up of nerve cells (neurons) and is used to carry "messages" to ...

  3. Engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Rohin K.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Reis, Lewis A.; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers the promise of creating functional tissue replacements for use in the failing heart or for in vitro drug screening. The last decade has seen a great deal of progress in this field with new advances in interdisciplinary areas such as developmental biology, genetic engineering, biomaterials, polymer science, bioreactor engineering, and stem cell biology. We review here a selection of the most recent advances in cardiac tissue engineering, including the classical cell-scaffold approaches, advanced bioreactor designs, cell sheet engineering, whole organ decellularization, stem-cell based approaches, and topographical control of tissue organization and function. We also discuss current challenges in the field, such as maturation of stem cell-derived cardiac patches and vascularization. PMID:21530228

  4. Assessment of tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, P W; Hart, B B

    1999-06-01

    A continuous supply of oxygen to all tissues is necessary for the efficient production of ATP, and this supply is considered sufficient when aerobic metabolism is maintained. Nonhealing wounds, necrotizing infections, radiation-induced necrosis, crush injury, decompression illness, and CO poisoning all exhibit impaired tissue oxygenation. The need for efficacy of HBO therapy in such conditions is in part determined by the prevailing state of tissue oxygen supply and demand. The methods currently available or under development for assessing the adequacy of tissue oxygenation include blood gas analysis, transcutaneous oxygen measurement, gastric tonometry, pulse oximetry, near-infrared spectroscopy, functional MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, and single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical and experimental applications of these methods are discussed and emphasis is placed on their role in hyperbaric medicine. PMID:10333450

  5. Spectromicroscopy of Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Bradley; Cannara, Rachel; Gilbert, Benjamin; Destasio, Gelsomina; Ogg, Mandy; Gough, Kathy

    2001-03-01

    X-ray PhotoElectron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM) was originally developed for studying the surface microchemistry of materials science specimens. It has then evolved into a valuable tool to investigate the magnetic properties of materials and the microchemistry of cells and tissues. We used the MEPHISTO X-PEEM instrument, installed at the UW-Synchrotron Radiation Center to detect trace concentrations of non-physiological elements in senile brain tissue specimens. These tissues contain a large number of plaques, in which all the compounds and elements that the brain does not need are disposed and stored. We hypothesized that plaques should contain elements, such as Si, B, and Al which are very abundant on the Earth crust but absent from healthy tissues. We verified this hypothesis with MEPHISTO and found evidence of Si and B, and suspect Al. We also found a higher than normal concentration of Fe.

  6. Tissue Culture in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Duray, Paul H.; Hatfill, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to simulate normal tissue micro-environments in vitro have been thwarted by the complexity and plasticity of the extracellular matrix, which is important in regulating cytoskeletal and nuclear matrix proteins. Gravity is one of the problems, tending to separate components that should be kept together. For space shuttle experiments, NASA engineers devised a double-walled rotating bioreactor, which is proving to be a useful tissue culture device on earth as well as in space.

  7. Facial Soft Tissue Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; McKnight, Aisha J.; Izaddoost, Shayan A.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic facial soft tissue injuries are commonly encountered in the emergency department by plastic surgeons and other providers. Although rarely life-threatening, the treatment of these injuries can be complex and may have significant impact on the patient's facial function and aesthetics. This article provides a review of the relevant literature related to this topic and describes the authors' approach to the evaluation and management of the patient with facial soft tissue injuries. PMID:22550459

  8. Biomaterials in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, J A

    1995-06-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in field of tissue engineering. Biomimetic synthetic polymers have been created to elicit specific cellular functions and to direct cell-cell interactions both in implants that are initially cell-free, which may serve as matrices to conduct tissue regeneration, and in implants to support cell transplantation. Biomimetic approaches have been based on polymers endowed with bioadhesive receptor-binding peptides and mono- and oligosaccharides. These materials have been patterned in two- and three-dimensions to generate model multicellular tissue architectures, and this approach may be useful in future efforts to generate complex organizations of multiple cell types. Natural polymers have also played an important role in these efforts, and recombinant polymers that combine the beneficial aspects of natural polymers with many of the desirable features of synthetic polymers have been designed and produced. Biomaterials have been employed to conduct and accelerate otherwise naturally occurring phenomena, such as tissue regeneration in wound healing in the otherwise healthy subject; to induce cellular responses that might not be normally present, such as healing in a diseased subject or the generation of a new vascular bed to receive a subsequent cell transplant; and to block natural phenomena, such as the immune rejection of cell transplants from other species or the transmission of growth factor signals that stimulate scar formation. This review introduces the biomaterials and describes their application in the engineering of new tissues and the manipulation of tissue responses. PMID:9634795

  9. American Association of Tissue Banks

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the Gift of Cells and Tissues Tissue Bank Specialist Certification AATB offers a program for Certification ... AATB conferences, workshops, webinars & CTBS Exam prep >> Accredited Bank Search AATB's Accreditation Program ensures that tissue-banking ...

  10. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - gastric tissue; Biopsy - gastric tissue ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be considered normal if it does not show certain bacteria. Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  11. Proteophosphoglycans of Leishmania mexicana. Identification, purification, structural and ultrastructural characterization of the secreted promastigote proteophosphoglycan pPPG2, a stage-specific glycoisoform of amastigote aPPG.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C; Göpfert, U; Goehring, N; Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T

    1999-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania secrete a range of proteophosphoglycans that appear to be important for successful colonization of the sandfly and for virulence in the mammalian host. A hallmark of these molecules is extensive phosphoglycosylation by phosphoglycan chains via the unusual linkage Manalpha1-PO(4)-Ser. In this study we have identified and purified to apparent homogeneity a novel proteophosphoglycan (pPPG2) which is secreted by Leishmania mexicana promastigotes (sandfly stage). Amino acid analysis and immunoblots using polypeptide-specific antisera suggest that pPPG2 shares a common protein backbone with a proteophosphoglycan (aPPG) secreted by Leishmania mexicana amastigotes (mammalian stage). Both pPPG2 and aPPG show a similar degree of Ser phosphoglycosylation (50. 5 mol% vs. 44.6 mol%), but the structure of their phosphoglycan chains is developmentally regulated: in contrast to aPPG which displays unique, complex and highly branched glycan chains [Ilg, Craik, Currie, Multhaup, and Bacic (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 13509-13523], pPPG2 contains short unbranched structures consisting of >60 mol% neutral glycans, most likely (Manalpha1-2)(0-5)Man and Galbeta1-4Man, as well as about 40 mol% monophosphorylated glycans of the proposed structures PO(4)-6Galbeta1-4Man and PO(4)-6(Glcbeta1-3)Galbeta1-4Man. The major differences between pPPG2 and aPPG with respect to their apparent molecular mass, their ultrastructure and their proteinase sensitivity are most likely a consequence of this stage-specific glycosylation of their common protein backbone. PMID:10585864

  12. Proteophosphoglycans of Leishmania mexicana. Identification, purification, structural and ultrastructural characterization of the secreted promastigote proteophosphoglycan pPPG2, a stage-specific glycoisoform of amastigote aPPG.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Göpfert, U; Goehring, N; Stierhof, Y D; Ilg, T

    1999-12-15

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania secrete a range of proteophosphoglycans that appear to be important for successful colonization of the sandfly and for virulence in the mammalian host. A hallmark of these molecules is extensive phosphoglycosylation by phosphoglycan chains via the unusual linkage Manalpha1-PO(4)-Ser. In this study we have identified and purified to apparent homogeneity a novel proteophosphoglycan (pPPG2) which is secreted by Leishmania mexicana promastigotes (sandfly stage). Amino acid analysis and immunoblots using polypeptide-specific antisera suggest that pPPG2 shares a common protein backbone with a proteophosphoglycan (aPPG) secreted by Leishmania mexicana amastigotes (mammalian stage). Both pPPG2 and aPPG show a similar degree of Ser phosphoglycosylation (50. 5 mol% vs. 44.6 mol%), but the structure of their phosphoglycan chains is developmentally regulated: in contrast to aPPG which displays unique, complex and highly branched glycan chains [Ilg, Craik, Currie, Multhaup, and Bacic (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 13509-13523], pPPG2 contains short unbranched structures consisting of >60 mol% neutral glycans, most likely (Manalpha1-2)(0-5)Man and Galbeta1-4Man, as well as about 40 mol% monophosphorylated glycans of the proposed structures PO(4)-6Galbeta1-4Man and PO(4)-6(Glcbeta1-3)Galbeta1-4Man. The major differences between pPPG2 and aPPG with respect to their apparent molecular mass, their ultrastructure and their proteinase sensitivity are most likely a consequence of this stage-specific glycosylation of their common protein backbone. PMID:10585864

  13. Optical birefringence of aorta tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G. C.; Wang, W. B.; Pu, Y.; Alfano, R. R.

    2010-02-01

    The optical birefringence of porcine aortic tissues including heated and non-heated tissues was studied using polarization technique. The measurements show that a whole piece of aortic tissue has birefringence properties like a uniaxial crystal. The experiment results indicate that the birefringence status of tissue have a potential application for monitoring changes of tissue structure due to burning, plastic surgery, laser tissue welding and wound healing.

  14. Intracorporeal Electromechanical Tissue Morcellation

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Kimberly A.; Anderson, Ted L.; Nezhat, Ceana H.

    2015-01-01

    Electromechanical morcellators have come under scrutiny with concerns about complications involving iatrogenic dissemination of both benign and malignant tissues. Although the rapidly rotating blade has resulted in morcellator-related vascular and visceral injuries, equally concerning are the multiple reports in the literature demonstrating seeding of the abdominal cavity with tissue fragmented such as leiomyomas, endometriosis, adenomyosis, splenic and ovarian tissues, and occult cancers of the ovaries and uterus. Alternatives to intra-corporeal electric morcellation for tissue extirpation through the vagina and through minilaparotomy are feasible, safe, and have been shown to have comparable, if not superior, outcomes without an increased need for laparotomy. Intracorporeal morcellation within a containment bag is another option to minimize the risk of iatrogenic tissue seeding. Patient safety is a priority with balanced goals of maximizing benefits and minimizing harm. When intracorporeal electromechanical morcellation is planned, physicians should discuss the risks and consequences with their patients. Although data are being collected to quantify and understand these risks more clearly, a minimally invasive alternative to unenclosed intracorporeal morcellation is favored when available. It is incumbent on surgeons to communicate the risks of practices and devices and to advocate for continued improvement in surgical instrumentation and techniques. PMID:25198260

  15. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    PubMed Central

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection. PMID:19485522

  16. Morphology of urethral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Herzen, Julia; Mushkolaj, Shpend; Bormann, Therese; Beckmann, Felix; Püschel, Klaus

    2010-09-01

    Micro computed tomography has been developed to a powerful technique for the characterization of hard and soft human and animal tissues. Soft tissues including the urethra, however, are difficult to be analyzed, since the microstructures of interest exhibit X-ray absorption values very similar to the surroundings. Selective staining using highly absorbing species is a widely used approach, but associated with significant tissue modification. Alternatively, one can suitably embed the soft tissue, which requires the exchange of water. Therefore, the more recently developed phase contrast modes providing much better contrast of low X-ray absorbing species are especially accommodating in soft tissue characterization. The present communication deals with the morphological characterization of sheep, pig and human urethras on the micrometer scale taking advantage of micro computed tomography in absorption and phase contrast modes. The performance of grating-based tomography is demonstrated for freshly explanted male and female urethras in saline solution. The micro-morphology of the urethra is important to understand how the muscles close the urethra to reach continence. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing, the function under static and, more important, under stress conditions has to be uncovered for the realization of artificial urinary sphincters, which needs sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  17. The tissue diagnostic instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Paul; Yu, Hongmei; Schultz, David; Rodriguez, Azucena; Yurtsev, Eugene A.; Orr, Jessica; Tang, Simon; Miller, Jon; Wallace, Joseph; Zok, Frank; Li, Cheng; Souza, Richard; Proctor, Alexander; Brimer, Davis; Nogues-Solan, Xavier; Mellbovsky, Leonardo; Peña, M. Jesus; Diez-Ferrer, Oriol; Mathews, Phillip; Randall, Connor; Kuo, Alfred; Chen, Carol; Peters, Mathilde; Kohn, David; Buckley, Jenni; Li, Xiaojuan; Pruitt, Lisa; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Alliston, Tamara; Weaver, Valerie; Lotz, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanical properties reflect extracellular matrix composition and organization, and as such, their changes can be a signature of disease. Examples of such diseases include intervertebral disk degeneration, cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and tooth decay. Here we introduce the tissue diagnostic instrument (TDI), a device designed to probe the mechanical properties of normal and diseased soft and hard tissues not only in the laboratory but also in patients. The TDI can distinguish between the nucleus and the annulus of spinal disks, between young and degenerated cartilage, and between normal and cancerous mammary glands. It can quantify the elastic modulus and hardness of the wet dentin left in a cavity after excavation. It can perform an indentation test of bone tissue, quantifying the indentation depth increase and other mechanical parameters. With local anesthesia and disposable, sterile, probe assemblies, there has been neither pain nor complications in tests on patients. We anticipate that this unique device will facilitate research on many tissue systems in living organisms, including plants, leading to new insights into disease mechanisms and methods for their early detection.

  18. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  19. Tissue optical immersion clearing.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we discuss the optical immersion method based on refractive index matching of scatterers (e.g., collagen, elastin fibers, cells and cell compartments) and the ground material (interstitial fluid and/or cytoplasm) of tissue and blood under the action of exogenous optical clearing agents. We analyze the optical clearing of fibrous and cell-structured tissues and blood from the point of view of receiving more valuable, normally hidden, information from spectroscopic and polarization measurements, confocal microscopy, optical coherence and optical projection tomography, as well as from nonlinear spectroscopies, such as two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation techniques. Some important applications of the immersion technique to glucose sensing, drug delivery monitoring, improvements of image contrast and imaging depth, nondistortive delivery of laser radiation and precision tissue laser photodisruption, among others, are also described. PMID:21050092

  20. Neovascularization in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jennifer C.-Y.; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for successful tissue engineering is adequate vascularization that would allow tissue engineering constructs to survive and grow. Angiogenic growth factors, alone and in combination, have been used to achieve this, and gene therapy has been used as a tool to enable sustained release of these angiogenic proteins. Cell-based therapy using endothelial cells and their precursors presents an alternative approach to tackling this challenge. These studies have occurred on a background of advancements in scaffold design and assays for assessing neovascularization. Finally, several studies have already attempted to translate research in neovascularization to clinical use in the blossoming field of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:24710553

  1. La Artesania Mexicana (Mexican Handicrafts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Bettina

    This booklet contains instructions in English and Spanish for making eleven typical Mexican craft articles. The instructions are accompanied by pen-and-ink drawings. The objects are (1) "La Rosa" (The Rose); (2) "El Crisantemo" (The Chrysanthemum); (3) "La Amapola" (The Poppy); (4) "Ojos de Dios" (God's Eyes); (5) "Ojitos con dos caras" (Two-Sided…

  2. Polarized light propagation through tissue and tissue phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, V; Walsh, J T JR; Maitland, D J

    2000-02-08

    We show that standard tissue phantoms can be used to mimic the intensity and polarization properties of tissue. Polarized light propagation through biologic tissue is typically studied using tissue phantoms consisting of dilute aqueous suspensions of microspheres. The dilute phantoms can empirically match tissue polarization and intensity properties. One discrepancy between the dilute phantoms and tissue exist: common tissue phantoms, such as dilute Intralipid and dilute 1-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microsphere suspensions, depolarize linearly polarized light more quickly than circularly polarized light. In dense tissue, however, where scatterers are often located in close proximity to one another, circularly polarized light is depolarized similar to or more quickly than linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that polarized light propagates differently in dilute versus densely packed microsphere suspensions, which may account for the differences seen between polarized light propagation in common dilute tissue phantoms versus dense biologic tissue.

  3. Tissue macerating instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A surgical tissue macerating and removal tool is described which has a rotating rod with a cutting member at one end and which disposed in a tube which is then contained in an extension of the tool handle. A frusto-conical member extends into the extension at the cutter member end of the rotating rod with its small end engaging the tube. The portion of the frusto-conical member outside of the extension forms a tissue engaging member and may be cut-off at an angle to the axis of the rod to form a tissue engaging edge. Apertures are provided in the extension adjacent the frusto-concial member so that treatment fluid supplied in the annular space between the tube and the extension may flow to the operative site. An aperture is provided in the frustoconical member between the extension and the tube so that fluid may also flow into the tube where it mixes with macerated tissue being directed through an aperture in the tube to a passageway which may have suction applied to help remove macerated material.

  4. Hypoelastic Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In Part I, a novel hypoelastic framework for soft-tissues was presented. One of the hallmarks of this new theory is that the well-known exponential behavior of soft-tissues arises consistently and spontaneously from the integration of a rate based formulation. In Part II, we examine the application of this framework to the problem of biaxial kinematics, which are common in experimental soft-tissue characterization. We confine our attention to an isotropic formulation in order to highlight the distinction between non-linearity and anisotropy. In order to provide a sound foundation for the membrane extension of our earlier hypoelastic framework, the kinematics and kinetics of in-plane biaxial extension are revisited, and some enhancements are provided. Specifically, the conventional stress-to-traction mapping for this boundary value problem is shown to violate the conservation of angular momentum. In response, we provide a corrected mapping. In addition, a novel means for applying loads to in-plane biaxial experiments is proposed. An isotropic, isochoric, hypoelastic, constitutive model is applied to an in-plane biaxial experiment done on glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium. The experiment is comprised of eight protocols that radially probe the biaxial plane. Considering its simplicity (two adjustable parameters) the model does a reasonably good job of describing the non-linear normal responses observed in these experimental data, which are more prevalent than are the anisotropic responses exhibited by this tissue. PMID:21394222

  5. Eye tissues study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Maksimova, Irina L.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Genina, Elina A.; Lakodina, Nina A.

    2001-08-01

    Theoretical and in vitro and in vivo experimental study of spectral and polarization characteristics of the human and rabbit eye tissues are presented. The possibility of control of optical properties of eye cornea, lens and sclera is discussed and realized experimentally for glucose solution as the refractive index matching factor.

  6. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... free at 5 years. Most people who survive 5 years can expect to be cancer-free at 10 years. ... most soft tissue sarcomas, and there is no way to prevent it. ... them can increase your chance of surviving this type of cancer.

  7. Neoproteoglycans in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Amanda; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteoglycans, comprised of a core protein to which glycosaminoglycan chains are covalently linked, are an important structural and functional family of macromolecules found in the extracellular matrix. Advances in our understanding of biological interactions have lead to a greater appreciation for the need to design tissue engineering scaffolds that incorporate mimetics of key extracellular matrix components. A variety of synthetic and semisynthetic molecules and polymers have been examined by tissue engineers that serve as structural, chemical and biological replacements for proteoglycans. These proteoglycan mimetics have been referred to as neoproteoglycans and serve as functional and therapeutic replacements for natural proteoglycans that are often unavailable for tissue engineering studies. Although neoproteoglycans have important limitations, such as limited signaling ability and biocompatibility, they have shown promise in replacing the natural activity of proteoglycans through cell and protein binding interactions. This review focuses on the recent in vivo and in vitro tissue engineering applications of three basic types of neoproteoglycan structures, protein–glycosaminoglycan conjugates, nano-glycosaminoglycan composites and polymer–glycosaminoglycan complexes. PMID:23399318

  8. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  9. Tissue and Tempera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, Marie

    1998-01-01

    Gives an art activity for second-graders where they use two art techniques, tissue gluing and tempera painting, to create brightly colored pictures of landscapes. Expounds that first the students examine a variety of landscapes by different artists, such as Paul Cezanne, and then learn the differences between the foreground and background. (CMK)

  10. Sensing in tissue bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, P.

    2006-03-01

    Specialized sensing and measurement instruments are under development to aid the controlled culture of cells in bioreactors for the fabrication of biological tissues. Precisely defined physical and chemical conditions are needed for the correct culture of the many cell-tissue types now being studied, including chondrocytes (cartilage), vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (blood vessels), fibroblasts, hepatocytes (liver) and receptor neurones. Cell and tissue culture processes are dynamic and therefore, optimal control requires monitoring of the key process variables. Chemical and physical sensing is approached in this paper with the aim of enabling automatic optimal control, based on classical cell growth models, to be achieved. Non-invasive sensing is performed via the bioreactor wall, invasive sensing with probes placed inside the cell culture chamber and indirect monitoring using analysis within a shunt or a sampling chamber. Electroanalytical and photonics-based systems are described. Chemical sensing for gases, ions, metabolites, certain hormones and proteins, is under development. Spectroscopic analysis of the culture medium is used for measurement of glucose and for proteins that are markers of cell biosynthetic behaviour. Optical interrogation of cells and tissues is also investigated for structural analysis based on scatter.

  11. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  12. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration. PMID:26056727

  13. Dinitrotoluene in deer tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1991-09-30

    Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP), Baraboo, Wisconsin, has within a security-fenced area, a herd of whitetail deer. The US Army and the State of Wisconsin, Department of Health and Social Services have determined that approximately 20 of the deer be harvested and tissue samples thus collected be analyzed for 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,4- and 2,6-DNT) by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to a sensitivity of 0.1 part per million (ppm). The HPLC analyses will be done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) following protocol used previously for similar work for other government sites. ORNL shall instruct Olin relative to the quantity and type of tissue required, storage and shipment requirements, and other information to ensure that all protocol and chain of custody requirements are clear. A final report will be made to Olin Corporation upon completion of the HPLC analyses.

  14. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  15. Nicotine and periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Grover, Vishakha; Kaushal, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco use has been recognized to be a significant risk factor for the development and progression of periodontal disease. Its use is associated with increased pocket depths, loss of periodontal attachment, alveolar bone and a higher rate of tooth loss. Nicotine, a major component and most pharmacologically active agent in tobacco is likely to be a significant contributing factor for the exacerbation of periodontal diseases. Available literature suggests that nicotine affects gingival blood flow, cytokine production, neutrophil and other immune cell function; connective tissue turnover, which can be the possible mechanisms responsible for overall effects of tobacco on periodontal tissues. Inclusion of tobacco cessation as a part of periodontal therapy encourages dental professionals to become more active in tobacco cessation counseling. This will have far reaching positive effects on our patients’ oral and general health. PMID:20922084

  16. Perivascular Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Maille, Nicole; Clas, Darren; Osol, George

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) contributes to vasoregulation. The role of this adipose tissue bed in pregnancy has not been examined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PVAT in pregnant rats decreases resistance artery tone. Mesenteric arteries from nonpregnant (NP) and late pregnant (LP) rats were exposed to phenylephrine (PHE) or KCl in the presence (+) versus absence (−) of PVAT. The LP PVAT(+) vessels showed a 44% decrease in sensitivity to PHE in the presence of PVAT. There was no attenuation of the contractile response to KCl when PVAT was present. The LP arteries perfused with LP or NP PVAT underwent vasodilation; unexpectedly, NP vessels in the presence of PVAT from LP rats sustained a 48% vasoconstriction. The PVAT attenuates vasoconstriction by a mechanism that involves hyperpolarization. The vasoconstriction observed when nonpregnant vessels were exposed to pregnant PVAT suggests pregnant vessels adapt to the vasoconstricting influence of pregnant PVAT. PMID:25527422

  17. Hard tissue laser procedures.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, C B

    2000-10-01

    A more conservative, less invasive treatment of the carious lesion has intrigued researchers and clinicians for decades. With over 170 million restorations placed worldwide each year, many of which could be treated using a laser, there exists an increasing need for understanding hard tissue laser procedures. An historical review of past scientific and clinical hard research, biophysics, and histology are discussed. A complete review of present applications and procedures along with their capabilities and limitations will give the clinician a better understanding. Clinical case studies, along with guidelines for tooth preparation and hard tissue laser applications and technological advances for diagnosis and treatment will give the clinician a look into the future. PMID:11048281

  18. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  19. Stereolithography in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-03-01

    Several recent research efforts have focused on use of computer-aided additive fabrication technologies, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, solid freeform fabrication, or three-dimensional printing technologies, to create structures for tissue engineering. For example, scaffolds for tissue engineering may be processed using rapid prototyping technologies, which serve as matrices for cell ingrowth, vascularization, as well as transport of nutrients and waste. Stereolithography is a photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology that involves computer-driven and spatially controlled irradiation of liquid resin. This technology enables structures with precise microscale features to be prepared directly from a computer model. In this review, use of stereolithography for processing trimethylene carbonate, polycaprolactone, and poly(D,L-lactide) poly(propylene fumarate)-based materials is considered. In addition, incorporation of bioceramic fillers for fabrication of bioceramic scaffolds is reviewed. Use of stereolithography for processing of patient-specific implantable scaffolds is also discussed. In addition, use of photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology, known as two-photon polymerization, for production of tissue engineering scaffolds with smaller features than conventional stereolithography technology is considered. PMID:24306145

  20. Extraocular connective tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel M; Demer, Joseph L; Poukens, Vadims; Pavlovski, Dmitri S; Nguyen, Hien N; Rossi, Ethan A

    2003-01-01

    Extraocular muscle pulleys, now well known to be kinematically significant extraocular structures, have been noted in passing and described in fragments several times over the past two centuries. They were late to be fully appreciated because biomechanical modeling of the orbit was not available to derive their kinematic consequences, and because pulleys are distributed condensations of collagen, elastin and smooth muscle (SM) that are not sharply delineated. Might other mechanically significant distributed extraocular structures still be awaiting description?An imaging approach is useful for describing distributed structures, but does not seem suitable for assessing mechanical properties. However, an image that distinguished types and densities of constituent tissues could give strong hints about mechanical properties. Thus, we have developed methods for producing three dimensional (3D) images of extraocular tissues based on thin histochemically processed slices, which distinguish collagen, elastin, striated muscle and SM. Overall tissue distortions caused by embedding for sectioning, and individual-slice distortions caused by thin sectioning and subsequent histologic processing were corrected by ordered image warping with intrinsic fiducials. We describe an extraocular structure, partly included in Lockwood's ligament, which contains dense elastin and SM bands, and which might refine horizontal eye alignment as a function of vertical gaze, and torsion in down-gaze. This active structure might therefore be a factor in strabismus and a target of therapeutic intervention. PMID:12723968

  1. Lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Bassett, Erik K; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Lung tissue engineering is an emerging field focused on the development of lung replacement devices and tissue to treat patients with end stage lung disease. Microfluidic based lung assist devices have been developed that have biomimetically designed vascular networks that achieve physiologic blood flow. Gas exchange in these devices occurs across a thin respiratory membrane. Designed for intrathoracic implantation as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy, these lung assist devices will allow ambulation and hospital discharge for patients with end stage lung disease. Decellularized lungs subsequently recellularized with epithelial and endothelial cells have been implanted in small animal models with demonstration of initial gas exchange. Further development of these tissues and scaling to large animal models will validate this approach and may be an organ source for lung transplantation. Initial clinical success has been achieved with decellularized tracheal implants using autologous stem cells. Development of microfluidic lung models using similar architecture to the lung assist device technology allows study of lung biology and diseases with manipulation of lung cells and respiratory membrane strain. PMID:24896347

  2. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  3. Prediction of tissue thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Subic, Aleksandar; Jazar, Reza; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2016-04-29

    This paper presents a method to characterize tissue thermal damage by taking into account the thermal-mechanical effect of soft tissues for thermal ablation. This method integrates the bio-heating conduction and non-rigid motion dynamics to describe thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and further extends the traditional tissue damage model to characterize thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively predict tissue thermal damage and it also provides reliable guidelines for control of the thermal ablation procedure. PMID:27163325

  4. Gastric tissue biopsy and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... laboratory test that examines the tissue sample for bacteria and other organisms that can cause disease. ... of organisms that cause infection. A gastric tissue culture may be ... Stomach acids normally prevent too much bacteria from growing.

  5. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003453.htm Gram stain of tissue biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gram stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal ...

  6. In Vitro Tissue Differentiation using Dynamics of Tissue Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Phillips, Paul J.

    2002-03-01

    Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties of various human tissue types were studied at macroscopic as well as microscopic level in vitro. This study was conducted to enable the development of a feedback system based on dynamics of tissue mechanical properties for intraoperative guidance for tumor treatment (e.g., RF ablation of liver tumor) and noninvasive tumor localization. Human liver tissues, including normal, cancerous, and cirrhotic tissues, were obtained from patients receiving liver transplant or tumor resection at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with the approval of the Vanderbilt Institutional Review Board. Tissue samples, once resected from the patients, were snap-frozen using liquid nitrogen and stored at -70 oC. Measurements of the mechanical properties of these tissue samples were conducted at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties were measured from both native and thermally coagulated tissue samples at macroscopic and microscopic level. Preliminary results suggest the dynamics of mechanical properties of normal liver tissues are very different from those of cancerous liver tissues. The correlation between the dynamics of mechanical properties at macroscopic level and those at microscopic level is currently under investigation.

  7. Tissue allograft coding and traceability in USM Tissue Bank, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Ab Hamid, Suzina; Abd Rahman, Muhamad Nor Firdaus

    2010-11-01

    In Malaysia, tissue banking activities began in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Tissue Bank in early 1990s. Since then a few other bone banks have been set up in other government hospitals and institutions. However, these banks are not governed by the national authority. In addition there is no requirement set by the national regulatory authority on coding and traceability for donated human tissues for transplantation. Hence, USM Tissue Bank has taken the initiatives to adopt a system that enables the traceability of tissues between the donor, the processed tissue and the recipient based on other international standards for tissue banks. The traceability trail has been effective and the bank is certified compliance to the international standard ISO 9001:2008. PMID:20582480

  8. [Azithromycin: tissue pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Bergogne-Bérézin, E

    1995-06-01

    Among macrolide derivatives, azithromycin which is an azalide, is a totally original new drug as to its pharmacokinetics in serum and tissues. Compared to reference compounds such as erythromycin or roxithromycin, pharmacokinetic parameters of azithromycin are characterized by: (i) much lower serum concentrations; (ii) a much longer elimination half-life (48-96 h); (iii) high and persistent tissue concentrations. The latter characteristic has been demonstrated in animal models (experimental H. influenzae pneumonia in mice) and in human studies. In lung parenchyma, azithromycin concentrations were higher and more persistent (72 h) in infected mice (12 mg/kg) as compared to non infected mice (controls) receiving the same dose of azithromycin (50 mg/kg); this may result from high intracellular concentrations in polymorphonuclear leucocytes and release of the drug at pulmonary sites of infection. In man, concentrations of azithromycin have been measured in lung parenchyma, bronchial secretions, tonsils, during exploratory or surgical conditions. After a single dose of 500 mg of azithromycin, local levels may reach up to 10 mg/kg with persistence of high levels for > or = 72 h in lungs, tonsils, sinus and bronchial secretions (1.5 to 8.6 mg/kg or mg/l). Five consecutive doses of azithromycin (500 mg per day) maintained for 10 days tonsil concentrations higher than the MICs for susceptible bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8539071

  9. Chemokines and tissue injury.

    PubMed Central

    Furie, M. B.; Randolph, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of leukocytes at sites of inflammation is essential for host defense, yet secretory products of the white cells may augment injury by damaging surrounding healthy tissues. Members of the chemokine family of chemotactic cytokines play a fundamental role in this process by attracting and stimulating specific subsets of leukocytes. In vitro studies suggest that chemokines participate in at least three phases of leukocyte recruitment. First, they foster tight adhesion of circulating leukocytes to the vascular endothelium by activating leukocytic integrins. Second, because of their chemoattractant properties, chemokines guide leukocytes through the endothelial junctions and underlying tissue to the inflammatory focus. Finally, chemokines activate effector functions of leukocytes, including production of reactive oxygen intermediates and exocytosis of degradative enzymes. Animal studies in which antibodies are used to neutralize the activity of individual members of the chemokine family confirm that these mediators contribute to the development of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. A number of mechanisms may operate in vivo to limit the proinflammatory properties of chemokines. Therapies that target chemokines directly or enhance the body's mechanisms for controlling their activity may prove to be reasonable approaches for treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:7778669

  10. Tissue bioengineering in orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Homma, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The use of cells for the purpose of orthopedic tissue engineering started more than 300 years ago. The first attempt of bone grafting was reported in 1668 by the Dutch surgeon Job-Van Meek'ren. In 1867, Ollier performed a series of experiments using transplanted periosteum and concluded that transplanted periosteum and bone remained alive and formed new bone. The osteogenic potential of transplanted bone marrow was later documented by Goujon in 1869, then by Macewen in 1881. Efforts of Albee and Phemister highlighted further the utility of bone transplantation for the healing of fractures and bone defects. The techniques for autografting pioneered by these individuals remained largely unchanged until today. Advances in understanding of the biology of osteogenic cells, the availability of many highly purified peptide growth factors, and the capacity to create highly specialized implantable materials have launched an explosion of new advances in bone grafting and bone regeneration, all under the banner of tissue engineering. This new field is rapidly expanding the armamentarium of orthopedic surgeons in every setting in which bone healing is required. Composites of cells and matrices are at the core of this revolution. PMID:22783330

  11. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  12. Laser-tissue photothermal interaction and tissue temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Andrea K.; Chen, Wei R.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, John A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    Responses of tissue to laser stimulation are crucial in both disease diagnostics and treatment. In general, when tissue absorbs laser energy photothermal interaction occurs. The most important signature of the photothermal reaction is the tissue temperature change during and after the laser irradiation. Experimentally, the tissue reaction to laser irradiation can be measured by numerous methods including direct temperature measurement and measurement of perfusion change. In this study, a multiple-channel temperature probe was used to measure tissue temperature change during irradiation of lasers with different wavelengths at different power settings. Tissue temperature in chicken breast tissue as well as skin and breast tumor of rats was measured during irradiation of an 805-nm diode laser. The vertical profiles of temperature were obtained using simultaneous measurement at several different locations. The absorption of laser energy by tissue was enhanced by injecting laser-absorbing dye into the tissue. A Nd:YAG laser of 1064-nm wavelength was also used to irradiate turkey breast tissue. Our results showed that both laser penetration ability and photothermal reaction depended on the wavelength of lasers. In the case of 805-nm laser, the temperature increased rapidly only in the region close to the laser source and the thermal equilibrium could be reached within a short time period. The laser absorbing dye drastically enhanced the thermal reaction, resulting in approximately 4-fold temperature increase. On the contrary, the laser beam with 1064-nm wavelength penetrated deeply into tissue and the tissue temperature continued increasing even after a 10-minute laser irradiation.

  13. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tharp, Kevin M; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and

  14. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Kevin M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and

  15. Polarized Light Propagation in Biological Tissue and Tissue Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, V.; Walsh, J.T.; Maitland, D.

    1999-12-10

    Imaging through biologic tissue relies on the discrimination of weakly scattered from multiply scattered photons. The degree of polarization can be used as the discrimination criterion by which to reject multiply scattered photons. Polarized light propagation through biologic tissue is typically studied using tissue phantoms consisting of dilute aqueous suspensions of microsphere. We show that, although such phantoms are designed to match the macroscopic scattering properties of tissue (i.e.. the scattering coefficient, {mu}{sub 3}, and scattering anisotropy, g), they do not accurately represent biologic tissue for polarization-sensitive studies. In common tissue phantoms, such as dilute Intralipid and dilute 1-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microsphere suspensions, we find that linearly polarized light is depolarized more quickly than circularly polarized light. In dense tissue, however, where scatterers are often located in close proximity to one another, circularly polarized light is depolarized similar to or more quickly than linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that polarized light propagates differently in dilute versus densely packed microsphere suspensions, which may account for the differences seen between polarized light propagation in common dilute tissue phantoms versus dense biologic tissue.

  16. Sirtuins, Tissue Maintenance, and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mohrin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a degenerative process resulting in compromised tissue maintenance and increased susceptibility to diseases, such as cancer. Recent advancements support the notion that aging is a highly regulated process governed by evolutionarily conserved pathways. In mammals, tissue-specific adult stem cells (ASCs) persist throughout the lifetime to maintain and repair tissues. While reduced ASC self-renewal is thought to contribute to compromised tissue maintenance, increased self-renewal of cancer stem cells (CSCs) may lead to tumorigenesis. It is speculated that genetic regulators of aging, such as sirtuins, are likely to impinge upon the ASC compartments to regulate tissue maintenance and tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the emerging evidence linking sirtuins to normal and malignant ASC self-renewal, tissue maintenance, and tumorigenesis. PMID:24019997

  17. Tissue Penetration of Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Timothy; Troke, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the tissue penetration of systemically administered antifungal agents is critical for a proper appreciation of their antifungal efficacy in animals and humans. Both the time course of an antifungal drug and its absolute concentrations within tissues may differ significantly from those observed in the bloodstream. In addition, tissue concentrations must also be interpreted within the context of the pathogenesis of the various invasive fungal infections, which differ significantly. There are major technical obstacles to the estimation of concentrations of antifungal agents in various tissue subcompartments, yet these agents, even those within the same class, may exhibit markedly different tissue distributions. This review explores these issues and provides a summary of tissue concentrations of 11 currently licensed systemic antifungal agents. It also explores the therapeutic implications of their distribution at various sites of infection. PMID:24396137

  18. Biomimetic Materials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peter X

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an exciting research area that aims at regenerative alternatives to harvested tissues for transplantation. Biomaterials play a pivotal role as scaffolds to provide three-dimensional templates and synthetic extracellular-matrix environments for tissue regeneration. It is often beneficial for the scaffolds to mimic certain advantageous characteristics of the natural extracellular matrix, or developmental or would healing programs. This article reviews current biomimetic materials approaches in tissue engineering. These include synthesis to achieve certain compositions or properties similar to those of the extracellular matrix, novel processing technologies to achieve structural features mimicking the extracellular matrix on various levels, approaches to emulate cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and biologic delivery strategies to recapitulate a signaling cascade or developmental/would-healing program. The article also provides examples of enhanced cellular/tissue functions and regenerative outcomes, demonstrating the excitement and significance of the biomimetic materials for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:18045729

  19. New Methods in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, Timothy P.; Rice, Charles M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    New insights in the study of virus and host biology in the context of viral infection are made possible by the development of model systems that faithfully recapitulate the in vivo viral life cycle. Standard tissue culture models lack critical emergent properties driven by cellular organization and in vivo–like function, whereas animal models suffer from limited susceptibility to relevant human viruses and make it difficult to perform detailed molecular manipulation and analysis. Tissue engineering techniques may enable virologists to create infection models that combine the facile manipulation and readouts of tissue culture with the virus-relevant complexity of animal models. Here, we review the state of the art in tissue engineering and describe how tissue engineering techniques may alleviate some common shortcomings of existing models of viral infection, with a particular emphasis on hepatotropic viruses. We then discuss possible future applications of tissue engineering to virology, including current challenges and potential solutions. PMID:25893203

  20. Citrus Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Einset, John W.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro growth of explant (juice vesicle or albedo tissues) cultures from citron (Citrus medica), lemon (C. limon), grapefruit (C. paradisi), sweet orange (C. sinensis), and mandarin (C. reticulata) fruits was stimulated by addition of orange juice (10% v/v optimum) to a basal medium containing Murashige and Skoog salts, 50 grams per liter sucrose, 100 milligrams per liter myo-inositol, 5 milligrams per liter thiamine·HCl, 2 milligrams per liter 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.5 milligrams per liter kinetin. In analyzing this effect of orange juice on citron explant cultures, we failed to obtain increased yields by addition of appropriate concentrations of citric acid to the basal medium but obtained growth stimulation when the medium was supplemented with juice from an “acidless” orange variety (cv. Lima). These facts suggest that some component(s) other than citric acid is involved. Addition of the inorganic ash corresponding to 10% (v/v) orange juice to the basal medium had no effect on yields. Similarly, the stimulatory effect of orange juice could not be explained based on its content of sucrose or of organic growth factors already present in the basal medium. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:16660631

  1. Ischemic tissue injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R. B.; Ganote, C. E.; Reimer, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    The subendocardial to subepicardial gradient in the severity of ischemia following acute coronary occlusion is described. The effects of mild, moderate, and severe ischemia on cell structure and function are compared in summary form, and special attention is given to the effects of severe ischemia on myocardial cells. The characteristics of reversible and irreversible ischemic injury are defined in biologic terms. The failure of cell volume regulation in cells which have entered an irreversible state of ischemic injury is demonstrated by the use of free-hand slices in vitro. Irreversibility is associated with structural defects in the plasma membrane and is reflected in an increased slice inulin-diffusible space, increased slice H2O and Na+ content, and failure of the tissue to maintain the high K+ and Mg2+ levels characteristic of normal left ventricular myocardium. Defective cell membrane function is an early feature of irreversible ischemic injury and may be a primary event in the genesis of the irreversible state. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1180331

  2. Soft tissue angiosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, P.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Barkley, H.T.

    1981-12-01

    From 1949 to 1979, 12 patients with soft tissue angiosarcoma received radiotherapy (alone or in combination with other modalities of treatment) with curative intent at The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute. The primary site was the head and neck in six patients (scalp, four; maxillary antrum, one; and oral tongue, one), the breast in four patients, and the thigh in two patients. All four patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp had advanced multifocal tumors, and two of them had clinically positive neck nodes. None of these tumors were controlled locally, and local recurrences occurred within and/or at a distance from the generous fields of irradiation. The remaining two patients with head and neck lesions had their disease controlled by surgery and postoperative irradiation. Three of the four angiosarcomas of the breast were primary cases which were treated by a combination of surgery (excisional biopsy, simple mastectomy, radical mastectomy) and postoperative irradiation. One patient also received adjuvant chemotherapy. The fourth patient was treated for scar recurrence after radical mastectomy. All four patients had their disease locally controlled, and two of them have survived over 5 years. The two patients with angiosarcoma of the thigh were treated by conservative surgical excision and postoperative irradiation. One patient had her disease controlled; the other had a local recurrence requiring hip disarticulation and subsequent hemipelvectomy for salvage.

  3. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  4. Osteochondral tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ivan; Miot, Sylvie; Barbero, Andrea; Jakob, Marcel; Wendt, David

    2007-01-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., defects which affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. Current surgical limits in the treatment of complex joint lesions could be overcome by grafting osteochondral composite tissues, engineered by combining the patient's own cells with three-dimensional (3D) porous biomaterials of pre-defined size and shape. Various strategies have been reported for the engineering of osteochondral composites, which result from the use of one or more cell types cultured into single-component or composite scaffolds in a broad spectrum of compositions and biomechanical properties. The variety of concepts and models proposed by different groups for the generation of osteochondral grafts reflects that understanding of the requirements to restore a normal joint function is still poor. In order to introduce the use of engineered osteochondral composites in the routine clinical practice, it will be necessary to comprehensively address a number of critical issues, including those related to the size and shape of the graft to be generated, the cell type(s) and properties of the scaffold(s) to be used, the potential physical conditioning to be applied, the degree of functionality required, and the strategy for a cost-effective manufacturing. The progress made in material science, cell biology, mechanobiology and bioreactor technology will be key to support advances in this challenging field. PMID:16730354

  5. Multimodality Instrument for Tissue Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip is discussed. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network, program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration.

  6. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merzlyak, Anna; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-01-01

    Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy. PMID:24991085

  7. Electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promises in providing successful treatments of human body tissue loss that current methods are unable to treat or unable to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes. In scaffold-based tissue engineering, a highperformance scaffold underpins the success of a tissue engineering strategy and a major direction in the field is to create multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds for enhanced biological performance and for regenerating complex body tissues. Electrospinning can produce nanofibrous scaffolds that are highly desirable for tissue engineering. The enormous interest in electrospinning and electrospun fibrous structures by the science, engineering and medical communities has led to various developments of the electrospinning technology and wide investigations of electrospun products in many industries, including biomedical engineering, over the past two decades. It is now possible to create novel, multicomponent tissue engineering scaffolds with multiple functions. This article provides a concise review of recent advances in the R & D of electrospun multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds. It also presents our philosophy and research in the designing and fabrication of electrospun multicomponent scaffolds with multiple functions.

  8. Fibrosis and Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Tordjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is increasingly appreciated as a major player in adipose tissue dysfunction. In rapidly expanding adipose tissue, pervasive hypoxia leads to an induction of HIF1α that in turn leads to a potent pro-fibrotic transcriptional program. The pathophysiological impact of adipose tissue fibrosis is likely to play an equally important role on systemic metabolic alterations as fibrotic conditions play in the liver, heart and kidney. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the genesis, modulation and systemic impact of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in adipose tissue of both rodents and humans and the ensuing impact on metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23954640

  9. Tissue regeneration during tissue expansion and choosing an expander

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, K.; Agrawal, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the various aspects of tissue regeneration during the process of tissue expansion. “Creep” and mechanical and biological “stretch” are responsible for expansion. During expansion, the epidermis thickens, the dermis thins out, vascularity improves, significant angiogenesis occurs, hair telogen phase becomes shorter and the peripheral nerves, vessels and muscle fibres lengthen. Expansion is associated with molecular changes in the tissue. Almost all these biological changes are reversible after the removal of the expander.This study is also aimed at reviewing the difficulty in deciding the volume and dimension of the expander for a defect. Basic mathematical formulae and the computer programmes for calculating the dimension of tissue expanders, although available in the literature, are not popular. A user-friendly computer programme based on the easily available Microsoft Excel spread sheet has been introduced. When we feed the area of defect and base dimension of the donor area or tissue expander, this programme calculates the volume and height of the expander. The shape of the expander is decided clinically based on the availability of the donor area and the designing of the future tissue movement. Today, tissue expansion is better understood biologically and mechanically. Clinical judgement remains indispensable in choosing the size and shape of the tissue expander. PMID:22754146

  10. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  11. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  13. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ... superficial (in subcutaneous tissue with no spread into connective tissue or muscle below) or deep (in the muscle ...

  14. [Myokines - muscle tissue hormones].

    PubMed

    Stránská, Zuzana; Svačina, Štěpán

    2015-04-01

    Physical inactivity is demonstrably related to the manifestation of chronic diseases which significantly modify the quality and prognosis of life in a negative way. The benefits of exercise are surely mediated by many pathophysiological mechanisms interrelated in varying degrees, which have not yet been fully examined in their complexity. In the late 20th century it was positively proven that a working striated muscle really regulates the metabolic and physiological response in the other organs. These involve several hundred substances with autocrine, paracrine and endocrine effects. These proteins and peptides, if released into the blood stream, substantially affect the metabolism of distant organs. They were classified as "myokines" (cytokines produced by myocytes). The identified myokines include e.g. IL4, IL6, IL7, IL15, myostatin, LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor), BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor), FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2), FGF21, FSTL1 (follistatin-related protein 1), irisin, EPO (erythropoetin) and BAIBA (β-aminoisobutyric acid). Myokines have first of all an immunoregulatory role in the human body. Another important effect of myokines is, coincidentally also in the interaction with adipose tissue, the regulation of energy homeostasis. They also affect the growth of muscle fibres and their regeneration, stimulate angiogenesis, they are involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism and have a proven effect on lipids. Considering their diverse function, myokines present a prospective therapeutic goal in the treatment of disorders of muscle growth and regeneration as well as obesity. Another recent research moves toward uncovering of the "myokine resistance" as a result of long-term muscle inactivity and its association with chronic subclinical inflammation. PMID:25894270

  15. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21673928

  16. Plant Tissues. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on plant tissues. Presented first are an attention step and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about plant tissues and the effect of water and minerals on them. The following topics are among those discussed: reasons why water is important to plants,…

  17. URIC ACID AND TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    NERY, Rodrigo Araldi; KAHLOW, Barbara Stadler; SKARE, Thelma L; TABUSHI, Fernando Issamu; CASTRO, Adham do Amaral e

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, a metabolic product of purines, may exert a role in tissue healing. In this review we will explore its role as an alarm initiating the inflammatory process that is necessary for tissue repair, as a scavenger of oxygen free radicals, as a mobilizer of progenitor endothelial cells and as supporter of adaptive immune system. PMID:26734804

  18. The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Robert J; Montgomery, Kelli; Liu, Chih Long; Shah, Nigam H; Prapong, Wijan; Nitzberg, Michael; Zachariah, Zachariah K; Sherlock, Gavin J; Natkunam, Yasodha; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Brown, Patrick O; Ball, Catherine A

    2008-01-01

    The Stanford Tissue Microarray Database (TMAD; http://tma.stanford.edu) is a public resource for disseminating annotated tissue images and associated expression data. Stanford University pathologists, researchers and their collaborators worldwide use TMAD for designing, viewing, scoring and analyzing their tissue microarrays. The use of tissue microarrays allows hundreds of human tissue cores to be simultaneously probed by antibodies to detect protein abundance (Immunohistochemistry; IHC), or by labeled nucleic acids (in situ hybridization; ISH) to detect transcript abundance. TMAD archives multi-wavelength fluorescence and bright-field images of tissue microarrays for scoring and analysis. As of July 2007, TMAD contained 205 161 images archiving 349 distinct probes on 1488 tissue microarray slides. Of these, 31 306 images for 68 probes on 125 slides have been released to the public. To date, 12 publications have been based on these raw public data. TMAD incorporates the NCI Thesaurus ontology for searching tissues in the cancer domain. Image processing researchers can extract images and scores for training and testing classification algorithms. The production server uses the Apache HTTP Server, Oracle Database and Perl application code. Source code is available to interested researchers under a no-cost license. PMID:17989087

  19. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  20. Tissue printing on nitrocellulose membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Song, Yanru; Pont-Lezica, R.; Lin, Liangshiou; Ye, Zhenghua; Varner, J.E. )

    1989-04-01

    In the 1950's Daoust developed substrate film printing on gelatin and starch films to localize protease, amylase, DNAase and RNAase activities. These procedures were adapted to plant tissues by Yomo and Taylor (1973) and by Jacobsen and Knox (1973). Membranes such as nitrocellulose bind cellular materials from cut tissue surfaces with little lateral diffusion. Thus accurate chemical prints are obtained. When the tissue is pressed firmly onto nitrocellulose a physical impression is obtained which shows the anatomy of the tissue. We have used the tissue-print technique to localize (1) proteins with labeled antibodies, (2) RNA with labeled nucleic acid probes, (3) enzymes by catalytic activity, (4) glycoproteins by fluorescent lectins, (5) lectins by fluorescent sugars, (6) cysteine-rich proteins by dansylated iodoacetamide, (7) ascorbic acid by silver nitrate, (8) soluble fluorescent compounds by direct observation.

  1. Videofluorometer for imaging tissue metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Rorvik, Dawn A.; Richmond, Keith N.; Barlow, Clyde H.

    1989-11-01

    A videofluorometer is described that directly acquires digital metabolic images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence in tissue. NADH fluorescence provides an intrinsic indicator of the state of tissue mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The device combines a computer-controlled fluorescence excitation system with digital image acquisition to quantify tissue bioenergetics in both spatial and time domains. Localized ischemia following coronary artery ligation in a perfused rat heart (model for a coronary artery occlusion heart attack) is used as an example to demonstrate the capabilities of the system. This videofluorometer permits monitoring changes in physiological state of organs and tissue without interfering with tissue metabolism. The digital nature of the acquired image allows detailed analysis of physiological features and their time dependence.

  2. Optical Characterization of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Frederick; Sardar, Dhiraj; Tsin, Andrew

    2008-03-01

    University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249. An in-depth characterization of optical properties of biological tissues has been performed. The wavelength-dependent total diffuse reflection (Rd) and total transmission (Tt) measurements have been taken for individual tissue by using a double-integrating sphere setup. The index of refraction of the tissue will be determined using conventional optical techniques. The Inverse Adding Doubling (IAD) computational method is applied to the measured values of n, Rd, and Tt to calculate the optical absorption and scattering coefficients as well as the scattering anisotropy coefficients of these tissues. The Rd and Tt determined by the IAD method were compared with those generated by the Monte Carlo simulation technique. A thorough comparison of the scattering characteristics of these tissues has been made. Furthermore, a comparison of these optical scattering and absorption coefficients calculated by IAD method were compared to the values determined by the Kubelka-Munk model.

  3. MALDI Tissue Profiling of Integral Membrane Proteins from Ocular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Danielle B.; Gillam, Christopher J.; Grey, Angus C.; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    MALDI tissue profiling and imaging have become valuable tools for rapid, direct analysis of tissues to investigate spatial distributions of proteins, potentially leading to an enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease. Sample preparation methods developed to date for these techniques produce protein expression profiles from predominantly hydrophilic, soluble proteins. The ability to obtain information about the spatial distribution of integral membrane proteins is critical to more fully understand their role in physiological processes, including transport, adhesion, and signaling. In this communication, a sample preparation method for direct tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins is presented. Spatially resolved profiles for the abundant lens membrane proteins aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and MP20, and the retinal membrane protein opsin, were obtained using this method. MALDI tissue profiling results were validated by analysis of dissected tissue prepared by traditional membrane protein processing methods. Furthermore, direct tissue profiling of lens membrane proteins revealed aged related post-translational modifications, as well as a novel modification that had not been detected using conventional tissue homogenization methods. PMID:18396059

  4. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well. PMID:17005024

  5. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  6. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  7. Trade in human tissue products.

    PubMed

    Tonti-Filippini, Nicholas; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2011-03-01

    Trade in human tissue in Australia is prohibited by state law, and in ethical guidelines by the National Health and Medical Research Council: National statement on ethical conduct in human research; Organ and tissue donation by living donors: guidelines for ethical practice for health professionals. However, trade in human tissue products is a common practice especially for: reconstructive orthopaedic or plastic surgery; novel human tissue products such as a replacement trachea created by using human mesenchymal stem cells; biomedical research using cell lines, DNA and protein provided through biobanks. Cost pressures on these have forced consideration of commercial models to sustain their operations. Both the existing and novel activities require a robust framework to enable commercial uses of human tissue products while maintaining community acceptability of such practices, but to date no such framework exists. In this article, we propose a model ethical framework for ethical governance which identifies specific ethical issues such as: privacy; unique value of a person's tissue; commodification of the body; equity and benefit to the community; perverse incentives; and "attenuation" as a potentially useful concept to help deal with the broad range of subjective views relevant to whether it is acceptable to commercialise certain human tissue products. PMID:21382003

  8. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  9. Multimodality instrument for tissue characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration. The use of this system will make surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Other applications of this system include the detection, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, prostate cancer, spinal diseases, and use in general exploratory surgery.

  10. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation. PMID:26678825

  11. In vitro NIR laser tissue welding of porcine ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Richard B.; Savage, Howard E.; Halder, Rabindra K.; Kartazayeu, Uladzimir; McCormick, Steven A.; Katz, Alvin; Perry, Henry D.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2005-04-01

    In this study, 72 different combinations of laser welding parameters were compared for their effectiveness in welding ocular tissue. The laser employed in the welding system was a near infrared (NIR) erbium fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.455 μm . The laser system used a motorized translational stage and shutter to control the laser exposure of the tissue being welded. The emission wavelength of the laser in the NIR range corresponds to one of the lesser absorption bands of water. Parameters of the laser welding system that could be changed to allow a more effective distribution of the laser energy and therefore management of thermal energy included: the number and kinds of intricate offset patterns of light on or around the incision, the number of lines per pattern, the power level, the speed of the laser beam movement over the tissues, the spot size, dwell time and the focus plane of the light beam in the tissue. Histopathology was used as an endpoint indication of the effects that the various sets of welding parameters had on the welded tissues. Standard Hematoxylin and Eosin stain and Sirius Red F3B (Direct Red 80) in combination with polarization microscopy were used to stain and visualize the welded ocular tissue. Paradoxically, the best cornea welds quantified using histopathology occurred with fluence of 4,500 mJ/cm2 or less while the corneal welds exhibiting the strongest tensile strengths, but most tissue damage had a delivered fluence above 7,000 mJ/cm2. The best histological representatives of welded corneas had an average delivered fluence of 2,687 mJ/cm2 and an irradiance of 14 W/cm2. Using the properly determined parameters, the NIR erbium fiber welding system provided full thickness welds without the requirement of extrinsic dyes, chromophores, or solders. The NIR laser system with the appropriately developed parameters can be used effectively to weld ocular tissues.

  12. Tissue patterning and cellular mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Evan

    2015-01-01

    In development, cells organize into biological tissues through cell growth, migration, and differentiation. Globally, this process is dictated by a genetically encoded program in which secreted morphogens and cell–cell interactions prompt the adoption of unique cell fates. Yet, at its lowest level, development is achieved through the modification of cell–cell adhesion and actomyosin-based contractility, which set the level of tension within cells and dictate how they pack together into tissues. The regulation of tension within individual cells and across large groups of cells is a major driving force of tissue organization and the basis of all cell shape change and cell movement in development. PMID:26504164

  13. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it`s usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  14. A study of a tissue equivalent gelatine based tissue substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    A study of several tissue substitutes for use as volumetric dosimeters was performed. The tissue substitutes studied included tissue substitutes from previous studies and from ICRU 44. The substitutes were evaluated for an overall match to Reference Man which was used as a basis for this study. The evaluation was based on the electron stopping power, the mass attenuation coefficient, the electron density, and the specific gravity. The tissue substitute chosen also had to be capable of changing from a liquid into a solid form to maintain an even distribution of thermoluminesent dosimetry (TLD) powder and then back to a liquid for recovery of the TLD powder without adversely effecting the TLD powder. The gelatine mixture provided the closest match to the data from Reference Man tissue. The gelatine mixture was put through a series of test to determine it's usefulness as a reliable tissue substitute. The TLD powder was cast in the gelatine mixture and recovered to determine if the TLD powder was adversely effected. The distribution of the TLD powder after being cast into the gelatin mixture was tested in insure an even was maintained.

  15. Identification of potential plant extracts for anti-tick activity against acaricide resistant cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srikanta; Tiwari, Shashi Shankar; Kumar, Bhanu; Srivastava, Sharad; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sachin; Bandyopadhyay, A; Julliet, Sanis; Kumar, Rajesh; Rawat, A K S

    2015-05-01

    To develop an eco-friendly tick control method, seven plant extracts were prepared using 50 and 95% ethanol and evaluated for acaricidal activity against cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The adult immersion test was adopted for testing different extracts. Based on 72 h screening criterion, 95% ethanolic extracts of Datura metel fruits and Argemone mexicana whole plant were found effective showing more than 50% mortality of treated ticks. The 95% ethanolic extracts of D. metel fruits and A. mexicana whole plant exhibited acaricidal and reproductive inhibitory effects on treated ticks. The LC90 values of D. metel and A. mexicana extracts were determined as 7.13 and 11.3%, respectively. However, although both the extracts were found efficacious against deltamethrin-resistant IVRI-4 and multi-acaricide resistant IVRI-5 lines of R. (B.) microplus, they caused less mortality than treated ticks of the reference IVRI-I line. Phytochemical studies indicated the presence of alkaloids and glucosides in D. metel fruits and alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids and phenolics in A. mexicana whole plant extracts. The results indicated that these botanicals may play an important role in reducing the use of chemicals for tick control and possibly to manage resistant tick population in environment friendly manner. PMID:25717008

  16. Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed. PMID:21699434

  17. Nanomaterials, Inflammation and Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials exhibit unique properties that are absent in the bulk material because decreasing material size leads to an exponential increase in surface area, surface area to volume ratio, and effective stiffness, resulting in altered physiochemical properties. Diverse categories of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanoporous scaffolds, nanopatterned surfaces, nanofibers and carbon nanotubes can be generated using advanced fabrication and processing techniques. These materials are being increasingly incorporated in tissue engineering scaffolds to facilitate the development of biomimetic substitutes to replace damaged tissues and organs. Long term success of nanomaterials in tissue engineering is contingent upon the inflammatory responses they elicit in vivo. This review seeks to summarize the recent developments in our understanding of biochemical and biophysical attributes of nanomaterials and the inflammatory responses they elicit, with a focus on strategies for nanomaterial design in tissue engineering applications. PMID:25421333

  18. Mechanical Force Sensing in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chanet, Soline; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue size, shape, and organization reflect individual cell behaviors such as proliferation, shape change, and movement. Evidence suggests that mechanical signals operate in tandem with biochemical cues to properly coordinate cell behavior and pattern tissues. The objective of this chapter is to present recent evidence demonstrating that forces transmitted between cells act as signals that coordinate cell behavior across tissues. We first briefly summarize molecular and cellular mechanisms by which forces are sensed by cells with an emphasis on forces generated and transmitted by cytoskeletal networks. We then discuss evidence for these mechanisms operating in multicellular contexts to coordinate complex cell and tissue behaviors that occur during embryonic development: specifically growth and morphogenesis. PMID:25081624

  19. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in the walls of the heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  20. Cytodiagnosis of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Oland, J; Rosen, A; Reif, R; Sayfan, J; Orda, R

    1988-03-01

    The only acceptable definitive diagnosis of a soft tissue mass is histologic or cytologic examination. In recent years, fine-needle aspiration cytology is used in more and more centers for diagnosis of soft tissue masses. We studied 196 aspiration cytologies performed on soft tissue lesions. Out of these, in 48 cases a definitive surgical procedure or open biopsy for histology and further evaluation were performed. There were 25 sarcomas and 23 benign tumors. There was one false negative cytologic result in this group; no false positive cytologies were detected. It seems that cytodiagnosis of soft tissue masses performed by an experienced pathologist is the method of choice, permitting a good diagnostic evaluation, with almost none of the traumatic and oncologic disadvantages of the other methods of biopsy. PMID:3352270

  1. Tissue engineering: A live disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hukins, David W. L.

    2005-12-01

    A material-cell hybrid device that mimics the anatomic shape of the intervertebral disc has been made and successfully implanted into mice to show that tissue engineering may, in the future, benefit sufferers from back pain.

  2. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  3. Optical Characterization of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimun, L.; Barrera, Frederick; Sardar, Dhiraj; Tsin, Andrew

    2008-03-01

    University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249 An in-depth characterization of the optical properties of biological tissues has been performed. The wavelength-dependent total diffuse reflection (Rd) and total transmission (Tt) measurements have been taken for individual tissues by using a double-integrating sphere setup. The index of refraction of the tissues will be determined using conventional optical techniques. The Kubelka Munk theory is applied to determine the scattering and absorption coefficients of these samples from the measurements of diffuse transmission and reflection. A thorough study of the scattering characteristics of these tissues has been made. *This work was supported in part by the NSF sponsored Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) at UC Davis under Cooperative Agreement No. PHY 0120999.

  4. Infrared Analysis Using Tissue Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Noel L.; Wood, Steven G.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a quick, easy, and cheap, but effective method of obtaining infrared spectra of solids and nonvolatile liquids by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The technique uses tissue paper as a support matrix. (RH)

  5. Mechanical Signaling in Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soledad; Chang, Sydney; Barzilai, Joshua J.; Leppert, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    The organs of the female reproductive system are among the most dynamic tissues in the human body, undergoing repeated cycles of growth and involution from puberty through menopause. To achieve such impressive plasticity, reproductive tissues must respond not only to soluble signals (hormones, growth factors, and cytokines) but also to physical cues (mechanical forces and osmotic stress) as well. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the process of mechanotransduction—how signals are conveyed from the extracellular matrix that surrounds the cells of reproductive tissues to the downstream molecules and signaling pathways that coordinate the cellular adaptive response to external forces. Our objective was to examine how mechanical forces contribute significantly to physiological functions and pathogenesis in reproductive tissues. We highlight how widespread diseases of the reproductive tract, from preterm labor to tumors of the uterus and breast, result from an impairment in mechanical signaling. PMID:25001021

  6. Teaching Tips: Plant Tissue Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Ed

    1991-01-01

    Plant tissue testing can be done to monitor plant nutrition levels during the growing season and diagnose nutrient deficiency problems. They can provide feedback on crop conditions and fertility needs. (Author)

  7. Tissue fusion over nonadhering surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nier, Vincent; Deforet, Maxime; Duclos, Guillaume; Yevick, Hannah G.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Marcq, Philippe; Silberzan, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue fusion eliminates physical voids in a tissue to form a continuous structure and is central to many processes in development and repair. Fusion events in vivo, particularly in embryonic development, often involve the purse-string contraction of a pluricellular actomyosin cable at the free edge. However, in vitro, adhesion of the cells to their substrate favors a closure mechanism mediated by lamellipodial protrusions, which has prevented a systematic study of the purse-string mechanism. Here, we show that monolayers can cover well-controlled mesoscopic nonadherent areas much larger than a cell size by purse-string closure and that active epithelial fluctuations are required for this process. We have formulated a simple stochastic model that includes purse-string contractility, tissue fluctuations, and effective friction to qualitatively and quantitatively account for the dynamics of closure. Our data suggest that, in vivo, tissue fusion adapts to the local environment by coordinating lamellipodial protrusions and purse-string contractions. PMID:26199417

  8. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  9. Tracheal tissue engineering in rats.

    PubMed

    Jungebluth, Philipp; Haag, Johannes C; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Ylva; Beltrán Rodríguez, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bianco, Alessandra; Dehnisch, Ivar; Uhlén, Per; Baiguera, Silvia; Lemon, Greg; Lim, Mei Ling; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered tracheal transplants have been successfully performed clinically. However, before becoming a routine clinical procedure, further preclinical studies are necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of in situ tissue regeneration. Here we describe a protocol using a tissue engineering strategy and orthotopic transplantation of either natural decellularized donor tracheae or artificial electrospun nanofiber scaffolds into a rat model. The protocol includes details regarding how to assess the scaffolds' biomechanical properties and cell viability before implantation. It is a reliable and reproducible model that can be used to investigate the crucial aspects and pathways of in situ tracheal tissue restoration and regeneration. The model can be established in <6 months, and it may also provide a means to investigate cell-surface interactions, cell differentiation and stem cell fate. PMID:25122525

  10. Therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chester J; Atala, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    A severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States leaves patients suffering from diseased and injured organs with few treatment options. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15094294

  11. Photoacoustic Measurements in Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we develop and evaluate the photoacoustic technique for recording spectra of white and gray mammalian brain tissues. In addition to the experimental work, we also discuss the geometric aspects of photoacoustic signal generation using collimated light. Spectra constructed from the peak-to-peak amplitude of the photoacoustic waveforms indicate differences in the two tissue types at wavelengths between 620 and 695 nm. The potential of the technique for non-invasive diagnosis is discussed.

  12. Magnetic resonance of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-04-01

    MRI of the human body is largely made possible by the favorable relaxation properties of protons of water and triacyl glycerides prevalent in soft tissues. Hard tissues - key among them bone - are generally less amenable to measurement with in vivo MR imaging techniques, not so much as a result of the lower proton density but rather due to the extremely short life-times of the proton signal in water bound to solid-like entities, typically collagen, or being trapped in micro-pores. Either mechanism can enhance T2 relaxation by up to three orders of magnitude relative to their soft-tissue counterparts. Detection of these protons requires solid-state techniques that have emerged in recent years and that promise to add a new dimension to the study of hard tissues. Alternative approaches to probe calcified tissues exploit their characteristic magnetic properties. Bone, teeth and extra-osseous calcium-containing biomaterials are unique in that they are more diamagnetic than all other tissues and thus yield information indirectly by virtue of the induced magnetic fields present in their vicinity. Progress has also been made in methods allowing very high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular and cortical bone relying on detection of the surrounding soft-tissues. This brief review, much of it drawn from work conducted in the author's laboratory, seeks to highlight opportunities with focus on early-stage developments for image-based assessment of structure, function, physiology and mechanics of calcified tissues in humans via liquid and solid-state approaches, including proton, deuteron and phosphorus NMR and MRI.

  13. [Connective tissue diseases in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Peitz, J; Tantcheva-Poór, I

    2016-04-01

    In this article we provide a brief review of systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease in adolescents. As skin manifestations often belong to the presenting symptoms and may have a significant impact on the quality of life, dermatologists play an important role in the management of patients with connective tissue diseases. Early diagnosis and therapy onset are crucial for the patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27000182

  14. Adipose tissues and thyroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Obregon, Maria-Jesus

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of energy balance is regulated by complex homeostatic mechanisms, including those emanating from adipose tissue. The main function of the adipose tissue is to store the excess of metabolic energy in the form of fat. The energy stored as fat can be mobilized during periods of energy deprivation (hunger, fasting, diseases). The adipose tissue has also a homeostatic role regulating energy balance and functioning as endocrine organ that secretes substances that control body homeostasis. Two adipose tissues have been identified: white and brown adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) with different phenotype, function and regulation. WAT stores energy, while BAT dissipates energy as heat. Brown and white adipocytes have different ontogenetic origin and lineage and specific markers of WAT and BAT have been identified. “Brite” or beige adipose tissue has been identified in WAT with some properties of BAT. Thyroid hormones exert pleiotropic actions, regulating the differentiation process in many tissues including the adipose tissue. Adipogenesis gives raise to mature adipocytes and is regulated by several transcription factors (c/EBPs, PPARs) that coordinately activate specific genes, resulting in the adipocyte phenotype. T3 regulates several genes involved in lipid mobilization and storage and in thermogenesis. Both WAT and BAT are targets of thyroid hormones, which regulate genes crucial for their proper function: lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, mitochondrial function, transcription factors, the availability of nutrients. T3 acts directly through specific TREs in the gene promoters, regulating transcription factors. The deiodinases D3, D2, and D1 regulate the availability of T3. D3 is activated during proliferation, while D2 is linked to the adipocyte differentiation program, providing T3 needed for lipogenesis and thermogenesis. We examine the differences between BAT, WAT and brite/beige adipocytes and the process that lead to activation of UCP1 in WAT

  15. The cryopreservation of composite tissues

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreservation of human cells and tissue has generated great interest in the scientific community since 1949, when the cryoprotective activity of glycerol was discovered. Nowadays, it is possible to reach the optimal conditions for the cryopreservation of a homogeneous cell population or a one cell-layer tissue with the preservation of a high pourcentage of the initial cells. Success is attained when there is a high recovery rate of cell structures and tissue components after thawing. It is more delicate to obtain cryopreservation of composite tissues and much more a whole organ. The present work deals with fundamental principles of the cryobiology of biological structures, with special attention to the transfer of liquids between intra and extracellular compartments and the initiation of the formation and aggregation of ice during freezing. The consequences of various physical and chemical reactions on biological tissue are described for different cryoprotective agents. Finally, we report a review of results on cyropreservation of various tissues, on the one hand, and various organs, on the other. We also report immunomodulation of antigenic responses to cryopreserved cells and organs. PMID:20046674

  16. Immediate versus chronic tissue expansion.

    PubMed

    Machida, B K; Liu-Shindo, M; Sasaki, G H; Rice, D H; Chandrasoma, P

    1991-03-01

    A quantitative comparison of the effects on tissues is performed between chronic tissue expansion, intraoperative expansion, and load cycling in a guinea pig model. Intra-operative expansion, which was developed by Sasaki as a method of immediate tissue expansion for small- to medium-sized defects, and load cycling, which was described by Gibson as a method using intraoperative pull, are compared with chronic tissue expansion on the basis of the following four parameters: amount of skin produced, flap viability, intraoperative tissue pressures, and histological changes. The chronically expanded group, which included booster and nonbooster expansions, produced a 137% increase in surface area, or a 52% increase in flap arc length, whereas intraoperative expansion resulted in a 31% increase in surface area, or a 15% increase in flap arc length. The load-cycled group, however, resulted in an almost negligible amount of skin increase. All three techniques exhibit immediate postexpansion stretchback. Flap viability is not impaired by any of the three techniques, in spite of the elevated pressures observed during expansion. Therefore, intraoperative expansion is effective primarily for limited expansion of small defects, whereas chronic tissue expansion still provides the greatest amount of skin increase when compared with other techniques. PMID:2029132

  17. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  18. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  19. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chiara, Gardin; Letizia, Ferroni; Lorenzo, Favero; Edoardo, Stellini; Diego, Stomaci; Stefano, Sivolella; Eriberto, Bressan; Barbara, Zavan

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering. PMID:22312283

  20. Material Tissue Interaction-From Toxicity to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Widbiller, M; Galler, K M

    2016-01-01

    The topic of material tissue interaction has gained increasing interest over recent decades from both the dental profession and the public. The primary goal initially was to avoid adverse reactions after the application of dental materials. New laboratory test methods have been developed, and currently premarket testing programs, which attempt to guarantee a basic level of patient safety, are legally required worldwide. The dentist is responsible for selecting the correct indication as well as the proper handling of any newly emerging risk. Apart from this phenomenon-oriented "inert materials concept," the "analytical concept" focuses primarily on analyzing the reasons for adverse reactions, and identifying their associated modifying factors, in order to prevent them or to develop new and more biocompatible materials. The "concept of bioactivity" involves addressing the possibility of positively influencing tissue by materials application, such as the generation of tertiary dentin or antibacterial effects. Finally, tissue regeneration may be supported and promoted by the use of various suitable materials (matrices/scaffolds) into which stem cells can migrate or be seeded, leading to cell differentiation and the generation of new tissue. These new dental materials must also fulfill additional requirements such as controlled degradability in order to be suitable for clinical use. Clearly, the field of material tissue interaction is complex and comprises a wide range of issues. To be successful as dentists in the future, practitioners should remain informed of these important new developments and have the argumentative competence to both properly advise and treat their patients. PMID:26645359

  1. Secretory function of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuryszko, J; Sławuta, P; Sapikowski, G

    2016-01-01

    There are two kinds of adipose tissue in mammals: white adipose tissue - WAT and brown adipose tissue - BAT. The main function of WAT is accumulation of triacylglycerols whereas the function of BAT is heat generation. At present, WAT is also considered to be an endocrine gland that produces bioactive adipokines, which take part in glucose and lipid metabolism. Considering its endocrine function, the adipose tissue is not a homogeneous gland but a group of a few glands which act differently. Studies on the secretory function of WAT began in 1994 after discovery of leptin known as the satiation hormone, which regulates body energy homeostasis and maintainence of body mass. Apart from leptin, the following belong to adipokines: adiponectin, resistin, apelin, visfatin and cytokines: TNF and IL 6. Adiponectin is a polypeptide hormone of antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity. It plays a key role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Resistin exerts a counter effect compared to adiponectin and its physiological role is to maintain fasting glycaemia. Visfatin stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake by muscle cells and adipocytes. Apelin probably increases the insulin sensitivity of tissues. TNF evokes insulin resistance by blocking insulin receptors and inhibits insulin secretion. Approximately 30% of circulating IL 6 comes from adipose tissue. It causes insulin resistance by decreasing the expression of insulin receptors, decreases adipogenesis and adiponectin and visfatin secretion, and stimulates hepatic gluconeogenesis. In 2004, Bays introduced the notion of adiposopathy, defined as dysfunction of the adipose tissue, whose main feature is insulin and leptin resistance as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines: TNF and IL 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein. This means that excess of adipose tissue, especially visceral adipose tissue, leads to the development of a chronic subclinical

  2. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  3. Three dimensional optic tissue culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Cardwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioreactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms normal, functional tissue organization and extracellular matrix.

  4. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma This page lists ... soft tissue sarcoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin ...

  5. Donation FAQs (Bone and Tissue Allografts)

    MedlinePlus

    ... donor family services. Most organ, tissue and eye banks that are members of MTF send tissue to ... according to exact surgical specifications. Small, local tissue banks could not provide this level of quality in ...

  6. Engineering of implantable liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasuyuki; Nishikawa, M; Evenou, F; Hamon, M; Huang, H; Montagne, K P; Kojima, N; Fujii, T; Niino, T

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, from the engineering point of view, we introduce the results from our group and related research on three typical configurations of engineered liver tissues; cell sheet-based tissues, sheet-like macroporous scaffold-based tissues, and tissues based on special scaffolds that comprise a flow channel network. The former two do not necessitate in vitro prevascularization and are thus promising in actual human clinical trials for liver diseases that can be recovered by relatively smaller tissue mass. The third approach can implant a much larger mass but is still not yet feasible. In all cases, oxygen supply is the key engineering factor. For the first configuration, direct oxygen supply using an oxygen-permeable polydimethylsiloxane membrane enables various liver cells to exhibit distinct behaviors, complete double layers of mature hepatocytes and fibroblasts, spontaneous thick tissue formation of hepatocarcinoma cells and fetal hepatocytes. Actual oxygen concentration at the cell level can be strictly controlled in this culture system. Using this property, we found that initially low then subsequently high oxygen concentrations were favorable to growth and maturation of fetal cells. For the second configuration, combination of poly-L: -lactic acid 3D scaffolds and appropriate growth factor cocktails provides a suitable microenvironment for the maturation of cells in vitro but the cell growth is limited to a certain distance from the inner surfaces of the macropores. However, implantation to the mesentery leaves of animals allows the cells again to proliferate and pack the remaining spaces of the macroporous structure, suggesting the high feasibility of 3D culture of hepatocyte progenitors for liver tissue-based therapies. For the third configuration, we proposed a design criterion concerning the dimensions of flow channels based on oxygen diffusion and consumption around the channel. Due to the current limitation in the resolution of 3D

  7. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age. PMID:23562167

  8. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. PMID:27284030

  9. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  10. Interface dynamics of competing tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podewitz, Nils; Jülicher, Frank; Gompper, Gerhard; Elgeti, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Tissues can be characterized by their homeostatic stress, i.e. the value of stress for which cell division and cell death balance. When two different tissues grow in competition, a difference of their homeostatic stresses determines which tissue grows at the expense of the second. This then leads to the propagation of the interface separating the tissues. Here, we study structural and dynamical properties of this interface by combining continuum theory with mesoscopic simulations of a cell-based model. Using a simulation box that moves with the interface, we find that a stationary state exists in which the interface has a finite width and propagates with a constant velocity. The propagation velocity in the simulations depends linearly on the homeostatic stress difference, in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions. This agreement is also seen for the stress and velocity profiles. Finally, we analyzed the interface growth and roughness as a function of time and system size. We estimated growth and roughness exponents, which differ from those previously obtained for simple tissue growth.

  11. Tissue Engineering Chamber Promotes Adipose Tissue Regeneration in Adipose Tissue Engineering Models Through Induced Aseptic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin− perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34−/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction. PMID:24559078

  12. [Brown fat tissue in humans].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, L N; Elsukova, E I

    2002-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is universally present in mammals. Thermal production in such tissue is physiologically important for maintaining temperature homeostasis and regulation of body mass in small-size homoiotherms. At present it is clearly established that unlike other large mammals, brown adipose in man and primates is retained throughout the whole postnatal othogenesis. Therefore, BAT appears as a possible effector of pharmacogenetic protection from human excessive adiposis. Systematic reserach of various functioning aspects of this unique organ of mammals were started abroad as early as 1960-es, and are actively developing at present. Domestic research of energy circulation physiology and of thermoregulation developed mostly outside the brown adipose tissue. Therefore, the principal objective of this publication is to draw attention of experimental and clinical researches to an intriguing aspect of the issue of energy circulation in humans--the issue of brown adipose functioning. PMID:12004574

  13. Pediatric free-tissue transfer.

    PubMed

    Upton, Joseph; Guo, Lifei; Labow, Brian I

    2009-12-01

    Free-tissue transfer has facilitated and refined the reconstructive surgeon's ability to repair or reconstruct acquired or congenital defects in children. Although parallels exist between indications for free-tissue transfer in adults and children, the technical challenges and surgical skill required in pediatric patients are much greater and the level of complexity can escalate tremendously. Although this operation is difficult, the success rate is high and the results are often outstanding, with the benefit of growth and functional adaptation of the transferred tissue. Experience in this field is cumulative and creative thinking is often required. This article outlines the specific features unique to children, the most commonly used flaps, the expected results in specific regions, and the potential pitfalls to be avoided. PMID:19952700

  14. [Functional morphology of pulp tissue].

    PubMed

    Heine, H; Schaeg, G; Türk, R

    1989-01-01

    As compared with mesenchyme no genuine defense cells are developed in the tissue of the dental pulp and the nervous tissue. This is a further hint for the common development from ectoderm. The three dimensional meshwork of pulpa fibroblasts ("mesectoderm") is structured by elongated cell processes connected with each other by a variety of special cell junctions ("electronic cell coupling"). Metabolites from the microcirculation and neuropeptides from vegetative axons influence the activity of fibroblasts synthetizing groundsubstance. The meshwork of the groundsubstance has exclusion effects concerning molecules with a distinct molecular weight and charge. Thus a primitive defense system is established. With this the role of a newly described cell type of the dental pulp, the "lymphocytic pericyte" is discussed. Because of the poor capacity of the pulpa tissue for immunological reactions pathologically disorders may easily become chronically spreading their antigenic components throughout the body. PMID:2800671

  15. Focusing light through living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, I. M.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2010-02-01

    Tissues such as skin, fat or cuticle are non-transparent because inhomogeneities in the tissue scatter light. We demonstrate experimentally that light can be focused through turbid layers of living tissue, in spite of scattering. Our method is based on the fact that coherent light forms an interference pattern, even after hundreds of scattering events. By spatially shaping the wavefront of the incident laser beam, this interference pattern was modified to make the scattered light converge to a focus. In contrast to earlier experiments, where light was focused through solid objects, we focused light through living pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. We discuss a dynamic wavefront shaping algorithm that follows changes due to microscopic movements of scattering particles in real time. We relate the performance of the algorithm to the measured timescale of the changes in the speckle pattern and analyze our experiment in the light of Laser Doppler flowmetry. Applications in particle tracking, imaging, and optical manipulation are discussed.

  16. Tissue C3b receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Schrieber, L; Penny, R

    1979-01-01

    Using fluorescein-labelled S. typhi coated with C3b (FBC) the presence of a receptor for C3b in normal human glomeruli has been confirmed. A quantitative system, counting the number of FBC bound per unit area of glomerulus, has been developed. Experimental variables have been studied to determine optimal conditions for FBC binding. Glomerular FBC binding has been shown to be dependent on FBC concentration, temperature and time of tissue incubation. A standardized procedure has been adopted. Using this technique we have examined a number of target tissues, including synovium, skin, lung, choroid plexus and uveal tract, which are frequently affected in systemic immune complex diseases. No evidence of this receptor has been found in these tissues. These results suggest a mechanism different from the C3b receptor operating to localise immune complexes in these non-renal sites. Images FIG. 2 PMID:527266

  17. [Cancer in ectopic breast tissue].

    PubMed

    Røikjer, Johan; Lindmark, Ida; Knudsen, Thor

    2015-06-15

    Two different forms of ectopic breast tissue exist in human beings: supernumerary and aberrant. Both forms are usually seen alongside the milk lines, which extend from the upper limbs to the inguinal region where they give rise to mammary glands, areolas and nipples. Although ectopic- and orthotopic breast tissue are placed in different areas of the body, they still share the same ability to undergo pathological degeneration. The focus of this case report is to shed light on this unusual form of breast cancer, and raise the level of awareness in cases with lumps located in the milk lines. PMID:26101129

  18. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Maryam; Duncan, Robin E; Jaworski, Kathy; Sarkadi-Nagy, Eszter; Sul, Hei Sook

    2009-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) in adipose tissue serves as the major energy storage form in higher eukaryotes. Obesity, resulting from excess white adipose tissue, has increased dramatically in recent years resulting in a serious public health problem. Understanding of adipocyte-specific TAG synthesis and hydrolysis is critical to the development of strategies to treat and prevent obesity and its closely associated diseases, for example, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis. In this review, we present an overview of the major enzymes in TAG synthesis and lipolysis, including the recent discovery of a novel adipocyte TAG hydrolase. PMID:19194515

  19. Advances in Meniscal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Forriol, Francisco; Romeo, Giovanni; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injuries and have a poor ability of healing. In the last few decades, several techniques have been increasingly used to optimize meniscal healing. Current research efforts of tissue engineering try to combine cell-based therapy, growth factors, gene therapy, and reabsorbable scaffolds to promote healing of meniscal defects. Preliminary studies did not allow to draw definitive conclusions on the use of these techniques for routine management of meniscal lesions. We performed a review of the available literature on current techniques of tissue engineering for the management of meniscal tears. PMID:25098366

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  1. Scalp repair using tissue expanders.

    PubMed

    Mangubat, E Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Repair of scalp defects is often challenging, because without careful planning, excision of the defect may leave unsatisfactory cosmesis. Contemporary techniques in hair restoration surgery allow creation of natural and undetectable results, but these techniques are often unsuitable for repairing large scarred areas of hair loss. However, by using older techniques of scalp reduction and tissue expansion, excision of many large scarring defects can be accomplished. Combining older methods with modern hair restoration surgery permits the satisfactory treatment of many previously untreatable conditions. This article focuses on tissue expansion as an adjunct to repairing large scalp defects. PMID:24017990

  2. Conductivity of living intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Latikka, J; Kuurne, T; Eskola, H

    2001-06-01

    Resistivity values were measured from living human brain tissue in nine patients. A monopolar needle electrode was used with a measurement frequency of 50 kHz. Mean values were 3.51 Ohms m for grey matter and 3.91 Ohms m for white matter. Cerebrospiral fluid had a mean value of 0.80 Ohms m. Values for tumour tissues were dependent on the type of tumour and ranged from 2.30 to 9.70 Ohms m. PMID:11419622

  3. The enigma of vestigial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B.

    1976-01-01

    There are several structures and various tissues in the human body that appear to be functionless relics of ancestral or embryonic development. As such they have long been of interest and have been cited in support of theories of evolution and of oncogenesis. Evidence can be adduced to show that these remnants are not necessarily degenerate, nor are they inevitably functionless. Vestigial tissues are especially common in tooth-bearing areas of the mouth, and the span of tooth development from early embryonic life until adolescence affords unique opportunities for studying the part played by embryonic remnants in later life. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:817639

  4. Photothermally induced delayed tissue death.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jeffrey M; Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Feuermann, Daniel; Huleihil, Mahmoud; Mizrahi, Solly

    2006-01-01

    We report pronounced delayed tissue death in photothermal surgery performed on the livers of live healthy rats with highly concentrated sunlight (ultrabright noncoherent light). Exposure times and power levels were selected to produce immediate necroses of the order of hundreds of cubic millimeters. Pathology reveals that lesion volumes increase by up to a factor of 5 within approximately 24 h after surgery, and then stabilize. Islands of viable cells can persist within damaged tissue, in the immediate vicinity of blood vessels, but also necrose within about 48 h. PMID:16822049

  5. [Skin and soft tissue infections].

    PubMed

    Piso, R J; Bassetti, S

    2012-03-14

    Skin- and Soft tissue infections are a frequent problem in hospital as well as in ambulatory care. Diagnostic procedures and treatment principles have to include the most frequent pathogens. While the acute forms of skin and soft tissue infections, with, necrotising fasciitis as important exception, rarely cause diagnostic or therapeutic problem, the treatment of patients with recurrent furunculosis, chronic wounds and diabetic feet is often difficult and frustration for patients and physicians. This article gives an overview of the most important problems and treatment strategies. PMID:22419138

  6. Soft tissue laser in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Gracco, Antonio; Tracey, Stephen; Lombardo, Luca; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Today a lot of minor cosmetic surgery operations on the gingiva can easily be carried out directly by the orthodontist with a small quantity of topical anaesthetic and the use of a soft tissue laser. The Diode laser is the most commonly used laser in dentistry for minor surgery to the soft tissues. This kind of laser offers numerous advantages with respect to traditional or electric scalpels. In this article the authors will analyse several typical uses of the diode laser in daily orthodontic practice. PMID:21515234

  7. Exercise regulation of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kristin I; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training results in adaptations to numerous organ systems and offers protection against metabolic disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes, and recent reports suggest that adipose tissue may play a role in these beneficial effects of exercise on overall health. Multiple studies have investigated the effects of exercise training on both white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), as well as the induction of beige adipocytes. Studies from both rodents and humans show that there are exercise training-induced changes in WAT including decreased cell size and lipid content, and increased mitochondrial activity. In rodents, exercise training causes an increased beiging of WAT. Whether exercise training causes a beiging of human scWAT, as well as which factors contribute to the exercise-induced beiging of WAT are areas of current investigation. Studies investigating the effects of exercise training on BAT mass and function have yielded conflicting data, and hence, is another area of intensive investigation. This review will focus on studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms regulating exercise training induced-adaptations to adipose tissue. PMID:27386159

  8. [Serpins in hyperplastic colon tissue].

    PubMed

    Kit, O I; Frantsiiants, E M; Kozlova, L S; Terpugov, A L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to define α-2-macroglobulin (α-2M) and α-1-proteinase inhibitor (α-1PI) in tissues of malignant tumors and polyps of the lower parts of the colon. 28 patients had malignant tumors of the sigmoid colon or rectum (T3N0-1M0-2), 29 had polyps of the same location. Content of α-2M and α-1PI was studied in cytosols of the central, peripheral and conditionally healthy tissues (of resection line) of the mentioned hyperplasias by the ELISA method using standard test kits. Suppression of a-2M and increase of α-1PI (perifocal zone) were found in malignant tumor tissue, as well as α-1PI maintenance in tumorous focus. Increase of α-2M and decrease of α-1PI were detected in polyp tissue. Changes in physiological balance of serpins were assessed by α-1PI/α-2M ratio in comparison with the resection line. The risk of distortion of proliferation and differentiation processes increases in polyps in ineffective inhibition of proteolysis under the influence of released factors of malignancy. Endogenous or medicamentous restoration of balance of interaction of trypsin-like proteases and kallikrein with inhibitors will probably play the crucial role. PMID:25911925

  9. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  10. Pediatric soft tissue oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andres; Haberland, Christel M; Baker, Suher

    2014-04-01

    This article provides an overview of common color changes and soft tissue oral nodular abnormalities in children and adolescents. The clinical presentation and treatment options to address these conditions are presented in a concise approach, highlighting key features relevant to the oral health care professional. PMID:24655531

  11. Cycling Rho for tissue contraction.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jessica L; Yap, Alpha S

    2016-08-29

    Cell contractility, driven by the RhoA GTPase, is a fundamental determinant of tissue morphogenesis. In this issue, Mason et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201603077) reveal that cyclic inactivation of RhoA, mediated by its antagonist, C-GAP, is essential for effective contractility to occur. PMID:27551059

  12. Application of Tissue Culture in Ornamental Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant tissue culture can be broadly defined as the culture of plant cells, tissues, or organs under sterile or aseptic conditions. To most growers, micropropagation is the term that perhaps best describes plant tissue culture. However, plant tissue culture plays an important role through its many ap...

  13. Mechanical Forces Governing Tissue Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn

    2002-10-01

    We have refined a UV-laser microbeam to investigate the forces at play during morphogenesis, i.e. early biological development, in the fruit fly Drosophila (1). While the microbeam typically is used to ablate tissue with cellular spatial resolution, it has the capability for submicron and thus subcellular spatial resolution. The microbeam can be steered in two-dimensions and UV-laser dissection occurred in vivo while the tissue was imaged in real time using a (visible) laser-scanning confocal microscope. We investigated a morphogenic process, known as dorsal closure, in a genetically engineered strain of Drosophila where green fluorescent protein has been fused to a fragment of a native structural protein (2). This allowed us to visualize the fluorescing contours of two opposing, outer sheets of tissue closing over an inner tissue sheet. Time-lapse imaging captured the contours in native closure as well as in response to UV-laser dissection. Specific patterns of dissection essentially eliminated a selected force: by tracking the changes in contour geometry we estimated the relative magnitude of that force (mechanical jump). Using this approach we identified and characterized a set of forces governing tissue dynamics. We have developed a mechanical model for the dynamics of dorsal closure based on this data set. This model provides a theoretical framework for investigating defective closure in mutant flies. Dorsal closure is a model system for various aspects of cell movement in wound healing and vertebrate development. This research has been supported by the DoD MFEL Program as administered by the AFOSR and by the NIH. 1. M.S. Hutson, Y. Tokutake, M-S. Chang, J.W. Bloor, S. Venakides, D.P. Kiehart, and G.S. Edwards. "Laser dissection of morphogenetic dynamics in Drosophila dorsal closure." In preparation. 2. D.P. Kiehart, et al, J. Cell Biol. 149, 471 (2000).

  14. Tissue macroarrays ("microchops") for gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P L; Nayach, I; Fernández, E; Fresno, L; Palacín, A; Farré, X; Campo, E; Cardesa, A

    2001-06-01

    We describe a simple system of tissue arraying with multiple tissue fragments obtained with a biopsy punch from selected areas of paraffin blocks. The new blocks thus constructed allow multiple tissue sections in which the uniform shape of the fragments coupled with a geometrical display and a significant amount of tissue per case allows a dependable, cost-effective way to screen tumors or other kinds of tissues with techniques such as immunohistochemistry. This system avoids the disadvantages of previous laborious methods of tissue arraying, such as expensive equipment and scarce tissue sampling, and it can be implemented in any institution with minimal cost and elaboration. PMID:11469691

  15. Nanotechnological strategies for engineering complex tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at developing functional substitutes for damaged tissues and organs. Before transplantation, cells are generally seeded on biomaterial scaffolds that recapitulate the extracellular matrix and provide cells with information that is important for tissue development. Here we review the nanocomposite nature of the extracellular matrix, describe the design considerations for different tissues and discuss the impact of nanostructures on the properties of scaffolds and their uses in monitoring the behaviour of engineered tissues. We also examine the different nanodevices used to trigger certain processes for tissue development, and offer our view on the principal challenges and prospects of applying nanotechnology in tissue engineering.

  16. A Team Approach to Improving Tissue Management.

    PubMed

    Sions, Jacqueline A; Cheuvront, Kimberly A; Grove, Georgiana L; Beach, Myra J; Bowers, Jay W; Cendaña, Cinthia R; Hixson, Jesse R; Wilson, Mary C

    2016-04-01

    Tissue implant management can be labor intensive because of multiple storage locations and cumbersome tracking systems. The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to enhance patient safety and nursing satisfaction by upgrading our tissue-management facility and processes. We created a centralized storage room for tissue implants and staffed this room during all shifts. Tissue management was executed using tracking software and transportation devices that supported tissue receipt, storage, disposition, documentation, and reporting. Our project resulted in our full compliance with tissue implant requirements from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The Joint Commission. We also reduced our documentation error rate from 3% to less than 1%, and decreased the tissue-expiration rate by 1.1%. Tissues are now delivered to ORs, which allows RNs to focus on patient care rather than retrieval of implants. Monitoring of the tissue inventory has improved, resulting in the reduction of tissue wastage. PMID:27004501

  17. [Metaplasia of aortic tissue into tracheal tissue. Surgical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Martinod, E; Zakine, G; Fornes, P; Zegdi, R; d'Audiffret, A; Aupecle, B; Goussef, N; Azorin, J; Chachques, J C; Fabiani, J N; Carpentier, A

    2000-05-01

    Tracheal reconstruction after extensive resection remains an unsolved surgical problem. Numerous attempts have been made using tracheal grafts or prosthetic conduits with disappointing results. In this study, we propose a new alternative using an aortic autograft as tracheal substitute. In a first series of experiments, a half circumference of two rings was replaced with an autologous carotid artery patch. In a second series, a complete segment of trachea was replaced with an autologous aortic graft supported by an endoluminal tracheal stent. No dehiscence or stenosis was observed. Microscopic examinations at 3 and 6 months showed the replacement of the aortic tissue by tracheal tissue comprising neoformation of cartilage and mucociliary or non-keratinizing metaplastic polystratified squamous epithelium. Although these results need to be confirmed by a larger series of experiments, they showed that a vascular tissue placed in a different environment with a different function can be submitted to a metaplastic transformation which tends to restore a normal structure adapted to its new function. These remarkable findings offer new perspectives in tracheal reconstruction in human. PMID:10879293

  18. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOEpatents

    Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

  19. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOEpatents

    Glinsky, Michael; London, Richard; Zimmerman, George; Jacques, Steven

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

  20. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities. PMID:27032791

  1. Image-guided tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ballyns, Jeffrey J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-01-01

    Replication of anatomic shape is a significant challenge in developing implants for regenerative medicine. This has lead to significant interest in using medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to design tissue engineered constructs. Implementation of medical imaging and computer aided design in combination with technologies for rapid prototyping of living implants enables the generation of highly reproducible constructs with spatial resolution up to 25 μm. In this paper, we review the medical imaging modalities available and a paradigm for choosing a particular imaging technique. We also present fabrication techniques and methodologies for producing cellular engineered constructs. Finally, we comment on future challenges involved with image guided tissue engineering and efforts to generate engineered constructs ready for implantation. PMID:19583811

  2. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now. PMID:26482855

  3. Brown adipose tissue and bone

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, M E; Enerbäck, S

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is capable of transforming chemically stored energy, in the form of triglycerides, into heat. Recent studies have shown that metabolically active BAT is present in a large proportion of adult humans, where its activity correlates with a favorable metabolic status. Hence, the tissue is now regarded as an interesting target for therapies against obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, the hypothesis being that an induction of BAT would be beneficial for these disease states. Apart from the association between BAT activity and a healthier metabolic status, later studies have also shown a positive correlation between BAT volume and both bone cross-sectional area and bone mineral density, suggesting that BAT might stimulate bone anabolism. The aim of this review is to give the reader a brief overview of the BAT research field and to summarize and discuss recent findings regarding BAT being a potential player in bone metabolism. PMID:27152171

  4. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  5. PAI-1 in Tissue Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Asish K.; Vaughan, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    1. Summary Fibrosis is defined as a fibroproliferative or abnormal fibroblast activation–related disease., Deregulation of wound healing leads to hyperactivation of fibroblasts and excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the wound area, the pathological manifestation of fibrosis. The accumulation of excessive levels of collagen in the extracellular matrix depends on two factors: an increased rate of collagen synthesis and or decreased rate of collagen degradation by cellular proteolytic activities. The urokinase-type/tissue-type plasminogen activator (uPA/tPA) and plasmin play significant roles in the cellular proteolytic degradation of ECM proteins and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The activities of uPA/tPA/plasmin and plasmin-dependent MMPs rely mostly on the activity of a potent inhibitor of uPA/tPA, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Under normal physiologic conditions, PAI-1 controls the activities of uPA/tPA/plasmin/MMP proteolytic activities and thus maintains the tissue homeostasis. During wound healing, elevated levels of PAI-1 inhibit uPA/tPA/plasmin and plasmin-dependent MMP activities and thus help expedite wound healing. In contrast to this scenario, under pathologic conditions, excessive PAI-1 contributes to excessive accumulation of collagen and other ECM protein in the wound area and thus preserves scarring. While the level of PAI-1 is significantly elevated in fibrotic tissues, lack of PAI-1 protects different organs from fibrosis in response to injury-related profibrotic signals. Thus PAI-1 is implicated in the pathology of fibrosis in different organs including the heart, lung, kidney, liver and skin. Paradoxically, PAI-1 deficiency promotes spontaneous cardiac-selective fibrosis. In this review we discuss the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of fibrosis in multiple organs. PMID:21465481

  6. Residual deformations in ocular tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruoya; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Residual deformations strongly influence the local biomechanical environment in a number of connective tissues. The sclera is known to be biomechanically important in healthy and diseased eyes, such as in glaucoma. Here, we study the residual deformations of the sclera, as well as the adjacent choroid and retina. Using freshly harvested porcine eyes, we developed two approaches of quantifying residual deformations in the spherically shaped tissues of interest. The first consisted of punching discs from the posterior wall of the eye and quantifying the changes in the area and eccentricity of these samples. The second consisted of cutting a ring from the equatorial sclera and making stress-relieving cuts in it. Measurements of curvature were made before and after the stress-relieving cuts. Using the first approach, we observed a 42% areal contraction of the choroid, but only modest contractions of the sclera and retina. The observed contractions were asymmetric. In the second approach, we observed an opening of the scleral rings (approx. 10% decrease in curvature). We conclude that residual bending deformations are present in the sclera, which we speculate may be due to radially heterogeneous growth and remodelling of the tissue during normal development. Further, residual areal deformations present in the choroid may be due to the network of elastic fibres in this tissue and residual deformations in the constituent vascular bed. Future studies of ocular biomechanics should attempt to include effects of these residual deformations into mechanical models in order to gain a better understanding of the biomechanics of the ocular wall. PMID:25740853

  7. Biotransformations with plant tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Carew, D P; Bainbridge, T

    1976-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus, Apocynum cannabinum and Conium maculatum were examined for their capacity to transform aniline, anisole, acetanilide, benzoic acid and coumarin. None of the cultures transformed acetanilide but each produced acetanilide when fed aniline. All three cultures converted benzoic acid to its para-hydroxy derivative. Coumarin was selectively hydroxylated at the 7-position by Catharanthus and Conium and anisole was O-demethylated only by older Catharanthus tissue. PMID:1084950

  8. Gender determination from pulpal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Khorate, Manisha M.; Dhupar, Anita; Ahmed, Junaid; Dinkar, Ajit D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of X (Barr body [BB]) and Y (F body [FB]) chromosomes observed in dental pulp tissue for gender determination of an individual. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 teeth (50 male and 50 female), which were indicated for extraction. The teeth were sectioned at various intervals (within 12 h to 49 days post-extraction), and the pulpal tissue was obtained. Two slides for each pulp tissue were prepared, one for 5% Quinacrine dihydrochloride stain (FB) and the other for Hemotoxylin and Eosin stain (BB). The slides were then observed under the fluorescent microscope for FB and under the light microscope for the BB respectively. Results: Gender determination from human pulp is possible up to 7 weeks. The percentage of FB and BB decrease gradually as the time interval increases. Further, an equation was derived from the data based on the canonical discriminant function coefficients. Conclusion: The determination of gender based on a joint search for the presence or absence of X (BB) and Y (FB) Chromosome is a reliable and cost-effective technique. PMID:25125918

  9. The history of tissue tension.

    PubMed

    Peters, W S; Tomos, A D

    1996-06-01

    In recent years the phenomenon of tissue tension and its functional connection to elongation growth has regained much interest. In the present study we reconstruct older models of mechanical inhomogenities in growing plant organs, in order to establish an accurate historical background for the current discussion. We focus on the iatromechanic model developed in Stephen Hales' Vegetable Staticks, Wilhelm Hofmeister's mechanical model of negative geotropism, Julius Sachs' explanation of the development of tissue tension, and the differential-auxin-response-hypothesis by Kenneth Thimann and Charles Schneider. Each of these models is considered in the context of its respective historic and theoretical environment. In particular, the dependency of the biomechanical hypotheses on the cell theory and the hormone concept is discussed. We arrive at the conclusion that the historical development until the middle of our century is adequately described as a development towards more detailed explanations of how differential tensions are established during elongation growth in plant organs. Then we compare with the older models the structure of more recent criticism of hormonal theories of tropic curvature, and particularly the epidermal-growth-control hypothesis of Ulrich Kutschera. In contrast to the more elaborate of the older hypotheses, the recent models do not attempt an explanation of differential tensions, but instead focus on mechanical processes in organs, in which tissue tension already exists. Some conceptual implications of this discrepancy, which apparently were overlooked in the recent discussion, are briefly evaluated. PMID:11541099

  10. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  11. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  12. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  13. Adipose tissue immunity and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Frühbeck, Gema

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete pro-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching toward M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumor growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumor cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumor microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoral drugs. PMID:24106481

  14. Differentiating tissue by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woessner, Stefan; Huen, Julien; Malthan, Dirk

    2004-03-01

    A common problem in several surgical applications is the lack of navigational information. Most often, the only source of information about the location of crucial structures, in relation to the surgical instrument, is the visible and tactile sensory input of the surgeon. In some cases, this leads to time-consuming procedures and a high risk for the patient. Therefore, we developed a spectroscopic sensor system for automatic differentiation between several tissue types. For example in milling processes, a sensor that is able to detect bone in contrast to nerve or vein tissue can be used to control the milling process. We showed exemplarily for the cochlea implant, a typical ENT-surgery, that with the help of our sensor system, the milling of bone can be accelerated without increasing the risk for the patient. It is also possible to use this type of sensor system in the area of medical robotics in soft-tissue applications. With real-time information, a continuous registration can take place, in contrast to a registration that is done using static preoperatively acquired images. We showed that our sensor system can be used to dynamically update the location of the patient in relation to CT or MR-images. In conclusion, we have been able to show that well-known spectroscopy sensors can be used to open new possibilities in medical treatment with and without the use of robotics.

  15. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  16. Optoacoustic detection of tissue glycation.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, Ara; Omar, Murad; Tserevelakis, George J; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, chronic renal failure, cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders are accompanied by accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). Therefore, AGE-associated changes in tissue optical properties could yield a viable pathological indicator for disease diagnostics and monitoring. We investigated whether skin glycation could be detected based on absorption changes associated with AGE accumulation using spectral optoacoustic measurements and interrogated the optimal spectral band for skin glycation determination. Glycated and non-glycated skin was optoacoustically measured at multiple wavelengths in the visible region. The detected signals were spectrally processed and compared to measurements of skin auto-fluorescence and to second harmonic generation multiphoton microscopy images. Optoacoustic measurements are shown to be capable of detecting skin glycolysis based on AGE detection. A linear dependence was observed between optoacoustic intensity and the progression of skin glycation. The findings where corroborated by autofluorescence observations. Detection sensitivity is enhanced by observing normalised tissue spectra. This result points to a ratiometric method for skin glycation detection, specifically at 540 nm and 620 nm. We demonstrate that optoacoustic spectroscopy could be employed to detect AGE accumulation, and possibly can be employed as a non-invasive quick method for monitoring tissue glycation. PMID:26417487

  17. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  18. Recent progress in tissue optical clearing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Larin, Kirill V; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique provides a prospective solution for the application of advanced optical methods in life sciences. This paper gives a review of recent developments in tissue optical clearing techniques. The physical, molecular and physiological mechanisms of tissue optical clearing are overviewed and discussed. Various methods for enhancing penetration of optical-clearing agents into tissue, such as physical methods, chemical-penetration enhancers and combination of physical and chemical methods are introduced. Combining the tissue optical clearing technique with advanced microscopy image or labeling technique, applications for 3D microstructure of whole tissues such as brain and central nervous system with unprecedented resolution are demonstrated. Moreover, the difference in diffusion and/or clearing ability of selected agents in healthy versus pathological tissues can provide a highly sensitive indicator of the tissue health/pathology condition. Finally, recent advances in optical clearing of soft or hard tissue for in vivo imaging and phototherapy are introduced. PMID:24348874

  19. Advanced Material Strategies for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Engelmayr, George C.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Moutos, Franklin T.; Guilak, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to restore the function of diseased or damaged tissues through the use of cells and biomaterial scaffolds. It is now apparent that the next generation of functional tissue replacements will require advanced material strategies to achieve many of the important requirements for long-term success. Here we provide representative examples of engineered skeletal and myocardial tissue constructs in which scaffolds were explicitly designed to match native tissue mechanical properties as well as to promote cell alignment. We discuss recent progress in microfluidic devices that can potentially serve as tissue engineering scaffolds, since mass transport via microvascular-like structures will be essential in the development of tissue engineered constructs on the length scale of native tissues. Given the rapid evolution of the field of tissue engineering, it is important to consider the use of advanced materials in light of the emerging role of genetics, growth factors, bioreactors, and other technologies. PMID:20882506

  20. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  1. Tissue engineering using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eberli, Daniel; Atala, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Patients with a variety of diseases may be treated with transplanted tissues and organs. However, there is a shortage of donor tissues and organs, which is worsening yearly because of the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering are applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. The use of adult stem cells for tissue engineering applications is promising. This chapter discusses applications of these new technologies for the engineering of tissues and organs. The first part provides an overview of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering techniques; the second highlights different adult stem cell populations used for tissue regeneration. PMID:17161702

  2. Monkey Alcohol Tissue Research Resource: Banking Tissues for Alcohol Research

    PubMed Central

    Daunais, JB; Davenport, AT; Helms, CM; Gonzales, SW; Hemby, SE; Friedman, DP; Farro, JP; Baker, EJ; Grant, KA

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 18 million adults in the United States meet the clinical criteria for diagnosis of alcohol abuse or alcoholism, a disorder ranked as the third leading cause of preventable death. In addition to brain pathology, heavy alcohol consumption is co-morbid with damage to major organs including heart, lungs, liver, pancreas and kidneys. Much of what is known about risk for and consequences of heavy consumption derive from rodent or retrospective human studies. The neurobiological effects of chronic intake in rodent studies may not easily translate to humans due to key differences in brain structure and organization between species, including a lack of higher-order cognitive functions, and differences in underlying prefrontal cortical neural structures that characterize the primate brain. Further, rodents do not voluntarily consume large quantities of EtOH and they metabolize it more rapidly than primates. Methods The basis of the Monkey Alcohol Tissue Research Resource (MATRR) is that nonhuman primates (NHPs), specifically monkeys, show a range of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol (>3.0 g/kg or a 12 drink equivalent/day) over long periods of time (12–30 months) with concomitant pathological changes in endocrine, hepatic and central nervous system (CNS) processes. The patterns and range of alcohol intake that monkeys voluntarily consume parallel what is observed in humans with alcohol use disorders and the longitudinal experimental design spans stages of drinking from the ethanol-naïve state to early exposure through chronic abuse. Age- and sex-matched control animals self-administer an isocaloric solution under identical operant procedures. Results The MATRR is a unique post-mortem tissue bank that provides CNS and peripheral tissues, and associated bioinformatics from monkeys that self-administer ethanol using a standardized experimental paradigm to the broader alcohol research community. Conclusions This resource provides a translational

  3. Unusual association of epidemic dropsy with brachial neuritis and palatal palsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sushama; Bandyopadhyay, Arindam; Mahapatra, Nepal Chandra

    2013-05-01

    Epidemic dropsy (ED) results from accidental ingestion of adulterated mustard oil with argemone oil. Chief organs involved in this disease are heart, subcutaneous tissue, eyes and kidneys. Nervous system involvement is very rare. Objective manifestation of neurological involvement is even rarer. The authors report two cases from the same family, who were victims of epidemic dropsy along with their parents. One of them showed objective neurologic involvement in the form of brachial neuritis and another showed palatal palsy. PMID:22231775

  4. SURROGATE TISSUE ANALYSIS: MONITORING TOXICANT EXPOSURE AND HEALTH STATUS OF INACCESSIBLE TISSUES THROUGH THE ANALYSIS OF ACCESSIBLE TISSUES AND CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surrogate Tissue Analysis: Monitoring Toxicant Exposure And Health Status Of Inaccessible Tissues Through The Analysis Of Accessible Tissues And Cells*
    John C. Rockett1, Michael E. Burczynski 2, Albert J. Fornace, Jr.3, Paul.C. Herrmann4, Stephen A. Krawetz5, and David J. Dix1...

  5. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  6. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  7. Fat tissue and long life.

    PubMed

    Bluher, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Studies over the last several years have revealed important roles of the body fat content, caloric intake and nutrition, insulin/IGF-1 signaling systems, and pathways involved in oxidative stress and control of protein acetylation on life span. Although the discovery of longevity genes supports the concept that life span is genetically determined, adipose tissue seems to be a pivotal organ in the aging process and in the determination of life span. Leanness and caloric restriction have been shown to increase longevity in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Increased longevity in mice with a fat-specific disruption of the insulin receptor gene (FIRKO) suggests that reduced adiposity, even in the presence of normal or increased food intake, leads to an extended life span. Reduced fat mass has an impact on longevity in a number of other model organisms. In Drosophila, a specific reduction in the fat body through overexpression of forkhead type transcription factor (dFOXO) extends life span. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the mammalian ortholog of the life-extending yeast gene silent information regulator 2 (SIR2), was proposed to be involved in the molecular mechanisms linking life span to adipose tissue. Moreover, in the control of human aging and longevity, one of the striking physiological characteristics identified in centenarians is their greatly increased insulin sensitivity even compared with younger individuals. On the other hand, overweight and obesity seem to be associated with decreased life span in humans. In addition, it was recently shown that modifiable risk factors during the later years of life, including smoking, obesity, and hypertension, are associated not only with lower life expectancy, but also with poor health and function during older age. There is growing evidence that the effect of reduced adipose tissue mass on life span could be due to the prevention of obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. PMID

  8. Quality control in tissue banking--ensuring the safety of allograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Linda K; Mansavage, Vicki L

    2006-09-01

    DESPITE FEDERAL REGULATIONS for tissue-banking practices, inadequate quality control led to the largest allograft tissue recall in history in October 2005. THE RECALL INCLUDED all allograft tissues obtained from 761 donors and distributed by five tissue banks. Many of these tissues already had been implanted and were unrecoverable. THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES the many tissue-banking industry variables, including donor selection and testing and tissue recovery, processing, and preservation. QUESTIONS THAT HEALTH CARE providers can ask to determine which tissue banks' quality control measures best ensure the safety of the allografts they provide also are included. PMID:17004664

  9. Mechanisms of tissue fusion during development

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Heather J.; Niswander, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Tissue fusion events during embryonic development are crucial for the correct formation and function of many organs and tissues, including the heart, neural tube, eyes, face and body wall. During tissue fusion, two opposing tissue components approach one another and integrate to form a continuous tissue; disruption of this process leads to a variety of human birth defects. Genetic studies, together with recent advances in the ability to culture developing tissues, have greatly enriched our knowledge of the mechanisms involved in tissue fusion. This review aims to bring together what is currently known about tissue fusion in several developing mammalian organs and highlights some of the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:22510983

  10. Soft tissue engineering in craniomaxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roderick Y; Fasi, Anthony C; Feinberg, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial soft tissue reconstruction may be required following trauma, tumor resection, and to repair congenital deformities. Recent advances in the field of tissue engineering have significantly widened the reconstructive armamentarium of the surgeon. The successful identification and combination of tissue engineering, scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules has enabled the surgeon to design, recreate the missing tissue in its near natural form. This has resolved the issues like graft rejection, wound dehiscence, or poor vascularity. Successfully reconstructed tissue through soft tissue engineering protocols would help surgeon to restore the form and function of the lost tissue in its originality. This manuscript intends to provide a glimpse of the basic principle of tissue engineering, contemporary, and future direction of this field as applied to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24987591

  11. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  12. General Information about Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. General Information about Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    In metabolically healthy humans, adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to insulin. Similar to muscle and liver, adipose tissue lipolysis is insulin resistant in adults with central obesity and type 2 diabetes. Perhaps uniquely, however, insulin resistance in adipose tissue may directly contribute to development of insulin resistance in muscle and liver because of the increased delivery of free fatty acids to those tissues. It has been hypothesized that insulin adipose tissue resistance may precede other metabolic defects in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, precise and reproducible quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, in vivo, in humans, is an important measure. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on how to determine adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. We review the methods available to quantitate adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27073214

  15. Biomimetic strategies for engineering composite tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy; Robinson, Jennifer; Lu, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The formation of multiple tissue types and their integration into composite tissue units presents a frontier challenge in regenerative engineering. Tissue-tissue synchrony is crucial in providing structural support for internal organs and enabling daily activities. This review highlights the state-of-the-art in composite tissue scaffold design, and explores how biomimicry can be strategically applied to avoid over-engineering the scaffold. Given the complexity of biological tissues, determining the most relevant parameters for recapitulating native structure-function relationships through strategic biomimicry will reduce the burden for clinical translation. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts in composite tissue engineering will enable integrative and functional repair of common soft tissue injuries and lay the foundation for total joint or limb regeneration. PMID:27010653

  16. Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Treatment Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  17. Method for localizing heating in tumor tissue

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1977-04-12

    A method for a localized tissue heating of tumors is disclosed. Localized radio frequency current fields are produced with specific electrode configurations. Several electrode configurations are disclosed, enabling variations in electrical and thermal properties of tissues to be exploited.

  18. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  19. What Is a Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in between fibrosarcoma and benign tumors such as fibromas and superficial fibromatosis. They tend to grow slowly ... These include: Elastofibromas, benign tumor of fibrous tissue Fibromas, benign tumor of fibrous tissue Fibrous histiocytomas, benign ...

  20. Survival by Stage of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic How are soft tissue sarcomas treated? Survival by stage of soft tissue sarcoma Survival rates ... observed, not relative survival): Stage 5-year observed survival rate I 90% II 81% III 56% IV ...

  1. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations. PMID:27523415

  2. Sex differences in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Ros, Purificación; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and its associated secondary complications are active areas of investigation in search of effective treatments. As a result of this intensified research numerous differences between males and females at all levels of metabolic control have come to the forefront. These differences include not only the amount and distribution of adipose tissue, but also differences in its metabolic capacity and functions between the sexes. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of these dimorphisms and emphasize the fact that these differences between males and females must be taken into consideration in hopes of obtaining successful treatments for both sexes. PMID:23991358

  3. Tissue enzyme studies in Macaca nemestrina monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. W.; Hoffman, R. A.; Jenkins, D.

    1971-01-01

    Total enzyme activities in fresh tissue specimens from major organs of Macaca nemestrina were analyzed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and aldolase. The concentration of these enzymes varied among the different tissue with skeletal muscle, heart, and brain having the highest activities. LDH isozymes determinations for the various tissues were also made. The spectrum of LDH isozyme distribution appears to be quite specific and characteristic for at least some of the tissues analyzed.

  4. Fatty acids of Pinus elliottii tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Lawler, G. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The total fatty constituents of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings were examined by GLC and MS. Qualitatively, the fatty acid composition of these tissues was found to be very similar to that reported for other pine species. The fatty acid contents of the tissue cultures resembled that of the seedling tissues. The branched-chain C(sub 17) acid reported for several other Pinus species was confirmed as the anteiso isomer.

  5. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Fried, D.

    2007-07-31

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  6. Tissue Barriers: Introducing an exciting new journal

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I

    2014-01-01

    This Editorial is written to introduce Tissue Barriers, a new Taylor & Francis journal, to the readers of Temperature. It describes the role of temperature in the regulation of different tissue barriers under normal and disease conditions. It also highlights the most interesting articles published in the first volume of Tissue Barriers.

  7. Comparative Histology of Plasma Treated Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Kyle

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric plasmas applied in surgical settings have unique characteristics found in histological results from animal tissue studies. This is evident in both ex vivo bench tissue tests and in vivo fresh tissue. Examples of these histological features are presented as results of a comparative study between plasma treated, common medical argon coagulation, and electrosurgery.

  8. Radioprotection of normal tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Maier, Patrick; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2014-08-01

    Improvements of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and systemic therapy have resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity is still dose limiting. Several strategies have been pursued with the goal to develop substances which may prevent or reduce damage to normal tissue. Drugs applied before radiotherapy are called radioprotectors; those given after radiotherapy to reduce long-term effects are radiomitigators. Despite more than 50 years of research, until now only two substances, amifostine and palifermin, have overcome all obstacles of clinical approval and are applied during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer or total body irradiation, respectively. However, better understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response has allowed the development of several highly promising drugs functioning as scavengers of reactive oxygen species or targeting specific molecules involved in regulation of cell death pathways or cell cycle arrest. The present review describes the major targets for radioprotectors or radiomitigators currently tested in clinical trials. PMID:24638269

  9. Leaf hydraulics II: vascularized tissues.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Fulton E; Holbrook, N Michele; Stroock, Abraham D

    2014-01-01

    Current models of leaf hydration employ an Ohm's law analogy of the leaf as an ideal capacitor, neglecting the resistance to flow between cells, or treat the leaf as a plane sheet with a source of water at fixed potential filling the mid-plane, neglecting the discrete placement of veins as well as their resistance. We develop a model of leaf hydration that considers the average conductance of the vascular network to a representative areole (region bounded by the vascular network), and represent the volume of tissue within the areole as a poroelastic composite of cells and air spaces. Solutions to the 3D flow problem are found by numerical simulation, and these results are then compared to 1D models with exact solutions for a range of leaf geometries, based on a survey of temperate woody plants. We then show that the hydration times given by these solutions are well approximated by a sum of the ideal capacitor and plane sheet times, representing the time for transport through the vasculature and tissue respectively. We then develop scaling factors relating this approximate solution to the 3D model, and examine the dependence of these scaling factors on leaf geometry. Finally, we apply a similar strategy to reduce the dimensions of the steady state problem, in the context of peristomatal transpiration, and consider the relation of transpirational gradients to equilibrium leaf water potential measurements. PMID:24012489

  10. Kidney diseases and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyung Hyun; Ko, In Kap; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Renal failure follows several disease stages including acute and chronic kidney symptoms. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with a mortality rate. Current treatment options are limited to dialysis and kidney transplantation; however, problems such as donor organ shortage, graft failure and numerous complications remain a concern. To address this issue, cell-based approaches using tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RM) may provide attractive approaches to replace the damaged kidney cells with functional renal specific cells, leading to restoration of normal kidney functions. While development of renal tissue engineering is in a steady state due to the complex composition and highly regulated functionality of the kidney, cell therapy using stem cells and primary kidney cells has demonstrated promising therapeutic outcomes in terms of restoration of renal functions in AKI and CKD. In this review, basic components needed for successful renal kidney engineering are discussed, and recent TE and RM approaches to treatment of specific kidney diseases will be presented. PMID:26134528

  11. Infrared Microspectroscopy Of Pathologic Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Timothy J.; Engler, Walter F.; Ventre, Kathleen M.

    1989-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique by which to characterize the conformations of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids (1). Previously we have demonstrated that infrared spectroscopy can be used to characterize the secondary structure of abnormal protein accumulation products, known as amyloid, which are often found in association with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (2). The utility of the technique was highly limited by the fact that essentially the entire specimen had to consist of this abnormal protein for infrared spectroscopic analysis to be useful. The development of high quality microscopes capable of both light microscopic and infrared characterization of materials has enabled us to extend our earlier use of infrared spectroscopy to diseases and tissues in which the abnormal region of interest is only a few hundred square micrometers in area. Tissue for spectroscopic examination is mounted on microscope slides which have been prepared by acid washing, plating with gold or gold-palladium alloy (3) and coating with high molecular weight poly-L-lysine. Sections of tissue which have been previously embedded in paraffin are cut with a microtome at 4 to 5 micrometers thickness, floated onto a bath of distilled water, picked up on the microscope slide, and allowed to dry overnight. Paraffin is removed by soaking the slides in two changes of xylene, and then the sections are rehydrated by placing them in absolute alcohol, then in fifty percent alcohol, and finally in water. Sections may then be stained using standard histologic stains, such as hematoxylin and eosin, then once again dehydrated with alcohol. After drying, the sections are covered with an index-matching fluid, such as Fluorolube, which allows a relatively good visual microscopic examination of the tissue when the microscope is used in reflectance mode. High quality reflectance infrared spectra may be easily obtained when the tissue is prepared and mounted in this way (Figure 1

  12. Lipid peroxidation and tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, C; Kouretas, D

    1999-01-01

    In recent years it has become apparent that the oxidation of lipids, or lipid peroxidation, is a crucial step in the pathogenesis of several disease states in adult and infant patients. Lipid peroxidation is a process generated naturally in small amounts in the body, mainly by the effect of several reactive oxygen species (hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide etc.). It can also be generated by the action of several phagocytes. These reactive oxygen species readily attack the polyunsaturated fatty acids of the fatty acid membrane, initiating a self-propagating chain reaction. The destruction of membrane lipids and the end-products of such lipid peroxidation reactions are especially dangerous for the viability of cells, even tissues. Enzymatic (catalase, superoxide dismutasse) and nonenzymatic (vitamins A and E) natural antioxidant defence mechanisms exist; however, these mechanisms may be overcome, causing lipid peroxidation to take place. Since lipid peroxidation is a self-propagating chain-reaction, the initial oxidation of only a few lipid molecules can result in significant tissue damage. Despite extensive research in the field of lipid peroxidation it has not yet been precisely determined if it is the cause or an effect of several pathological conditions. Lipid peroxidation has been implicated in disease states such as atherosclerosis, IBD, ROP, BPD, asthma, Parkinson's disease, kidney damage, preeclampsia and others. PMID:10459507

  13. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  14. Optical metabolic imaging of live tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-02-01

    The fluorescence properties, both intensity and fluorescence lifetime, of NADH and FAD, two coenzymes of metabolism, are sensitive, high resolution measures of cellular metabolism. However, often in vivo measurements of tissue are not feasible. In this study, we investigate the stability over time of two-photon auto-fluorescence imaging of NADH and FAD in live-cultured tissues. Our results demonstrate that cultured tissues remain viable for at least several days post excision. Furthermore, the optical redox ratio, NADH fluorescence lifetime, and FAD fluorescence lifetime do not significantly change in the cultured tissues over time. With these findings, we demonstrate the potential of sustained tissue culture techniques for optical metabolic imaging.

  15. Photoacoustic tomography of water in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    As an emerging imaging technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been widely used to image optically absorptive objects in both human and animal tissues. PAT overcomes the depth limitation of other high-resolution optical imaging methods, and it is also free from speckle artifacts. To our knowledge, water has never been imaged by PAT in biological tissue. Here, for the first time, we experimentally imaged water in both tissue phantoms and biological tissues using a near infrared (NIR) light source. The differences among photoacoustic images of water with different concentrations indicate that laser-based PAT can usefully detect and image water content in tissue.

  16. Bioengineering heart tissue for in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Cimetta, Elisa; Godier-Furnémont, Amandine; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    A classical paradigm of tissue engineering is to grow tissues for implantation by using human stem cells in conjunction with biomaterial scaffolds (templates for tissue formation) and bioreactors (culture systems providing environmental control). A reverse paradigm is now emerging through microphysiological platforms for preclinical testing of drugs and modeling of disease that contain large numbers of very small human tissues. We discuss the biomimetic approach as a common underlying principle and some of the specifics related to the design and utilization of platforms with heart micro-tissues for high-throughput screening in vitro. PMID:23932513

  17. Tissue simulating gel for medical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Companion, John A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A tissue simulating gel and a method for preparing the tissue simulating gel are disclosed. The tissue simulating gel is prepared by a process using water, gelatin, ethylene glycol, and a cross-linking agent. In order to closely approximate the characteristics of the type of tissue being simulated, other material has been added to change the electrical, sound conducting, and wave scattering properties of the tissue simulating gel. The result of the entire process is a formulation that will not melt at the elevated temperatures involved in hyperthermia medical research. Furthermore, the tissue simulating gel will not support mold or bacterial growth, is of a sufficient mechanical strength to maintain a desired shape without a supporting shell, and is non-hardening and non-drying. Substances have been injected into the tissue simulating gel prior to the setting-up thereof just as they could be injected into actual tissue, and the tissue simulating gel is translucent so as to permit visual inspection of its interior. A polyurethane spray often used for coating circuit boards can be applied to the surface of the tissue simulating gel to give a texture similar to human skin, making the tissue simulating gel easier to handle and contributing to its longevity.

  18. Tissue microarrays: applications in genomic research.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Aprill; Cornelison, Robert; Hostetter, Galen

    2005-03-01

    The widespread application of tissue microarrays in cancer research and the clinical pathology laboratory demonstrates a versatile and portable technology. The rapid integration of tissue microarrays into biomarker discovery and validation processes reflects the forward thinking of researchers who have pioneered the high-density tissue microarray. The precise arrangement of hundreds of archival clinical tissue samples into a composite tissue microarray block is now a proven method for the efficient and standardized analysis of molecular markers. With applications in cancer research, tissue microarrays are a valuable tool in validating candidate markers discovered in highly sensitive genome-wide microarray experiments. With applications in clinical pathology, tissue microarrays are used widely in immunohistochemistry quality control and quality assurance. The timeline of a biomarker implicated in prostate neoplasia, which was identified by complementary DNA expression profiling, validated by tissue microarrays and is now used as a prognostic immunohistochemistry marker, is reviewed. The tissue microarray format provides opportunities for digital imaging acquisition, image processing and database integration. Advances in digital imaging help to alleviate previous bottlenecks in the research pipeline, permit computer image scoring and convey telepathology opportunities for remote image analysis. The tissue microarray industry now includes public and private sectors with varying degrees of research utility and offers a range of potential tissue microarray applications in basic research, prognostic oncology and drug discovery. PMID:15833047

  19. Optimal tissue tension for secure laparoscopic knots.

    PubMed

    Raut, Vikram N; Takaori, Kyoichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2011-02-01

    Security and strength of a knot are main concerns of the surgeon since last 4000 years. The advancement of endoscopic and minimally invasive surgery in last few decades had a significant influence on a knot tying. The most difficult methods of a knot tying are performed during endoscopic procedures, in which the surgeon execute instrumentation from outside the body without palpation of organs and three-dimensional vision. In addition, laparoscopic instruments due to friction in transmission mechanism have very poor force feedback. This results into difficulty in applying the appropriate grasping force to the tissue, resulting in slippage or damage to the tissue. Our hypothesis highlights the need of tissue approximation at the 'optimum tissue tension' sufficient to resist the slippage of suture/clip without strangulation. The purpose of suture is to maintain an approximation of the tissue until healing progresses to the point where artificial support is no longer necessary for the wound to resist normal stress. When the approximation is too tight, tension in tissue leads to diminished blood supply resulting into the necrosis. Various tissues need different blood supply and different tissue pressure for optimum healings. Proposed hypothesis helps to improve the feedback of current knot pushers or clip applicators used in laparoscopic surgery using optimum tissue tension. Tissue approximation at an optimal tissue tension translates into the secure laparoscopic knot/clip application resulting in prevention of wound dehiscence, anastomosis leak, and secondary haemorrhages. PMID:21071154

  20. Assessment of brown adipose tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Virtue, Sam; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this review we discuss practical considerations for the assessment of brown adipose tissue in rodent models, focusing on mice. The central aim of the review is to provide a critical appraisal of the utility of specialized techniques for assessing brown adipose tissue function in vivo. We cover several of the most common specialized methods for analysing brown adipose tissue function in vivo, including assessment of maximal thermogenic capacity by indirect calorimetry and the measurement of sympathetic tone to brown adipose tissue. While these techniques are powerful, they are not readily available to all laboratories; therefore we also cover several simple measurements that, particularly in combination, can be used to determine if a mouse model is likely to have alterations in brown adipose tissue function. Such techniques include: pair feeding, analysis of brown adipose tissue lipid content and mRNA and protein markers of brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:23760815

  1. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of liver tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, Nina; Nilsson, Jan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Sturesson, Christian; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic contact probe is a cost-effective, rapid, and non-invasive optical method used to extract diagnosis information of tissue. By combining commercially available VIS- and NIR-spectrometers with various fiber-optic contact-probes, we have access to the full wavelength range from around 400 to 1600 nm. Using this flexible and portable spectroscopy system, we have acquired ex-vivo DRS-spectra from murine, porcine, and human liver tissue. For extracting the tissue optical properties from the measured spectra, we have employed and compared predictions from two models for light propagation in tissue, diffusion theory model (DT) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC). The focus in this work is on the capacity of this DRS-technique in discriminating metastatic tumor tissue from normal liver tissue as well as in assessing and characterizing damage to non-malignant liver tissue induced by preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastases.

  2. Multiscale tissue engineering for liver reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sudo, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a target of in vitro tissue engineering despite its capability to regenerate in vivo. The construction of liver tissues in vitro remains challenging. In this review, conventional 3D cultures of hepatocytes are first discussed. Recent advances in the 3D culturing of liver cells are then summarized in the context of in vitro liver tissue reconstruction at the micro- and macroscales. The application of microfluidics technology to liver tissue engineering has been introduced as a bottom-up approach performed at the microscale, whereas whole-organ bioengineering technology was introduced as a top-down approach performed at the macroscale. Mesoscale approaches are also discussed in considering the integration of micro- and macroscale approaches. Multiple parallel multiscale liver tissue engineering studies are ongoing; however, no tissue-engineered liver that is appropriate for clinical use has yet been realized. The integration of multiscale tissue engineering studies is essential for further understanding of liver reconstruction strategies. PMID:24500493

  3. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  4. Tissue engineering therapy for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Helen M; Edelman, Elazer R

    2003-05-30

    The present treatments for the loss or failure of cardiovascular function include organ transplantation, surgical reconstruction, mechanical or synthetic devices, or the administration of metabolic products. Although routinely used, these treatments are not without constraints and complications. The emerging and interdisciplinary field of tissue engineering has evolved to provide solutions to tissue creation and repair. Tissue engineering applies the principles of engineering, material science, and biology toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. Progress has been made in engineering the various components of the cardiovascular system, including blood vessels, heart valves, and cardiac muscle. Many pivotal studies have been performed in recent years that may support the move toward the widespread application of tissue-engineered therapy for cardiovascular diseases. The studies discussed include endothelial cell seeding of vascular grafts, tissue-engineered vascular conduits, generation of heart valve leaflets, cardiomyoplasty, genetic manipulation, and in vitro conditions for optimizing tissue-engineered cardiovascular constructs. PMID:12775655

  5. Improved traditional phytomedicines in current use for the clinical treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Merlin

    2011-04-01

    Phytomedicines and "green pharmacies" are promoted by some NGOs and governments as part of their efforts to control malaria. "Improved traditional medicines" (ITMs) are standardised as regards preparation and dose, although not always according to the concentration of active compounds. A systematic literature search revealed that six such phytomedicines are currently government-approved in at least one country and used on a relatively large scale nationally or internationally: Artemisia annua L. (Asteraceae), Cinchona bark (Rubiaceae), Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schltr. (Apocynaceae), "Ayush-64", "Malarial-5" and Cochlospermum planchonii Hook. f. ex Planch. (Bixaceae). One further ITM has been developed and is in the process of being approved: Argemone mexicana decoction. Their development, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials are reviewed, as well as priorities for future research. PMID:21204042

  6. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  7. Tissue homeostasis: A tensile state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podewitz, N.; Delarue, M.; Elgeti, J.

    2015-03-01

    Mechanics play a significant role during tissue development. One of the key characteristics that underlies this mechanical role is the homeostatic pressure, which is the pressure stalling growth. In this work, we explore the possibility of a negative bulk homeostatic pressure by means of a mesoscale simulation approach and experimental data of several cell lines. We show how different cell properties change the bulk homeostatic pressure, which could explain the benefit of some observed morphological changes during cancer progression. Furthermore, we study the dependence of growth on pressure and estimate the bulk homeostatic pressure of five cell lines. Four out of five result in a bulk homeostatic pressure in the order of minus one or two kPa.

  8. Endometriosis, Angiogenesis and Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Krikun, Graciela

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), is a cellular receptor that binds the factor VII/VIIa to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. In addition to its role as the initiator of the hemostatic cascade, TF is known to be involved in angiogenesis via intracellular signaling that utilizes the protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2). We now review the physiologic expression of TF in the endometrium and its altered expression in multiple cell types derived from eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis compared with normal endometrium. Our findings suggest that TF might be an ideal target for therapeutic intervention in endometriosis. We have employed a novel immunoconjugate molecule known as Icon and were able to eradicate endometrial lesions in a mouse model of endometriosis without affecting fertility. These findings have major implications for potential treatment in humans. PMID:24278684

  9. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  10. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  11. Bottom-up tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Recapitulating the elegant structures formed during development is an extreme synthetic and biological challenge. Great progress has been made in developing materials to support transplanted cells, yet the complexity of tissues is far beyond that found in even the most advanced scaffolds. Self-assembly is a motif used in development and a route for the production of complex materials. Self-assembly of peptides, proteins and other molecules at the nanoscale is promising, but in addition, intriguing ideas are emerging for self-assembly of micron-scale structures. In this brief review, very recent advances in the assembly of micron-scale cell aggregates and microgels will be described and discussed. PMID:21524904

  12. Heterophile Antibodies and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Taichman, Norton S.; Pulver, Wayne H.; Schönbaum, Eduard

    1973-01-01

    Platelets appear to be pathogenetic determinants in the development of lethal Forssman shock, which was provoked in guinea pigs by an intravenous injection of rabbit antiserum to sheep erythrocyte stromata. Within moments, circulating platelets (prelabeled with 14C-serotonin) were removed from the blood stream and impacted in the lungs, where they liberated 14C into the tissues. When animals were depleted of platelets prior to the production of shock, they survived for prolonged periods of time or were protected against death. Pretreatment with antiinflammatory compounds capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and release phenomena had a similar protective influence. It would appear, therefore, that Forssman shock is a convenient and accessible model for investigating the mechanisms whereby platelets mediate immune vascular damage. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4740636

  13. Dynamic simulations of tissue welding

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, D.J.; Eder, D.C.; London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E.

    1996-02-01

    The exposure of human skin to near-infrared radiation is numerically simulated using coupled laser, thermal transport and mass transport numerical models. The computer model LATIS is applied in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometries. Zones within the skin model are comprised of a topical solder, epidermis, dermis, and fatty tissue. Each skin zone is assigned initial optical, thermal and water density properties consistent with values listed in the literature. The optical properties of each zone (i.e. scattering, absorption and anisotropy coefficients) are modeled as a kinetic function of the temperature. Finally, the water content in each zone is computed from water diffusion where water losses are accounted for by evaporative losses at the air-solder interface. The simulation results show that the inclusion of water transport and evaporative losses in the model are necessary to match experimental observations. Dynamic temperature and damage distributions are presented for the skin simulations.

  14. Who "owns" cells and tissues?

    PubMed

    Lebacqz, K

    2001-01-01

    Opposition to 'ownership' of cells and tissues often depends on arguments about the special or sacred nature of human bodies and other living things. Such arguments are not very helpful in dealing with the patenting of DNA fragments. Two arguments undergird support for patenting: the notion that an author has a 'right' to an invention resulting from his/her labor, and the utilitarian argument that patents are needed to support medical inventiveness. The labor theory of ownership rights is subject to critique, thought it may still have enduring value. The more important argument is that deriving from the common good. If patents on DNA are supported on the basis of their contributions to the common good, then they can also be limited based on considerations of the common good. PMID:11794837

  15. Tissue Engineered Strategies for Pseudoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Trovato, Ugo; Loppini, Mattia; Rizzello, Giacomo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Numerous classification systems of non-union have been proposed based on: presence or absence of infection, radiographic features, clinical findings, biologic activity, location and shape. The management of pseudarthrosis is strongly related to the type of non-union (infected versus uninfected, atrophic versus hypertrophic). Surgical management of pseudarthrosis is generally effective with a success rate ranging from 75 to 100%. Nevertheless, in a relatively high number of instances several combined treatments are required for the fracture healing. The current gold standard to stimulate the bone regeneration is represented by the revision surgery with the application of autologous bone grafts. However, several approaches have been described to promote and enhance the bone tissue regeneration, including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), ultrasound, electromagnetic, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and platelet-rich-plasma (PRP). The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature evaluating the current therapies to promote and enhance the bone tissue healing. The systematic review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines with a PRISMA checklist and algorithm. Limitations of the present systematic review are mainly related to the scanty quality of the studies available in the literature. Although the therapies previously described for the management of patients with non-unions seems to be effective, the limitations of the included studies, especially the extensive clinical heterogeneity, make not possible to provide clear recommendations regarding the application of these approaches. The problems remain the need to better understand the most effective treatment options, subject to surgical stabilization as a first step. PMID:23248729

  16. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  17. Volatile Emissions from Compressed Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Francesca; Capuano, Rosamaria; Strand, Tillan; Ek, Anna-Christina; Lindgren, Margareta; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; Lundström, Ingemar

    2013-01-01

    Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from compressed and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in compresses, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the compressed and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the compression were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from compressed tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers. PMID:23874929

  18. Raman tomography of tissue phantoms and bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Kreider, Jaclynn; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Morris, Michael D.

    2008-02-01

    We report tomographic reconstruction of objects located several millimeters below the surface of highly scattering media. For this purpose we adapted proven software developed for fluorescence tomography with and without the use of spatial priors1. For this first demonstration we acquired Raman spectra using an existing ring/disk fiber optic probe with fifty collection fibers2. Several illumination ring diameters were employed to generate multiple angles of incidence. Tomographic reconstruction from Raman scatter was tested using a 9.5 mm diameter Teflon® sphere embedded in a gel of agarose and 1% Intralipid. Blind reconstruction of the sphere using the 732 cm -1 C-F stretch yielded an accurate shape but an inaccurate depth. Using the known shape and position of the object as spatial priors, a more accurate reconstruction was obtained. We also demonstrated a reconstruction of the tibial diaphysis of an intact canine hind limb using spatial priors generated from micro-computed tomography. In this first demonstration of Raman tomography in animal tissue, the P-O stretch of the bone mineral at 958 cm -1 was used for the reconstruction. An accurate shape and depth were recovered.

  19. Tissue-resident macrophages: then and now.

    PubMed

    Davies, Luke C; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages have been at the heart of immune research for over a century and are an integral component of innate immunity. Macrophages are often viewed as terminally differentiated monocytic phagocytes. They infiltrate tissues during inflammation, and form polarized populations that perform pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory functions. Tissue-resident macrophages were regarded as differentiated monocytes, which seed the tissues to perform immune sentinel and homeostatic functions. However, tissue-resident macrophages are not a homogeneous population, but are in fact a grouping of cells with similar functions and phenotypes. In the last decade, it has been revealed that many of these cells are not terminally differentiated and, in most cases, are not derived from haematopoiesis in the adult. Recent research has highlighted that tissue-resident macrophages cannot be grouped into simple polarized categories, especially in vivo, when they are exposed to complex signalling events. It has now been demonstrated that the tissue environment itself is a major controller of macrophage phenotype, and can influence the expression of many genes regardless of origin. This is consistent with the concept that cells within different tissues have diverse responses in inflammation. There is still a mountain to climb in the field, as it evolves to encompass not only tissue-resident macrophage diversity, but also categorization of specific tissue environments and the plasticity of macrophages themselves. This knowledge provides a new perspective on therapeutic strategies, as macrophage subsets can potentially be manipulated to control the inflammatory environment in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25684236

  20. Tissue expanders in reconstruction of maxillofacial defects.

    PubMed

    John, Jacob; Edward, Joseph; George, Joju

    2015-03-01

    Tissue expansion in its natural ways had fascinated man from prehistoric times itself. But tissue expansion for medical purposes was first tried and reported only in the early half of twentieth century. Presently the principle of tissue expansion is being used in reconstruction of many hard and soft tissue defects of larger dimension, which were previously regarded as great challenge for maxillofacial and plastic surgeons. Making use of the viscoelastic nature of the skin, considerable amount of tissue expansion based tissue engineering is possible in the maxillofacial region. Here we present a case of a facial scar of large dimension with a central oro cutaneous fistula developed as a result of facial artery blow out in a 24 year old female for which esthetic correction was done using the excess tissue obtained from tissue expansion. In this case where other methods of reconstruction such as local flaps, free flaps and normal tissue grafts were assessed to be non viable, tissue expansion was found to be an apt solution for esthetic reconstruction. PMID:25848145

  1. Tissue-resident macrophages: then and now

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Luke C; Taylor, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages have been at the heart of immune research for over a century and are an integral component of innate immunity. Macrophages are often viewed as terminally differentiated monocytic phagocytes. They infiltrate tissues during inflammation, and form polarized populations that perform pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory functions. Tissue-resident macrophages were regarded as differentiated monocytes, which seed the tissues to perform immune sentinel and homeostatic functions. However, tissue-resident macrophages are not a homogeneous population, but are in fact a grouping of cells with similar functions and phenotypes. In the last decade, it has been revealed that many of these cells are not terminally differentiated and, in most cases, are not derived from haematopoiesis in the adult. Recent research has highlighted that tissue-resident macrophages cannot be grouped into simple polarized categories, especially in vivo, when they are exposed to complex signalling events. It has now been demonstrated that the tissue environment itself is a major controller of macrophage phenotype, and can influence the expression of many genes regardless of origin. This is consistent with the concept that cells within different tissues have diverse responses in inflammation. There is still a mountain to climb in the field, as it evolves to encompass not only tissue-resident macrophage diversity, but also categorization of specific tissue environments and the plasticity of macrophages themselves. This knowledge provides a new perspective on therapeutic strategies, as macrophage subsets can potentially be manipulated to control the inflammatory environment in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25684236

  2. Modeling Tissue Growth Within Nonwoven Scaffolds Pores

    PubMed Central

    Church, Jeffrey S.; Alexander, David L.J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process. PMID:20687775

  3. Laser capture microdissection in the tissue biorepository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Angen

    2010-09-01

    An important need of many cancer research projects is the availability of high-quality, appropriately selected tissue. Tissue biorepositories are organized to collect, process, store, and distribute samples of tumor and normal tissue for further use in fundamental and translational cancer research. This, in turn, provides investigators with an invaluable resource of appropriately examined and characterized tissue specimens and linked patient information. Human tissues, in particular, tumor tissues, are complex structures composed of heterogeneous mixtures of morphologically and functionally distinct cell types. It is essential to analyze specific cell types to identify and define accurately the biologically important processes in pathologic lesions. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is state-of-the-art technology that provides the scientific community with a rapid and reliable method to isolate a homogeneous population of cells from heterogeneous tissue specimens, thus providing investigators with the ability to analyze DNA, RNA, and protein accurately from pure populations of cells. This is particularly well-suited for tumor cell isolation, which can be captured from complex tissue samples. The combination of LCM and a tissue biorepository offers a comprehensive means by which researchers can use valuable human biospecimens and cutting-edge technology to facilitate basic, translational, and clinical research. This review provides an overview of LCM technology with an emphasis on the applications of LCM in the setting of a tissue biorepository, based on the author's extensive experience in LCM procedures acquired at Fox Chase Cancer Center and Hollings Cancer Center. PMID:20808641

  4. Multiscale mechanical modeling of soft biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2008-10-01

    Soft biological tissues include both native and artificial tissues. In the human body, tissues like the articular cartilage, arterial wall, and heart valve leaflets are examples of structures composed of an underlying network of collagen fibers, cells, proteins and molecules. Artificial tissues are less complex than native tissues and mainly consist of a fiber polymer network with the intent of replacing lost or damaged tissue. Understanding of the mechanical function of these materials is essential for many clinical treatments (e.g. arterial clamping, angioplasty), diseases (e.g. arteriosclerosis) and tissue engineering applications (e.g. engineered blood vessels or heart valves). This thesis presents the derivation and application of a multiscale methodology to describe the macroscopic mechanical function of soft biological tissues incorporating directly their structural architecture. The model, which is based on volume averaging theory, accounts for structural parameters such as the network volume fraction and orientation, the realignment of the fibers in response to strain, the interactions among the fibers and the interactions between the fibers and the interstitial fluid in order to predict the overall tissue behavior. Therefore, instead of using a constitutive equation to relate strain to stress, the tissue microstructure is modeled within a representative volume element (RVE) and the macroscopic response at any point in the tissue is determined by solving a micromechanics problem in the RVE. The model was applied successfully to acellular collagen gels, native blood vessels, and electrospun polyurethane scaffolds and provided accurate predictions for permeability calculations in isotropic and oriented fiber networks. The agreement of model predictions with experimentally determined mechanical properties provided insights into the mechanics of tissues and tissue constructs, while discrepancies revealed limitations of the model framework.

  5. Prickly Poppies Can Get Pricklier: Ontogenetic Patterns in the Induction of Physical Defense Traits

    PubMed Central

    Hoan, Ryan P.; Ormond, Rhys A.; Barton, Kasey E.

    2014-01-01

    Plant ontogeny is a common source of variation in defense and herbivory. Yet, few studies have investigated how the induction of physical defense traits changes across plant ontogeny. Physical defense traits are costly to produce, and thus, it was predicted that induction as a cost-saving strategy would be particularly favorable for seedlings, leading to ontogenetic declines in the inducibility of these traits. We tested for induction of three different physical defense traits (prickles, latex and leaf toughness) in response to mechanical defoliation and jasmonic acid application using prickly poppies (Argemone glauca and A. mexicana, Papaveraceae) as a model system. Genetic variation in the induction of physical defenses was tested using maternal sib-ships sampled from multiple populations. Both species induced higher densities of laminar prickles, although the magnitude of induction was much higher in the endemic Hawaiian prickly poppy, A. glauca, than in the cosmopolitan A. mexicana. The magnitude of prickle induction was also higher in young compared to older juvenile plant stages in A. glauca, demonstrating a strong role of ontogeny. Neither latex exudation nor leaf toughness was induced in either species. Although significant genetic variation was detected within and among populations for constitutive expression of physical defense traits in Argemone, there was no evidence for genetic variation in the induction of these traits. This study provides the first evidence for the induction of physical defenses in prickly poppies, emphasizing how an ontogenetically explicit framework can reveal new insights into plant defense. Moreover, this study illustrates how sister species comparisons between island vs. continental plants can provide new insights into plant functional and evolutionary ecology, highlighting a fruitful area for future research on more species pairs. PMID:24802133

  6. Optical imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouza Dominguez, Jorge

    In this thesis, a new time-dependent model for describing light propagation in biological media is proposed. The model is based on the simplified spherical harmonics approximation and is represented by a set of coupled parabolic partial differential equations (TD-pSPN equations). In addition, the model is extended for modeling the time-dependent response of fluorescent agents in biological tissues and the ensuing time-domain propagation of light therein. In a comparison with Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that the TD-pSPN equations present unique features in its derivation that makes it a more accurate alternative to the diffusion equation (DE). The TD-pSPN model (for orders N > 1) outperforms the DE in the description of the propagation of light in near-nondiffusive media and in all the physical situations where DE fails. Often, only small orders of the SP N approximation are needed to obtain accurate results. A diffuse optical tomography (DOT) algorithm is also implemented based on the TD-pSPN equations as the forward model using constrained optimization methods. The algorithm uses time-dependent (TD) data directly. Such an approach is benefited from both the accuracy of the SPN models and the richness of TD data. In the calculation of the gradient of the objective function, a time-dependent adjoint differentiation method is introduced that reduces computation time. Several numerical experiments are performed for small geometry media with embedded inclusions that mimic small animal imaging. In these experiments, the values of the optical coefficients are varied within realistic bounds that are representative of those found in the range of the near-infrared spectrum, including high absorption values. Single and multi-parameter reconstructions (absorption and diffusion coefficients) are performed. The reconstructed images based on the TD-pSPN equations (N > 1) give better estimates of the optical properties of the media than the DE. On the other hand

  7. Photon dynamics in tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton; Haselgrove, John C.; Wang, NaiGuang; Maris, Michael B.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    1991-11-01

    The emerging need for a fast, safe economical approach to global and localized measures of desaturation of hemoglobin with oxygen (HbO2) in the human brain motivates further research on time-resolved spectroscopy in four areas of study. (1) To afford quantization of hemoglobin saturation through time-resolved spectroscopy in the time domain (TD) and in the frequency domain (FD). Evaluation of dual-wavelength TD and FD spectrometers for determining quantitatively hemoglobin desaturation and blood-volume changes by calculations that are insensitive to mutual interference is proposed. The diffusion equation, as it applies especially to TD studies, and the absorption ((mu) a) and scattering ((mu) s) coefficients provide their independent determination from the late and early respective portions of the kinetics of the emergent photons in response to a short input pulse (50-100 psec). (2) The identification of the photon-pathlength change due to the arterial pulse in the brain tissue by FD methods with Fourier transformation affords an opportunity to employ principles of pulse oximetry to vessels localized deep within the brain tissue. (3) Localization of desaturation of hemoglobin in portions of the brain can be achieved through dual-wavelength scanning of the input/output optical fibers across the head for an X-Y coordinate and varying the distance between input and output ((rho) ) or the time delay in data acquisition to afford an in-depth Z scan. Localizations of shed blood, which have an effective concentration of over 10 times that of capillary-bed blood, are identified by X, Y, Z scans using only a single wavelength. (4) Independent measurements of absorption ((mu) a) and scattering ((mu) s) coefficients, particularly by TD techniques, affords structural mapping of the brain, which can be used to diagnose brain tumor and neuronal degeneration. Two experimental systems are used to critically evaluate these studies; the first, a hemoglobin/lipid/yeast model in which

  8. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  9. Engineering complex orthopaedic tissues via strategic biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z; Boushell, Margaret K; Lu, Helen H

    2015-03-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, wherein overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g., bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  10. Engineering Complex Orthopaedic Tissues via Strategic Biomimicry

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, whereby overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g. bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  11. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called tissue microfluidics because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets. The proposed principles represent a paradigm shift in microfluidic technology in three important ways: Microfluidic devices are to be directly integrated with, onto, or around tissue samples, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample extraction followed by sample insertion in microfluidic devices. Architectural and operational principles of microfluidic devices are to be subordinated to suit specific tissue structure and needs, in contrast to the conventional method of building devices according to fluidic function alone and without regard to tissue structure. Sample acquisition from tissue is to be performed on-chip and is to be integrated with the diagnostic measurement within the same device, in contrast to the conventional method of off-chip sample prep and

  12. Unified quantitative characterization of epithelial tissue development.

    PubMed

    Guirao, Boris; Rigaud, Stéphane U; Bosveld, Floris; Bailles, Anaïs; López-Gay, Jesús; Ishihara, Shuji; Sugimura, Kaoru; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating development requires a quantitative characterization of cell divisions, rearrangements, cell size and shape changes, and apoptoses. We developed a multiscale formalism that relates the characterizations of each cell process to tissue growth and morphogenesis. Having validated the formalism on computer simulations, we quantified separately all morphogenetic events in the Drosophila dorsal thorax and wing pupal epithelia to obtain comprehensive statistical maps linking cell and tissue scale dynamics. While globally cell shape changes, rearrangements and divisions all significantly participate in tissue morphogenesis, locally, their relative participations display major variations in space and time. By blocking division we analyzed the impact of division on rearrangements, cell shape changes and tissue morphogenesis. Finally, by combining the formalism with mechanical stress measurement, we evidenced unexpected interplays between patterns of tissue elongation, cell division and stress. Our formalism provides a novel and rigorous approach to uncover mechanisms governing tissue development. PMID:26653285

  13. Heart Regeneration with Engineered Myocardial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and regenerative therapies that replace damaged myocardium could benefit millions of patients annually. The many cell types in the heart, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and cardiac fibroblasts, communicate via intercellular signaling and modulate each other’s function. Although much progress has been made in generating cells of the cardiovascular lineage from human pluripotent stem cells, a major challenge now is creating the tissue architecture to integrate a microvascular circulation and afferent arterioles into such an engineered tissue. Recent advances in cardiac and vascular tissue engineering will move us closer to the goal of generating functionally mature tissue. Using the biology of the myocardium as the foundation for designing engineered tissue and addressing the challenges to implantation and integration, we can bridge the gap from bench to bedside for a clinically tractable engineered cardiac tissue. PMID:24819474

  14. Nanotechnology in the Regeneration of Complex Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Modern medicine faces a growing crisis as demand for organ transplantations continues to far outstrip supply. By stimulating the body’s own repair mechanisms, regenerative medicine aims to reduce demand for organs, while the closely related field of tissue engineering promises to deliver “off-the-self” organs grown from patients’ own stem cells to improve supply. To deliver on these promises, we must have reliable means of generating complex tissues. Thus far, the majority of successful tissue engineering approaches have relied on macroporous scaffolds to provide cells with both mechanical support and differentiative cues. In order to engineer complex tissues, greater attention must be paid to nanoscale cues present in a cell’s microenvironment. As the extracellular matrix is capable of driving complexity during development, it must be understood and reproduced in order to recapitulate complexity in engineered tissues. This review will summarize current progress in engineering complex tissue through the integration of nanocomposites and biomimetic scaffolds. PMID:26097381

  15. Biochemistry of adipose tissue: an endocrine organ

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Marisa; Oliveira, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is no longer considered to be an inert tissue that stores fat. This tissue is capable of expanding to accommodate increased lipids through hypertrophy of existing adipocytes and by initiating differentiation of pre-adipocytes. Adipose tissue metabolism exerts an impact on whole-body metabolism. As an endocrine organ, adipose tissue is responsible for the synthesis and secretion of several hormones. These are active in a range of processes, such as control of nutritional intake (leptin, angiotensin), control of sensitivity to insulin and inflammatory process mediators (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), resistin, visfatin, adiponectin, among others) and pathways (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and acylation stimulating protein (ASP) for example). This paper reviews some of the biochemical and metabolic aspects of adipose tissue and its relationship to inflammatory disease and insulin resistance. PMID:23671428

  16. Biomaterials for hollow organ tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hendow, Eseelle K; Guhmann, Pauline; Wright, Bernice; Sofokleous, Panagiotis; Parmar, Nina; Day, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly advancing field that is likely to transform how medicine is practised in the near future. For hollow organs such as those found in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems or gastrointestinal tract, tissue engineering can provide replacement of the entire organ or provide restoration of function to specific regions. Larger tissue-engineered constructs often require biomaterial-based scaffold structures to provide support and structure for new tissue growth. Consideration must be given to the choice of material and manufacturing process to ensure the de novo tissue closely matches the mechanical and physiological properties of the native tissue. This review will discuss some of the approaches taken to date for fabricating hollow organ scaffolds and the selection of appropriate biomaterials. PMID:27014369

  17. Tissue Engineering: Step Ahead in Maxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Raj; Raval, Rushik; Khandeparker, Rakshit Vijay Sinai; Chidrawar, Swati K; Khan, Abdul Ahad; Ganpat, Makne Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Within the precedent decade, a new field of “tissue engineering” or “tissue regeneration” emerge that offers an innovative and exhilarating substitute for maxillofacial reconstruction. It offers a new option to supplement existing treatment regimens for reconstruction/regeneration of the oral and craniofacial complex, which includes the teeth, periodontium, bones, soft tissues (oral mucosa, conjunctiva, skin), salivary glands, and the temporomandibular joint (bone and cartilage), as well as blood vessels, muscles, tendons, and nerves. Tissue engineering is based on harvesting the stem cells which are having potential to form an organ. Harvested cells are then transferred into scaffolds that are manufactured in a laboratory to resemble the structure of the desired tissue to be replaced. This article reviews the principles of tissue engineering and its various applications in oral and maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26435634

  18. Intermuscular and intramuscular adipose tissues: Bad vs. good adipose tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hausman, Gary J; Basu, Urmila; Du, Min; Fernyhough-Culver, Melinda; Dodson, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    Human studies of the influence of aging and other factors on intermuscular fat (INTMF) were reviewed. Intermuscular fat increased with weight loss, weight gain, or with no weight change with age in humans. An increase in INTMF represents a similar threat to type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance as does visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Studies of INTMF in animals covered topics such as quantitative deposition and genetic relationships with other fat depots. The relationship between leanness and higher proportions of INTMF fat in pigs was not observed in human studies and was not corroborated by other pig studies. In humans, changes in muscle mass, strength and quality are associated with INTMF accretion with aging. Gene expression profiling and intrinsic methylation differences in pigs demonstrated that INTMF and VAT are primarily associated with inflammatory and immune processes. It seems that in the pig and humans, INTMF and VAT share a similar pattern of distribution and a similar association of components dictating insulin sensitivity. Studies on intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in meat animals were reviewed. Gene expression analysis and genetic analysis have identified candidate genes involved in IM adipocyte development. Intramuscular (IM) adipocyte development in human muscle is only seen during aging and some pathological circumstance. Several genetic links between human and meat animal adipogenesis have been identified. In pigs, the Lipin1 and Lipin 2 gene have strong genetic effects on IM accumulation. Lipin1 deficiency results in immature adipocyte development in human lipodystrophy. In humans, overexpression of Perilipin 2 (PLIN2) facilitates intramyocellular lipid accretion whereas in pigs PLIN2 gene expression is associated with IM deposition. Lipins and perilipins may influence intramuscular lipid regardless of species. PMID:26317048

  19. Tissue spheroid fusion-based in vitro screening assays for analysis of tissue maturation.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Zoltan; Mironov, Vladimir; Mehesz, Agnes Nagy; Norris, Russell A; Markwald, Roger R; Visconti, Richard P

    2010-12-01

    Organ printing or computer-aided robotic layer-by-layer additive biofabrication of thick three-dimensional (3D) living tissue constructs employing self-assembling tissue spheroids is a rapidly evolving alternative to classic solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering. However, the absence of effective methods of accelerated tissue maturation immediately after bioprinting is the main technological imperative and potential impediment for further progress in the development of this emerging organ printing technology. Identification of the optimal combination of factors and conditions that accelerate tissue maturation ('maturogenic' factors) is an essential and necessary endeavour. Screening of maturogenic factors would be most efficiently accomplished using high-throughput quantitative in vitro tissue maturation assays. We have recently reviewed the formation of solid scaffold-free tissue constructs through the fusion of bioprinted tissue spheroids that have measurable material properties. We hypothesize that the fusion kinetics of these tissue spheroids will provide an efficacious in vitro assay of the level of tissue maturation. We report here the results of experimental testing of two simple quantitative tissue spheroid fusion-based in vitro high-throughput screening assays of tissue maturation: (a) a tissue spheroid envelopment assay; and (b) a tissue spheroid fusion kinetics assay. PMID:20603872

  20. Terahertz sensing in corneal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, David B.; Taylor, Zachary D.; Tewari, Pria; Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Sassoon, Daniel J.; Johnson, R. Duncan; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Brown, Elliott R.

    2011-01-01

    This work introduces the potential application of terahertz (THz) sensing to the field of ophthalmology, where it is uniquely suited due to its nonionizing photon energy and high sensitivity to water content. Reflective THz imaging and spectrometry data are reported on ex-vivo porcine corneas prepared with uniform water concentrations using polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions. At 79% water concentration by mass, the measured reflectivity of the cornea was 20.4%, 14.7%, 11.7%, 9.6%, and 7.4% at 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1 THz, respectively. Comparison of nine corneas hydrated from 79.1% to 91.5% concentration by mass demonstrated an approximately linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with a monotonically decreasing slope as the frequency increases. The THz-corneal tissue interaction is simulated with a Bruggeman model with excellent agreement. THz applications to corneal dystrophy, graft rejection, and refractive surgery are examined from the context of these measurements. PMID:21639581

  1. Tissue engineering a fetal membrane.

    PubMed

    Mi, Shengli; David, Anna L; Chowdhury, Bipasha; Jones, Roanne Razalia; Hamley, Ian William; Squires, Adam M; Connon, Che John

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an artificial fetal membrane (FM) by combination of human amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) and a mechanically enhanced collagen scaffold containing encapsulated human amniotic stromal fibroblasts (hASFs). Such a tissue-engineered FM may have the potential to plug structural defects in the amniotic sac after antenatal interventions, or to prevent preterm premature rupture of the FM. The hAESCs and hASFs were isolated from human fetal amniotic membrane (AM). Magnetic cell sorting was used to enrich the hAESCs by positive ATP-binding cassette G2 selection. We investigated the use of a laminin/fibronectin (1:1)-coated compressed collagen gel as a novel scaffold to support the growth of hAESCs. A type I collagen gel was dehydrated to form a material mimicking the mechanical properties and ultra-structure of human AM. hAESCs successfully adhered to and formed a monolayer upon the biomimetic collagen scaffold. The resulting artificial membrane shared a high degree of similarity in cell morphology, protein expression profiles, and structure to normal fetal AM. This study provides the first line of evidence that a compacted collagen gel containing hASFs could adequately support hAESCs adhesion and differentiation to a degree that is comparable to the normal human fetal AM in terms of structure and maintenance of cell phenotype. PMID:21919796

  2. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C; Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Ivan

    2015-09-15

    Skin and soft tissue infections result from microbial invasion of the skin and its supporting structures. Management is determined by the severity and location of the infection and by patient comorbidities. Infections can be classified as simple (uncomplicated) or complicated (necrotizing or nonnecrotizing), or as suppurative or nonsuppurative. Most community-acquired infections are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococcus. Simple infections are usually monomicrobial and present with localized clinical findings. In contrast, complicated infections can be mono- or polymicrobial and may present with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation. Laboratory testing may be required to confirm an uncertain diagnosis, evaluate for deep infections or sepsis, determine the need for inpatient care, and evaluate and treat comorbidities. Initial antimicrobial choice is empiric, and in simple infections should cover Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Patients with complicated infections, including suspected necrotizing fasciitis and gangrene, require empiric polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, inpatient treatment, and surgical consultation for debridement. Superficial and small abscesses respond well to drainage and seldom require antibiotics. Immunocompromised patients require early treatment and antimicrobial coverage for possible atypical organisms. PMID:26371732

  3. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, Dimitrios; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have all been reported; however, most of these studies have proven inconclusive. Clearly, the major problem here, like with any other ocular disease, is quality of life and the threat of vision loss. While most KC cases progress until the third or fourth decade, it varies between individuals. Patients may experience periods of several months with significant changes followed by months or years of no change, followed by another period of rapid changes. Despite the major advancements, it is still uncertain how to treat KC at early stages and prevent vision impairment. There are currently limited tissue engineering techniques and/or “smart” biomaterials that can help arrest the progression of KC. This review will focus on current treatments and how biomaterials may hold promise for the future. PMID:25215423

  4. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road.

    PubMed

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world's best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration. PMID:27527229

  5. Tissue Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    The current American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guideline provides strategies for achieving the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on the size of liver nodules seen on surveillance imaging. For lesions less than 1 cm in size, follow-up surveillance imaging is recommended. Lesions larger than 2 cm require typical radiological hallmark on dynamic imaging. Lesions of 1–2 cm in size require typical imaging features including intense uptake of contrast during arterial phases followed by decreased enhancement during portal venous phases on at least 2 imaging modalities. In cases of atypical radiological features of the suspected lesion, tissue diagnosis either by fine needle aspiration or biopsy should be obtained. Although fine needle aspiration could give a smaller risk of seeding than biopsy, biopsy has been preferred over cytology. Percutaneous biopsy of HCC carries a potential risk of tumor seeding along the needle tract. However the risk is low and there is no clear evidence of post transplant recurrence due to needle tract seeding. Histopathologic assessment can differentiate between premalignant lesions such as dysplastic nodules and early HCC. Atypical variants of HCC can be recognized morphologically which may have associated prognostic value. PMID:25755614

  6. Microholography applied to tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depeursinge, Christian D.; de Haller, Emmanuel B.; Coquoz, Olivier; Conde, Ramiro; von Bally, Gert

    1995-01-01

    An in-situ holographic technique, involving the use of a flexible miniaturized endoscope (diameter less than 1 mm) coupled to a CCD camera, to record the hologram, has been developed for medical applications and more particularly in-vivo biopsy. The hologram is formed, by reflection, on the tip of a multimode, multicore fiber (MCF), sampled, and then treated electronically. The image is reconstructed numerically, providing more flexibility to the holographic process. Reconstructed images show the capability of the microendoscopic system to restore 3D informations of the observed scene. Our predictions and experimental results have shown that the hope to achieve tissue observations at the cellular level is realistic. Furthermore, the different sources of noise of the experimental device were analyzed and their influence on the quality of the reconstructed image quantified. Images of simple cell models such as epithelial cells easily taken in the oral cavity, have been taken and analyzed. The possibility of using the microholographic technique for in-vivo biopsy is discussed both from theoretical considerations and experimental observations.

  7. Cryosectioning of undecalcified tissues for immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Rijntjes, N V; Van de Putte, L B; Van der Pol, M; Guelen, P J

    1979-01-01

    The present report describes a procedure for preparing 4--6 micrometers cryostat sections of undecalcified fresh frozen tissue which contain hard tissue, for immunofluorescence. The apparatus used is a cryomicrotome originally designed for cutting sections for whole body autoradiography. To obtain cryostat sections suitable for tissue immunofluorescence the standard procedure was modified with respect to the hardness and edges of the microtome knife, the temperature of the cryostat and the carboxymethyl cellulose concentration of the embedding material. PMID:387879

  8. Explant culture of sarcoma patients' tissue.

    PubMed

    Muff, Roman; Botter, Sander M; Husmann, Knut; Tchinda, Joelle; Selvam, Philomina; Seeli-Maduz, Franziska; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Human sarcomas comprise a heterogeneous group of rare tumors that affect soft tissues and bone. Due to the scarcity and heterogeneity of these diseases, patient-derived cells that can be used for preclinical research are limited. In this study, we investigated whether the tissue explant technique can be used to obtain sarcoma cell lines from fresh as well as viable frozen tissue obtained from 8 out of 12 soft tissue and 9 out of 13 bone tumor entities as defined by the World Health Organization. The success rate, defined as the percent of samples that yielded sufficient numbers of outgrowing cells to be frozen, and the time to freeze were determined for a total of 734 sarcoma tissue specimens. In 552 cases (75%) enough cells were obtained to be frozen at early passage. Success rates were higher in bone tumors (82%) compared with soft tissue tumors (68%), and the mean time to freezing was lower in bone tumors (65 days) compared with soft tissue tumors (84 days). Overall, from 40% of the tissues cells could be frozen at early passage within <2 month after tissue removal. Comparable results as with fresh tissue were obtained after explant of viable frozen patient-derived material. In a selected number of bone and soft tissue sarcoma entities, conventional karyotyping and/or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis revealed a high amount (>60%) of abnormal cells in 41% of analyzed samples, especially in bone sarcomas (osteosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma). In conclusion, the explant technique is well suited to establish patient-derived cell lines for a large majority of bone and soft tissue sarcoma entities with adequate speed. This procedure thus opens the possibility for molecular analysis and drug testing for therapeutic decision making even during patient treatment. PMID:27111283

  9. [Cryopreservation of testicular tissue in children].

    PubMed

    Rives, Nathalie; Milazzo, Jean-Pierre; Travers, Albanne; Arkoun, Brahim; Bironneau, Amandine; Sibert, Louis; Liard-Zmuda, Agnès; Marie-Cardine, Aude; Schneider, Pascale; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Macé, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of cancer therapies can affect all organs and tissues. Some treatments damage spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), with a risk of infertility. Storage and reimplantation of frozen testicular tissue is a recent approach tofertilitypreservationfor young boys. However, thawed frozen prepubertal testicular tissue must undergo a maturation process to restore sperm production. This process, currently being studied in animal models, can be achieved by in vivo transplantation of SSCs into seminiferous tubules or by testicular grafting, possibly following in vitro maturation. PMID:25518156

  10. Animal Models for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Beahm, Elisabeth; Frye, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is a critical need for adequate reconstruction of soft tissue defects resulting from tumor resection, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. To be sure, adipose tissue engineering strategies offer promising solutions. However, before clinical translation can occur, efficacy must be proven in animal studies. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of animal models currently employed for adipose tissue engineering. PMID:18544014

  11. Method for thermal monitoring subcutaneous tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Brandenburger, G. H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A noninvasive accurate method for measuring the temperature of tissue beneath the surface of a living body is described. Ultrasonic signals are directed into beads of a material that are inserted into the tissue with a syringe. The reflected signals indicate the acoustic impedance or resonance frequency of the beads which in turn indicates the temperature of the tissue. A range of temperatures around the melting temperature of the material can be measured by this method.

  12. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases. PMID:23834768

  13. Preservation and transplantation of porcine testis tissue.

    PubMed

    Zeng, W; Snedaker, A K; Megee, S; Rathi, R; Chen, F; Honaramooz, A; Dobrinski, I

    2009-01-01

    Grafting of immature mammalian testis tissue to mouse hosts can preserve the male germline. To make this approach applicable to a clinical or field situation, it is imperative that the testis tissue and/or spermatozoa harvested from grafted tissue are preserved successfully. The aim of the present study was to evaluate protocols for the preservation of testis tissue in a porcine model. Testis tissue was stored at 4 degrees C for short-term preservation or cryopreserved by slow-freezing, automated slow-freezing or vitrification for long-term storage. Preserved tissue was transplanted ectopically to mouse hosts and recovered xenografts were analysed histologically. In addition, spermatozoa were harvested from xenografts and cryopreserved. Total cell viability and germ cell viability remained high after tissue preservation. Complete spermatogenesis occurred in xenografts preserved by cooling up to 48 h, whereas spermatogenesis progressed to round spermatids in the xenografts that were frozen-thawed before grafting. Approximately 50% of spermatozoa harvested from xenografts remained viable after freezing and thawing. The in vivo developmental potential of cryopreserved tissue was reduced despite high post-thaw viability. Therefore, it is important to evaluate germ cell differentiation in vivo in addition to cell viability in vitro when optimising freezing protocols for testis tissue. PMID:19261226

  14. Tissue banking training courses: Polish experience.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Artur; Gut, Grzegorz; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, Izabela; Olender, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Personnel directly involved in the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human tissues and cells should be appropriately qualified and provided with timely and relevant training according to EU directives. In the time of new tissue and cells regulations implementation such a training system existed in Poland only at a local level. The first training programme outlines for various groups of health professionals engaged in tissue banking practice was created in co-operation with the Institute for LifeLong Learning at University of Barcelona in 2006. This initial training courses were financially supported by EU Transition Facility Programme 2004. Then, starting from 2006, based on previous experience, system of advanced training courses was created. This training programme was financially supported by the National Programme for the Development of Transplantation Medicine 2006-2009-POLGRAFT financed by Polish Ministry of Health. During 2006 and 2007 first set of tissue banking initial training courses were provided according to TF 2004 project. Over 200 pathologists, forensic medicine specialists and other medical doctors responsible for donor screening and classification, medical directors of tissue establishments, technical staff; tissue graft users: orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, cardiosurgeons and ophthalmologists were trained. Between 2006 and 2009 there were organized 8 advanced tissue banking training courses according to POLGRAFT programme. There were organized both theoretical and practical courses on various aspects of tissue for over 350 persons. We present our experience in organisation of international and national tissue banking training courses. PMID:22318653

  15. Printing and Prototyping of Tissues and Scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Brian

    2012-11-01

    New manufacturing technologies under the banner of rapid prototyping enable the fabrication of structures close in architecture to biological tissue. In their simplest form, these technologies allow the manufacture of scaffolds upon which cells can grow for later implantation into the body. A more exciting prospect is the printing and patterning in three dimensions of all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) to generate structures analogous to tissues; this has been termed bioprinting. Such techniques have opened new areas of research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Measuring tissue oxygen saturation using NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, Aslinur; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat

    2014-05-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is known quite useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to diagnose pathologic tissues due to lack of normal blood circulation by measuring tissue oxygen saturation. In the study, human blood samples with different level of oxygen saturations have been prepared and spectra were taken using an optical fiber probe to investigate correlation between the oxygen saturations and the spectra. The experimental set up for the spectroscopic measurements was consists of a miniature NIR light spectrometer, an optical fiber probe, a halogen-tungsten light source and a laptop. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation of the blood samples and the ratio of the light of wavelengths 660 nm to 790 nm has been found from the spectra. Then, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements within an error of 2.9%. Furthermore, it has been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Tissue oxygen saturation has been estimated from the spectroscopic measurements were taken from the fingers of healthy volunteers using the correlation between the spectra and blood oxygen saturation. The tissue StO2 measured was 80% as expected. The technique developed to measure tissue oxygen saturation has potential to diagnose premalignant tissues, follow up prognosis of cancerous tissues, and evaluation of ischemia reperfusion tissues.

  17. Microgravity cultivation of cells and tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, L. E.; Pellis, N.; Searby, N.; de Luis, J.; Preda, C.; Bordonaro, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro studies of cells and tissues in microgravity, either simulated by cultivation conditions on earth or actual, during spaceflight, are expected to help identify mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and transduction in biological organisms. In this paper, we review rotating bioreactor studies of engineered skeletal and cardiovascular tissues carried out in unit gravity, a four month long cartilage tissue engineering study carried out aboard the Mir Space Station, and the ongoing laboratory development and testing of a system for cell and tissue cultivation aboard the International Space Station.

  18. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  19. Imaging Strategies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung Yun; Ricles, Laura M.; Suggs, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has evolved with multifaceted research being conducted using advanced technologies, and it is progressing toward clinical applications. As tissue engineering technology significantly advances, it proceeds toward increasing sophistication, including nanoscale strategies for material construction and synergetic methods for combining with cells, growth factors, or other macromolecules. Therefore, to assess advanced tissue-engineered constructs, tissue engineers need versatile imaging methods capable of monitoring not only morphological but also functional and molecular information. However, there is no single imaging modality that is suitable for all tissue-engineered constructs. Each imaging method has its own range of applications and provides information based on the specific properties of the imaging technique. Therefore, according to the requirements of the tissue engineering studies, the most appropriate tool should be selected among a variety of imaging modalities. The goal of this review article is to describe available biomedical imaging methods to assess tissue engineering applications and to provide tissue engineers with criteria and insights for determining the best imaging strategies. Commonly used biomedical imaging modalities, including X-ray and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, and emerging techniques and multimodal imaging, will be discussed, focusing on the latest trends of their applications in recent tissue engineering studies. PMID:25012069

  20. Design of spectral filtering for tissue classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ajay; Shah, Pratik; Das, Bipul

    2012-02-01

    Tissue characterization from imaging studies is an integral part of clinical practice. We describe a spectral filter design for tissue separation in dual energy CT scans obtained from Gemstone Spectral Imaging scanner. It enables to have better 2D/3D visualization and tissue characterization in normal and pathological conditions. The major challenge to classify tissues in conventional computed tomography (CT) is the x-ray attenuation proximity of multiple tissues at any given energy. The proposed method analyzes the monochromatic images at different energy levels, which are derived from the two scans obtained at low and high KVp through fast switching. Although materials have a distinct attenuation profile across different energies, tissue separation is not trivial as tissues are a mixture of different materials with range of densities that vary across subjects. To address this problem, we define spectral filtering, that generates probability maps for each tissue in multi-energy space. The filter design incorporates variations in the tissue due to composition, density of individual constituents and their mixing proportions. In addition, it also provides a framework to incorporate zero mean Gaussian noise. We demonstrate the application of spectral filtering for bone-free vascular visualization and calcification characterization.

  1. The organization of tissue banking in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Galea, G

    2012-11-01

    Tissue banking in Scotland has developed significantly over the past 20 years or so. The range of issues procured has increased and so have their numbers. Initially, bone from live donors was the only tissue banked; later, tissues from multiorgan donors were procured; this was finally followed by the collection of tissues from donors following cardiac death. Bones, tendons, heart valves and skin are the main tissue types collected, stored and issued for clinical use. Much of our activity is based on identification of donors in two major accident and emergency departments followed by retrievals that take place in a dedicated mortuary by fully-trained staff. Tissues are released according to clinical need for Scottish patients and beyond. All of the tissue banking activity in Scotland takes place within the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service, which is the preferred provider of tissues for Scottish patients. There is very close cooperation between our teams, the transplant teams and other clinical colleagues, including pathologists and anatomical technicians. The achievements in issue banking in Scotland are outlined along with the main clinical indications of the tissue procured. Diversification is now taking place into cellular therapy with the establishment of an islet processing programme and cell culturing techniques. The future is very exciting. PMID:23138581

  2. Excursion of vibrating microelectrodes in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanabus, E. W.; Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a vibrating microelectrode holder consisting of a support rod attached to the cone of a miniature loudspeaker. This holder facilitates a microelectrode penetration into arterial wall tissue, eliminates surface dimpling, and relieves polarographic artifacts believed to be due to tissue compression. The paper presents construction and performance details of the electrode holder, and evaluates the extent of possible damage incurred during such vibration by measuring electrode motion relative to surrounding tissue in an excised segment of femoral artery in the rabbit. It is concluded that under proper vibratory conditions microelectrodes can be easily inserted into the arterial wall with minimum tissue disturbance.

  3. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby – (1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization – need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  4. Amelogenin in Enamel Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the basic premises, the recent findings and the future challenges in the use of amelogenin for enamel tissue engineering are being discoursed on. Results emerging from the experiments performed to assess the fundamental physicochemical mechanisms of the interaction of amelogenin, the main protein of the enamel matrix, and the growing crystals of apatite, are mentioned, alongside a moderately comprehensive literature review of the subject at hand. The clinical importance of understanding this protein/mineral interaction at the nanoscale are highlighted as well as the potential for tooth enamel to act as an excellent model system for studying some of the essential aspects of biomineralization processes in general. The dominant paradigm stating that amelogenin directs the uniaxial growth of apatite crystals in enamel by slowing down the growth of (hk0) faces on which it adheres is being questioned based on the results demonstrating the ability of amelogenin to promote the nucleation and crystal growth of apatite under constant titration conditions designed to mimic those present in the developing enamel matrix. The role of numerous minor components of the enamel matrix is being highlighted as essential and impossible to compensate for by utilizing its more abundant ingredients only. It is concluded that the three major aspects of amelogenesis outlined hereby--(1) the assembly of amelogenin and other enamel matrix proteins, (2) the proteolytic activity, and (3) crystallization--need to be in precise synergy with each other in order for the grounds for the proper imitation of amelogenesis in the lab to be created. PMID:26545753

  5. A Novel Albumin-Based Tissue Scaffold for Autogenic Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Shan; -Liang Lee, I.; Yu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Jane, Wann-Neng; Shen, Hsin-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide a framework for living tissue regeneration. However, traditional tissue scaffolds are exogenous, composed of metals, ceramics, polymers, and animal tissues, and have a defined biocompatibility and application. This study presents a new method for obtaining a tissue scaffold from blood albumin, the major protein in mammalian blood. Human, bovine, and porcine albumin was polymerised into albumin polymers by microbial transglutaminase and was then cast by freeze-drying-based moulding to form albumin tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy and material testing analyses revealed that the albumin tissue scaffold possesses an extremely porous structure, moderate mechanical strength, and resilience. Using a culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a model, we showed that MSCs can be seeded and grown in the albumin tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the albumin tissue scaffold can support the long-term osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results show that the albumin tissue scaffold exhibits favourable material properties and good compatibility with cells. We propose that this novel tissue scaffold can satisfy essential needs in tissue engineering as a general-purpose substrate. The use of this scaffold could lead to the development of new methods of artificial fabrication of autogenic tissue substitutes. PMID:25034369

  6. A Novel Albumin-Based Tissue Scaffold for Autogenic Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei-Shan; -Liang Lee, I.; Yu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Jane, Wann-Neng; Shen, Hsin-Hsin

    2014-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide a framework for living tissue regeneration. However, traditional tissue scaffolds are exogenous, composed of metals, ceramics, polymers, and animal tissues, and have a defined biocompatibility and application. This study presents a new method for obtaining a tissue scaffold from blood albumin, the major protein in mammalian blood. Human, bovine, and porcine albumin was polymerised into albumin polymers by microbial transglutaminase and was then cast by freeze-drying-based moulding to form albumin tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy and material testing analyses revealed that the albumin tissue scaffold possesses an extremely porous structure, moderate mechanical strength, and resilience. Using a culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a model, we showed that MSCs can be seeded and grown in the albumin tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the albumin tissue scaffold can support the long-term osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results show that the albumin tissue scaffold exhibits favourable material properties and good compatibility with cells. We propose that this novel tissue scaffold can satisfy essential needs in tissue engineering as a general-purpose substrate. The use of this scaffold could lead to the development of new methods of artificial fabrication of autogenic tissue substitutes.

  7. Effects of Tissue Mechanical Properties on Susceptibility to Histotripsy-induced Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues. PMID:24351722

  8. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography in Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Yang, Ying; Wang, Ruikang K.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Tissue engineering holds the promise for a therapeutic solution in regenerative medicine. The primary goal of tissue engineering is the development of physiologically functional and biocompatible tissues/organs being implanted for the repair and replacement of damaged or diseased ones. Given the complexity in the developing processes of engineered tissues, which involves multi-dimensional interactions among cells of different types, three-dimensionally constructed scaffolds, and actively intervening bioreactors, a capable real-time imaging tool is critically required for expanding our knowledge about the developing process of desired tissues or organs. It has been recognized that optical coherence tomography (OCT), an emerging noninvasive imaging technique that provides high spatial resolution (up to the cellular level) and three-dimensional imaging capability, is a promising investigative tool for tissue engineering. This chapter discusses the existing and potential applications of OCT in tissue engineering. Example OCT investigations of the three major components of tissue engineering, i.e., cells, scaffolds, and bioreactors are overviewed. Imaging examples of OCT and its enabling functions and variants, e.g., Doppler OCT, polarization-sensitive OCT, optical coherence microscopy are emphasized. Remaining challenges in the application of OCT to tissue engineering are discussed, and the prospective solutions including the combination of OCT with other high-contrast and high-resolution modalities such as two-photon fluorescence microscopy are suggested as well. It is expected that OCT, along with its functional variants, will make important contributions toward revealing the complex cellular dynamics in engineered tissues as well as help us culture demanding tissue/organ implants that will advance regenerative medicine.

  10. Protein Signature of Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Michael R.; Ayers, Deborah; Thirstrup, Derek; Xiong, Wei; Ostroff, Rachel M.; Brody, Edward N.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Gold, Larry; Jarvis, Thale C.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Wilcox, Sheri K.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related mortality. We applied a highly multiplexed proteomic technology (SOMAscan) to compare protein expression signatures of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues with healthy adjacent and distant tissues from surgical resections. In this first report of SOMAscan applied to tissues, we highlight 36 proteins that exhibit the largest expression differences between matched tumor and non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of twenty proteins increased and sixteen decreased in tumor tissue, thirteen of which are novel for NSCLC. NSCLC tissue biomarkers identified here overlap with a core set identified in a large serum-based NSCLC study with SOMAscan. We show that large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression can be used to develop novel histochemical probes. As expected, relative differences in protein expression are greater in tissues than in serum. The combined results from tissue and serum present the most extensive view to date of the complex changes in NSCLC protein expression and provide important implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22509397

  11. Vitamin D3 in Fat Tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The literature describing vitamin D content of fat tissue is extremely limited. We conducted a pilot study that measured the concentrations of vitamin D3 in the fat tissue and serum of obese adults. These measurements were performed using a new liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) metho...

  12. Contemporary upper lid blepharoplasty--tissue invagination.

    PubMed

    Siegel, R J

    1993-04-01

    Blepharoplasty is the most commonly performed operation to enhance facial appearance. Controversy arises over the need for tissue invagination as opposed to simple tissue excision. This article focuses on advanced invagination-type blepharoplasty, discussing who, what, where, when, why, and how. PMID:8485932

  13. Optical Properties of Bruised Apple Tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the optical properties of apple tissue, especially bruised tissue, can help us prevent or mitigate bruise occurrence during harvest and postharvest operations, and develop an effective method for detecting bruises during sorting and grading. This research was aimed at determining the o...

  14. α-Klotho Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kenneth; Groen, Arnoud; Molostvov, Guerman; Lu, Tzongshi; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Snead, David; James, Sean; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Ting, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: α-Klotho has emerged as a powerful regulator of the aging process. To date, the expression profile of α-Klotho in human tissues is unknown, and its existence in some human tissue types is subject to much controversy. Objective: This is the first study to characterize systemwide tissue expression of transmembrane α-Klotho in humans. We have employed next-generation targeted proteomic analysis using parallel reaction monitoring in parallel with conventional antibody-based methods to determine the expression and spatial distribution of human α-Klotho expression in health. Results: The distribution of α-Klotho in human tissues from various organ systems, including arterial, epithelial, endocrine, reproductive, and neuronal tissues, was first identified by immunohistochemistry. Kidney tissues showed strong α-Klotho expression, whereas liver did not reveal a detectable signal. These results were next confirmed by Western blotting of both whole tissues and primary cells. To validate our antibody-based results, α-Klotho-expressing tissues were subjected to parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (data deposited at ProteomeXchange, PXD002775) identifying peptides specific for the full-length, transmembrane α-Klotho isoform. Conclusions: The data presented confirm α-Klotho expression in the kidney tubule and in the artery and provide evidence of α-Klotho expression across organ systems and cell types that has not previously been described in humans. PMID:26280509

  15. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  16. Injectable Silk Foams for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, E.; Lo, T.J.; Fournier, E.P.; Brown, J.E.; Abbott, R.D.; Gil, E.S.; Marra, K.G.; Rubin, J.P.; Leisk, G.G.; Kaplan, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow for the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration. Adipose derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10 day period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3 month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure was applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. PMID:25323438

  17. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  18. Plant Tissue Culture in a Bag.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of an oven bag as a sterile chamber for culture initiation and tissue transfer. Plant tissue culture is an ideal tool for introducing students to plants, cloning, and experimental design. Includes materials, methods, discussion, and conclusion sections. (SAH)

  19. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  20. Live birth after ovarian tissue transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. M.; Yeoman, R. R.; Battaglia, D. E.; Stouffer, R. L.; Zelinski-Wooten, M. B.; Fanton, J. W.; Wolf, D. P.

    2004-03-01

    Radiation and high-dose chemotherapy may render women with cancer prematurely sterile, a side-effect that would be avoided if ovarian tissue that had been removed before treatment could be made to function afterwards. Live offspring have been produced from transplanted ovarian tissue in mice and sheep but not in monkeys or humans, although sex steroid hormones are still secreted. Here we describe the successful transplantation of fresh ovarian tissue to a different site in a monkey, which has led to the birth of a healthy female after oocyte production, fertilization and transfer to a surrogate mother. The ectopically grafted tissue functions without surgical connection to major blood vessels and sets the stage for the transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue in humans.

  1. Liposomes in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Nelson; Martins, Albino; Reis, Rui L.; Neves, Nuno M.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are vesicular structures made of lipids that are formed in aqueous solutions. Structurally, they resemble the lipid membrane of living cells. Therefore, they have been widely investigated, since the 1960s, as models to study the cell membrane, and as carriers for protection and/or delivery of bioactive agents. They have been used in different areas of research including vaccines, imaging, applications in cosmetics and tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is defined as a strategy for promoting the regeneration of tissues for the human body. This strategy may involve the coordinated application of defined cell types with structured biomaterial scaffolds to produce living structures. To create a new tissue, based on this strategy, a controlled stimulation of cultured cells is needed, through a systematic combination of bioactive agents and mechanical signals. In this review, we highlight the potential role of liposomes as a platform for the sustained and local delivery of bioactive agents for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:25401172

  2. Allograft Replacement for Absent Native Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fox, Alice J.; Warren, Russell F.; Doyle, Maureen; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Structural instability due to poor soft tissue quality often requires augmentation. Allografts are important biological substitutes that are used for the symptomatic patient in the reconstruction of deficient ligaments, tendons, menisci, and osteochondral defects. Interest in the clinical application of allografts has arisen from the demand to obtain stable anatomy with restoration of function and protection against additional injury, particularly for high-demand patients who participate in sports. Traditionally, allografts were employed to reinforce weakened tissue. However, they can also be employed to substitute deficient or functionally absent tissue, particularly in the sports medicine setting. Objective: This article presents a series of 6 cases that utilized allografts to restore functionally deficient anatomic architecture, rather than just simply augmenting the degenerated or damaged native tissue. Detailed discussions are presented of the use of allografts as a successful treatment strategy to replace functionally weakened tissue, often after failed primary repairs. PMID:24427387

  3. Origin and Functions of Tissue Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are distributed in tissues throughout the body and contribute to both homeostasis and disease. Recently, it has become evident that most adult tissue macrophages originate during embryonic development and not from circulating monocytes. Each tissue has its own composition of embryonically derived and adult-derived macrophages, but it is unclear whether macrophages of distinct origins are functionally interchangeable or have unique roles at steady state. This new understanding also prompts reconsideration of the function of circulating monocytes. Classical Ly6chi monocytes patrol the extravascular space in resting organs, and Ly6clo nonclassical monocytes patrol the vasculature. Inflammation triggers monocytes to differentiate into macrophages, but whether resident and newly recruited macrophages possess similar functions during inflammation is unclear. Here, we define the tools used for identifying the complex origin of tissue macrophages and discuss the relative contributions of tissue niche versus ontological origin to the regulation of macrophage functions during steady state and inflammation. PMID:25035951

  4. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N D; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C W; Kang, Jin U; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement. PMID:26440616

  5. Myocardial tissue engineering for cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Pecha, Simon; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Reichenspurner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    The number of patients with heart failure is increasing in the aging population. Heart transplantation remains the only curative treatment option for patients with end-stage heart failure. Because of an organ donor shortage, new organ-independent treatment options are necessary. Different approaches to cardiac repair therapies have been developed and optimized in recent years. One of these promising approaches is myocardial tissue engineering, which refers to the creation of 3-dimensional engineered heart tissue in vitro. This perspective provides an overview of different approaches to tissue engineering, including essentials to improve tissue quality and choice of ideal cell source, as well as an overview of in vitro and in vivo studies. Several hurdles that have to be overcome before clinical application of engineered heart tissue might become a realistic scenario are also addressed. PMID:26856673

  6. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering. PMID:26545748

  7. New Era in Health Care: Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, S; Krishnakumar, K; Sahoo, SK

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Tissue engineering is a rapidly expanding field, which applies the principles and methods of physical sciences, life sciences and engineering to understand physiological and pathological systems and to modify and create cells and tissues for therapeutic applications. It has emerged as a rapidly expanding ‘interdisciplinary field’ that is a significant potential alternative wherein tissue and organ failure is addressed by implanting natural, synthetic, or semi synthetic tissue or organ mimics that grow into the required functionality or that are fully functional from the start. This review presents in a comprehensive manner the various considerations for the reconstruction of various tissues and organs as well as the various applications of this young emerging field in different disciplines. PMID:24692857

  8. Biodegradable inflatable balloons for tissue separation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Haim-Zada, Moran; Domb, Abraham J

    2016-10-01

    Confining radiation to a specific region (during radiation therapy) minimizes damage to surrounding tissues. Biodegradable inflatable balloons (bio-balloons) were developed. The device protects the normal tissues by increasing the gap between radiation source and critical structures. The radiation fades away while passing through the inflated balloon preventing the surrounding tissues from harmful radiation. These bio-balloons have also found clinical use to treat massive rotator cuff tear. This review summarizes the chemistry, engineering, and clinical development of these biomedical devices. These balloons are made of biodegradable polymers folded into the edge of a trocar and inserted between the tissues to be separated, and inflated by normal saline in the site of the application. The inserted balloon protects the tissues from radiation or mechanical stress. They remain inflated on site for two months and are finally eliminated within 12 months. PMID:27521613

  9. The human transcriptome across tissues and individuals

    PubMed Central

    Melé, Marta; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Reverter, Ferran; DeLuca, David S.; Monlong, Jean; Sammeth, Michael; Young, Taylor R.; Goldmann, Jakob M; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Johnson, Rory; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Djebali, Sarah; Niarchou, Anastasia; Wright, Fred A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Calvo, Miquel; Getz, Gad; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional processing underlie many cellular and organismal phenotypes. We used RNA sequence data generated by Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project to investigate the patterns of transcriptome variation across individuals and tissues. Tissues exhibit characteristic transcriptional signatures that show stability in postmortem samples. These signatures are dominated by a relatively small number of genes—which is most clearly seen in blood—though few are exclusive to a particular tissue and vary more across tissues than individuals. Genes exhibiting high interindividual expression variation include disease candidates associated with sex, ethnicity, and age. Primary transcription is the major driver of cellular specificity, with splicing playing mostly a complementary role; except for the brain, which exhibits a more divergent splicing program. Variation in splicing, despite its stochasticity, may play in contrast a comparatively greater role in defining individual phenotypes. PMID:25954002

  10. Tissue engineering in the rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Diseases such as degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by joint destruction. Clinically applied tissue engineering technologies like autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation, or in situ recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells target the treatment of traumatic defects or of early osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions in the joint hamper the application of tissue engineering during chronic joint diseases. Here, most likely, cartilage formation is impaired and engineered neocartilage will be degraded. Based on the observations that mesenchymal stem cells (a) develop into joint tissues and (b) in vitro and in vivo show immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory qualities indicating a transplant-protecting activity, these cells are prominent candidates for future tissue engineering approaches for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Tissue engineering also provides highly organized three-dimensional in vitro culture models of human cells and their extracellular matrix for arthritis research. PMID:19232063

  11. Nonmuscle Tissues Contribution to Cancer Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Argilés, Josep M.; Stemmler, Britta; López-Soriano, Francisco J.; Busquets, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia is a syndrome associated with cancer, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting, and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. In spite of the fact that muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be the main tissue involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia, recent developments suggest that tissues/organs such as adipose (both brown and white), brain, liver, gut, and heart are directly involved in the cachectic process and may be responsible for muscle wasting. This suggests that cachexia is indeed a multiorgan syndrome. Bearing all this in mind, the aim of the present review is to examine the impact of nonmuscle tissues in cancer cachexia. PMID:26523094

  12. Design Strategies and Applications of Tissue Bioadhesives

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh, Mohammadreza; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades tissue adhesives and sealants have revolutionized hemostasis and wound management in traumatic and surgical injuries. Various biological-driven glues and synthetic adhesives are clinically utilized either as an adjunct to conventional hemostats and wound closure techniques, such as suturing, or as a replacement to them. The ability to effectively and promptly control bleeding, thus, reducing the risk of complications due to severe blood loss, in addition to convenience of use render medical adhesive a highly suitable tool for wound management. This review focuses on existing tissue adhesive systems, their structure, functioning mechanism, indicated and off-label applications, and limitations. It also includes the latest advances in the development of new tissue adhesives as well as the emerging applications in regenerative medicine. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on tissue bioadhesive design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of tissue bioadhesives and their related biomedical applications. PMID:23225776

  13. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  14. Injectable fillers for facial soft tissue enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A P; Romo, T

    2000-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation materials have been advocated for correction of post-surgical or post-traumatic facial defects, as well as for age-related folds and wrinkles. While autogenous tissues may be the safest option, they require a second operative site. Animal-derived or synthetic materials have been advocated since the late 19th century, and have waxed and waned in popularity. In recent years, we have gained a better understanding of the physical events that occur when material is placed within or below the skin. With this knowledge, we stand at the threshold of a new era, where soft tissue fillers can be designed and customized to suit the individual patient. This article will review the major materials that have been or are now advocated for use as soft tissue fillers, and will detail their relative strengths and weaknesses in order to give the clinician a better perspective when considering a material for soft tissue augmentation. PMID:11802343

  15. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  16. Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the activities of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements and discusses tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurement. The following section is on basic concepts including definitions, specifications, and interaction coefficients. This section also includes a description of the effects of photons, electrons, neutrons, and heavily charged particles on body tissues. The third section is on selected requirements for tissue substitutes and briefly covers radiation-related requirements for radiation therapy, radiologic diagnosis, radiation protection, and radiobiology. The fourth short section is on composition of body tissues, and comparative interaction and depth dose data for selected tissue substitutes are covered in the fifth section. This includes several tables and many graphs of the ratios required to calculate the radiation dose.

  17. Tissue modification with feedback: the smart scalpel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebern, Elizabeth L.; Brenan, Colin J. H.; Anderson, R. Rox; Hunter, Ian W.

    1998-10-01

    While feedback control is widespread throughout many engineering fields, there are almost no examples of surgical instruments that utilize a real-time detection and intervention strategy. This concept of closed loop feedback can be applied to the development of autonomous or semi- autonomous minimally invasive robotic surgical systems for efficient excision or modification of diseased tissue. Spatially localized regions of the tissue are first probed to distinguish pathological from healthy tissue based on differences in histochemical and morphological properties. Energy is directed to only the diseased tissue, minimizing collateral damage by leaving the adjacent healthy tissue intact. Continuous monitoring determines treatment effectiveness and, if needed, enables real-time treatment modifications to produce optimal therapeutic outcomes. The present embodiment of this general concept is a microsurgical instrument we call the Smart Scalpel, designed to treat skin angiodysplasias such as port wine stains. Other potential Smart Scalpel applications include psoriasis treatment and early skin cancer detection and intervention.

  18. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  19. Depositing archived paraffin tissue core biopsy specimens in paraffin tissue microarrays using a paraffin tissue punch modified with a countersink

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Ulrich Felix

    2007-01-01

    Paraffin tissue microarrays (PTMAs) introduced by Kononen et al in 1998 have become a widely used technique in routine pathology and even more so in research. Kononen used a tissue puncher/arrayer (Beecher Instruments, Sun Prairie, WI, USA) to take paraffin tissue core biopsy specimens (PTCBs) of 0.6–2 mm in diameter from routine paraffin tissue blocks and transfer them to another paraffin block with up to 1000 holes. As pointed out by Mengel et al, however, it is not possible to use the Kononen/Beecher system to construct PTMAs out of archived PTCBs. To overcome this drawback in the extremely popular Beecher system, the paraffin tissue punch was modified by incorporating a conical 4 mm deep countersink. This countersink was milled with a conical precision cutter that can be bought in an ordinary hardware store (cost tissue punch and enables the construction of PTMAs with previously archived PTCBs using the widely distributed Beecher system. Moreover, this paraffin tissue punch can be used for other systems to create PTMAs, such as the low‐budget systems designed by Vogel. PMID:17079355

  20. Assessment of tissue viability by polarization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G.; Anderson, C.; Henricson, J.; Leahy, M.; O'Doherty, J.; Sjöberg, F.

    2008-09-01

    A new and versatile method for tissue viability imaging based on polarization spectroscopy of blood in superficial tissue structures such as the skin is presented in this paper. Linearly polarized light in the visible wavelength region is partly reflected directly by the skin surface and partly diffusely backscattered from the dermal tissue matrix. Most of the directly reflected light preserves its polarization state while the light returning from the deeper tissue layers is depolarized. By the use of a polarization filter positioned in front of a sensitive CCD-array, the light directly reflected from the tissue surface is blocked, while the depolarized light returning from the deeper tissue layers reaches the detector array. By separating the colour planes of the detected image, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the microvascular network of the tissue under investigation can be derived. A theory that utilizes the differences in light absorption of RBCs and bloodless tissue in the red and green wavelength region forms the basis of an algorithm for displaying a colour coded map of the RBC distribution in a tissue. Using a fluid model, a linear relationship (cc. = 0.99) between RBC concentration and the output signal was demonstrated within the physiological range 0-4%. In-vivo evaluation using transepidermal application of acetylcholine by the way of iontophoresis displayed the heterogeneity pattern of the vasodilatation produced by the vasoactive agent. Applications of this novel technology are likely to be found in drug and skin care product development as well as in the assessment of skin irritation and tissue repair processes and even ultimately in a clinic case situation.

  1. Emergent Global Contractile Force in Cardiac Tissues.

    PubMed

    Knight, Meghan B; Drew, Nancy K; McCarthy, Linda A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-04-12

    The heart is a complex organ whose structure and function are intricately linked at multiple length scales. Although several advancements have been achieved in the field of cardiac tissue engineering, current in vitro cardiac tissues do not fully replicate the structure or function necessary for effective cardiac therapy and cardiotoxicity studies. This is partially due to a deficiency in current understandings of cardiac tissue organization's potential downstream effects, such as changes in gene expression levels. We developed a novel (to our knowledge) in vitro tool that can be used to decouple and quantify the contribution of organization and associated downstream effects to tissue function. To do so, cardiac tissue monolayers were designed into a parquet pattern to be organized anisotropically on a local scale, within a parquet tile, and with any desired organization on a global scale. We hypothesized that if the downstream effects were muted, the relationship between developed force and tissue organization could be modeled as a sum of force vectors. With the in vitro experimental platforms of parquet tissues and heart-on-a-chip devices, we were able to prove this hypothesis for both systolic and diastolic stresses. Thus, insight was gained into the relationship between the generated stress and global myofibril organization. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the developed quantitative tool could be used to estimate the changes in stress production due to downstream effects decoupled from tissue architecture. This has the potential to elucidate properties coupled to tissue architecture, which change force production and pumping function in the diseased heart or stem cell-derived tissues. PMID:27074686

  2. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  3. Scaffolding in tissue engineering: general approaches and tissue-specific considerations

    PubMed Central

    Leong, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds represent important components for tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper aims to review the functions of scaffolds and the major scaffolding approaches as important guidelines for selecting scaffolds and discuss the tissue-specific considerations for scaffolding, using intervertebral disc as an example. PMID:19005702

  4. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  5. The importance of establishing an international network of tissue banks and regional tissue processing centers.

    PubMed

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    During the past four decades, many tissue banks have been established across the world with the aim of supplying sterilized tissues for clinical use and research purposes. Between 1972 and 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency supported the establishment of more than sixty of these tissue banks in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Eastern Europe; promoted the use of the ionizing radiation technique for the sterilization of the processed tissues; and encouraged cooperation between the established tissue banks during the implementation of its program on radiation and tissue banking at national, regional and international levels. Taking into account that several of the established tissue banks have gained a rich experience in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and medical use of sterilized tissues, it is time now to strengthen further international and regional cooperation among interested tissue banks located in different countries. The purpose of this cooperation is to share the experience gained by these banks in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and used of different types of tissues in certain medical treatments and research activities. This could be done through the establishment of a network of tissue banks and a limited number of regional tissue processing centers in different regions of the world. PMID:23765095

  6. SpOT the Correct Tissue Every Time in Multi-Tissue Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Anna H.; Berry, Deborah L.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-tissue paraffin blocks provide high throughput analysis with increased efficiency, experimental uniformity, and reduced time and cost. Tissue microarrays make up the majority of multi-tissue paraffin blocks, but increasingly, researchers are using non-arrayed blocks containing larger tissues from multiple individuals which can provide many of the advantages of tissue microarrays without substantial investment in planning and equipment. A critical component of any multi-tissue analysis is the orientation method used to identify each individual tissue. Although methods exist to maintain proper orientation and identification of tissues in multi-tissue blocks, most are not well-suited to non-arrayed blocks, may consume valuable space within an array and/or are difficult to produce in the standard histology laboratory. The Specimen Orientation Tag (SpOT) is a simple, low cost orientation tool that is clearly visible in paraffin blocks and all tissue sections for reliable specimen identification in arrayed and non-arrayed layouts. The SpOT provides advantages over existing orientation methods for non-arrayed blocks as it does not require any direct modification to the tissue and allows for flexibility in the arrangement of tissue pieces. PMID:26067587

  7. Stokes-polarimetry imaging of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Paul J.

    A novel Stokes-polarimetry imaging system and technique was developed to quantify fully the polarization properties of light remitted from tissue. The uniqueness of the system and technique is established in the incident polarization. Here, the diffuse illumination is varied and controlled with the intention to improve the visibility of tissue structures. Since light retains some polarization even after multiple-scattering events, the polarization of remitted light depends upon the interactions within the material. Differentiation between tissue structures is accomplished by two-dimensional mapping of the imaged area using metrics such as the degree of linear polarization, degree of circular polarization, ellipticity, and Stokes parameters. While Stokes-polarimetry imaging can be applied to a variety of tissues and conditions, this thesis focuses on tissue types associated with the disease endometriosis. The current standard in diagnosing endometriosis is visual laparoscopy with tissue biopsy. The documented correlation between laparoscopy inspection and histological confirmation of suspected lesions was at best 67%. Endometrial lesions vary greatly in their appearance and depth of infiltration. Although laparoscopy permits tissue to be assessed by color and texture, to advance beyond the state-of-the-art, a new imaging modality involving polarized light was investigated; in particular, Stokes-polarimetry imaging was used to determine the polarization signature of light that interacted with tissue. Basic science studies were conducted on rat tails embedded within turbid gelatin. The purpose of these experiments was to determine how identification of sub-surface structures could be improved. Experimental results indicate image contrast among various structures such as tendon, soft tissue and intervertebral discs. Stokes-polarimetry imaging experiments were performed on various tissues associated with endometriosis to obtain a baseline characterization for each

  8. Photon-tissue interaction model for quantitative assessment of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; McKenna, Barbara; Simeone, Diane; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we describe a direct fit photon-tissue interaction model to quantitatively analyze reflectance spectra of biological tissue samples. The model rapidly extracts biologically-relevant parameters associated with tissue optical scattering and absorption. This model was employed to analyze reflectance spectra acquired from freshly excised human pancreatic pre-cancerous tissues (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), a common precursor lesion to pancreatic cancer). Compared to previously reported models, the direct fit model improved fit accuracy and speed. Thus, these results suggest that such models could serve as real-time, quantitative tools to characterize biological tissues assessed with reflectance spectroscopy.

  9. Superior Tissue Evolution in Slow-Degrading Scaffolds for Valvular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Marieke M C P; Soekhradj-Soechit, R Sarita; van Geemen, Daphne; Cox, Martijn; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Baaijens, Frank P T; Driessen-Mol, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are widely used to fabricate porous scaffolds for the regeneration of cardiovascular tissues. To ensure mechanical integrity, a balance between the rate of scaffold absorption and tissue formation is of high importance. A higher rate of tissue formation is expected in fast-degrading materials than in slow-degrading materials. This could be a result of synthetic cells, which aim to compensate for the fast loss of mechanical integrity of the scaffold by deposition of collagen fibers. Here, we studied the effect of fast-degrading polyglycolic acid scaffolds coated with poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (PGA-P4HB) and slow-degrading poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on amount of tissue, composition, and mechanical characteristics in time, and compared these engineered values with values for native human heart valves. Electrospun PGA-P4HB and PCL scaffolds were either kept unseeded in culture or were seeded with human vascular-derived cells. Tissue formation, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, remaining scaffold weight, tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, and mechanical properties were analyzed every week up to 6 weeks. Mass of unseeded PCL scaffolds remained stable during culture, whereas PGA-P4HB scaffolds degraded rapidly. When seeded with cells, both scaffold types demonstrated increasing amounts of tissue with time, which was more pronounced for PGA-P4HB-based tissues during the first 2 weeks; however, PCL-based tissues resulted in the highest amount of tissue after 6 weeks. This study is the first to provide insight into the tissue-to-scaffold weight ratio, therewith allowing for a fair comparison between engineered tissues cultured on scaffolds as well as between native heart valve tissues. Although the absolute amount of ECM components differed between the engineered tissues, the ratio between ECM components was similar after 6 weeks. PCL-based tissues maintained their shape, whereas the PGA-P4HB-based tissues deformed during culture. After 6 weeks

  10. Construction of cardiac tissue rings using a magnetic tissue fabrication technique.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Ito, Akira; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-01-01

    Here we applied a magnetic force-based tissue engineering technique to cardiac tissue fabrication. A mixture of extracellular matrix precursor and cardiomyocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles was added into a well containing a central polycarbonate cylinder. With the use of a magnet, the cells were attracted to the bottom of the well and allowed to form a cell layer. During cultivation, the cell layer shrank towards the cylinder, leading to the formation of a ring-shaped tissue that possessed a multilayered cell structure and contractile properties. These results indicate that magnetic tissue fabrication is a promising approach for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21152282

  11. Equine Model for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J.E.; Lo, T.; Quinn, K.P.; Fourligas, N.; Georgakoudi, I.; Leisk, G.G.; Mazan, M.; Thane, K.E.; Taeymans, O.; Hoffman, A.M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kirker-Head, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over six months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation. PMID:25350377

  12. Vibro-acoustography: The sound of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenleaf, James; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2003-04-01

    Palpation is routinely used for detecting pathology using the stiffness of the tissue and is more than 2000 years old. Palpation is subjective and limited to individual experience and to the accessibility of the tissue region to touch. Noninvasive images of elastic modulus may be useful to distinguish tissues and pathologic processes based on mechanical properties such as elastic modulus. Static, quasistatic, or cyclic stresses have been applied while strains have been measured using ultrasound or MRI. The related elastic modulus has been estimated from visco-elastic models of tissue mechanics. Recently we have developed a new ultrasound technique that produces speckle free images related to both tissue stiffness and reflectivity. This method, termed Ultrasound Stimulated Vibro-acoustography [Science 280, 83-85 (1998); PNAS 96, 6603-6608 (1999)], uses ultrasound radiation pressure to produce sound vibrations from a small region of the tissue that depend on the scattering and elastic characteristics of the tissue. The method can detect microcalcification within breasts, and promises to provide high-quality images of calcification within the arteries. Vibro-acoustography can detect mechanical defects in prostheses such as artificial mitral and aortic valves. The method may also be used in nondestructive evaluation. [Work supported by HL 61451, DBI 7980-4.

  13. Viscoelastic and ultrasonic measurements of canine tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos; Varghese, Tomy

    2005-03-01

    Mechanical properties, of biological tissues, such as the complex modulus, are of interest for assessing the performance of elastographic methods that evaluate the stiffness characteristics of tissue. Determination of the mechanical properties of biological tissues is often limited by proper geometry of the sample, as well as homogeneity of the stress-strain relationship. Viscoelastic measurements were performed on in vitro canine liver tissue specimens, using a dynamic testing system, from 0.1 -- 100 Hz, and ultrasonic attenuation measurements were performed from 6 -- 9 MHz . Both normal tissues as well as thermal lesions prepared by immersion heating at several temperatures were tested. Experiments were conducted by uniaxially compressing tissue samples and measuring the load response. The resulting moduli spectra were then fit to both the Kelvin-Voigt model, as well as the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative model. The data agree well with the models and in comparing the results from the normal tissue with that of the thermal lesions, the concept of a complex modulus contrast is introduced and its applications to elastography are discussed.

  14. Tissue refractive index as marker of disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    The gold standard in histopathology relies on manual investigation of stained tissue biopsies. A sensitive and quantitative method for in situ tissue specimen inspection is highly desirable, as it would allow early disease diagnosis and automatic screening. Here we demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging of entire unstained biopsies has the potential to fulfill this requirement. Our data indicates that the refractive index distribution of histopathology slides, which contains information about the molecular scale organization of tissue, reveals prostate tumors and breast calcifications. These optical maps report on subtle, nanoscale morphological properties of tissues and cells that cannot be recovered by common stains, including hematoxylin and eosin. We found that cancer progression significantly alters the tissue organization, as exhibited by consistently higher refractive index variance in prostate tumors versus normal regions. Furthermore, using the quantitative phase information, we obtained the spatially resolved scattering mean free path and anisotropy factor g for entire biopsies and demonstrated their direct correlation with tumor presence. In essence, our results show that the tissue refractive index reports on the nanoscale tissue architecture and, in principle, can be used as an intrinsic marker for cancer diagnosis.

  15. Composite tissue engineering on polycaprolactone nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Reed, Courtney R; Han, Li; Andrady, Anthony; Caballero, Montserrat; Jack, Megan C; Collins, James B; Saba, Salim C; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Cairns, Bruce A; van Aalst, John A

    2009-05-01

    Tissue engineering has largely focused on single tissue-type reconstruction (such as bone); however, the basic unit of healing in any clinically relevant scenario is a compound tissue type (such as bone, periosteum, and skin). Nanofibers are submicron fibrils that mimic the extracellular matrix, promoting cellular adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Stem cell manipulation on nanofiber scaffolds holds significant promise for future tissue engineering. This work represents our initial efforts to create the building blocks for composite tissue reflecting the basic unit of healing. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun using standard techniques. Human foreskin fibroblasts, murine keratinocytes, and periosteal cells (4-mm punch biopsy) harvested from children undergoing palate repair were grown in appropriate media on PCL nanofibers. Human fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells were osteoinduced on PCL nanofibers. Cell growth was assessed with fluorescent viability staining; cocultured cells were differentiated using antibodies to fibroblast- and keratinocyte-specific surface markers. Osteoinduction was assessed with Alizarin red S. PCL nanofiber scaffolds supported robust growth of fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and periosteal cells. Cocultured periosteal cells (with fibroblasts) and keratinocytes showed improved longevity of the keratinocytes, though growth of these cell types was randomly distributed throughout the scaffold. Robust osteoinduction was noted on PCL nanofibers. Composite tissue engineering using PCL nanofiber scaffolds is possible, though the major obstacles to the trilaminar construct are maintaining an appropriate interface between the tissue types and neovascularization of the composite structure. PMID:19387150

  16. [Tissue grafts: an activity concerning many patients].

    PubMed

    Loty, B

    1997-11-15

    Tissue allografts mainly include corneas, bone (and cartilage, tendon, ligament, aponevrosis), skin, vessels and cardiac valves. All these grafts have been widely used for many years and were the subject of a large number of experimental and clinical studies. The different steps allowing the obtention of different tissue allografts have in fact a common organization through tissue procurement and banking activities. Tissue banks have a central situation ensuring security, safety, traceability and distribution of tissues. Appropriate organization of the banks, and respect of high level standards are thus mandatory. Tissue transplantation activity in France has been studied through national surveys: they concern more than 600 hospitals and clinics, and grafts procured in France (excluding imported allografts) are around 15,000 a year. Precise regulation implied by the bioethical law published in 1994 and homogeneous organization of the activity allow the use of stringent and regularly updated standards, allowing the distribution to the patients of safe grafts procured in ethical conditions. The actual shortage of tissue allografts in France implies increasing procurement through a better organization of retrieval in hospitals and clinics and donation promotion. PMID:9501596

  17. On the Compressibility of Arterial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-04-01

    Arterial tissue is commonly assumed to be incompressible. While this assumption is convenient for both experimentalists and theorists, the compressibility of arterial tissue has not been rigorously investigated. In the current study we present an experimental-computational methodology to determine the compressibility of aortic tissue and we demonstrate that specimens excised from an ovine descending aorta are significantly compressible. Specimens are stretched in the radial direction in order to fully characterise the mechanical behaviour of the tissue ground matrix. Additionally biaxial testing is performed to fully characterise the anisotropic contribution of reinforcing fibres. Due to the complexity of the experimental tests, which entail non-uniform finite deformation of a non-linear anisotropic material, it is necessary to implement an inverse finite element analysis scheme to characterise the mechanical behaviour of the arterial tissue. Results reveal that ovine aortic tissue is highly compressible; an effective Poisson's ratio of 0.44 is determined for the ground matrix component of the tissue. It is also demonstrated that correct characterisation of material compressibility has important implications for the calibration of anisotropic fibre properties using biaxial tests. Finally it is demonstrated that correct treatment of material compressibility has significant implications for the accurate prediction of the stress state in an artery under in vivo type loading. PMID:26297340

  18. Segmentation of prostate cancer tissue microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Can, Ali; Padfield, Dirk

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is diagnosed by histopathology interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained tissue sections. Gland and nuclei distributions vary with the disease grade. The morphological features vary with the advance of cancer where the epithelial regions grow into the stroma. An efficient pathology slide image analysis method involved using a tissue microarray with known disease stages. Digital 24-bit RGB images were acquired for each tissue element on the slide with both 10X and 40X objectives. Initial segmentation at low magnification was accomplished using prior spectral characteristics from a training tissue set composed of four tissue clusters; namely, glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei. The segmentation method was automated by using the training RGB values as an initial guess and iterating the averaging process 10 times to find the four cluster centers. Labels were assigned to the nearest cluster center in red-blue spectral feature space. An automatic threshold algorithm separated the glands from the tissue. A visual pseudo color representation of 60 segmented tissue microarray image was generated where white, pink, red, blue colors represent glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei, respectively. The higher magnification images provided refined nuclei morphology. The nuclei were detected with a RGB color space principle component analysis that resulted in a grey scale image. The shape metrics such as compactness, elongation, minimum and maximum diameters were calculated based on the eigenvalues of the best-fitting ellipses to the nuclei.

  19. Tylosin depletion in edible tissues of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Montesissa, C; De Liguoro, M; Santi, A; Capolongo, F; Biancotto, G

    1999-10-01

    The depletion of tylosin residues in edible turkey tissues was followed after 3 days of administration of tylosin tartrate at 500 mg l-1 in drinking water, to 30 turkeys. Immediately after the end of the treatment (day 0) and at day 1, 3, 5 and 10 of withdrawal, six turkeys (three males and three females) per time were sacrificed and samples of edible tissues were collected. Tissue homogenates were extracted, purified and analysed by HPLC according to a method previously published for the analysis of tylosin residues in pig tissues. In all tissues, tylosin residues were already below the detection limits of 50 micrograms kg-1 at time zero. However, in several samples of tissues (skin + fat, liver, kidney, muscle), from the six turkeys sacrificed at that time, one peak corresponding to an unknown tylosin equivalent was detected at measurable concentrations. The identification of this unknown compound was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis of the extracts from incurred samples. The mass fragmentation of the compound was consistent with the structure of tylosin D (the alcoholic derivative of tylosin A), the major metabolite of tylosin previously recovered and identified in tissues and/or excreta from treated chickens, cattle and pigs. PMID:10755131

  20. Elastic Light Tunable Tissue Adhesive Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gao; Djordjevic, Ivan; Mogal, Vishal; O'Rorke, Richard; Pokholenko, Oleksandr; Steele, Terry W J

    2016-07-01

    Development of bioadhesive formulations for tissue fixation remains a challenge. The major drawbacks of available bioadhesives are low adhesion strength, toxic byproducts, and complexity of application onto affected tissues. In order to address these problems, this study has developed a hydrogel bioadhesive system based on poly amido amine (PAMAM) dendrimer, grafted (conjugated) with UV-sensitive, 4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl] benzyl bromide (PAMAM-g-diazirine). This particular diazirine molecule can be grafted to the surface amine groups of PAMAM in a one-pot synthesis. Diazirine functionalities are carbene precursors that form covalent crosslinks with hydrated tissues after low-power UV activation without necessity of free-radical initiators. The rheological properties and adhesion strength to ex vivo tissues are highly controllable depending on diazirine grafting, hydrogel concentration, and UV dose intensity fitting variety types of tissues. Covalent bonds at the tissue/bioadhesive interface provide robust adhesive and mechanical strength in a highly hydrated environment. The free flowing hydrogel conversion to elastic adhesive after UV activation allows intimate contact with the ex vivo swine tissue surfaces with low in vitro cytotoxicity observed, making it a promising bioadhesive formulation toward clinical applications. PMID:27061355