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Sample records for argentine shortfin squid

  1. Relationship between beak morphological variables and body size and mantle length of male and female Argentine shortfin squid ( Illex argentinus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjun; Lu, Huajie; Liu, Bilin; Fang, Zhou

    2012-12-01

    Beak of cephalopod is an important hard tissue. Understanding the morphology of beak can yield critical information on the role of cephalopods in the ecosystem. The south patagonic stock of the Argentine shortfin squid, Illex argentinus, is not only one of the most important fishing targets, but also one of the most important species in the marine eco-system of the southwest Atlantic. A total of 430 samples of I. argentinus, including 229 females 103-346mm in mantle length (ML) and 201 males 140-298mm in ML, were collected from the area off the Exclusive Economic Zone of Argentinean waters by Chinese squid jigging vessels during February to May 2007. The morphology of their beaks was evaluated. The relationships between beak morphological variables and ML differed significantly among males and females. They could be best described by logarithmic functions for females and linear functions for males except for upper wing length (UWL) and lower rostrum length (LRL), which followed exponential functions in their relationships with ML. The results showed the sexual dimorphism in the relationship between ML and beak morphology for the south patagonic stock of I. argentinus. However, no significant difference was found between males and females in the relationships of beak morphological variables (except for UWL) versus body weight (BW), suggesting that the relationship between beak morphological variables and BW can be used for estimating the biomass consumed by their predators.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of Argentine shortfin squid (Illex argentines).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jianshe; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the complete mitochondrial genome of the Illex argentinus. The genome was 20,278 bp in length and contained 18 protein-coding genes, 23 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 3 main non-coding regions. The composition and order of genes were different to some other invertebrates. The overall base composition of I. argentinus was A 39.23%, C 17.50%, T 33.71% and G 9.56%, with a highly A + T bias of 72.94%. All of the three control regions (CR) contained termination-associated sequences and conserved sequence blocks. This mitogenome sequence data would play an important role in the taxonomic resolution and phylogeography of the Ommastrephidae. PMID:25707415

  3. Genomic Sequence of a Ranavirus Isolated from Short-Finned Eel (Anguilla australis)

    PubMed Central

    Toffan, Anna; Cappellozza, Elisabetta; Steckler, Natalie K.; Olesen, Niels J.; Ariel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The short-finned eel ranavirus (SERV) was isolated from short-finned eel imported to Italy from New Zealand. Phylogenomic analyses revealed that SERV is a unique member of the genus Ranavirus, family Iridoviridae, branching at the base of the tree near other fish ranaviruses. PMID:27540067

  4. The Squid Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillaume, Andrea M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an approach to the study of squid that helps students of all ages develop richer ideas about the structure of living things, how living things are adapted to their habitats, and how they interact with other organisms. Highlights include the external and internal features of the squid, squid statements and statistics, and writing…

  5. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    There is an ongoing disagreement regarding the aging of the shortfin mako due to a difference of interpretation in the periodic deposition of vertebral growth band pairs, especially for the larger size classes. Using analysis of length-month information, tagging data, and length-frequency analysis, concluded that two band pairs were formed in the vertebral centrum every year (biannual band-pair interpretation). Cailliet et al. (1983), however, presented growth parameters based on the common assumption that one band pair forms annually (annual band-pair interpretation). Therefore, growth rates obtained by Pratt & Casey (1983) were twice that of Cailliet et al. (1983) and could lead to age discrepancies of about 15 years for maximum estimated ages on the order of 30 from the annual band-pair interpretation. Serious consequences in the population dynamics could occur for this species if inputs are based on an invalid age interpretation. The latest Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Highly Migratory Species (HMS), for example, adopted the biannual band pair deposition hypothesis because it apparently fit the observed growth patterns best (Pacific Fishery Management Council 2003). However, the ongoing uncertainty about the aging of the shortfin mako was acknowledged and it was recommended that an endeavor to resolve this issue be made. Since 1983, five additional studies on the age and growth of the shortfin mako have been conducted (Chan 2001, Campana et al. 2002, Hsu 2003, Ribot-Carballal et al. 2005, Bishop et al. 2006). Using Marginal Increment Ratio (MIR), Hsu (2003) indicated the formation of annual translucent bands from July to September in western North Pacific Ocean shortfin makos. Using Marginal Increment Analysis (MIA) Ribot-Carballal et al. (2005) supported the annual band-pair interpretation for 109 shortfin makos collected in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Although the study provided support for annual band-pair deposition, no statistical test was performed

  6. Scale morphology and flexibility in the shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus and the blacktip shark Carcharhinus limbatus.

    PubMed

    Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria Laura; Lang, Amy; Hueter, Robert; Davis, Jessica

    2012-10-01

    We quantified placoid scale morphology and flexibility in the shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus and the blacktip shark Carcharhinus limbatus. The shortfin mako shark has shorter scales than the blacktip shark. The majority of the shortfin mako shark scales have three longitudinal riblets with narrow spacing and shallow grooves. In comparison, the blacktip shark scales have five to seven longitudinal riblets with wider spacing and deeper grooves. Manual manipulation of the scales at 16 regions on the body and fins revealed a range of scale flexibility, from regions of nonerectable scales such as on the leading edge of the fins to highly erectable scales along the flank of the shortfin mako shark body. The flank scales of the shortfin mako shark can be erected to a greater angle than the flank scales of the blacktip shark. The shortfin mako shark has a region of highly flexible scales on the lateral flank that can be erected to at least 50°. The scales of the two species are anchored in the stratum laxum of the dermis. The attachment fibers of the scales in both species appear to be almost exclusively collagen, with elastin fibers visible in the stratum laxum of both species. The most erectable scales of the shortfin mako shark have long crowns and relatively short bases that are wider than long. The combination of a long crown length to short base length facilitates pivoting of the scales. Erection of flank scales and resulting drag reduction is hypothesized to be passively driven by localized flow patterns over the skin. PMID:22730019

  7. Laminar separation control effects of shortfin mako shark skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael Thomas

    Shark skin is investigated as a means of laminar flow separation control due to its preferential flow direction as well as the potential for scales to erect and obstruct low-momentum backflow resulting from an adverse pressure gradient acting on the boundary layer. In this study, the effect of the scales on flow reversal is observed in laminar flow conditions. This is achieved by comparing the flow over a pectoral fin from a shortfin mako shark to that over the same fin that is painted to neutralize the effect of the scales on the flow. The effect of the scales on flow reversal is also observed by comparing the flow over a smooth PVC cylinder to that over the same cylinder with samples of mako shark skin affixed to the entire circumference of the cylinder. These samples were taken from the flank region of the shark because the scales at this location have been shown to have the greatest angle of erection compared to the scales on the rest of the shark's body. Scales at this location have an average crown length of 220 microm with a maximum bristling angle of proximately 50 degrees. Because these scales have the highest bristling angle, they have the best potential for separation control. All data was taken using time-resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. The flow over the pectoral fin was analyzed at multiple angles of attack. It was found that the shark skin had the effect of decreasing the size of the separated region over both the pectoral fin and the cylinder as well as decreasing the magnitudes of the reversing flow found in these regions. For all Reynolds numbers tested, drag reduction over 28% was found when applying the sharkskin to the cylinder.

  8. Contemporary Argentine Cinema during Neoliberalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocha, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    In this article I analyze contemporary Argentine cinematic production assessing the impact of Law 24,377 that was implemented in 1995 and that provided much-needed funds for national productions. By looking at film production and consumption, the emergence of young filmmakers and the performance of both commercial films and those belonging to the…

  9. Subranging scheme for SQUID sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A readout scheme for measuring the output from a SQUID-based sensor-array using an improved subranging architecture that includes multiple resolution channels (such as a coarse resolution channel and a fine resolution channel). The scheme employs a flux sensing circuit with a sensing coil connected in series to multiple input coils, each input coil being coupled to a corresponding SQUID detection circuit having a high-resolution SQUID device with independent linearizing feedback. A two-resolution configuration (course and fine) is illustrated with a primary SQUID detection circuit for generating a fine readout, and a secondary SQUID detection circuit for generating a course readout, both having feedback current coupled to the respective SQUID devices via feedback/modulation coils. The primary and secondary SQUID detection circuits function and derive independent feedback. Thus, the SQUID devices may be monitored independently of each other (and read simultaneously) to dramatically increase slew rates and dynamic range.

  10. Recent Observations on Shortfin Mako Scale Flexibility as a Mechanism for Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Amy; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria; Jones, Emily; Hueter, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Recent results obtained from examining the skin of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) suggest that scale flexibility may provide a passive, flow actuated mechanism for controlling flow separation. The shortfin mako is considered to be one of the fastest and most agile marine predators. High contragility, or the ability to change direction while already in a turn, requires minimal form drag and thus control of flow separation on body regions aft of the point of maximum girth. Recent biological observations have found that the shortfin mako has highly flexible scales, or denticles, particularly on the sides of the body downstream of the gills; in these regions scale crowns can be easily manipulated to angles in excess of 60 degrees. Histological data of the skin provides preliminary evidence that this flexibility is achieved due, in part, to a reduction in the size of the base of the scale where it is anchored into the skin. Experimental measurements of maximum angle of denticle bristling observed as a function of body location will be presented and a probable mechanism leading to separation control will be discussed.

  11. Selection of the Argentine indicator region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Reed, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Determined from available Argentine crop statistics, selection of the Indicator Region was based on the highest wheat, corn, and soybean producing provinces, which were: Buenos Aires, Cordoba, Entre Rios, and Santa Fe. Each province in Argentina was examined for the availability of LANDSAT data; area, yield and production statistics; crop calendars; and other ancillary data. The Argentine Indicator Region is described.

  12. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  13. SQUIDs - ultimate magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Gordon B.

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) have extreme electromagnetic energy sensitivity, which can be applied in a wide variety of ways. Some of these are covered in the papers representing the rest of this symposium: in this brief introductory paper we indicate the wide extent of the full range of applications to which they have been put, from bioscience to tests of General Relativity.

  14. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  15. Geophysical applications of squids

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1983-05-01

    Present and potential geophysical applications of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) include remote reference magnetotellurics, controlledsource electromagnetic sounding, airborne gradiometry, gravity gradiometers, rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism, the location of hydrofractures for hot dry rock geothermal energy and enhanced oil and gas recovery, the detection of internal ocean waves, and underwater magnetotellurics.

  16. Low-noise SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E.; Clarke, J.

    2000-02-08

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w(C), which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers ({mu}m). When made with film widths of about 4 {mu}m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla ({mu}T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 {mu}m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 {mu}T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  17. SQUIDs: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    In 1964, Jaklevic, Lambe, Silver and Mercereau demonstrated quantum interference in a superconducting ring containing two Josephson tunnel junctions. This observation marked the birth of the SQUID--Superconducting QUantum Interference Device. The following year saw the appearance of the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer)--a blob of solder frozen around a length of niobium wire--that was used as a voltmeter with femtovolt resolution. Although extremely primitive by today's standards, the SLUG was used successfully in a number of ultrasensitive experiments. Today, the square washer dc SQUID, fabricated on a wafer-scale from thin films with an integrated input coil, finds a wide range of applications. One example is the use of a SQUID amplifier to read out ADMX--Axion Dark Matter eXperiment--at the University of Washington, Seattle. This experiment, which involves a cooled microwave cavity surrounded by a superconducting magnet, searches for the axion, a candidate for cold dark matter. In the presence of a magnetic field the axion is predicted to decay into a photon, which is detected by the SQUID. In another example, the combination of a SQUID with prepolarized proton spins enables one to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in magnetic fields of the order of 0.1 mT, four orders of magnitude lower than in conventional MRI systems. In vivo images of the human brain acquired at these ultralow fields are able distinguish brain tissue, blood, cerebrospinal fluid and scalp fat using a combination of inversion recovery and multiple echo sequences. Potential clinical applications are briefly discussed.

  18. The Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, John Arthur Benson

    2011-12-01

    This thesis describes a multiplexer of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with low-noise, ultra-low power dissipation, and great scalability. The multiplexer circuit measures the magnetic flux in a large number of unshunted rf SQUIDs by coupling each SQUID to a superconducting microwave resonator tuned to a unique resonance frequency and driving the resonators from a common feedline. A superposition of microwave tones measures each SQUID simultaneously using only two coaxial cables between the cryogenic device and room temperature. This multiplexer will enable the instrumentation of arrays with hundreds of thousands of low-temperature detectors for new applications in cosmology, materials analysis, and nuclear non-proliferation. The driving application of the Microwave SQUID Multiplexer is the readout of large arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors, by some figures of merit the most sensitive detectors of electromagnetic signals over a span of more than nine orders of magnitude in energy, from 40 GHz microwaves to 200 keV gamma rays. Modern transition-edge sensors have noise-equivalent power as low as 10-20 W / Hz1/2 and energy resolution as good as 2 eV at 6 keV. These per-pixel sensitivities approach theoretical limits set by the underlying signals, motivating a rapid increase in pixel count to access new science. Compelling applications, like the non-destructive assay of nuclear material for treaty verification or the search for primordial gravity waves from inflation use arrays of these detectors to increase collection area or tile a focal plane. We developed three generations of SQUID multiplexers, optimizing the first for flux noise 0.17 muPhi0 / Hz1/2, the second for input current noise 19 pA / Hz1/2, and the last for practical multiplexing of large arrays of cosmic microwave background polarimeters based on transition-edge sensors. Using the last design we demonstrated multiplexed readout of prototype polarimeters with the

  19. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies. PMID:17066809

  20. Dissect Your Squid and Eat It Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a science lab activity in which students dissect fresh squids in groups of four and observe the anatomy. Parent volunteers cook the squid mantle for kids to taste. Includes directions for squid dissection. (YDS)

  1. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  2. Time-division SQUID multiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.; Bergren, N. E.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rudman, D. A.; Huber, M. E.

    2002-02-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of low-temperature bolometers and microcalorimeters based on superconducting transition-edge sensors with a manageable number of readout channels. We discuss the technical tradeoffs between proposed time-division multiplexer and frequency-division multiplexer schemes and motivate our choice of time division. Our first-generation SQUID multiplexer is now in use in an astronomical instrument. We describe our second-generation SQUID multiplexer, which is based on a new architecture that significantly reduces the dissipation of power at the first stage, allowing thousands of SQUIDs to be operated at the base temperature of a cryostat. .

  3. [Theory of Argentine cultural "isoidia"].

    PubMed

    Pagés Larraya, F

    1982-03-01

    For the epidemiological study of mental pathology in the Argentine Republic the country has been systematically divided into 25 Cultural Areas, to which it is necessary to add the "megalopolis" of Buenos Aires City and conurbation. Each one of these Cultural Areas is analysed according to the anthropological method, which enables us to comprise an innumerable series of epidemiological variants. We investigate, for example, in every one of them the situation of the mentally sick within the community and the cultural attitude of the latter towards mental illness. For statistical purposes of Psychiatrical Epidemiology an experimental study of the prevalence of this type of disease is carried out in each of the above mentioned areas. As a complement to this investigation an analysis of the Institutional Prevalence of Mental Pathology has been performed, i.e., of the patients attended at the State Establishments, be they national, provincial or municipal. PMID:7136824

  4. The complete mitochondrial DNA of the endemic shortfin silverside, Chirostoma humboldtianum (Valenciennes, 1835).

    PubMed

    Barriga-Sosa, Irene de los A; De León, Francisco J García; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    The shortfin silverside Chirostoma humboldtianum, is an endemic fish from the Mesa Central of Mexico, it is considered the "ancestral" species of the "peces blancos" and plays an important role as a potential species for aquaculture. Here we sequence its mitogenome (Genbank accession number KJ921739), which has a total length of 16,447 bp, and the arrangement consist of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and 22 transfer RNA similar to other Atheriniformes. This mitogenome will be useful for phylogenetic, population and phylogeographic studies of this and other important atherinopsid species. PMID:25185796

  5. Disseminated granulomas associated with nematode larvae in a shortfin mako shark.

    PubMed

    Borucinska, J D; Heger, K

    1999-01-01

    A shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) caught in 1996 by sportfishermen in Long Island (New York, USA) had many granulomas containing larval nematodes. Granulomas were present in the myocardium, spleen, pancreas, stomach, spiral intestine, hematopoietic tissue within the anterior kidney, and in the branchial septum and primary lamellae of the gills. Epicardial hyperplasia and granulomatous myocarditis were associated with the larvae. Although identification of the larvae was impossible due to lack of distinct morphological features, they resembled dracunculoid larvae previously reported from sharks. PMID:10073355

  6. Shortfin Mako Skin: A Possible Passive Flow Control Mechanism for Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelus, Jennifer; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; Motta, Phillip; Habegger, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The shortfin mako is one of the fastest and most agile ocean predators creating the need to minimize its pressure drag by controlling flow separation. One proposed method for flow control is the activation of small teeth-like denticles, on the order of 0.2 mm, that cover the skin of the shark. Biological studies of the shortfin mako skin have shown the passive bristling angle of their denticles to exceed 50 degrees in areas on the flank corresponding to the locations likely to experience separation first. It is proposed that reversing flow, as occurs at the onset of separation in a turbulent boundary layer, would activate denticle bristling and hinder local separation from leading to global separation over the shark. It has been shown on a biomimetic model that bristled denticles create cavities that support the formation of vortices that interact with the boundary layer. This interaction is thought to support momentum exchange and allow the flow to stay attached longer. This experiment focuses on the mechanism that triggers bristling of the real shark skin denticles and further explores the interaction those denticles foster with the boundary layer on a 3D biomimetic model using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). Support for this research by the NSF GRFP is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. A flow separation study over a shortfin mako shark pectoral fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Smith, Drew; Motta, Philip

    2011-11-01

    Many animals possess performance enhancing mechanisms, such as the denticles found on the skin of the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus). The shortfin mako, one of the fastest sharks on the planet, is covered by small, tooth-like scales that vary in bristling capability. Previous biological findings have shown that the scales increase in flexibility from the leading to trailing edge over the pectoral fin. As this fin is a primary control surface, the scale bristling may provide a mechanism for separation control that leads to decreased drag and increased maneuverability. Such findings can potentially lead to the development of similar micro-scale mechanisms to improve the efficiency of aerospace design. A left pectoral fin (71 cm span) was tested in a water tunnel facility under static and dynamic conditions. Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) was used to characterize the flow over the fin. Various angles of attack at two speeds were tested (Re of 44,500 and 68,000). Two chord-wise locations, approximately mid-span where three-dimensional effects were minimized, were viewed to analyze the flow. After the initial testing, the fin was painted to eliminate the effect of the scales and retested to observe flow separation. Supported by REU SITE EEC grant number 1062611.

  8. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Tsai, An-Yi; Su, Pin-Xuan; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2015-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) was determined by using a PCR-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,701 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region, and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the tiger tail seahorse is also matching the one observed in the most vertebrate creatures. Base composition of the genome is A (28.8%), T (28.0%), C (28.0%), and G (15.2%) with an A + T rich hallmark as that of other vertebrate mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24047173

  10. Unexpected headless and tailless fish in the stomach content of shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus.

    PubMed

    Biton Porsmoguer, Sebastián; Bănaru, Daniela; Béarez, Philippe; Dekeyser, Ivan; Merchán Fornelino, Manuel; Boudouresque, Charles F

    2014-01-01

    The stomach content of 113 individuals of shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus was analyzed. Individuals were sampled at landing in Vigo (Spain) and captured by sea-surface long-liners in the vicinity of the Azores Archipelago and between Azores and the Iberian Peninsula, in March and October 2012, and March 2013. Teleosts constituted the dominant item, mainly Atlantic saury Scomberesox saurus (87% of teleost prey). Among them, 94% were deprived of both head and the caudal fin, while the flesh and bones of the body were preserved. The presence of eye's lenses, the number of which was consistent with the number of fish remains, likely rules out the elimination of the heads before ingestion. There is no obvious explanation for this unexpected and unrecorded pattern of digestion. PMID:24533093

  11. Unexpected Headless and Tailless Fish in the Stomach Content of Shortfin Mako Isurus oxyrinchus

    PubMed Central

    Biton Porsmoguer, Sebastián; Bănaru, Daniela; Béarez, Philippe; Dekeyser, Ivan; Merchán Fornelino, Manuel; Boudouresque, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    The stomach content of 113 individuals of shortfin mako Isurus oxyrinchus was analyzed. Individuals were sampled at landing in Vigo (Spain) and captured by sea-surface long-liners in the vicinity of the Azores Archipelago and between Azores and the Iberian Peninsula, in March and October 2012, and March 2013. Teleosts constituted the dominant item, mainly Atlantic saury Scomberesox saurus (87% of teleost prey). Among them, 94% were deprived of both head and the caudal fin, while the flesh and bones of the body were preserved. The presence of eye's lenses, the number of which was consistent with the number of fish remains, likely rules out the elimination of the heads before ingestion. There is no obvious explanation for this unexpected and unrecorded pattern of digestion. PMID:24533093

  12. Squid rocket science: How squid launch into air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dor, Ron; Stewart, Julia; Gilly, William; Payne, John; Borges, Teresa Cerveira; Thys, Tierney

    2013-10-01

    Squid not only swim, they can also fly like rockets, accelerating through the air by forcefully expelling water out of their mantles. Using available lab and field data from four squid species, Sthenoteuthis pteropus, Dosidicus gigas, Illex illecebrosus and Loligo opalescens, including sixteen remarkable photographs of flying S. pteropus off the coast of Brazil, we compared the cost of transport in both water and air and discussed methods of maximizing power output through funnel and mantle constriction. Additionally we found that fin flaps develop at approximately the same size range as flight behaviors in these squids, consistent with previous hypotheses that flaps could function as ailerons whilst aloft. S. pteropus acceleration in air (265 body lengths [BL]/s2; 24.5m/s2) was found to exceed that in water (79BL/s2) three-fold based on estimated mantle length from still photos. Velocities in air (37BL/s; 3.4m/s) exceed those in water (11BL/s) almost four-fold. Given the obvious advantages of this extreme mode of transport, squid flight may in fact be more common than previously thought and potentially employed to reduce migration cost in addition to predation avoidance. Clearly squid flight, the role of fin flaps and funnel, and the energetic benefits are worthy of extended investigation.

  13. [Potential emigration of young Italian-Argentines].

    PubMed

    Cacopardo, M C

    1992-12-01

    The author examines trends in out-migration among young, highly skilled Argentines, with a focus on those of Italian descent. Data are from interviews conducted among young adults in Buenos Aires, Mar del Plata, and Rosario. Major factors influencing migration include perceived labor force and economic opportunities. (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12344794

  14. Radiation Studies with Argentine Ion Exchange Material

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    2002-06-28

    A recent technology exchange between Argentina Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEA) and the US Department of Energy involved vitrification studies of ion exchange resins. Details of the spent ion exchange resins currently stored at two Argentine nuclear power plants, Atucha I and Embalse, have been presented in earlier reports. The present study examines irradiation of simulant samples of ion exchange resins.

  15. High survivorship after catch-and-release fishing suggests physiological resilience in the endothermic shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    PubMed Central

    French, Robert P.; Lyle, Jeremy; Tracey, Sean; Currie, Suzanne; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2015-01-01

    The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a species commonly targeted by commercial and recreational anglers in many parts of the developed world. In Australia, the species is targeted by recreational anglers only, under the assumption that most of the sharks are released and populations remain minimally impacted. If released sharks do not survive, the current management strategy will need to be revised. Shortfin mako sharks are commonly subjected to lengthy angling events; however, their endothermic physiology may provide an advantage over ectothermic fishes when recovering from exercise. This study assessed the post-release survival of recreationally caught shortfin mako sharks using Survivorship Pop-up Archival Transmitting (sPAT) tags and examined physiological indicators of capture stress from blood samples as well as any injuries that may be caused by hook selection. Survival estimates were based on 30 shortfin mako sharks captured off the south-eastern coast of Australia. Three mortalities were observed over the duration of the study, yielding an overall survival rate of 90%. All mortalities occurred in sharks angled for <30 min. Sharks experienced increasing plasma lactate with longer fight times and higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs), increased plasma glucose at higher SSTs and depressed expression of heat shock protein 70 and β-hydroxybutyrate at higher SSTs. Long fight times did not impact survival. Circle hooks significantly reduced foul hooking when compared with J hooks. Under the conditions of this study, we found that physical injury associated with hook choice is likely to have contributed to an increased likelihood of mortality, whereas the high aerobic scope associated with the species' endothermy probably enabled it to cope with long fight times and the associated physiological responses to capture. PMID:27303650

  16. High survivorship after catch-and-release fishing suggests physiological resilience in the endothermic shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus).

    PubMed

    French, Robert P; Lyle, Jeremy; Tracey, Sean; Currie, Suzanne; Semmens, Jayson M

    2015-01-01

    The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a species commonly targeted by commercial and recreational anglers in many parts of the developed world. In Australia, the species is targeted by recreational anglers only, under the assumption that most of the sharks are released and populations remain minimally impacted. If released sharks do not survive, the current management strategy will need to be revised. Shortfin mako sharks are commonly subjected to lengthy angling events; however, their endothermic physiology may provide an advantage over ectothermic fishes when recovering from exercise. This study assessed the post-release survival of recreationally caught shortfin mako sharks using Survivorship Pop-up Archival Transmitting (sPAT) tags and examined physiological indicators of capture stress from blood samples as well as any injuries that may be caused by hook selection. Survival estimates were based on 30 shortfin mako sharks captured off the south-eastern coast of Australia. Three mortalities were observed over the duration of the study, yielding an overall survival rate of 90%. All mortalities occurred in sharks angled for <30 min. Sharks experienced increasing plasma lactate with longer fight times and higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs), increased plasma glucose at higher SSTs and depressed expression of heat shock protein 70 and β-hydroxybutyrate at higher SSTs. Long fight times did not impact survival. Circle hooks significantly reduced foul hooking when compared with J hooks. Under the conditions of this study, we found that physical injury associated with hook choice is likely to have contributed to an increased likelihood of mortality, whereas the high aerobic scope associated with the species' endothermy probably enabled it to cope with long fight times and the associated physiological responses to capture. PMID:27303650

  17. Paleomagnetic Analysis Using SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.; Fong, Luis E.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2007-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopes are a new generation of instruments that map magnetic fields with unprecedented spatial resolution and moment sensitivity. Unlike standard rock magnetometers, SQUID microscopes map magnetic fields rather than measuring magnetic moments such that the sample magnetization pattern must be retrieved from source model fits to the measured field data. In this paper, we presented the first direct comparison between paleomagnetic analyses on natural samples using joint measurements from SQUID microscopy and moment magnetometry. We demonstrated that in combination with apriori geologic and petrographic data, SQUID microscopy can accurately characterize the magnetization of lunar glass spherules and Hawaiian basalt. The bulk moment magnitude and direction of these samples inferred from inversions of SQUID microscopy data match direct measurements on the same samples using moment magnetometry. In addition, these inversions provide unique constraints on the magnetization distribution within the sample. These measurements are among the most sensitive and highest resolution quantitative paleomagnetic studies of natural remanent magnetization to date. We expect that this technique will be able to extend many other standard paleomagnetic techniques to previously inaccessible microscale samples.

  18. Recent developments in SQUID NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, H.-J.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.

    2002-03-01

    By presenting brief summaries of recent application highlights, an overview of NDE methods using SQUIDs is given. Bridge inspection with a SQUID array integrated with a yoke magnet excitation was shown by scanning along the pre-stressed steel of bridges and verified by opening the bridge deck. As the construction of the megaliner Airbus aircraft progresses, testing procedures for extremely thick-walled structures are needed. Defects at a depth of up to 40 mm were measured in a bolted three-layer aluminum sample with a total thickness of 62 mm. For the investigation of aircraft wheels, a remote eddy current (EC) excitation scheme yields better depth selectivity. Defects with an inside penetration of only 10% could be detected. SQUID magnetometers are well suited for pulsed EC techniques which cover a broader depth range than standard single frequency EC. An inversion procedure is presented providing a tomographic-like conductivity image of stacked aluminum samples. A recent SQUID application is nondestructive testing of niobium sheets used for superconducting cavities of particle accelerators. The detection of tantalum inclusions and other impurities which lower the cavity performance is based on the measurement of local current inhomogeneities caused by EC excitation or thermal gradients. Alternate techniques using SQUID sensors, such as modulated excitation arrays, rotating field schemes, sensor multiplexing, magnetic moment detection, and microscopy setups, are discussed.

  19. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  20. Tracking Electromagnetic Energy With SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a gadget used to measure extremely weak signals, specifically magnetic flux. It can detect subtle changes in energy, up to 100 billion times weaker than the electromagnetic energy required to move a compass needle. SQUIDs are used for a variety of testing procedures where extreme sensitivity is required and where the test instrument need not come into direct contact with the test subject. NASA uses SQUIDs for remote, noncontact sensing in a variety of venues, including monitoring the Earth s magnetic field and tracking brain activity of pilots. Scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have been making extensive use of this technology, from astrophysical research, to tracking the navigational paths of bees in flight to determine if they are using internal compasses. These very sensitive measurement devices have a wide variety of uses within NASA and even more uses within the commercial realm.

  1. SAC-B, Argentine scientific satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulich, J. M.; White, C.

    1994-01-01

    The project and the missions of the Argentine scientific satellite, SAC-B, are summarized. SAC-B is an international cooperative project between NASA and the Secretariat of State of Science and Technology of the Argentine Republic. The objective of SAC-B is to advance the study of solar physics and astrophysics through the examination of solar flares, gamma ray burst sources and the diffuse soft X-ray cosmic background. The scientific payload comprises an instrument to measure the temporal evolution of X-ray emissions from solar flares as well as nonsolar gamma ray bursts, a combined soft X-ray and gamma ray burst detector, a diffuse X-ray background detector, and an energetic neutral atoms detector.

  2. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C. |

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  3. How the SQUID was born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Arnold H.

    2006-05-01

    I was asked to speak about the discovery and invention of the SQUID at the International Superconducting Electronics Conference (ISEC) 2005 banquet. This narrative is based on my personal recollections of the sequence of events and the motivations. I have edited the text and added figures for clarity. Although it is an old story, it may contain some useful lessons.

  4. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  5. Calling under pressure: short-finned pilot whales make social calls during deep foraging dives

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Frants H.; Perez, Jacobo Marrero; Johnson, Mark; Soto, Natacha Aguilar; Madsen, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Toothed whales rely on sound to echolocate prey and communicate with conspecifics, but little is known about how extreme pressure affects pneumatic sound production in deep-diving species with a limited air supply. The short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) is a highly social species among the deep-diving toothed whales, in which individuals socialize at the surface but leave their social group in pursuit of prey at depths of up to 1000 m. To investigate if these animals communicate acoustically at depth and test whether hydrostatic pressure affects communication signals, acoustic DTAGs logging sound, depth and orientation were attached to 12 pilot whales. Tagged whales produced tonal calls during deep foraging dives at depths of up to 800 m. Mean call output and duration decreased with depth despite the increased distance to conspecifics at the surface. This shows that the energy content of calls is lower at depths where lungs are collapsed and where the air volume available for sound generation is limited by ambient pressure. Frequency content was unaffected, providing a possible cue for group or species identification of diving whales. Social calls may be important to maintain social ties for foraging animals, but may be impacted adversely by vessel noise. PMID:21345867

  6. Triacylglyceride physiology in the short-finned eel, Anguilla australis--the effects of androgen.

    PubMed

    Damsteegt, Erin L; Ozaki, Yuichi; McCormick, Sally P A; Lokman, P Mark

    2016-03-01

    The importance of androgens (especially 11-ketotestosterone) during previtellogenesis in eels is well established. In wild pubertal migrants, circulating 11-ketotestosterone levels correlate with a number of morphological and molecular changes. Here, we test the prediction that this correlation represents a causal relationship by artificially raising the levels of circulating 11-ketotestosterone in prepubertal nonmigratory female and pubertal, migratory male short-finned eels (Anguilla australis) using sustained-release hormone implants. In females, increases in hepatosomatic index and transcript copy numbers of hepatic apolipoprotein B and microsomal triacylglyceride transfer protein indicated increased repackaging of endogenously sourced triacylglycerides. These changes in liver measures were reflected in increased concentrations of serum triacylglycerides. However, despite a small increase in gonadosomatic index, ovarian lipoprotein receptor transcript abundances were not affected by 11-ketotestosterone. Interestingly, no such changes in hepatic gene expression were detected in a dose-response experiment using males. We propose that the androgens are inducing the observed changes in previtellogenic females, although it remains unclear to what extent these effects are direct or indirect. PMID:26764051

  7. An Experimental Study of Flow Separation Control by Shortfin Mako Shark Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afroz, Farhana; Lang, Amy; Motta, Philip; Habegger, Maria

    2013-11-01

    The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a fast swimmer and has incredible turning agility. Shark skin is covered with flexible scales and this bristling capability may result in a unique Boundary Layer Control (BLC) method to reduce drag. It is hypothesized that scales bristle when the flow above it is reversed, and between the bristled scales embedded micro-vortices form in the cavities which induce boundary layer mixing and aid in delaying flow separation. To testify this hypothesis, samples of mako shark skin have been tested in a water tunnel under various strengths of adverse pressure gradient (APG). Laminar and turbulent separation over shark skin was studied experimentally using Time-Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-DPIV) system, where the APG was generated and varied using a rotating cylinder. Then shark skin results were compared with that of a flat plate data for a given amount of APG. The study reveals that shark skin is capable of controlling both laminar and turbulent flow separation. Support under NSF grant 0932352 is gratefully acknowledged. First author Farhana Afroz was also supported by a scholarship through the Alabama EPSCoR Graduate Research Scholars Program.

  8. An X-band SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, I.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Weilert, M.; Day, P.

    2006-09-01

    We are developing a microwave readout multiplexer for arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). A series of microwave resonators with frequencies ˜10 GHz are each loaded by a dc SQUID to a degree that depends on the flux state of the SQUID. By using resonators with high quality factors and slightly different resonance frequencies, many of these resonator-coupled SQUIDs may be read out with a single excitation line and cryogenic amplifier. Our multiplexer is similar to the one demonstrated by Irwin and Lehnert except for the use of higher-frequency, fully-lithographed transmission line resonators. We discuss a technique for modulating the SQUID array in series that alleviates the need to individually flux-bias the SQUIDs. The multiplexer has applications to the readout of detector arrays for astronomy as well as medical magnetic imaging.

  9. Aspects of the reproductive biology of the shortfin Mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Elasmobranchii Lamnidae), in the southeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, F E S; Braga, F M S; Arfelli, C A; Amorim, A F

    2002-05-01

    Uteri from four pregnant females and two newborn of shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, were collected in the southeastern region of Brazil, during September, October, and November of 1993 and 1994. All embryos were near-term with developing dentition and inner organs. Total length ranged from 64.5 to 72.0 cm, and the maximum number of embryos observed in a litter was 20. These observations further confirmed oophagy as a form of nutrition in this species, and its periodicity. The presence of teeth in the embryos' stomachs suggest that tooth replacement begins in the uterine phase. PMID:12489396

  10. Functional morphology of the gills of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, a lamnid shark.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Olson, Kenneth R; Hyndman, Kelly A; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-01

    This study examines the functional gill morphology of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, to determine the extent to which its gill structure is convergent with that of tunas for specializations required to increase gas exchange and withstand the forceful branchial flow induced by ram ventilation. Mako gill structure is also compared to that of the blue shark, Prionace glauca, an epipelagic species with lower metabolic requirements and a reduced dependence on fast, continuous swimming to ventilate the gills. The gill surface area of the mako is about one-half that of a comparably sized tuna, but more than twice that of the blue shark and other nonlamnid shark species. Mako gills are also distinguished from those of other sharks by shorter diffusion distances and a more fully developed diagonal blood-flow pattern through the gill lamellae, which is similar to that found in tunas. Although the mako lacks the filament and lamellar fusions of tunas and other ram-ventilating teleosts, its gill filaments are stiffened by the elasmobranch interbranchial septum, and the lamellae appear to be stabilized by one to two vascular sacs that protrude from the lamellar surface and abut sacs of adjacent lamellae. Vasoactive agents and changes in vascular pressure potentially influence sac size, consequently effecting lamellar rigidity and both the volume and speed of water through the interlamellar channels. However, vascular sacs also occur in the blue shark, and no other structural elements of the mako gill appear specialized for ram ventilation. Rather, the basic elasmobranch gill design and pattern of branchial circulation are both conserved. Despite specializations that increase mako gill area and efficacy relative to other sharks, the basic features of the elasmobranch gill design appear to have limited selection for a larger gill surface area, and this may ultimately constrain mako aerobic performance in comparison to tunas. PMID:20623624

  11. Clonally related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus), human volunteers, and a bayfront cetacean rehabilitation facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In May of 2011 a live mass stranding of 26 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) occurred in the lower Florida Keys. Five surviving whales were transferred from the original stranding site to a nearby marine mammal rehabilitation facility where they were constantly attended to by a ...

  12. Analytical derivation of DC SQUID response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Schegolev, A. E.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We consider voltage and current response formation in DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with overdamped Josephson junctions in resistive and superconducting state in the context of a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. For simplicity we neglect the junction capacitance and the noise effect. Explicit expressions for the responses in resistive state were obtained for a SQUID which is symmetrical with respect to bias current injection point. Normalized SQUID inductance l=2{{eI}}{{c}}L/{\\hslash } (where I c is the critical current of Josephson junction, L is the SQUID inductance, e is the electron charge and ℏ is the Planck constant) was assumed to be within the range l ≤ 1, subsequently expanded up to l≈ 7 using two fitting parameters. SQUID current response in the superconducting state was considered for arbitrary value of the inductance. The impact of small technological spread of parameters relevant to low-temperature superconductor (LTS) technology was studied, using a generalization of the developed analytical approach, for the case of a small difference of critical currents and shunt resistances of the Josephson junctions, and inequality of SQUID inductive shoulders for both resistive and superconducting states. Comparison with numerical calculation results shows that developed analytical expressions can be used in practical LTS SQUIDs and SQUID-based circuits design, e.g. large serial SQIF, drastically decreasing the time of simulation.

  13. SQUID Multiplexers for Cryogenic Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Kent; Beall, James; Deiker, Steve; Doriese, Randy; Duncan, William; Hilton, Gene; Moseley, S. Harvey; Reintsema, Carl; Stahle, Caroline; Ullom, Joel; Vale, Leila

    2004-01-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of cryogenic detectors with a manageable number of readout channels. We are developing time-division SQUID multiplexers based on Nb trilayer SQUIDs to read arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors. Our first-generation, 8-channel SQUID multiplexer was used in FIBRE, a one-dimensional TES array for submillimeter astronomy. Our second-generation 32-pixel multiplexer, based on an improved architecture, has been developed for instruments including Constellation-X, SCUBA-2, and solar x-ray astronomy missions. SCUBA-2, which is being developed for the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, will have more than 10,000 pixels. We are now developing a third-generation architecture based on superconducting hot-electron switches. The use of SQUID multiplexers in instruments operating at above 2 K will also be discussed.

  14. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  15. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Where and how Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) spreads in Corsica?

    PubMed

    Blight, Olivier; Orgeas, Jérôme; Renucci, Marielle; Tirard, Alain; Provost, Erick

    2009-08-01

    The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Dolichoderinae), is one of the most widespread invasive ant species in the world. When established in optimal habitat, this species usually excludes most other local ants and can heavily impact other arthropods as well. Although Argentine ants have been present in southern Europe for more than 100 years, they were first noted in Corsica, a French Mediterranean island, in 1957 in only one urban station. In this study, we aimed to map precisely their geographical distribution in Corsica and to quantify their presence by using an infestation index. We recorded changes in the distribution of Argentine ants in Corsica over the past decade. Argentine ants appeared to be well established within their introduced range and spreading along the Corsican coasts principally through Human-mediated jump-dispersal but not homogenously. PMID:19632658

  17. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  18. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity.

    PubMed

    Suckling, D M; Peck, R W; Manning, L M; Stringer, L D; Cappadonna, J; El-Sayed, A M

    2008-12-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m(2)) to 1- and 4-m(2) plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. PMID:19034574

  19. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes. PMID:24501132

  20. First demonstration of transcontinental SQUID magnetometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, C.; Febvre, P.; Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Waysand, G.; Gouws, D.; Saunderson, E.; Henry, S.; Gaffet, S.; Janse van Vuuren, L.; Lochner, E. T.; Matladi, T.; Kwisanga, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first simultaneous measurements from an ultra-sensitive dual-node transcontinental SQUID magnetometer network, available in real time on the internet. A three-axis low temperature SQUID sensor at LSBB Underground Research Laboratory, Rustrel, France (43.841 N, 5.484 E) and a two-axis high temperature SQUID sensor at SANSA Space Science in Hermanus, South Africa (34.424 S, 19.223 E), form the sensitive nodes of the network. Data are measured and GPS time stamped continuously at 125 Hz. The low-Tc SQUID at LSBB URL (known as a [SQUID]2 system) is inside a shielded steel capsule underneath 500 meters of karstic rock, which allows a low magnetic noise floor. The less sensitive high-Tc SQUID at SANSA Space Science is completely unshielded, and housed only in a magnetically neutral hut, 50 metres from a calibrated fluxgate node of the INTERMAGNET network, to protect it against the weather. The network, which is more sensitive than observatory fluxgate magnetometers, detects Earth's magnetosphere pulsations, Schumann waves, mesopause resonance, breathing modes of the Earth and oceanic swell. Our goal is further to extract directional or polarization information if earthquake precursors are observed again, as with the Sichuan-Wenchuan earthquake on 12 May 2008. In the medium term, we are exploring the possibility to extend the network with more spatially distributed SQUID sensors, such as at the South African National Antarctic Expedition's SANAE IV base in Antarctica.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of a new Cetacean morbillivirus from a short-finned pilot whale stranded in the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Bellière, E N; Esperón, F; Fernández, A; Arbelo, M; Muñoz, M J; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2011-04-01

    Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) is considered the most pathogenic virus in cetaceans. Three strains have been already described: the dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), the porpoise morbillivirus (PMV) and the tentatively named pilot whale morbillivirus (PWMV). This study describes the molecular characterization of a strain of CeMV detected in the brain of a short-finned pilot whale that had stranded in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean around the Canary Islands and that showed lesions compatible with morbilliviral disease. Sequences for the nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, fusion protein and haemagglutinin genes were obtained. The phylogenetic study showed high homology (97%) with the PWMV strain previously detected from a long-finned pilot whale stranded in the Western Atlantic Ocean. These results support the existing classification of CeMV into three principal genetic clusters. PMID:20576281

  2. Carbohydrate supply limits invasion of natural communities by Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Alexei D; Silverman, Jules

    2009-08-01

    The ability of species to invade new habitats is often limited by various biotic and physical factors or interactions between the two. Invasive ants, frequently associated with human activities, flourish in disturbed urban and agricultural environments. However, their ability to invade and establish in natural habitats is more variable. This is particularly so for the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile). While biotic resistance and low soil moisture limits their invasion of natural habitats in some instances, the effect of food availability has been poorly explored. We conducted field experiments to determine if resource availability limits the spread and persistence of Argentine ants in remnant natural forest in North Carolina. Replicated transects paired with and without sucrose solution feeding stations were run from invaded urban edges into forest remnants and compared over time using baits and direct counts at feeding stations. Repeated under different timing regimes in 2006 and 2007, access to sucrose increased local Argentine ant abundances (1.6-2.5 fold) and facilitated their progression into the forest up to 73 +/- 21% of 50-m transects. Resource removal caused an expected decrease in Argentine ant densities in 2006, in conjunction with their retreat to the urban/forest boundary. However, in 2007, Argentine ant numbers unexpectedly continued to increase in the absence of sugar stations, possibly through access to alternative resources or conditions not available the previous year such as honeydew-excreting Hemiptera. Our results showed that supplementing carbohydrate supply facilitates invasion of natural habitat by Argentine ants. This is particularly evident where Argentine ants continued to thrive following sugar station removal. PMID:19452171

  3. Detrimental effects of highly efficient interference competition: invasive Argentine ants outcompete native ants at toxic baits.

    PubMed

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; Bennett, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    The Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is an invasive species that disrupts the balance of natural ecosystems by displacing indigenous ant species throughout its introduced range. Previous studies that examined the mechanisms by which Argentine ants attain ecological dominance showed that superior interference and exploitation competition are key to the successful displacement of native ant species. The objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that effective interference competition by Argentine ants may also be detrimental to the survival of Argentine ant colonies where Argentine ants and native ants compete at toxic baits used to slow the spread of Argentine ants. To study this hypothesis, we examined the competitive interactions between Argentine ants and native odorous house ants, Tapinoma sessile, in the presence and absence of toxic baits. Results showed that Argentine ants aggressively outcompete T. sessile from toxic baits through efficient interference competition and monopolize bait resources. This has severe negative consequences for the survival of Argentine ants as colonies succumb to the toxic effects of the bait. In turn, T. sessile avoid areas occupied by Argentine ants, give up baits, and consequently suffer minimal mortality. Our results provide experimental evidence that highly efficient interference competition may have negative consequences for Argentine ants in areas where toxic baits are used and may provide a basis for designing innovative management programs for Argentine ants. Such programs would have the double benefit of selectively eliminating the invasive species while simultaneously protecting native ants from the toxic effects of baits. PMID:18559180

  4. [The Argentine Health System: organization and financial features].

    PubMed

    Arce, Hugo E

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine health system is defined by the following features: a) federal country organization; b) coexistence of public and private services with either outpatients or inpatients; c) fragmented entities of social security, most of these originated outside of the state organization. Components of the system are described and weighed; making decisions strength between national and provincial health authorities is analyzed and the Argentine system is compared with that of other countries. Statistical data on distribution of health expenditures and coverage of health services are presented as well as financial flow among diverse funding sources, insurers, providers and users of each sector. PMID:23089118

  5. Visually guided eye growth in the squid.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip R K; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John R

    2015-09-21

    Eyes with refractive error have reduced visual acuity and are rarely found in the wild. Vertebrate eyes possess a visually guided emmetropisation process within the retina which detects the sign of defocus, and regulates eye growth to align the retina at the focal plane of the eye's optical components to avoid the development of refractive error, such as myopia, an increasing problem in humans. However, the vertebrate retina is complex, and it is not known which of the many classes of retinal neurons are involved. We investigated whether the camera-type eye of an invertebrate, the squid, displays visually guided emmetropisation, despite squid eyes having a simple photoreceptor-only retina. We exploited inherent longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) to create disparate focal lengths within squid eyes. We found that squid raised under orange light had proportionately longer eyes and more myopic refractions than those raised under blue light, and when switched between wavelengths, eye size and refractive status changed appropriately within a few days. This demonstrates that squid eye growth is visually guided, and suggests that the complex retina seen in vertebrates may not be required for emmetropisation. PMID:26394098

  6. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Paulo C; Glória, Rafael V; de Miranda, Antonio B; Degrave, Wim M

    2005-01-01

    Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example. PMID:16078998

  7. Flux modulation scheme for direct current SQUID readout revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Tao; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-02-01

    The flux modulation scheme (FMS) is the standard readout technique of dc SQUIDs, where a step-up transformer links the SQUID to the preamplifier. The transformer's primary winding shunts the SQUID via a large capacitor while the secondary winding connects it to the preamplifier. A modulation flux having a frequency of typically 100 kHz generates an ac voltage across the SQUID, stepped up by the transformer. The SQUID with FMS is customarily operated in the current bias mode, because a constant dc bias current flows only through the SQUID due to the capacitor isolation. With FMS, however, the transformer ac shunts the SQUID so that in reality the operating mode is neither purely current-biased nor voltage-biased but rather nominal current-biased or "mixed biased." Our objective is to experimentally investigate the consequences of ac shunting of the dc SQUID in FMS and the transformer's transfer characteristics. For different shunt values we measure the change in the SQUID bias current due to the ac shunt using another SQUID in the two-stage readout scheme, and simultaneously monitor the SQUID output voltage signal. We then explain our measurements by a simplified graphic analysis of SQUID intrinsic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Since the total current flowing through the SQUID is not constant due to the shunting effect of the transformer, the amplitude of SQUID flux-to-voltage characteristics V(Φ) is less as compared to the direct readout scheme (DRS). Furthermore, we analyze and compare V(Φ) obtained by DRS and FMS. We show that in FMS, the transfer characteristics of the SQUID circuit also depend on the isolation capacitance and the dynamic resistance of the SQUID.

  8. SQUID method of lung contamination testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinická, F.; Šimáček, I.; Jurdák, P.; Cigáň, A.; Maňka, J.

    2006-03-01

    We are reporting on the development of a SQUID magnetometric method of ferromagnetic dust quantification in the human lungs. In order to solve this problem we utilize a forward method of magnetized ferromagnetic particle (dipole) distribution 3D modeling in human lung torso and in an arc welder's lungs. We also solve the inverse problem, by which the amount of dust in the lungs is estimated using the results of the remanent magnetic induction Br measurement upon the human chest. We state the formula for SQUID measured output voltage U to Br conversion for the second order gradiometer, which is in a highly dipole position and density dependent. We utilize a low-Tc second order rf SQUID gradiometer with the sensitivity of 10-14 T in the unit frequency range.

  9. Different Argentine Rural Extensionists' Mindsets and Their Practical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landini, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reflects upon the practice of Argentine rural extensionists working in the extension public system through the process of identifying different rural extensionists' types of mindsets and comparing them with transfer of technology extension approach, dialogical processes of horizontal knowledge exchange, participatory…

  10. The Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) in an Argentine Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes, Silvana Andrea; Ledesma, Rubén Daniel; García, Natalia Mariana; Poó, Fernando Martín

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of validity for the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale scores in an Argentine sample (Spanish-language version). Results indicated satisfactory psychometric properties (a one-factor structure, good item discrimination, high reliability, and significant correlations with additional measures). This…

  11. A Three-Channel DC SQUID System Using Time-Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Matthias; Mueck, Michael; Mugford, Chas; Kycia, Jan

    2004-03-01

    Conventional multichannel SQUID systems require SQUID readout electronics for each channel, as well as many wires connecting the individual SQUIDs and feedback coils to the room temperature electronics. We have studied a time domain multiplexed readout scheme which requires only a single SQUID readout which is successively switched between all SQUIDs. By connecting all SQUIDs and all feedback coils in series, the system requires only a few wires between SQUIDs and room temperature readout.

  12. Structural studies of haemoglobin from pisces species shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) at 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Pandian; Sundaresan, S S; Sathya Moorthy, Pon; Balasubramanian, M; Ponnuswamy, M N

    2013-11-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric iron-containing protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide from tissues back to the lungs. Pisces are the advanced aquatic vertebrates capable of surviving at wide depth ranges. The shortfin mako shark (SMS) is the pelagic, largest, fastest and most sophisticated species of the shark kingdom with well developed eyes. Mostly the pisces species are cold blooded in nature. Distinctly, the SMSs are warm-blooded animals with an advanced circulatory system. SMSs are capable of maintaining elevated muscle temperatures up to 33 K above the ambient water temperatures at a depth of 150-500 m. SMSs have a diverged air-breathing mechanism compared with other vertebrates. The haemoglobin molecule consists of four polypeptide chains, namely two α chains, each with 140 amino acids and two β chains each having 136 amino acids. The SMS Hb was found to crystallize in monoclinic space group P21 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystal packing parameters for the SMS Hb structure contain one whole biological molecule in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 47%. The SMS Hb quaternary structural features interface-interface interactions and heme binding sites are discussed with different state Hbs and the results reveal that SMS Hb adopts an unliganded deoxy T state conformation. PMID:24121325

  13. 4.2K Cryocooled Scanning SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. P.; Knauss, L.; Lettsome, N.; Cawthorne, A.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2003-03-01

    We have assembled a scanning SQUID microscope using a Nb SQUID and a cryocooler. The Nb SQUID is contained within a vacuum jacket while material being scanned is at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure. A 25 micron thick sapphire window separates the SQUID in vacuum from the scanned material. The Nb DC SQUID, fabricated by Hypres Inc., has an inner dimension of 10 microns by 10 microns and the Josephson Junctions are resistively shunted. Cooling is provided by a Pulse Tube Cryocooler from Cryomech Inc. Temperatures as low as 3.8 K have been obtained while operating the SQUID microscope. Due to radiation heating, the temperature of the SQUID has been estimated to be 1.0 K to 1.5 K higher than sensor values. Flux-Locked-Loop electronics are used to take magnetic field data. Preliminary measurements of the flux noise indicated resolution to better than 10 micro Flux Quantum for one second averaging time.

  14. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahadır Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  15. The Argentine ant persists through unfavorable winters via a mutualism facilitated by a native tree.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, Robert J; Silverman, Jules

    2011-10-01

    Mutualisms and facilitations can fundamentally change the relationship between an organism's realized and fundamental niche. Invasive species may prove particularly suitable models for investigating this relationship as many are dependent on finding new partners for successful establishment. We conducted field-based experiments testing whether a native tree facilitates the successful survival of the invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), through unfavorable winter conditions in the southeastern United States. We found Argentine ant nests aggregated around the native loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., during the winter months. The bark of this tree absorbed enough radiant solar energy to reach temperatures suitable for Argentine ant foraging even when ambient temperatures should have curtailed all foraging. Conversely, foraging ceased when the trunk was shaded. The sun-warmed bark of this tree gave the Argentine ant access to a stable honeydew resource. Argentine ants were not found on or near deciduous trees even though bark temperatures were warm enough to permit Argentine ant foraging on cold winter days. Augmenting deciduous trees with sucrose water through the winter months lead to Argentine ant nests remaining at their base and Argentine ants foraging on the tree. The Argentine ant requires both foraging opportunity and a reliable winter food source to survive through unfavorable winter conditions in the southeastern United States. The loblolly pine provided both of these requirements extending the realized niche of Argentine ants beyond its fundamental niche. PMID:22251714

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: SQUID systems for biomagnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Della Penna, Stefania; DelGratta, Cosimo; Luca Romani, Gian

    2001-07-01

    This review paper illustrates the different SQUID based systems used for biomagnetic imaging. The review is divided into nine sections. The first three sections are introductory: section 1 is a short overview of the topic; section 2 summarizes how the biomagnetic fields are generated and what are the basic mathematical models for the field sources; section 3 illustrates the principles of operation of the SQUID device. Sections 4-8 are specifically devoted to the description of the different systems used for biomagnetic measurements: section 4 discusses the different types of detection coils; section 5 illustrates the SQUID sensors specifically designed for biomagnetic applications together with the necessary driving electronics, with special emphasis on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUIDs, since HTS devices are still in a developing stage; section 6 illustrates the different noise reduction techniques; section 7 describes the different multichannel sensors presently operating; and, finally, section 8 gives a hint of what kind of physiological and/or clinical information may be gathered by the biomagnetic technique. Section 9 suggests some future trends for the biomagnetic technique.

  17. Multichannel SQUID systems for brain research

    SciTech Connect

    Ahonen, A.I.; Hamalainen, M.S.; Kajola, M.J.; Knuutila, J.E.F.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Simola, J.T.; Vilkman, V.A. . Low Temperature Lab.); Tesche, C.D. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reviews basis principles of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and neuromagnetic instrumentation. The authors' 24-channel system, based on planar gradiometer coils and dc-SQUIDs, is then described. Finally, recent MEG-experiments on human somatotopy and focal epilepsy, carried out in the authors' laboratory, are presented.

  18. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  19. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  20. High Resolution LTS-SQUID Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudenbacher, Franz; Peters, Nicholas; Wikswo, John

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature samples with sub-millimeter resolution. In our design, hand wound niobium pickup coils were coupled to commercially available low-temperature SQUID sensors. The SQUID sensor and the pickup coil are in the vacuum space of the cryostat separated typically less than 50μm by a thin sapphire window from the room-temperature sample. A computerized non-magnetic scanning stage with sub-micron resolution in combination with a tripod leveling system allows samples to be scanned within 10μm of the sapphire window. For a 20-turn 500μm diameter pickup coil, we achieved a field sensitivity of 350fT\\cdotHz-1/2 for frequencies above 1 Hz, and 1pT\\cdotHz-1/2 for a 10-turn 250mm coil. The SQUID microscope was used to image the distribution of time-dependent stimulus and action currents in anisotropic cardiac tissue, the remanent magnetization of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 during thermal demagnetisation, and the magnetic susceptibility of biogenic magnetite in the beak of homing pigeons.

  1. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometers for Spin Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Natania

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have longer coherence times, making them attractive qubit candidates, but necessitating the development of very sensitive detectors for readout. This 3D nanobridge SQUID combines the exquisite spatial sensitivity of a traditional nanoSQUID with a large non-linearity on par with a tunnel junction SQUID. This allows us to build a highly sensitive magnetometer which can act as both an efficient flux transducer as well as a nearly quantum limited lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier. We show that the device has a minimum flux noise of 17 +/- 0.9 nphi0/Hz1/2 with only a factor of ˜2.5 increase in flux noise up to 61 mT. A second generation device with a smaller capacitor achieves field tolerance up to 75 mT. The maximal bandwidth values range from 25-40 MHz in the parametric amplification regime to 70 MHz in the linear regime. This combination of large bandwidth, low flux noise, large flux coupling and field tolerance make this sensor a promising candidate for near-single-spin dynamics measurements. In the last part of this thesis we begin to demonstrate the utility of a nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for characterizing spin systems in the solid state. We use the magnetometer to measure the decay characteristics of P1 centers in diamond. We find that the spin-lattice relaxation time varies with temperature, with an order of magnitude decrease in the decay time between 25 mK and 370 mK.

  2. High-Tc and low-Tc dc SQUID electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are commonly operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL). The SQUID electronics amplifies the small SQUID signal to an acceptable level without adding noise, and it linearizes the transfer function of the SQUID in order to provide sufficient dynamic range. In this paper, the fundamentals of SQUID readout are reviewed including a discussion of preamplifier noise. The basic FLL concepts, direct readout and flux modulation readout, are discussed both with dc bias and bias reversal. Alternative readout concepts such as additional positive feedback (APF), two-stage SQUIDs, SQUID series arrays, relaxation oscillation SQUIDs and digital SQUIDs are briefly described. The FLL dynamics are discussed on the basis of a simple model with finite loop delay. It is shown that with optimized SQUID electronics a system bandwidth of ap18 MHz and a corresponding slew rate of ap8 PHgr0 µs-1 are possible. A novel FLL scheme involving a Smith predictor is presented which allows one to increase the FLL bandwidth to about 100 MHz. The theoretical predictions are experimentally checked using a high-speed SQUID electronics prototype with a small-signal bandwidth of 300 MHz. Methods for increasing the dynamic range of SQUID systems are described: flux-quanta counting and dynamic field compensation (DFC). With DFC, the residual magnetic field at the SQUID can be kept close to zero even if the device is moved in the Earth's field. Therefore, the noise level of a high-Tc magnetometer measured inside a magnetically shielded room (60 fT Hz-1/2 with a 1/f corner at 2 Hz) remained unchanged after moving the device in the magnetic field outside the room (60 µT dc plus 0.8 µT peak-to-peak power line interference).

  3. Fast and Flexible: Argentine Ants Recruit from Nearby Trails

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Tatiana P.; Pinter-Wollman, Noa M.; Moses, Melanie E.; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) live in groups of nests connected by trails to each other and to stable food sources. In a field study, we investigated whether some ants recruit directly from established, persistent trails to food sources, thus accelerating food collection. Our results indicate that Argentine ants recruit nestmates to food directly from persistent trails, and that the exponential increase in the arrival rate of ants at baits is faster than would be possible if recruited ants traveled from distant nests. Once ants find a new food source, they walk back and forth between the bait and sometimes share food by trophallaxis with nestmates on the trail. Recruiting ants from nearby persistent trails creates a dynamic circuit, like those found in other distributed systems, which facilitates a quick response to changes in available resources. PMID:23967129

  4. The Argentine ant: challenges in managing an invasive unicolonial pest.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Brightwell, Robert John

    2008-01-01

    The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, has invaded urban, agricultural, and natural habitats worldwide, causing economic damage and disrupting ecosystem processes. Introduced populations of L. humile and those of many other invasive ants tend to be unicolonial, forming expansive, multiqueened supercolonies that dominate native ant communities and challenge control practices in managed habitats. Argentine ant management typically entails the application of residual insecticide liquids, granules, or baits to only a portion of the colony, resulting in fairly rapid reinfestation. We suggest that prevailing control methodologies are incomplete and not compatible with the behavior, nesting habits, and population structure of this ant, and therefore, more aggressive management strategies are required. Successful eradication efforts against other invasive unicolonial ant species can provide useful insights for local-scale L. humile eradication. PMID:17877449

  5. Argentine Valuation of the EQ-5D Health States

    PubMed Central

    Augustovski, Federico Ariel; Irazola, Vilma Edit; Velazquez, Alberto Pascual; Gibbons, Luz; Craig, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a set of EQ-5D health state values for the Argentine general population. Methods Consecutive subjects attending six primary care centers in Argentina were selected based on quota sampling and interviewed using the EuroQol Group protocol for measurement and valuation of health studies. Initially respondents were randomly assigned a unique card set; however, to improve efficiency, subjects were later randomly assigned to one of three fixed sets of EQ-5D states. Using the VAS and TTO responses for these states, we estimated a valuation model using ordinary least squares regression clustered by respondent. Predicted values for EQ-5D health states are compared to published values for the United States. Results Six hundred eleven subjects were interviewed by 14 trained interviewers, rendering 6,887 TTO and 6,892 VAS responses. The model had an R2 of 0.897 and 0.928 for TTO and VAS respectively. The mean absolute difference between observed and predicted values was 0.039 for TTO and 0.020 for VAS, each showing a Lin’s concordance coefficient above 0.98. United States and Argentine TTO predicted values were highly correlated (Pearson’s rho=0.963), though the average absolute difference was clinically meaningful (0.06), rejecting the US values for nearly two thirds of the states (62.8%). The Argentine population placed lower values on mild states and higher values on severe states. Conclusion This study provides an Argentine value set that could be used locally or regionally, with meaningful and significant differences with that of the US. Health policy in Latin America must incorporate local values for sovereignty and validity. PMID:19900257

  6. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  7. A method for simulating a flux-locked DC SQUID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutt, G. M.; Kasdin, N. J.; Condron, M. R., II; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J. M.; Cromar, M. W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a computationally efficient and accurate method for simulating a dc SQUID's V-Phi (voltage-flux) and I-V characteristics which has proven valuable in evaluating and improving various SQUID readout methods. The simulation of the SQUID is based on fitting of previously acquired data from either a real or a modeled device using the Fourier transform of the V-Phi curve. This method does not predict SQUID behavior, but rather is a way of replicating a known behavior efficiently with portability into various simulation programs such as SPICE. The authors discuss the methods used to simulate the SQUID and the flux-locking control electronics, and present specific examples of this approach. Results include an estimate of the slew rate and linearity of a simple flux-locked loop using a characterized dc SQUID.

  8. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  9. Multichannel applications of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan; Kim, Jin-Mok; Park, Yong-Ki

    2001-12-01

    Double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) provided high flux-to-voltage transfers of larger than 1 mV Φ0-1 and simple flux-locked loop circuits were used for SQUID operation. We constructed two multichannel systems based on DROSs. The first system is a 40-channel planar gradiometer system consisting of integrated first-order pickup coils. average noise level of the 40 channels is 1 fT cm-1 Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz, corresponding to a field noise of 4 fT Hz-1/2, operating inside a magnetically shielded room. The second one is a 37-channel magnetometer system with 37 integrated magnetometers distributed on a spherical surface and measures field component normal to the head surface. The average noise of the magnetometers is 3 fT Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz. The two systems were applied to measure neuromagnetic fields.

  10. Practical SQUID Instrument for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J. R.; Miller, John H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-Tc superconducting and A-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature.

  11. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  12. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  13. Practical SQUID instrument for nondestructive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, N.; Claycomb, J.R.; Miller, J.H. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    We report on the development of a scanning eddy-current imaging system designed to detect deep subsurface flaws in conducting materials. A high transition temperature (high-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer is employed to provide the required sensitivity at low frequencies, while a combination of small cylindrical high-T{sub c} superconducting and {mu}-metal shields enable the instrument to be scanned in a magnetically noisy environment, rather than the object under test. The shields are arranged to prevent unwanted excitation and ambient noise fields from reaching the SQUID, and to enhance spatial resolution and minimize undesirable edge effects. Thus far, the instrument has successfully detected cracks and pits through 10 layers of aluminum, with a combined thickness of 5 cm at room temperature. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  15. Performance of multiplexed SQUID readout for Cryogenic Sensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Grossman, E. N.; Irwin, K. D.; Martinis, John M.; Reintsema, C. D.; Allen, C. A.; Bergman, D. I.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R.

    2000-04-01

    We report on the implementation of a multiplexer that uses superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to read out low-impedance cryogenic detectors. Using prototype chips, a circuit was built which interfaces eight input SQUID channels with a close-packed array of eight transition-edge sensor (TES) infrared bolometers. Circuit elements were measured and crosstalk specifications are reported. Digital feedback is employed to flux-lock a single element in the array of SQUIDs.

  16. Comparison of swimming capacity and energetics of migratory European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis)

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Christian; Burgerhout, Erik; Brittijn, Sebastiaan; van den Thillart, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The spawning migration of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) can cover more than 6000 km, while that of the New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis) is assumed to be approximately 3000 km. Since these species are expected to show adaptive traits to such an important lifetime event, we hypothesized differences in swimming capacity and energetics as a response to this adaptation. In an experimental swimming respirometer set-up, critical swimming speed (Ucrit), optimal swimming speed (Uopt), mass specific oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate at Ucrit (AMRcrit) and at Uopt (AMRopt), the minimum cost of transport at Uopt (COTmin), and the scope for activity, were assessed and compared between the species. With a similar body length and mass, European eels showed ca. 25% higher values for both Ucrit and Uopt, and 23% lower values for COTmin, compared to New Zealand short-finned eels. However, SMR, AMRcrit, AMRopt, and scope for activity did not differ between the species, indicating very similar swimming physiology traits. This study discusses physiological aspects of long distance migration and provides recommendations for (a) swimming respirometry in anguilliform fish, and (b) telemetry research using externally attached pop-up tags. PMID:26441675

  17. The First Record of Female Maturation of the Short-finned Eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor, in the Coastal Waters of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Tongnunui, Prasert; Yoknoi, Nuengruetai; Pechnoi, Pimwipa; Yamada, Hideaki; Kon, Koetsu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to provide reproductive biological information on the gonadal development of the short-finned eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor, which inhabits the coastal waters of Thailand. Short-finned eels were collected from three coastal areas of Trang Province, southern Thailand, from September 2011 to December 2013. The gonads of 151 specimens were subjected to a histological analysis. The histological observations found both immature and maturing females. Based on the advanced oocytes within an entire ovarian section, the ovaries of the studied specimens were classified into three maturity phases: 1) the immature phase was defined by ovaries that showed oogonia and primary growth oocytes, 2) the developing phase was defined by ovaries that contained early vitellogenic-stage oocytes with some oogonia present along with cortical alveolar oocytes and many adipocytes, and 3) the late vitellogenic phase refers to ovaries that contained nearly entirely late-vitellogenic oocytes. The density of oocytes in juxtaposition to an adipose matrix is considered to represent the degree of gonadal development. The results of this study may be applicable in further defining the general spawning area of A. bicolor bicolor in regions of the Indian Ocean. PMID:27019687

  18. The First Record of Female Maturation of the Short-finned Eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor, in the Coastal Waters of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tongnunui, Prasert; Yoknoi, Nuengruetai; Pechnoi, Pimwipa; Yamada, Hideaki; Kon, Koetsu

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to provide reproductive biological information on the gonadal development of the short-finned eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor, which inhabits the coastal waters of Thailand. Short-finned eels were collected from three coastal areas of Trang Province, southern Thailand, from September 2011 to December 2013. The gonads of 151 specimens were subjected to a histological analysis. The histological observations found both immature and maturing females. Based on the advanced oocytes within an entire ovarian section, the ovaries of the studied specimens were classified into three maturity phases: 1) the immature phase was defined by ovaries that showed oogonia and primary growth oocytes, 2) the developing phase was defined by ovaries that contained early vitellogenic-stage oocytes with some oogonia present along with cortical alveolar oocytes and many adipocytes, and 3) the late vitellogenic phase refers to ovaries that contained nearly entirely late-vitellogenic oocytes. The density of oocytes in juxtaposition to an adipose matrix is considered to represent the degree of gonadal development. The results of this study may be applicable in further defining the general spawning area of A. bicolor bicolor in regions of the Indian Ocean. PMID:27019687

  19. First descriptions of early- and middle-stage copepodids of Anthosoma crassum (Dichelesthiidae: Siphonostomatoida) and lesions on shortfin makos (Isurus oxyrinchus) infected with A. crassum.

    PubMed

    Benz, George W; Borucinska, Joanna D; Greenwaldt, Scott A

    2002-02-01

    Early- and middle-stage copepodids of Anthosoma crassum (Dichelesthiidae: Siphonostomatoida) and lesions associated with A. crassum infections are described from samples collected from the jaws of shortfin makos captured off southern California. The copepodids did not possess frontal filaments or frontal organs, and they resided in a headstandlike position firmly attached by their embedded antennae. Copepod larvae and small adults were lodged in shallow mucosal ulcers that basally exhibited mild, acute granulocytic stomatitis; large adults were lodged in deep tunnels encompassing the anterior aspects of their bodies. Some lesions contained more than I copepod. Examinations of lesions revealed that A. crassum infection of shortfin makos can result in severe subacute, necrotizing stomatitis with hemorrhage, granulation tissue, and lymphocytic aggregations in the mucosa, and reactive lymphocytic infiltration of the submucosal skeletal muscle. Copepod gut contents consisted of shark erythrocytes, hemosiderin granules, and necrotic host cells. These observations, along with reports of sharks heavily infected with A. crassum, suggest that this copepod may sometimes play a role in the morbidity and mortality of sharks that it infects. PMID:12053965

  20. Ceramic HTSC SQUID-based galvanometer

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, S.V.; Hiep, L.H. )

    1992-06-01

    A highly sensitive galvanometer operating at liquid-nitrogen temperature for direct and low-frequency current measurements was developed on the basis of a HTSC SQUID. The direct-current sensitivity of the galvanometer is approximately 0.5 nA at an internal resistance of about 20 ohms. Its energy resolution in the white noise region is 2 x 10 exp 21 J/Hz. 11 refs.

  1. Digital filter design approach for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.C.; Ribeiro, P.C.

    1988-04-15

    A review of the traditional method for designing gradiometers is made. A nonrecursive digital filter model for the gradiometer is presented, giving a new set of parameters for the gradiometer identification. Some designs are analyzed using the proposed set. As an example, a true differentiator is designed to be used as the SQUID input coil. It is shown that the differentiator has the same noise rejection as the conventional gradiometer but provides more signal sensitivity.

  2. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  3. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  4. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  5. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  6. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  7. Single SQUID frequency-domain multiplexer for large bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Skidmore, J.T.; Richards, P.L.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe the development of a frequency-domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. We have built an eight-channel prototype and demonstrated channel separation and signal recovery.

  8. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is {approx} 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current-applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  9. A nanoscale SQUID operating at high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Simon K. H.; Clem, John R.; Yang, Wenrong

    2011-10-13

    A washer-free Nb nanoSQUID has been developed for measuring magnetization changes from nanoscale objects. The SQUID loop is etched into a 250 nm wide Au/Nb bilayer track and the diameter of the SQUID hole is ~ 70 nm. In the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the SQUID, vortex penetration into the 250 nm wide track can be observed via the critical current–applied field characteristic and the value at which vortex first penetrates is consistent with the theoretical prediction. Upon removing the applied field, the penetrated vortices escape the track and the critical current at zero field is restored.

  10. Transparency and Coherence in rf SQUID Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlage, Steven; Trepanier, Melissa; Zhang, Daimeng

    We have developed active metamaterials capable of quickly tuning their electrical and magnetic responses over a wide frequency range. These metamaterials are based on superconducting elements to form low loss, physically and electrically small, highly tunable structures for fundamental studies of extraordinarily nonlinear media. The meta-atoms are rf superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that incorporate the Josephson effect. RF SQUIDs have an inductance which is strongly tunable with dc and rf magnetic fields and currents. The rf SQUID metamaterial is a richly nonlinear effective medium introducing qualitatively new macroscopic quantum phenomena into the metamaterials community, namely magnetic flux quantization and the Josephson effect. The coherent oscillation of the meta-atoms is strongly sensitive to the environment and measurement conditions, and we have developed several strategies to improve the coherence experimentally by exploiting ideas from nonlinear dynamics. The metamaterials also display a unique form of transparency whose development can be manipulated through multiple parametric dependences. We discuss these qualitatively new metamaterial phenomena. This work is supported by the NSF-GOALI and OISE Programs through Grant No. ECCS-1158644 and the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  11. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied. PMID:26795486

  12. Trail pheromone of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Villafuerte, David B; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is recognized as one of the world's most damaging invasive species. One reason for the ecological dominance of introduced Argentine ant populations is their ability to dominate food and habitat resources through the rapid mobilization and recruitment of thousands of workers. More than 30 years ago, studies showed that (Z)-9-hexadecenal strongly attracted Argentine ant workers in a multi-choice olfactometer, suggesting that (Z)-9-hexadecenal might be the trail pheromone, or a component of a trail pheromone mixture. Since then, numerous studies have considered (Z)-9-hexadecenal as the key component of the Argentine ant trails. Here, we report the first chemical analyses of the trails laid by living Argentine ants and find that (Z)-9-hexadecenal is not present in a detectible quantity. Instead, two iridoids, dolichodial and iridomyrmecin, appear to be the primary chemical constituents of the trails. Laboratory choice tests confirmed that Argentine ants were attracted to artificial trails comprised of these two chemicals significantly more often than control trails. Although (Z)-9-hexadecenal was not detected in natural trails, supplementation of artificial dolichodial+iridomyrmecin trails with an extremely low concentraion of (Z)-9-hexadecenal did increase the efficacy of the trail-following behavior. In stark contrast with previous dogma, our study suggests that dolichodial and iridomyrmecin are major components of the Argentine ant trail pheromone. (Z)-9-hexadecenal may act in an additive manner with these iridoids, but it does not occur in detectable quantities in Argentine ant recruitment trails. PMID:23028739

  13. Deterrency and Toxicity of Essential Oils to Argentine and Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory assays were conducted to evaluate deterrency and contact toxicity of six essential oils to the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), and the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren. In choice tests, both Argentine ants and fire ants crossed barriers treated with multiple rates...

  14. Thermal dependence of contractile properties of the aerobic locomotor muscle in the leopard shark and shortfin mako shark.

    PubMed

    Donley, Jeanine M; Shadwick, Robert E; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Syme, Douglas A

    2007-04-01

    The work loop technique was used to examine contractile properties of the red aerobic locomotor muscle (RM) in the ectothermic leopard shark Triakis semifasciata and endothermic shortfin mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus. The effects of axial position and temperature on the twitch kinetics, and the stimulus duration and phase producing maximum net positive work and power output were investigated. Contractile performance was measured over the temperature range of 15 to 25 degrees C for Triakis and 15 to 28 degrees C for Isurus at cycle frequencies (analogous to tailbeat frequencies) ranging from 0.25 to 3 Hz using muscle bundles isolated from anterior (0.4 L where L is total body length) and posterior (0.6-0.65 L) axial positions. Pairwise comparisons of twitch times for anterior and posterior muscle samples indicated that there were no significant differences related to body position, except in mako sharks at unphysiologically cool temperatures (<20 degrees C). We found no significant differences in optimal stimulus duration, phase, net work or power output between anterior and posterior bundles in each species. With increasing cycle frequency the stimulus duration yielding maximum power decreased while optimal phase occurred earlier. The cycle frequency at which peak power was generated in leopard shark RM was only affected slightly by temperature, increasing from about 0.6 to 1.0 Hz between 15 and 25 degrees C. In contrast, mako RM showed a much more dramatic temperature sensitivity, with the peak power frequency rising from <0.25 to 2.25 Hz between 15 and 28 degrees C. These data support the hypothesis that the contractile properties of RM are functionally similar along the body in both species. In addition, our data identify a significant difference in the effect of temperature on net work and power output between these two shark species; at 15 degrees C muscle from the ectothermic leopard shark performs relatively well in comparison with mako, while at higher

  15. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  16. Peripheral injury alters schooling behavior in squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Megumi; di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Carroll, Julia; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T; Crook, Robyn J

    2016-07-01

    Animals with detectable injuries are at escalated threat of predation. The anti-predation tactic of schooling reduces individual predation risk overall, but it is not known how schooling behavior affects injured animals, or whether risks are reduced equally for injured animals versus other school members. In this laboratory study we examined the effects of minor fin injury on schooling decisions made by squid. Schooling behavior of groups of squid, in which one member was injured, was monitored over 24h. Injured squid were more likely to be members of a school shortly after injury (0.5-2h), but there were no differences compared with sham-injured squid at longer time points (6-24h). Overall, the presence of an injured conspecific increased the probability that a school would form, irrespective of whether the injured squid was a member of the school. When groups containing one injured squid were exposed to a predator cue, injured squid were more likely to join the school, but their position depended on whether the threat was a proximate visual cue or olfactory cue. We found no evidence that injured squid oriented themselves to conceal their injury from salient threats. Overall we conclude that nociceptive sensitization after injury changes grouping behaviors in ways that are likely to be adaptive. PMID:27108689

  17. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  18. Planar thin film SQUID with integral flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N. (Inventor); Sisk, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A thin film SQUID is disclosed having improved flux concentration combined with simplicity of design and fabrication. The SQUID starts with a wafer like substrate having simple planar geometry. A large area of superconducting film is coated on the substrate, with a small open or uncoated area remaining at its center to define a SQUID loop, and a gap in the film formed, beginning at the outer circumferential edge of the substrate and extending radially inward to the open area. A Josephson junction is formed across the gap near the open area to interrupt the electrical continuity of the SQUID loop. A coil is attached to the surface of the substrate, electrically insulated from the superconducting film, and is energized to induce flux within the SQUID which is concentrated within the open area.

  19. A SQUID gradiometer module with large junction shunt resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Wang, Yong-Liang; Li, Hua; Zeng, Jia; Kong, Xiang-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ming

    2014-08-01

    A dual-washer superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a loop inductance of 350 pH and two on-washer integrated input coils is designed according to conventional niobium technology. In order to obtain a large SQUID flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient, the junction shunt resistance is selected to be 33 Ω. A vertical SQUID gradiometer module with a baseline of 100 mm is constructed by utilizing such a SQUID and a first-order niobium wire-wound antenna. The sensitivity of this module reaches about 0.2 fT/(cm·Hz1/2) in the white noise range using a direct readout scheme, i.e., the SQUID is directly connected to an operational amplifier, in a magnetically shielded room. Some magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements with a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are demonstrated.

  20. Presynaptic calcium currents in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Steinberg, I Z; Walton, K

    1981-01-01

    A voltage clamp study has been performed in the presynaptic terminal of the squid stellate ganglion. After blockage of the voltage-dependent sodium and potassium conductances, an inward calcium current is demonstrated. Given a step-depolarization pulse, this voltage- and time-dependent conductance has an S-shaped onset. At the "break" of the voltage step, a rapid tail current is observed. From these results a kinetic model is generated which accounts for the experimental results and predicts for the time course and amplitude a possible calcium entry during presynaptic action potentials. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7225510

  1. Moderately shielded high-Tc SQUID system for rat MCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Kim, I.-S.; Drung, D.; Novikov, I.; Schurig, Th

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a 5-channel high-Tc SQUID system with one signal channel intended for rat magnetocardiography (MCG) in moderately shielded or "quiet" real environment. This system is an adapted version of a human MCG system which has been improved with respect to user-friendliness and stability. A dewar with a cold-warm distance of 7 mm and a refill cycle time of up to one week is utilized. The implemented high-Tc SQUIDs are single-layer devices with grain boundary junctions fabricated at KRISS with laser ablation on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates. In order to cancel environmental magnetic noise, three of the five SQUIDs are arranged to build an axial software first-order or second-order gradiometer with a base line of 35 mm. The other two SQUIDs are used for balancing. To overcome previous system instabilities, we have implemented an Earth field compensation for each SQUID. For this, the SQUIDs were mounted in capsules containing integrated field compensation coils. The three Earth field components are measured with an additional triaxial fluxgate, and compensated at the SQUID locations using the low-noise current source of the SQUID readout electronics. This way, the SQUIDs can be cooled and operated in a low residual field that improves system stability and reduces low-frequency SQUID noise. It is even possible to slowly move the dewar in the Earth field (dynamic field compensation). Different noise cancellation procedures were optimized and compared employing a periodic signal source.

  2. Effects of prolonged entanglement in discarded fishing gear with substantive biofouling on the health and behavior of an adult shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Cartamil, Daniel P

    2012-02-01

    A mature male shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, was captured with a three-strand twisted natural fiber rope wrapped around the body causing deep abrasions, scoliosis of the back, and undernourishment. Fifty-two pelagic peduculate barnacles from four species were found fouling on the rope. Assuming larval settlement occurred following entanglement, barnacle growth-rate data suggest the rope had been around the shark for at least 150 days. However, the onset of severe scoliosis (likely linked to the increased constriction of the rope with growth and the added drag induced by biofouling) indicates that this rope may have been in place much longer. Following removal of the rope, a pop-up satellite archival tag was attached to the shark to assess post-release health. The resulting 54 days of tag deployment data show that despite its injuries, the shark survived, and following an initial stress period, exhibited movement patterns characteristic of healthy makos. PMID:22172235

  3. A simple three-channel dc SQUID system using time domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, M.; Korn, M.; Mugford, C. G. A.; Kycia, J. B.

    2004-08-01

    Conventional multichannel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems require a SQUID read-out circuit for each channel, as well as many wires connecting each individual SQUID and feedback coil to the room temperature electronics. We present a simple time domain multiplexed read-out scheme which requires only a single SQUID read-out circuit that is successively switched between all the SQUIDs. By connecting all the SQUIDs and all the feedback coils in series, this time domain multiplexed system requires many fewer wires between the SQUIDs and the room temperature read-out circuit than other multichannel systems.

  4. Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

  5. Trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail formation and foraging.

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Peck, Robert W; Stringer, Lloyd D; Snook, Kirsten; Banko, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2–3 m s−1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. PMID:20077128

  6. Cross-linking Chemistry of Squid Beak*

    PubMed Central

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J. Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  7. Cross-linking chemistry of squid beak.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-12-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  8. The curvy photonics of squid camouflage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Alison; Holt, Amanda; Daniel, Morse; Stramski, Dariusz

    2013-03-01

    Cephalopods (squids and octopuses) ubiquitously possess reflective structures in their skin composed of ``reflectin'' proteins. Although a few simple laminar, Bragg-stack type optical structures have been known in a handful of common squid species for some time, our extensive survey of optically active tissues of exotic deep-sea species has revealed complex, extended curvatures and topologies in dermal reflectors of these rarely-studied animals. Molecular deep-sequencing has revealed these structures also to be composed of reflectin-like proteins. Here we show a survey of some of these deep-sea reflector structures, and present evidence that each novel structure may be a transform of the radiance in the optical niche in the ocean where each of these species live, such that light reflecting off the sides of these animals in their specific ocean habitat resembles the light that would be transmitted through the animals if they were transparent, from many different viewing angles and possible ocean depths.

  9. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-06-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. Rhodopsin, a photoreceptor membrane protein in the retina, is a prototypical member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. In this study, rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was treated with V8 protease to remove the C-terminal extension. Truncated rhodopsin was selectively extracted from the microvillar membranes using alkyl glucoside in the presence of zinc ions and was then crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Of the various crystals obtained, hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. The diffraction data suggested that the crystal belongs to space group P6{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.1, c = 158.6 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis, together with linear dichroism results, suggested that the rhodopsin dimers are packed in such a manner that their transmembrane helices are aligned nearly parallel to the c axis.

  10. Base distance optimization for SQUID gradiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Garachtchenko, A.; Matlashov, A.; Kraus, R.

    1998-12-31

    The measurement of magnetic fields generated by weak nearby biomagnetic sources is affected by ambient noise generated by distant sources both internal and external to the subject under study. External ambient noise results from sources with numerous origins, many of which are unpredictable in nature. Internal noise sources are biomagnetic in nature and result from muscle activity (such as the heart, eye blinks, respiration, etc.), pulsation associated with blood flow, surgical implants, etc. Any magnetic noise will interfere with measurements of magnetic sources of interest, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), in various ways. One of the most effective methods of reducing the magnetic noise measured by the SQUID sensor is to use properly designed superconducting gradiometers. Here, the authors optimized the baseline length of SQUID-based symmetric axial gradiometers using computer simulation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criteria. They found that in most cases the optimal baseline is not equal to the depth of the primary source, rather it has a more complex dependence on the gradiometer balance and the ambient magnetic noise. They studied both first and second order gradiometers in simulated shielded environments and only second order gradiometers in a simulated unshielded environment. The noise source was simulated as a distant dipolar source for the shielded cases. They present optimal gradiometer baseline lengths for the various simulated situations below.

  11. Whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Matsui, T; Uchikawa, Y

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed a mobile whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield - a cylinder of high Tc superconductor BSCCO of 65 cm in diameter and 160 cm in length. We compared the noise spectra of several SQUID sensors of SNS Josephson junctions in the superconducting magnetic shield with those of the same SQUID sensors in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy. The SQUID sensors in the superconducting magnetic shield are more than 100 times more sensitive than those in a magnetically shielded room of Permalloy below 1 Hz. We tested the whole-head SQUID system in the superconducting magnetic shield observing somatosensory signals evoked by stimulating the median nerve in the right wrist of patients by current pulses. We present data of 64 and 128 traces versus the common time axis for comparison. Most sensory responses of human brains phase out near 250 ms. However monotonic rhythms still remain even at longer latencies than 250 ms. The nodes of these rhythm are very narrow even at these longer latencies just indicating low noise characteristics of the SQUID system at low-frequencies. The current dipoles at the secondary somatosensory area SII are evoked at longer latencies than 250 ms contributing to a higher-level brain function. The SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield will also have advantages when it is used as a DC MEG to study very slow activities and function of the brain. PMID:16012595

  12. High speed non-latching SQUID binary ripple counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, A. H.; Phillips, R. R.; Sandell, R. D.

    1985-03-01

    High speed, single flux quantum (SFQ) binary scalers are important components in superconducting analog-to-digital converters (ADC). This paper reviews the concept for a SQUID ADC and the design of an SFQ binary ripple counter, and reports the simulation of key components, and fabrication and performance of non-latching SQUID scalers and SFQ binary ripple counters. The SQUIDs were fabricated with Nb/Nb2O5/PbIn junctions and interconnected by monolithic superconducting transmission lines and isolation resistors. Each SQUID functioned as a bistable flip-flop with the input connected to the center of the device and the output across one junction. All junctions were critically damped to optimize the pulse response. Operation was verified by observing the dc I-V curves of successive SQUIDs driven by a cw pulse train generated on the same chip. Each SQUID exhibited constant-voltage current steps at 1/2 the voltage of the preceding device as expected from the Josephson voltage-to-frequency relation. Steps were observed only for the same voltage polarity of successive devices and for proper phase bias of the SQUID. Binary frequency division was recorded up to 40GHz for devices designed to operate to 28GHz.

  13. High speed non-latching squid binary ripple counter

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A.H.; Phillips, R.R.; Sandell, R.D.

    1985-03-01

    High speed, single flux quantum (SFQ) binary scalers are important components in superconducting analog-to-digital converters (ADC). This paper reviews the concept for a SQUID ADC and the design of an SFQ binary ripple counter, and reports the simulation of key components, and fabrication and performance of non-latching SQUID scalers and SFQ binary ripple counters. The SQUIDs were fabricated with Nb/Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5//PbIn junctions and interconnected by monolithic superconducting transmission lines and isolation resistors. Each SQUID functioned as a bistable flip-flop with the input connected to the center of the device and the output across one junction. All junctions were critically damped to optimize the pulse response. Operation was verified by observing the dc I-V curves of successive SQUIDs driven by a cw pulse train generated on the same chip. Each SQUID exhibited constant-voltage current steps at 1/2 the voltage of the preceding device as expected from the Josephson voltage-to-frequency relation. Steps were observed only for the same voltage polarity of successive devices and for proper phase bias of the SQUID. Binary frequency division was recorded up to 40GHz for devices designed to operate to 28GHz.

  14. Recent Results of a New Microwave SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Limketkai, B.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a proof-of-concept microwave SQUID multiplexer containing four SQUIDs coupled to GHz frequency resonant circuits and fed with a single microwave readout line. The resonators are half-wave coplanar waveguide sections and are similar to the structures used for the microwave kinetic inductance detectors developed in our group. Optimal values for the interdigital gap capacitors were determined to maximize the sensitivity of the transmitted and reflected microwave signal with respect to changes in the dynamic resistance of the SQUID. The dc current-bias line for the SQUID has an in-line inductive high frequency filter to minimize coupling between the bias line and resonator. A high frequency modulation scheme is proposed to eliminate the need for individual flux biasing of the SQUIDs, which extends the dynamic range of the readout. In this scheme a common modulation signal is imposed on each SQUID and the received signal is demodulated at one and two times the modulation frequency to maintain sensitivity at any flux state. We present the recent results of the microwave SQUID multiplexer system operating at a readout frequency range of 10 - 11GHz.

  15. Ginzburg-Landau modeling of Nano-SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, John; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hasselbach, Klaus; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    NanoSQUIDs are micron-sized Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices with narrow (50 nm) sized constrictions as weak links. They are used for, e.g., studying switching dynamics in magnetic nanoparticles and high spatial resolution magnetic microscopy. When the constriction dimensions become comparable to or larger than the superconducting coherence length, the current-phase relations become non-sinusoidal, reducing the flux modulation depth and increasing the thermally activated flux noise. We have numerically solved the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for the nanoSQUID geometry to obtain current-phase relations, the dependence of critical current on magnetic flux, and the thermally activated escape rates. We predict NanoSQUIDs with short coherence lengths to have critical current distribution widths, and therefore flux noises, proportional to T1/2, as opposed to tunnel junction SQUIDs, which are proportional to T2/3. Our GL simulations predict that the ultimate noise performance of Al nanoSQUIDs, with their longer coherence lengths, should be better than Nb nanoSQUIDs, with suspended bridge Al/Nb nanoSQUIDs intermediate between the two.

  16. Two-stage series array SQUID amplifier for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, J. G.; DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Welty, R. P.; Radparvar, M.

    We present test results for a two-stage integrated SQUID amplifier which uses a series array of d.c. SQUIDS to amplify the signal from a single input SQUID. The device was developed by Welty and Martinis at NIST and recent versions have been manufactured by HYPRES, Inc. Shielding and filtering techniques were employed during the testing to minimize the external noise. Energy resolution of 300 h was demonstrated using a d.c. excitation at frequencies above 1 kHz, and better than 500 h resolution was typical down to 300 Hz.

  17. Dynamics of a SQUID with topologically nontrivial barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Dawood, R.

    2016-03-01

    The phase dynamics of a SQUID consisting of Josephson junctions with topologically nontrivial barriers has been studied. Its comparative analysis with the dynamics of a conventional SQUID has been performed. The current-voltage characteristics have been calculated. The dependence of the return current on the magnetic field has been found. It has been shown that the branch of the current-voltage characteristic corresponding to the resonance frequency in the case of the SQUID with nontrivial barriers is displaced by √ 2 over voltage. This effect can be used for the detection of Majorana fermions.

  18. Resonance detection of dark matter axions using a DC SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    A method for detecting dark matter axions in which a dc SQUID serves as a detector is proposed. The SQUID is shown to be able to detect the magnetic field perturbations induced by its interaction with axions. The resonance signal appears as a current step in the SQUID current-voltage characteristic. The voltage of the step corresponds to the axion mass, while its height depends on the axion energy density in near-Earth space. The proposed method is aimed at detecting axions with masses m a ≲ 10-4 eV, which are of interest for both cosmology and particle physics.

  19. Martian paleomagnetism with the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin Paul

    Rocks should preserve natural remanent magnetizations with stable directional and intensity information at levels ˜1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best moment magnetometers. The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope is a new, high-resolution magnetometer that can now detect such weak signals. It maps the magnetic fields above samples with a spatial resolution of <100 mum and a moment sensitivity of <10 -15 Am2. It therefore provides data with a resolution directly comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques. This thesis describes applications of SQUID microscopy to a variety of problems in the planetary sciences. A SQUID microscope paleomagnetic conglomerate test demonstrates that ALH84001 has been cooler than ˜40°C since before its ejection from the surface of Mars at 15 Ma. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. These and other data on panspermia demand a re-evaluation of the long-held assumption that terrestrial life evolved in isolation on Earth. Subsequent magnetic and textural studies of the meteorite show that 4 Ga ALH84001 carbonates containing magnetite and pyrrhotite carry a stable natural remanent magnetization. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology demonstrates that this magnetization originated at 3.9--4.1 Ga on Mars. This magnetization is the oldest known for a planetary rock, and its strong intensity suggests that Mars had generated a geodynamo at or before 4 Ga. The intensity of the field that magnetized ALH84001 was roughly within an order of magnitude of that at the surface of the present-day Earth, sufficient for magnetotaxis by the bacteria whose magnetofossils have been reported in ALH84001 and possibly for the production of the strong crustal anomalies. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology calculations also provide an explanation for why ALH84001 contains a sample of

  20. Realizing and optimizing an atomtronic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Mathey, L.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how a toroidal Bose–Einstein condensate with a movable barrier can be used to realize an atomtronic SQUID. The magnitude of the barrier height, which creates the analogue of an SNS junction, is of crucial importance, as well as its ramp-up and -down protocol. For too low of a barrier, the relaxation of the system is dynamically suppressed, due to the small rate of phase slips at the barrier. For a higher barrier, the phase coherence across the barrier is suppressed due to thermal fluctuations, which are included in our Truncated Wigner approach. Furthermore, we show that the ramp-up protocol of the barrier can be improved by ramping up its height first, and its velocity after that. This protocol can be further improved by optimizing the ramp-up and ramp-down time scales, which is of direct practical relevance for on-going experimental realizations.

  1. Activity of Bifenthrin, Chlorfenapyr, Fipronil, and Thiamethoxam against Argentine Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam were evaluated for activity against the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr). Mobility impairment and lethal times were determined following topical treatments. Ants were immobilized most quickly by bifenthrin, followed by chlorfenapyr and th...

  2. Squid as nutrient vectors linking Southwest Atlantic marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.

    2013-10-01

    Long-term investigations of three abundant nektonic squid species from the Southwest Atlantic, Illex argentinus, Doryteuthis gahi and Onykia ingens, permitted to estimate important population parameters including individual growth rates, duration of ontogenetic phases and mortalities. Using production model, the productivity of squid populations at different phases of their life cycle was assessed and the amount of biomass they convey between marine ecosystems as a result of their ontogenetic migrations was quantified. It was found that squid are major nutrient vectors and play a key role as transient 'biological pumps' linking spatially distinct marine ecosystems. I. argentinus has the largest impact in all three ecosystems it encounters due to its high abundance and productivity. The variable nature of squid populations increases the vulnerability of these biological conveyers to overfishing and environmental change. Failure of these critical biological pathways may induce irreversible long-term consequences for biodiversity, resource abundance and spatial availability in the world ocean.

  3. Integrated SQUID sensors for low cross-talk multichannel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Luiso, M.; Russo, M.

    2006-06-01

    We present a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer based on niobium technology including a new feedback coil design. In respect to a standard SQUID design, such a feedback-coil design was optimized in order to reduce the mutual inductance with the neighbours and to increase the coupling with the pick-up coil of the SQUID itself. In such a way, it is possible to reduce cross-talks due to both feedback coil and wires. Experimental results about the characterization of the device and the crosstalk measurements are reported. The measurements have been performed in liquid helium using a low noise readout electronics specifically designed for large multichannel SQUID based instrumentations. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of cross-talk between neighbouring sensors.

  4. Magnetic Field Sampling using a Pulsed Hysteretic SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, S. P.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Berkley, A. J.; Gubrud, M. A.; Wellstood, F. C.; Cawthorne, A.

    2004-03-01

    Weak magnetic field detection using a non-hysteretic DC SQUID with Flux-Locked-Loop electronics is typically limited to 1MHz bandwidth or less. However, there is demand for larger bandwidth magnetic field detection for use in the semiconductor industry. We have studied the possibility of using a 4.2K hysteretic trilayer Nb DC SQUID, fabricated by Hypres Inc., with pulsed bias current to increase the bandwidth by an order of magnitude or more. The technique is based on the fast switching of a hysteretic SQUID from the superconducting state to the normal conducting state. By observing the switching of the SQUID, the applied magnetic field at the time of a pulse can be followed. Experimental results show that the technique can be used to follow magnetic fields of up to 60MHz with 5ns pulses. With shorter pulses and better electronics, the technique could further increase the bandwidth by another order of magnitude.

  5. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth. PMID:25577086

  6. TGS pipeline primed for Argentine growth, CEO says

    SciTech Connect

    Share, J.

    1997-03-01

    Nowhere in Latin America has the privatization process been more aggressively pursued than in Argentina where President Carlos Menem has successfully turned over the bulk of state companies to the private sector. In the energy sector, that meant the divestiture in 1992 of Gas del Estado, the state-owned integrated gas transportation and distribution company. It was split in two transportation companies: Transportadora de Gas del Sur (TGS) and Transportadora de Gas del Norte (TGN), and eight distribution companies. TGS is the largest transporter of natural gas in Argentina, delivering more than 60 percent of that nation`s total gas consumption with a capacity of 1.9 Bcf/d. This is the second in a series of Pipeline and Gas Journal special reports that discuss the evolving strategies of the natural gas industry as it continues to restructure amid deregulation. The article focuses on TGS, the Argentine pipeline system in which Enron Corp. is a key participant.

  7. Tectonics of the Argentine and Chilean Andes: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Alvarado, Patricia; Arriagada, César; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    This Special Issue gathers a series of contributions derived from presentations at the 19° Congreso Geológico Argentino held in Córdoba in 2-6 June 2014. Specific subjects cover a wide variety of topics and regions of the Argentine and Chilean Andes, varying from sedimentological analyses and U/Pb dating of detrital zircons in different rocks to determine source areas for different times and regions along the southern Andes; satellite gravity data for monitoring earthquakes at the subduction zone to understand their complex rupture structure; fission track data from the Andes to the foreland region; use of seismic tomographies and conventional seismic reflection data for analyzing crustal structure; to paleomagnetic data and structural and morphological analyses (Fig. 1).

  8. Colorado Basin Structure and Rifting, Argentine passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autin, Julia; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Loegering, Markus; Anka, Zahie; Vallejo, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Jorge; Marchal, Denis; Reichert, Christian; di Primio, Rolando

    2010-05-01

    The Argentine margin presents a strong segmentation with considerable strike-slip movements along the fracture zones. We focus on the volcanic segment (between the Salado and Colorado transfer zones), which is characterized by seaward dipping reflectors (SDR) all along the ocean-continent transition [e.g. Franke et al., 2006; Gladczenko et al., 1997; Hinz et al., 1999]. The segment is structured by E-W trending basins, which differs from the South African margin basins and cannot be explained by classical models of rifting. Thus the study of the relationship between the basins and the Argentine margin itself will allow the understanding of their contemporary development. Moreover the comparison of the conjugate margins suggests a particular evolution of rifting and break-up. We firstly focus on the Colorado Basin, which is thought to be the conjugate of the well studied Orange Basin [Hirsch et al., 2009] at the South African margin [e.g. Franke et al., 2006]. This work presents results of a combined approach using seismic interpretation and structural, isostatic and thermal modelling highlighting the structure of the crust. The seismic interpretation shows two rift-related discordances: one intra syn-rift and the break-up unconformity. The overlying sediments of the sag phase are less deformed (no sedimentary wedges) and accumulated before the generation of oceanic crust. The axis of the Colorado Basin trends E-W in the western part, where the deepest pre-rift series are preserved. In contrast, the basin axis turns to a NW-SE direction in its eastern part, where mainly post-rift sediments accumulated. The most distal part reaches the margin slope and opens into the oceanic basin. The general basin direction is almost orthogonal to the present-day margin trend. The most frequent hypothesis explaining this geometry is that the Colorado Basin is an aborted rift resulting from a previous RRR triple junction [e.g. Franke et al., 2002]. The structural interpretation

  9. Soils of the Galindez Island, Argentine archipelago, Western Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, Evgeny; Parnikoza, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula is a part of Antarctica which is characterized by increased soil diversity, caused by specific of parent materials and diversity of non-vascular and vascular plants. Soils of Galindez Island have been investigated during the 18-th Ukranian Antarctic Expedition 2013/14. This Island situated in Argentine archipelago (coastal part of Antarctic Peninsula). Soils of Galindez Island presented by following types: Leptosols, Lithosols, Histic Lithosols and Leptosols and some Gleyic soils, located in lowlands and coastal parts. An average solum profile thickness is 3-19 cm which result from the small depth of debris's, underplayed by massive crystallic rocks. The permafrost layer is located within the massive rock, but not in coarse friable parent material. The soils with bird influence are widely spread both in coastal and central part of Island. In the coastal parts we can find typical Ornithosols in the penguin rockeries areas. The main aim of our investigation was characterization of soils formed under vegetation, exactly under Deschampsia antarctica Desv. localities. Argentine Islands is the central part of D. antarctica spreading area in region of Antarctic peninsula. Probably, these islands colonized by hairgrass mainly due to ornitogenic activity. So, coastal population appearance related with Larus dominicanus nest areas and feeding activity. Thus, we found typical post ornithogenic soils here. This kind of soils we also observed in population of hairgrass of Galindez mainland where it was connected with the other Antarctic bird - Catharacta maccormicki activity. Thus, the soil diversity and soil geochemistry of the Galindez Island are closely related to the activity of birds. The spatial pattern of soils, their chemistry and organic matter quality is discussed in relation with distribution of bird nesting and feeding activity.

  10. Testing baits to control Argentine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in vineyards.

    PubMed

    Daane, Kent M; Cooper, Monica L; Sime, Karen R; Nelson, Erik H; Battany, Mark C; Rust, Michael K

    2008-06-01

    Liquid baits were evaluated for control of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and associated mealybug and soft scale pests in California vineyards. In 2003, liquid baits with small doses ofimidacloprid, boric acid, or thiamethoxam dissolved in 25% sucrose water resulted in lower ant and mealybug densities and fruit damage, compared with an untreated control. Similar treatments in a soft scale-infested vineyard showed only a reduction of ant density and fruit infestation in only the boric acid and thiamethoxam treatments. In 2004, commercial and noncommercial formulations of liquid baits reduced ant densities in three separate trials, but they had inconsistent effects on mealybug densities and fruit infestation; granular protein bait had no effect. Using large plots and commercial application methodologies, liquid bait deployed in June resulted in lower ant density and fruit infestation, but it had no effect on mealybug density. Across all trials, liquid bait treatments resulted in lower ant density (12 of 14 trials) and fruit damage (11 of 14 sites), presenting the first report of liquid baits applied using commercial methodologies that resulted in a reduction of ants and their associated hemipteran crop damage. For commercialization of liquid baits, we showed that any of the tested insecticides can suppress Argentine ants when properly delivered in the crop system. For imidacloprid, bait dispensers must be protected from sunlight to reduce photodegradation. Results suggest that incomplete ant suppression can suppress mealybug densities. However, after ant populations are suppressed, there may be a longer period before hemipteran populations are effectively suppressed. Therefore, liquid baits should be considered part of a multiseason program rather than a direct, in-season control of hemipteran pest populations. PMID:18613568

  11. ELECTROPHORETIC AND IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES OF SQUID AXOPLASM PROTEINS.

    PubMed

    HUNEEUS-COX, F

    1964-03-01

    By disc electrophoresis of the axoplasm of Dosidicus gigas, 14 protein bands have been resolved. Anti-bodies to the intra-axonal proteins and to squid blood proteins were produced in rabbits. By Ouchterlony's technique, six antigenic components can be demonstrated in axoplasm; the combined use of disc electrophoresis and immune diflusion in agar resolves seven antigenic components in axoplasm; none of these components is detectable in squid blood. PMID:14107426

  12. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  13. High-T(c) squid application in medicine and geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polushkin, V. N.; Uchaikin, S. V.; Vasiliev, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    In our laboratory of high-T(sub c), a one-hole squid was built from Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-x) ceramics obtained by a standard procedure of solid state reaction. The ceramics with critical current density J(sub c) is greater than 100 A/sq cm was selected. In the middle of a 10 x 10 x 2 mm ceramics pellet, a 0.8 mm hole was drilled in which the superconducting loop of the squid was located. Between the hole and the edge of the pellet, a cut was mechanically filed out with a bridge inside it connecting the superconducting ring. A scheme of the magnetometer is presented. The resonant frequency shift of the tank circuit, the connection of the squid with this circuit, and the squid inductance are evaluated. One of the most interesting fields of the squid-based magnetometer application is biomagnetism, particularly, the human heart magnetocardiogram measuring. The low-temperature squids were used in this area and many interesting and important scientific results have been obtained. The observations have shown that the main noise contribution was not due to the squid but to the Earth's magnetic field variations, industrial inductions, and mainly to the vibrations caused by liquid nitrogen boiling and by vibrations of the box. Further attempts are needed to reduce the magnetic noise inductions. Nevertheless, the estimations promise the maximum signal/noise relation of the high-T(sub c) squid-magnetocardiometer to be not less than 10:1 in a bandwidth of 60 Hz. Apparently, such resolution would be enough not only for steady cardiogram reading but even for thin structure investigation at average technique application.

  14. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  15. High-performance DC SQUID read-out electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2002-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL) is discussed using a simple mathematical description. It is shown that the slew rate of any FLL is limited by the linear flux range of the SQUID Φlin and the effective loop delay td to approximately Φ˙f, max=Φ lin/(4t d) if a one-pole integrator is used. This allows one to estimate the dynamic limits of both analog SQUIDs with flux modulation or direct read-out and digital SQUIDs with on-chip read-out. In addition to theoretical limits, practically achievable performance is presented using our latest direct-coupled FLL electronics as an example of state-of-the-art SQUID read-out. This electronics is designed for both low-critical temperature (low- Tc) and high- Tc SQUIDs. It combines low noise with high bandwidth and slew rate. All functions are computer controlled using a LabVIEW ® program. An automatic bias voltage tuning circuit increases the system stability in case of large cryogenic temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, an ultra-low-noise current source is integrated into the FLL board which can be used to supply a coil system compensating the Earth's magnetic field of about 60 μT while producing only 17 fT/ Hz extra noise at 1 kHz and 41 fT/ Hz at 1 Hz, respectively.

  16. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    PubMed

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property. PMID:11464670

  17. A scanning SQUID microscope with 200 MHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanov, Vladimir V.; Lettsome, Nesco M., Jr.; Borzenets, Valery; Gagliolo, Nicolas; Cawthorne, Alfred B.; Orozco, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    We developed a scanning DC SQUID microscope with novel readout electronics capable of wideband sensing of RF magnetic fields from 50 to 200 MHz and simultaneously providing closed-loop response at kHz frequencies. To overcome the 20 MHz bandwidth limitation of traditional closed-loop SQUIDs, a flux-modulated closed-loop simultaneously locks the SQUID quasi-static flux and flux-biases the SQUID for amplification of the RF flux up to Φ0/4 in amplitude. Demodulating the SQUID voltage with a double lock-in technique yields a signal representative of both the amplitude and phase of the RF flux. This provides 80 dB of a linear dynamic range with a flux noise density of 4 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 at 200 MHz for a Y Ba2Cu3O7 bi-crystal SQUID at 77 K. We describe the electronics’ performance and present images for RF magnetic field of the travelling wave in a coplanar waveguide, the standing wave in an open-circuited microstrip, and a surface mounted device antenna.

  18. An investigation of pinch welds using HTS SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Chris; Espy, Michelle A.; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2006-05-01

    To contain high-pressure gases inside a pressure vessel a seal is often made in a thin-walled tube, known as the stem tube, that connects the gas reservoir and the vessel. This seal can be achieved through the use of a resistance pinch weld that forms with only a limited amount of melting occurring. The lack of melting makes applying traditional post-weld nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques extremely difficult. The welds of interest here are made from 304L stainless steel (typically 3.8 mm diameter and 38 mm long) and have a non-uniform geometry that does not inherently lend itself to either eddy current or static field SQUID-based measurement techniques. We perform these NDE measurements with both the sample and the SQUID located inside local electromagnetic shielding. SQUID data are presented as individual time series traces for a set of welds that were fabricated using a broad range of fabrication parameters, and a comparison is made between the SQUID-based results and the known parameters. With the limited spatial resolution offered by our present SQUID system, it is not clear if weld quality can be evaluated from purely SQUID-based results.

  19. Age, Growth and Spatial Distribution of the Life Stages of the Shortfin Mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Rafinesque, 1810) Caught in the Western and Central Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Rodrigo R; de Farias, Wialla K T; Andrade, Humber; Santana, Francisco M; Lessa, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    The shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a highly migratory pelagic shark that preferentially inhabits oceanic regions in practically all oceans. The wide distribution range of this species renders it susceptible to coastal and oceanic fishing operations. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) consider this species to be highly vulnerable, especially due to its biological parameters, which are different from those of other sharks that occupy the same niche (e.g., Prionace glauca). Consequently, considerable declines in abundance have been detected over various parts of its range, most of which are linked to oceanic longline fishing. The species has conflicting life history parameters in studies conducted in the last 30 years, especially with regard to age and growth. The main discrepancies regard the interpretation of the periodicity of the deposition of band pairs (BPs) on vertebrae and the possibility of ontogenetic variations in growth. Shortfin mako sharks (n = 1325) were sampled by onboard observers of the Brazilian chartered pelagic longline fleet based in northeast Brazil from 2005 to 2011. Lengths were 79 to 250 and 73 to 296 cm (fork length, FL) for males and females, respectively, with a statistically significant difference in size between sexes and differences in the proportion of individuals in each size class. The onboard observers collected a subsample of vertebrae (n = 467), only 234 of which were suitable for analyses. Reliability between readings was satisfactory. However, it was not possible to validate periodicity in the formation of age bands in the sample. Thus, the von Bertalanffy growth function was used to calculate growth rates for the species through the interpretation of BPs in different scenarios: one BP per year (s1), two BPs per year (s2) and two BPs per year until five years of life (s3). Growth parameters varied for both females (Linf

  20. Age, Growth and Spatial Distribution of the Life Stages of the Shortfin Mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Rafinesque, 1810) Caught in the Western and Central Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Rodrigo R.; de Farias, Wialla K. T.; Andrade, Humber; Santana, Francisco M.; Lessa, Rosangela

    2016-01-01

    The shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a highly migratory pelagic shark that preferentially inhabits oceanic regions in practically all oceans. The wide distribution range of this species renders it susceptible to coastal and oceanic fishing operations. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) consider this species to be highly vulnerable, especially due to its biological parameters, which are different from those of other sharks that occupy the same niche (e.g., Prionace glauca). Consequently, considerable declines in abundance have been detected over various parts of its range, most of which are linked to oceanic longline fishing. The species has conflicting life history parameters in studies conducted in the last 30 years, especially with regard to age and growth. The main discrepancies regard the interpretation of the periodicity of the deposition of band pairs (BPs) on vertebrae and the possibility of ontogenetic variations in growth. Shortfin mako sharks (n = 1325) were sampled by onboard observers of the Brazilian chartered pelagic longline fleet based in northeast Brazil from 2005 to 2011. Lengths were 79 to 250 and 73 to 296 cm (fork length, FL) for males and females, respectively, with a statistically significant difference in size between sexes and differences in the proportion of individuals in each size class. The onboard observers collected a subsample of vertebrae (n = 467), only 234 of which were suitable for analyses. Reliability between readings was satisfactory. However, it was not possible to validate periodicity in the formation of age bands in the sample. Thus, the von Bertalanffy growth function was used to calculate growth rates for the species through the interpretation of BPs in different scenarios: one BP per year (s1), two BPs per year (s2) and two BPs per year until five years of life (s3). Growth parameters varied for both females (Linf

  1. SQUID use for Geophysics: finding billions of dollars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Soon after their discovery, Jim Zimmerman saw the potential of using Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices, SQUIDs, for the study of Geophysics and undertook experiments to understand the magnetic phenomena of the Earth. However his early experiments were not successful. Nevertheless up to the early 1980's, some research effort in the use of SQUIDs for geophysics continued and many ideas of how you could use SQUIDs evolved. Their use was not adopted by the mining industry at that time for a range of reasons. The discovery of high temperature superconductors started a reinvigoration in the interest to use SQUIDs for mineral exploration. Several groups around the world worked with mining companies to develop both liquid helium and nitrogen cooled systems. The realisation of the achievable sensitivity that contributed to successful mineral discoveries and delineation led to real financial returns for miners. By the mid 2000's, SQUID systems for geophysics were finally being offered for sale by several start-up companies. This talk will tell the story of SQUID use in geophysics. It will start with the early work of the SQUID pioneers including that of Jim Zimmerman and John Clarke and will also cover the development since the early 1990's up to today of a number of magnetometers and gradiometers that have been successfully commercialised and used to create significant impact in the global resources industry. The talk will also cover some of the critical technical challenges that had to be overcome to succeed. It will focus mostly on magnetically unshielded systems used in the field although some laboratory-based systems will be discussed.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  3. The crustal structure of the southern Argentine margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katharina; Franke, Dieter; Schnabel, Michael; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Heyde, Ingo; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2012-06-01

    Multichannel reflection seismic profiles, combined with gravimetric and magnetic data provide insight into the crustal structure of the southernmost Argentine margin, at the transition from a rifted to a transform margin and outline the extent of the North Falkland Graben. Based on these data, we establish a regional stratigraphic model for the post-rift sediments, comprising six marker horizons with a new formation in the Barremian/Lower Cretaceous. Our observations support that a N-S trending subsidiary branch of the North Falkland Graben continues along the continental shelf and slope to the Argentine basin. During the rift phase, a wide shelf area was affected by the E-W extension, subsequently forming the North Falkland Graben and the subsidiary branch along which finally breakup occurred. We propose the division of the margin in two segments: a N-S trending rifted margin and an E-W trending transform margin. This is further underpinned by crustal scale gravity modelling. Three different tectono-dynamic processes shaped the study area. (1) The Triassic/Early Jurassic extensional phase resulting in the formation of the North Falkland Graben and additional narrower rift grabens ended synchronously with the breakup of the South Atlantic in the early Valanginian. (2) Extensional phase related to the opening of the South Atlantic. (3) The transform margin was active in the study area from about Hauterivian times and activity lasted until late Cretaceous/early Cenozoic. Both, the rifted margin and the transform margin are magma-poor. Very limited structures may have a volcanic origin but are suggested to be post-rift. The oceanic crust was found to be unusually thin, indicating a deficit in magma supply during formation. These findings in combination with the proposed breakup age in the early Valanginian that considerably predates the formation of the Paraná-Etendeka continental flood basalt provinces in Brazil and Namibia question the influence of the Tristan da

  4. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  5. Processing of polarized light by squid photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Saidel, W M; Lettvin, J Y; MacNichol, E F

    Behavioural tests have demonstrated that cephalopods can discriminate light polarized in different planes, and the receptors have been localized by electrophysiological studies of the eye. Discrimination of the plane of polarization is a consequence of both the structure of the microvilli in the outer segments of the photoreceptors and the orientation of the photosensitive chromophore on these membranes. However, between the depolarizing receptor response resulting from photoreception and the behaviour of the animal, nothing is known about neuronal processing of polarized light by cephalopods. Here we show that some squid photoreceptors discriminate the plane of polarization within the spike train, and that any particular plane is seen as a variable intensity. Given the well known orthogonal orientation of microvilli in outer segments of adjacent photoreceptors and the physiological preference for one of two mutually perpendicular planes of polarization by single photoreceptors, we conclude that cephalopod vision is based on two complementary views of the world, each determined by the transformation of polarization-sensitive receptors into complementary intensity scales. A visual system based on this transformation would lead to enhanced contrast underwater and visualization of object details obscured by confounding highlights. PMID:6877374

  6. Histological Features of the Gastrointestinal Tract of Wild Indonesian Shortfin Eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor (McClelland, 1844), Captured in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Nasruddin, Nurrul Shaqinah; Azmai, Mohammad Noor Amal; Ismail, Ahmad; Saad, Mohd Zamri; Daud, Hassan Mohd; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to record the histological features of the gastrointestinal tract of wild Indonesian shortfin eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor (McClelland, 1844), captured in Peninsular Malaysia. The gastrointestinal tract was segmented into the oesophagus, stomach, and intestine. Then, the oesophagus was divided into five (first to fifth), the stomach into two (cardiac and pyloric), and the intestine into four segments (anterior, intermediate, posterior, and rectum) for histological examinations. The stomach had significantly taller villi and thicker inner circular muscles compared to the intestine and oesophagus. The lamina propria was thickest in stomach, significantly when compared with oesophagus, but not with the intestine. However, the intestine showed significantly thicker outer longitudinal muscle while gastric glands were observed only in the stomach. The histological features were closely associated with the functions of the different segments of the gastrointestinal tract. In conclusion, the histological features of the gastrointestinal tract of A. b. bicolor are consistent with the feeding habit of a carnivorous fish. PMID:25587561

  7. Structural studies of haemoglobin from pisces species shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) at 1.9 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Pandian; Sundaresan, S. S.; Sathya Moorthy, Pon.; Balasubramanian, M.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric iron-containing protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide from tissues back to the lungs. Pisces are the advanced aquatic vertebrates capable of surviving at wide depth ranges. The shortfin mako shark (SMS) is the pelagic, largest, fastest and most sophisticated species of the shark kingdom with well developed eyes. Mostly the pisces species are cold blooded in nature. Distinctly, the SMSs are warm-blooded animals with an advanced circulatory system. SMSs are capable of maintaining elevated muscle temperatures up to 33 K above the ambient water temperatures at a depth of 150–500 m. SMSs have a diverged air-breathing mechanism compared with other vertebrates. The haemoglobin molecule consists of four polypeptide chains, namely two α chains, each with 140 amino acids and two β chains each having 136 amino acids. The SMS Hb was found to crystallize in monoclinic space group P21 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystal packing parameters for the SMS Hb structure contain one whole biological molecule in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 47%. The SMS Hb quaternary structural features interface–interface interactions and heme binding sites are discussed with different state Hbs and the results reveal that SMS Hb adopts an unliganded deoxy T state conformation. PMID:24121325

  8. Biological characterization of the skin of shortfin mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus and preliminary study of the hydrodynamic behaviour through computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Díez, G; Soto, M; Blanco, J M

    2015-07-01

    This study characterized the morphology, density and orientation of the dermal denticles along the body of a shortfin mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus and identified the hydrodynamic parameters of its body through a computational fluid-dynamics model. The study showed a great variability in the morphology, size, shape, orientation and density of dermal denticles along the body of I. oxyrinchus. There was a significant higher density in dorsal and ventral areas of the body and their highest angular deviations were found in the lower part of the mouth and in the areas between the pre-caudal pit and the second dorsal and pelvic fins. A detailed three-dimensional geometry from a scanned body of a shark was carried out to evaluate the hydrodynamic properties such as drag coefficient, lift coefficient and superficial (skin) friction coefficient of the skin together with flow velocity field, according to different roughness coefficients simulating the effect of the dermal denticles. This preliminary approach contributed to detailed information of the denticle interactions. As the height of the denticles was increased, flow velocity and the effect of lift decreased whereas drag increased. The highest peaks of skin friction coefficient were observed around the pectoral fins. PMID:26044174

  9. Oxygen utilization and the branchial pressure gradient during ram ventilation of the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus: is lamnid shark-tuna convergence constrained by elasmobranch gill morphology?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Nicholas C; Lai, N Chin; Bull, Kristina B; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Ram ventilation and gill function in a lamnid shark, the shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, were studied to assess how gill structure may affect the lamnid-tuna convergence for high-performance swimming. Despite differences in mako and tuna gill morphology, mouth gape and basal swimming speeds, measurements of mako O(2) utilization at the gills (53.4±4.2%) and the pressure gradient driving branchial flow (96.8±26.1 Pa at a mean swimming speed of 38.8±5.8 cm s(-1)) are similar to values reported for tunas. Also comparable to tunas are estimates of the velocity (0.22±0.03 cm s(-1)) and residence time (0.79±0.14 s) of water though the interlamellar channels of the mako gill. However, mako and tuna gills differ in the sites of primary branchial resistance. In the mako, approximately 80% of the total branchial resistance resides in the septal channels, structures inherent to the elasmobranch gill that are not present in tunas. The added resistance at this location is compensated by a correspondingly lower resistance at the gill lamellae accomplished through wider interlamellar channels. Although greater interlamellar spacing minimizes branchial resistance, it also limits lamellar number and results in a lower total gill surface area for the mako relative to tunas. The morphology of the elasmobranch gill thus appears to constrain gill area and, consequently, limit mako aerobic performance to less than that of tunas. PMID:22162850

  10. Environmental effects on recreational squid jigging fishery catches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz

    2012-08-01

    Experimental fishing sessions simulating the operating procedures of the recreational fishery for the European squid that operates at inshore Palma Bay (Balearic Islands, Spain) were conducted to investigate the effects of environmental variables on squid catches. The catch per unit of effort (cpue) of recreational-like jigging sessions showed a seasonal pattern (higher cpue during colder months). Two alternative hypotheses can explain such a pattern. First, squid could migrate inshore during colder months to seek spatio-temporal windows within which the sea temperature maximize spawning success. Second, the timing of the seasonal reproductive peak and the growth rate of any given cohort would result in a higher percentage of squid whose body size is greater than the gear-specific vulnerability threshold during the colder months. The combination of environmental variables that maximized cpue was a low sea surface temperature, a low windspeed, low atmospheric pressure, and days close to the new moon. A specific period of the day, narrowly around sunset, favoured the catches. Within this narrow period, the sunlight is still sufficient to allow the recreational fishing lures to be effective, and the squid have already shifted to a more active pattern of movement characteristic of the night-time period.

  11. Mobile HTS SQUID System for Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Hans-Joachim; Hohmann, Rainer; Grueneklee, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Braginski, Alex I.

    1997-03-01

    For the detection of deep-lying flaws in aircraft structures, a mobile eddy-current system is being developed in conjunction with a high-temperature superconductor (Yba_2Cu_3O_7) thin-film HTS SQUID gradiometer. The challenge is to operate the SQUID sensor during movement in strong ambient fields, independent of orientation. A planar rf double hole gradiometer with a gradient sensitivity of 500 fT/(cm √Hz) was designed for that purpose. Two different cooling concepts were successfully implemented: the SQUID operation in the vacuum region of a lightweight nitrogen cryostat, constructed for operation in any orientation, and the use of a commercial Joule-Thomson cryocooler for liquid-nitrogen-free SQUID cooling. With a SQUID integration scheme using a sapphire cold finger, motion-related additional noise is nearly eliminated. Using a system equipped with a differential eddy current excitation, two-dimensional scans were performed to find fatigue cracks and corrosion pits hidden below several layers of aluminum. For demonstration in the Lufthansa maintenance facility at Frankfurt Airport, the system was used to detect flaws in aircraft wheels. Work in progress includes developing longer base gradiometers for detection of deep flaws.

  12. Eddy current nondestructive material evaluation based on HTS SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, M.; Kreutzbruck, M. v.; Baby, U.; Tröll, J.; Heiden, C.

    1997-08-01

    High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are promising sensors for applications in eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Due to their high field sensitivity at low frequencies, they are especially suitable for applications, where a large penetration depth is required. We have investigated two different SQUID-based NDE systems, one of which is optimised for testing felloes of aircraft wheels. The second system allows for testing planar structures using a motorised x-y-stage, which moves the cryostat above the planar samples. As sensors 3 GHz rf SQUIDs made from YBCO were used, having a field noise of about 1 pT/√Hz. This results in a dynamic range of our SQUID system of about 155 dB/√Hz. In most cases, the SQUIDs have been cooled by immersing them in liquid nitrogen. We have however also developed a cryosystem, which allows for cooling the sensors by a Ne-gas flow. In planar test structures we could detect flaws with lengths of 10 mm, having a height of 0.6 mm in a depth of 13 mm. In aircraft felloes, flaws located at the inner surface of the felloe (thickness 8 mm) were easily detectable despite a high static background field of up to 0.5 G caused by ferromagnetic structures inside the felloe. For flaws in a depth of 5 mm, the spatial resolution of both systems was about 8 mm without applying image postprocessing.

  13. Cryogenic Integrated Offset Compensation for Time Domain SQUID Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Martino, J.; Bréelle, E.; Bordier, G.; Piat, M.

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) multiplexing is a common technique in the use of large arrays of Transition Edge Sensors (TES). A Time Domain Multiplexer (TDM) combines input TES signals into one output signal using several SQUIDs. Different TES, SQUID and amplifier characteristics induce unavoidable different offsets on the multiplexed signal. Additionally, given the periodicity of the SQUID characteristic, the Flux Locked Loop (FLL) operating point is only defined modulo Φ 0. This can lead to a large output offset. In multiplexed mode, the difference between offsets associated with different pixels can induce a parasitic signal which is often larger than that of the TES. These offset signals drastically constrain the readout dynamic range and thus the maximum gain allowed. They also limit the signal-to-noise ratio, the FLL stability and the multiplexing frequency. Offsets in SQUID readout are discussed and offset compensation for TDM is presented. The dynamic calibration and compensation on a simplified 4:1 TDM are demonstrated in simulation. Dynamic offset compensation is being implemented on a cryogenic SiGe integrated circuit operated at 4 K for 128:1 TDM.

  14. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  15. High-sensitivity SQUIDs with dispersive readout for scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol, J. M.; Foroughi, F.; Arps, J.; Kammerloher, E.; Bethke, P.; Gibson, G. W., Jr.; Fung, Y. K. K.; Klopfer, B.; Nowack, K.; Kratz, P. A.; Huber, M. E.; Moler, K. A.; Kirtley, J. R.; Bluhm, H.

    2014-03-01

    In a scanning SQUID microscope, the high magnetic flux sensitivity is utilized to image magnetic properties of sample surfaces. As an alternative to the widely used DC SQUIDs, we present Nb SQUIDs for scanning with dispersive microwave readout, featuring significantly higher bandwidth and sensitivity. An on-chip shunt capacitor in parallel with the junction and flux pickup loops forms an LC resonator whose resonance depends on the flux in the SQUID. The readout utilizes a phase-sensitive detection of the reflected drive signal at the SQUID's resonance frequency. Highest sensitivities are achieved by making use of the inherent nonlinearity of the device at high excitation powers. We present a study of the characteristics and noise measurements of our sensors at 4 K. Extrapolations from our results to 300 mK indicate that flux sensitivities as low as 50 nΦ0Hz- 1 / 2 could be possible. Using high-resolution lithography, our sensors promise sub-micron spatial resolution. Integrated into a scanning microscope, they will provide a powerful tool for the study of weak magnetic effects and quantum coherent phenomena. This work was supported by NSF IMR-MIP grant No. 0957616 and the Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach - Foundation.

  16. Cross-protection in nonhuman primates against Argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher, M C; Coto, C E; Calello, M A; Rondinone, S N; Damonte, E B; Frigerio, M J

    1982-01-01

    The susceptibility of the marmoset Callithrix jacchus to Tacaribe virus infection was investigated to perform cross-protection studies between Junin and Tacaribe viruses. Five marmosets inoculated with Tacaribe virus failed to show any signs of disease, any alterations in erythrocyte, leukocyte, reticulocyte, and platelet counts or any changes in hematocrit or hemoglobin values. No Tacaribe virus could be recovered from blood at any time postinfection. Anti-Tacaribe neutralizing antibodies appeared 3 weeks postinfection. The five Tacaribe-infected marmosets and four noninfected controls were challenged with the pathogenic strain of Junin virus on day 60 post-Tacaribe infection. The former group showed no signs of disease, no viremia, and no challenge virus replication, whereas the control group exhibited the typical symptoms of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, high viremia, and viral titers in organs. Soon after challenge, the Tacaribe-protected marmosets synthesized neutralizing antibodies against Junin virus. These results indicate that the marmoset C. jacchus can be considered an experimental model for protection studies with arenaviruses and that the Tacaribe virus could be considered as a potential vaccine against Junin virus. PMID:6276301

  17. Argentine ant trail pheromone disruption is mediated by trail concentration.

    PubMed

    Suckling, David Maxwell; Stringer, Lloyd D; Corn, Joshua E

    2011-10-01

    Argentine ant trail pheromone disruption, using continuous release of the trail pheromone compound (Z)-9-hexadecanal, reduces the incidence of trails and foraging rates of field populations. However, little is known about the concentrations of pheromone required for successful disruption. We hypothesized that higher pheromone quantities would be necessary to disrupt larger ant populations. To test this, we laid a 30-cm long base trail of (Z)-9-hexadecanal on a glass surface at low and high rates (1 and 100 pg/cm) (Trail 1), and laid a second, shorter trail (Trail 2, 10 cm long, located 1.5 cm upwind) near the middle of Trail 1 at six rates (1, 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and 100,000 pg/cm). We then recorded and digitized movements of individual ants following Trail 1, and derived a regression statistic, r (2), as an index of trail integrity, and also recorded arrival success at the other end of the trail (30 cm) near a food supply. Disruption of trails required 100 fold more pheromone upwind, independent of base-trail concentration. This implies that in the field, trail disruption is likely to be less successful against high ant-trail densities (greater concentration of trail pheromone), and more successful against newly formed or weak trails, as could be expected along invasion fronts. PMID:21964852

  18. Chemical signals associated with life inhibit necrophoresis in Argentine ants.

    PubMed

    Choe, Dong-Hwan; Millar, Jocelyn G; Rust, Michael K

    2009-05-19

    One of the most conspicuous and stereotyped activities of social insects such as ants and honey bees is necrophoresis, the removal of dead colony members from the nest. Previous researchers suggested that decomposition products such as fatty acids trigger necrophoric behavior by ant workers. However, fatty acids elicit both foraging and necrophoric responses, depending on the current nest activities (e.g., feeding or nest maintenance). Furthermore, workers often carry even freshly killed workers (dead for <1 h) to refuse piles before significant decomposition has a chance to occur. Here, we show that the cuticular chemistry of Argentine ant workers, Linepithema humile, undergoes rapid changes after death. When the workers are alive or freshly killed, relatively large amounts of 2 characteristic ant-produced compounds, dolichodial and iridomyrmecin, are present on the ants' cuticle. However, these compounds disappear from the cuticle within about 1 h after death. We demonstrate how this phenomenon supports an alternative mechanism of ant necrophoresis in which the precise recognition and rapid removal of dead nestmates are elicited by the disappearance of these chemical signals associated with life. PMID:19416815

  19. Insecticide Transfer Efficiency and Lethal Load in Argentine Ants

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Kwok, E S.C.; Buchholz, B. A.; Rust, M. K.; Eastmond, D. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    2015-07-03

    Trophallaxis between individual worker ants and the toxicant load in dead and live Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in colonies exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon experimental baits were examined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). About 50% of the content of the crop containing trace levels of 14C-sucrose, 14C-hydramethylnon, and 14C-fipronil was shared between single donor and recipient ants. Dead workers and queens contained significantly more hydramethylnon (122.7 and 22.4 amol/μg ant, respectively) than did live workers and queens (96.3 and 10.4 amol/μg ant, respectively). Dead workers had significantly more fipronil (420.3 amol/μg ant) than did live workers (208.5 amol/μg ant), but dead and live queens had equal fipronil levels (59.5 and 54.3 amol/μg ant, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of fipronil differed within the bodies of dead and live queens; the highest amounts of fipronil were recovered in the thorax of dead queens whereas live queens had the highest levels in the head. Resurgence of polygynous ant colonies treated with hydramethylnon baits may be explained by queen survival resulting from sublethal doses due to a slowing of trophallaxis throughout the colony. The bait strategies and dose levels for controlling insect pests need to be based on the specific toxicant properties and trophic strategies for targeting the entire colony.

  20. Insecticide Transfer Efficiency and Lethal Load in Argentine Ants

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Kwok, E S.C.; Buchholz, B. A.; Rust, M. K.; Eastmond, D. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    2015-07-03

    Trophallaxis between individual worker ants and the toxicant load in dead and live Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in colonies exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon experimental baits were examined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). About 50% of the content of the crop containing trace levels of 14C-sucrose, 14C-hydramethylnon, and 14C-fipronil was shared between single donor and recipient ants. Dead workers and queens contained significantly more hydramethylnon (122.7 and 22.4 amol/μg ant, respectively) than did live workers and queens (96.3 and 10.4 amol/μg ant, respectively). Dead workers had significantly more fipronil (420.3 amol/μg ant) than did live workers (208.5 amol/μg ant), butmore » dead and live queens had equal fipronil levels (59.5 and 54.3 amol/μg ant, respectively). Moreover, the distribution of fipronil differed within the bodies of dead and live queens; the highest amounts of fipronil were recovered in the thorax of dead queens whereas live queens had the highest levels in the head. Resurgence of polygynous ant colonies treated with hydramethylnon baits may be explained by queen survival resulting from sublethal doses due to a slowing of trophallaxis throughout the colony. The bait strategies and dose levels for controlling insect pests need to be based on the specific toxicant properties and trophic strategies for targeting the entire colony.« less

  1. Insecticide transfer efficiency and lethal load in Argentine ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Kwok, E. S. C.; Buchholz, B. A.; Rust, M. K.; Eastmond, D. A.; Vogel, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Trophallaxis between individual worker ants and the toxicant load in dead and live Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) in colonies exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon experimental baits were examined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). About 50% of the content of the crop containing trace levels of 14C-sucrose, 14C-hydramethylnon, and 14C-fipronil was shared between single donor and recipient ants. Dead workers and queens contained significantly more hydramethylnon (122.7 and 22.4 amol/μg ant, respectively) than did live workers and queens (96.3 and 10.4 amol/μg ant, respectively). Dead workers had significantly more fipronil (420.3 amol/μg ant) than did live workers (208.5 amol/μg ant), but dead and live queens had equal fipronil levels (59.5 and 54.3 amol/μg ant, respectively). The distribution of fipronil differed within the bodies of dead and live queens; the highest amounts of fipronil were recovered in the thorax of dead queens whereas live queens had the highest levels in the head. Resurgence of polygynous ant colonies treated with hydramethylnon baits may be explained by queen survival resulting from sublethal doses due to a slowing of trophallaxis throughout the colony. Bait strategies and dose levels for controlling insect pests need to be based on the specific toxicant properties and trophic strategies for targeting the entire colony.

  2. Antibiotic sensitivity of an Argentine strain collection of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G; Piscitelli, H; Perez-Monti, H; Stobbs, L A

    2000-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 88 isolates of Moraxella bovis of Argentine origin was evaluated for 12 antimicrobials by broth microdilution procedures. The isolates had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of < or = 0.06 microg/mL to enrofloxacin; < or = 0.12 microg/mL to ceftiofur; < or = 0.25 microg/mL to ampicillin; < or = 0.5 microg/mL to florfenicol and gentamicin; < or = 1.0 microg/mL to tilmicosin, erythromycin, and oxytetracycline; < or = 4.0 microg/mL to tylosin; < or = 8.0 microg/mL to spectinomycin; < or = 0.25/4.75 microg/mL to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole; and > or = 32 microg/mL to lincomycin. Modal MIC values for these antimicrobials were as follows: enrofloxacin, 0.03 microg/mL; ceftiofur, 0.06 pg/mL; ampicillin, 0.25 microg/mL; florfenicol, gentamicin, erythromycin, and oxytetracycline, 0.5 microg/mL; tilmicosin, 1.0 microg/mL; tylosin and spectinomycin, 4.0 microg/mL; lincomycin and erythromycin, 16 microg/mL; and trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole, < or = 0.25/4.75 microg/mL. These data show that all antimicrobials except lincomycin have MICs suggestive of sensitivity in vitro, though confirmation of clinical efficacy can only be properly assessed based on pharmacologic and/or clinical data to support the MIC values. PMID:19757583

  3. Monitoring of erythemal irradiance in the Argentine ultraviolet network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cede, Alexander; Luccini, Eduardo; Nuñez, Liliana; Piacentini, Rubén D.; Blumthaler, Mario

    2002-07-01

    The Ultraviolet (UV) Monitoring Network of the Argentine Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (National Weather Service) consists at present of nine stations from 22° to 64° latitude south equipped with biometers, broadband instruments that measure the erythemal irradiance. After a complete calibration of the instruments and reprocessing of the database a preliminary climatology of erythemal irradiance and erythemal exposure was built by analyzing the data of the first 2-4 years for each station. The influence of the measurement interval on the UV Index is quantified. A tropical high-altitude station in the Andean Altiplano reaches top UV Index values of 20 and daily doses of 10.6 kJ/m2, among the highest UV levels worldwide. Characteristic UV lndex and erythemal exposure in the central, most populated areas of Argentina are similar to those in other Southern Hemisphere stations and are higher than in comparable latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere. The southern stations in the UV network are often affected by the Antarctic ozone hole. By comparing clear-sky irradiance measurements with aerosol-free radiative transfer calculations using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer surface albedo climatology, typical attenuations from 2 to 15% due to aerosols were determined, reaching maxima of 30% at urban locations. On the other hand, increases of ~3-6% due to higher surface albedo were obtained for snow-free conditions, and increases up to 15% were obtained for snow-covered terrain.

  4. [Distribution of Lutzomyia longipalpis in the Argentine Mesopotamia, 2010].

    PubMed

    Salomon, Oscar D; Fernandez, Maria S; Santini, María S; Saavedra, Silvina; Montiel, Natalia; Ramos, Marina A; Rosa, Juan R; Szelag, Enrique A; Martinez, Mariela F

    2011-01-01

    The first case of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Argentina was reported in 2006 in Posadas, Misiones. During the summer 2008-2009 Lutzomyia longipalpis, the VL vector, and canine VL cases were already spread along the province of Corrientes. In order to know the distribution of VL risk, systematic captures of the vector were performed between February and March 2010, in 18 areas of the provinces of Entre Ríos and Corrientes, and the city of Puerto Iguazú, Misiones, with a total of 313 traps/night. We confirmed the presence of Lu. longipalpis, for the first time in Chajarí (Entre Ríos), Alvear, La Cruz, Curuzú Cuatiá and Bella Vista (Corrientes), and Puerto Iguazú (Misiones). In Santo Tome and Monte Caseros (Corrientes), where the vector had been previously reported, traps with more samples were obtained with 830 and 126 Lu. Longipalpis trap/site/night respectively. These results show that the vector of urban VL continues spreading in the Argentine territory. Simultaneously, the spread of the parasite and the resulting human VL cases are associated with the dispersion of reservoirs, infected dogs, with or without clinical symptoms or signs, due to human transit. PMID:21296716

  5. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  6. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  7. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) (75 FR 11441, March 11, 2010) as a... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Framework Adjustment 7 AGENCY... on the longfin squid fishery from a catch cap to a discard cap in Framework Adjustment 7 to...

  8. 50 CFR 648.26 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mackerel, squid, and butterfish... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.26 Mackerel, squid, and butterfish possession restrictions. (a) Atlantic mackerel. (1) A vessel must be...

  9. 50 CFR 648.23 - Mackerel, squid, and butterfish gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing 2,500 lb (1.13 mt) or more of butterfish...) Longfin squid fishery. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels possessing longfin squid harvested in or... constriction. Owners or operators of otter trawl vessels fishing for and/or possessing longfin squid shall...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of hybrid Nb-YBCO dc SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Frack, E.K.; Drake, R.E.; Patt, R.; Radparvar, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication of hybrid low T{sub c}/high T{sub c} dc SQUIDs of two flavors. The first kind utilizes niobium tunnel junctions and a YBCO film strip as the most inductive portion of the SQUID loop. This configuration allows a direct measurement of the inductance of the YBCO microstrip from which the effective penetration depth can be calculated. The successful fabrication of these SQUIDs has required 1. superconducting Nb-to-YBCO contacts, 2. deposition and patterning of an SiO{sub 2} insulation layer over YBCO, and 3. selective patterning of niobium and SiO{sub 2} relative to YBCO. All these process steps are pertinent to the eventual use of YBCO thin films in electronic devices.

  11. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  12. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  13. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  14. Improved Readout Scheme for SQUID-Based Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    An improved readout scheme has been proposed for high-resolution thermometers, (HRTs) based on the use of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to measure temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibilities. The proposed scheme would eliminate counting ambiguities that arise in the conventional scheme, while maintaining the superior magnetic-flux sensitivity of the conventional scheme. The proposed scheme is expected to be especially beneficial for HRT-based temperature control of multiplexed SQUIDbased bolometer sensor arrays. SQUID-based HRTs have become standard for measuring and controlling temperatures in the sub-nano-Kelvin temperature range in a broad range of low-temperature scientific and engineering applications. A typical SQUIDbased HRT that utilizes the conventional scheme includes a coil wound on a core made of a material that has temperature- dependent magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range of interest. The core and the coil are placed in a DC magnetic field provided either by a permanent magnet or as magnetic flux inside a superconducting outer wall. The aforementioned coil is connected to an input coil of a SQUID. Changes in temperature lead to changes in the susceptibility of the core and to changes in the magnetic flux detected by the SQUID. The SQUID readout instrumentation is capable of measuring magnetic-flux changes that correspond to temperature changes down to a noise limit .0.1 nK/Hz1/2. When the flux exceeds a few fundamental flux units, which typically corresponds to a temperature of .100 nK, the SQUID is reset. The temperature range can be greatly expanded if the reset events are carefully tracked and counted, either by a computer running appropriate software or by a dedicated piece of hardware.

  15. Patch voltage clamp of squid axon membrane.

    PubMed

    Fishman, H M

    1975-12-01

    A small area (patch) of the external surface of a squid axon can be "isolated" electrically from the surrounding bath by means of a pair of concentric glass pipettes. The seawater-filled inner pipette makes contact with the axon and constitutes the external access to the patch. The outer pipette is used to direct flowing sucrose solution over the area surrounding the patch of membrane underlying the inner pipette. Typically, sucrose isolated patches remain in good condition (spike amplitude greater than 90 mV) for periods of approximately one half hour. Patches of axon membrane which had previously been exposed to sucrose solution were often excitable. Membrane survival of sucrose treatment apparently arises from an outflow of ions from the axon and perhaps satellite cells into the interstitial cell space surrounding the exolemma. Estimate of the total access resistance (electrode plus series resistance) to the patch is about 100 komega (7 omega cm2). Patch capacitance ranges from 10-100 pF, which suggests areas of 10(-4) to 10(-5) cm2 and resting patch resistances of 10-100 Momega. Shunt resistance through the interstitial space exposed to sucrose solution, which isolates the patch, is typically 1-2 Momega. These parameters indicate that good potential control and response times can be achieved on a patch. Furthermore, spatial uniformity is demonstrated by measurement of an exoplasmic isopotential during voltage clamp of an axon patch. The method may be useful for other preparations in which limited membrane area is available or in special instances such as in the measurement of membrane conduction noise. PMID:1214276

  16. Application of squids in the Iwate create project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, M.; He, D. F.; Nakai, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Yaegashi, M.; Ito, M.; Yashiro, H.; Daibo, M.; Simizu, T.; Uchikawa, Y.; Noto, K.

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a 64-channel magnetocardiograph (MCG) system for the diagnosis of heart disease. The MCG is characterized by its display of a unique three-dimensional image of bio-currents flowing inside the human body. The outline of the heart can be displayed without use of MRI. A mobile SQUID-based non-distractive evaluation apparatus was realized by the active shielding technique. The system can offer information from beneath the surface of the specimen by using a saw-wave excitation method. This mobile technology enables us to inspect ferromagnetic materials, whose high magnetic field rules out the use of a conventional SQUID apparatus near them.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SQUIDs are an attractive candidate for the amplification of low-level rf and microwave signals. Compared to semiconductor amplifiers, they offer lower noise and much lower power dissipation. Especially at frequencies below 1 GHz, the improvement in noise temperature compared to the best cold semiconductor amplifiers can be as high as 50; noise temperatures only slightly above the quantum limit have been achieved in this frequency range. This article will review the current status of radio-frequency amplifiers based on dc SQUIDs and provide detailed discussions of amplifier noise temperature, input and output impedance, and nonlinearities.

  18. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  19. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  20. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  1. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  2. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  3. Swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency of squids throughout ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Thompson, Joseph T; Stewart, William J

    2008-12-01

    Squids encounter vastly different flow regimes throughout ontogeny as they undergo critical morphological changes to their two locomotive systems: the fins and jet. Squid hatchlings (paralarvae) operate at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers (Re) and typically have rounded bodies, small fins, and relatively large funnel apertures, whereas juveniles and adults operate at higher Re and generally have more streamlined bodies, larger fins, and relatively small funnel apertures. These morphological changes and varying flow conditions affect swimming performance in squids. To determine how swimming dynamics and propulsive efficiency change throughout ontogeny, digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and kinematic data were collected from an ontogenetic range of long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii and brief squid Lolliguncula brevis swimming in a holding chamber or water tunnel (Re = 20-20 000). Jet and fin wake bulk properties were quantified, and propulsive efficiency was computed based on measurements of impulse and excess kinetic energy in the wakes. Paralarvae relied predominantly on a vertically directed, high frequency, low velocity jet as they bobbed up and down in the water column. Although some spherical vortex rings were observed, most paralarval jets consisted of an elongated vortical region of variable length with no clear pinch-off of a vortex ring from the trailing tail component. Compared with paralarvae, juvenile and adult squid exhibited a more diverse range of swimming strategies, involving greater overall locomotive fin reliance and multiple fin and jet wake modes with better defined vortex rings. Despite greater locomotive flexibility, jet propulsive efficiency of juveniles/adults was significantly lower than that of paralarvae, even when juvenile/adults employed their highest efficiency jet mode involving the production of periodic isolated vortex rings with each jet pulse. When the fins were considered together with the jet for several

  4. Common trends in northeast Atlantic squid time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuur, A. F.; Pierce, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic factor analysis is used to estimate common trends in time series of squid catch per unit effort in Scottish (UK) waters. Results indicated that time series of most months were related to sea surface temperature measured at Millport (UK) and a few series were related to the NAO index. The DFA methodology identified three common trends in the squid time series not revealed by traditional approaches, which suggest a possible shift in relative abundance of summer- and winter-spawning populations.

  5. Feeding strategy of juvenile (age-0+ year) Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi in the Patagonian nursery ground.

    PubMed

    Temperoni, B; Viñas, M D; Buratti, C C

    2013-11-01

    Age-0+ year juvenile Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi (60-150 mm total length, L(T)) from San Jorge Gulf, north Patagonian shelf region of the Argentine Sea, had an almost exclusively pelagic diet dominated by the hyperiid amphipod Themisto gaudichaudii and the euphausiid Euphausia lucens. This suggested that final settlement and permanent demersal habitat utilization might not, as previously reported, occur at earlier sizes (c. 20 mm L(T)). Their feeding strategy involves specialization at a population level towards both the main pelagic prey, indicating a narrow trophic niche. Novel data are provided which contribute to the growing body of information in relation to the age-0+ year transitional stage in demersal fishes and particularly to M. hubbsi recruitment in the Argentine Sea. PMID:24580669

  6. Biotic and abiotic controls of argentine ant invasion success at local and landscape scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menke, S.B.; Fisher, R.N.; Jetz, W.; Holway, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Although the ecological success of introduced species hinges on biotic interactions and physical conditions, few experimental studies - especially on animals - have simultaneously investigated the relative importance of both types of factors. The lack of such research may stem from the common assumption that native and introduced species exhibit similar environmental tolerances. Here we combine experimental and spatial modeling approaches (1) to determine the relative importance of biotic and abiotic controls of Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) invasion success, (2) to examine how the importance of these factors changes with spatial scale in southern California (USA), and (3) to assess how Argentine ants differ from native ants in their environmental tolerances. A factorial field experiment that combined native ant removal with irrigation revealed that Argentine ants failed to invade any dry plots (even those lacking native ants) but readily invaded all moist plots. Native ants slowed the spread of Argentine ants into irrigated plots but did not prevent invasion. In areas without Argentine ants, native ant species showed variable responses to irrigation. At the landscape scale, Argentine ant occurrence was positively correlated with minimum winter temperature (but not precipitation), whereas native ant diversity increased with precipitation and was negatively correlated with minimum winter temperature. These results are of interest for several reasons. First, they demonstrate that fine-scale differences in the physical environment can eclipse biotic resistance from native competitors in determining community susceptibility to invasion. Second, our results illustrate surprising complexities with respect to how the abiotic factors limiting invasion can change with spatial scale, and third, how native and invasive species can differ in their responses to the physical environment. Idiosyncratic and scale-dependent processes complicate attempts to forecast where

  7. Combined effect of hemipteran control and liquid bait on Argentine ant populations.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, R J; Bambara, S B; Silverman, J

    2010-10-01

    The invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), has become a worldwide problem capable of inflicting significant ecological and economic injury on urban, agricultural, and natural environments. The mobility of this pest ant has long been noted, rapidly moving nests to new food resources and then away as resources are depleted. This ant, like many pest ant species, has a special affinity for honeydew excreted by phloem-feeding Hemiptera. We investigated the effect of various hemipteran control strategies on terrapin scale densities and measured their indirect effect on local Argentine ant densities and foraging effort. We then determined whether this indirect treatment strategy improved the performance of an ant bait. We predicted that Argentine ants would move nests away from trees treated for Hemiptera and then move nests back when a liquid bait was offered, followed by a decline in ant numbers due to intake of the toxicant. A horticultural oil spray and soil application of the systemic insecticide, imidacloprid, had no effect on terrapin scale numbers. However, trunk-injected dicrotophos caused a reduction in scale and a decline in local Argentine ant nest density and canopy foraging effort. We also recorded a reduction in local Argentine ant ground foraging when large amounts of liquid bait were applied, and we found no evidence that combining dicrotophos with liquid ant bait performed better than each treatment alone. We suggest that a strategy of combined hemipteran control plus application of liquid ant bait can reduce local Argentine ant densities, when both components of this system are highly efficacious. PMID:21061981

  8. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.

  9. Two Methods for a First Order Hardware Gradiometer Using Two HTS SQUID's

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-09-15

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. ''Analog'' gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  10. Two methods for a first order hardware gradiometer using two HTS SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.

    1998-12-31

    Two different systems for noise cancellation (first order gradiometers) have been developed using two similar high temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUIDs. Analog gradiometry is accomplished in hardware by either (1) subtracting the signals from the sensor and background SQUIDs at a summing amplifier (parallel technique) or (2) converting the inverted background SQUID signal to a magnetic field at the sensor SQUID (series technique). Balance levels achieved are 2000 and 1000 at 20 Hz for the parallel and series methods respectively. The balance level as a function of frequency is also presented. The effect which time delays in the two sets of SQUID electronics have on this balance level is presented and discussed.

  11. Agronomic characterization of the Argentina Indicator Region. [U.S. corn belt and Argentine pampas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, D. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the Argentina indicator region including information on topography, climate, soils and vegetation is presented followed by a regionalization of crop livestock land use. Corn/soybean production and exports as well as agricultural practices are discussed. Similarities and differences in the physical agronomic scene, crop livestock land use and agricultural practices between the U.S. corn belt and the Argentine pampa are considered. The Argentine agricultural economy is described. Crop calendars for the Argentina indicator region, an accompanying description, notes on crop-livestock zones, wheat production, field size, and agricultural problems and practices are included.

  12. [A century of legislation as regards Italy-Argentine immigration, 1860-1960].

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyzes the changes in Argentine laws regarding migration, mainly in the hundred years since the Argentine Constitution was passed until the 1950s. The different subsequent laws and the debates they caused are related by the author to the political and ideological trends dominating Argentina in that period as to the characteristics and oscillations of the migratory afflux. Further the paper considers Italian laws and migration policies during the same period. The author concludes that after a liberal migration policy in the 19th century, growing legal restrictions and passionate discussion on the role of immigrants followed in this century, particularly between the 2 World Wars. PMID:12269146

  13. DNA Barcoding Identifies Argentine Fishes from Marine and Brackish Waters

    PubMed Central

    Mabragaña, Ezequiel; Díaz de Astarloa, Juan Martín; Hanner, Robert; Zhang, Junbin; González Castro, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding has been advanced as a promising tool to aid species identification and discovery through the use of short, standardized gene targets. Despite extensive taxonomic studies, for a variety of reasons the identification of fishes can be problematic, even for experts. DNA barcoding is proving to be a useful tool in this context. However, its broad application is impeded by the need to construct a comprehensive reference sequence library for all fish species. Here, we make a regional contribution to this grand challenge by calibrating the species discrimination efficiency of barcoding among 125 Argentine fish species, representing nearly one third of the known fauna, and examine the utility of these data to address several key taxonomic uncertainties pertaining to species in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings Specimens were collected and morphologically identified during crusies conducted between 2005 and 2008. The standard BARCODE fragment of COI was amplified and bi-directionally sequenced from 577 specimens (mean of 5 specimens/species), and all specimens and sequence data were archived and interrogated using analytical tools available on the Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD; www.barcodinglife.org). Nearly all species exhibited discrete clusters of closely related haplogroups which permitted the discrimination of 95% of the species (i.e. 119/125) examined while cases of shared haplotypes were detected among just three species-pairs. Notably, barcoding aided the identification of a new species of skate, Dipturus argentinensis, permitted the recognition of Genypterus brasiliensis as a valid species and questions the generic assignment of Paralichthys isosceles. Conclusions/Significance This study constitutes a significant contribution to the global barcode reference sequence library for fishes and demonstrates the utility of barcoding for regional species identification. As an independent assessment of alpha taxonomy, barcodes provide

  14. Argentine experience in the field of illegal immigration.

    PubMed

    Villar, J M

    1984-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of Argentine policy toward migratory flows from neighboring countries and Europe, and concludes with statistics on the number of foreigners in Argentina in the 1970-80 period. Measures passed during the 1940s and 1950s were aimed at providing amnesty for foreigners who were residing in Argentina without immigrant status. However, the lack of an adequate administrative structure to regulate foreigners at the borders was a drawback for migration authorities and limited the possiblility of applying admission criteria effectively. By 1970, there were 583,000 foreigners from neighboring countries living in Argentina, which represented a 25% increase from 1960. 42% of these migrants were in the metropolitan region of the country, indicative of a shift away from employment in agriculture. Decree No. 87, passed in 1974, represented an extension of a migration policy aimed at granting ample facilities for permanent residence to aliens from contiguous countries and was designed to prevent abuse of clandestine workers by employers. As a result of this measure, 150,000 foreigners were able to settle legally in the country. A 1981 law, yet to be implemented, establishes a new legal framework aimed at fostering immigration and regulating the admission of foreigners. To attain the objective of settling workers in areas of the country considered of prime importance to economic development, the law provides for infrastructural investments and promotional measures in areas such as tax exemption and the granting of credit. The 1980 National Population Census indicated there were 677,000 foreigners from neighboring countries in Argentina. In that year, foreigners comprised 2.4% of the country's population and 3.1% of the inhabitants of the metropolitan region. These figures are indicative of a decline in the growth of immigration, most likely due to the decline in the purchasing power of workers' salaries in the late 1970s. PMID:12339919

  15. Relationship between tissue structural collapse and disappearance of flesh transparency during postmortem changes in squid mantles.

    PubMed

    Kugino, Mutsuko; Kugino, Kenji; Tamura, Tomoko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between squid flesh transparency and muscle tissue microstructure. Squid mantle muscle was stored at 4 degrees C after being transported for 2 h by 4 different transportation methods used commonly in Japan (Group 1: live squid packed in ice-cold seawater; Group 2: live squid packed at 4 degrees C; Group 3: squid killed immediately after harvest and packed at 4 degrees C; Group 4: live squid packed in a fish tank containing seawater). Parameters of muscle tissue transparency were measured by an image analysis of digital images of squid muscle tissue. The mantle muscle tissue was observed under a transmission electron microscope to determine the postmortem structural changes at the cellular level. The ATP content of muscle tissue and rupture energy of squid flesh were also measured. As a result, the transparency of squid flesh and the ATP content of the muscles showed the same pattern of change in degree as time passed. The values of these parameters were highest in the group of squid killed immediately followed in order by those transported live, the refrigerated squid, and squid stored in ice-cold seawater. The mantle muscle tissue started to lose its transparency when the ATP in the muscle tissue started to decline. Disintegration of squid muscle tissue structure at the cellular level during storage under refrigeration for 24 h (4 degrees C) was observed in all methods of transportation. This suggested that destruction of the squid muscle tissue structure by autolysis is remarkably fast. The muscle tissue structure disintegrates due to decomposition of the muscle proteins, and muscle transparency is lost because the entire muscle develops a mixed coarse-minute structure. PMID:20492111

  16. Digestive enzyme activities are higher in the shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, than in ectothermic sharks as a result of visceral endothermy.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kyle C; Wraith, James; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2015-08-01

    Lamnid sharks are regionally endothermic fishes that maintain visceral temperatures elevated above the ambient water temperature. Visceral endothermy is thought to increase rates of digestion and food processing and allow thermal niche expansion. We tested the hypothesis that, at in vivo temperatures, the endothermic shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, has higher specific activities of three digestive enzymes-gastric pepsin and pancreatic trypsin and lipase-than the thresher shark, Alopias vulpinus, and the blue shark, Prionace glauca, neither of which can maintain elevated visceral temperatures. Homogenized stomach or pancreas tissue obtained from sharks collected by pelagic longline was incubated at both 15 and 25 °C, at saturating substrate concentrations, to quantify tissue enzymatic activity. The mako had significantly higher enzyme activities at 25 °C than did the thresher and blue sharks at 15 °C. This difference was not a simple temperature effect, because at 25 °C the mako had higher trypsin activity than the blue shark and higher activities for all enzymes than the thresher shark. We also hypothesized that the thermal coefficient, or Q 10 value, would be higher for the mako shark than for the thresher and blue sharks because of its more stable visceral temperature. However, the mako and thresher sharks had similar Q 10 values for all enzymes, perhaps because of their closer phylogenetic relationship. The higher in vivo digestive enzyme activities in the mako shark should result in higher rates of food processing and may represent a selective advantage of regional visceral endothermy. PMID:25893905

  17. Clonally related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus), human volunteers, and a bayfront cetacean rehabilitation facility.

    PubMed

    Hower, Suzanne; Phillips, Matthew C; Brodsky, Micah; Dameron, Adrienne; Tamargo, Manuel A; Salazar, Norma C; Jackson, Charlene R; Barrett, John B; Davidson, Maureen; Davis, Johnnie; Mukherjee, Sampa; Ewing, Ruth Y; Gidley, Maribeth L; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Johns, Lisa; Johnson, Frank E; Adebanjo, Olufunmilola; Plano, Lisa R W

    2013-05-01

    In May of 2011, a live mass stranding of 26 short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) occurred in the lower Florida Keys. Five surviving whales were transferred from the original stranding site to a nearby marine mammal rehabilitation facility where they were constantly attended to by a team of volunteers. Bacteria cultured during the routine clinical care of the whales and necropsy of a deceased whale included methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA). In order to investigate potential sources or reservoirs of MSSA and MRSA, samples were obtained from human volunteers, whales, seawater, and sand from multiple sites at the facility, nearby recreational beaches, and a canal. Samples were collected on 3 days. The second collection day was 2 weeks after the first, and the third collection day was 2 months after the last animal was removed from the facility. MRSA and MSSA were isolated on each day from the facility when animals and volunteers were present. MSSA was found at an adjacent beach on all three collection days. Isolates were characterized by utilizing a combination of quantitative real-time PCR to determine the presence of mecA and genes associated with virulence, staphylococcal protein A typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing, multilocus sequence typing, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Using these methods, clonally related MRSA were isolated from multiple environmental locations as well as from humans and animals. Non-identical but genetically similar MSSA and MRSA were also identified from distinct sources within this sample pool. PFGE indicated that the majority of MRSA isolates were clonally related to the prototype human strain USA300. These studies support the notion that S. aureus may be shed into an environment by humans or pilot whales and subsequently colonize or infect exposed new hosts. PMID:23508733

  18. Quantification of red myotomal muscle volume and geometry in the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) and the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis) using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Perry, Cameron N; Cartamil, Daniel P; Bernal, Diego; Sepulveda, Chugey A; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Graham, Jeffrey B; Frank, Lawrence R

    2007-04-01

    T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with image and segmentation analysis (i.e., the process of digitally partitioning tissues based on specified MR image characteristics) was evaluated as a noninvasive alternative for differentiating muscle fiber types and quantifying the amounts of slow, red aerobic muscle in the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) and the salmon shark (Lamna ditropis). MRI-determinations of red muscle quantity and position made for the mid-body sections of three mako sharks (73.5-110 cm fork length, FL) are in close agreement (within the 95% confidence intervals) with data obtained for the same sections by the conventional dissection method involving serial cross-sectioning and volumetric analyses, and with previously reported findings for this species. The overall distribution of salmon shark red muscle as a function of body fork length was also found to be consistent with previously acquired serial dissection data for this species; however, MR imaging revealed an anterior shift in peak red muscle cross-sectional area corresponding to an increase in body mass. Moreover, MRI facilitated visualization of the intact and anatomically correct relationship of tendon linking the red muscle and the caudal peduncle. This study thus demonstrates that MRI is effective in acquiring high-resolution three-dimensional digital data with high contrast between different fish tissue types. Relative to serial dissection, MRI allows more precise quantification of the position, volume, and other details about the types of muscle within the fish myotome, while conserving specimen structural integrity. PMID:17299779

  19. Movements, dive patterns, and social associations of short-finned pilot whales, Globicephala macrorhynchus, released from a mass stranding in the Florida keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Randall S.; Fougeres, Erin M.; Cooper, Arthur G.; Stevens, Robert O.; Brodsky, Micah; Lingenfelser, Robert; Dold, Chris; Douglas, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) are among the most common cetaceans to engage in mass strandings in the southeastern United States. Because these are primarily pelagic, continental shelf-edge animals, much of what is known about this species has derived from mass stranding events. Post-release monitoring via satellite-linked telemetry was conducted with two adult males determined on-site to be healthy, and released directly from a mass stranding of 23 pilot whales in May 2011, near Cudjoe Key, Florida. Tracking provided an opportunity to evaluate the decision for immediate release vs rehabilitation, and to learn more about the lives of members of this difficult-to-study species in the wild. The two pilot whales remained together for at least 16 d before transmissions from one pilot whale (Y-404) ceased. Dive patterns and travel rates suggested that Y-404’s condition deteriorated prior to signal loss. Pilot Whale Y-400 was tracked for another 51 d, moving from the Blake Plateau to the Greater Antilles, remaining in the Windward Passage east of Cuba for the last 17 d of tracking. Once he reached the Antilles, Y-400 remained in high-relief habitat appropriate for the species and made dives within or exceeding the reported range for depth and duration for this species, following expected diel patterns, presumably reflecting continued good health. Telemetry data indicate that he made at least one dive to 1,000 to 1,500 m, and several dives lasted more than 40 min. Although the fates of the two released pilot whales may have been different, the concept of evaluating health and releasing individuals determined to be healthy at the time of stranding appears to have merit as an alternative to bringing all members of mass-stranded pilot whale groups into rehabilitation.

  20. A 128 Multiplexing Factor Time-Domain SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Decourcelle, T.; Perbost, C.; Chapron, C.; Rambaud, D.; Maestre, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.

    2016-07-01

    A cryogenic 128:1 Time-Domain Multiplexer (TDM) has been developed for the readout of kilo-pixel Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays dedicated to the Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology (QUBIC) instrument which aims to measure the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are usually used to read out TESs. Moreover, SQUIDs are used to build TDM by biasing sequentially the SQUIDs connected together—one for each TES. In addition to this common technique which allows a typical 32 multiplexing factor, a cryogenic integrated circuit provides a 4:1 second multiplexing stage. This cryogenic integrated circuit is one of the original part of our TDM achieving an unprecedented 128 multiplexing factor. We present these two dimension TDM stages: topology of the SQUID multiplexer, operation of the cryogenic integrated circuit, and integration of the full system to read out a TES array dedicated to the QUBIC instrument. Flux-locked loop operation in multiplexed mode is also discussed.

  1. High-Tc SQUID magnetometer system with active cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriki, S.; Oyama, H.; Hayashi, A.; Washio, T.; Fujita, M.; Hirata, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Recent developments of high-Tc SQUIDs have enabled high sensitivity magnetometers to be used in wide range of places, such as laboratory and outdoor fields. At the early stage of developing multichannel system for measurement of magnetocardiogram (MCG) in clinical application, we have fabricated a single channel high-Tc SQUID magnetometer system. The system includes a direct-coupled SQUID with slot structure, a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR), and some active compensation electronics for the purpose of reducing various environmental field noises. A novel active noise cancellation was made by using a combination of a normal conducting detection coil that was horizontally wound in the middle height of the MSR, and two compensation coils that were wound at the top and bottom of the MSR. In addition, adaptive noise cancellation was supplemented by means of adaptive digital filter that was implemented in a digital signal processor. A total noise field attenuation of 50-60 dB was attained at 0.5-100 Hz. Low noise signals from the human heart were measured with a high-Tc SQUID in the noise reduced space in the MSR.

  2. A Numerical Treatment of the Rf SQUID: II. Noise Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter; Clarke, John

    2007-01-15

    We investigate rf SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices), coupled to a resonant input circuit, a readout tank circuit and a preamplifier, by numerically solving the corresponding Langevin equations and optimizing model parameters with respect to noise temperature. We also give approximate analytic solutions for the noise temperature, which we reduce to parameters of the SQUID and the tank circuit in the absence of the input circuit. The analytic solutions agree with numerical simulations of the full circuit to within 10%, and are similar to expressions used to calculate the noise temperature of dc SQUIDs. The best device performance is obtained when {beta}{sub L}{prime} {triple_bond} 2{pi}LI{sub 0}/{Phi}{sub 0} is 0.6-0.8; L is the SQUID inductance, I{sub 0} the junction critical current and F{sub 0} the flux quantum. For a tuned input circuit we find an optimal noise temperature T{sub N,opt} {approx} 3Tf/f{sub c}, where T, f and f{sub c} denote temperature, signal frequency and junction characteristic frequency, respectively. This value is only a factor of 2 larger than the optimal noise temperatures obtained by approximate analytic theories carried out previously in the limit {beta}{sub L}{prime} << 1. We study the dependence of the noise temperature on various model parameters, and give examples using realistic device parameters of the extent to which the intrinsic noise temperature can be realized experimentally.

  3. Bias Reversal Technique in SQUID Bootstrap Circuit (SBC) Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Liangliang; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Guofeng; Wu, Jun; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Longqing; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhüusser, Andreas

    Recently, a SQUID direct readout scheme called voltage-biased SQUID Bootstrap Circuit (SBC) is introduced to reduce preamplifier noise contribution. In this paper, we describe a concept of SBC with bias reversal technique which can suppress SQUID intrinsic 1/f noise. When applying a symmetrically rectangular voltage across SBC, two I-Φ characteristics appear at the amplifier output. In order to return to one I - Φ curve, a demodulation technique is required. Because of the asymmetry of typical SBC I-Φ curve, the demodulation method is realized by using a flux compensation of one half Φ0 flux shift. The output signal is then filtered and returned to one I-Φ curve for ordinary FLL readout. It was found, the reversal frequency fR can be dramatically enhanced when using a preamplifier consisting of two operational amplifiers. A planar Nb SQUID magnetometer with a loop-inductance of 350 pH, fR =50 kHz and a second order low pass filter with 10 kHz cut off frequency was employed in our experiment. Results prove the feasibility of SBC bias reversal method. Comparative experiment on noise performance will be carried out in further studies.

  4. Scanning SQUID-on-tip microscopy of vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anahory, Yonathan; Embon, Lior; Vasyukov, Denis; Cuppens, Jo; Lachman, Ella; Halbertal, Dorri; Yaakobi, Elad; Uri, Aviram; Myasoedov, Yuri; Rappaport, Michael L.; Huber, Martin E.; Zeldov, Eli; Weizmann Institute of Science Team; University of Colorado at Denver Team

    2014-03-01

    We present a scanning nanoSQUID microscope with record spatial resolution, spin sensitivity, and operating magnetic fields for the study of vortex matter. The key element of the microscope is the SQUID-on-tip (SOT) device, which is fabricated by pulling a quartz tube into a sharp pipette, followed by three steps of thermal evaporation of a thin superconducting film onto the sides and the apex of the pipette. The devices operate at 4.2 K in applied fields of up to 1T and can be made with diameters down to 50 nm. The SQUIDs-on-tip display an extremely low flux noise of Φn = 50 nΦ0/Hz1/2 and corresponding spin sensitivity of better than 1 μB/Hz1/2, which is about two orders of magnitude improvement over any previous SQUID. Using this new tool we have investigated static and dynamic behavior of vortices in superconducting Pb films. By driving ac and dc transport current we can study vortex displacement and the vortex potential landscape with sub-atomic precision. Azrieli and Minerva Foundation, FQRNT(Quebec), ERC (Europe)

  5. A 128 Multiplexing Factor Time-Domain SQUID Multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.; Decourcelle, T.; Perbost, C.; Chapron, C.; Rambaud, D.; Maestre, S.; Marty, W.; Montier, L.

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic 128:1 Time-Domain Multiplexer (TDM) has been developed for the readout of kilo-pixel Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays dedicated to the Q&U Bolometric Interferometer for Cosmology (QUBIC) instrument which aims to measure the B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background. Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) are usually used to read out TESs. Moreover, SQUIDs are used to build TDM by biasing sequentially the SQUIDs connected together—one for each TES. In addition to this common technique which allows a typical 32 multiplexing factor, a cryogenic integrated circuit provides a 4:1 second multiplexing stage. This cryogenic integrated circuit is one of the original part of our TDM achieving an unprecedented 128 multiplexing factor. We present these two dimension TDM stages: topology of the SQUID multiplexer, operation of the cryogenic integrated circuit, and integration of the full system to read out a TES array dedicated to the QUBIC instrument. Flux-locked loop operation in multiplexed mode is also discussed.

  6. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes. PMID:22425154

  7. High-Resolution Displacement Sensor Using a SQUID Array Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin; Barmatz, M.; Paik, Ho Jung

    2004-01-01

    Improvement in the measurement of displacement has profound implications for both exploration technologies and fundamental physics. For planetary exploration, the new SQUID-based capacitive displacement sensor will enable a more sensitive gravity gradiometer for mapping the interior of planets and moons. A new concept of a superfluid clock to be reported by Penanen and Chui at this workshop is also based on a high-resolution displacement sensor. Examples of high-impact physics projects that can benefit from a better displacement sensor are: detection of gravitational waves, test of the equivalence principle, search for the postulated "axion" particle, and test of the inverse square law of gravity. We describe the concept of a new displacement sensor that makes use of a recent development in the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) technology. The SQUID array amplifier, invented by Welty and Martinis (IEEE Trans. Appl. Superconductivity 3, 2605, 1993), has about the same noise as a conventional SQUID; however, it can work at a much higher frequency of up to 5 MHz. We explain how the higher bandwidth can be translated into higher resolution using a bridge-balancing scheme that can simultaneously balance out both the carrier signal at the bridge output and the electrostatic force acting on the test mass.

  8. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  9. Efficiency of the SQUID ratchet driven by external current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiechowicz, J.; Łuczka, J.

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically the efficiency of an asymmetric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) which is constructed as a loop with three capacitively and resistively shunted Josephson junctions. Two junctions are placed in series in one arm and the remaining one is located in the other arm. The SQUID is threaded by an external magnetic flux and driven by an external current of both constant (dc) and time periodic (ac) components. This system acts as a nonequilibrium ratchet for the dc voltage across the SQUID with the external current as a source of energy. We analyze the power delivered by the external current and find that it strongly depends on thermal noise and the external magnetic flux. We explore a space of the system parameters to reveal a set for which the SQUID efficiency is globally maximal. We detect the intriguing feature of the thermal noise enhanced efficiency and show how the efficiency of the device can be tuned by tailoring the external magnetic flux.

  10. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  11. Magnetic biosensor using a high transition temperature SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Helene Lila

    A high transition temperature (Tc) Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is used to detect magnetically-labeled microorganisms. The targets are identified and quantified by means of magnetic relaxation measurements, with no need for unbound magnetic labels to be washed away. The binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and targets can be measured with this technique. Installed in a "SQUID microscope," a YBa2Cu 3O7-delta SQUID is mounted on a sapphire rod thermally linked to a liquid nitrogen can; these components are enclosed in a fiberglass vacuum chamber. A thin window separates the vacuum chamber from the sample, which is at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In one mode of the experiment, targets are immobilized on a substrate and immersed a suspension of ˜50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies. A pulsed magnetic field aligns the magnetic dipole moments, and the SQUID measures the magnetic relaxation signal each time the field is turned off. Unbound particles relax within ˜50 mus by Brownian rotation, too fast for the SQUID system to measure. In contrast, particles bound to targets have their Brownian motion inhibited. These particles relax in ˜1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment, and this Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. This assay is demonstrated with a model system of liposomes carrying the FLAG epitope; the detection limit is (2.7 +/- 0.2) x 105 particles. The replacement of the SQUID with a gradiometer improves the detection limit to (7.0 +/- 0.7) x 103 particles. In an alternate mode of the experiment, freely suspended targets (larger than ˜1 mum diameter) are detected. Since the Brownian relaxation time of the targets is longer than the measurement time, particles bound to targets are effectively immobilized and exhibit Neel relaxation. Listeria monocytogenes are detected using this method; the sensitivity is (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 105 bacteria in 20 muL. For a 1 n

  12. Paleointensity of the Martian field from SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Fong, L. E.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Vali, H.

    2005-12-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies in the southern Martian hemisphere have intensities an order of magnitude larger than typical crustal anomalies on Earth. Two possible explanations for this difference are that compared to the present-day Earth, Mars has either (i) larger amounts of crustal ferromagnetic minerals or (ii) the crust was magnetized by a larger paleofield. ALH84001, the only pre-Amazonian Martian meteorite, possesses a stable magnetization dating to 4 Ga or earlier. Previous paleomagnetic studies with SQUID moment magnetometers on bulk ALH84001 grains have estimated that the paleointensity of the field which magnetized the meteorite was between 0.1-1 times that of the Earth's present field. However, these estimates may be lower limits on the true paleointensity because the orientation of the magnetization in ALH84001 is spatially heterogeneous on the submillimeter scale. This complication could have profound implications for hypothesis (ii) above. Here we first demonstrate that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy can recover the same magnetization intensity and direction of a well characterized modern-day terrestrial basalt as that measured with a 2G Enterprises SQUID moment magnetometer. A SQUID microscope paleointensity analysis of this basalt gives the expected present day field intensity of a few tens of microtesla. We further show that our new high resolution SQUID microscopy study of ALH84001, which has mapped its heterogeneous magnetization with the highest resolution yet (0.1 mm), favors the upper range of previous paleointensity estimates for the 4 Ga Martian paleofield (e.g., within a factor of several of that of the present-day Earth). However, this field, were it dynamo in origin, is still too weak to easily explain the intensity of the Martian magnetic anomalies.

  13. Effects of honeydew-producing hemipteran denial on local argentine ant distribution and boric acid bait performance.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, R J; Silverman, J

    2009-06-01

    The Argentine ant is well known for its affinity for honeydew and is often associated with hemipteran outbreaks in agricultural and urban environments. It has been suggested that Argentine ants may be controlled by restricting access to honeydew, thereby forcing the ants to move or by encouraging increased liquid toxicant intake. We tested this possible control strategy by restricting Argentine ant access to the honeydew-producing terrapin scale within the canopy of red maple trees and monitoring ant numbers with pitfall traps and nest counts in the mulch around the tree base. Argentine ant nest numbers fell dramatically in the mulch around ant-excluded trees; however, there was no reduction in Argentine ant numbers caught in pitfalls around trees with or without canopy access. We added 0.5% boric acid bait stations at the base of the red maples and monitored bait consumption. Pitfall and nest counts were not affected by the addition of boric acid, although bait consumption was lower around ant-excluded trees, suggesting that restricting access to honeydew-producing Hemiptera did not enhance bait performance. We attribute this result to the increased distance Argentine ant workers had to trail from nest to bait station when not tending nearby terrapin scale. We suggest an alternative management strategy concentrating direct insecticidal control of Argentine ants around a few host plants infested with honeydew-producing Hemiptera by controlling Hemiptera in nearby host plants. PMID:19610434

  14. Applied Ecology and Control of Imported Fire Ants and Argentine Ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, and Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), are invasive species that are major pests in urban, natural, and agricultural habitats. The goal of this dissertation was to study aspects the chemical sensitivity, behavior, and ecology of each specie...

  15. Argentine Hydrellia Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera, Ephydridae): new species and key to identification.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Francisco De Assis; Mathis, Wayne Nielsen; Hauser, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrellia egeriae sp. nov., a new species of Hydrellia from Campana (34 14' 04 S, 58 52' 32 W) and Hurlingham (3435'14 S, 5838'27 W), Buenos Aires province, Argentina is described. A key to the Argentine Hydrellia species is presented. PMID:26249060

  16. Schooling and Governance: Pedagogical Knowledge and Bureaucratic Expertise in the Genesis of the Argentine Educational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwell, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of the Argentine Federal Government by the 1870s aimed to modernise local society, establish state institutions and reach political stabilisation. Building a modern schooling system articulated both utopia and bureaucracy by establishing the use of knowledge as an instrument of social intervention, vindicating and legitimising…

  17. Draft genome of the globally widespread and invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile).

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher D; Zimin, Aleksey; Holt, Carson; Abouheif, Ehab; Benton, Richard; Cash, Elizabeth; Croset, Vincent; Currie, Cameron R; Elhaik, Eran; Elsik, Christine G; Fave, Marie-Julie; Fernandes, Vilaiwan; Gadau, Jürgen; Gibson, Joshua D; Graur, Dan; Grubbs, Kirk J; Hagen, Darren E; Helmkampf, Martin; Holley, Jo-Anne; Hu, Hao; Viniegra, Ana Sofia Ibarraran; Johnson, Brian R; Johnson, Reed M; Khila, Abderrahman; Kim, Jay W; Laird, Joseph; Mathis, Kaitlyn A; Moeller, Joseph A; Muñoz-Torres, Monica C; Murphy, Marguerite C; Nakamura, Rin; Nigam, Surabhi; Overson, Rick P; Placek, Jennifer E; Rajakumar, Rajendhran; Reese, Justin T; Robertson, Hugh M; Smith, Chris R; Suarez, Andrew V; Suen, Garret; Suhr, Elissa L; Tao, Shu; Torres, Candice W; van Wilgenburg, Ellen; Viljakainen, Lumi; Walden, Kimberly K O; Wild, Alexander L; Yandell, Mark; Yorke, James A; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2011-04-01

    Ants are some of the most abundant and familiar animals on Earth, and they play vital roles in most terrestrial ecosystems. Although all ants are eusocial, and display a variety of complex and fascinating behaviors, few genomic resources exist for them. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of a particularly widespread and well-studied species, the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile), which was accomplished using a combination of 454 (Roche) and Illumina sequencing and community-based funding rather than federal grant support. Manual annotation of >1,000 genes from a variety of different gene families and functional classes reveals unique features of the Argentine ant's biology, as well as similarities to Apis mellifera and Nasonia vitripennis. Distinctive features of the Argentine ant genome include remarkable expansions of gustatory (116 genes) and odorant receptors (367 genes), an abundance of cytochrome P450 genes (>110), lineage-specific expansions of yellow/major royal jelly proteins and desaturases, and complete CpG DNA methylation and RNAi toolkits. The Argentine ant genome contains fewer immune genes than Drosophila and Tribolium, which may reflect the prominent role played by behavioral and chemical suppression of pathogens. Analysis of the ratio of observed to expected CpG nucleotides for genes in the reproductive development and apoptosis pathways suggests higher levels of methylation than in the genome overall. The resources provided by this genome sequence will offer an abundance of tools for researchers seeking to illuminate the fascinating biology of this emerging model organism. PMID:21282631

  18. Library Networks in Less-Developed Countries: Two Argentine Cases and Some Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Donna Taxco

    As an American Library Association/USIA International Library Fellow in Argentina from March to September 1989, the author worked with the Argentine National Protective Commission for People's Libraries. Included in her assignment was a charge "to assist in the development of a popular libraries network in Patagonia," the southernmost region of…

  19. Powerful motors: Kinship, citizenship and the transformation of the Argentine oil industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shever, Elana

    The privatization of the Argentine oil industry has been described as an unprecedented transfer of property, capital and control from the state to the corporate sphere, but this study demonstrates that the privatization process is better understood as a transformation of the historical configurations of oil-fueled development, political communities and human subjectivities. This dissertation probes the development of the state-led oil industry, and the shift to a corporate-led one, through an ethnography of Argentines differently positioned in relation to the global oil industry. The ethnography explores the lives of middle class oil workers and their families in Northwest Patagonia, impoverished residents of the shanty neighborhoods near the refineries in metropolitan Buenos Aires, and affluent employees of the translocal corporations operating in the Argentine oil fields. After the Introduction delineates this study's four principal interventions into anthropological scholarship, each subsequent chapter engages a particular problem that cuts across the Argentine oil fields and the anthropological theoretical fields. Chapter Two scrutinizes the historical construction of the Argentine subterritory as a "natural" space of value. Chapters Three and Four investigate the articulation of capitalist production and filial reproduction. These chapters argue that sentiment is a crucial generative force that has shaped the oil industry, company towns and worker families from the founding of the state-owned oil company in beginning of the twentieth century to its conversion into a corporate-owned one at the century's close. Chapters Five and Six examine the emergence of consumer citizenship and corporate citizenship out of Argentine neoliberalismo and its transformation of the oil industry. They argue that consumer and corporate citizenship are both reformulations of the older traditions of liberalism and Peronism. All the chapters of this dissertation illustrate that the

  20. Abiotic factors control invasion by Argentine ants at the community scale.

    PubMed

    Menke, Sean B; Holway, David A

    2006-03-01

    1. A prominent and unresolved question in ecology concerns why communities differ in their susceptibility to invasion. While studies often emphasize biotic resistance, it is less widely appreciated how the physical environment affects community vulnerability to invasion. 2. In this study we performed field experiments to test how abiotic variation directly and indirectly influences the extent to which Linepithema humile Mayr (Argentine ants) invade seasonally dry environments in southern California. 3. In controlled and replicated experiments involving drip irrigation, we demonstrate (i) that elevated levels of soil moisture increased both the abundance of Argentine ants and their ability to invade native ant communities and (ii) that cessation of irrigation caused declines in the abundance of Argentine ants and led to their withdrawal from previously occupied areas. 4. Because drip irrigation stimulated plant growth, in an additional experiment we manipulated both soil moisture and plant cover to assess the direct vs. indirect effects of added water on the abundance of L. humile. 5. Local abundance of Argentine ants increased in irrigated plots but was 38% higher in irrigated plots with plants compared to irrigated plots where plant growth was suppressed. The results of this experiment thus argue for a direct role of soil moisture in influencing Argentine ant abundance but suggest that that the indirect effects of added water may also be important. 6. Our study illustrates more generally that fine-scale variation in the physical environment can control whether communities become invaded by non-native species and suggests that an understanding of community susceptibility to invasion will be improved by a better appreciation of interactions between the biotic and abiotic environment. PMID:16637990

  1. Resonant Frequency Dependence on Outer Diameter of High Tc rf-SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashizuka, Takuya; Sakai, Akira; Miyato, Yuji; Itozaki, Hideo

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been applied to various magnetic sensing. An rf-SQUID can measure magnetic signals by applying external rf-magnetic field whose frequency is tuned to its resonance. Our rf-SQUID having the outer diameter of 3.5 mm needed a substrate resonator to operate it within the operation frequency range of our using FLL electronics. The designs of the rf-SQUID and the resonator were critical to the resonant frequency and the effective area. In this paper, the outer diameter dependence of the resonant frequency and the effective area were investigated by both the electromagnetic simulations and the experiments. The results showed that the rf-SQUID having the larger outer diameter has the smaller resonant frequency and the larger effective area. The rf-SQUIDs having the larger outer diameter were fabricated according to the simulation results. They could be operated within the operation frequency range even though a resonator was omitted.

  2. Retrieval of granular bait by the Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): effect of clumped versus scattered dispersion patterns.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jules; Roulston, T'ai H

    2003-06-01

    Argentine ants, Linepithema humile (Mayr), use mass recruitment foraging, with clumped prey items being retrieved more efficiently than dispersed prey. However, in prior field experiments, granular baits, whether dispensed in containers or broadly scattered, had a similar impact on Argentine ant populations. In laboratory experiments, granular insecticide bait was encountered faster by Argentine ant workers and more granules were initially returned to the colony when the granules were scattered versus clumped. After 2 h, granules from both dispersion patterns were retrieved equally. Our results suggest that Argentine ant colonies adjust their foraging patterns to resources of different quality (prey versus bait). Also, foraging activity patterns for bait in the laboratory are consistent with prior field results demonstrating no efficacy advantages to discrete granular bait placements. PMID:12852629

  3. nSQUID arrays as conveyers of quantum information

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Qiang; Averin, D. V.

    2014-12-15

    We have considered the quantum dynamics of an array of nSQUIDs—two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms. Effective dual-rail structure of the array creates additional internal degree of freedom for the fluxons in the array, which can be used to encode and transport quantum information. Physically, this degree of freedom is represented by electromagnetic excitations localized on the fluxon. We have calculated the spatial profile and frequency spectrum of these excitations. Their dynamics can be reduced to two quantum states, so that each fluxon moving through the array carries with it a qubit of information. Coherence properties of such a propagating qubit in the nSQUID array are characterized by the dynamic suppression of the low-frequency decoherence due to the motion-induced spreading of the noise spectral density to a larger frequency interval.

  4. nSQUID arrays as conveyers of quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Qiang; Averin, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have considered the quantum dynamics of an array of nSQUIDs—two-junction SQUIDs with negative mutual inductance between their two arms. Effective dual-rail structure of the array creates additional internal degree of freedom for the fluxons in the array, which can be used to encode and transport quantum information. Physically, this degree of freedom is represented by electromagnetic excitations localized on the fluxon. We have calculated the spatial profile and frequency spectrum of these excitations. Their dynamics can be reduced to two quantum states, so that each fluxon moving through the array carries with it a qubit of information. Coherence properties of such a propagating qubit in the nSQUID array are characterized by the dynamic suppression of the low-frequency decoherence due to the motion-induced spreading of the noise spectral density to a larger frequency interval.

  5. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction

    PubMed Central

    McCaughan, Adam N.; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films. PMID:27296586

  6. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled bymore » the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.« less

  7. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-12-07

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. Additionally, we consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. Furthermore, the first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation.

  8. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C; Wu, R Q

    2015-08-14

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O_{2} molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O_{2} molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ~1.8 μ_{B}. The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic XY spins on a square lattice find 1/f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs. PMID:26317742

  9. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  10. Energetics of an rf SQUID Coupled to Two Thermal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, B.; Łuczka, J.; Ptok, A.; Dajka, J.

    2015-01-01

    We study energetics of a Josephson tunnel junction connecting a superconducting loop pierced by an external magnetic flux (an rf SQUID) and coupled to two independent thermal reservoirs of different temperature. In the framework of the theory of quantum dissipative systems, we analyze energy currents in stationary states. The stationary energy flow can be periodically modulated by the external magnetic flux exemplifying the rf SQUID as a quantum heat interferometer. We also consider the transient regime and identify three distinct regimes: monotonic decay, damped oscillations and pulse-type behavior of energy currents. The first two regimes can be controlled by the external magnetic flux while the last regime is robust against its variation. PMID:26641890