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Sample records for argon 31

  1. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  2. Lunar exospheric argon modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hurley, D. M.; Hodges, R. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Argon is one of the few known constituents of the lunar exosphere. The surface-based mass spectrometer Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) deployed during the Apollo 17 mission first detected argon, and its study is among the subjects of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) and Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission investigations. We performed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutral atomic argon that we use to better understand its transport and storage across the lunar surface. We took into account several loss processes: ionization by solar photons, charge-exchange with solar protons, and cold trapping as computed by recent LRO/Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) mapping of Permanently Shaded Regions (PSRs). Recycling of photo-ions and solar radiation acceleration are also considered. We report that (i) contrary to previous assumptions, charge exchange is a loss process as efficient as photo-ionization, (ii) the PSR cold-trapping flux is comparable to the ionization flux (photo-ionization and charge-exchange), and (iii) solar radiation pressure has negligible effect on the argon density, as expected. We determine that the release of 2.6 × 1028 atoms on top of a pre-existing argon exosphere is required to explain the maximum amount of argon measured by LACE. The total number of atoms (1.0 × 1029) corresponds to ∼6700 kg of argon, 30% of which (∼1900 kg) may be stored in the cold traps after 120 days in the absence of space weathering processes. The required population is consistent with the amount of argon that can be released during a High Frequency Teleseismic (HFT) Event, i.e. a big, rare and localized moonquake, although we show that LACE could not distinguish between a localized and a global event. The density of argon measured at the time of LACE appears to have originated from no less than four such episodic events. Finally, we show that the extent of the PSRs that trap

  3. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  4. Thermophysical properties of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  5. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  6. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  7. Argon ion pollution of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Power Satellite (SPS) would require the injection of large quantities of propellant to transport material from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the construction site at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). This injection, in the form of approx 10 to the 32nd power, 2 KeV argon ions (and associated electrons) per SPS, is comparable to the content of the plasmasphere (approx 10 to the 31st power ions). In addition to the mass deposited, this represents a considerable injection of energy. The injection is examined in terms of a simple model for the expansion of the beam plasma. General features of the subsequent magnetospheric convection of the argon are also examined.

  8. Argon Purification Reference and Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-05-23

    This engineering note is a reference for future consideration on the purification of argon. The original concern was for the possibility of argon contamination from components in the cryostats over long-term storage. An argon purification system could also be useful for purifying the contents of the argon dewar. The general conclusion is that most of the systems researched are too expensive at this time, but the recommended choice would be Centorr Furnaces. There were three basic types of purification systems which were to be considered. The first was the molecular sieve. This method would have been the preferred one, because it was claimed that it could purify liquid argon, removing liquid oxygen from the argon. However, none of the commercial companies researched provided this type of purification for use with liquid argon. Most companies said that this type of purification was impossible, and tests at IB-4 confirmed this. The second system contained a copper oxide to remove gaseous oxygen from argon gas. The disadvantage of this system wass that the argon had to be heated to a gas, and then cooled back down to liquid. The third system was similar to the second, except that it used tungsten or another material like titanium. This system also needed to heat the argon to gas, however the advantage of this system was that it supposedly removed all contaminants, that is, everything except for inert gases. Of the three systems, the third is the type manufactured by Centorr Furnaces, which uses a titanium charge.

  9. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  10. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  11. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  12. Photoionization of argon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-01-01

    Argon clusters were produced in a free supersonic molecular beam expansion of pure argon at room temperature and the photoionization efficiency curves of the trimer through hexamer were measured in the wavelength regions from threshold to 700 Â. A study of the Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve as a function of nozzle stagnation pressure shows that fragmentation of heavier clusters can dominate the spectrum, even near threshold, and even when the nozzle conditions are such that the Ar⁺4 intensity is only a small fraction of the Ar⁺3 intensity. The Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve, obtained using nozzle stagnation conditions such that no heavier ions were detected, exhibits several broad peaks near threshold which show similarities to bands of the dimer. At high nozzle stagnation pressures, the photoionization efficiency curves for Ar⁺3 to Ar⁺6 are nearly identical due to the effects of fragmentation. These spectra exhibit two very broad features which are similar to features observed in the solid. The threshold regions for all the positive ions show extremely gradual onsets, making it difficult to determine the appearance potentials accurately. The appearance potentials for Ar⁺2 and Ar⁺3 are 855.0±1.5 and 865.0±1.5 Â, respectively, yielding a value of 0.18±0.05 eV for the dissociation energy of Ar⁺3. The appearance potentials for the heavier clusters Ar⁺4 through Ar⁺6 are all approximately 870±2 Â.

  13. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  14. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  15. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  16. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  17. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  18. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  19. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  20. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  1. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  2. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  3. Modelling of RF Discharge in Argon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, P.; Virostko, P.; Hubicka, Z.; Bartos, P.

    2007-12-26

    An one-dimensional hybrid model of RF discharge in low-temperature argon plasma is presented in our paper. The hybrid model consists of two parts--particle model which simulates fast electrons while fluid model simulates slow electrons and positive argon ions. In the particle model the positions and velocities of fast electrons are calculated by means of deterministic Verlet algorithm while the collision processes are treated by the stochastic way. For the solution of fluid equations, for slow electrons and positive argon ions, the Scharfetter-Gummel exponential algorithm was used. Typical results of our calculations presented in this paper are total RF current and RF voltage waveforms on the planar substrate immersed into argon plasma. The next results which can be found here are the ion, electron and displacement current waveforms on the substrate. Especially, the knowledge of waveform of the ion current is very important for experimental physicists during the deposition of thin films.

  4. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  5. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  6. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  8. Inhaled 45–50% argon augments hypothermic brain protection in a piglet model of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Kevin D.; Fierens, Igor; Fleiss, Bobbi; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Ezzati, Mojgan; Hassell, Jane; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Bainbridge, Alan; Kawano, Go; Ma, Daqing; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Golay, Xavier; Sanders, Robert D.; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Cooling to 33.5 °C in babies with neonatal encephalopathy significantly reduces death and disability, however additional therapies are needed to maximize brain protection. Following hypoxia–ischemia we assessed whether inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermia neuroprotection in a neonatal piglet model, using MRS and aEEG, which predict outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy, and immunohistochemistry. Following cerebral hypoxia–ischemia, 20 Newborn male Large White piglets < 40 h were randomized to: (i) Cooling (33 °C) from 2–26 h (n = 10); or (ii) Cooling and inhaled 45–50% Argon (Cooling + Argon) from 2–26 h (n = 8). Whole-brain phosphorus-31 and regional proton MRS were acquired at baseline, 24 and 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia. EEG was monitored. At 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia, cell death (TUNEL) was evaluated over 7 brain regions. There were no differences in body weight, duration of hypoxia–ischemia or insult severity; throughout the study there were no differences in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, blood biochemistry and inotrope support. Two piglets in the Cooling + Argon group were excluded. Comparing Cooling + Argon with Cooling there was preservation of whole-brain MRS ATP and PCr/Pi at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia (p < 0.001 for both) and lower 1H MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate in white (p = 0.03 and 0.04) but not gray matter at 24 and 48 h. EEG background recovery was faster (p < 0.01) with Cooling + Argon. An overall difference between average cell-death of Cooling versus Cooling + Argon was observed (p < 0.01); estimated cells per mm2 were 23.9 points lower (95% C.I. 7.3–40.5) for the Cooling + Argon versus Cooling. Inhaled 45–50% Argon from 2–26 h augmented hypothermic protection at 48 h after hypoxia–ischemia shown by improved brain energy metabolism on MRS, faster EEG recovery and reduced cell death on TUNEL. Argon may provide a cheap and practical therapy

  9. Inhaled 45-50% argon augments hypothermic brain protection in a piglet model of perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Broad, Kevin D; Fierens, Igor; Fleiss, Bobbi; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Ezzati, Mojgan; Hassell, Jane; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Bainbridge, Alan; Kawano, Go; Ma, Daqing; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Golay, Xavier; Sanders, Robert D; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-03-01

    Cooling to 33.5°C in babies with neonatal encephalopathy significantly reduces death and disability, however additional therapies are needed to maximize brain protection. Following hypoxia-ischemia we assessed whether inhaled 45-50% Argon from 2-26h augmented hypothermia neuroprotection in a neonatal piglet model, using MRS and aEEG, which predict outcome in babies with neonatal encephalopathy, and immunohistochemistry. Following cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, 20 Newborn male Large White piglets<40h were randomized to: (i) Cooling (33°C) from 2-26h (n=10); or (ii) Cooling and inhaled 45-50% Argon (Cooling+Argon) from 2-26h (n=8). Whole-brain phosphorus-31 and regional proton MRS were acquired at baseline, 24 and 48h after hypoxia-ischemia. EEG was monitored. At 48h after hypoxia-ischemia, cell death (TUNEL) was evaluated over 7 brain regions. There were no differences in body weight, duration of hypoxia-ischemia or insult severity; throughout the study there were no differences in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, blood biochemistry and inotrope support. Two piglets in the Cooling+Argon group were excluded. Comparing Cooling+Argon with Cooling there was preservation of whole-brain MRS ATP and PCr/Pi at 48h after hypoxia-ischemia (p<0.001 for both) and lower (1)H MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate in white (p=0.03 and 0.04) but not gray matter at 24 and 48h. EEG background recovery was faster (p<0.01) with Cooling+Argon. An overall difference between average cell-death of Cooling versus Cooling+Argon was observed (p<0.01); estimated cells per mm(2) were 23.9 points lower (95% C.I. 7.3-40.5) for the Cooling+Argon versus Cooling. Inhaled 45-50% Argon from 2-26h augmented hypothermic protection at 48h after hypoxia-ischemia shown by improved brain energy metabolism on MRS, faster EEG recovery and reduced cell death on TUNEL. Argon may provide a cheap and practical therapy to augment cooling for neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:26687546

  10. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Achey, R.; Hunter, D.

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  11. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  12. Argon isotopic zoning in mantle phlogopite

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T.C.

    1988-06-01

    Incremental-heating and laser-probe /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar analyses were performed on phlogopite extracted from a garnet-lherzolite mantle nodule entrained by the Precambrian (1200 Ma) Premier kimberlite, South Africa. The spatial resolution of the laser probe has enabled the characterization of argon isotopic zoning in a single phlogopite grain. An apparent age contour map records lower ages (1.2 Ga) along grain margins and high apparent ages (up to 2.4 Ga) at the core. The latter ages are caused by excess argon contamination and subsequent partial diffusive loss, and have no age significance. Comparison with step-heating results indicates that argon spatial distributions inferred from in-vacuo step-heating experiments are, at best, grossly approximate. Variations in the laser-probe apparent ages were observed only laterally across the phlogopite cleavage surface, indicating that argon transport occurs preferentially along phlogopite cleavage planes. Age profiles, when modeled using one-dimensional radial geometry (cylindrical coordinates), do not conform to classical Fick's law diffusion, suggesting that the characteristic dimension of diffusion for argon in phlogopite may be highly variable within individual grains.

  13. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  14. High-pressure stabilization of argon fluorides.

    PubMed

    Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk

    2016-01-28

    On account of the rapid development of noble gas chemistry in the past half-century both xenon and krypton compounds can now be isolated in macroscopic quantities. The same does not hold true for the next lighter group 18 element, argon, which forms only isolated molecules stable solely in low temperature matrices or supersonic jet streams. Here we present theoretical investigations into a new high-pressure reaction pathway, which enables synthesis of argon fluorides in bulk and at room temperature. Our hybrid DFT calculations (employing the HSE06 functional) indicate that above 60 GPa ArF2-containing molecular crystals can be obtained by a reaction between argon and molecular fluorine. PMID:26742478

  15. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  16. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  17. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  18. Thermal evolution of Venus with argon degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Korenaga, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Decades-old measurements of atmospheric and elemental surface composition constrain the history of Venus. In this study, we search for a model featuring continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime that predicts the present-day atmospheric mass of radiogenic argon and satisfies the other available constraints. For comparison, we also consider the end-member scenario of a single catastrophic resurfacing event. Thermal evolution simulations are performed that track the mass transport of argon and potassium and include a simple model of upwelling mantle plumes. Sensitivity analyses and linear regression are used to quantify the range of initial conditions that will produce desired values for key model output parameters. Decompression melting of passively upwelling mantle causes considerable mantle processing and crustal growth during the early evolution of Venus. Mantle plumes have negligible effects on recent crustal production, but may be important to local surface features. For a wide range of initial conditions, continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime predicts the correct amount of argon degassing, along with the absence of a global magnetic field, crustal and lithosphere thicknesses matching modern estimates, and volcanism consistent with the cratering record. Argon degassing does not uniquely constrain mantle dynamics, but the success of simple stagnant-lid models diminishes the need to invoke dramatic changes like catastrophic resurfacing.

  19. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  20. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  1. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  2. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  3. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  9. On the OES line-ratio technique in argon and argon-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate capacitively coupled argon and argon-hydrogen-silane plasmas. The argon collisional-radiative model (CRM) used to extract the electron density and temperature from the spectra is presented. The electron energy distribution function, which is an input parameter to the model, is discussed in detail. Its strong variation with pressure is found to significantly influence the results for the (effective) temperature. For the analysis of the spectra the common line-ratio technique is applied. Special attention is paid to the choice of lines and a pair of line-ratios for optimum accuracy is suggested. For the argon gas mixture at high partial pressure of the admixed molecular gases the CRM reduces to a corona-like model, extended by a quenching term. The line-ratio method is found to fail under these conditions due to the strong depopulation of the argon 1s states. As a consequence, individual line intensities have to be used and an absolute calibration is required. An easy calibration method, which relies on the results obtained by the line-ratio method in pure argon, is proposed and applied.

  10. Ab initio pair potential energy curve for the argon atom pair and thermophysical properties for the dilute argon gas. II. Thermophysical properties for low-density argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Jäger, Benjamin; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2010-12-01

    A recent argon-argon interatomic potential energy curve determined from quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations and described with an analytical representation [B. Jäger, R. Hellmann, E. Bich, and E. Vogel, Mol. Phys. 107, 2181 (2009); 108, 105 (2010)] was used to calculate the most important thermophysical properties of argon governed by two-body interactions. Second pressure, acoustic, and dielectric virial coefficients as well as viscosity and thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density were computed for natural argon from 83 to 10,000 K. The calculated values for the different thermophysical properties are compared with available experimental data and values computed for other argon-argon potentials. This extensive analysis shows that the proposed potential is superior to all previous ones and that the calculated thermophysical property values are accurate enough to be applied as standard values for the complete temperature range of the calculations.

  11. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-10-15

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts.

  12. Dissociation-excitation reactions of argon metastables with carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study showing that a metastable argon-carbon dioxide reaction results in dissociation of carbon dioxide and electronic excitation of one of the products, carbon monoxide or oxygen. A flow system using a 2450-MHz discharge was used to produce metastable argon atoms. Metastable argon in the afterglow was confirmed by adding nitrogen to the afterglow. Without addition of carbon dioxide no argon line emission, or any other emission, is observed from the reaction zone. Absence of argon line emission produced by recombination indicates the absence of charged species.

  13. Argon Dewar Relief Set Pressure Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-19

    This engineering note documents the calculations of Kelly Dixon, used to determine the maximum allowable set pressure for the argon dewar low relief valve, tag number PSV620A, Anderson Greenwood Type 526J. The original setting was 16 psig. This value was chosen in order to protect against cryostat overpressurization by the source dewar (see D0 Engineering Note 115), however, the following calculations will show that the set pressure can be raised to approximately 18.5 psig, which would result in a faster filling of the cryostat, along with a higher level of liquid argon. Three other engineering notes were revised to reflect the change in set pressure according to this note. They are notes 115, 219, and 263.

  14. Photoassociative Spectroscopy of Ultracold Argon and Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. K.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on photoassociative spectroscopy experiments performed separately on ultracold 40 Ar and ultracold 84 Kr with the spectroscopy laser tuned around the trapping transition for each species (ns[ 3 / 2 ] 2 --> np[ 5 / 2 ] 3 where n = 4 for argon and n = 5 for krypton). Previous studies in argon observed several discrete features in the spectrum that have now been positively identified as arising from otherwise undetectable frequency sidebands on the spectroscopy laser and not from molecular structure. Spectra have been taken over a range of laser intensities and show a broad (several GHz) signature of single photon photo-association, but with no individual vibrational levels resolved. We will discuss our results and compare our spectra to those obtained in ultracold, noble gas photoassociative spectroscopy experiments conducted by other groups in recent years. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award, No. PHY-0855290.

  15. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carminati, L.

    2005-10-12

    The construction of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed and commissioning is in progress. After a brief description of the detector layout, readout electronics and calibration, a review of the present status of the integration and the detector qualification is reported. Finally a selection of performance results obtained during several test beams will be presented with particular attention to linearity, uniformity, position reconstruction and {gamma}/{pi}0 separation.

  16. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  17. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  18. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  19. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  20. Insights into discharge argon mediated biofilm inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Danni; Azzam, Robin; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in biomedical sciences. Conventional sterilization and decontamination methods are not suitable for new and more sophisticated biomaterials. In this paper, the efficiency and effectiveness of gas discharges in inactivation and removal of biofilms on biomaterials were studied. We found that although discharge oxygen, nitrogen and argon all demonstrated excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, gases with distinct chemical/physical properties underwent different mechanisms of action. Discharge oxygen and nitrogen mediated decontamination was associated with strong etching effects, which can cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. On the contrary, although discharge argon at low powers maintained excellent antibacterial ability, it had negligible etching effects. Based on these results, an effective decontamination approach using discharge argon was established in which bacteria and biofilms were killed in situ and then removed from contaminated biomaterials. This novel procedure is applicable for a wide range of biomaterials and biomedical devices in an in vivo and clinical setting. PMID:24070412

  1. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  2. Histology assessment of bipolar coagulation and argon plasma coagulation on digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Teresa; Baba, Elisa R; Wodak, Stephanie; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of bipolar electrocoagulation and argon plasma coagulation on fresh specimens of gastrointestinal tract. METHODS: An experimental evaluation was performed at Hospital das Clinicas of the University of São Paulo, on 31 fresh surgical specimens using argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocoagulation at different time intervals. The depth of tissue damage was histopathologically analyzed by single senior pathologist unaware of the coagulation method and power setting applied. To analyze the results, the mucosa was divided in superficial mucosa (epithelial layer of the esophagus and superficial portion of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) intermediate mucosa (until the lamina propria of the esophagus and until the bottom of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) and muscularis mucosa. Necrosis involvement of the layers was compared in several combinations of power and time interval. RESULTS: Involvement of the intermediate mucosa of the stomach and of the muscularis mucosa of the three organs was more frequent when higher amounts of energy were used with argon plasma. In the esophagus and in the colon, injury of the intermediate mucosa was frequent, even when small amounts of energy were used. The use of bipolar electrocoagulation resulted in more frequent involvement of the intermediate mucosa and of the muscularis mucosa of the esophagus and of the colon when higher amounts of energy were used. In the stomach, these involvements were rare. The risk of injury of the muscularis propria was significant only in the colon when argon plasma coagulation was employed. CONCLUSION: Tissue damage after argon plasma coagulation is deeper than bipolar electrocoagulation. Both of them depend on the amount of energy used. PMID:25031789

  3. 46 CFR § 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2015-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. § 151.50-36 Section § 151.50-36... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172...

  4. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  5. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  6. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  7. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  8. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  9. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  10. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Boyle, G J; McEachran, R P; Cocks, D G; White, R D

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies. PMID:25903897

  11. Argon laser photocoagulation in the dog stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Salmon, P R; Kelly, D F; Calder, B M; Pearson, H; Weaver, B M; Read, A E

    1979-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is one of a number of methods currently under investigation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The Argon ion and Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd YAG) lasers are theoretically suitable as the beam from each may be transmitted via a flexible fibre. Argon laser photocoagulation has been shown to be effective and we have elucidated which factors determine its safety and efficacy. Studies on normal canine gastric mucosa showed that the depth of tissue damage depended chiefly on the total incident laser energy on any one spot, and that below 50 J the risk of perforation was extremely low. The energy density was much less important. The haemostatic effect depended more on the laser power. In artificial bleeding gastric ulcers in heparinised dogs the most effective level was 7--9 W, at which 22 out of 23 ulcers (96%) stopped bleeding completely, compared with one out of 12 controls. Photocoagulation was achieved in these cases with energies well within the safe limits. The procedure was effective endoscopically, and these results justify early clinical studies in man. PMID:573722

  12. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  13. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  16. Performance and technical challenges of liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers offer the possibility of incredible resolution of particle interactions. This review outlines the ongoing research and development towards the realization of a multi-kiloton scale detector. The ICARUS and ArgoNeuT experiments which make use of liquid argon time projection chamber technology are also described.

  17. Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

  18. Improved installation prototype for measurement of low argon-37 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Sergei; Dubasov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    On-site Inspection (OSI) is a key element of verification of State Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out. One of the most significant evidence of n underground nuclear explosion (UNE) is detection above background concentrations of argon-37 in near surface air. Argon-37 is formed in large amounts at interaction of neutrons of UNE with the potassium which is a part of the majority of rocks. Its estimated contents for the 100th days after explosion with a energy of 1000 t of TNT near a surface can vary from 1 to 1000 mBq/m3. The background concentrations of argon-37 in subsoil air vary 1 do100 mBq/m3. Traditionally, for argon-37 activity measurement the gas-proportional counters are used. But at Khlopin Radium institute the developments of the new type of highly sensitive and low-background installation capable to provide the required range of measurements of the argon-37 concentration are conducted. The liquid scintillation method of the registration of the low-energetic argon-37 electrons is the basic installation principle and as scintillator, the itself condensed air argon sample is used. Registration of scintillations of liquid argon is made by means of system from 3 PMT which cathodes are cooled near to the temperature of liquid nitrogen together with the measuring chamber in which placed the quartz glass ampule, containing the measured sample of the liquefied argon. For converse the short wavelength photons (λ = 127 nm) of liquid argon scintillations to more long-wave, corresponding to the range of PMT sensitivity, the polymer film with tetra-phenyl-butadiene (TPB) is provided. Even the insignificant impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and others gaseous in the liquid argon samples can to cause the quenching of scintillation, especially their slow components. To account this effect and it influence on change of registration

  19. Argon Adsorption on Open Carbon Nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brice; Calvillo, Angel; Khanal, Pravin; Migone, Aldo; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    We have measured adsorption isotherms for argon adsorbed on a 0.1692 g sample of chemically-opened carbon nanohorns. Two clear substeps are visible in the adsorption data, corresponding to groups of stronger binding sites (lower pressure substep) and weaker binding sites (higher pressure substep). We have measured adsorption at eight different temperatures in the range between approximately 70 and 110 K. The space at the interior of the individual nanohorns is accessible to sorbates in these chemically opened nanohorns. Consequently, higher loadings are obtained on these samples when compared to those measured on unopened (as-produced) nanohorns. Results for the kinetics of adsorption, the effective specific surface area, and the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of sorbent loading will be presented and compared to results from other gases adsorbed on nanohorns. This work was supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1006428.

  20. Photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold metastable argon

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M. K.; Ranjit, G.; Sukenik, C. I.; Walhout, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present results of photoassociative spectroscopy performed on ultracold metastable argon atoms in a magneto-optical trap. Ion spectra are obtained with laser detuning up to a few gigahertz below the 4s[3/2]{sub 2}{yields}4p[5/2]{sub 3} trapping transition at 811 nm and with intensities in a range of {approx}(10{sup 2}-10{sup 5})I{sub Sat}. We also compute dipole-dipole potentials for both singly and doubly excited diatomic molecules and use a Leroy-Bernstein analysis to determine the approximate vibrational spacings in the (s+p) and (p+p) manifolds. Based on this theoretical framework, we explain a broad background feature in our data and suggest that double-excitation mechanisms are likely responsible for sharp dips in the ion signal.

  1. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  2. Attosecond Time-Resolved Autoionization of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Chini, Michael; Chen Shouyuan; Zhang Changhua; Cheng Yan; Wu Yi; Thumm, Uwe; He Feng; Chang Zenghu

    2010-10-01

    Autoionization of argon atoms was studied experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy with isolated attosecond pulses. The peak position, intensity, linewidth, and shape of the 3s3p{sup 6}np {sup 1}P Fano resonance series (26.6-29.2 eV) were modified by intense few-cycle near infrared laser pulses, while the delay between the attosecond pulse and the laser pulse was changed by a few femtoseconds. Numerical simulations revealed that the experimentally observed splitting of the 3s3p{sup 6}4p {sup 1}P line is caused by the coupling between two short-lived highly excited states in the strong laser field.

  3. Large vessel sealing with the argon laser.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; Lyons, R; White, G; Klein, S R; Pizzurro, D; Abergel, R P; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser-welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas. Twelve animals had bilateral femoral vessels studied, with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks (four animals for each type of repair), and were evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin, elastin, and trichrome stains; biochemically by the formation of [3H]hydroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis; and mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welding may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large-diameter venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas, as healing is comparable to that seen with suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:3306233

  4. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  5. Argon laser treatment of radiation proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation therapy for malignant gynecologic disease and prostatic cancer has resulted in increased survival and cure rates. This modality has unfortunately produced debilitating radiation proctitis. Recently, five patients were seen with continuous rectal bleeding secondary to radiation disease of the rectum. Four of these patients were women who were being treated for cervical carcinoma and one was a man with prostatic cancer. These patients were refractory to steroid retention enemas, iron therapy, and benproperine enema therapy. Treatment was accomplished using the argon laser with a 300-micron fiber passed via flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscope. The most proximal areas were treated first. One and a half watts at 0.5 pulses was used. Up to 50 pulses were delivered per therapy session. The fiber was placed in contact with the lesion and circumferentially for 0.5 cm surrounding each suspected area. Bleeding stopped in the four women after two sessions and in the man after four sessions.

  6. Explosive cavitation in superheated liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, V E; Pavlov, P A; Baidakov, V G

    2008-06-21

    The kinetics of explosive boiling-up of liquid argon has been investigated at negative pressures created by the reflection of a compression pulse 3-5 mus long from the free surface of a liquid by the method of liquid pulse heating on a thin platinum wire (with a rate of temperature increase of about 1 Kmus). The limiting superheats T(*) (stretches p(*)), the effective nucleation rate J(*), and the derivative G(T)=(d ln JdT)(T=T(*) ) have been determined by experimental data on the thermal perturbation of a wire probe and the results of solution of the problem on the initial stage of explosive boiling-up of a liquid. The experimental data are compared with homogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:18570511

  7. Hydrothermal fluids and argon isotopes in quartz veins and cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    1988-06-01

    Argon isotopes from a number of sources are present in quartz veins and chert; in situ decay of potassium, parentless 40Ar leached or outgassed from surrounding rocks, atmospheric argon dissolved in ancient hydrothermal fluids, and, modern atmospheric argon. The manner in which the 40Ar- 39Ar techniques can be used to unscramble these components, by way of correlations with Cl and K, is described in relation to two parallel studies of vein quartz and the Gunflint chert. Information concerning several processes can be inferred, including: contributions of surface waters to trapped fluids (from the concentration of atmospheric argon in the fluids), degree of water-rock interaction (from the concentration of parentless 40Ar and/or the ratio of parentless to atmospheric argon), effects of dilution of primary hydrothermal brines by meteoric water (which results in a decrease in the ratio of both Cl and parentless 40Ar to atmospheric argon), effects of boiling (from low concentrations of atmospheric argon and an increase in Cl/40Ar ). The K-Ar chronology of deposition can also be inferred in suitable circumstances. In principle, the ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio of the ancient atmosphere can be determined from fluids free of parentless 40Ar. However, a ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio determined for a low salinity end member in Gunflint chert probably reflects the presence of modern meteoric water.

  8. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T.

    2014-01-29

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  9. Load on Trough Bellows Following an Argon Spill

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, K.; /Fermilab

    1988-07-12

    In the case of a gross argon spill from the DO detector, the liquid argon is caught in three plenums. These plenums are to be connected by bellows to make a horizontal trough open at one end for removing the argon. The design of these bellows is dependent on the maximum argon load they must carry. Bellows to connect the three argon-catching plenums in the DO detector must be able to carry at least 92 lbs of argon when closed and 231 lbs when open, plus the load due to argon in the convolutions. Examples of such loads and the method for their calculations are contained in the Discussion. It should be noted that a set of assumptions was used in these calculations. First, we considered a uniform channel and uniform flow. Second, we used a value for Manning's n meant for a similar, but not exactly the same, case. Finally, we were forced to define an average depth, d, to be used to state the hydraulic radius, R, and area of flow, A. These facts may warrant consideration in future calculations.

  10. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  11. The Phosphorus, Sulfur, Argon, and Calcium Isotopic Composition of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Stone, E. C.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.

    2009-04-01

    Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) measurements of the phosphorus, sulfur, argon, and calcium isotopes made by the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer are reported over the energy range from ~100 to ~400 MeV nucleon-1. The propagation of cosmic rays through the Galaxy and heliosphere is modeled with constraints imposed by measurements. Isotopic source abundance ratios 31P/32S, 34S/32S, 38Ar/36Ar, and 44Ca/40Ca are deduced. The derived 31P/32S ratio is 2.34 ± 0.34 times larger than the solar system value, lending further credence to the suggestion that refractory elements are enriched in the GCRs due to the sputtering of ions off grains in the cores of superbubbles. By determining the GCR source abundances of argon (a noble gas) and calcium (a refractory), it is determined that material in grains is accelerated to GCR energies a factor of 6.4 ± 0.3 more efficiently than gas-phase material in this charge range. With this information, the dust fraction of phosphorus and sulfur in the interstellar material that is mixed with stellar ejecta to form the GCR seed material is found to be consistent with astronomical observations.

  12. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  13. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  14. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Dardin, S. M.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Peskov, V.; Wenzel, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon (xe) in the high electric field ( >7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure-dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure-independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure-dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure-independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure-dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  15. Argon laser treatment of urethral stricture and vesical neck contracture.

    PubMed

    Adkins, W C

    1988-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the argon laser wavelength allow a precise incision with excellent hemostasis and negligible heating of adjacent tissues resulting in less scarring. These qualities are used to advantage in the treatment of strictures. The argon laser was used to perform 13 internal urethrotomies and ten vesical neck incisions. The operative method used is similar to optical internal urethrotomy. The argon probe incises hemostatically, reducing the need for extensive fulguration of tissues at the operative site and thereby reducing the tendency for more scar tissue to form and compromise the operation. The same hemostasis reduces the need for postoperative indwelling urethral catheterization. Utility of the argon device in most instances allows treatment to be conducted on an outpatient basis without general anesthesia and without use of postoperative urethral catheters, yielding an effective, cost-saving therapy. PMID:3210887

  16. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  17. A study of the trace 39Ar content in argon from deep underground sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Guray, G.; Hohman, T.; Holtz, D.; Ianni, An.; Laubenstein, M.; Loer, B.; Love, C.; Martoff, C. J.; Montanari, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nelson, A.; Rountree, S. D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wright, A.

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of argon from deep underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct dark matter detection experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low-background single-phase liquid argon detector that was built to study the 39Ar content of this underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon, or 6.6 mBq/kg specific 39Ar activity.

  18. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti. PMID:22447067

  19. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  20. Electron densities and energies of a guided argon streamer in argon and air environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, S.; Hofmann, S.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the temporally and spatially resolved electron densities and mean energies of a guided argon streamer in ambient argon and air obtained by Thomson laser scattering. The plasma is driven by a positive monopolar 3.5 kV pulse, with a pulse width of 500 ns and a frequency of 5 kHz which is synchronized with the high repetition rate laser system. This configuration enables us to use the spatial and temporal stability of the guided streamer to accumulate a multitude of laser/plasma shots by a triple grating spectrometer equipped with an ICCD camera and to determine the electron parameters. We found a strong initial ne-overshoot with a maximum of 7 × 1019 m-3 and a mean electron energy of 4.5 eV. This maximum is followed by a fast decay toward the streamer channel. Moreover, a 2D distribution of the electron density is obtained which exhibits a peculiar mushroom-like shape of the streamer head with a diameter significantly larger than that of the emission profile. A correlation of the width of the streamer head with the expected pre-ionization channel is found.

  1. Concerning Apparent Similarity of Structures of Fluoropolymer Surfaces Exposed to an Argon Plasma or Argon Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Covington, M. Alan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C(sub 1s) spectra of fluoropolymers exposed to either an argon plasma or argon ion beam show remarkable similarity, implying that the surface-modification reactions for these two processes likely proceed through comparable mechanisms, revolving predominantly ion-surface interactions. The importance of working with a monochromatized x-ray source for XPS analysis of the surface-modified fluoropolymers is once again emphasized.

  2. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for

  3. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  4. Characteristics of Knock in Hydrogen-Oxygen-Argon SI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Rapp, V; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-02-23

    A promising approach for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is to employ a working fluid with a high specific heat ratio such as the noble gas argon. Moreover, all harmful emissions are eliminated when the intake charge is composed of oxygen, nonreactive argon, and hydrogen fuel. Previous research demonstrated indicated thermal efficiencies greater than 45% at 5.5 compression ratio in engines operating with hydrogen, oxygen, and argon. However, knock limits spark advance and increasing the efficiency further. Conditions under which knock occurs in such engines differs from typical gasoline fueled engines. In-cylinder temperatures using hydrogen-oxygen-argon are higher due to the high specific heat ratio and pressures are lower because of the low compression ratio. Better understanding of knock under these conditions can lead to operating strategies that inhibit knock and allow operation closer to the knock limit. In this work we compare knock with a hydrogen, oxygen, and argon mixture to that of air-gasoline mixtures in a variable compression ratio cooperative fuels research (CFR) engine. The focus is on stability of knocking phenomena, as well as, amplitude and frequency of the resulting pressure waves.

  5. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  6. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  7. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  8. Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-(E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.; Tandon, Hannah K.; Messinger, Joseph P.; Mlaver, Eli

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies of argon complexes with fluoroethylenes have revealed a preference for a geometry that maximizes the contact of the argon atom with heavy atoms on the fluoroethylene. We have observed a continuation of this trend when one of the fluorine atoms is replaced by chlorine. The argon-(E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene complex provides two competing heavy atom cavities, FCCF and FCCl, and the opportunity to examine whether the number of heavy atoms or the associated increase in polarizability is determinative of structure. The 5.6 -- 18.1 GHz chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrum of this species provides initial assignments and predictions for spectra obtained in a more sensitive and higher precision Balle-Flygare instrument. Transitions for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed and analyzed to provide geometric parameters for this non-planar complex. The spectrum is consistent with the argon atom located in the FCCl cavity, and the structure agrees well with ab initio predictions. Comparisons are made with Ar-1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene, (Z)-1-chloro-2-fluoroethylene, and Ar-vinyl chloride. Z. Kisiel, P.W. Fowler, and A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 2283 (1991).

  9. Argon laser trabeculoplasty as a means of decreasing intraocular pressure from ''normal'' levels in glaucomatous eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, E.D.; Simmons, R.J.

    1985-06-15

    The authors conducted a retrospective study of 67 patients (85 eyes) with severe glaucoma to determine whether argon laser trabeculoplasty could reduce intraocular pressures below the ''normal'' range. All patients had initial intraocular pressures of less than or equal to 19 mm Hg. Success was defined as a decrease in intraocular pressure of at least 20%, no increase in medications, stable visual field, and no subsequent glaucoma surgery. After an average follow-up period of 30 months, treatment was successful in 31 cases. One half of the failures occurred by six months and 11 failures (30%) occurred after 12 months. Sixteen patients were able to decrease their medications. Two patients achieved intraocular pressures between 6 and 9 mm Hg and 20 between 10 and 12 mm Hg.

  10. Mass measurements demonstrate a strong N=28 shell gap in argon.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Z; George, S; Ahn, S; Browne, J; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-01-16

    We present results from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We report the first mass measurements of ^{48}Ar and ^{49}Ar and find atomic mass excesses of -22.28(31)  MeV and -17.8(1.1)  MeV, respectively. These masses provide strong evidence for the closed shell nature of neutron number N=28 in argon, which is therefore the lowest even-Z element exhibiting the N=28 closed shell. The resulting trend in binding-energy differences, which probes the strength of the N=28 shell, compares favorably with shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using SDPF-U and SDPF-MU Hamiltonians. PMID:25635542

  11. Superconductivity of compressed solid argon from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Asano, Masamichi; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the superconductivity of solid argon under high pressure. Solid argon is found to take the double hexagonal close-packed structure in pressure range from 420 to 690 GPa, where an insulator-to-metal transition occurs at around 590 GPa. The crystal structure transforms into the hexagonal close-packed structure at 690 GPa and into the face-centered cubic structure at 2300 GPa. The superconducting critical temperature is gradually increased with the successive phase transitions and reaches the maximum value of 12 K at 2600 GPa due to the enhancement of the Fermi surface nesting.

  12. Study of fluid mechanical helium argon ion laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An approach to an argon ion laser based on gasdynamic techniques is presented. Improvement in efficiency and power output are achieved by eliminating high heat rejection problems and plasma confinement of the seal-off conventional lasers. The process of producing population inversion between the same energy levels, as in the conventional argon ion laser, has been divided into two phases by separating each other from the processes of ionization and subsequent excitation. Line drawings and graphs are included to amplify the theoretical presentation.

  13. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  14. Common Blepharitis Related to Phthiriasis Palpebrarum: Argon Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Sundu, Cem; Dinç, Erdem; Kurtuluş, Umut Can; Yıldırım, Özlem

    2015-09-01

    A 42-year-old woman was admitted to Mersin University, Department of Ophthalmology Clinic with itching and burning sensation of the right eye for 3 weeks. In her slit-lamp examination, nits and lice, attached to the upper and lower eyelashes of her right eye, were observed. Lice and nits were destroyed by argon laser phototherapy and were removed with the help of a fine forceps thereafter. Argon laser phototherapy is a quick, effective, and safe treatment modality for phthiriasis palpebrarum. PMID:26470938

  15. Aging tests of ethylene contaminated argon/ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Bauer, G.

    1994-09-22

    We report on aging tests of argon/ethane gas with a minor (1800 ppM) component of ethylene. The measurements were first conducted with the addition of alcohol to test the suppression of aging by this additive, with exposure up to {approx}1.5 C/cm. Tests have included: a proportional tube with ethanol, another with isopropyl alcohol, and for comparison a tube has also been run with ethanol and argon/ethane from CDF`s old (ethylene-free) ethane supply. The aging test with ethanol showed no difference between the ethylene-free and the ethylene tube. Furthermore, raw aging rates of argon/ethane and argon/ethane/ethylene were measured by exposing tubes without the addition of alcohol to about 0.1 C/cm. Again, no significant difference was observed. In conclusion, we see no evidence that ethylene contamination up to 1800 ppM has any adverse effect on wire aging. However, this level of ethylene does seem to significantly suppress the gas gain.

  16. Supersonic Argon Flow In An Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Izrar, B.; Dudeck, M.; Andre, P.; Elchinger, M. F.; Aubreton, J.

    2006-01-15

    The plasma properties inside a D.C. arc-jet operating with argon is analysed by means of a continuum description taking into account non equilibrium ionization processes and dissipative effects. The relaxation of the different physical processes inside the nozzle and the evolution of the Mach number are aanalysed.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  18. Operation of a liquid argon time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.

    1983-02-01

    For the first time, the operation of a three-dimensional liquid argon time projection chamber has been demonstrated. This was accomplished in a 50 liter test detector using a readout plane with a woven structure etched on a PC-board.

  19. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models. PMID:24559345

  20. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  1. Irradiation simulation of zirconium using high energy argon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D. Q.; Bai, X. D.; Pan, F.

    2007-03-01

    In order to simulate the irradiation damage, the argon ion was implanted in the zirconium with fluence ranging from 1×10 16 to 1×10 17 ions/cm 2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV at liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the effect of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of zirconium was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was employed to examine the phase transformation due to the argon ion implantation. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted zirconium in a 1 M H 2SO 4 solution. From XPS, there existed adsorbed carbon and a little of oxygen (depth less than 20 nm) in the surface of samples, zirconium changed from zirconia to metallic zirconium along the depth direction. From GAXRD, the argon-implanted samples are little oxidized. It was found that the corrosion resistance of implanted samples declined with increasing the fluence, which is attributed to the removing of oxide protection layer and the irradiation damage.

  2. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.; Shen, Z. J.

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  3. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the <0.5% level at the collector mirror location using the cusp magnetic field alone. Plasma also is rejected using a low argon density (<1x1014cm-3). We have measured the tin ion flow pattern toward the large area annular beam dump. Scaling of the cusp design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  4. Radiative Properties of Argon Gas-Puff Implosions on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, Nicholas; Qi, Niansheng; de Grouchy, Phil; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Pikuz, Sergei; Giuliani, John; Dasgupta, Arati; Apruzese, John; Clark, Robert; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were performed on the 1 MA COBRA pulsed power generator at Cornell University. The gas puffs were injected into the load region from a triple nozzle. The load region had an anode-cathode gap of 2.5 cm. The standard diagnostics on COBRA include time-integrated pinhole cameras, a time-integrated axially resolved x-ray spectrometer, filtered photo-conducting detectors, and time-gated XUV cameras. We will focus mainly on results from pinhole images and x-ray spectra from argon gas puffs including some with a SO2 dopant. The x-ray time-integrated pinhole images feature a tight axially uniform plasma column with a diameter of approximately 1 mm for argon gas implosion. The x-ray spectrometer used mica crystals (2d =19.84 Å) and captured the argon K-shell radiation from different crystal reflections. A 1-D multi-zone argon and sulfur non-LTE kinetics code with radiation transport is used to model the K-shell emission for the purpose of inferring the plasma conditions and the interaction of gas from the inner annulus with the central jet. This work is supported by DOE/NNSA.

  5. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors.

  6. Calibration of Electric Field Induced Energy Level Shifts in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    1999-10-01

    Argon is a commonly used gas in a number of discharges. As such it is an ideal candidate for spectroscopic based electric field measurements within the sheath and bulk discharge regions. Recently, measurements demonstrated the use of the Stark induced shifts of high lying energy levels in Argon to make spatially and temporally resolved electric field measurements [1]. However, that method relied on the cross calibration of known and calculable shifts in helium discharges to calibrate, in-situ, the energy level shifts in Argon. This poster shows the use of an atomic beam system to calibrate the electric field induced shift of high lying energy levels directly. In addition, data on very high lying argon levels, up to the 20 F manifold, were obtained. Comparison of our electric field induced energy level shift calibration curves with previous work will be shown. The possibility of using this system to calibrate energy level shifts in other gases of technological interest to the microelectronics and lighting industry will be discussed. [1]. J. B. Kim, K. Kawamura, Y. W. Choi, M. D. Bowden, K. Muraoka and V. Helbig, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 26(5), 1556 (1998). This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories and supported by the United States Department of Energy (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  7. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  8. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N₂ density [N₂]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H₂O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H₂O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H₂O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  9. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  10. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  11. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  12. 40 CFR 31.31 - Real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Real property. 31.31 Section 31.31... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 31.31 Real property. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to real property acquired under a grant or subgrant will...

  13. 40 CFR 31.31 - Real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real property. 31.31 Section 31.31... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 31.31 Real property. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to real property acquired under a grant or subgrant will...

  14. 40 CFR 31.31 - Real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Real property. 31.31 Section 31.31... Requirements Changes, Property, and Subawards § 31.31 Real property. (a) Title. Subject to the obligations and conditions set forth in this section, title to real property acquired under a grant or subgrant will...

  15. 14 CFR 31.31 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General. 31.31 Section 31.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.31 General. The suitability of each design...

  16. 31 CFR 31.218 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Enforcement. 31.218 Section 31.218... Conflicts of Interest § 31.218 Enforcement. (a) Compliance with these rules concerning conflicts of interest... information pursuant to 31 U.S.C. part 31 violates any of these rules, Treasury may impose or pursue one...

  17. 31 CFR 31.213 - General standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General standards. 31.213 Section 31... certification to the Treasury that is relating to services under EESA or required pursuant to 31 CFR Part 31 is... Conflicts of Interest § 31.213 General standards. (a) During the time period in which a retained......

  18. 31 CFR 31.213 - General standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to the Treasury that is relating to services under EESA or required pursuant to 31 CFR Part 31 is... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General standards. 31.213 Section 31... Conflicts of Interest § 31.213 General standards. (a) During the time period in which a retained entity...

  19. Light noble gas chemistry: Structures, stabilities, and bonding of helium, neon and argon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frenking, G. ); Koch, W. ); Reichel, F. ); Cremer, D. )

    1990-05-23

    Theoretically determined geometries are reported for the light noble gas ions Ng{sub 2}C{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}N{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}O{sup 2+}, NgCCNg{sup 2+}, NgCCH{sup +}, NgCN{sup +}, and NgNC{sup +} (Ng = He, Ne, Ar) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. In a few cases, optimizations were carried out at CASSCF/6-31G(d,p). The thermodynamic stability of the Ng compounds is investigated at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2df,2pd) for Ng = He, Ne and at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(d,p) for Ng = Ar. The structures and stabilities of the molecules are discussed in terms of donor-acceptor interactions between Ng and the respective fragment cation, by using molecular orbital arguments and utilizing the analysis of the electron density distribution and its associated Laplace field. Generally, there is an increase in Ng,X binding interactions of a noble gas molecule NgX with increasing atomic size of Ng. In some cases the Ne,X stabilization energies are slightly smaller than the corresponding He,X values because of repulsive p-{pi} interactions in the neon compounds. The argon molecules are in all cases significantly stronger bound.

  20. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  1. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  2. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  3. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yichen; Tsang, Thomas; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2016-04-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev-Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  4. [Experience with argon laser in urological diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rothauge, C F; Nöske, H D; Kraushaar, J

    1981-09-01

    The application of the Argon laser in urology has proved to be effective in resecting recurrent, exophytic urothelial tumors of the bladder up to the size of a raspberry. In cases of wide spread bladder tumors we only perform a radiation of the resected area as local recurrence prophylaxis following transurethral resection. The urethroscopic Argon laser irradiation makes laser urethrotomy and evaporisation of urethral strictures possible. Furthermore, a curative and conservative treatment of urethral tumors is possible in combination with chemotherapy. The same applies for the penis carcinoma. Urethral ruptures are also successfully treated by urethroscopic laser recanalization. A determination of the ureteral submucosal course, which may allow a prognosis about the probable maturation, is possible in cases of cystoureteral reflux with the help of laser diaphanoscopy. PMID:7197839

  5. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. I. Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Kenji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were carried out to investigate the dynamics of evaporation and condensation for argon at the temperature of 80 and 100 K. From the decrease of the survival probability of vapor molecules, the ratio of self reflection to collision is estimated to be 12%-15%, only weakly dependent on the temperature. This suggests that argon vapor molecules are in the condition of almost complete capture, and the condensation is considered to be a barrierless process. The total ratio of reflection which is evaluated with the flux correlation of condensation and evaporation is 20% at both temperature. The difference between these two ratios of reflection is ascribed to a phenomenon that vapor molecules colliding with the surface drive out other liquid molecules. This molecule exchange at the surface is as important as the self-reflection, and the conventional picture of condensation as a unimolecular chemical reaction is not appropriate.

  6. Argon-assisted growth of epitaxial graphene on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Tyagi, Parul; Mowll, Tyler R.; Ventrice, Carl A., Jr.; Hannon, James B.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of graphene by catalytic decomposition of ethylene on Cu(111) in an ultrahigh vacuum system was investigated with low-energy electron diffraction, low-energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Attempts to form a graphene overlayer using ethylene at pressures as high as 10 mTorr and substrate temperatures as high as 900 ∘C resulted in almost no graphene growth. By using an argon overpressure, the growth of epitaxial graphene on Cu(111) was achieved. The suppression of graphene growth without the use of an argon overpressure is attributed to Cu sublimation at elevated temperatures. During the initial stages of growth, a random distribution of rounded graphene islands is observed. The predominant rotational orientation of the islands is within ±1∘ of the Cu(111) substrate lattice.

  7. Near infrared photodissociation spectra of the aniline +-argon ionic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, T.; Douin, S.; Boudin, N.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2006-02-01

    The near infrared spectra of the ionic complexes aniline(NH 2) +-argon and aniline(ND 2) +-argon have been measured by laser photodissociation spectroscopy. The bands observed from 10 500 to 13 500 cm -1 have been assigned to the D1(A˜2A2)←D0(X˜2B1) electronic transition within the solvated chromophore. They are characterized by a long vibrational progression involving the 6a mode. On the basis of CASSCF calculations, a large change of geometry along this coordinate is found while the amino group remains in the ring plane. Therefore, a change of the conjugation of the ring rather than a charge transfer is inferred. This is thought to be the origin of the extent of the progression.

  8. Experimental investigations of argon and xenon ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The multipole thruster was used to investigate the use of argon and xenon propellants as possible alternatives to the electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole approach was used because of its general high performance level. The design employed, using flat and cylindrical rolled sections of sheet metal, was selected for ease of fabrication, design, assembly, and modification. All testing was conducted in a vacuum facility and the pumping was accomplished by a 0.8 m diffusion pump together with liquid nitrogen cooled liner. Minimum discharge losses were in the 200-250 ev. ion range for both argon and xenon. Flatness parameters were typically in the 0.70-0.75 range.

  9. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter system for the SLC Large Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Fox, J.D.; Smith, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper the physical packaging and the logical organization of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) electronics system for the Stanford Linear Collider Large Detector (SLD) at SLAC are described. This system processes signals from approximately 44,000 calorimeter towers and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged within the detector itself as opposed to an external electronics support rack. The signal path from the towers in the liquid argon through the vacuum to the outside of the detector is explained. The organization of the control logic, analog electronics, power regulation, analog-to-digital conversion circuits, and fiber optic drivers mounted directly on the detector are described. Redundancy considerations for the electronics and cooling issues are discussed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  11. Intramolecular interaction and dynamics of the cationic argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnetti, F.; Zuhrt, C.; Zuelicke, L.

    1996-12-31

    For the simplest cationic argon cluster, Ar{sub 3}{sup +}, the topographical characteristics of the ground-state potential energy surface (PES), the mode coupling and the claswsical intramolecular dynamics are studied; PES data have been obtained by the diatomics-in-molecules approach of Kuntz et al. The results show that Ar{sub 3}{sup +} s a rather floppy system with rapid vibrational energy redistribution and early onset of classical chaos.

  12. Interference and PCI in argon Auger (e, 2e) spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, D. K.; Williams, J. F.

    1997-06-01

    Angle-dependent interference is observed in electron-impact ionization (e, 2e) coincidence experiments on the argon 0953-4075/30/12/013/img1 and 0953-4075/30/12/013/img2 Auger transitions. Recapture of the slow ejected electron from the Auger process leads to interference with the satellite-state ionization processes. The post-collision interaction (PCI) and interference effects are quantified for a large range of excess energies.

  13. Gastric explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Freiman, John Saul; Hampe, Toni

    2014-12-01

    We describe the occurrence of an iatrogenic explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation in a 70-year-old man undergoing gastroscopy. Combustible gases in the stomach may have been released by bacterial overgrowth as a result of partial gastric outlet obstruction (caused by a gastric tumor) and reduced acidity (from proton pump inhibitor therapy). We propose a stepwise process during upper endoscopy to prevent this devastating complication, comprising aspiration, preinsufflation with CO2, and then coagulation. PMID:25041867

  14. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  15. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R&D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors.

  16. Demonstration and comparison of photomultiplier tubes at liquid Argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Boffelli, F.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Cocco, A. G.; Deniskina, N.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Kryczynski, P.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Perfetto, F.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Triossi, A.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Zani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Liquified noble gases are widely used as a target in direct Dark Matter searches. Signals from scintillation in the liquid, following energy deposition from the recoil nuclei scattered by Dark Matter particles (e.g. WIMPs), should be recorded down to very low energies by photosensors suitably designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Liquid Argon based detectors for Dark Matter searches currently implement photomultiplier tubes for signal read-out. In the last few years PMTs with photocathodes operating down to liquid Argon temperatures (87 K) have been specially developed with increasing Quantum Efficiency characteristics. The most recent of these, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Mod. R11065 with peak QE up to about 35%, has been extensively tested within the R&D program of the WArP Collaboration. During these tests the Hamamatsu PMTs showed excellent performance and allowed obtaining a light yield around 7 phel/keVee in a Liquid Argon detector with a photocathodic coverage in the 12% range, sufficient for detection of events down to few keVee of energy deposition. This shows that this new type of PMT is suited for experimental applications, in particular for new direct Dark Matter searches with LAr-based experiments.

  17. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  18. Neuroprotection by Argon Ventilation after Perinatal Asphyxia: A Safety Study in Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Alderliesten, Thomas; Favie, Laurent M. A.; Neijzen, Robert W.; Auwärter, Volker; Nijboer, Cora H. A.; Marges, Roland E. J.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; Kempf, Jürgen; van Bel, Frank; Groenendaal, Floris

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia is ineffective in 45% of neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Xenon has additive neuroprotective properties, but is expensive, and its application complicated. Argon gas is cheaper, easier to apply, and also has neuroprotective properties in experimental settings. The aim was to explore the safety of argon ventilation in newborn piglets. Methods Eight newborn piglets (weight 1.4–3.0 kg) were used. Heart rate, blood pressure, regional cerebral saturation, and electrocortical brain activity were measured continuously. All experiments had a 30 min. baseline period, followed by three 60 min. periods of argon ventilation alternated with 30 min argon washout periods. Two animals were ventilated with increasing concentrations of argon (1h 30%, 1 h 50%, and 1 h 80%), two were subjected to 60 min. hypoxia (FiO2 0.08) before commencing 50% argon ventilation, and two animals received hypothermia following hypoxia as well as 50% argon ventilation. Two animals served as home cage controls and were terminated immediately. Results Argon ventilation did not result in a significant change of heart rate (mean ± s.d. −3.5±3.6 bpm), blood pressure (−0.60±1.11 mmHg), cerebral oxygen saturation (0.3±0.9%), electrocortical brain activity (−0.4±0.7 µV), or blood gas values. Argon ventilation resulted in elevated argon concentrations compared to the home cage controls (34.5, 25.4, and 22.4 vs. 7.3 µl/ml). Conclusion Ventilation with up to 80% argon during normoxia, and 50% argon after hypoxia did not affect heart rate, blood pressure, cerebral saturation and electrocortical brain activity. Clinical safety studies of argon ventilation in humans seem justified. PMID:25460166

  19. A combined TEM and X-ray microanalytical study of argon in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, R. J.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1988-07-01

    A series of aluminium samples have been implanted at room temperature with a low dose of argon ions. The development of argon bubbles from the initially sub-microscopic argon clusters has been studied by annealing the samples to a series of temperatures up to 0.97 Tm. The argon content of selected volumes of each sample has been determined by X-ray analysis in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). This result has then been compared with that calculated from measurements of bubble sizes taken from TEM micrographs of the visible bubble population in the same volume of the sample. The results indicate that sub-microscopic argon clusters may survive after annealing to temperatures as high as 500°C. Evidence is also found for the trapping of argon at the air formed surface oxide-metal interfaces.

  20. Composition of the atmosphere at the surface of Mars - Detection of argon-36 and preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the Martian atmosphere was determined by the mass spectrometer in the molecular analysis experiment. The presence of argon and nitrogen was confirmed and a value of 1 to 2750 plus or minus 500 for the ratio of argon-36 to argon-40 was established. A preliminary interpretation of these results suggests that Mars had a slightly more massive atmosphere in the past, but that much less total outgassing has occurred on Mars than on earth.

  1. Spectroscopic modeling of an argon-doped shock-ignition implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-10-15

    We present results from the spectral postprocessing of a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of an argon-doped, warm-shell shock-ignition implosion with a detailed atomic and radiation physics model. The argon tracer is added to the deuterium filling in the core for diagnostic purposes. Spectral features in the emergent intensity distribution in the photon energy range of the argon K-shell spectrum that have potential for diagnostic application are discussed.

  2. The effects of argon in the bioenergetics of the hamster and the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen consumption was examined in hamsters and rats exposed to normoxic mixtures of argon at 1 atm. In fasted and nonfasted animals, no marked change in O2 utilization was detectable at 22 C. However, at 7 C a significant decrease in oxygen consumption was observed where the animals were exposed in argon. The data are interpreted in terms of the greater thermal conductivity of nitrogen. The study was prompted by conflicting reports on the metabolic effects of argon and helium.

  3. Infrared spectrum of the complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Baas, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide has been studied by infrared spectroscopy in argon and nitrogen matrices. The shifts relative to the free species show that the complex is weak and similar in argon and nitrogen. The results give evidence for T-shaped complexes, which are isolated in several configurations. Some evidence is also presented which indicates that, in addition to the two well-known sites in argon, carbon dioxide can be trapped in a third site.

  4. Argon Laser Photoablation for Treating Benign Pigmented Conjunctival Nevi

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Gehedan, Saeed M.; Alasbali, Tariq; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Lotfy, Nancy M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of argon laser photoablation of benign conjunctival pigmented nevi with different clinical presentations. Patients and Methods: This interventional case series was conducted between July 2014 and January 2015. Patients presenting with benign conjunctival nevi were included. Data were collected on the clinical features at presentation, argon laser photoablation, and follow-up at 8 and 24 weeks. Postoperative photography allowed recording of the success of each case and the overall success rate. Complete removal of conjunctival pigments was considered an absolute success. Partial pigmentation requiring repeat laser treatment was considered a qualified success. Results: There were 14 eyes (four right eyes and ten left eyes) with benign pigmented conjunctival nevi. There were three males and eight females in the study sample. The median age was 36 (25% percentile: 26 years). Three patients had bilateral lesions. The nevi were located temporally in nine eyes, nasally in three eyes, and on the inferior bulbar conjunctiva in two eyes. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of nevi were 5 ± 2 mm and 4 ± 2.7 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 5 months. Following laser treatment, no eyes had subconjunctival hemorrhage, infection, scarring, neovascularization, recurrence, or corneal damage. The absolute success rate of laser ablation was 79%. Three eyes with elevated nevi had one to three sessions of laser ablation resulting in a qualified success rate of 100%. Conclusions: Argon laser ablation was a safe and effective treatment for the treatment of selective benign pigmented conjunctival nevi in Arab patients. PMID:27555708

  5. Use of the argon aiming beam in visual function testing.

    PubMed

    Kelley, J S

    1978-12-01

    The aiming beam of the argon laser photocoagulator can be a useful tool in visual function testing. Applied with the slit lamp delivery system and fundus contact lens, it clearly documents the size of the blind spot surrounding the optic nerve head and the normal area of nonfunctional retina in the periphery. The size of pathologic field defects can be recorded on fundus photographs or retinal drawings by an observer. Safety precautions must be taken to protect all patients from excessive laser energy. PMID:736394

  6. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ö.; Tapan, İ.; Özmutlu, E. N.; Veenhof, R.

    2010-05-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  7. A Mini-helicon Thruster in Argon and Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.

    2015-11-01

    Our small helicon discharge, 5 cm in diam and 5 cm long, using a commercial Nd permanent magnet, has been used previously to eject an argon ion beam suitable for spacecraft propulsion. The specific impulse can be increased by biasing the conducting top plate of the discharge. Thrusters normally use xenon for propulsion because of its high mass and low ionization potential. We have now tested the mini-helicon thruster in xenon. The entire device is small enough to be brought to a poster session and shown there.

  8. Flash pyrolysis of coal by an argon ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.S.; Egsgaard, H.

    1994-12-31

    A novel approach to laser induced pyrolysis of coal by using the visible blue-green emission from an argon ion laser is presented. The gaseous pyrolysis products are identified by on-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Five different subbituminous to bituminous coals have been studied and results for the low-molecular weight hydrocarbons up to C{sub 3} are discussed. Mechanisms for the formation of the unsaturated hydrocarbons, ethylene and acetylene, during laser pyrolysis of coal have been disclosed utilizing deuterium as a buffer gas in the pyrolysis cell.

  9. Low energy argon ion irradiation surface effects on triglycine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragó, Carmen; Plaza, José L.; Marqués, Manuel I.; Gonzalo, Julio A.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study of the effects of low energy (1-2 keV) argon ion (Ar+) irradiation on Triglycine Sulfate (TGS) has been performed. Ferroelectric parameters, such as the Curie temperature TC determined from the dielectric constant peaks ɛ(T), or the remnant polarization Pr, and coercive field Ec, obtained from the hysteresis loops, show interesting differences between samples irradiated in ferroelectric and paraelectric phases, respectively. The radiation damage seems to be superficial, as observed by AFM microscope, and the surface alteration in both phases becomes eventually notorious when the radiation dosage increases.

  10. Argon flash candle. Quarterly report, April--June 1964

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Several additional argon flash candles have been fired during the quarter. Several shots both straight-in and at 45{degrees} with and without the prism were fired. Some interesting data were obtained from pseudo-spectrograph shots performed by interposing filters in the light path of the camera and using both glass and Plexiglas simultaneously on the candle front. From these shots, we were able to better illustrate some of the differences in glass and Plexiglas with regard to diffusion and light scattering, as well as spectral transmission characteristics.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Argon at High Pressures and High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Goncharov, A. F.; Dalton, D. A.; Ojwang, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Konopkova, Z.; Lazor, P.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate data on the thermal conductivity of argon at high pressures and high temperatures is essential to unraveling the nature of the Earth’s interior. Argon is a common pressure-transmitting medium in diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments, which is commonly used for studying the properties of minerals at pressures and temperatures native to the mantel and core. We used a transient heating technique (Beck et al., 2007) in a symmetric DAC up to 50 GPa and 2500 K. A thin iridium foil (1 μm thick) positioned in a recessed gasket hole filled with argon served as a heat absorber (coupler) to pump thermal energy into the sample. We used 6 μs width pulses from electronically modulated Yb-based fiber laser. We determined the temperature of the coupler with 500 ns time resolution by applying the Planck function to its thermal emission spectrum, and doing this over time yields temperature verses time for the coupler. Using finite element (FE) calculation methods we simulated the heat flux transfer in the DAC cavity using the experimentally determined geometric and laser heating parameters. The thermochemical parameters of Ir and Ar were determined by scaling the ambient pressure data using the available equations of state. The temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Ar was determined by fitting the results of FE calculations to the experimentally determined time dependent coupler temperature. We used the results of the theoretical calculations (Tretiakov & Scandolo, 2004) as the initial input. The results for the pressure and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Ar will be reported at the meeting. This work is supported by NSF EAR 0711358, NSF-REU, Carnegie Institution of Washington, and DOE-NNSA (CDAC). Beck, P; Goncharov, A.F., Struzhkin, V.V., Militzer, B, Mao, H.K, Hemley, R.J. (2007). Measurement of thermal diffusivity at high pressure using a transient heating technique, Appl Phys. Lett. 91, 181914-(1-3). Tretiakov, K. V. & S. Scandolo (2004

  12. High intensity, argon ion laser-jet photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Marshall; Schnapp, Karlyn A.; Hannemann, Klaus; Ho, Douglas M.; Memarian, Hamid R.; Azadnia, Ardeshir; Pinhas, Allan R.; Figley, Timothy M.

    A new technique for the study of high intensity solution photochemistry has been developed. With this laser-jet technique, a high velocity microjet is irradiated with the focussed output of an argon ion laser. Under these extremely high intensity conditions, photochemically generated transient species with suitable absorption properties are excited further and produce relatively large amounts of photoproducts which are not observed under low intensity conditions. The application of this laser-jet technique in the study of the photochemistry of radicals, biradicals, photoenols and the higher excited states of carbonyl and polycyclic aromatic compounds is described.

  13. Searching for dark matter with single phase liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr.

    The first hint that we fail to understand the nature of a large fraction of the gravitating matter in the universe came from Fritz Zwicky's measurements of the velocity distribution of the Coma cluster in 1933. Using the Virial theorem, Zwicky found that galaxies in the cluster were orbiting far too fast to remain gravitationally bound when their mass was estimated by the brightness of the visible matter. This led to the postulation that some form of non-luminous dark matter is present in galaxies comprising a large fraction of the galactic mass. The nature of this dark matter remains yet unknown over 80 years after Zwicky's measurements despite the efforts of many experiments. Dark matter is widely believed to be a beyond the Standard Model particle which brings the dark matter problem into the realm of particle physics. Supersymmetry is one widely explored extension of the Standard model, from which particles meeting the constraints on dark matter properties can naturally arise. These particles are generically termed weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and are a currently favored dark matter candidate. A variety of experimental efforts are underway aimed towards direct detection of dark matter through observation of rare scattering of WIMPs in terrestrial detectors. Single phase liquid argon detectors are an appealing WIMP detection technique due to the scintillation properties of liquid argon and the scalability of the single phase approach. The MiniCLEAN dark matter detector is a single phase liquid argon scintillation scintillation detector with a 500 kg active mass. The modular design offers 4pi coverage with 92 optical cassettes, each containing TPB coated acrylic and a cryogenic photomultiplier tube. The MiniCLEAN detector has recently completed construction at SNOLAB. The detector is currently being commissioned, and will soon begin operation with the liquid argon target. Utilizing advanced pulse-shape discrimination techniques, MiniCLEAN will

  14. Dissociation rate of bromine diatomics in an argon heat bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of a collection of 300 K bromine diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.

  15. Argon Analyses of Lherzolic Shergottites Y984028 and Y000097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic Martian meteorites Yamato (Y) 984028 and Y000027/47/97 have similar textures, mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic composition and are possibly paired. We analyzed the argon isotopic composition of Y984028 whole rock (WR) and pyroxene mineral separates (Px) in order to evaluate their trapped Ar components and compare with Y000097 Ar data. WR and Px yield an apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra of roughly 2 Ga, much older than the crystallization age determined by other isotopic techniques. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages for Y984028 are approximately 170 Ma. This discrepancy is likely the byproduct of several coexisting Ar components, such as radiogenic 40Ar*, cosmogenic Ar, and trapped Ar from the multiple minerals, as well as multiple source origins. Similarly, the reported Ar-39-Ar-40 age of Y000097 is approximately 260 Ma with a Rb-Sr age of 147+/- 28 Ma and a Sm-Nd age of 152 +/- 13 Ma [4]. Apparently Ar-Ar ages of both Y984028 and Y000097 show trapped Ar components. Stepwise temperature extractions of Ar from Y984028 Px show several Arcomponents released at different temperatures. For example, intermediate temperature data (800-1100 C) are nominally consistent with the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr radiometric ages (approximately 170 Ma) with an approximately Martian atmosphere trapped Ar composition with a Ar-40-Ar-36 ratio of approximately 1800. Based on K/Ca distribution, we know that Ar-39 at both lower and intermediate temperatures is primarily derived from plagioclase and olivine. Argon released during higher temperature extractions (1200-1500 C), however, differs significantly. The thermal profile of argon released from Martian meteorites is complicated by multiple sources, such as Martian atmosphere, Martian mantle, inherited Ar, terrestrial atmosphere, cosmogenic Ar. Obviously, Ar release at higher temperatures from Px should contain little terrestrial atmospheric component. Likewise, Xe-129/Xe-132 from high temperature extractions (1200-1800 C) gives a value above that

  16. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  17. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    PubMed

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  18. Transport Properties of Equilibrium Argon Plasma in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Laricchiuta, A.; Chikhaoui, A.; Kustova, E. V.; Giordano, D.

    2005-05-16

    Electron electrical conductivity coefficients of equilibrium Argon plasma in a magnetic field are calculated up to the 12th Chapman-Enskog approximation at pressure of 1 atm and 0.1 atm for temperatures 500K-20000K; the magnetic Hall parameter spans from 0.01 to 100. The collision integrals used in the calculations are discussed. The convergence properties of the different approximations are assessed. The degree of anisotropy introduced by the presence of the magnetic field is evaluated. Differences with the isotropic case can be very substantial. The biggest effects are visible at high ionization degrees, i.e. high temperatures, and at strong magnetic fields.

  19. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, E.; Pencheva, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  20. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschel, Thomas; Stefanović, Ilija; Malović, Gordana; Marić, Dragana; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2013-08-01

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges.

  1. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  2. HARP: high-pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco-Luque, M.; Fabjan, C.W.; Frandsen, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx. 200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described.

  3. Exploration of Argon PSD with the MiniCLEAN 39Ar Spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronquest, Michael

    2013-04-01

    MiniCLEAN is a single-phase WIMP dark matter experiment which observes scintillation light from a 150kg fiducial mass liquid argon target. This design utilizes argon's powerful pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability in order to identify and separate electron recoil backgrounds from WIMP-induced nuclear recoil signals. Experimental knowledge of the efficacy of argon PSD, as a function of photoelectron statistics and electron recoil energy, would inform the design and physics reach of the next generation of detectors. MiniCLEAN will perform the best measurement to date of argon PSD by utilizing a novel technique of ``spiking'' the detector with additional amounts of 39Ar. This unstable isotope produces beta decays at a level of 1Bq/kg in natural argon, and thus presents a major background for argon based experiments. Produced using the irradiation of potassium salts, the 39Ar spike will be injected into MiniCLEAN to produce ``enriched argon'' with the data compared to a prior run using natural argon. The difference in the number and distribution of candidate events between the two runs will yield the magnitude and shape of the argon PSD leakage background PDF. This talk will review the motivation, production and use of the 39Ar spike in MiniCLEAN.

  4. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  5. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Montanari, D.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.

    2015-12-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these installations (parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). This paper gives an overview of the installations involved in these cryogenic projects, describes the functional demands made to these cryogenic systems and presents the initial studies on which these future cryogenic systems will be based.

  6. Liquid argon scintillation read-out with silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canci, N.; Cattadori, C.; D'Incecco, M.; Lehnert, B.; Machado, A. A.; Riboldi, S.; Sablone, D.; Segreto, E.; Vignoli, C.

    2013-10-01

    Silicon photosensors represent a viable alternative to standard photomultipliers in fields such as communications and medical imaging. We explored the interesting possibility of using these sensors in combination with liquid argon (LAr) for astroparticle physics applications such as neutrino, dark matter and double beta decay experiments. In fact, silicon photosensors have detection efficiencies comparable with those of the highest performance PMTs and can be manufactured with high level of radiopurity. In particular within the on-going R&D activity of the SILENT project (Low background and low noise techniques for double beta decay physics funded by ASPERA) a large area SiPM (Silicon PhotoMultiplier - Hamamatsu S11828-3344M - 1.7 cm2 area) has been installed in a LAr scintillation chamber of 0.5 liters volume together with a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu R11065) used as a reference. The liquid argon chamber has been exposed to many gamma sources of different energies and single photoelectron response and light yield for the SiPM and PMT have been measured and compared. In this contribution the results of the tests, and the ongoing R&D to optimize the SiPM for cryogenic and for ultralow background applications, are reported, as well as the possible application in the GERDA experiment on Double Beta Decay Searches of 76Ge.

  7. Neutrino-Argon Interaction with GENIE Event Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneanu, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    Neutrinos are very special particles, have only weak interactions, except gravity, and are produced in very different processes in Nuclear and Particle Physics. Neutrinos are, also, messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe. Therefore, its can give us information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise. The underground instrumentation including a variety of large and very large detectors, thanks to technical breakthroughs, have achieved new fundamental results like the solution of the solar neutrino puzzle and the evidence for Physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary interactions in the neutrino sector with non-vanishing neutrino masses and lepton flavour violation. Two of the LAGUNA (Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics) detectors, namely: GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) [1] and LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astrophysics) [2] could be emplaced in ``Unirea'' salt mine from Slănic-Prahova, Romania. A detailed analysis of the conditions and advantages is necessary. A few results have been presented previously [3]. In the present work, we propose to generate events and compute the cross sections for interactions between neutrino and Argon-40, to estimate possible detection performances and event types. For doing this, we use the code GENIE (G_enerates E_vents for N_eutrino I_nteraction E_xperiments) [4]. GENIE Code is an Object-Oriented Neutrino MC Generator supported and developed by an international collaboration of neutrino interaction experts.

  8. Neutrino-Argon Interaction with GENIE Event Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chesneanu, Daniela

    2010-11-24

    Neutrinos are very special particles, have only weak interactions, except gravity, and are produced in very different processes in Nuclear and Particle Physics. Neutrinos are, also, messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe. Therefore, its can give us information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise. The underground instrumentation including a variety of large and very large detectors, thanks to technical breakthroughs, have achieved new fundamental results like the solution of the solar neutrino puzzle and the evidence for Physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary interactions in the neutrino sector with non-vanishing neutrino masses and lepton flavour violation.Two of the LAGUNA(Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics) detectors, namely: GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) and LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astrophysics) could be emplaced in 'Unirea' salt mine from Slanic-Prahova, Romania. A detailed analysis of the conditions and advantages is necessary. A few results have been presented previously. In the present work, we propose to generate events and compute the cross sections for interactions between neutrino and Argon-40, to estimate possible detection performances and event types. For doing this, we use the code GENIE(G lowbar enerates E lowbar vents for N lowbar eutrino I lowbar nteraction E lowbar xperiments). GENIE Code is an Object-Oriented Neutrino MC Generator supported and developed by an international collaboration of neutrino interaction experts.

  9. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  10. Investigation of a Mercury-Argon Hot Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamsley, Robert Charles

    Classical absorption and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments are used to investigate processes in the cathode region of a Hg-Ar hot cathode discharge. The absorption and LIF measurements are used to test the qualitative understanding and develop a quantitative model of a hot cathode discharge. The main contribution of this thesis is a model of the negative glow region that demonstrates the importance of Penning ionization to the ionization balance in the negative glow. We modeled the excited argon balance equation using a Monte Carlo simulation. In this simulation we used the trapped radiative decay rate of the resonance levels and the Penning ionization rate as the dominant loss terms in the balance equation. The simulated data is compared to and found to agree with absolute excited argon densities measured in a classical absorption experiment. We found the primary production rate per unit volume of excited Ar atoms in the simulation is sharply peaked near the cathode hot spot. We used the ion production rate from this simulation and a Green's function solution to the ambipolar diffusion equation to calculate the contribution of Penning ionization to the total ion density. We compared the results of this calculation to our experimental values of the Hg ^+ densities in the negative glow. We found that Penning ionization is an important and possibly the dominant ionization process in the negative glow.

  11. A DSMC Study of Low Pressure Argon Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Work toward a self-consistent plasma simulation using the DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) method for examination of the flowfields of low-pressure high density plasma reactors is presented. Presently, DSMC simulations for these applications involve either treating the electrons as a fluid or imposing experimentally determined values for the electron number density profile. In either approach, the electrons themselves are not physically simulated. Self-consistent plasma DSMC simulations have been conducted for aerospace applications but at a severe computational cost due in part to the scalar architectures on which the codes were employed. The present work attempts to conduct such simulations at a more reasonable cost using a plasma version of the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO, on an IBM SP-2. Due to availability of experimental data, the GEC reference cell is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is examined thus affording a simple chemistry set with eight gas-phase reactions and five species: Ar, Ar(+), Ar(*), Ar(sub 2), and e where Ar(*) is a metastable.

  12. Argon hydrochloride, Ar.HCl, bond energy by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miziolek, A. W.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared absorption of argon (200 to 760 torr) and hydrogen chloride (2 to 6 torr) mixtures is reexamined in the missing Q branch region (spectral region between 2860 and 3010 wavelength/cm) at temperatures ranging from 195 to 298 K. The temperature dependence of two absorption features of the argon hydrogen chloride complex, at 2887 and 2879 wavelength/cm, leads to a bond energy estimate that depends on the assumptions made about the internal degrees of freedom of the complex. It is shown that agreement with experiment can be reached for well depths near 1.2 kcal/mole. This result is relatively insensitive to the choice of the vibrational frequencies and anharmonicities, but does depend on the extent to which the energy level manifolds are truncated to avoid molecular excitation in excess of the bond energy. The bond energy is found to deviate from the commonly accepted value of 0.4 kcal/mole. Possible causes for the discrepancy are considered.

  13. Elastic properties of liquid and solid argon in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Schappert, Klaus; Pelster, Rolf

    2013-10-16

    We have measured sorption isotherms and determined the intrinsic longitudinal elastic modulus β(Ar,ads) of nanoconfined material via ultrasonic measurements combined with a special effective medium analysis. In the liquid regime the adsorbate only contributes to the measured effective properties when the pores are completely filled and the modulus is bulklike. At partial fillings its contribution is cancelled out by the high compressibility of the vapour phase. In contrast, at lower temperatures frozen argon as well as underlying liquid surface layers cause a linear increase of the effective longitudinal modulus upon filling. During sorption the contribution of the liquid surface layers near the pore wall β(Ar,surf) increases with the thickness of the solid layers reaching the bulk value β(Ar,liquid) only in the limit of complete pore filling. We interpret this effect as due to the gradual stiffening of the solid argon membrane. The measurements and their analysis show that longitudinal ultrasonic waves are well suited to the study of the elastic properties and liquid-solid phase transitions in porous systems. This method should also help to detect the influence of nanoconfinement on elastic properties in further research. PMID:24057946

  14. Argon Triple-Point Device for Calibration of SPRTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Kowal, A.; Steur, P. P. M.; Pavese, F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an apparatus for the calibration of long-stem platinum resistance thermometers at the argon triple point , designed at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structural Research, Poland (INTiBS). A hermetically sealed cell filled at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Italy with high purity gas (6N) is the main element of this apparatus. The cell is placed in a cryostat fully immersed in liquid nitrogen. A temperature-controlled shield ensures the quasi-adiabatic condition needed for proper realization of the phase transition. A system for correcting the temperature distribution along the thermometer well is also implemented. The cell cooling and argon solidification is carried out by filling the thermometer well with liquid nitrogen. A LabVIEW computer program written at INTiBS automatically controls the triple-point realization process. The duration of a melting plateau in the apparatus lasts for about 24 h. The melting width for between 20 % and 80 % was mK. The reproducibility of the plateau temperature is better than.

  15. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  16. The effect of accelerated argon ions on the retina.

    PubMed

    Krebs, W; Krebs, I; Merriam, G R; Worgul, B V

    1988-07-01

    It has been postulated that high energy heavy ions cause a unique form of damage in living tissue, which results from the high linear energy transfer of accelerated single particles. We have searched for these single-particle effects, so-called "microlesions," in composite electron micrographs of retinas of rats which had been irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy of 570 MeV/amu argon ions. The calculated rate of energy deposition of the radiation in the retina was about 100 keV/micron and the influence was four particles per 100 micron 2. Different areas of the irradiated retinas which combined would have been expected to be traversed by approximately 2400 particles were examined. We were unable to detect ultrastructural changes in the irradiated retinas distinct from those of controls. The spatial cellular densities of pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cells remained within the normal range when examined at 24 h and at 6 months after irradiation. These findings suggest that the retina is relatively resistant to heavy-ion irradiation and that under the experimental conditions the passage of high energy argon ions does not cause retinal microlesions that can be detected by ultrastructural analysis. PMID:3393633

  17. Effect of argon ion bombardment on amorphous silicon carbonitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batocki, R. G. S.; Mota, R. P.; Honda, R. Y.; Santos, D. C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films were synthesized by radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Vapor Chemical Deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) as precursor compound. Then, the films were post-treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) in argon atmosphere from 15 to 60 min. The hardness of the film enhanced after ion implantation, and the sample treated at 45 min process showed hardness greater than sixfold that of the untreated sample. This result is explained by the crosslinking and densification of the structure. Films were exposed to oxygen plasma for determining of the etching rate. It decreased monotonically from 33 Å/min to 19 Å/min for the range of process time, confirming structural alterations. Hydrophobic character of the a-SiCN:H films were modified immediately after ion bombardment, due to incorporation of polar groups. However, the high wettability of the films acquired by the ion implantation was diminished after aging in air. Therefore, argon PIII made a-SiCN:H films mechanically more resistant and altered their hydrophobic character.

  18. Resolving the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos using a liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2008-10-01

    We explore the potential offered by large-mass liquid argon detectors for determination of the sign of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through interactions of atmospheric neutrinos. We give results for a 100 kT sized magnetized detector which provides separate sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and, over a limited energy range, to {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub e}. We also discuss the sensitivity for the unmagnetized version of such a detector. After including the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporating the relevant statistical, theoretical, and systematic errors, we perform a binned {chi}{sup 2} analysis of simulated data. The {chi}{sup 2} is marginalized over the presently allowed ranges of neutrino parameters and determined as a function of {theta}{sub 13}. We find that such a detector offers superior capabilities for hierarchy resolution, allowing a >4{sigma} determination for a 100 kT detector over a 10-year running period for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.05. For an unmagnetized detector, a 2.5{sigma} hierarchy sensitivity is possible for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}=0.04.

  19. Studies in Above- and Below-Threshold Harmonics in Argon with an Infrared Femtosecond Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Andrew; Yin, Yanchun; Li, Jie; Ren, Xiaoming; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate and compare the above- and below-threshold harmonics in Argon gas using our recently-developed 1 kHz, two-cycle (11.4 fs), 3mJ, and carrier-envelope-phase(CEP)-stable laser at 1.6 μm. Such ultraviolet pulses can serve as pump or probe for studying dynamics in atoms and molecules. Unlike high harmonics with photon energy well above the ionization potential, the mechanism for generating harmonics near the ionization threshold is still under intense investigation. Previous work by Chini et al. on below-threshold harmonics was done using a 0.8 μm few-cycle Ti:Sapphire spectrally-broadened source with energy up to 300 μJ. It has been predicted by theory that free-free transitions dominate the below threshold harmonic generation as the laser wavelength increase from near infrared to mid-infrared. We are therefore interested in investigating how using a longer wavelength laser might lead to changes to the behavior of below-threshold harmonics when we vary various parameters. We report the π-periodity CEP dependence and ellipticity dependence of the above- and below-threshold harmonics. This material was based on work supported by National Science Foundation (1068604), Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0383), Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-15-1-0037) and the DARPA PULSE program by a Grant from AMRDEC (W31P4Q1310017).

  20. Correction of NPL-2013 estimate of the Boltzmann constant for argon isotopic composition and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, Michael; Yang, Inseok; Mark, Darren F.; Underwood, Robin; Sutton, Gavin; Machin, Graham

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, a team from NPL, Cranfield University and SUERC published an estimate of the Boltzmann constant based on precision measurements of the speed of sound in argon. A key component of our results was an estimate of the molar mass of the argon gas used in our measurements. To achieve this we made precision comparison measurements of the isotope ratios found in our experimental argon against the ratios of argon isotopes found in atmospheric air. We then used a previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios to calibrate the relative sensitivity of the mass spectrometer to different argon isotopes. The previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios was carried out at KRISS using a mass spectrometer calibrated using argon samples of known isotopic composition, which had been prepared gravimetrically. We report here a new measurement made at KRISS in October 2014, which directly compared a sample of our experimental gas against the same gravimetrically-prepared argon samples. We consider that this direct comparison has to take precedence over our previous more indirect comparison. This measurement implies a molar mass which is 2.73(60) parts in 106 lighter than our 2013 estimate, a shift which is seven times our 2013 estimate of the uncertainty in the molar mass. In this paper we review the procedures used in our 2013 estimate of molar mass; describe the 2014 measurement; highlight some questions raised by the large change in our estimate of molar mass; and describe how we intend to address the inconsistencies between them. We also consider the effect of a new estimate of the low pressure thermal conductivity of argon at 273.16 K. Finally we report our new best estimate of the Boltzmann constant with revised uncertainty, taking account of the new estimates for the molar mass and the thermal conductivity of the argon.

  1. 31 CFR 31.201 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 31.201 Section 31.201 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.201 Definitions. As used in this part: Arrangement means a contract or financial agency agreement between a private...

  2. 31 CFR 31.1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false General. 31.1 Section 31.1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM § 31.1 General. This part sets forth regulations to implement and administer the Emergency Economic Stabilization...

  3. 31 CFR 31.201 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definitions. 31.201 Section 31.201... words have in 5 CFR 2635.402(b)(4). Organizational conflict of interest means a situation in which the... Conflicts of Interest § 31.201 Definitions. As used in this part: Arrangement means a contract or...

  4. 31 CFR 357.31 - Certifying individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certifying individuals. 357.31 Section 357.31 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL... DIRECT Legacy Treasury Direct Book-Entry Securities System (Legacy Treasury Direct) § 357.31...

  5. 31 CFR 31.218 - Enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enforcement. 31.218 Section 31.218 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.218 Enforcement. (a) Compliance with these rules concerning conflicts of interest is of the utmost importance. In the event...

  6. The influence of microstructures on the relationship between argon retentivity and chemical composition of hornblende

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Pringle-Goodell, L. )

    1988-08-01

    This paper discusses isotope dating of hornblende separates from the Connemara, western Ireland. The dating is based on potassium/argon dates and the author provides a rebuttal of an earlier paper which dismisses any correlation between iron content in the hornblende and the Argon isotope dates for the same mineral.

  7. Influence of longitudinal argon flow on DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Xu, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the influence of longitudinal argon flow on the DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. It is found that the charges exhibit distinct dynamic behaviors at different argon flow velocities, accompanied by a considerable change in the discharge structure. The positive argon flow allows for the reduction of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions, and even leads to the disappearance of negative glow. The negative argon flow gives rise to the enhancement of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions. These observations are attributed to the fact that the gas flow convection influences the transport of charges through different manners by comparing the argon flow velocity with the ion drift velocity. The findings are important for improving the chemical activity and work efficiency of the plasma source by controlling the gas flow in practical applications.

  8. Surface treatment of para-aramid fiber by argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruxi; Yu, Junrong; Hu, Chengcheng; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Hu, Zuming

    2012-10-01

    This paper is focused on influence of argon dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the adhesive performance and wettability of para-aramid fibers and three parameters including treated power, exposure time and argon flux were detected. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was greatly increased by 28% with 300 W, 60 s, 2 L min-1 argon flux plasma treatment. The content of oxygen atom and oxygen-containing polar functional groups were enhanced after the argon plasma treated, so as the surface roughness, which contributed to the improvement of surface wettability and the decrease of contact angle with water. However, long-time exposure, exorbitant power or overlarge argon flux could partly destroy the prior effects of the treatment and damage the mechanical properties of fibers to some degree.

  9. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  10. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wenting; Li Guo; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Wang Huabo; Zeng Shi; Gao Xing; Luo Huiying

    2007-06-15

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure {alpha}-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  11. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  12. In situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Analysis of Aromatic Polyester Surface Treated with Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuo; Okamoto, Nanami

    2013-10-01

    Effects of surface modification treatment by argon plasma processing of two types of aromatic polyester, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(oxybenzonate-co-oxynaphthoate) (POCO), were investigated. This paper presents a description of our experiment and a discussion of the surface modification mechanism, which uses a simple and inexpensive procedure to conduct analysis without breaking vacuum after plasma processing. In situ analysis of the chemical composition of a polymer surface was attempted without exposing the sample to air after argon plasma processing. In particular, the respective actions of each active species were investigated for electrons and ions in argon plasma. Electrons and ions in argon plasma break some polymer bonds. Specifically, ester groups are broken and oxygen atoms are kicked out in PET and POCO. No oxygen functional group is formed after argon plasma processing, but such groups are formed if the sample is exposed to air.

  13. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  14. Fluorescence Spectrum of SiO in an Argon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullman, R.; Hormes, J.; Schroeder, W.; Wiggenhauser, H.

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence from SiO matrix isolated in argon has been investigated in the wavelength region 120-300 nm. Fluorescence emission spectra from the valence states, A1Π, E1Σ+ and G1Π, revealed that nearly all radiation comes from one channel at 305 nm, which was analysed as originating from the b3Π-X1Σ+ transition. Contrary to the A1Π and G1Π states, the E1Σ+ state also decays radiatively, although weakly, through two other channels situated in the vicinity of 305 nm. These two channels were believed to originate from the a3Σ+-X1Σ+ and e3Σ--X1Σ+ transitions.

  15. Low-energy ion implantation: Large mass fractionation of argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, TH.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The isotropic signatures of noble gases in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets are considerably evolved when compared to signatures observed in the solar wind. The mechanisms driving the evolution of planetary volatiles from original compositions in the solar accretion disk are currently poorly understood. Modeling of noble-gas compositional histories requires knowledge of fractionating processes that may have operated through the evolutionary stages. Since these gases are chemically inert, information on noble-gas fractionation processes can be used as probes. The importance of understanding these processes extends well beyond 'noble-gas planetology.' Trapped argon acquired by low-energy implantation (approximately less than 100 eV) into solids is strongly mass fractionated (approximately greater than or equal to 3 percent/amu). This has potential implications for the origin and evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres.

  16. Collisionless "thermalization" in the sheath of an argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this "thermalization" can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities).

  17. Studies on argon collisions with smooth and rough tungsten surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H; Utkin, A V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate argon scattering behaviors on the smooth and rough tungsten surfaces. Current work deals with numerical simulation of nanoscale heat transfer process accompanying with rarefied gas-solid substrate interactions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. Taking into account that this method is very time consuming, MD simulation using CUDA capable Graphic Cards is implemented. The results found that imperfection of the surface significantly influences on gas atom's momentum change upon collision. However, the energy exchange rate remains unchanged regardless to the surface roughness. This finding is in contrast with the results in extant literatures. We believed the results found in this paper are important for both numerical and theoretical analyses of rarefied gas flow in micro- and nano-systems where the choice of boundary conditions significantly influences flow. PMID:24007943

  18. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  19. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogle, C. W.; Tong, X. M.; Martin, L.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Ranitovic, P.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom.

  20. Self-consistent polarization density functional theory: Application to Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Maerzke, Katie A.; Murdachaew, Garold; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Siepmann, J. I.

    2009-03-12

    We present a comprehensive set of results for argon, a case study in weak interactions, using the selfconsistent polarization density functional theory (SCP-DFT). With minimal parameterization, SCPDFT is found is give excellent results for the dimer interaction energy, the second virial coefficient, the liquid structure, and the lattice constant and cohesion energy of the face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal compared to both accurate theoretical and experimental benchmarks. Thus, SCP-DFT holds promise as a fast, efficient, and accurate method for performing ab initio dynamics that include additional polarization and dispersion interactions for large, complex systems involving solvation and bond breaking. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  1. Threshold photoelectron spectrum of the Argon 3s satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Medhurst, L.J.; Von Wittenau, A.S.; van Zee, R.D.; Zhang, J.S.; Liu, S.H.; Shirley, D.A.; Lindle, D.W.

    1989-07-01

    Lately a variety of techniques have studied the electron correlation satellites with binding energies between the Argon 3s binding energy (29.24 eV) and the 2p/sup /minus/2/ ionization potential (43.38 eV). One of these techniques, Threshold Photoelectron Spectroscopy, with /approximately/90 meV FWHM resolution, revealed at least 25 individual electronic states. All of these could contribute to any other satellite spectrum, and this helped explain some discrepancies between previous measurements. This technique has been applied to the same region with higher resolution (<60 meV at the Ar 3s/sup /minus/1/peak). In this higher resolution spectrum at least 29 individual electronic states are present. In some cases the multiplet splitting is observed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Plasma core reactor simulations using RF uranium seeded argon discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater systems to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor (PCR). A nonfissioning, steady-state RF-heated argon plasma seeded with pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was used. An overall objective was to achieve maximum confinement of uranium vapor within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition. Exploratory tests were conducted using the 80 kW RF induction heater with the test chamber at approximately atmospheric pressure and discharge power levels on the order of 10 kW. Four different test chamber flow configurations were tested to permit selection of the configuration offering the best confinement characteristics for subsequent tests at higher pressure and power in the 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility.

  3. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  4. Is there excess argon in the Fish Canyon magmatic system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, C. M.; Sherlock, S.; Kelley, S. P.; Charlier, B. L.

    2010-12-01

    Some phenocrysts from the Fish Canyon Tuff (San Juan volcanic field, south-western Colorado, USA) have yielded anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages and yet the sanidine ages are sufficiently reproducible to allow its use as an international standard. The eruption age of the Fish Canyon tuff has recently been determined by high precision analysis and recalibration of the decay constants based on the sanidine standard at 28.305 ± 0.036 Ma [1], slightly younger than the generally accepted U-Pb age. Previously, minerals from the tuff have been used in various geochronological studies e.g., fission-track; U-Pb; Rb-Sr; K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar, but U-Pb zircon ages which range 28.37 - 28.61 Ma appear to be older than the sanidine and other minerals, including biotite, yield older ages (27.41 - 28.25 Ma for biotite) [2]. In the Fish Canyon volcanic system, the erupted products are thought to exist in the magma chamber for significant periods prior to eruption [3] and then pass rapidly from a high temperature magmatic environment (where Ar is free to re-equilibrate among the minerals), to effectively being quenched upon eruption (where Ar becomes immobile). Artificially elevated ages, older than eruption age, have been identified in some 40Ar/39Ar geochronological studies (e.g. [4]). These older ages may either reflect; 1) argon accumulation in pheno- or xenocrysts (by radioactive decay of parent 40K), 2) excess argon (40ArE) incorporated into a mineral during crystallisation (via diffusion into the mineral lattice or hosted within fluid or melt inclusions) or 3) inherited radiogenic argon (the dated material contains a component older than the age of eruption) [5]. To better understand the effects of 40ArE on 40Ar/39Ar apparent ages we have conducted a detailed study of intra-grain grain age variations by UV-LAMP Ar-analysis. Analysis of polished thick sections has been performed in-situ using a 213nm laser and Nu Instruments Noblesse which is able to discriminate against

  5. Plasma core reactor simulations using RF uranium seeded argon discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results are described in which pure uranium hexafluoride was injected into an argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasma to investigate characteristics of plasma core nuclear reactors. The 80 kW (13.56 MHz) and 1.2 MW (5.51 MHz) rf induction heater facilities were used to determine a test chamber flow scheme which offered best uranium confinement with minimum wall coating. The cylindrical fused-silica test chamber walls were 5.7-cm-ID by 10-cm-long. Test conditions included RF powers of 2-85 kW, chamber pressures of 1-12 atm, and uranium hexafluoride mass-flow rates of 0.005-0.13 g/s. Successful techniques were developed for fluid-mechanical confinement of RF-heated plasmas with pure uranium hexafluoride injection.

  6. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  7. Evaluation of phototoxic retinal damage after argon laser iridotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.R.; Knighton, R.W.; Feuer, W.J.

    1989-04-15

    We performed several visual function tests in 17 eyes (ten patients) before and after argon laser iridotomy in an effort to detect diffuse photochemical damage to photoreceptors caused by exposure to the intense, blue-green light that is transmitted into the posterior segment as the iridotomy is created and enlarged. No change was detected in static threshold sensitivity in the central 30 degrees of the field (Octopus perimeter), color sensitivity (Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test), or visual acuity. Contrast sensitivity showed a small increase at low spatial frequencies and a small decrease at high spatial frequencies. The latter change was small and not necessarily laser related, but precautions to limit laser exposure of the posterior pole are prudent.

  8. Methane from benzene in argon dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Das, Tomi Nath; Dey, G R

    2013-03-15

    A first-time account of direct, on-line, instantaneous and efficient chemical conversion of gas phase benzene to methane in argon Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) is presented. In the absence of another overt hydrogen-donating source, potency of analogous parents toward methane generation is found to follow the order: benzene>toluene>p-xylene. Simultaneous production of trace amounts of phenolic surface deposits suggest (a) prompt decomposition of the parent molecules, including a large fraction yielding atomic transients (H-atom), (b) continuous and appropriate recombination of such parts, and (c) trace moisture in parent contributing OH radicals and additional H-atoms, which suitably react with the unreacted fraction of the parent, and also other intermediates. Results highlight Ar DBD to be a simple and exploitable technology for transforming undesirable hazardous aromatics to usable/useful low molecular weight open-chain products following the principles of green chemistry and engineering. PMID:23419905

  9. Attosecond Coherent Control of Single and Double Photoionization in Argon.

    PubMed

    Hogle, C W; Tong, X M; Martin, L; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C; Ranitovic, P

    2015-10-23

    Ultrafast high harmonic beams provide new opportunities for coherently controlling excitation and ionization processes in atoms, molecules, and materials on attosecond time scales by employing multiphoton two-pathway electron-wave-packet quantum interferences. Here we use spectrally tailored and frequency tuned vacuum and extreme ultraviolet harmonic combs, together with two phase-locked infrared laser fields, to show how the total single and double photoionization yields of argon can be coherently modulated by controlling the relative phases of both optical and electronic-wave-packet quantum interferences. This Letter is the first to apply quantum control techniques to double photoionization, which is a fundamental process where a single, high-energy photon ionizes two electrons simultaneously from an atom. PMID:26551112

  10. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  11. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  12. A 400 kilowatt argon arc lamp for solar simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Pollack, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A 400 kilowatt argon arc lamp for a solar simulator has been designed, operated, and evaluated. The lamp is designed to produce one solar constant on a test area 4.6 by 9.2 meters when used with a collimator. The divergence angle of the beam is about 1 deg. The lamp is designed to operate completely within a vacuum environment. Over 80 kilowatt of directed radiation was monitored and measured for a 25-hour period during a recent test. In another test, an arc was operated at 400 kilowatt for 110 hours without removal or refurbishing of the electrodes. These tests have proven the cleanliness and integrity of the radiation source.

  13. Prediction of underground argon content for dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, D.-M.; Spaans, J.; Keller, C.; Yin, Z.-B.; Koppang, M.; Hime, A.; Gehman, V. M.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of physical models to evaluate the production of {sup 39}Ar and {sup 40}Ar underground. Considering both cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar production and radiogenic {sup 40}Ar production in situ and from external sources, we can derive the ratio of {sup 39}Ar to {sup 40}Ar in underground sources. We show for the first time that the {sup 39}Ar production underground is dominated by stopping negative muon capture on {sup 39}K and (alpha,n) induced subsequent {sup 39}K(n,p){sup 39}Ar reactions. The production of {sup 39}Ar is shown as a function of depth. We demonstrate that argon depleted in {sup 39}Ar can be obtained only if the depth of the underground resources is greater than 500 m.w.e. below the surface. Stopping negative muon capture on {sup 39}K dominates over radiogenic production at depths of less than 2000 m.w.e., and that production by muon-induced neutrons is subdominant at any depth. The depletion factor depends strongly on both radioactivity level and potassium content in the rock. We measure the radioactivity concentration and potassium concentration in the rock for a potential site of an underground argon source in South Dakota. Depending on the probability of {sup 39}Ar and {sup 40}Ar produced underground being dissolved in the water, the upper limit of the concentration of {sup 39}Ar in the underground water at this site is estimated to be in a range of a factor of 1.6 to 155 less than the {sup 39}Ar concentration in the atmosphere. The calculation tools presented in this paper are also critical to the dating method with {sup 39}Ar.

  14. Argon laser photocoagulation versus intrastromal voriconazole injection in treatment of mycotic keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Mohammad M.; El-Shorbagy, Mohammad S.; Selima, Adel A.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare argon laser photocoagulation and intrastromal injection of voriconazole as adjunctive treatment modalities in cases of resistant mycotic corneal ulcers. METHODS Two groups each of them included 20 cases of resistant mycotic corneal ulcers. Both groups treated with local and systemic specific antimicrobial drugs guided with culture and sensitivity results. In one group argon laser photocoagulation was used as an adjunctive therapy to the specific antifungal drugs and in the other group, intrastromal injection of voriconazole was done besides the specific antifungal drugs. The 40 cases included in the study were proven according to culture and sensitivity to be 28 cases with pure fungal results and 12 cases with mixed (fungal and bacterial). In argon laser group, argon laser irradiation of the corneal ulcer was performed using argon laser 532 nm wavelength (Carl Zeiss LSL 532s AG; Meditec, Inc.) after fluorescein staining. In the other group, voriconazole solution (500 µg/mL) was prepared and injected in the corneal stroma. All cases were followed up for 3mo after healing was achieved. RESULTS Complete healing of the epithelial defect and resolution of stromal infiltration with no adverse effects were achieved in argon laser group in duration ranged from 2-4wk in 90% of cases. In voriconazole group 4 cases needed amniotic membrane graft due to thinning and 16 cases healed in duration ranged from 2-6wk (80% of cases). CONCLUSION Argon laser photocoagulation is superior to intrastromal voriconazole injection in treatment of resistant fungal corneal ulcers. PMID:26949639

  15. [TESTING THE PROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF ARGON DURING SUBACUTE EXPOSURE TO HYPOXIC HYPOXIA].

    PubMed

    Soldatov, P E; Dadasheva, O A; Gurieva, T S; Markin, A A; Tatarkin, S V; Nosovskii, A M; Smirnov, I A; Tiurin-Kuzmin, A Iu; Shulagin, Yu A; Smolenskaia, T S; Grishin, V I

    2015-01-01

    Previously it has been shown that argon has a stimulating effect on biological processes including, specifically, strong protective properties during exposure to acute (1-4 hrs.) hypoxic hypoxia. Experiments with animals under hypoxia gradually growing over 3 to 7 days may give insight into mechanisms of the argon protective action. Purpose of the work was to explore character and severity of developing disorders, to attempt their prognosis and to test potentiality of argon as a protector from the effects of subacute hypoxic exposure. In two series of experiments Wistar male rats were housed in pressure chambers with different rates of O2 reduction without argon and with argon in concentration of 32-38%. Oxygen reduction from 20.9 to 9.0% in 3 days led to the death of 50% animals. Oxygen reduction to 12.0% in 7 days and one day in low-oxygen atmosphere was harmless for animals. Argon in air makes the response to hypoxia almost twice as sharp on virtually every level (red blood system, physiological, morphological and biochemical shifts) validating the concept that argon acts as a stimulator. In context of the most critical processes of adaptation to hypoxia--activation of blood formation and lipid metabolism--this sharpening of the response results in depletion of body resources and instigates irreversible shifts. PMID:26087583

  16. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  17. 31 CFR 357.31 - Certifying individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certifying individuals. 357.31 Section 357.31 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY TREASURY BONDS, NOTES AND BILLS HELD IN...

  18. 31 CFR 357.31 - Certifying individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certifying individuals. 357.31 Section 357.31 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL... institutions, corporate central credit unions, and institutions that are members of...

  19. Argon-40/argon-39 whole-rock slate ages from the Robertson Bay terrane, northern Victoria Land: Documenting diachronous orogeny as a result of terrane accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In models of tectonic convergence, oceanic material enters subduction zones, descends, and is deformed. Over time subduction cuts across areas of deformation and should become younger in a direction opposite the dip of the subduction zone. Typically, geologists have found it difficult to document this because of insufficient cross-strike exposure, uncertainties in interpretation of radiometric ages, and overprinting of later tectonothermal events. The Robertson Bay and Bowers terranes of northern Victoria Land, which were accreted to the east antarctic craton (Gondwana margin) during the Ordovician Ross Orogeny, offer a unique opportunity to document a potentially diachronous deformation associated with an Ordovician orogeny. Exposed over a large area, these terranes display nearly uniform lithology, low metamorphic grade, and structural style and are combined with the absence of a regionally significant tectonothermal over print. Reconnaissance age analysis by potassium/argon and argon-40/argon-39 methods suggests that ages decrease eastward across the Robertson Bay terrane. The objective is systematically to collect samples of and perform argon-40/argon-39 age analysis on a whole-rock suite from the Bowers and Robertson Bay terranes. The resultant ages would more clearly document the suggested diachronism and allow more rigorous evaluation of the various tectonothermal models proposed for the evolution of the Gondwana margin.

  20. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  1. Computational and Experimental Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Argon Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Brizes, W.

    2003-02-11

    Experimental and computational studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of an Argon Reservoir (AR). The AR is designed to prevent the ingress of air into the extraction furnace during the insertion and removal of the extraction basket, which contains Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods. Computational computer code studies were performed to evaluate the AR design concept. Based on the results of this study it was concluded that the Argon reservoir would be very effective in keeping air and moisture from infiltrating into the furnace module if the reservoir was continuously supplied with make-up argon.

  2. Imaging of the structure of the argon and neon dimer, trimer, and tetramer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, B; Vredenborg, A; Malakzadeh, A; Schmidt, L Ph H; Havermeier, T; Meckel, M; Cole, K; Smolarski, M; Chang, Z; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2011-06-30

    We Coulomb explode argon and neon dimers, trimers, and tetramers by multiple ionization in an ultrashort 800 nm laser pulse. By measuring all momentum vectors of the singly charged ions in coincidence, we determine the ground state nuclear wave function of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Furthermore we retrieve the bond angles of the trimer in position space by applying a classical numerical simulation. For the argon and neon trimer, we find a structure close to the equilateral triangle. The width of the distribution around the equilateral triangle is considerably wider for neon than for argon. PMID:21413773

  3. The role of carrier gases in the production of metastable argon atoms in an RF discharge.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudinger, K.; Lu, Z. T.; Mueller, P.; Physics

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the role of carrier gases in the production of metastable argon atoms in a rf-driven discharge. The effects of different carrier gases (krypton, xenon, neon, and helium), carrier gas pressures, and rf discharge powers are examined. A xenon carrier gas provides the greatest metastable population of argon, yielding an optimal fractional metastable population of argon (Ar*/Ar) of 2 x 10{sup -4} at 0.2 mTorr of xenon gas. The optimal krypton configuration yields 60% of the xenon-supported population at 1.5 times higher pressure. Neon and helium perform considerably worse probably due to their higher ionization potentials.

  4. Argon recovery from hydrogen depleted ammonia plant purge gas using a HARP Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A number of ammonia plants employ membranes or cryogenic hydrogen recovery units to separate hydrogen contained in the purge gas for recycle to the ammonia synthesis loop. The resulting hydrogen depleted purge gas, which is usually used for fuel, is an attractive source of argon. This paper presents the novel features of a process which employs a combination of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and cryogenic technology to separate the argon from this hydrogen depleted purge gas stream. This new proprietary Hybrid Argon Recovery Progress (HARP) plant is an effective alternative to a conventional all-cryogenic plant.

  5. Liquid-Argon Time Projection Chambers in the U.S

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detectors are ideally suited for studying neutrino interactions and probing the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. The ability to drift ionization particles over long distances in purified argon and to trigger on abundant scintillation light allows for excellent particle identification and triggering capability. Recent U.S. based work in the development of LAr TPC technology for massive kiloton size detectors will be discussed in this talk, including details of the ArgoNeuT (Argon Neutrino Test) test-beam project, which is a 175 liter LAr TPC exposed to Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beamline.

  6. The nature of fluctuations in a double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Xin; Yan Jianhua; Yu Liang; Cen, Kefa; Cheron, Bruno

    2007-09-24

    The dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet is investigated by combined means of the fast Fourier transform, correlation function, and Wigner distribution. The restrike mode is identified as the fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which indicates that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the power supply undulation and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. It is further found that the double anode torch could inhibit and reduce the restrike phenomenon.

  7. Nonadiabatic alignment of van der Waals--force-bound argon dimers by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Vredenborg, A.; Ulrich, B.; Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Meckel, M.; Voss, S.; Sann, H.; Kim, H.; Jahnke, T.; Doerner, R.

    2011-06-15

    We demonstrated that the weak van der Waals-force-bound argon dimer can be nonadiabatically aligned by nonresonant femtosecond laser pulses, showing periodic alignment and anti-alignment revivals after the extinction of the laser pulse. Based on the measured nonadiabatic alignment trace, the rotational constant of the argon dimer ground state is determined to be B{sub 0}= 0.05756 {+-} 0.00004 cm{sup -1}. Noticeable alignment dependence of frustrated tunneling ionization and bond-softening induced dissociation of the argon dimer are observed.

  8. X-ray Emission Wavelengths of Argon, Krypton, Xenon, and Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleykamp, H.

    1992-03-01

    The wavelengths of the L series of argon, krypton and xenon, the K series of argon, and the M series of curium were measured by means of wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The specimens for the investigations were TiC layers which had been HF sputtered under reduced argon pressure by the PVD method, krypton and xenon implanted zeolites, and a curium doped borosilicate glass. The obtained relative intensities of the X-ray emission lines were normalized to the maximum intensity of the line of the respective series

  9. Changes in a surface of polycrystalline aluminum upon bombardment with argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ashkhotova, I. B.; Bliev, A. P.; Magkoev, T. T.; Krymshokalova, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between argon ions and a natural oxide layer of polycrystalline aluminum is studied via Auger electron (AE) and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy. It is found that bombardment with argon ions whose energy is lower than the Al2O3 sputtering threshold results in the accumulation of bombarding ions in interstitial surface voids, thus forming a supersaturated solid solution of target atoms and bombarding ions of argon and nitrogen entrapped by the ion beam from the residual gas of the working chamber of the spectrometer.

  10. Development of a Laser Probe for Argon Isotope Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConville, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The first objective of this study was to develop a laser outgassing facility for argon isotope studies. Apart from the laser and construction of the laser sample port, existing vacuum and mass spectrometer systems were used. Laser performance and optimum operating conditions were investigated. The second objective was test and evaluate the laser extraction technique by studies of simple geological samples. Previous laser ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar dating studies by other workers had not systematically established the basis or characteristics of the method. Results from laser and complementary stepped heating studies of the ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar dating standard hornblende, hb3gr; a phlogopite sample from the Palabora (Phalaborwa) Complex; and biotites in a thin section of the Hamlet Bjerg granite from East Greenland, verified that: (1) Laser extraction reproduced within experimental error the stepped heating ^{40}Ar-^ {39}Ar and K-Ar ages of simple samples. (2) The precision of the technique i.e. the amount of sample required to give reliable ages, was limited in the present experiments largely by the level of the blanks and backgrounds to 10-100 ug samples. (3) Sample outgassing appeared to be limited to the order of 10 um outside the physical size of the laser pit, consistent with other estimates of the spatial definition in the literature. This could be understood by thermal diffusion and the length of the laser pulse. (4) The efficiency of the laser pulse in melting and outgassing mineral samples was shown to be dependent on silicate latent heats and mineral absorption at the laser wavelength. In addition, the ^{40} Ar-^{39}Ar age of the geologically significant Palabora Complex was determined as (2053 +/- 5) Ma. Excess argon led to a discrepancy between the laser and stepped heating ages of biotite and muscovite, (405 +/- 5) Ma, and laser ages of feldspars (510 +/- 20) Ma in the Hamlet Bjerg granite. This illustrated

  11. Neuroprotective therapy for argon-laser-induced retinal injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai; Solberg, Yoram; Turetz, Yosef

    1999-06-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment of the central retina is often complicated by an immediate side effect of visual impairment, caused by the unavoidable laser-induced destruction of the normal tissue lying adjacent to the lesion and not affected directly by the laser beam. Furthermore, accidental laser injuries are at present untreatable. A neuroprotective therapy for salvaging the normal tissue might enhance the benefit obtained from treatment and allow safe perifoveal photocoagulation. We have developed a rat model for studying the efficacy of putative neuroprotective compounds in ameliorating laser-induced retinal damage. Four compounds were evaluated: the corticosteroid methylprednisolone, the glutamate-receptor blocker MK-801, the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the calcim-overload antagonist flunarizine. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first, the histopathological development of retinal laser injuries was studied. Argon laser lesions were inflicted in the retinas of 18 pigmented rats. The animals were sacrificed after 3, 20 or 60 days and their retinal lesions were evaluated under the light microscope. The laser injury mainly involved the outer layers of the retina, where it destroyed significant numbers of photoreceptor cells. Over time, evidence of two major histopathological processes was observed: traction of adjacent nomral retinal cells into the central area of the lesion forming an internal retinal bulging, and a retinal pigmented epithelial proliferative reaction associated with subretinal neovascularization and invations of the retinal lesion site by phagocytes. The neuroprotective effects of each of the four compounds were verified in a second step of the study. For each drug tested, 12 rats were irradiated wtih argon laser inflictions: six of them received the tested agent while the other six were treated with the corresponding vehicle. Twenty days after laser expsoure, the rats were sacrificed and their lesions were

  12. ULTRAVIOLET INDUCED MOTION OF A FLUORESCENT DUST CLOUD IN AN ARGON DIRECT CURRENT GLOW DISCHARGE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M.G.; and Zwicker, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dusty plasmas consist of electrons, ions, neutrals and nm-μm sized particles commonly referred to as dust. In man-made plasmas this dust may represent impurities in a tokamak or plasma etching processing. In astrophysical plasmas this dust forms structures such as planetary rings and comet tails. To study dusty plasma dynamics an experiment was designed in which a 3:1 silica (<5 μm diameter) and fl uorescent dust mixture was added to an argon DC glow discharge plasma and exposed to UV radiation. This fl uorescent lighting technique offers an advantage over laser scattering (which only allows two-dimensional slices of the cloud to be observed) and is simpler than scanning mirror techniques or particle image velocimetry. Under typical parameters (P=150 mTorr, V anode= 100 V, Vcathode= -400 V, Itotal < 2mA) when the cloud is exposed to the UV light (100W, λ = 365 nm) the mixture fl uoresces, moves ~2mm towards the light source and begins rotating in a clockwise manner (as seen from the cathode). By calibrating a UV lamp and adjusting the relative intensity of the UV with a variable transformer it was found that both translational and rotational velocities are a function of UV intensity. Additionally, it was determined that bulk cloud rotation is not seen when the dust tray is not grounded while bulk translation is. This ongoing experiment represents a novel way to control contamination in man-made plasmas and a path to a better understanding of UV-bathed plasma systems in space..

  13. The development of the simultaneous GC method of helium, argon and neon measurements for the groundwater dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Joanna; Śliwka, Ireneusz

    2014-05-01

    In this work we present a chromatographic method for simultaneous analysis of helium, neon and argon in groundwater from one water sample. The concentration of helium in groundwater may be a good environmental tracer for groundwater dating. Proper use of environmental tracers in hydrogeology for dating purpose, requires the knowledge of recharge temperature of the system and the so-called "Excess air". "Excess air" allows for the necessary correction of measured concentration of helium in water. Both parameters can be determined by measuring the concentration of argon and neon in groundwater. In the Department of Physicochemistry of Ecosystems from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences the chromatographic method for the simultaneous analysis of He, Ar and Ne from one groundwater sample for dating purposes was developed. Water samples are taken to the stainless steel vessels with a capacity of 2900 cc. Gases are extracted from water by headspace method (HS). Helium, neon and argon are analyzed on two gas chromatographs equipped with capillary and packed columns and three thermo-conductive detectors (TCD). The chromatographic method was applied to groundwater dating from areas of Podhalańska Basin, Kraków and Żarnowiec. The levels of detection LOD for each measurement systems for the tested compounds are: 1,9•10-8 cm3STP/cm3 for Ne, 3,1•10-6 cm3STP/cm3 for Ar and 1,2•10-8 cm3STP/cm3 for He. Work performed within the strategic research project "Technologies supporting the development of safe nuclear power" financed by the National Centre for Research and Development (NCBiR). Research Task "Development of methods to assure nuclear safety and radiation protection for current and future needs of nuclear power plants", contract No. SP/J/6/143339/11. This work was also supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the Polish National Science Centre.

  14. Positive column of the glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Artushenko, Ekaterina; Yegorenkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    We report the measurements we performed of the reduced electric field strength E / p in the positive column in the range of the gas pressure and tube radius product of 0.01 argon are obtained. The second model consists in considering the production and loss of charged particles and metastable atoms and obtaining a simple equation for the reduced electric field E / p depending on the discharge current density, gas pressure and tube radius. These models furnish a good description of experimental data in the whole range of pR values studied. and Scientific Center of Physical Technologies, Svobody Sq.6, Kharkov, 61022, Ukraine.

  15. Coherent set of electron cross sections for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. L.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a coherent set of electron impact cross sections for argon (elastic momentum-transfer, inelastic for the excitation of 37 levels Ar(4s,4p,3d,5p,4d,6s) and ionization), which was recently uploaded onto the LXcat IST-Lisbon database. The cross section set was validated by comparing calculated swarm parameters (electron mobility and characteristic energy) and rate coefficients (Townsend ionization coefficient and direct + cascade excitation coefficients to the 4s and 4p states) with available experimental data, for E / N = 10-4 - 100 Td and Tg = 300, 77 K. The validation procedure involves the solution to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, resorting to three different solvers: (i) IST-Lisbon's (ii) BOLSIG+ (v1.2) with LXcat; (iii) BOLSIG+ (v1.23). The results obtained with these solvers are compared to evidence the importance of certain numerical features related with both the energy-grid (number of points, grid-type and maximum energy value) and the interpolation scheme adopted for the cross sections. In particular, the latter can cause a 6% variation on the values of swarm parameters at intermediate E/Ns.

  16. Interaction of an argon plasma jet with a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Max; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A filamentary discharge is ignited in an argon plasma jet under atmospheric pressure conditions. The gas discharge is characterized with voltage-current measurements, optical emission spectroscopy and an ICCD-camera with a high temporal resolution down to 10 ns. In the effluent of the plasma jet, filaments come into contact with the surface of a silicon wafer and modify it, namely etching traces are produced and microcrystals are deposited. These traces are studied with optical and electron microscopes. The material of the deposited microcrystals and the surface modifications of the silicon wafer are analyzed with Raman microspectroscopy. Amorphous silicon is found within the etching traces. The largest part of the deposited microcrystals are composed of nitratine (NaNO3) and some of them are calcite (CaCO3). Analyzing the possible reasons for the silicon wafer modifications we come to the conclusion that plasmoids, which are produced near the substrate surface by interaction with ionization waves, are a plausible explanation for the observed surface modifications of the silicon wafer.

  17. Low Temperature Atmospheric Argon Plasma: Diagnostics and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, Svetlana; Petrov, Oleg; Zigangirova, Nailya; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Sysolyatina, Elena; Antipov, Sergei; Alyapyshev, Maxim; Kolkova, Natalia; Mukhachev, Andrei; Naroditsky, Boris; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Grigoriev, Anatoly; Morfill, Gregor; Fortov, Vladimir; Gintsburg, Alexander

    This study was devoted to diagnostic of low temperature plasma produced by microwave generator and investigation of its bactericidal effect against bacteria in biofilms and within eukaryotic cells. The profile of gas temperature near the torch outlet was measured. The spectrum in a wide range of wavelengths was derived by the method of optical emission spec-troscopy. Probe measurements of the floating potential of plasma were car-ried out. The estimation and adaptation of parameters of plasma flow (tem-perature, velocity, ion number density) according to medico-technical requirements were produced. The model of immersed surface-associated biofilms formed by Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, was used to assess bactericidal effects of plasma treatment. Reduction in the concentration of live bacteria in biofilms treated with plasma for 5 min was demonstrated by measuring Live/Dead fluorescent labeling and using direct plating. The intracellular infection model with the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was used to study the efficacy of microwave argon plasma against intracellular parasites. A 2 min plasma treatment of mouse cells infected with C. trachomatis reduced infectious bacteria by a factor of 2×106. Plasma treatment diminished the number of viable host cells by about 20%. When the samples were covered with MgF2 glass to obstruct active particles and UV alone was applied, the bactericidal effect was re-duced by 5×104 fold compared to the whole plasma.

  18. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.

    1996-12-31

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV.

  19. Imaging of hydrogen halides photochemistry on argon and ice nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poterya, V.; Lengyel, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Svrčková, P.; Fárník, M.

    2014-08-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of HX (X = Cl, Br) molecules deposited on large ArN and (H2O)N, bar{N}≈ 102-103, clusters is investigated at 193 nm using velocity map imaging of H and Cl photofragments. In addition, time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization complemented by pickup cross section measurements provide information about the composition and structure of the clusters. The hydrogen halides coagulate efficiently to generate smaller (HX)n clusters on ArN upon multiple pickup conditions. This implies a high mobility of HX molecules on argon. On the other hand, the molecules remain isolated on (H2O)N. The photodissociation on ArN leads to strong H-fragment caging manifested by the fragment intensity peaking sharply at zero kinetic energy. Some of the Cl-fragments from HCl photodissociation on ArN are also caged, while some of the fragments escape the cluster directly without losing their kinetic energy. The images of H-fragments from HX on (H2O)N also exhibit a strong central intensity, however, with a different kinetic energy distribution which originates from different processes: the HX acidic dissociation followed by H3O neutral hydronium radical formation after the UV excitation, and the slow H-fragments stem from subsequent decay of the H3O. The corresponding Cl-cofragment from the photoexcitation of the HCl.(H2O)N is trapped in the ice nanoparticle.

  20. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  1. Identification of cosmogenic argon components in Allende by laser microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1986-01-01

    New techniques are presented for using a laser microprobe to determine the spallation argon systematics of calcium-aluminum inclusions. The Ar-38(s) amounts determined for melilite and anorthite in a coarse-grained inclusion from Allende are 2.9 x 10 to the -8th and 1.3 x 10 to the -8th cc/g, respectively. The ratio of the amounts is consistent with the calcium contents of these two minerals. The Ar-38(s) amount determined for a fine-grained inclusion from Allende is 1.1 x 10 to the -8th cc/g. Calcium and potassium amounts were determined from irradiated samples of the same inclusions so that production of Ar-38 from calcium during the cosmic ray exposure of Allende could be determined for these samples. The production observed was 12.4 + or - 2.1 x 10 to the -8th cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the coarse-grained inclusion and 9.9 + or - 2.4 cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the fine-grained inclusion. No evidence of unusual exposure was observed in the two inclusions studied.

  2. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  3. Photon Detection System for LBNE Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2014-03-01

    The LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is the next generation accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment planned in US. The experiment will use a new muon-neutrino beam sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics goal of the LBNE is a definitive determination the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta-23, and precise measurement of CP violation in neutrino oscillation. Neutrino interaction in LAr result in charged particles producing ionization and scintillation light signals. Dedicated photon detection system is under design for use in the LBNE LArTPC far detectors. The baseline design couples wavelength-shifter coated ultraviolet transmitting acrylic to 3 mm2 silicon photomultipliers. By detecting scintillation light we aim to improve event reconstruction capabilities and efficiently separate neutrino events from background. Current status of the system will be described.

  4. ECR Plasma Sterilisation, Argon and Nitrogen Treated Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helhel, Selcuk; Oksuz, Lutfi; Cerezci, Osman; Rad, Abbas Y.

    2004-09-01

    ECR type plasma system was built to produce plasma in axial direction. Plasma was initiated in a specially designed Nickel - Chrome cylindrical vacuum tube which is being driven through dielectric window by 2.45GHz commercial magnetron source. Tube is also surrounded by a coil driving 150ADC to generate approximately 875Gauss magnetic field at the center. Langmuir probe and ICCD for optical spectrometry were used to characterize internal parameters like electron density, electron temperature and different characteristics of the plasma. Bacillus Subtilis var nigar, bacillus Stearothermophilus, bacillus pumilus E601, Escherichia coli and staphylococcus aureus type bacteria were selected as a reference. Each is resistant for different actions while the Bacilus cereus is the most resistant bacteria for microwave interaction. This study presents the effect of system on used bacteria. Those are gram positive and gram negative bacteria that refers to structure of cell wall. The sterilization efficacy of Argon type ECR plasma was found to be over 99, 5% in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis (vegetative cell), Bacillus cereus (vegetative cell), Bacillus pumilus and Escherichia coli. System response type is less than 2 minutes.

  5. Change in subfoveal choroidal thickness after argon laser panretinal photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ga Eun; Cho, Hee Yun; Kim, Yun Taek

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate changes in subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) and macular thickness as measured by enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) after argon laser panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in patients with severe diabetic retinopathy. METHODS This prospective, comparative case series included 21 patients (28 eyes) with severe diabetic retinopathy. All patients underwent three sessions of PRP. The SFCT and macular thickness were measured using EDI-OCT at baseline and one week after completion of 3 sessions of PRP. RESULTS SFCT before PRP was (318.1±96.5)µm and increased to (349.9±108.3)µm (P=0.001) after PRP. Macular thickness significantly increased at one week after PRP (from 273.1±23.9µm at baseline vs 295.8±25.3µm at one week; P<0.001). No significant relationship between the changes in macular thickness and SFCT was observed (r=-0.13, P=0.52). CONCLUSION PRP induced increases in both SFCT and macular thickness. Changes in SFCT did not correlate with changes in macular thickness. PMID:23991387

  6. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Bremer, J.; Gendotti, A.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Loew, T.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Murphy, S.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sharma, R.; Smargianaki, D.; Stewart, J.; Vignoli, C.; Wilson, P.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study neutrinos from a new beam from Fermilab. These cryostats will be engineered, constructed, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution presents the on-going effort on the development of the cryostats and details the requirements and the current status of the design.

  7. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar3), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar3 rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10(-3) cm(-1) or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar3 are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar3 is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar3 may be found in the current literature-and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations. PMID:25053315

  8. Vibrational Energy Relaxation of Choloroiodomethane in Cold Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L. Sibert, Iii

    2013-06-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH_{2}ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH_{2}Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization are inferred. To gain further mechanistic insights into this process we have studied the isomerization theoretically using molecular dynamics. Two and three low frequency modes (C-Cl-I bend, Cl-I stretch and C-Cl stretch) are included in the model. The experiment is simulated by equilibrating the molecule in the parent configuration and providing an energy of 37,500 cm^{-1}, corresponding to the electronic excitation of the C-I stretch. Subsequent time evolution of the classical trajectories is monitored, and the decay rates of energy are compared to the experimental spectroscopy results. Varying different parameters related to the potential energy surface can lead to different results and their implications to the energy flow are discussed. The decay rates in the isomer well are also compared to the classical Landau Teller theory. T. J. Preston, M. Dutta, B. J. Esselman, A. Kalume, L. George, R. J. McMahon, S. A. Reid, and F. F. Crim, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)

  9. Post-flight Analysis of the Argon Filled Ion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Goldhagen, P.; Jones, I. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is a complex mixture of primary galactic and solar cosmic rays and a multitude of secondary particles produced in collision with air nuclei. The first series of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) measurement flights on the NASA research aircraft ER-2 took place in June 1997. The ER-2 flight package consisted of fifteen instruments from six countries and were chosen to provide varying sensitivity to specific components. These AIR ER-2 flight measurements are to characterize the AIR environment during solar minimum to allow the continued development of environmental models of this complex mixture of ionizing radiation. This will enable scientists to study the ionizing radiation health hazard associated with the high-altitude operation of a commercial supersonic transport and to allow estimates of single event upsets for advanced avionics systems design. The argon filled ion chamber representing about 40 percent of the contributions to radiation risks are analyzed herein and model discrepancies for solar minimum environment are on the order of 5 percent and less. Other biologically significant components remain to be analyzed.

  10. Front-End ASIC for Liquid Argon TPC

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, G.; Li, S.; D'Andragora, A.; Nambiar, N.; Rescia, S.; Vernon, E.; Chen, H.; Lanni, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Thorn, C.; Yu, B.

    2011-06-15

    We present a front-end application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a wire based time-projection-chamber (TPC) operating in liquid Argon (LAr). The LAr TPC will be used for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The ASIC must provide a low-noise readout of the signals induced on the TPC wires, digitization of those signals at 2 MSamples/s, compression, buffering and multiplexing. A resolution of better than 1000 rms electrons at 200 pF input capacitance for an input range of 300 fC is required, along with low power and operation in LAr (at 87 K). We include the characterization of a commercial technology for operation in the cryogenic environment and the first experimental results on the analog front end. The results demonstrate that complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistors have lower noise and much improved dc characteristics at LAr temperature. Finally, we introduce the concept of '1/f equivalent' to model the low-frequency component of the noise spectral density, for use in the input metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor optimization.

  11. Powder evolution at low powers in silane-argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, P.; Gupta, N. Dutta; Bhaduri, A.; Longeaud, C.; Vignoli, S.; Marty, O.

    2005-08-15

    Powder formation in a 13.56-MHz radio frequency (rf) capacitive glow discharge plasma of silane-argon mixture has been studied by in situ laser light-scattering measurements. The rf power density (P{sub rf}) was varied from 18 to 53 mW/cm{sup 2}. At high P{sub rf} the light scattering occurs all along the discharge and extends even beyond the exit end of the electrodes toward the pumping system. With decreasing P{sub rf} the maximum intensity of the light scattering decreases and the scattering zone shrinks and moves toward the exit end. With P{sub rf}{approx_equal}20 mW/cm{sup 2} a very bright scattering zone only a few centimeters wide appears located at the electrodes outlet. The powders studied by transmission electron microscopy did not show a drastic decrease of their sizes with P{sub rf} though clear coagulation of small particles is observed at high P{sub rf}. In this paper we have tried to link the laser light-scattering evolution with P{sub rf} to various parameters such as the microstructure factor, the deposition rate, the electron mobilityxlifetime product, the density of states, and the minority-carriers diffusion length of the films in an attempt to link the effect the evolution of powder formation to the films properties.

  12. Argon inclusion in sputtered films and the effect of the gas on molybdenum field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Reuss, Robert H.

    2001-04-01

    Residual gas analysis of a number of field emission displays showed that argon desorbed from molybdenum metal lines was the dominant gas in sealed vacuum packages. We present experimental results on the emission characteristics of molybdenum field emitter arrays in argon ambient. In argon, the emission current dropped rapidly similar to that in oxygenic gas ambients. Existing degradation models do not provide an adequate explanation for this behavior. Rather, we suggest a model based on shallow implantation of argon into the field emitter tips that increases the effective width of the tunneling barrier. Experimental support for this model comes from the following observations: emission current degraded only when the device was turned on; after gas exposure, significant current recovery which followed diffusion type behavior was noted; degradation and recovery rates were functions of partial pressure; and no detectable effects associated with sputtering were observed. This mechanism is also consistent with ion pumping known to occur in field emission displays.

  13. Lead Pipe Scale Analysis Using Broad-Beam Argon Ion Milling to Elucidate Drinking Water Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we compared the characterization of lead pipe scale removed from a drinking water distribution system using two different cross section methods (conventional polishing and argon ion beam etching). The pipe scale solids were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM...

  14. Formation and characterization of magnesium bisozonide and carbonyl complexes in solid argon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjun; Gong, Yu; Zhang, Qingqing; Zhou, Mingfei

    2010-10-14

    The reactions of magnesium atoms with dioxygen and dioxygen/carbon monoxide mixture have been investigated by matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. Magnesium atoms react with dioxygen in solid argon to form the inserted MgO(2) molecules under UV excitation, which were previously characterized. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and to react with MgO(2) and form the magnesium bisozonide complex, Mg(O(3))(2), which is proposed to be coordinated by two argon atoms in solid argon matrix. The Mg(O(3))(2)(Ar)(2) complex is characterized to have two equivalent side-on bonded ozonide ligands with a D(2h) symmetry. The coordinated argon atoms can be replaced by carbon monoxide to give the magnesium bisozonide dicarbonyl complex, Mg(O(3))(2)(CO)(2), a neutral magnesium carbonyl complex with CO binding to the Mg(2+) center. PMID:20857987

  15. Pose Measurement Performance of the Argon Relative Navigation Sensor Suite in Simulated Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Eepoel, John Van; Strube, Matt; Gill, Nat; Gonzalez, Marcelo; Hyslop, Andrew; Patrick, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Argon is a flight-ready sensor suite with two visual cameras, a flash LIDAR, an on- board flight computer, and associated electronics. Argon was designed to provide sensing capabilities for relative navigation during proximity, rendezvous, and docking operations between spacecraft. A rigorous ground test campaign assessed the performance capability of the Argon navigation suite to measure the relative pose of high-fidelity satellite mock-ups during a variety of simulated rendezvous and proximity maneuvers facilitated by robot manipulators in a variety of lighting conditions representative of the orbital environment. A brief description of the Argon suite and test setup are given as well as an analysis of the performance of the system in simulated proximity and rendezvous operations.

  16. Influence of oxygen traces on an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive argon plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shouzhe; Wu Qi; Yan Wen; Wang Dezhen; Uhm, Han S.

    2011-10-15

    An atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharge source driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz has been developed experimentally that is capable of producing a homogeneous and cold glow discharge in O{sub 2}/Ar. With respect to the influence of oxygen component when diluted into argon plasma discharge on the discharge characteristics, the measurements of the electrical parameters (impedance, phase angle, resistance, and reactance) are made systematically and the densities of the metastable and resonant state of argon are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). It is shown that the admixture of oxygen into argon plasma not only changes the electric characteristics but also alters the optical emission spectra greatly due to strong interaction between the oxygen content and the argon in the plasma environment.

  17. A modified technique using the Yankauer sucker and argon plasma coagulation for anorectal procedures.

    PubMed

    Quah, H M; Hay, D J; Maw, A

    2004-03-01

    Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a useful and effective treatment for some anorectal conditions. We describe a modification of the APC instrumentation that aids the application of APC in such cases. PMID:15057591

  18. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cooldown was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling, liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cooldown, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  19. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cool down was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cool down, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  20. Numerical modelling of the nonequilibrium expansion process of argon plasma flow through a nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fu-Zhi; Wang, Hai-Xing; Murphy, A. B.; Sun, Wei-Ping; Liu, Yu

    2013-12-01

    A two-temperature thermal and chemical nonequilibrium model is developed and applied to investigate the expansion processes of an argon plasma flow through a Laval nozzle. This model describes in a self-consistent manner the gas flow and heat transfer, the coupling of the electric energy deposited into the plasma, and the reaction kinetics including the contribution of excited species. It is found that the plasma is far from thermodynamic equilibrium in the entire argon plasma flow expansion process through a nozzle. Significant temperature discrepancies between electrons and heavy species are found in the cooler outer region. The dominant chemical kinetic processes in different plasma gas expansion regions are presented and discussed. It is noted that although the number density of excited argon atoms (Ar*) is much lower than that of other species in the argon plasma, Ar* play important roles in the ionization and recombination processes, and in arc attachment to the anode.

  1. ARCS 3 ionospheric artificial argon ion beam injections - Waves near the heavy ion gyrofrequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlandson, R. E.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kaufmann, R. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Pollock, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    Low-frequency electric field data below the proton gyrofrequency are presented for the duration of the argon ion beam experiment conducted as part of the Argon Release for Controlled Studies (ARCS) program. An argon ion beam was injected from the subpayload antiparallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field at altitudes from 250 to 405 km. During the injections, the wave spectra were broadband near the subpayload and narrow-band near heavy ion gyrofrequencies at perpendicular separation distances between 42 and 254 m. It is suggested that the narrow-band waves are associated with both the perpendicular argon ion beam and an unexpected flux of low-energy ions which peaked in energy near 15 eV and pitch angle near 90 deg with respect to the magnetic field.

  2. Diagnostics of Argon Inductively Coupled Plasma and Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-liang; Yu, Shi-ji; Ma, Teng-cai; Deng, Xin-lu

    2001-08-01

    An experimental setup was built up to carry out radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and to depict the optical emission spectra (OES) of the discharges. OES from argon ICP and DBD plasmas in visible and near ultraviolet region were measured. For argon ICP, the higher RF power input (higher than 500 W for our machine), the higher degree of argon plasma ionization. But that doesn't mean a higher mean electron energy. With the increase in the power input, the mean electron energy increases slightly, whereas the density of electron increases apparently. Or, the contrary, argon DBD discharge behaves in the manner of a pulsed DC discharge on optical emission spectroscopy and V-I characteristics. DBD current is composed of a series of pulses equally spaced in temporal domain. The kinetics of DBD emission strength is mainly governed by the frequency of the current pulse.

  3. Transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture based on ab initio potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharipov, Felix; Benites, Victor J.

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and thermal diffusion factor of helium-argon mixtures are calculated for a wide range of temperature and for various mole fractions up to the 12th order of the Sonine polynomial expansion with an ab initio intermolecular potential. The calculated values for these transport coefficients are compared with other data available in the open literature. The comparison shows that the obtained transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture have the best accuracy for the moment.

  4. An experimental investigation of the dissociative ionization process of argon cluster ions induced by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, X.; Yan, S.; Xu, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, X.; Li, B.; Feng, W.; Qian, D.; Zhang, R.; Guo, D.; Wen, W.; Zhang, D.; Yang, J.; Zhao, D.; Liu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Utilizing the Cold Target Recoil Ions Momentum Spectrometer (COLTRIMS), dissociative ionization of argon cluster was experimentally investigated by electron impact. The recoil ions produced both in the pure ionization process and the dissociative ionization channels are measured with collision energies from 100 and 1000 eV. The ratios of the dimer ions from pure ionization (Ar2P+) and the dimer ions from small cluster dissociation (Ar+2D) to the atomic argon ion (Ar+) in different stagnation pressures were obtained.

  5. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  6. 12-cm magneto-electrostatic containment argon/xenon ion source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The original 12 cm hexagonal magneto-electrostatic containment (MESC) discharge chamber described by Moore in 1969 has been optimized for argon and xenon operation. Argon mass utilization efficiencies of 65 to 77 percent were achieved at keeper-plus-main discharge energy consumptions of 244 to 422 eV/ion respectively. Xenon performance of 85 to 96 percent mass utilization were realized at 203 to 350 eV/ion. The paper discusses the optimization process and test results.

  7. Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes of argon metastable transitions in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes were observed in a commercial hollow cathode lamp containing argon buffer gas. Deviations from Gaussian line shapes were particularly strong for transitions originating from the 3P2 metastable level of argon. The anomalous line shapes can be described reasonably well by the assumption that two regions in the discharge are excited simultaneously, each giving rise to a purely Gaussian line shape, but with different polarities, amplitudes, and linewidths.

  8. Numerical study of breakdown pattern induced by an intense microwave under nitrogen and argon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-07-01

    Filamentary plasma induced by microwave beam irradiation was reproduced in nitrogen and argon by combining fluid or particle plasma models with electromagnetic wave propagation. Transport coefficients used in the fluid model are estimated from particle simulation to maintain consistency of the breakdown structure between the fluid and particle models. A discrete structure was obtained using the one-dimensional (1D) fluid model, because a standing wave is generated in front of the plasma when the incident microwave beam is reflected by the overcritical plasma, which agrees with the breakdown structure obtained using the 1D particle model. A 2D plasma filament was also reproduced using the fluid model in nitrogen and argon. Reflection of the incident microwave in argon becomes stronger than that in nitrogen because of the denser argon plasma. Change in filament shape is induced in argon because the electric field is deformed at the plasma tip owing to stronger wave reflection from the neighboring filament. The propagation speed of the plasma front becomes larger in argon breakdown because of the larger ionization frequency and the larger diffusion coefficient.

  9. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain 39Ar at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 ±0.2 )×103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 ±43 ) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 ×10-44 cm2 (8.6 ×10-44 cm2 , 8.0 ×10-43 cm2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV /c2 (1 TeV /c2 , 10 TeV /c2 ).

  10. Argon concentration time-series as a tool to study gas dynamics in the hyporheic zone.

    PubMed

    Mächler, Lars; Brennwald, Matthias S; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    The oxygen dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a peri-alpine river (Thur, Switzerland), were studied through recording and analyzing the concentration time-series of dissolved argon, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and temperature during low flow conditions, for a period of one week. The argon concentration time-series was used to investigate the physical gas dynamics in the hyporheic zone. Differences in the transport behavior of heat and gas were determined by comparing the diel temperature evolution of groundwater to the measured concentration of dissolved argon. These differences were most likely caused by vertical heat transport which influenced the local groundwater temperature. The argon concentration time-series were also used to estimate travel times by cross correlating argon concentrations in the groundwater with argon concentrations in the river. The information gained from quantifying the physical gas transport was used to estimate the oxygen turnover in groundwater after water recharge. The resulting oxygen turnover showed strong diel variations, which correlated with the water temperature during groundwater recharge. Hence, the variation in the consumption rate was most likely caused by the temperature dependence of microbial activity. PMID:23611693

  11. Effect of Argon Laser on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Etrati Khosroshahi, Mohammad; Motahary, Pouya; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Mahjub, Hossein; Dadashi, Maryam; Farhadian, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effect of argon laser irradiation on development and progress of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Fifty caries-free, intact human premolars were randomly assigned to one of the following five equal groups: Groups 1 (control) and 2: The brackets were bonded using conventional halogen light for 40s and argon laser for 10s, respectively. Teeth in group 3 were lased with argon laser for 10s before bracket bonding with halogen light. Group 4 was the same as group 3 except that brackets were also bonded with argon laser. In group 5 samples were bonded conventionally, immersed in an artificial caries solution for two days and then irradiated for 10s with argon laser. All samples were subjected to demineralization by artificial caries solution for 10 days. After bracket removal, samples were buccolingually sectioned and evaluated by polarized light microscopy. Decalcified lesion depth in each section was measured by a trained examiner in a blind fashion. Data were analyzed in SPSS 14 using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test. Results: The control group showed the greatest mean lesion depth while group 5 revealed the lowest. The laser-treated groups had significantly lower mean lesion depth compared with the control group (P<0.05) except for group 4 (P=0.192). Conclusion: Argon laser irradiation for 10s before or during bracket bonding can increase caries resistance of intact and demineralized enamel. PMID:25584052

  12. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  13. The role of three-body interactions in the adsorption of argon in silicalite-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Alonso, Félix; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Nicholson, David

    The significance of three-body interactions for argon adsorption in silicalite at 77K is considered, for triplets involving two or more argon atoms. Configurations from previous simulations, obtained using a new potential function for single argon atoms interacting with the zeolite, and a conventional 12-6 argon-argon effective pair potential were used as a starting point. The total energy of these configurations was recalculated with the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential for argon pair interactions, and three-body dispersion terms up to the triple quadrupole term. The overall contribution from the higher order nonadditive terms is always negative, and decreases with adsorbate loading. A substantial part (˜ 20%) of the total interaction was found to come from the non-additive contributions, in contrast to other calculations on zeolitic systems; and largely from Ar-Ar-O triplets. The cancellation between fourth-order terms and third-order quadrupole terms which occurs in isotropic homogeneous systems does not occur here. An iterative scheme is described by which heats of adsorption can be obtained. A first-order calculation of this type shows that effect of the non-additive contributions is initially to reduce the adsorbate-adsorbate contribution. This has the effect of producing an isosteric heat curve which is nearly invariant with loading for low adsorbate loading. Thus it appears that energetic homogeneity need not be invoked as an explanation of experimental observations showing this type of behaviour.

  14. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2015-06-12

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  15. Thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling of a low-power argon arcjet wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsurayama, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Non-transferred low-power arcjet wind tunnels with pure argon working gas are widely used as inexpensive laboratory plasma sources to simulate a weakly ionized supersonic flow around an atmospheric entry vehicle. Many experiments using argon arcjet wind tunnels have been conducted, but their numerical modeling is not yet complete. We develop an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes model with thermochemical nonequilibrium and arc discharge that simulates the entire flow field in a steady-operating argon arcjet wind tunnel, which consists of the inside of the arcjet and its arc plume entering a rarefied vacuum chamber. The computational method we develop makes it possible to reproduce the arc column behavior far from thermochemical equilibrium in the low-voltage discharge mode typical of argon arcjets. Furthermore, the results reveal that the plasma characteristic of being far from thermal equilibrium, which is particular to argon, causes the arcjet to operate in the low-voltage mode and its arc plume to be completely thermochemically frozen. Moreover, the arc plume has electroconductive non-uniformity with an electrically insulating boundary in the radial direction. Our computed values for the shock standoff distance in front of a blunt body and the drag exerted on it agree with measured values. As a result, the self-consistent computational model in this study is useful in investigating thermochemical nonequilibrium plasma flows in argon arcjet wind tunnels.

  16. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  17. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnes, P.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 ± 0.2) × 103 relative to atmospheric argon. Here, we report a background-free null result from (2616 ± 43) kg d ofmore » data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 × 10–44 cm2 (8.6 × 10–44 cm2, 8.0 × 10–43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2).« less

  18. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I.

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  19. Evolution of subsurface nanocavities in copper under argon bombardment and annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, D. V.; Kurnosikov, O.; Kharlamov, V. S.; Trushin, Yu. V.

    2013-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies of evolution of nanocavities in argon-irradiated copper under annealing are presented. The subsurface argon-filled nanocavities are formed during a short annealing at a temperature around 1000 K by migration and interaction of complexes of the simplest defects created by argon irradiation at room temperature. A long-time annealing at a temperature above 1075 K leads to decomposition of nanocavities and desorption of argon from the sample. Using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, valuable data sets including the density of nanocavities and their size and depth distribution are obtained. A theoretical model describing the nucleation and evolution of nanocavities is developed. Computer simulations based on this model show that the nanocavities grow at elevated temperatures by absorption of argon-vacancy complexes formed during the ion irradiation. By comparison the calculations with experimental results, the migration energy of these complexes is estimated to be around 2.5-2.75 eV. Also, the value of dissociation energy of a complex, consisting of two vacancies and two argon atoms, is found to be equal to approximately 1.10-1.18 eV. The calculation of concentration of nanocavities at different annealing conditions reveals a satisfactory agreement with the experimental observations.

  20. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnes, P.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar-39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 +- 43) kg d of data, accumulatedmore » over 70.9 live-days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2 , 10 TeV/c2).« less

  1. Low Radioactivity Argon Dark Matter Search Results from the DarkSide-50 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnes, P.

    2015-10-02

    Our DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of lowradioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1.4 ±0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon was also found to contain (2.05 ± 0.13)mBq=kg of 85Kr. We also found no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 ± 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV=c2 (1TeV=c2, 10TeV=c2).

  2. Effect of Argon/Oxygen Flow Rate Ratios on DC Magnetron Sputtered Nano Crystalline Zirconium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, D. Jhansi; Kumar, A. GuruSampath; Sarmash, T. Sofi; Chandra Babu Naidu, K.; Maddaiah, M.; Rao, T. Subba

    2016-06-01

    High transmitting, non absorbent, nano crystalline zirconium titanate (ZT) thin films suitable for anti reflection coatings (ARC) were deposited on to glass substrates by direct current (DC) magnetron reactive sputtering technique, under distinct Argon to Oxygen (Ar/O2) gas flow rate ratios of 31/1, 30/2, 29/3 and 28/4, with a net gas flow (Ar + O2) of 32sccm, at an optimum substrate temperature of 250°C. The influence of the gas mixture ratio on the film properties has been investigated by employing x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra violet visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and four point probe methods. The films showed a predominant peak at 30.85° with (111) orientation. The crystallite size reduced from 22.94 nm to 13.5 nm and the surface roughness increased from 11.53 nm to 50.58 nm with increase in oxygen content respectively. The films deposited at 31/1 and 30/2 showed almost similar chemical composition. Increased oxygen content results an increase in electrical resistivity from 3.59 × 103 to 2.1 × 106 Ωm. The film deposited at Ar/O2 of 28/4 exhibited higher average optical transmittance of 91%, but its refractive index is higher than that of what is required for ARC. The films deposited at 31/1 and 30/2 of Ar/O2 possess higher transmittance (low absorbance) apart from suitable refractive index. Thus, these films are preferable candidates for ARC.

  3. Effect of Argon/Oxygen Flow Rate Ratios on DC Magnetron Sputtered Nano Crystalline Zirconium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, D. Jhansi; Kumar, A. GuruSampath; Sarmash, T. Sofi; Chandra Babu Naidu, K.; Maddaiah, M.; Rao, T. Subba

    2016-04-01

    High transmitting, non absorbent, nano crystalline zirconium titanate (ZT) thin films suitable for anti reflection coatings (ARC) were deposited on to glass substrates by direct current (DC) magnetron reactive sputtering technique, under distinct Argon to Oxygen (Ar/O2) gas flow rate ratios of 31/1, 30/2, 29/3 and 28/4, with a net gas flow (Ar + O2) of 32sccm, at an optimum substrate temperature of 250°C. The influence of the gas mixture ratio on the film properties has been investigated by employing x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra violet visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and four point probe methods. The films showed a predominant peak at 30.85° with (111) orientation. The crystallite size reduced from 22.94 nm to 13.5 nm and the surface roughness increased from 11.53 nm to 50.58 nm with increase in oxygen content respectively. The films deposited at 31/1 and 30/2 showed almost similar chemical composition. Increased oxygen content results an increase in electrical resistivity from 3.59 × 103 to 2.1 × 106 Ωm. The film deposited at Ar/O2 of 28/4 exhibited higher average optical transmittance of 91%, but its refractive index is higher than that of what is required for ARC. The films deposited at 31/1 and 30/2 of Ar/O2 possess higher transmittance (low absorbance) apart from suitable refractive index. Thus, these films are preferable candidates for ARC.

  4. Elastic scattering of electrons from singly ionized argon

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, Greenwood {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 75}, 1062 (1995)] reported measurements of large-angle elastic scattering of electrons from singly ionized argon at an energy of 3.3 eV. They compared their results for the differential cross section with cross sections determined using phase shifts obtained from two different scattering potentials and found large discrepancies between theory and experiment at large angles. They state that these differences may be due to the effects of polarization of the target, which are not included in their calculations, as well as inaccurate representations of electron exchange in the local scattering potentials that are employed to determine the phase shifts. In order to test these proposed explanations of the discrepancies, we have carried out calculations of elastic scattering from Ar{sup +} using the {ital R}-matrix method. We compare both a single-state calculation, which does not include polarization, and a 17-state calculation, in which the effects of dipole polarizability are included through the use of polarization pseudostates within the close-coupling expansion, to each other and with the measurements. We find some differences between the two calculations at intermediate scattering angles, but very close agreement at angles above 100{degree}. Although the calculated cross sections agree with experiment between 120{degree} and 135{degree}, large discrepancies persist at angles above 135{degree}. We conclude that the differences between the measurements and theory cannot be explained on the basis of an inaccurate representation of electron exchange or polarization of the target. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  6. Imaging of hydrogen halides photochemistry on argon and ice nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poterya, V; Lengyel, J; Pysanenko, A; Svrčková, P; Fárník, M

    2014-08-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of HX (X = Cl, Br) molecules deposited on large ArN and (H2O)N, N̄ ≈ 10(2)-10(3), clusters is investigated at 193 nm using velocity map imaging of H and Cl photofragments. In addition, time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization complemented by pickup cross section measurements provide information about the composition and structure of the clusters. The hydrogen halides coagulate efficiently to generate smaller (HX)n clusters on ArN upon multiple pickup conditions. This implies a high mobility of HX molecules on argon. On the other hand, the molecules remain isolated on (H2O)N. The photodissociation on ArN leads to strong H-fragment caging manifested by the fragment intensity peaking sharply at zero kinetic energy. Some of the Cl-fragments from HCl photodissociation on ArN are also caged, while some of the fragments escape the cluster directly without losing their kinetic energy. The images of H-fragments from HX on (H2O)N also exhibit a strong central intensity, however, with a different kinetic energy distribution which originates from different processes: the HX acidic dissociation followed by H3O neutral hydronium radical formation after the UV excitation, and the slow H-fragments stem from subsequent decay of the H3O. The corresponding Cl-cofragment from the photoexcitation of the HCl·(H2O)N is trapped in the ice nanoparticle. PMID:25149788

  7. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  8. Imaging of hydrogen halides photochemistry on argon and ice nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Poterya, V. Lengyel, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Svrčková, P.; Fárník, M.

    2014-08-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of HX (X = Cl, Br) molecules deposited on large Ar{sub N} and (H{sub 2}O){sub N}, N{sup ¯}≈ 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3}, clusters is investigated at 193 nm using velocity map imaging of H and Cl photofragments. In addition, time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization complemented by pickup cross section measurements provide information about the composition and structure of the clusters. The hydrogen halides coagulate efficiently to generate smaller (HX){sub n} clusters on Ar{sub N} upon multiple pickup conditions. This implies a high mobility of HX molecules on argon. On the other hand, the molecules remain isolated on (H{sub 2}O){sub N}. The photodissociation on Ar{sub N} leads to strong H-fragment caging manifested by the fragment intensity peaking sharply at zero kinetic energy. Some of the Cl-fragments from HCl photodissociation on Ar{sub N} are also caged, while some of the fragments escape the cluster directly without losing their kinetic energy. The images of H-fragments from HX on (H{sub 2}O){sub N} also exhibit a strong central intensity, however, with a different kinetic energy distribution which originates from different processes: the HX acidic dissociation followed by H{sub 3}O neutral hydronium radical formation after the UV excitation, and the slow H-fragments stem from subsequent decay of the H{sub 3}O. The corresponding Cl-cofragment from the photoexcitation of the HCl·(H{sub 2}O){sub N} is trapped in the ice nanoparticle.

  9. The response of the inductively coupled argon plasma to solvent plasma load: spatially resolved maps of electron density obtained from the intensity of one argon line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, D. G. J.; Blades, M. W.

    1994-12-01

    A survey of spatially resolved electron number density ( ne) in the tail cone of the inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) is presented: all of the results of the survey have been radially inverted by numerical, asymmetric Abel inversion. The survey extends over the entire volume of the plasma beyond the exit of the ICAP torch; It extends over distances of z = 5-25 mm downstream from the induction coil, and over radial distances of ± 8 mm from the discharge axis. The survey also explores a range of inner argon flow rates ( QIN), solvent plasma load ( Qspl) and r.f. power: moreover, it explores loading by water, methanol and chloroform. Throughout the survey, ne was determined from the intensity of one, optically thin argon line, by a method which assumes that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) for argon lies close to local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The validity of this assumption is reviewed. Also examined are the discrepancies between ne from this method and ne from Stark broadening measurements. With the error taken into account, the results of the survey reveal how time averaged values of ne in the ICAP respond over an extensive, previously unexplored range of experimental parameters. Moreover, the spatial information lends insight into how the thermal conditions and the transport of energy respond. Overall, the response may be described in terms of energy consumption along the axial channel and thermal pinch within the induction region. The predominating effect depends on the solvent plasma load, the solvent composition, the robustness of the discharge, and the distribution of solvent material over the argon stream.

  10. Argon Induces Protective Effects in Cardiomyocytes during the Second Window of Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Britta; Soppert, Josefin; Kraemer, Sandra; Schemmel, Sabrina; Beckers, Christian; Bleilevens, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark; Goetzenich, Andreas; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that argon has organoprotective properties. So far, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of argon preconditioning in cardiomyocytes within the first and second window of preconditioning. Primary isolated cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were subjected to 50% argon for 1 h, and subsequently exposed to a sublethal dosage of hypoxia (<1% O2) for 5 h either within the first (0–3 h) or second window (24–48 h) of preconditioning. Subsequently, the cell viability and proliferation was measured. The argon-induced effects were assessed by evaluation of mRNA and protein expression after preconditioning. Argon preconditioning did not show any cardioprotective effects in the early window of preconditioning, whereas it leads to a significant increase of cell viability 24 h after preconditioning compared to untreated cells (p = 0.015) independent of proliferation. Argon-preconditioning significantly increased the mRNA expression of heat shock protein (HSP) B1 (HSP27) (p = 0.048), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) (p = 0.001), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (p < 0.001) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (p = 0.001). No difference was found with respect to activation of pro-survival kinases in the early and late window of preconditioning. The findings provide the first evidence of argon-induced effects on the survival of cardiomyocytes during the second window of preconditioning, which may be mediated through the induction of HSP27, SOD2, VEGF and iNOS. PMID:27447611

  11. Argon Induces Protective Effects in Cardiomyocytes during the Second Window of Preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Britta; Soppert, Josefin; Kraemer, Sandra; Schemmel, Sabrina; Beckers, Christian; Bleilevens, Christian; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark; Goetzenich, Andreas; Stoppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that argon has organoprotective properties. So far, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of argon preconditioning in cardiomyocytes within the first and second window of preconditioning. Primary isolated cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were subjected to 50% argon for 1 h, and subsequently exposed to a sublethal dosage of hypoxia (<1% O₂) for 5 h either within the first (0-3 h) or second window (24-48 h) of preconditioning. Subsequently, the cell viability and proliferation was measured. The argon-induced effects were assessed by evaluation of mRNA and protein expression after preconditioning. Argon preconditioning did not show any cardioprotective effects in the early window of preconditioning, whereas it leads to a significant increase of cell viability 24 h after preconditioning compared to untreated cells (p = 0.015) independent of proliferation. Argon-preconditioning significantly increased the mRNA expression of heat shock protein (HSP) B1 (HSP27) (p = 0.048), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) (p = 0.001), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (p < 0.001) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (p = 0.001). No difference was found with respect to activation of pro-survival kinases in the early and late window of preconditioning. The findings provide the first evidence of argon-induced effects on the survival of cardiomyocytes during the second window of preconditioning, which may be mediated through the induction of HSP27, SOD2, VEGF and iNOS. PMID:27447611

  12. Temperature-induced evolution of subsurface nanocavities in argon-implanted copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosikov, O.; Kulikov, D. V.; Kharlamov, V. S.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Trushin, Yu. V.

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of argon-filled nanocavities in a copper crystal under annealing is studied experimentally and theoretically. The subsurface argon-filled nanocavities are formed after a short annealing at a temperature ˜1000 K by coalescence of subsurface defects initially created by argon implantation. The further prolonged annealing at a temperature above 1075 K leads to decomposition of the nanocavities and diffusion of implanted argon out of the sample. According to a simple analysis, the mechanism of the nanocavity formation is governed not only by the migration of simplest defects, such as vacancies and argon and copper interstitials, but also to a large extent, by diffusion and interaction of the complexes of these simplest defects. The experimental studies with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy provide valuable data sets of the density of nanocavities and their size and depth distribution. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model is developed. The calculation with the model proves that the growth of the nanocavities is mainly determined by the temperature-induced migration of vacancy-argon complexes. By combining the experimental data with the simulation results, the migration energy of these kinds of complexes is estimated ˜2.55-2.75 eV. Moreover, the calculation with our model provides the estimate of the dissociation energy of a multiple complex, consisting of two vacancies and two argon atoms, as 1.10-1.18 eV. These parameters, reported in this article, play a key role in the description of the kinetics of the growth and decomposition of nanocavities.

  13. Broadband Chirped-Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-{ {(Z)}}-1-CHLORO-2-FLUOROETHYLENE Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.

    2012-06-01

    A chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer is used to obtain the 6--18 GHz rotational spectrum of the gas-phase complex formed between argon and (Z)-1-chloro-2-fluoroethylene. Both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed in natural abundance, and analysis of these spectra provides predictions for both singly-substituted 13C species with sufficient precision to allow their observation with minimal searching using the more sensitive narrow band Balle-Flygare cavity technique. The non-planar structure of the complex is similar to previously observed argon-fluoroethylene complexes with the argon atom closer to the fluorine than to the chlorine. In contrast to the argon-vinyl chloride and argon-cis-1,2-difluoroethylene complexes, tunneling of the argon atom between the two equivalent, non-planar geometries is not observed.

  14. Argon Diffusion in Shocked Pyroxene, Feldspar, and Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J.; Isachsen, C. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.

    2010-12-01

    Background: The diffusion rate of argon (Ar) in unshocked feldspar has been well studied, but studies on pyroxene and olivine are limited or non-existent. Likewise, the effects of shock on these mineral groups is also limited or non-existent. Understanding how shock affects these mineral groups is important for determining the thermal history of shocked meteorites and collisional impact craters. We have analyzed the Ar diffusion rate of an albitite and a pyroxenite at various experimental shock pressures up to ~60GPa, unshocked high-Ca pyroxene, and an olivine mineral separate from the Springwater meteorite. A previous study of shocked feldspar has shown that Ar diffusion in plagioclase (An67) is unaffected by experimental shock [1]. Re-reduction of data from another study [2] suggests naturally shocked K-rich feldspar is affected, though experimentally shocked oligoclase feldspar (An10-30) is not affected. However, previous shock experiments on feldspar were performed with low temperature resolution and only a single extraction at each temperature. This makes determining the diffusion parameters difficult because the presence of multiple grain sizes can compromise the data. By performing our experiments with a higher temperature resolution and with two extractions at each temperature, we can attain higher quality and more reliable data. The effects of shock on pyroxene and olivine have never been studied. Results: We have found that experimental shock undoubtedly raises the diffusivity of albite (Ab97), and lowers the activation energy required for diffusion. Comparison with previous data indicates that the Ca content may be controlling the response to shock. Pyroxene seems to be somewhat variable regardless of shock pressure, even within the same sample. Shock may have an effect on the diffusion rate of pyroxene, but given the variability it is difficult to delineate. The range of pyroxene diffusion rates is similar to previous studies. Olivine is found to have a

  15. The decay dynamics of photoexcited argon cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Gotts, N. G.; Winkel, J. F.; Hallett, R.; Woodward, C. A.; Stace, A. J.; Whitaker, B. J.

    1992-07-01

    Following the photoexcitation of argon cluster ions, Ar+n for n in the range 4-25, kinetic energy release measurements have been undertaken on the fragments using two quite separate techniques. For Ar+4-Ar+6, fragment ion kinetic energy spectra were recorded at 532 nm in a crossed beam apparatus as a function of the angle of polarization of the laser radiation with respect to the incident ion beam. Only Ar+ from Ar+4 was observed to exhibit a polarization dependence together with a comparatively high kinetic energy release. The principal fragment ion Ar+2 was found both to emerge with a low kinetic energy release and to display no dependence on the angle of polarization of the radiation. In a second series of experiments, mass and kinetic energy resolved cluster ions were photodissociated in the entrance to a time-of-flight (TOF) device of variable length. The subsequent deflection of all ions allowed for time resolved measurements to be undertaken on the neutral photofragments. Following the absorption of a photon, all cluster ions up to Ar+25 were found to eject one/two neutral atoms with comparatively high kinetic energies. Any remaining internal energy appears to be dissipated through the loss of further neutral atoms with low kinetic energies. An analysis of the laser polarization dependence of these events, shows that those atoms identified as having high kinetic energies are ejected on a time scale which is short compared with the rotation period of a cluster (≂10 ps). These experimental observations are consistent with the results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of excited states in rare gas clusters by Landman, Jortner, and co-workers [J. Phys. Chem. 91, 4890 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 88, 4273 (1988)]. Kinetic energy releases calculated from the TOF spectra exhibit marked fluctuations as a function of cluster size, with Ar+15 showing a minimum and Ar+19 a maximum. It is suggested that such behavior is part of a dynamic response to changes in

  16. Argon Intercalibration Pipette System (APIS): Smoking from the Same Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C., III; Hemming, S. R.; Renne, P. R.; Deino, A. L.; Hodges, K. V.; Van Soest, M. C.; Heizler, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar age inter-calibration experiments, conducted as part of the US NSF sponsored EARTHTIME initiative, (http://www.earth-time.org), using two of the most commonly used 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards, Fish Canyon (FC, ~28.2 Ma) and Alder Creek (AC, ~1.2 Ma) sanidines, have revealed significant inter-laboratory inconsistencies. The reported ages for the AC sanidines range from 1.173 to 1.200 Ma (FC 28.02) (±~2%), ~4 times greater than the reported precision. These experiments have caused the 40Ar/39Ar community to scrutinize procedures and several informal lab intercalibrations have been conducted among different labs. This exercise is leading to better agreement, but discrepancies remain that need to be addressed. In an effort to isolate the cause(s) of these inconsistencies, two Argon Inter-calibration Pipette System (APIS) were designed and constructed. Each consists of three gas canisters; one contains atmospheric Ar, while the other two contain artificial gas mixtures with 40Ar/39Ar ratios similar to those of FC and AC. Each canister has 4x10-10 moles of 40Ar, is equipped with 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 cc pipettes, and can deliver gas volumes from 0.1-0.7 cc. All volumes were determined manometrically to 0.4% or better and then filled to uniform pressure with Ar standard gases. This experimental design eliminates sample heterogeneity, leaving only interlaboratory variations in gas purification, data reduction, and isotopic measurement as potential sources of interlaboratory calibration discrepancies. APIS-1 was designated as a traveling unit that is brought to participating labs. APIS-2 is the reserve/master standard. Currently, APIS-1 is in its early stages in the voyage and has been to three labs (Rutgers, LDEO, and New Mexico Tech) as of this writing. The interlaboratory comparisons are ongoing, and will include ASU, BGC, Univ. of Wisconsin, and Oregon State University, plus additional laboratories of opportunity. A progress report will be presented at AGU.

  17. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  18. Argon and nitrogen adsorption in disordered nanoporous carbons: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Pikunic, Jorge; Llewellyn, Philip; Pellenq, Roland; Gubbins, Keith E

    2005-05-10

    We report experimental measurements of the isosteric heats of adsorption for argon and nitrogen in two microporous saccharose-based carbons, using a Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter. These data are used to test recently developed molecular models of these carbons, obtained by a constrained reverse Monte Carlo method. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats for these systems, and the results for the latter are compared to the experimental data. For argon, excellent quantitative agreement is obtained over the entire range of pore filling. In the case of nitrogen, very good agreement is obtained over the range of coverage 0.25 < or = gamma/gamma 0 < or = 0.85, but discrepancies are observed at lower and higher coverages. The discrepancy at low coverage may be due to the presence of oxygenated groups on the pore surfaces, which are not taken into account in the model. The differences at high coverage are believed to arise from the presence of a few mesopores, which again are not included in the model. Pair correlation functions (argon-carbon and argon-argon) are determined from the simulations and are discussed as a function of pore filling. Snapshots of the simulations are presented and provide a picture of the pore filling process. PMID:16032857

  19. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  20. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  1. Use of Neutral Argon Plasma in the Laparoscopic Treatment of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Kimberly A.; Morozov, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To report the feasibility and safety of the use of a novel energy source that uses an electrically neutral beam of pure argon plasma for the laparoscopic management of endometriosis. Methods: In this prospective pilot study, 20 patients undergoing laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis were included. Characteristic endometriotic lesions throughout the pelvis were vaporized or resected using neutral argon plasma. Specimens were evaluated for the presence of endometriosis and thermal effects on tissue. The bases of the treated lesions were biopsied to determine whether residual endometriosis was present. Results: Neutral argon plasma was used in 18 of the 20 patients for laparoscopic treatment of pelvic endometriosis. All biopsies confirmed complete vaporization or re-section with no residual endometriosis at the base. Endometriosis was identified on pathology in all lesions excised. Thermal effects did not interfere with histologic analysis in any of the lesions. No complications occurred. Conclusion: Neutral argon plasma can be utilized as a multi-functional device that has vaporization, coagulation, and superficial cutting capacities with minimal thermal spread and acceptable outcomes. The use of neutral argon plasma appears to be efficacious and safe for the complete treatment of endometriotic implants. PMID:20202387

  2. Solution and shock-induced exsolution of argon in vitreous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, Carey; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    To add to the knowledge of noble gas solution and exsolution in carbonaceus material, experiments were performed on vitreous carbon. Ar-rich vitreous carbon samples were prepared under vapor-saturated conditions using argon as the pressurizing medium. Solubility data were obtained for temperatures of 773 to 973 K and pressures of 250 to 1500 bars. Up to 7 wt pct Ar was dissolved in the carbon. The solubility data were compared to a thermodynamic model of argon atoms dissolving into a fixed population of 'holes' in the carbon. Two variations of the model yielded estimates of the enthalpy of solution of Ar in vitreous carbon equal to about -4700 cal/mole. Preliminary shock experiments showed that 28 percent of the total argon was released by driving 4 GPa shocks into the argon-rich carbon. It was demonstrated that shock-induced argon loss is not simply caused by the impact-induced diminution of grain size. The present value of shock pressure required for partial impact devolatilization of Ar from carbon is below the range (5-30 GPa) at which H2O is released from phyllosilicates.

  3. Safety related issues of the unexpected Argon release into the tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Malecha, Z. M.; Polinski, J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern physics laboratories require very large amounts of cryogenics fluids. Often the fluid must be transported along the tunnels or stored in the underground cavities. Currently, there are several ongoing projects where very large amounts of liquid (LAr) or gaseous Argon (GAr) will be used. One of them is a part of the LAGUNA-LBNO (Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics and Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations) design study, where the GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) neutrino detector is considered. In order for it to properly operate, it requires the appropriate environment (it must be located in a deep, underground cavity) and approximately 150,000 tons of LAr. This huge amount of cryogen must be transported down the tunnel in cryogenic-tank trucks or by using pipelines. In both cases, there is a risk of uncontrolled LAr or GAr leakage into the tunnel, which can be dangerous for people, as well as during the installation itself. The presented work focuses on the risk analysis and consequences of unexpected Argon leakage into the tunnel. It shows the mathematical model and numerical tools which can serve to model the Argon cloud propagation, temperature distribution, and Oxygen deficiency. The results present a series of numerical experiments for Argon leakage into the tunnel with different external conditions (e.g. different ventilation regimes).

  4. 2D laser-collision induced fluorescence in low-pressure argon discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.

    2015-09-25

    Development and application of laser-collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) diagnostic technique is presented for the use of interrogating argon plasma discharges. Key atomic states of argon utilized for the LCIF method are identified. A simplified two-state collisional radiative model is then used to establish scaling relations between the LCIF, electron density, and reduced electric fields (E/N). The procedure used to generate, detect and calibrate the LCIF in controlled plasma environments is discussed in detail. LCIF emanating from an argon discharge is then presented for electron densities spanning 109 e cm–3 to 1012 e cm–3 and reduced electric fields spanning 0.1 Td to 40 Td. Lastly, application of the LCIF technique for measuring the spatial distribution of both electron densities and reduced electric field is demonstrated.

  5. 2D laser-collision induced fluorescence in low-pressure argon discharges

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.

    2015-09-25

    Development and application of laser-collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) diagnostic technique is presented for the use of interrogating argon plasma discharges. Key atomic states of argon utilized for the LCIF method are identified. A simplified two-state collisional radiative model is then used to establish scaling relations between the LCIF, electron density, and reduced electric fields (E/N). The procedure used to generate, detect and calibrate the LCIF in controlled plasma environments is discussed in detail. LCIF emanating from an argon discharge is then presented for electron densities spanning 109 e cm–3 to 1012 e cm–3 and reduced electric fields spanning 0.1 Tdmore » to 40 Td. Lastly, application of the LCIF technique for measuring the spatial distribution of both electron densities and reduced electric field is demonstrated.« less

  6. Ionic Wind Phenomenon and Charge Carrier Mobility in Very High Density Argon Corona Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.

    2014-04-01

    Wind ions phenomenon has been observed in the high density argon corona discharge plasma. Corona discharge plasma was produced by point to plane electrodes and high voltage DC. Light emission from the recombination process was observed visually. The light emission proper follow the electric field lines that occur between point and plane electrodes. By using saturation current, the mobilities of non-thermal electrons and ions have been obtained in argon gas and liquid with variation of density from 2,5 1021 to 2 1022 cm-3. In the case of ions, we found that the behaviour of the apparent mobility inversely proportional to the density or follow the Langevin variation law. For non-thermal electron, mobility decreases and approximately follows a variation of Langevin type until the density <= 0,25 the critical density of argon.

  7. Experimental investigation on argon cluster sizes for conical nozzles with different opening angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanglong; Kim, Byunghoon; Ahn, Byungnam; Kim, Dong Eon

    2010-09-01

    Using Rayleigh scattering measurement, we experimentally studied the effect of the opening angle of conical nozzles on the average sizes of argon clusters produced by high-pressure argon gas (up to 50 bars) expanding into vacuum. Both the scattering signal intensity and the scattering image were synchronically recorded by a photomultiplier tube and a charge-coupled device camera. These measurements allow for the comparison of average cluster sizes among conical nozzles of different opening angles. The experimental results indicate that, as expected by Hagena's scaling law, the argon cluster size is dependent on the opening angle. However, it is also found that (1) the cluster size exhibits a larger deviation from Hagena's scaling law at high backing pressure for a nozzle of a smaller opening angle and (2) the smaller the opening angle of conical nozzle gets, the weaker the pressure dependence of cluster size becomes.

  8. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:6688868

  9. Spectroscopic Characterization of Post-Cluster Argon Plasmas During the Blast Wave Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, H,-K.; Fournier, K.B.; Edwards, M.J.; Scott, H.A.; Cattolica, R.; Ditmire, T.; Lee, R.W.

    2002-05-30

    In this work we present temperature diagnostics of an expanding laser-produced argon plasma. A short-pulse (35fs) laser with an intensity of I = 10{sup 17}W/cm{sup 2} deposits {approx} 100 mJ of energy into argon clusters. This generates a hot plasma filament that develops into a cylindrically expanding shock. We develop spectral diagnostics for the temperatures of the argon plasma in the shock region and the preionized region ahead of the shock. A collisional-radiative model is applied to explore line intensity ratios derived from Ar II - Ar IV spectra that are sensitive to temperatures in a few eV range. The results of hydrodynamic simulations are employed to derive a time dependent radiative transport calculation that generates the theoretical emission spectra from the expanding plasma.

  10. Melting of “non-magic” argon clusters and extrapolation to the bulk limit

    SciTech Connect

    Senn, Florian Wiebke, Jonas; Schumann, Ole; Gohr, Sebastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Pahl, Elke

    2014-01-28

    The melting of argon clusters Ar{sub N} is investigated by applying a parallel-tempering Monte Carlo algorithm for all cluster sizes in the range from 55 to 309 atoms. Extrapolation to the bulk gives a melting temperature of 85.9 K in good agreement with the previous value of 88.9 K using only Mackay icosahedral clusters for the extrapolation [E. Pahl, F. Calvo, L. Koči, and P. Schwerdtfeger, “Accurate melting temperatures for neon and argon from ab initio Monte Carlo simulations,” Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8207 (2008)]. Our results for argon demonstrate that for the extrapolation to the bulk one does not have to restrict to magic number cluster sizes in order to obtain good estimates for the bulk melting temperature. However, the extrapolation to the bulk remains a problem, especially for the systematic selection of suitable cluster sizes.

  11. In situ investigation of silicon surface cleaning and damage by argon electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Z.; Buaud, P. P.; Wang, Y.; Spanos, L.; Irene, E. A.

    1994-03-01

    An argon electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma process has been optimized to successfully remove oxide films from a silicon surface at elevated temperatures leaving smooth Si surfaces devoid of an amorphized silicon damage layer. Etch rates of over 10 nm/min have been achieved at ion energies below 100 eV. The low ion energy (-50 V dc bias) and high ion fluxes (1×1016 ions/cm2 s) represent a significant improvement from conventional Ar ion sputter cleaning processes. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry and ex situ atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the surface condition during and after cleaning to establish a 700 °C argon plasma cleaning process for silicon. Real-time single wavelength ellipsometry was used to study the cleaning kinetics, determine the optimal end point, and elucidate a controversy about the level of damage in the argon ECR plasma cleaning process.

  12. Time Passes - Argon Isotopes as Tracers of Fluids in the Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Simon P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental measurements of noble gas solubility in silicate minerals (e.g. Jackson et al. 2013, 2015) means that we can begin to explore the use of noble gas partition between minerals and fluids to understand their residence and transport in the Earth's crust. One starting point for this exploration is the distribution of noble gases and halogens in crustal fluids which was reviewed by Kendrick and Burnard (2013). In particular, K&B (2013) noted that time is a key parameter in understanding noble gas tracers in crustal processes; yielding information such as the residence time of water in a reservoir based on 4He acquired from aquifer rocks, and the 40Ar/39Ar age of fluid inclusions based on trapped fluid and minerals in quartz. Argon isotope variations in natural systems have been measured during studies of 40Ar/39Ar ages to quantify the rates and timescales of crustal processes. There are also studies of fluids in similar rocks, notably in fluid inclusions, providing the opportunity to quantify the variations in the crust. Partition of argon between mineral phases under conditions of varying fluid availability can be compared in systems where 40Ar/39Ar measurements indicate the preservation of non-radiogenic argon (both excess and atmospheric) in the minerals. Rather than a simple picture of radiogenic argon contents increasing with crustal age, and gradual depletion of atmospheric argon in deeper fluids, what emerges is a sometimes dynamic and sometimes static system in different zones of the crust. While it can be shown that the hydrous fluid in sandstone reservoirs contained excess argon, analyses of authigenic minerals rarely exhibit 40Ar/39Ar ages in excess of the growth age. In this scenario, the incompatible nature of argon means that the fluid acts as an effective infinite reservoir and radiogenic argon dominates the potassium rich authigenic minerals. The controls on noble gas distribution are also well illustrated by deep crustal rocks such as

  13. Enhancement of the EUV emission of a metallic capillary discharge operated with argon ambient gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L. S. Tan, D. Saboohi, S. Yap, S. L. Wong, C. S.

    2014-03-05

    In this work, the metallic capillary discharge is operated with two different ambients: air and argon. In the experiments reported here, the chamber is first evacuated to 10{sup −5} mbar. The discharge is initiated by the transient hollow cathode effect generated electron beam, with either air ambient or argon ambient at 10{sup −4} mbar. The bombardment of electron beam at the tip of the stainless steel anode gives rise to a metallic vapor, which is injected into the capillary and initiates the main discharge through the capillary. The EUV emission is measured for different discharge voltages for both conditions and compared. It is found that the metallic capillary discharge with argon ambientis able to produce higher EUV energy compared to that with air ambient.

  14. Pore size analysis of activated carbons from argon and nitrogen porosimetry using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, R.J.; Hyduke, D.R.; Lastoskie, C.M.

    2000-05-30

    The authors present isotherms calculated from density functional theory for the adsorption of argon in model slit-shaped carbon pores at 77 K. The model isotherms are used to interpret experimental argon uptake measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density measurements and to obtain the pore size distributions of several porous carbons. A similar set of density functional theory isotherms, previously reported for nitrogen adsorption on carbon slit pores at 77 K, are used to determine pore size distributions for the same set of carbons. The pore size distribution maxima, mean pore widths, and specific pore volumes measured using the two different probe gases are all found to agree to within approximately 8% on average. Some of the differences in the pore size distributions obtained from argon and nitrogen porosimetry may be attributable to quadrupolar interactions of the nitrogen molecules with functional groups on the carbon surface.

  15. Second Discharge Characteristics of Aluminum Wire Electrical Explosion Under Various Argon Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wenyu; Zhang, Qiaogen; Zhao, Junping; Chen, Gangliang; Liu, Longchen

    2014-10-01

    Electrical wire explosion is a promising method for the preparation of metal nanopowder, but the properties of metal nanopowder are affected by the second discharge process of electrical wire explosion. The second discharge characteristics of aluminum wire electrical explosion under variant argon pressures were studied in a RLC discharge circuit. The results show that the curve of the second discharge voltages versus the pressure presents a U-shape. To clarify the roles of aluminum vapor and argon in the process of the second discharge, a spectrograph and a high speed framing camera were used to study the radiation spectrum and spatial distribution of the electrical explosion plasma. It is observed that argon participates in the second discharge process under low pressure. A discharge channel develops along the surface of the aluminum vapor. Under higher pressure, a second discharge takes place in the aluminum vapor and the discharge channel is inside the aluminum vapor.

  16. Argon: Systematic Review on Neuro- and Organoprotective Properties of an “Inert” Gas

    PubMed Central

    Höllig, Anke; Schug, Anita; Fahlenkamp, Astrid V.; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Argon belongs to the group of noble gases, which are regarded as chemically inert. Astonishingly some of these gases exert biological properties and during the last decades more and more reports demonstrated neuroprotective and organoprotective effects. Recent studies predominately use in vivo or in vitro models for ischemic pathologies to investigate the effect of argon treatment. Promising data has been published concerning pathologies like cerebral ischemia, traumatic brain injury and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, models applied and administration of the therapeutic gas vary. Here we provide a systematic review to summarize the available data on argon’s neuro- and organoprotective effects and discuss its possible mechanism of action. We aim to provide a summary to allow further studies with a more homogeneous setting to investigate possible clinical applications of argon. PMID:25310646

  17. Synodic and semiannual oscillations of argon-40 in the lunar exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, R. Richard; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The neutral mass spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft collected a trove of exospheric data, including a set of high-quality measurements of radiogenic 40Ar over a period of 142 days. Data synthesis studies, using well-established exosphere simulation tools, show that the LADEE argon data are consistent with an exosphere-regolith interaction that is dominated by adsorption and that the desorption process generates the Armand distribution of exit velocities. The synthesis work has uncovered an apparent semiannual oscillation of argon that is consistent with temporal sequestration in the seasonal cold traps created at the poles by the obliquity of the Moon. In addition, the LADEE data provide new insight into the pristine nature of lunar regolith, its spatially varying sorption properties, and the influence of sorption processes on the synodic oscillation of the argon exosphere.

  18. Scintillation photon detection in liquid argon at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Bruce; Adams, Brice; Baugh, Brian; Buchanan, Norm; Bugel, Len; Conrad, Janet; Davis, Ronald; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Miner, Bill; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Pordes, Stephen; Rebel, Brian; Smith, Paul; Toups, Matt; Urheim, Jon; Warner, David; Wongjirad, Taritree; Whittington, Denver

    2015-04-01

    The proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) aims to answer outstanding questions relating to neutrino physics and other phenomena, such as proton decay and supernova neutrinos. The proposed far detector design calls for a multi-kiloton liquid argon time-projection chamber at a long baseline. In addition to its utility as a target material, liquid argon scintillates in the far UV, providing further physics information and serving as a trigger for non-beam events. The photon detection system in development for the LBNF far detector includes a mechanism for capturing and transporting the light, a method to detect the photons (silicon photomultipliers), and the necessary readout electronics. Testing in liquid argon has occurred at the ``TallBo'' facility at Fermilab to characterize and compare the performance of these systems. In this talk, we present the details of these photon detection systems and the latest results of testing.

  19. Compatibility of the argon and KTP lasers with middle ear implants.

    PubMed

    Wanamaker, H H; Silverstein, H

    1993-06-01

    Visible-spectrum lasers (argon, KTP) are becoming common tools in otology. Concern over transmission of disease by homograft tissue has focused attention on synthetic materials such as Silastic, Polycel, hydroxylapatite, and Teflon. This study sought to determine the effects of argon and KTP lasers on materials used in stapes and chronic ear surgery. Silastic sheeting, hydroxylapatite and polycel total ossicular replacement prostheses (TORPs) and partial ossicular replacement prostheses (PORPs), and platinum wire/Teflon stapes prostheses were exposed to argon and KTP laser energy at clinical power settings. Effects of the two lasers were similar. The presence of pigment (char or blood) was necessary to produce any effect. Silastic transmitted energy to underlying material. Hydroxylapatite cracked and shattered. Polycel vaporized and melted, as did Teflon. Clinical implications of these interactions on primary and revision otologic surgeries will be discussed. PMID:8388975

  20. Argon isotopic studies of minerals in kimberlites, mantle xenoliths and diamonds, from selected southern African localities

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence, composition, behavior and origin of excess argon components, in mantle phases hosted by southern African kimberlites, is evaluated using furnace step-heating and laser-probe analytical techniques. Laser-probe {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses of phlogopite from the swartruggens kimberlite dyke (145 Ma), and Premier diatreme ({approximately}1200 Ma) lherzolite xenoliths, yielded apparent ages decreasing from high ages at grain centres to values approaching the age of kimberlite intrusion, along grain margins. The old apparent ages are attributed excess radiogenic argon, with high {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ratios (> 15,000), incorporated prior to kimberlite intrusion under conditions of locally high argon partial pressure. The preservation of the excess argon components is dependent on the timing of melt devolatilization, temperature, cooling rate and the characteristic radius for argon diffusion. Swartruggens phlogopite grains also display chlorine zonations, measured by a neutron activation technique and the laser probe. Fluorine contents, determined by electron microprobe were uniform. Halogen analyses of Premier xenolith phlogopite revealed minor variations. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser-probe analyses of eclogitic suite clinopyroxene inclusions in diamonds from the Premier kimberlite yielded an age of 1198 {plus minus} 6 Ma, indistinguishable from the inferred time of intrusion of the host kimberlite ({approximately}1200 Ma). This implies diamond formation synchronous with, or no more than {approximately}20 Ma before kimberlite generation. The associated initial {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ratio of 334 {plus minus} 50 is similar to the present day atmospheric composition. It is suggested that late-stage equilibration with {sup 36}Ar-rich fluids, derived either from primordial mantle, or from subducted atmospheric argon, is the most likely explanation for this low {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar value.

  1. DarkSide-50 WIMP search results with low radioactivity argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, DarkSide-50 is the first physics detector of the DarkSide dark matter search program. The experiment features a dual-phase Time Projection Chamber as the WIMP detector, surrounded by an organic liquid-scintillator neutron veto and a water-Cherenkov muon detector. We report the results from the first use of low radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources in a dark matter search. We have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1 . 4 +/- 0 . 2) ×103 relative to atmospheric argon whose 39Ar activity is 1 bq/kg. The underground argon is also found to contain (2 . 05 +/- 0 . 13) mBq/kg of 85Kr. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36 . 9 +/- 0 . 6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2 . 0 ×10-44 cm2 (8 . 6 ×10-44 cm2, 8 . 0 ×10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2). DS-50 will continue dark matter search with the underground argon target for a total of 3 years. See also the DS-50 presentations by E. Edkins and G. Koh.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  3. Episodic growth of Mt. Shasta, CA, documented by argon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.; Christiansen, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    eruptive focus shifted 1.5 km north (Misery Hill) between 50-35 ka, erupting silicic andesite and mafic dacite onto all sectors of the volcano. Flank vents directly south and north erupted domes and lavas 20-15 ka. At ~11 ka a voluminous episode began with the subplinian Red Banks pumice followed shortly by Shastina andesite/dacite lavas, domes, and pyroclastic flows, and soon after by Black Butte flank dacites. Existing 14C geochronology, and stratigraphic studies of the deposits show no eruptive breaks and constrain the episode to have lasted less than a few hundred years. Subsequent Holocene eruptions all issued from the modern summit (Hotlum cone), producing at least 10 large lava flows directed toward the NE sector, along with pyroclastic and debris flows, and a summit dome. Preliminary argon geochronology in progress dates summit lavas at 8.8, 5.8 and 4.7 ka.

  4. Boltzmann expansion in a radiofrequency conical helicon thruster operating in xenon and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-06-01

    A low pressure (˜0.5 mTorr in xenon and ˜1 mTorr in argon) Boltzmann expansion is experimentally observed on axis within a magnetized (60 to 180 G) radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) conical helicon thruster for input powers up to 900 W using plasma parameters measured with a Langmuir probe. The axial forces, respectively, resulting from the electron and magnetic field pressures are directly measured using a thrust balance for constant maximum plasma pressure and show a higher fuel efficiency for argon compared to xenon.

  5. Application of argon laser LAK-1 for therapy in selected blood vessel diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz

    1995-03-01

    Argon laser was applied in 172 patients with various vascular disorders and epidermal nevi. The best therapeutical results were obtained in facial telangiectasia and in cavernous hemangiomas, in which there was a complete or almost complete regression. In capillary facial hemangiomas in 49 patients (79%) clearing of 50% to 75% was obtained, and in epidermal nevi the full regression was in 4 (44%) of the cases, and 50% regression in 4 (44%). In telangiectasia of the lower limbs the results were not satisfactory. We stress that cavernous, and capillary hemangiomas, as well as facial telangiectasia are an indication for the argon laser therapy.

  6. Determination of argon resonance line emission in an ICP hitting a biological sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, P.; Bibinov, N.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo model for the calculation of argon resonance line photon trapping in a double inductively coupled plasma is presented. Different probabilities of photon behaviour are calculated and the flux of photons hitting a target placed in the middle of the chamber is determined by simulation. Different gas admixtures or gas impurities can absorb photons or quench excited argon atoms, which is considered in the simulation. Electron energy distribution function and electron density are measured with a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Nitrogen impurities, due to opening of the chamber, are measured using OES. These measured values and other additional input values such as gas temperature are used for simulation.

  7. Numerical simulation of atomic nitrogen formation in plasma of glow discharge in nitrogen-argon mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, V. A.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Didyk, E. G.; Zhovtyansky, V. A.; Nazarenko, V. G.

    2010-10-01

    We consider the problem of determining the content of atomic nitrogen as an active component responsible for the efficiency of metal surface modification in plasma of stationary low-pressure glow discharge in nitrogen-argon mixture (widely used in this technology). The influence of the gas mixture composition on the rate constant of molecular nitrogen dissociation, which determines the atomic nitrogen production, has been calculated, The parameters of plasma have been experimentally determined using the method of double probes. The electron energy distribution function is found by numerically integrating the Boltzmann equation in a two-term approximation for the molecular nitrogen-argon mixture.

  8. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Zander

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss the outcome of recent research and development of wavelength-shifting lightguides for LArTPCs. The response of the lightguides was characterized in both air and liquid argon. Attenuation lengths over 100cm were consistently measured in air, which is an important step in the development of meter-scale lightguides for future LArTPCs. Additionally, good agreement was found between simulations and measurements performed in air and liquid argon. Such agreement indicates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of lightguide production. Zander Moss for the MIT Light Collection R&D Group.

  9. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; et al

    2016-06-06

    Here, we describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). Moreover, this system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. Finally, a gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  10. Microstructural and strength stability of CVD SiC fibers in argon environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Hull, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The room temperature tensile strength and microstructure of three types of commercially available chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured after 1, 10, and 100 hour heat treatments under argon pressures of 0.1 to 310 MPa at temperatures to 2100 C. Two types of fiber had carbon-rich surface coatings and the other contained no coating. All three fiber types showed strength degradation beyond 1400 C. Time and temperature of exposure had greater influence on strength degradation than argon pressure. Recrystallization and growth of near stoichiometric SiC grains appears to be the dominant mechanism for the strength degradation.

  11. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas. PMID:6547800

  12. Shock tube study of ionization rates of NaCl-contaminated argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheneider, C.-P.; Park, C.

    1975-01-01

    Spectrally resolved radiometry and a microwave technique were used to measure the electron density, electron temperature, and concentration, and the concentration of sodium atoms in the weakly ionized region behind a shock wave in an argon shock tube. It is shown that the observed increase in the ionization rate is due to electron detachment of negative chlorine ions produced from sodium chloride vapor contained as an impurity in the argon gas. The observed behavior of the electron temperature in time and the reactions controlled by the electron temperature are analyzed in the light of the impurity reaction scheme.

  13. Fully differential single-photon double ionization of neon and argon.

    PubMed

    Yip, F L; Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Martín, F

    2013-04-26

    Triply differential cross sections are calculated for one-photon double ionization of neon and argon at various photon energies and electron energy sharings by using a frozen-core treatment to represent the remaining electrons of the residual ion. Angular distributions agree well with all existing experimental data, showing that in spite of its simplicity the method can treat the double ionization of complex targets reliably. A comparison of the cross sections for helium, neon, and argon into the same final state symmetry at the same relative excess energies reveals a distinctive signature of the role of electron correlation in each target. PMID:23679717

  14. Emission in argon and krypton at 147 nm excited by runaway-electron-induced diffusion discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, Gennadii N; Krylov, B E; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Rybka, D V; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2010-05-26

    Plasma emission of a pulsed diffuse discharge produced at increased pressures due to the preionisation of the gap by runaway electrons is studied in argon, krypton, and xenon. Nanosecond voltage pulses with the amplitude {approx}220 kV were applied to the discharge gap. It is shown that the presence of xenon ({approx}0.01%) in argon and krypton leads to the emergence of high-power narrowband radiation at awavelength of 147 nm. It is assumed that this radiation belongs to the bands of heteronuclear molecules Xe*Ar and Xe*Kr.

  15. Equation of state of dense argon; a comparison of shock and static studies. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Mao, H.K.; Bell, P.M.; Xu, J.A.

    1985-07-01

    In the present paper we report new diamond anvil cell (DAC) measurements for room temperature solid argon to 800 kbars. This isotherm is in excellent agreement with one predicted from a theoretical analysis of shockwave data. These results are important for several reasons. First they demonstrate agreement between shock and static techniques even in cases where shock temperatures are extremely high and a large thermal correction is required to reduce the Hugoniot to an isotherm. Secondly the results suggest that solid argon may provide a useful pressure standard up to 3 Mbar. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  16. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; Tsang, T.; Zhang, L.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  17. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF HIGH ENERGY CARBON, NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, E.A.; Appleby, A.; Jayko, M.

    1980-07-01

    Chemical yields of Fe{sup 3+} have been measured from FeSO{sub 4} solutions irradiated in the presence and absence of oxygen with carbon, neon, and argon ions from the Berkeley Bevalac facility. G(Fe{sup 3+}) decreases with increasing beam penetration and with increasing atomic number of the incident ion. The results are compared with current theoretical expectations of the behavior of these particles in an aqueous absorber. The chemical yields are consistently higher than theoretically predicted, by amounts varying from <6.2% (carbon ions) to <13.2% (argon ions). The additional yields are possibly attributable to fragmentation of the primary particle beams.

  18. Microstructural and strength stability of CVD SiC fibers in argon environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Hull, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The room temperature tensile strength and microstructure of three types of commercially available chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers were measured after 1, 10, and 100 hour heat treatments under argon pressures of 0.1 to 310 MPa at temperatures to 2100 C. Two types of fiber had carbon-rich surface coatings and the other contained no coating. All three fiber types showed strength degradation beyond 1400 C. Time and temperature of exposure had greater influence on strength degradation than argon pressure. Recrystallization and growth of near stoichiometric SiC grains appears to be the dominant mechanism for the strength degradation.

  19. Boltzmann expansion in a radiofrequency conical helicon thruster operating in xenon and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R.; Takahashi, K.

    2013-06-03

    A low pressure ({approx}0.5 mTorr in xenon and {approx}1 mTorr in argon) Boltzmann expansion is experimentally observed on axis within a magnetized (60 to 180 G) radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) conical helicon thruster for input powers up to 900 W using plasma parameters measured with a Langmuir probe. The axial forces, respectively, resulting from the electron and magnetic field pressures are directly measured using a thrust balance for constant maximum plasma pressure and show a higher fuel efficiency for argon compared to xenon.

  20. Convergence of Chapman-Enskog calculation of transport coefficients of magnetized argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Catalfamo, C.; Laricchiuta, A.; Giordano, D.; Capitelli, M.

    2006-07-15

    Convergence properties of the Chapman-Enskog method in the presence of a magnetic field for the calculation of the transport properties of nonequilibrium partially ionized argon have been studied emphasizing the role of the different collision integrals. In particular, the Ramsauer minimum of electron-argon cross sections affects the convergence of the Chapman-Enskog method at low temperature, while Coulomb collisions affect the results at higher temperatures. The presence of an applied magnetic field mitigates the slow convergence for the components affected by the field.

  1. Argon laser curing of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant: in vitro caries development.

    PubMed

    Westerman, G; Hicks, J; Flaitz, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of argon laser polymerization of a visible-light-cured, fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant on caries development in vitro. A total of twelve caries-free premolar and molar teeth was selected, and underwent a fluoride-free prophylaxis and soft tissue debridement. Cavity preparations were placed in buccal and lingual surfaces. Lingual cavity preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant (UltraSealXTplus, Ultradent) and visible light cured per the manufacturer's recommendation. Buccal preparations were filled with the fluoride-releasing sealant and argon laser cured (231 mW, 12 J/cm2 for 10 seconds). Following sealant placement, the teeth were sectioned into buccal and lingual halves. An acid-resistant varnish was placed leaving a 1 mm rim of exposed surface enamel adjacent to the sealant. The specimens were then thermocycled in synthetic saliva (500 cycles, 5 to 50 degrees C). In vitro caries lesions were formed (2.2 mM Ca, 2.2 mM PO4, 50 mM acetic acid, 5 ppm fluoride, pH 3.95). Longitudinal sections (five sections per tooth half) were obtained and evaluated by polarized light microscopy for mean outer surface lesion depths and frequency of wall lesions. Mean primary surface (outer) lesion depth was significantly decreased (ANOVA, DMR, P < .05) for the fluoride-releasing sealant with argon laser polymerization (152 +/- 16 um) when compared with visible light curing (211 +/- 23 um). Likewise, wall lesion frequency was substantially reduced for the argon laser polymerized sealants (17 percent) when compared with that for the visible light polymerized sealants (24 percent, ANOVA, DMR, P < .05). Argon laser polymerization of a fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealant improved caries resistance markedly in the surface enamel adjacent to the sealant material. Argon laser curing enhanced the caries protective ability of the sealant along the enamel-resin cavosurface, as noted by a decrease in wall

  2. Transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture based on ab initio potential.

    PubMed

    Sharipov, Felix; Benites, Victor J

    2015-10-21

    The viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and thermal diffusion factor of helium-argon mixtures are calculated for a wide range of temperature and for various mole fractions up to the 12th order of the Sonine polynomial expansion with an ab initio intermolecular potential. The calculated values for these transport coefficients are compared with other data available in the open literature. The comparison shows that the obtained transport coefficients of helium-argon mixture have the best accuracy for the moment. PMID:26493894

  3. Hypervelocity flows of argon produced in a free piston driven expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure, and flat plate heat transfer rates are used to confirm the presence of quasi-steady flow, and comparisons are made with predictions for the equilibrium flow of an ideal, ionizing, monatomic gas. The results of this work indicate that expansion tubes can be used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon at speeds in excess of Earth orbital velocity.

  4. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  5. 48 CFR 31.205-31 - Plant reconversion costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plant reconversion costs. 31.205-31 Section 31.205-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Organizations 31.205-31 Plant reconversion costs. Plant reconversion costs are those incurred in restoring...

  6. 48 CFR 31.205-31 - Plant reconversion costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plant reconversion costs. 31.205-31 Section 31.205-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Organizations 31.205-31 Plant reconversion costs. Plant reconversion costs are those incurred in restoring...

  7. 48 CFR 31.205-31 - Plant reconversion costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plant reconversion costs. 31.205-31 Section 31.205-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205-31 Plant reconversion...

  8. 27 CFR 31.31 - Retail dealer in liquors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retail dealer in liquors. 31.31 Section 31.31 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Activities Subject to This Part Dealers Classified § 31.31 Retail dealer in liquors....

  9. Effects of argon pressure on the properties of ZnO:Ga thin films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marwoto, Putut; Fatiatun, Sulhadi, Sugianto, Aryanto, Didik

    2016-03-01

    Gallium (Ga)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Ga) thin films were deposited on corning glass substrates by homemade DC magnetron sputtering. Effects of argon gas pressure on the structural and optical properties of ZnO:Ga thin films were investigated by XRD, SEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The argon gas pressure was adjusted at 450, 500 and 550 mtorr. All the films exhibit a strong (002) peak and a weak (004) peaks. The XRD pattern demonstrated that crystallinity of the film improved with increasing of the argon pressure. ZnO:Ga thin films deposited have polycrystalline structure. It was shown that the argon pressure has a great influence on ZnO:Ga film surface structures. The grain size of the films was increased with the increases of argon pressure. The grains shape of the film change from an equiaxed rough grain to a longish grain with the argon pressure. The average of transmittance of the films is about 80% in the visible range. It is shown that the argon pressure has no effect significantly on optical bandgap of ZnO:Ga, but in general it can be explained that increasing of the argon pressure can reduce the bandgap. The optical bandgap of ZnO:Ga thin films in the range of 3.25 - 3.3 eV.

  10. Self-Organization and Migration of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Filaments in Argon Gas Flow

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cho, Young I.; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Fridman, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge are conducted through a water-filled electrode in atmospheric-pressure argon gas flow. Quasi-symmetric self-organized discharge filaments were observed. The streamers moved with the gas flow, and the migration velocity increased with increasing gas velocity. PMID:22287814

  11. Photoionization cross-sections for atoms and ions of aluminum, silicon, and argon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. D.; Henry, R. J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photoionization cross sections for all levels belonging to the configurations of atoms and ions of aluminum, silicon, and argon have been calculated using Hartree-Fock bound-electron wave functions and close-coupling approximation free-electron wave functions. The results are presented in the form of a computationally convenient interpolation formula and should find wide astrophysical application.

  12. Compression of An Ultrashort Laser Pulse via Self-Phase Modulation in An Argon Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, Masashi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-01-22

    Compression and splitting of the optical laser pulse due to multiple filamentation in an argon gas-filled channel was observed. A 130-140-fs linearly polarized pulse was successfully compressed to less than 60-80 fs with the output energy of a few 10 mJ.

  13. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  14. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  15. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  16. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  17. Proton decay and solar neutrino experiment with a liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.I.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in development of the liquid argon Time Projection Chamber is reviewed. Application of this technique to a search for proton decay and /sup 8/B solar neutrinos with directional sensitivity is considered. The steps necessary for a large scale application of this technique deep underground are described.

  18. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-03-15

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

  19. CVD formation of graphene on SiC surface in argon atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wierzbowska, Małgorzata; Dominiak, Adam; Tokar, Kamil

    2013-06-14

    We investigate the microscopic processes leading to graphene growth by the chemical vapor deposition of propane in an argon atmosphere at the SiC surface. Experimentally, it is known that the presence of argon fastens the dehydrogenation processes at the surface, at high temperatures of about 2000 K. We perform ab initio calculations, at zero temperature, to check whether chemical reactions can explain this phenomenon. Density functional theory and supporting quantum chemistry methods qualitatively describe formation of the graphene wafers. We find that the 4H-SiC(0001) surface exhibits a large catalytic effect in the adsorption process of hydrocarbon molecules, this is also supported by preliminary molecular dynamics results. The existence of the ArH(+) molecule, and an observation from the Raman spectra that the negative charge transfers into the SiC surface, would suggest that presence of argon atoms leads to a deprotonization on the surface, which is necessary to obtain a pure carbon adlayer. But the zero-temperature description shows that the cold environment is insufficient to promote argon-assisted surface cleaning. PMID:23640518

  20. Analysis of time-resolved argon line spectra from OMEGA direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Florido, R.; Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.

    2008-10-15

    We discuss the observation and data analysis of argon K-shell line spectra from argon-doped deuterium-filled OMEGA direct-drive implosion cores based on data recorded with two streaked crystal spectrometers. The targets were 870 {mu}m in diameter, 27 {mu}m wall thickness plastic shells filled with 20 atm of deuterium gas, and a tracer amount of argon for diagnostic purposes. The argon K-shell line spectrum is primarily emitted at the collapse of the implosion and its analysis provides a spectroscopic diagnostic of the core implosion conditions. The observed spectra includes the He{alpha}, Ly{alpha}, He{beta}, He{gamma}, Ly{beta}, and Ly{gamma} line emissions and their associated He- and Li-like satellites thus covering a broad photon energy range from 3100 to 4200 eV with a spectral resolution power of approximately 500. The data analysis relies on detailed atomic and spectral models that take into account nonequilibrium collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark-broadened line shapes, and radiation transport calculations.

  1. Dissociation of internally excited UF 6- ions in collision with argon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, J. A. D.

    1987-06-01

    Uranium hexafluoride negative ions (UF 6-) of controlled average internal and kinetic energy were collided with argon. A qualitative change was observed in the dependence of ionic fragmentation on internal excitation prior to collision, as the laboratory collision energy was increased above 150 eV.

  2. Analysis of regimes of magnetogasdynamic interaction between a current layer and an argon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, E. N.; Nesterov, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    A nonstationary three-dimensional magnetogasdynamics (MGD) model is used to study the dynamics of a current layer interacting with a transverse magnetic field in a supersonic argon flow through a channel of constant cross section. The MGD interaction regimes and the features of the current layer formation for various external resistances and channel widths are analyzed as based on numerical results.

  3. Darkside-20k: A 20 ton Liquid Argon Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Henning; Darkside-20k Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Darkside-20k detector is the next step in the Darkside dark matter search program at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The Darkside detectors have grown in fiducial mass starting with 10kg in Darkside10, to 50 kg in Darkside50, and finally a proposed 20,000 kg fiducial mass, Darkside20k. The Darkside detectors are dual-phase argon TPCs that combine the very powerful scintillation pulse-shape analysis and ionization information to discriminate against background events. Two unique aspects to the Darkside program is the use of an external neutron veto based on borated liquid scintillator, and the use of low radioactivity argon from underground sources as the target. Argon from the atmosphere has an 39Ar activity of 1Bq/kg, which would be the limiting background, but the underground argon is essentially free of 39Ar. Additionally, the detector is placed in a water Cherenkov muon veto. Combining all these techniques allows Darkside-20k to achieve a background-free 100 t-yr exposure accumulated in a 5 yr run. Darkside-20k is expected to start operations in 2020 with data taking starting in 2021, and will be sensitive to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections of 1×10-47 cm2 (1x10-46 cm2) for WIMPs of 1 TeV/c2 (10 TeV/c2) mass.

  4. Liquid Argon Dielectric Breakdown Studies with the MicroBooNE Purification System

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Carls, B.; James, C.; Johnson, B.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Lundberg, B.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Rebel, B.; Zeller, G. P.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-11-04

    The proliferation of liquid argon time projection chamber detectors makes the characterization of the dielectric properties of liquid argon a critical task. To improve understanding of these properties, a systematic study of the breakdown electric field in liquid argon was conducted using a dedicated cryostat connected to the MicroBooNE cryogenic system at Fermilab. An electrode sphere-plate geometry was implemented using spheres with diameters of 1.3 mm, 5.0 mm, and 76 mm. The MicroBooNE cryogenic system allowed measurements to be taken at a variety of electronegative contamination levels ranging from a few parts-per-million to tens of parts-per-trillion. The cathode-anode distance was varied from 0.1 mm to 2.5 cm. The results demonstrate a geometric dependence of the electric field strength at breakdown. This study is the first time that the dependence of the breakdown field on stressed cathode area has been shown for liquid argon.

  5. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED ARGON PLASMA AS AN ION SOURCE FOR MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solution aerosols are injected into an inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) to generate a relatively high number density of positive ions derived from elemental constituents. A small fraction of these ions is extracted through a sampling orifice into a differentially pumped vac...

  6. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, X.; Cheron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-15

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  7. Pilot study about dose-effect relationship of ocular injury in argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Fu, X. B.; Zhang, T. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Qian, H. W.; San, Q.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this article was to study the injury effect of either convergent or parallel argon laser beam on rabbit retina, get the dose-effect relationship for the two types of laser beams, and calculate the damage threshold of argon laser for human retinas. An argon laser therapeutic instrument for ophthalmology was used in this study. A total of 80 rabbit eyes were irradiated for 600 lesions, half of which were treated by convergent laser and the other half were done with parallel laser beam. After irradiation, slit lamp microscope and fundus photography were used to observe the lesions, change and the incidence of injury was processed statistically to get the damage threshold of rabbit retina. Based on results from the experiments on animals and the data from clinical cases of laser treatment, the photocoagulation damage thresholds of human retinas for convergent and parallel argon laser were calculated to be 0.464 and 0.285 mJ respectively. These data provided biological reference for safely operation when employing laser photocoagulation in clinical practice and other fields.

  8. Histopathology of diode and argon laser lesions in rabbit retina. A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Brancato, R.; Pratesi, R.; Leoni, G.; Trabucchi, G.; Vanni, U.

    1989-07-01

    Argon lasers are the most frequently used laser source for retinal photocoagulation. These are expensive, bulky and low-efficiency devices. In contrast, diode semiconductor lasers have a number of characteristics that make them attractive for medical application: compact size, high electrical-to-optical efficiency, and long operating lifetime. Comparable irradiance lesions (about 120 Wcm2), ophthalmoscopically similar to those obtained therapeutically in humans, were obtained by a diode and an argon laser. Twenty-four hours after the treatment, a study of these lesions was made by light and electron microscopy. Argon irradiations resulted in damage to both the inner and the outer retinal layers, while the diode laser radiation produced damage to the outer retina and choroid. A sufficient diode laser light passed into the choroid to induce small vessel occlusions and/or edema. The histological characteristics of the lesions produced by the two lasers suggest the use of the diode lasers, as well as argon lasers, in the treatment of retinal and subretinal pathologies.

  9. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  10. Continuous-wave dye laser pumped by a high-pressure argon arc

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, E.; Zander, C.; Drexhage, K.

    1988-11-01

    Continuous-wave operation of a Rhodamine 6G dye laser, incoherently pumped by a high-pressure argon arc, has been achieved. A special electrode design reduces melting of the electrode tips, and thus the arc provides the necessary brightness for periods of the order of hours.

  11. Evaluation of argon laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy and its diffusion in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Vondeling, H

    1993-01-01

    Argon laser treatment of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the best evaluated case in the field of minimally invasive therapy. A well-organized randomized controlled trial was followed by formal cost-analyses and cost-effectiveness analyses. Laser treatment of DR proved to be cost-effective in a situation where there was no satisfactory treatment previously. Subsequently, screening strategies for retinopathy were developed. Systematic screening for DR in diabetic populations would be cost-saving from a societal perspective. The availability of effective and cost-effective therapy and cost-saving screening strategies for DR warrants active policy making to stimulate the implementation of strategies to control retinopathy in diabetic populations. Such strategies would ideally include both guided diffusion of argon lasers and the organization of screening programs. Data from the Netherlands are used to illustrate the diffusion of argon lasers in health care. After a slow start, argon lasers have diffused widely in the Dutch health care system. This development is complemented by recommendations for screening of the European diabetic population, which were issued in 1991. More active cooperation of all parties involved would benefit in preventing blindness from DR. PMID:10123418

  12. A comparison of absorbable suture and argon laser welding for lateral repair of arteries.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, P F; Li, K; Merrell, S W; Goodman, G R

    1991-08-01

    Conventional vascular anastomoses between autogenous vessels are performed with nonabsorbable sutures. Recently, use of absorbable sutures and laser-assisted vascular anastomoses has been advocated because of their improved healing characteristics. This study compared arterial repairs with the argon laser, absorbable suture, and nonabsorbable suture for technical characteristics including additional suture and overall success rates, burst strength, and cost. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture closures were comparable with respect to technique, but laser-assisted vascular anastomosis was technically more demanding and required almost twice as much time for completion. The argon laser successfully closed only 58.6% of the arteriotomies, and 90% of the closures required additional sutures for complete hemostasis. All sutured arteriotomies were successfully completed by use of either absorbable or nonabsorbable suture. Burst strength was similar for all groups, but was uniformly greater than 300 mm Hg for sutured repairs, whereas two of five laser-assisted closures burst below 300 mm Hg. Finally, costs for purchasing ($35,000) and operating ($300/hr.) an argon laser make laser-assisted vascular anastomosis much more expensive than sutured repair. These data suggest argon laser-assisted vascular anastomoses are more technically demanding, less successful, and more expensive than conventional sutured anastomoses when evaluated in large caliber arteries in a canine model. Absorbable suture, however, is comparable to conventional nonabsorbable sutured arterial repairs in expense, handling characteristics, and success rates with the added advantage of eliminating permanent foreign body in the arterial wall when it is absorbed. PMID:1861329

  13. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23794223

  14. Decomposition of heavy hydrocarbons in argon arc with the sunken electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerkaev, B. A.; Ganieva, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The way of decomposition of heavy hydrocarbons in the argon arc with the sunken electrodes is proposed. The chromatographic analysis of the gases appeared in the chamber and the electronic and microscopic investigation of the carbonaceous deposits formed on electrodes during experiment is carried out.

  15. Influence of argon gas flow on mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered titanium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, Kaykhosrow; Savaloni, Hadi; Shokrai, Ebrahim; Dehghani, Zohreh; Dehnavi, Naser Zare

    2013-07-01

    Titanium nitrides have good mechanical, tribological, electrical, biomedical, and optical properties; therefore, they are used to harden and protect cutting and sliding surfaces, as semiconductor devices, and as a nontoxic exterior for biomedical applications. The dependence of the mechanical and electrical properties of titanium nitride thin films deposited on silicon substrates by direct-current reactive magnetron sputtering technique on argon gas flow (in the range of 8 to 20 sccm) was investigated. The crystallographic structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and electrical properties of these films were investigated by nanoindentation test and a four-point probe instrument, respectively. The XRD patterns showed titanium nitride (TiN) formation with a face-centered cubic structure for all samples. It was also observed that (111) crystallographic direction was the preferred orientation for TiN thin films which became more pronounced with increasing argon gas flow. The AFM images showed a granular structure for TiN layers. The hardness, crystallite/grain size (obtained from XRD and AFM), and surface roughness increased with the flow of argon gas, while elastic modulus and dislocation density in the films decreased. The study on electrical properties showed that the dependence of voltage with current for all samples was linear, and film resistivity was increased with argon gas flow.

  16. The Ashima/MIT Mars GCM and argon in the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuan; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Lee, Christopher; Toigo, Anthony D.; Mischna, Michael A.; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the ability of modern general circulation models (GCMs) to simulate transport in the martian atmosphere using measurements of argon as a proxy for the transport processes. Argon provides the simplest measure of transport as it is a noble gas with no sinks or sources on seasonal timescales. Variations in argon result solely from 'freeze distillation', as the atmosphere condenses at the winter poles, and from atmospheric transport. Comparison of all previously published models when rescaled to a common definition of the argon enhancement factor (EF) suggest that models generally do a poor job in predicting the peak enhancement in southern winter over the winter pole - the time when the capability of the model transport approaches are most severely tested. Despite observed peak EF values of ˜6, previously published model predictions peaked at EF values of only 2-3. We introduce a new GCM that provides a better treatment of mass conservation within the dynamical core, includes more sophisticated tracer transport approaches, and utilizes a cube-sphere grid structure thus avoiding the grid-point convergence problem at the pole that exists for most current Mars GCMs. We describe this model - the Ashima Research/Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mars General Circulation Model (Ashima/MIT Mars GCM) and use it to demonstrate the significant sensitivity of peak EF to the choices of transport approach for both tracers and heat. We obtain a peak EF of 4.75 which, while over 50% higher than any prior model, remains well short of the observed value. We show that the polar EF value in winter is primarily determined by the competition between two processes: (1) mean meridional import of lower-latitude air not enriched in argon and (2) the leakage of enriched argon out of the polar column by eddies in the lowest atmospheric levels. We suggest possibilities for improving GCM representation of the CO2 cycle and the general circulation that may further improve the

  17. Cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb Rahman, Keedakkadan; Abe, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of mass independent isotope fractionation in oxygen during the formation of ozone in the stratosphere has initiated a wide application in isotope geochemistry field. Separation of oxygen-argon mixture has become the foundation of high precision analysis of Δ17O and δ(O2/Ar) for geochemical applications. Here we present precise and simplified cryogenic separation of argon oxygen mixture from the atmospheric and dissolved air using 30/60 mesh 5A molecular sieve zeolite. A pioneer study of this method was conducted by Thiemens and Meagher in 1984. The column which is made of glass tube contains about 1.1 grams of molecular sieve zeolite and both ends of column was filled with glass wools. The experimental set up was tested for different combination of molecular sieves and slurry temperatures. We found the most efficient condition for the separation was at a column temperature of -103°C. For complete transfer of O2 and Ar mixture usually takes in 15-20 minutes time. The isotopic ratios of oxygen were analyzed using mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer Delta Plus) relative to reference oxygen-argon mixture at 3V of m/z 32 for both sample and reference side. The signals of m/z 28, 32, and 40 were measured by dynamically to determine oxygen -argon ratio and to check nitrogen contamination. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (SE n=80) of 0.006, 0.004 and 0.19‰ for δ17O, δ18O and δO2/Ar respectively. The isotopic and molecular fractionation of argon- oxygen mixture during gas adsorption and desorption while using molecular sieve under liquid nitrogen temperature was studied. We have established a linear relationship governing the effect of 13X and 5A molecular sieves on molecular fractionation. And suggested the use of single 1/8" pellet 13X molecular sieve provided a negligible fractionation.

  18. Atomic data generation and collisional radiative modeling of argon II, argon III, and neon I for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge Manuel

    introduce RF power up to 2 kWatt. Two RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure T e and N e . In a series of experiment Ar II, Ar III, and Ne transitions are monitored as a function of T e , while Ne is kept nearly constant. Observations revealed that T e is by far the most significant parameter affecting the emission rate coefficients, thus confirming our predictions. The spectroscopy measurements are compared with those from our spectral modeling which in turn help us to compare the effectiveness of the new atomic data calculations with those from other calculations. We performed a new R -Matrix calculation for Ar 2+ . Emission from Ar 2+ is seen in planetary nebulae, in H II regions, and from laboratory plasmas. Our calculation improved upon existing electron-impact excitation data for the 3p 4 configuration of Ar 2+ and calculated new data for the excited levels. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths were calculated using the R - Matrix intermediate-coupling (IC) frame-transformation method and the R -Matrix Breit-Pauli method. Excitation cross-sections are calculated between all levels of the configurations 3s 2 3p 4 , 3s 3p 5 , 3p 6 , 3p 5 3d, and 3s 2 3p 3 nl (3d <= nl <= 5s). Maxwellian effective collision strengths are generated from the collision strength data. Good agreement is found in the collision strengths calculated using the two R -Matrix methods. The effects of the new data on line ratio diagnostics were studied. The collision strengths are compared with literature values for transitions within the 3s 2 3p 4 configuration. The new data has a small effect on T e values obtained from the I (l7135Å + l7751Å)/ I (l5192Å) line ratio, and a larger effect on the N e values obtained from the I (l7135Å)/ I (l9m m ) line ratio. The final effective collision strength data is archived online. Neon as well as Argon is a species of current interest in fusion TOKAMAK studies. It is used for radiative cooling of the divertor region and for disruption

  19. Atomic data generation and collisional radiative modeling of argon II, argon III, and neon I for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz Burgos, Jorge Manuel

    introduce RF power up to 2 kWatt. Two RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure T e and N e . In a series of experiment Ar II, Ar III, and Ne transitions are monitored as a function of T e , while Ne is kept nearly constant. Observations revealed that T e is by far the most significant parameter affecting the emission rate coefficients, thus confirming our predictions. The spectroscopy measurements are compared with those from our spectral modeling which in turn help us to compare the effectiveness of the new atomic data calculations with those from other calculations. We performed a new R -Matrix calculation for Ar 2+ . Emission from Ar 2+ is seen in planetary nebulae, in H II regions, and from laboratory plasmas. Our calculation improved upon existing electron-impact excitation data for the 3p 4 configuration of Ar 2+ and calculated new data for the excited levels. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths were calculated using the R - Matrix intermediate-coupling (IC) frame-transformation method and the R -Matrix Breit-Pauli method. Excitation cross-sections are calculated between all levels of the configurations 3s 2 3p 4 , 3s 3p 5 , 3p 6 , 3p 5 3d, and 3s 2 3p 3 nl (3d <= nl <= 5s). Maxwellian effective collision strengths are generated from the collision strength data. Good agreement is found in the collision strengths calculated using the two R -Matrix methods. The effects of the new data on line ratio diagnostics were studied. The collision strengths are compared with literature values for transitions within the 3s 2 3p 4 configuration. The new data has a small effect on T e values obtained from the I (l7135Å + l7751Å)/ I (l5192Å) line ratio, and a larger effect on the N e values obtained from the I (l7135Å)/ I (l9m m ) line ratio. The final effective collision strength data is archived online. Neon as well as Argon is a species of current interest in fusion TOKAMAK studies. It is used for radiative cooling of the divertor region and for disruption

  20. 33 CFR 83.31 - Seaplanes (Rule 31).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seaplanes (Rule 31). 83.31 Section 83.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES RULES Lights and Shapes § 83.31 Seaplanes (Rule 31). Where it is impracticable for...

  1. 33 CFR 83.31 - Seaplanes (Rule 31).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seaplanes (Rule 31). 83.31 Section 83.31 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES RULES Lights and Shapes § 83.31 Seaplanes (Rule 31). Where it is impracticable for...

  2. Argon isotopes as tracers for martian atmospheric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipski, Marek; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the present-day Ar abundance and isotopic ratios in the martian atmosphere by the SAM instrument suite onboard the Curiosity rover can be used to constrain the atmospheric and volatile evolution. We have examined the role of volcanic outgassing, escape to space via sputtering, crustal erosion, impact delivery, and impact erosion in reproducing the Ar isotope ratios from an initial state 4.4 billion years ago. To investigate the effects of each of these processes, their timing, and their intensity we have modeled exchanges of Ar isotopes between various reservoirs (mantle, crust, atmosphere, etc.) throughout Mars' history. Furthermore, we use present-day atmospheric measurements to determine the parameter space consistent with observations. We find that significant loss to space (at least 48% of atmospheric 36Ar) is required to match the observed 36Ar/38Ar ratio. Our estimates of volcanic outgassing do not supply sufficient 40Ar to the atmosphere to match observations, so in our model at least 31% of 40Ar produced in the crust must have also been released to the atmosphere. Of the total 40Ar introduced into the atmosphere about 25% must have been lost to space. By adding the present-day isotopic abundances with our results of total integrated Ar loss we find a "restored" value of atmospheric 40Ar/36Ar, which represents what that ratio would be if the total integrated Ar loss had remained in the atmosphere. We determine the restored value to be ∼900-1500. This is below the present martian atmospheric value (1900 ± 300), but 3-5 times greater than the terrestrial value.

  3. Argon Mediates Anti-Apoptotic Signaling and Neuroprotection via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai; Roesslein, Martin; Wellner, Franziska; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen; Loop, Torsten; Buerkle, Hartmut; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, the noble gas argon attracted significant attention due to its neuroprotective properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. There is growing evidence that the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is involved in Argon´s protective effect. We hypothesized that argon mediates its protective effects via the upstream located toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4. Methods Apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was induced using rotenone. Argon treatment was performed after induction of apoptosis with different concentrations (25, 50 and 75 Vol% in oxygen 21 Vol%, carbon dioxide and nitrogen) for 2 or 4 hours respectively. Apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry (annexin-V (AV)/propidiumiodide (PI)) staining, caspase-3 activity and caspase cleavage. TLR density on the cells’ surface was analyzed using FACS and immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of TLR signaling and extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were assessed by western blot, activity assays and FACS analysis. Results Argon 75 Vol% treatment abolished rotenone-induced apoptosis. This effect was attenuated dose- and time-dependently. Argon treatment was accompanied with a significant reduction of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor density and protein expression. Moreover, argon mediated increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated after inhibition of TLR signaling. ERK1/2 and TLR signaling inhibitors abolished the anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of argon. Immunohistochemistry results strengthened these findings. Conclusion These findings suggest that argon-mediated anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective effects are mediated via inhibition of TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26624894

  4. The Mysterious Case of the Solar Argon Abundance Near Sunspots in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, George A.; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Recently Doschek et al. (2015, ApJL, 808, L7) reported on an observation of an enhancement of the abundance of Ar XIV relative to Ca XIV of about a factor of 30 near a sunspot during a flare, observed in spectra recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. This enhancement yields an argon/calcium abundance ratio 7 times greater than expected from the photospheric abundances. Such a large abundance anomaly is unprecedented in the solar atmosphere. We interpreted this result as due to an inverse First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect. Argon is a high-FIP element and calcium is a low-FIP element. In the published work two lines of Ar XIV were observed and one line was tentatively identified as an Ar XI line. The number of argon lines was limited by the limitations of the flare study that was executed. In this paper we report observing a similar enhancement in a full-CCD EIS flare spectrum in argon lines with reasonable statistics and lack of blending that lie within the EIS wavelength ranges. The observed lines include two Ar XI lines, four Ar XIII lines, six Ar XIV lines, and one Ar XV line. The enhancement is far less than reported in Doschek et al. (2015) but exhibits similar morphology. The argon abundance is close to a photospheric abundance in the enhanced area, and is only marginally an inverse FIP effect. However, as for the published cases, this newly discovered enhancement occurs in association with a sunspot in a small area only a few arcsec in size and therefore we feel it is produced by the same physics that produced the strong inverse FIP case. There is no enhancement effect observed in the normally high-FIP sulfur and oxygen line ratios relative to lines of low-FIP elements available to EIS. Calculations of path lengths in the strongest enhanced area in Doschek et al. (2015) indicate that the argon/calcium enhancement is due to a depletion of low-FIP elements. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  5. Stimulation of cell division by argon and Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty in cynomolgus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Dueker, D.K.; Norberg, M.; Johnson, D.H.; Tschumper, R.C.; Feeney-Burns, L. )

    1990-01-01

    Although laser treatment of the trabecular meshwork is the most common form of surgery for glaucoma, the tissue response to this therapy is still incompletely understood. We applied argon or Nd:YAG laser to the trabecular meshwork of six monkeys. Cell division was identified by injecting tritiated thymidine into the anterior chamber 24 hr after laser application. Autoradiography of tissue sections revealed significantly more labelled cells in eyes treated with laser than in the untreated controls. In addition, cells in neighboring tissues such as iris, ciliary body and sclera showed labelling in association with laser application. Furthermore, comparison of argon-induced lesions with those caused by pulsed Nd:YAG suggests that there are quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of trabecular meshwork and surrounding tissues to these two forms of laser energy.

  6. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  7. Formation mechanism of graphite hexagonal pyramids by argon plasma etching of graphite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glad, X.; de Poucques, L.; Bougdira, J.

    2015-12-01

    A new graphite crystal morphology has been recently reported, namely the graphite hexagonal pyramids (GHPs). They are hexagonally-shaped crystals with diameters ranging from 50 to 800 nm and a constant apex angle of 40°. These nanostructures are formed from graphite substrates (flexible graphite and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite) in low pressure helicon coupling radiofrequency argon plasma at 25 eV ion energy and, purportedly, due to a physical etching process. In this paper, the occurrence of peculiar crystals is shown, presenting two hexagonal orientations obtained on both types of samples, which confirms such a formation mechanism. Moreover, by applying a pretreatment step with different time durations of inductive coupling radiofrequency argon plasma, for which the incident ion energy decreases at 12 eV, uniform coverage of the surface can be achieved with an influence on the density and size of the GHPs.

  8. Experimental thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat values for mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. A.; Cieszkiewicz, M. T.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity obtained with a transient hot-wire apparatus are reported for three mixtures of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon. Values of the specific heat, Cp, are calculated from these measured values and the density calculated with an equation of state. The measurements were made at temperatures between 65 and 303 K with pressures between 0.1 and 70 MPa. The data cover the vapor, liquid, and supercritical gas phases for the three mixtures. The total reported points are 1066 for the air mixture (78.11 percent nitrogen, 20.97 percent oxygen, and 0.92 percent argon), 1058 for the 50 percent nitrogen, 50 percent oxygen mixture, and 864 for the 25 percent nitrogen, 75 oxygen mixture. Empirical thermal conductivity correlations are provided for the three mixtures.

  9. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of 2-aminopyrimidine-parabenzoquinone in an argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plokhotnichenko, A. M.; Stepanian, S. G.; Karachevtsev, V. A.; Adamowicz, L.

    2006-02-01

    The H-bonded complexes of 2-aminopyrimidine (NH2Py) with parabenzoquinone (Qu) in a low-temperature argon matrix are investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. The IR absorption spectra in the spectral range 400-3600cm-1 are obtained for different concentration ratios of these compounds at a temperature of 11K. The molar integrated absorption coefficients in the bands of the stretching modes of the free and H-bonded NH2 group are determined. Quantum-mechanical calculations of the IR spectra of the NH2Py and Qu molecules and their dimers are carried out. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results permits the conclusion that NH2Py-Qu dimers in an argon matrix have a planar structure with two weak hydrogen bonds, NH ⋯O and CH ⋯N.

  10. Surface modification of fluorosilicone acrylate RGP contact lens via low-temperature argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shiheng; Wang, Yingjun; Ren, Li; Zhao, Lianna; Kuang, Tongchun; Chen, Hao; Qu, Jia

    2008-11-01

    A fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens was modified via argon plasma to improve surface hydrophilicity and resistance to protein deposition. The influence of plasma treatment on surface chemical structure, hydrophilicity and morphology of RGP lens was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The contact angle results showed that the hydrophilicity of the contact lens was improved after plasma treatment. XPS results indicated that the incorporation of oxygen-containing groups on surface and the transformation of silicone into hydrophilic silicate after plasma treatment are the main reasons for the surface hydrophilicity improvement. SEM results showed that argon plasma with higher power could lead to surface etching.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Aggregation and Cluster Formation in Argon Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roser, J. E.; Allamondola, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier-transform mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 micron emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 micron emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  12. Test of an argon cusp plasma for tin LPP power scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-03-01

    Scaling the power of the tin droplet laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source to 500W has eluded the industry after a decade of effort. In 2014 we proposed [2] a solution: placing the laser-plasma interaction region within an argon plasma in a magnetic cusp. This would serve to ionize tin atoms and guide them to a large area annular beam dump. We have since demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. We present first results from a full-scale test plasma at power levels relevant to the generation of at least 200W, showing both that the argon cusp plasma is very stable, and that its geometrical properties are ideal for the transport of exhaust power and tin to the beam dump.

  13. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  14. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  15. Tetraphenyl-butadiene films: VUV-Vis optical characterization from room to liquid argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    A thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor's optical window is the most common solution to down convert argon VUV scintillation light in current and planned liquid argon based experiments for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. Characterization of the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  16. Potassium-argon dating of the cape granite and a granitized xenolith at sea point.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, G D; Basson, H H; Verbeek, A A

    1968-11-01

    Ages obtained by potassium-argon dating are reported for the total rock, light mineral fraction and heavy mineral fractions of the Cape Granite, and of a granitized xenolith derived from the Malmesbury sediments. These ages lie between 430 and 554 million years. The heavy mineral fractions from each rock type show the oldest age, 540 (granite) and 554 (xenolith) million years. These ages are interpreted as lower limits, and the granite age confirms the age of 553 million years found by rubidium-strontium dating. The coincidence of the ages of the different fractions of the granite and xenolith samples is discussed in the light of the different suggestions about the age of the Malmesbury sediments. The conclusion is reached that all pre-granitization history has been eliminated. The possibility of the use of argon retention as a measure of metamorphic activity is suggested. PMID:18960415

  17. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-02-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas.

  18. Chemical potential, Helmholtz free energy and entropy of argon with kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Do, D. D.; Nicholson, D.; Ustinov, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method based on kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine the chemical potential, Helmholtz free energy and entropy of a fluid within the course of a simulation. The procedure requires no recourse to auxiliary methods to determine the chemical potential, such as the implementation of a Widom scheme in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, as it is determined within the course of the simulation. The equation for chemical potential is proved, for the first time in the literature, to have a direct connection with inverse Widom potential theory in using real molecules rather than ghost molecules. We illustrate this new procedure by several examples, including fluid argon and adsorption of argon as a non-uniform fluid on a graphite surface and in slit pores.

  19. Shock tube study of ionization rates of NaCl-contaminated argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, K.-P.; Park, C.

    1975-01-01

    Electron density, electron temperature, and concentration of excited sodium atoms are measured in the weakly ionized regime behind a shock wave in impure argon in a shock tube using microwave techniques and spectrally resolved radiometry. Evidence is presented to show that an apparent increase in the rate of ionization is due to electron detachment of negative chlorine ions produced from sodium chloride vapor contained as an impurity. To be consistent with this chemical model, rate coefficients are found in the temperature range between 5500 and 8600 K for the dissociation of NaCl into an ion pair, dissociation of NaCl into a neutral pair, and electron detachment of a negative chlorine ion. Electron temperature is lower than heavy-particle temperature by roughly 1000 K. The electron-argon impact-ionization rate coefficient is a weak function of electron temperature in contradiction to expectation.

  20. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NAPHTHALENE AGGREGATION AND CLUSTER FORMATION IN ARGON MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J. E.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2010-10-20

    Fourier-transform, mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 {mu}m emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 {mu}m emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  1. Calculations and analysis of cross sections required for argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, David Robert; Lee, Teck; Loch, Stuart D

    2010-01-01

    A large set of calculations has been carried out providing a basis for diagnostics of fusion plasmas through emission resulting from radiative deexcitation following charge transfer between hydrogen and highly charged argon ions, so-called argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. These results have been obtained using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method to treat charge transfer to states with principal quantum numbers up to 30 or more. Nine collision energies between 13.3333 and 250 keV/u pertinent to neutral beam injection have been considered for Arq+ (q=15-18) colliding with atomic hydrogen in both the ground and metastable states. Atomic orbital close coupling calculations have also been undertaken in order to provide a fully quantum mechanical test of the CTMC results for Ar18+ + H(1s) collisions. The results of the calculations are discussed here and the full set of data is made available through a web posting.

  2. Photochemistry of the ozone-water complex in cryogenic neon, argon, and krypton matrixes.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Kawai, Akio; Shibuya, Kazuhiko

    2013-12-12

    The photochemistry of ozone-water complexes and the wavelength dependence of the reactions were studied by matrix isolation FTIR spectrometry in neon, argon, and krypton matrixes. Hydrogen peroxide was formed upon the irradiation of UV light below 355 nm. Quantitative analyses of the reactant and product were performed to evaluate the matrix cage effect of the photoreaction. In argon and krypton matrixes, a bimolecular O((1)D) + H2O → H2O2 reaction was found to occur to form hydrogen peroxide, where the O((1)D) atom generated by the photolysis of ozone diffused in the cryogenic solids to encounter water. In a neon matrix, hydrogen peroxide was generated through intracage photoreaction of the ozone-water complex, indicating that a neon matrix medium is most appropriate to study the photochemistry of the ozone-water complex. PMID:24252115

  3. Some effects of argon and helium upon explosions of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiock, Ernst F; Roeder, Carl H

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study the effects of the inert gases, argon and helium, upon flame speed and expansion ratio in exploding mixtures of carbon monoxide, oxygen and water.For the particular gas mixtures investigated the results show that: (1) With the possible exception of helium in small amounts the addition of inert gas always produces decreased flame speed and expansion ratio; (2) like volumes of argon and helium have very different effects upon flame speed but practically the same effect upon expansion ratio; and (3) the difference in the effect of these two gases upon speed is independent of the ratio of carbon monoxide to oxygen. A discussion of some possible modes by which inert gases may produce the observed effects is included.

  4. Argon thermochronology of mineral deposits; a review of analytical methods, formulations, and selected applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snee, Lawrence W.

    2002-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology is an experimentally robust and versatile method for constraining time and temperature in geologic processes. The argon method is the most broadly applied in mineral-deposit studies. Standard analytical methods and formulations exist, making the fundamentals of the method well defined. A variety of graphical representations exist for evaluating argon data. A broad range of minerals found in mineral deposits, alteration zones, and host rocks commonly is analyzed to provide age, temporal duration, and thermal conditions for mineralization events and processes. All are discussed in this report. The usefulness of and evolution of the applicability of the method are demonstrated in studies of the Panasqueira, Portugal, tin-tungsten deposit; the Cornubian batholith and associated mineral deposits, southwest England; the Red Mountain intrusive system and associated Urad-Henderson molybdenum deposits; and the Eastern Goldfields Province, Western Australia.

  5. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q F; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  6. Observation of Ω mode electron heating in dusty argon radio frequency discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Killer, Carsten; Bandelow, Gunnar; Schneider, Ralf; Melzer, André; Matyash, Konstantin

    2013-08-15

    The time-resolved emission of argon atoms in a dusty plasma has been measured with phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy using an intensified charge-coupled device camera. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a capacitively coupled rf argon discharge with the help of thermophoretic levitation. While electrons are exclusively heated by the expanding sheath (α mode) in the dust-free case, electron heating takes place in the entire plasma bulk when the discharge volume is filled with dust particles. Such a behavior is known as Ω mode, first observed in electronegative plasmas. Furthermore, particle-in-cell simulations have been carried out, which reproduce the trends of the experimental findings. These simulations support previous numerical models showing that the enhanced atomic emission in the plasma can be attributed to a bulk electric field, which is mainly caused by the reduced electrical conductivity due to electron depletion.

  7. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energydistributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-03-23

    The charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmas were measured and analyzed at different oxygen and argon pressures in the range 0.5 8.0 mTorr. A significant reduction of the ion energy was detected as the pressure was increased, most pronounced in an argon environment and for the higher charge states. The corresponding average charge state decreased from 1.87 to 1.0 with increasing pressure. The IEDs of all metal ions in oxygen were fitted with shifted Maxwellian distributions. The results show that it is possible to obtain a plasma composition with a narrow charge-state distribution as well as a narrow IED. These data may enable tailoring thin-film properties through selecting growth conditions that are characterized by predefined charge state and energy distributions.

  8. Effect of argon ion etching on the magnetic properties of FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junwei; Zhou, Kan; Yang, Yi; Tang, Dongming; Zhang, Baoshan; Lu, Mu; Lu, Huaixian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method to modify Ta underlayers by an argon ion etching technology is introduced. Surface roughness of Ta underlayers, as well as soft magnetic properties of post-deposited FeCoB films can be improved by applying a proper ion etching process. The reduction of magnetic coercivity of FeCoB films deposited on the modified Ta underlayers is attributed to the improvement of interfacial roughness, which can reduce magnetic ripples in magnetic films. The microwave damping linewidth of magnetic films is also found to be related to the interfacial roughness. Ta underlayers modified by the ion etching can reduce the influence of two-magnon scattering effect, and thus tune microwave properties of magnetic films. All the results prove that argon ion etching is an effective way to tailor magnetic properties of magnetic films.

  9. Electron kinetics in atmospheric-pressure argon and nitrogen microwave microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Electron kinetics in atmospheric-pressure argon and nitrogen microwave (4 GHz) microdischarges is studied using a self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. The reversal of electric field (i.e., inverted sheath formation) is obtained in nitrogen and is not obtained in argon. This is explained by the different energy dependencies of electron-neutral collision cross sections in atomic and molecular gases and, as a consequence, different drag force acting on electrons. A non-local behavior of electron energy distribution function is obtained in both gases owing to electrons are generated in the plasma sheath. In both gases, electron energy relaxation length is comparable with the interelectrode gap, and therefore, they penetrate the plasma bulk with large energies.

  10. Low-pressure argon adsorption assessment of micropore connectivities in activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Villieras, F; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2006-01-01

    Low-pressure argon adsorption has been used to study the energetic distribution of microporous activated carbons differing by their burn-off. The collected isotherms were analyzed using the derivative isotherm summation method. Some oscillations on the experimental curves for very low partial pressures were detected. The results are analyzed and discussed according to the literature and could be attributed to local overheating caused by spontaneous mass transfer of argon through constrictions between former pores and the new opening pore or deadend pores. We used the dynamic character of the experimental method and mainly the discrepancy of the quasi-equilibrium state to deduce key parameters related to the porosity topology. PMID:16112680

  11. Effects of argon gas pressure on its metastable-state density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of argon gas pressure on its metastable density in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by using the laser-induced fluorescence method. Our results show that the metastable-state density of argon varies with the gas pressure depending on the measurement position; the density decreases with the pressure at a position far from the ICP antenna, whereas it increases with the pressure at a position near the antenna. This contrast in the metastable-state density trend with the pressure is explained by considering the electron temperature variations at the two measurement positions. The theoretical interpretation and calculation using a global model are also addressed in detail in this paper.

  12. Drift Time Measurement in the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter using Cosmic Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barros, N.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bastos, J.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernadez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de La Taille, C.; de Mora, L.; de Oliveira Branco, M.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Deberg, H.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Dennis, C.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, D. J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duperrin, A.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Eerola, P.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. 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K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. N.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; P Ottersbach, J.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S. I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ionization signals in the liquid argon of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter are studied in detail using cosmic muons. In particular, the drift time of the ionization electrons is measured and used to assess the intrinsic uniformity of the calorimeter gaps and estimate its impact on the constant term of the energy resolution. The drift times of electrons in the cells of the second layer of the calorimeter are uniform at the level of 1.3% in the barrel and 2.8% in the endcaps. This leads to an estimated contribution to the constant term of (0.29^{+0.05}_{-0.04})% in the barrel and (0.54^{+0.06}_{-0.04})% in the endcaps. The same data are used to measure the drift velocity of ionization electrons in liquid argon, which is found to be 4.61±0.07 mm/μs at 88.5 K and 1 kV/mm.

  13. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber research and development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Buchanan, N.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Gehman, V.; Greenlee, H.; Guardincerri, E.; Jones, B.; Junk, T.; Katori, T.; Kirby, M.; Lang, K.; Loer, B.; Marchionni, A.; Maruyama, T.; Mauger, C.; Menegolli, A.; Montanari, D.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sanders, R.; Soderberg, M.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.; Tope, T.; Touramanis, C.; Thorn, C.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Yu, B.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-05-01

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in seven topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity, ii) Cryogenics, iii) TPC and High Voltage, iv) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, v) Scintillation Light Detection, vi) Calibration and Test Beams, and vii) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  14. The Radiation Loss of a Cylindrical Methane-Argon Plasma Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liani, B.; Benallal, R.; Lemerini, M.

    2010-04-01

    Calculation of the net radiation emitted by a CH4-Ar mixture, in a temperature range of 5,000~30,000 K with the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), is conducted. Continuum and line emissions are taken into account. The radiative transfer of each line is calculated by means of an escape factor depending on the shape and broadening of the line. Assuming a cylindrical, homogeneous, and isothermal plasma, the net emission coefficient is calculated for different pressures between 1 atm and 10 atm and arc radia of 0 mm to 1 mm. Results show that the argon presence in the CH4-Ar mixture has a significant effect on the total radiation emitted for the temperature above 17,000 K and the results for pure argon agree with those of BAUDER and EVANS.

  15. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ɛT from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ɛT from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ɛT.

  16. Parametric scaling of neutral and ion excited state densities in an argon helicon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarren, D.; Scime, E.

    2016-04-01

    We report measurements of the absolute density and temperature of ion and neutral excited states in an argon helicon source. The excited ion state density, which depends on ion density, electron density, and electron temperature, increases sharply with increasing magnetic field in the source. The neutral argon metastable density measurements are consistent with an increasing ionization fraction with increasing magnetic field strength. The ion temperature shows no evidence of increased heating with increasing magnetic field strength (which has only been observed in helicon sources operating at driving frequencies close to the lower hybrid frequency). The measurements were obtained through cavity ring down spectroscopy, a measurement technique that does not require the target excited state to be metastable or part of a fluorescence scheme; and is therefore applicable to any laser accessible atomic or ionic transition in a plasma.

  17. Reduction of a collisional-radiative mechanism for argon plasma based on principal component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemans, A.; Munafò, A.; Magin, T. E.; Degrez, G.; Parente, A.

    2015-06-15

    This article considers the development of reduced chemistry models for argon plasmas using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based methods. Starting from an electronic specific Collisional-Radiative model, a reduction of the variable set (i.e., mass fractions and temperatures) is proposed by projecting the full set on a reduced basis made up of its principal components. Thus, the flow governing equations are only solved for the principal components. The proposed approach originates from the combustion community, where Manifold Generated Principal Component Analysis (MG-PCA) has been developed as a successful reduction technique. Applications consider ionizing shock waves in argon. The results obtained show that the use of the MG-PCA technique enables for a substantial reduction of the computational time.

  18. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M.; Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  19. Effect of 200 keV argon ion implantation on refractive index of polyethylene terepthlate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Chawla, Mahak; Rubi, Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Kumar, Praveen; Kanjilal, D.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, the effect of argon ion implantation has been studied on the refractive index of PET. The specimens were implanted at 200 keV with argon ions in the fluence range of 1×1015 to 1×1017 ions cm-2. The refractive indices have been found to increase with implantation dose and wavelength (in visible region) obtained by using UV-visible spectroscopy. Also a drastic decrease in optical band gap (from 3.63 eV to 1.48eV) and increase in Urbach energy (from 0.29 eV to 3.70 eV) with increase in implantation dose has been observed. The possible correlation between the changes observed in the refractive indices and the Urbachenergyhave been discussed.

  20. Mantle-derived argon components in phlogopite from southern African kimberlites

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Application of the /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar dating technique to kimberlite geochronology often yields discordant spectra with ages that are much older than the inferred time of emplacement of the kimberlite body. In the past, these anomalously high ages have been attributed to the presence of excess radiogenic /sup 49/Ar incorporated into the mineral phases either pre- or syn- emplacement of the kimberlite. Detailed /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar stepheating analyses on phlogopite xenocrysts from Southern African kimberlites revealed the presence of excess argon. Discrimination between different reservoirs of argon, contained in the phlogopite, was best achieved using plots of /sup 36/Ar//sup 40/Ar versus /sup 39/Ar//sup 40/Ar. High /sup 36/Ar//sup 40/Ar ratios for the low temperature steps are interpreted as resulting from atmospheric contamination (/sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar = 295.5). At the highest temperature steps (1100/sup 0/-1200/sup 0/C), the /sup 36/Ar//sup 40/Ar ratios increase dramatically. Least squares fits of the high temperature components yield /sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar initial ratios ranging from 340 to 366. These values correspond closely to those obtained by Allegre et al. (1983) for Hawaiian basalts. This suggest that either the xenocrystic phlogopites within the kimberlites or the vapor phase within which they crystallized were derived from an undegassed mantle source. The release of this mantle reservoir at high temperatures requires a high retentivity site for the argon within the phlogopite structure. As phlogopite appears to retain its structural water to high temperatures, the argon may be trapped within the hydroxyl sites of the mica.

  1. Modelling of an inductively coupled plasma torch with argon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahouh, Hanene; Rebiai, Saida; Rochette, David; Vacher, Damien; Dudeck, Michel

    2014-05-01

    A fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the electromagnetic field, fluid flow and heat transfer in an inductively coupled plasma torch working at atmospheric pressure for argon plasma. The numerical simulation is carried out by using the finite element method based on COMSOL software. The two-dimensional profiles of the electric field, temperature, velocity and charged particle densities are demonstrated inside the discharge region. These numerical results are obtained for a fixed flow rate, frequency and electric power.

  2. A measurement of E/{pi} for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S.; Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J.; Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T.; Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Bowen, T.; Forden, G.; Jenkins, E.; Johns, K.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M.; Burnett, T.; Cook, V.; Davisson, R.; Mockett, P.; Rothberg, J.; Williams, R.W.; Cremaldi, L.; Reidy, J.; Summers, D.; DiGiacomo, N.; Draper, P.; Ferbel, T.; Lobkowicz, F.; Faust, J.; Hauptman, J.; Pang, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Hagopian, V.; Womersley, J.; Handler, T.; Hitlin, D.; Mulholland, G.T.; Watanabe, Y.; Weerts, H.

    1990-12-31

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  3. A simple velocity-tunable pulsed atomic source of slow metastable argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Aljunid, S. A.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Perales, F.; Tualle, J. M.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.; Dutier, G.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed beam of metastable argon atoms having a low tunable velocity (10 to 150 m s-1) is produced with a very substantial brightness (9  ×  108Ar* s-1 sr-1). The present original experimental configuration leads to a variable velocity dispersion that can be smaller than the standard Brownian one. This behaviour, analysed using Monte Carlo simulations, exhibits momentum stretching (heating) or narrowing (cooling) entirely due to a subtle combination of Doppler and Zeeman effects.

  4. ArgoNeuT: A Physics-Minded Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitz, Joshua

    2009-05-01

    ArgoNeuT is a 170 liter Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector set in the on-axis NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The experiment's research/design goals and physics possibilities, including a charged current quasi-elastic cross section and MA parameter measurement, are reviewed. Also, the results of the above-ground cosmic ray commissioning run with accompanying event displays and reconstructed muon tracks and the current status of the experiment are shown.

  5. Argon Plasma Coagulation for Extraction of an Impacted Trapezoid Basket in the Pancreatic Duct

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Treta; Garg, Mrinal; Kulkarni, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    We performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphincterotomy for pancreatic stent placement on a 55-year-old woman with a dilated pancreatic duct, pancreatic duct stone, and chronic pancreatitis. During follow-up ERCP, the lithotripter traction wire fractured during electrohydraulic lithotripsy and mechanical lithotripsy. Multiple attempts using standard techniques to clear the lithotripter and stone failed. Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was used to ablate 2 of the lithotripter wires, and the lithotripter was disengaged from the stone and removed. PMID:26157943

  6. Argon used as dry suit insulation gas for cold-water diving

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cold-water diving requires good thermal insulation because hypothermia is a serious risk. Water conducts heat more efficiently compared to air. To stay warm during a dive, the choice of thermal protection should be based on physical activity, the temperature of the water, and the duration of exposure. A dry suit, a diving suit filled with gas, is the most common diving suit in cold water. Air is the traditional dry suit inflation gas, whereas the thermal conductivity of argon is approximately 32% lower compared to that of air. This study evaluates the benefits of argon, compared to air, as a thermal insulation gas for a dry suit during a 1-h cold-water dive by divers of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Methods Seven male Special Forces divers made (in total) 19 dives in a diving basin with water at 13°C at a depth of 3 m for 1 h in upright position. A rubber dry suit and woollen undergarment were used with either argon (n = 13) or air (n = 6) (blinded to the divers) as suit inflation gas. Core temperature was measured with a radio pill during the dive. Before, halfway, and after the dive, subjective thermal comfort was recorded using a thermal comfort score. Results No diver had to abort the test due to cold. No differences in core temperature and thermal comfort score were found between the two groups. Core temperature remained unchanged during the dives. Thermal comfort score showed a significant decrease in both groups after a 60-min dive compared to baseline. Conclusions In these tests the combination of the dry suit and undergarment was sufficient to maintain core temperature and thermal comfort for a dive of 1 h in water at 13°C. The use of argon as a suit inflation gas had no added value for thermal insulation compared to air for these dives. PMID:24438580

  7. Peculiarities of formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbanismailov, V. S. Omarov, O. A.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Bairkhanova, M. G.; Kattaa, A. J.

    2011-12-15

    The experimental results on the formation and development of initial stages of an impulse breakdown in atmospheric-pressure argon at townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms for different initial conditions are presented. A streamer channel is shown to be initiated by bright luminescence formed at the point of critical avalanche amplification at different distances from the cathode depending on overvoltage. Prebreakdown currents are experimentally measured for the townsend and streamer breakdown mechanisms and peculiarities of spark channel formation for these mechanisms are studied.

  8. Other uses of the program ‘ARGON.f90’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Pedlow, R. T.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this communication is to show that the program 'ARGON.f90' can be simply extended to model ionization from the excited states of atoms where the active electron has a principal quantum number less than or equal to 3. This fact is illustrated by considering a relatively simple collision involving a proton and a neutral hydrogen atom with principal quantum number n=2.

  9. Examination of scattering volume aligment in Thomson scattering off of a shock front in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Reighard, A B; Froula, D H; Drake, R P; Ross, J S; Divol, L

    2007-07-26

    Thomson scattering in argon gas successfully probed the region of plasma just behind the shock front. The instantaneous shock velocity can be inferred from the duration of the signal, taking into account the size and shape of the scattering volume. Possible misalignment of the probe beam and spectrometer slits greatly affects the size and shape of the scattering volume, and therefore affects the calculation of the instantaneous shock velocity.

  10. Spectral dependence of purely-Kerr-driven filamentation in air and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettoumi, W.; Béjot, P.; Petit, Y.; Loriot, V.; Hertz, E.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.

    2010-09-01

    Based on numerical simulations, we show that higher-order nonlinear indices (up to n8 and n10, respectively) of air and argon have a dominant contribution to both focusing and defocusing in the self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over most of the spectrum. Plasma generation and filamentation are therefore decoupled. As a consequence, ultraviolet wavelength may not be the optimal wavelength for applications requiring to maximize ionization.

  11. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  12. Initial results from the operation of two argon ion generators in the auroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlandson, R. E.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Pollock, C. J.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Scales, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    Two argon ion generators have been lofted by sounding rockets in order to investigate ion beam dynamics and beam effects on the ionosphere, and auroral electrodynamics during rocket passage over auroral arcs. The ion generators were on a subpayload that was separated from the main payload early in the flight. The main payload conducted the diagnostic measurements during ion beam operations. Evidence of heating of the ionosphere around the subpayload during each ion beam emission is noted.

  13. Potassium-argon and lead-alpha ages of plutonic rocks, Bokan Mountain area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; MacKevett, E.M., Jr.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America.

  14. Spectral dependence of purely-Kerr-driven filamentation in air and argon

    SciTech Connect

    Ettoumi, W.; Petit, Y.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Bejot, P.; Hertz, E.; Faucher, O.; Lavorel, B.; Loriot, V.

    2010-09-15

    Based on numerical simulations, we show that higher-order nonlinear indices (up to n{sub 8} and n{sub 10}, respectively) of air and argon have a dominant contribution to both focusing and defocusing in the self-guiding of ultrashort laser pulses over most of the spectrum. Plasma generation and filamentation are therefore decoupled. As a consequence, ultraviolet wavelength may not be the optimal wavelength for applications requiring to maximize ionization.

  15. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Merlemis, N.; Giannetas, V.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  16. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvani, S.; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H.; Montazerolghaem, M.; Mollabashi, M.; Naeimi, S. A.; Esmaeilpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO2 laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO2 laser with optimised composition of the CO2:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system.

  17. The variation of hydrophobicity of aluminum alloy by nitrogen and argon ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Sang Cheol; Kim, Ki Wook; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen and argon ions were irradiated on the surface of aluminum alloy. Ion irradiation appeared to increase contact angle of the metallic specimens. In order to investigate the factors affecting the changes of contact angles, changes in the characteristics of the surfaces were examined using SEM, AFM, and X-ray diffraction. The contact angle increased due to surface composition changes and surface roughness changes.

  18. Potassium-Argon and Lead-Alpha Ages of Plutonic Rocks, Bokan Mountain Area, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, M A; Mackevett, E M; Stern, T W

    1964-08-14

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America. PMID:17754670

  19. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  20. Comparisons of cross-section predictions for relativistic iron and argon beams with semiempirical fragmentation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Khan, Ferdous

    1993-01-01

    Cross-section predictions with semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation models from the Langley Research Center and the Naval Research Laboratory are compared with experimental data for the breakup of relativistic iron and argon projectile nuclei in various targets. Both these models are commonly used to provide fragmentation cross-section inputs into galactic cosmic ray transport codes for shielding and exposure analyses. Overall, the Langley model appears to yield better agreement with the experimental data.

  1. A measurement of E/. pi. for a fast lead liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Gordon, H.A.; Ma, H.; Murtagh, M.; Radeka, V.; Rahm, D.; Rescia, S. ); Abrams, G.S.; Groom, D.E.; Kirsten, F.; Levi, M.; Siegrist, J. ); Amako, K.; Inaba, O.; Kondo, T. ); Baden, A.R.; Fong, D.; Hadley, N.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A. (Maryland U

    1990-01-01

    The NA34 (HELIOS) calorimeter has measured e/{pi} {congruent} 1.1 in a uranium/liquid argon calorimeter with a shaping time of 135 nsec. Lead may be a viable alternative, but e/{pi} must first be measured at fast shaping times in lead. We re preparing to measure e/{pi} at momenta ranging from 0.5 to 20 GeV/c and with shaping times of 50, 100 and 150 nsec.

  2. Rubidium-strontium and potassium-argon age of lunar sample 15555.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. R.; Evensen, N. M.; Jahn, B. M.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar mare basalt 15555 from the edge of Hadley Rille has been dated at 3.3 b.y. by both rubidium-strontium and potassium-argon techniques. Age and trace element abundances closely resemble those of the Apollo 12 mare basalts. Data from lunar basalts obtained thus far indicate that they cannot be derived by simple fractionation from a homogeneous source.

  3. Differential cross sections for ionization of helium, neon, and argon by fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Manson, S.T.

    1984-05-01

    Ionization cross sections, differential in the energy of secondary electrons, are presented for high-energy electrons incident on helium, neon, and argon. The results are based on Bethe's theory for inelastic scattering of fast charged particles using photoabsorption data and proton-impact differential ionization cross sections to determine the coefficients of this asymptotic expansion of the first Born approximation. The model cross sections are compared with experimental data for primary-electron energies between 100 and 5000 eV.

  4. Argon plasma coagulation therapy for a hemorrhagic radiation-induced gastritis in patient with pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Kazutaka; Kume, Keiichiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Otsuki, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastritis is a serious complication of radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer which is difficult to manage. A 79-year-old man had been diagnosed as having inoperable pancreatic cancer (stage IVa). We encountered this patient with hemorrhagic gastritis induced by external radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer that was well-treated using argon plasma coagulation (APC). After endoscopic treatment using APC, anemia associated with hemorrhagic radiation gastritis improved and required no further blood transfusion. PMID:17603236

  5. The Development of a 2000L Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and its Application to the Search for Proton Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming

    A new type of particle detector, the liquid argon time projection chamber, is developed and systematically tested using cosmic ray muons with a three ton prototype. The main technical problems, such as the liquid argon purity, wire chamber configuration, low noise electronics, and their long term stability, are solved after two years of run. Most of the basic parameters associated with the liquid argon TPC technology, the charge drift velocity, the spatial resolution, charge recombination and diffusion, are extracted. In order to apply this technique to solar neutrino physics, a measurement of the intrinsive radioactive Ar^{42} was performed and the results are compatible with current limits. An application to the search for proton decay with the liquid argon TPC technique is studied and some preliminary results are reported.

  6. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  7. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  8. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Christopher M.

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  9. A Supersonic Argon/Air Coaxial Jet Experiment for Computational Fluid Dynamics Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, Chandler W.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    A non-reacting experiment is described in which data has been acquired for the validation of CFD codes used to design high-speed air-breathing engines. A coaxial jet-nozzle has been designed to produce pressure-matched exit flows of Mach 1.8 at 1 atm in both a center jet of argon and a coflow jet of air, creating a supersonic, incompressible mixing layer. The flowfield was surveyed using total temperature, gas composition, and Pitot probes. The data set was compared to CFD code predictions made using Vulcan, a structured grid Navier-Stokes code, as well as to data from a previous experiment in which a He-O2 mixture was used instead of argon in the center jet of the same coaxial jet assembly. Comparison of experimental data from the argon flowfield and its computational prediction shows that the CFD produces an accurate solution for most of the measured flowfield. However, the CFD prediction deviates from the experimental data in the region downstream of x/D = 4, underpredicting the mixing-layer growth rate.

  10. Spectral absorption coefficients of argon and silicon and spectral reflectivity of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krascella, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to estimate the spectral properties of argon as a function of pressure, temperature, and wave number. The spectral characteristics of the argon buffer gas exert a strong influence on radiative energy transfer in the in-reactor test configuration of the nuclear light bulb engine. An existing computer program was modified and used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficients of argon at total pressures of 50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 atm in the temperature interval between 1000 and 30,000 K. At each pressure and temperature, spectral properties were calculated for forty-seven wave numbers in the interval between 1000 and 1,000,000 cm/1. Estimates of the spectral absorption coefficients of silicon were made as part of an evaluation of silicon vapor as a possible buffer-gas seeding agent for the reference nuclear light bulb engine. Existing cross-section data were used to calculate the spectral characteristics of silicon at twenty-four temperatures in the interval between 2000 and 10,000 K.

  11. DarkSide-50: A WIMP Search with a Two-phase Argon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, P. D.; Agnes, P.; Alton, D.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Crippa, L.; DAngelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Humble, P.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Joliet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P. D.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Nelson, A.; Okounkova, M.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Papp, L.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Perfetto, F.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvarov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A.; Westerdale, R.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    DarkSide-50 is a two phase argon TPC for direct dark matter detection which is installed at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory, Italy. DarkSide-50 has a 50-kg active volume and will make use of underground argon low in 39Ar. The TPC is installed inside an active neutron veto made with boron-loaded high radiopurity liquid scintillator. The neutron veto is installed inside a 1000 m3 water Cherenkov muon veto. The DarkSide-50 TPC and cryostat are assembled in two radon-free clean rooms to reduce radioactive contaminants. The overall design aims for a background free exposure after selection cuts are applied. The expected sensitivity for WIMP-nucleon cross section is of the order of 10-45 cm2 for WIMP masses around 100 GeV/c2. The commissioning and performance of the detector are described. Details of the low-radioactivity underground argon and other unique features of the projects are reported.

  12. Reference free, high-precision measurements of transition energies in few electron argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Csilla I.; Amaro, Pedro; Guerra, Mauro; Schlesser, Sophie; Gumberidze, Alexander; Santos, José Paulo; Indelicato, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The use of a vacuum double crystal spectrometer, coupled to an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS), allows to measure low-energy x-ray transitions energies in highly-charged ions with accuracies of the order of a few parts per million. We have used this installation to measure the 1s2p 1 P1 → 1s2 1 S0 diagram line and the 1s2s 3 S1 → 1s2 1 S0 forbidden M1 transition energies in helium-like argon, the 1s2s2p 2 Pj → 1s2 2s 2 S1/2 transitions in lithium-like argon and the 1s2s2 2p 1 P1 → 1s2 2s2 1 S0 transition in beryllium-like argon. These transition measurements have accuracies between 2 and 4 ppm depending on the line intensity. Thanks to the excellent agreement between the simulations and the measurements, we were also able to measure the transition width of all the allowed transitions. The results are compared to recent QED and relativistic many-body calculations.

  13. Investigation of argon ion sputtering on the secondary electron emission from gold samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Cui, Wanzhao; Li, Yun; Xie, Guibai; Zhang, Na; Wang, Rui; Hu, Tiancun; Zhang, Hongtai

    2016-09-01

    Secondary electron (SE) yield, δ, is a very sensitive surface property. The values of δ often are not consistent for even identical materials. The influence of surface changes on the SE yield was investigated experimentally in this article. Argon ion sputtering was used to remove the contamination from the surface. Surface composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface topography was scanned by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) before and after every sputtering. It was found that argon sputtering can remove contamination and roughen the surface. An "equivalent work function" is presented in this thesis to establish the relationship between SE yield and surface properties. Argon ion sputtering of 1.5keV leads to a significant increase of so called "work function" (from 3.7 eV to 6.0 eV), and a decrease of SE yield (from 2.01 to 1.54). These results provided a new insight into the influence of surface changes on the SE emission.

  14. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-19

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron--ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  15. Effects of argon laser radiation on aortic endothelial cells: Early membrane changes and proliferative response

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschi, D.; Graham, D.; Alexander, J.J.; Koehler, K. )

    1989-06-01

    Membrane fluidity, transmembrane signaling responses, and proliferative characteristics of endothelial cells were studied to characterize biochemical and molecular changes after treatment with argon laser energy. Bovine aortic endothelial cells grown in monolayers were irradiated at 50, 100, and 200 J with an argon laser (wavelength, 488 and 514 nm). Proliferation, assayed by ({sup }3H)thymidine incorporation, was measured daily for 6 days. An initial lag phase was observed for irradiated cells when compared to nonirradiated controls (P less than 0.03), with eventual recovery by the third day. Membrane fluidity, determined by fluorescence anisotropy, was measured 1 hr after irradiation. A decrease in static rotational motion of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was noted in irradiated versus nonirradiated cells indicating a decrease in membrane fluidity (P less than 0.02). Dynamic studies of intracellular calcium and pH flux utilizing fluorescent probes demonstrated a preserved response to mitogenic stimulation. An increase in intracellular Ca2+ with a concomitant alkalinization of the intracellular milieu was observed in irradiated and non-irradiated cells in response to stimulation with endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF). These responses resemble those characterized for other mitogens. Argon laser energy applied to aortic endothelial cells decreases membrane fluidity early after irradiation. These alterations probably cause the initial lag observed in their proliferative response; however, the capacity to respond to exogenous mitogenic stimulation is maintained.

  16. Influence of oxygen in atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet on sterilization of Bacillus atrophaeous spores

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jin-Pyo; Uhm, Han S.; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2007-09-15

    A nonequilibrium Ar/O{sub 2} plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure was carried out in a coaxial cylindrical reactor with a stepped electrode configuration powered by a 13.56 MHz rf power supplier. The argon glow discharge with high electron density produces oxygen reactive species in large quantities. Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. The decimal reduction time (D values) of the Ar/O{sub 2} plasma jet at an exposure distance of 0.5-1.5 cm ranges from 5 to 57 s. An actinometric comparison of the sterilization data shows that atomic oxygen radicals play a significant role in plasma sterilization. When observed under a scanning electron microscope, the average size of the spores appears to be greatly reduced due to chemical reactions with the oxygen radicals.

  17. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HyŻorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods—the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm.

  18. Impact of an atmospheric argon plasma jet on a dielectric surface and desorption of organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damany, Xavier; Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Bauville, Gérard; Bournonville, Blandine; Fleury, Michel; Jeanney, Pascal; Santos Sousa, João

    2016-08-01

    The propagation of a DC-pulsed argon plasma jet through the surrounding ambient air, and its interaction with an ungrounded glass plate placed on the jet trajectory, was studied by means of fast imaging. The surface plays an important role in the spatio-temporal characteristics of the plasma. Indeed, for an argon jet propagating perpendicularly to the surface, the plasma jet structure changes from filamentary to diffuse when the distance between the nozzle of the capillary tube and the surface is short (≤10 mm). Changing the angle between the capillary tube and the glass plate, and varying the gas flow rate strongly affects the spatial extension of the plasma that develops on the surface. This surface plasma propagates while the plasma in the argon jet is maintained with the same luminous intensity. Finally, this plasma jet shows interesting characteristics for desorption of low volatile organic molecules such as bibenzyl. A maximum removal of bibenzyl is located at the intersection area between the jet axis and the glass surface, and some of the initially deposited molecules are found intact in gas phase. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  19. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  20. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Detection of argon in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Balsiger, Hans; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, Andre; Bochsler, Peter; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Eberhardt, Peter; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen A; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas I; Hansen, Kenneth C; Hässig, Myrtha; Jäckel, Annette; Kopp, Ernest; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olivier; Owen, Tobias; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Waite, J Hunter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Comets have been considered to be representative of icy planetesimals that may have contributed a significant fraction of the volatile inventory of the terrestrial planets. For example, comets must have brought some water to Earth. However, the magnitude of their contribution is still debated. We report the detection of argon and its relation to the water abundance in the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by in situ measurement of the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) mass spectrometer aboard the Rosetta spacecraft. Despite the very low intensity of the signal, argon is clearly identified by the exact determination of the mass of the isotope (36)Ar and by the (36)Ar/(38)Ar ratio. Because of time variability and spatial heterogeneity of the coma, only a range of the relative abundance of argon to water can be given. Nevertheless, this range confirms that comets of the type 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko cannot be the major source of Earth's major volatiles. PMID:26601264

  2. Waves generated in the vicinity of an argon plasma gun in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lysak, R. L.; Peria, W.; Lynch, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    Wave and particle observations were made in the close vicinity of an argon plasma gun carned to over 600 km altitude on a sounding rocket. The gun was carned on a subpayload, separated from the main payload early in the flight. Twelve-second argon ion ejections were energized alternately with a peak energy of 100 or 200 eV. They produced waves, with multiple harmonics, in the range of ion cyclotron waves, 10 to 1000 Hz at rocket altitudes. Many of these waves could not be identified as corresponding to the cyclotron frequencies of any of the ions, argon or ambient, known to be present. In addition, the wave frequencies were observed to rise and fall and to change abruptly during a 12-s gun operation. The wave amplitudes, near a few hundred Hertz, were of the order of O. 1 V/m. Some of the waves may be ion-ion hybrid waves. Changes in ion populations were observed at the main payload and at the subpayload during gun operations. A gun-related, field-aligned, electron population also appeared.

  3. Development of a Photon Detection System in Liquid Argon for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Denver; Adams, Brice; Baptista, Brian; Baugh, Brian; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Smith, Paul; Urheim, Jon

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the LBNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. The team at Indiana University is exploring a design based on acrylic waveguides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, combined with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. Large-scale tests of this design are being conducted at the ``TallBo'' liquid argon dewar facility at Fermilab, where performance studies with cosmic ray events are helping steer decisions for the final detector design. We present an overview of the design and function of this photon detection system and the latest results from the analysis of data collected during these tests. Photon Detector R&D Team at Indiana University.

  4. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods-the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm. PMID:27208958

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of the damage production in Al (110) surface with slow argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkealahti, S.; Nieminen, R. M.

    We have developed a molecular dynamics simulation program to gain more insight into the sputtering process, especially the damage produced by it. We have studied the sputtering of aluminium (110) surface with argon ions. The Morse pair potentail was used for Al-Al interaction, the Lennard-Jones potential for Ar-Ar interaction and both the Molière potential and the universal potential of Ziegler et al. for Ar-Al interaction. An electronic friction term proportional to the particle velocities was also used. The studied incident argon ion energies and angles were 200 and 400 eV and 0° (normal), 25°, 45° and 75°, respectively. The calculated sputtering yield and the overall shape and the mean depth of the vacancy profiles agree with the experimental results. The obtained profiles contain a narrow peak within the topmost atomic layers, followed by a weak tail deeper in the material. The intersitial and argon ion distributions are much more spread out at larger depths. The total number of vacancies per incident Ar + ion varies from 0 to 7, increasing as function of Ar + ion energy.

  6. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-01

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron—ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  7. Effects of argon, dye, and Nd:YAG lasers on epidermis, dermis, and venous vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Landthaler, M.; Haina, D.; Brunner, R.; Waidelich, W.; Braun-Falco, O.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the present study, which was performed at the dorsal aspects of the ears of guinea pigs, was to compare effects of different lasers on epidermis, dermis, and small venous vessels. Irradiations were performed with argon, dye, and Nd:YAG lasers. In the first series tissue repair processes were studied after argon laser application. Laser defects were excised after 1, 4, 8, and 14 days and were prepared for routine histological examination. The breadth of epidermal defect and extent of dermal coagulation and occlusion of vessels by thrombus formation were examined histologically. In a second series parameters of irradiation (ie, exposure time, laser power) of the three different lasers were changed systematically. Laser-induced morphological tissue changes could be best observed 24 hours after irradiation. Each of the lasers led to occlusion of vessels by thrombus formation and also coagulated epidermis and dermis. The extent of dermal and epidermal coagulation was less pronounced after dye laser application. Using short exposure times it was possible to reduce the extent of epidermal damage caused by argon and Nd:YAG lasers. Only 50-msec dye laser pulses led to intravascular thrombus formation without epidermal and dermal damage.

  8. Detection of argon in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    PubMed Central

    Balsiger, Hans; Altwegg, Kathrin; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, Andre; Bochsler, Peter; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Combi, Michael; De Keyser, Johan; Eberhardt, Peter; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Hässig, Myrtha; Jäckel, Annette; Kopp, Ernest; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olivier; Owen, Tobias; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Waite, J. Hunter; Wurz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Comets have been considered to be representative of icy planetesimals that may have contributed a significant fraction of the volatile inventory of the terrestrial planets. For example, comets must have brought some water to Earth. However, the magnitude of their contribution is still debated. We report the detection of argon and its relation to the water abundance in the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by in situ measurement of the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) mass spectrometer aboard the Rosetta spacecraft. Despite the very low intensity of the signal, argon is clearly identified by the exact determination of the mass of the isotope 36Ar and by the 36Ar/38Ar ratio. Because of time variability and spatial heterogeneity of the coma, only a range of the relative abundance of argon to water can be given. Nevertheless, this range confirms that comets of the type 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko cannot be the major source of Earth’s major volatiles. PMID:26601264

  9. The capabilities of ROSINA/DFMS to measure argon isotopes at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hässig, M.; Altwegg, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Calmonte, U.; De Keyser, J.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Le Roy, L.; Owen, T.; Rubin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the noble gas abundances in comets. These highly volatile atoms are possible tracers of the history of cometary matter including the thermal evolution. They can help quantify the contribution of cometary impacts to terrestrial oceans and help elucidate on the formation history of comets and their role in the formation and evolution of planetary atmospheres. This paper focuses on argon and the capabilities to measure this noble gas with in situ mass spectrometry at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency's spacecraft Rosetta. Argon may have been detected by remote sensing in a single Oort cloud comet but to date nothing is known about the isotopic abundances of argon in comets. Furthermore, no detection of argon in a Jupiter-family comet has been reported. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko belongs to the group of Jupiter-family comets and originates most likely in the Kuiper belt. Onboard Rosetta is ROSINA/DFMS (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis/Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer). DFMS has unprecedented mass resolution and high sensitivity and is designed to measure isotopic ratios including argon (Balsiger et al., 2007). Argon measurements using the DFMS lab model (identical to the flight model) demonstrate this capability. At very least, this mass spectrometer has the resolution and sensitivity to reduce the upper limit on the argon outgassing rate relative to water by more than three orders of magnitude (for 38Ar). Most likely, ROSINA/DFMS will provide the first detection of argon in a Jupiter-family comet together with the first determination of the 36Ar/38Ar ratio at a comet.

  10. 31 CFR 31.212 - Personal conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Personal conflicts of interest. 31.212 Section 31.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.212 Personal conflicts of interest. (a) Retained...

  11. 31 CFR 31.212 - Personal conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal conflicts of interest. 31.212 Section 31.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.212 Personal conflicts of interest. (a) Retained...

  12. 31 CFR 31.212 - Personal conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Personal conflicts of interest. 31.212 Section 31.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.212 Personal conflicts of interest. (a) Retained...

  13. 31 CFR 31.212 - Personal conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Personal conflicts of interest. 31.212 Section 31.212 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.212 Personal conflicts of interest. (a) Retained...

  14. 31 CFR 10.31 - Negotiation of taxpayer checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Negotiation of taxpayer checks. 10.31 Section 10.31 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.31 Negotiation of taxpayer checks. A practitioner who prepares tax returns may not endorse...

  15. 31 CFR 31.211 - Organizational conflicts of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organizational conflicts of interest. 31.211 Section 31.211 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.211 Organizational conflicts of interest. (a) Retained entity's responsibility. A retained...

  16. 31 CFR 31.215 - Grant of waivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grant of waivers. 31.215 Section 31.215 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.215 Grant of waivers. The TARP Chief Compliance Officer may waive a...

  17. 31 CFR 363.31-363.32 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 363.31-363.32 Section 363.31-363.32 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... TREASURYDIRECT General Provisions Governing Securities Held in TreasuryDirect §§ 363.31-363.32...

  18. 31 CFR 31.214 - Limitations on concurrent activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limitations on concurrent activities. 31.214 Section 31.214 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.214 Limitations on concurrent activities. Treasury...

  19. 31 CFR 31.200 - Purpose and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Purpose and scope. 31.200 Section 31.200 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM Conflicts of Interest § 31.200 Purpose and scope. (a) Purpose. This regulation sets forth standards...

  20. 31 CFR 10.31 - Negotiation of taxpayer checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Negotiation of taxpayer checks. 10.31 Section 10.31 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.31 Negotiation of taxpayer checks. (a) A practitioner may not endorse or otherwise negotiate...