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Sample records for argon metastable number

  1. Measurements of cross sections for electron-impact excitation into the metastable levels of argon and number densities of metastable argon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schappe, R.S.; Schulman, M.B.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C. )

    1994-07-01

    The technique of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been applied to measure the cross sections for electron-impact excitation into the metastable levels of argon atoms as well as the number densities of the argon metastable atoms produced by electron excitation. A monoenergetic electron beam excites the ground-state atoms into the 3[ital p][sup 5]4[ital s] [sup 3][ital P][sub 0],[sup 3][ital P][sub 2] metastable levels (1[ital s][sub 3] and 1[ital s][sub 5] in Paschen's notation) and a pulsed laser pumps the atoms of a metastable level to a level in the 3[ital p][sup 5]4[ital p] configuration (2[ital p] in Paschen's notation). The transient LIF from the 2[ital p] level is shown to be proportional to the apparent cross section of the metastable level and to the metastable number densities so that measurements of LIF enable us to determine both metastable cross sections and number densities. Methods for absolute calibration are described. We obtain both the apparent and direct excitation cross sections for each of the two metastable levels for electron energies from threshold to 200 eV and the results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical works. The pulsed LIF technique is also used to determine the disappearance rates of the metastable atoms after the electron beam is turned off. Two distinct decay modes are found and the observed behaviors are consistent with calculations based on diffusion theory.

  2. Dissociation-excitation reactions of argon metastables with carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study showing that a metastable argon-carbon dioxide reaction results in dissociation of carbon dioxide and electronic excitation of one of the products, carbon monoxide or oxygen. A flow system using a 2450-MHz discharge was used to produce metastable argon atoms. Metastable argon in the afterglow was confirmed by adding nitrogen to the afterglow. Without addition of carbon dioxide no argon line emission, or any other emission, is observed from the reaction zone. Absence of argon line emission produced by recombination indicates the absence of charged species.

  3. Photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold metastable argon

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M. K.; Ranjit, G.; Sukenik, C. I.; Walhout, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present results of photoassociative spectroscopy performed on ultracold metastable argon atoms in a magneto-optical trap. Ion spectra are obtained with laser detuning up to a few gigahertz below the 4s[3/2]{sub 2}{yields}4p[5/2]{sub 3} trapping transition at 811 nm and with intensities in a range of {approx}(10{sup 2}-10{sup 5})I{sub Sat}. We also compute dipole-dipole potentials for both singly and doubly excited diatomic molecules and use a Leroy-Bernstein analysis to determine the approximate vibrational spacings in the (s+p) and (p+p) manifolds. Based on this theoretical framework, we explain a broad background feature in our data and suggest that double-excitation mechanisms are likely responsible for sharp dips in the ion signal.

  4. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  5. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N₂ density [N₂]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H₂O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H₂O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H₂O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  6. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  7. The role of carrier gases in the production of metastable argon atoms in an RF discharge.

    SciTech Connect

    Rudinger, K.; Lu, Z. T.; Mueller, P.; Physics

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the role of carrier gases in the production of metastable argon atoms in a rf-driven discharge. The effects of different carrier gases (krypton, xenon, neon, and helium), carrier gas pressures, and rf discharge powers are examined. A xenon carrier gas provides the greatest metastable population of argon, yielding an optimal fractional metastable population of argon (Ar*/Ar) of 2 x 10{sup -4} at 0.2 mTorr of xenon gas. The optimal krypton configuration yields 60% of the xenon-supported population at 1.5 times higher pressure. Neon and helium perform considerably worse probably due to their higher ionization potentials.

  8. Effects of metastable species in helium and argon atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) on inactivation of periodontopathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Young; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Seol, Yang-Jo; Kim, Su-Jeong; Bae, Byeongjun; Huh, Sung-Ryul; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The helium and argon have been widely used as discharge gases in atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) for bacteria inactivation. The APPJs show apparent different in bullet propagation speed and bacteria inactivation rate apparently vary with discharge gas species. This work shows that these two distinctive features of APPJs can be linked through one factor, the metastable energy level. The effects of helium and argon metastable species on APPJ discharge mechanism for reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) generation in APPJs are investigated by experiments and numerical estimation. The discharge mechanism is investigated by using the bullet velocity from the electric field which is obtained with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement. The measured electric field also applied on the estimation of RONS generation, as electron energy source term in numerical particle reaction. The estimated RONS number is verified by comparing NO and OH densities to the inactivation rate of periodontitis bacteria. The characteristic time for bacteria inactivation of the helium-APPJ was found to be 1.63 min., which is significantly less than that of the argon-APPJ, 12.1 min. In argon-APPJ, the argon metastable preserve the energy due to the lack of the Penning ionization. Thus the surface temperature increase is significantly higher than helium-APPJ case. It implies that the metastable energy plays important role in both of APPJ bullet propagation and bacteria inactivation mechanism.

  9. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes of argon metastable transitions in a hollow cathode lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Anomalous optogalvanic line shapes were observed in a commercial hollow cathode lamp containing argon buffer gas. Deviations from Gaussian line shapes were particularly strong for transitions originating from the 3P2 metastable level of argon. The anomalous line shapes can be described reasonably well by the assumption that two regions in the discharge are excited simultaneously, each giving rise to a purely Gaussian line shape, but with different polarities, amplitudes, and linewidths.

  11. Effects of argon gas pressure on its metastable-state density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    The effect of argon gas pressure on its metastable density in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by using the laser-induced fluorescence method. Our results show that the metastable-state density of argon varies with the gas pressure depending on the measurement position; the density decreases with the pressure at a position far from the ICP antenna, whereas it increases with the pressure at a position near the antenna. This contrast in the metastable-state density trend with the pressure is explained by considering the electron temperature variations at the two measurement positions. The theoretical interpretation and calculation using a global model are also addressed in detail in this paper.

  12. A simple velocity-tunable pulsed atomic source of slow metastable argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Loize, T.; Aljunid, S. A.; Correia, F.; Fabre, N.; Perales, F.; Tualle, J. M.; Baudon, J.; Ducloy, M.; Dutier, G.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed beam of metastable argon atoms having a low tunable velocity (10 to 150 m s-1) is produced with a very substantial brightness (9  ×  108Ar* s-1 sr-1). The present original experimental configuration leads to a variable velocity dispersion that can be smaller than the standard Brownian one. This behaviour, analysed using Monte Carlo simulations, exhibits momentum stretching (heating) or narrowing (cooling) entirely due to a subtle combination of Doppler and Zeeman effects.

  13. Enhanced metastable population through evaporation cooling and recombination in the argon afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnetzki, Uwe; Celik, Yusuf; Tsankov, Tsanko; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Luggenholscher, Dirk

    2011-10-01

    Measurements, modelling and numerical simulations performed in a pulsed inductively coupled argon plasma at low pressures (1-5 Pa) show that very low electron temperatures are achieved on a characteristic time scale of a few tens of micro seconds through evaporation cooling. This allows for recombination resulting in the observed increase of the metastable density in the afterglow phase. The previously observed super-linear scaling with the electron density of the electron decay time is well reproduced analytically by assuming that microfield limited electron-stabilized three-body recombination into highly excited Rydberg states takes place. This hypothesis is strongly supported by experimental results from various diagnostic techniques.

  14. Determination of the coefficient of reflection of metastable argon atoms from the discharge tube wall

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorian, G. M.; Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.

    2015-05-15

    Radial profiles of the density of metastable atoms Ar({sup 3}P{sub 2}) in the positive column of a dc glow discharge in argon were measured. Gas-discharge glass tubes with clean inner surfaces and surfaces covered with a carbonitride or carbon film were utilized. The parameters of the discharge plasma under experimental conditions were calculated in the framework of a one-dimensional (along the tube radius) discharge model. The coefficient K of reflection of Ar({sup 3}P{sub 2}) atoms from the tube wall was estimated by comparing the measured and calculated density profiles. It is found that, for a clean tube wall, the coefficient of reflection is K = 0.4 ± 0.2, whereas for a wall covered with a carbonitride or carbon film, it is K < 0.2.

  15. Argon metastable densities in the GEC reference cell: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, S.; Kushner, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell was introduced several years ago as a standard parallel plate capacitively coupled experimental platform for comparing measurements from different research groups and providing reliable data for evaluating models. Recently, McMillin and Zachariah applied planar laser-induced fluorescence to construct two-dimensional profiles of argon metastable densities in argon, Ar, Ar/O{sub 2} and Ar/CF{sub 4} plasmas over a wide range of gas pressures and applied rf voltages. They observed systematic trends in the spatial distributions and magnitudes of the Ar* densities. In this paper, the authors report on a numerical investigation of the GEC reference cell for the conditions of these experiments with the goals of identifying the processes responsible for the experimental observations. The numerical model used in this study is based on a previously described hybrid simulation originally developed for inductively coupled plasmas. In the model, ions and neutrals are simulated using fluid techniques, while a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used for computing the electron dynamics. The fluid and MC modules, coupled with a solution of Poisson`s equation, are iterated until quasi-steady state conditions are obtained. Simulations were performed for the experimental parameter space of 100--1,000 mTorr and rf voltage of 75--300 V.

  16. Measurements of the populations of metastable and resonance levels in the plasma of an RF capacitive discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilieva, A. N.; Voloshin, D. G.; Kovalev, A. S. Kurchikov, K. A.

    2015-05-15

    The behavior of the populations of two metastable and two lower resonance levels of argon atoms in the plasma of an RF capacitive discharge was studied. The populations were measured by two methods: the method of emission self-absorption and the method based on measurements of the intensity ratios of spectral lines. It is shown that the populations of resonance levels increase with increasing power deposited in the discharge, whereas the populations of metastable levels is independent of the RF power. The distribution of the populations over energy levels is not equilibrium under these conditions. The population kinetics of argon atomic levels in the discharge plasma is simulated numerically. The distribution function of plasma electrons recovered from the measured populations of atomic levels and numerical simulations is found to be non-Maxwellian.

  17. Absorption spectroscopy measurements of argon metastable and resonant atom density in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas using a low pressure lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, J.; Margot, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2012-01-15

    The densities of metastable and resonant atom were measured in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas. Measurements were performed using an absorption spectroscopy method taking into account the Voigt profiles of the plasma lines. The density values of the argon {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0} (metastable atoms) and {sup 3}P{sub 1} (resonant atoms) levels measured in pure argon discharges are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. A drastic decrease of metastable and resonant densities is observed when introducing helium in amounts as low as 2%. The influence of electron density and gas temperature on the population mechanisms (direct electron excitation from the ground state and dissociative recombination) of metastable and resonant atoms is discussed using a simplified theoretical model.

  18. FPGA Implementation of Metastability-Based True Random Number Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Shuichi

    True random number generators (TRNGs) are important as a basis for computer security. Though there are some TRNGs composed of analog circuit, the use of digital circuits is desired for the application of TRNGs to logic LSIs. Some of the digital TRNGs utilize jitter in free-running ring oscillators as a source of entropy, which consume large power. Another type of TRNG exploits the metastability of a latch to generate entropy. Although this kind of TRNG has been mostly implemented with full-custom LSI technology, this study presents an implementation based on common FPGA technology. Our TRNG is comprised of logic gates only, and can be integrated in any kind of logic LSI. The RS latch in our TRNG is implemented as a hard-macro to guarantee the quality of randomness by minimizing the signal skew and load imbalance of internal nodes. To improve the quality and throughput, the output of 64-256 latches are XOR'ed. The derived design was verified on a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA (XC4VFX20), and passed NIST statistical test suite without post-processing. Our TRNG with 256 latches occupies 580 slices, while achieving 12.5Mbps throughput.

  19. Measurements of population densities of metastable and resonant levels of argon using laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolić, M.; Newton, J.; Sukenik, C. I.; Vušković, L.; Popović, S.

    2015-01-14

    We present a new approach to measure population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant excited states in low temperature Ar plasmas at pressures higher than 1 Torr. This approach combines the time resolved laser induced fluorescence technique with the kinetic model of Ar. The kinetic model of Ar is based on calculating the population rates of metastable and resonant levels by including contributions from the processes that affect population densities of Ar I excited states. In particular, we included collisional quenching processes between atoms in the ground state and excited states, since we are investigating plasma at higher pressures. We also determined time resolved population densities of Ar I 2 p excited states by employing optical emission spectroscopy technique. Time resolved Ar I excited state populations are presented for the case of the post-discharge of the supersonic flowing microwave discharge at pressures of 1.7 and 2.3 Torr. The experimental set-up consists of a pulsed tunable dye laser operating in the near infrared region and a cylindrical resonance cavity operating in TE{sub 111} mode at 2.45 GHz. Results show that time resolved population densities of Ar I metastable and resonant states oscillate with twice the frequency of the discharge.

  20. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M.; Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  1. An investigation of Ar metastable state density in low pressure dual-frequency capacitively coupled argon and argon-diluted plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Guo, Qian; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-01-14

    An tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the Ar*({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar*({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms densities in dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas. The effects of different control parameters, such as high-frequency power, gas pressure and content of Ar, on the densities of two metastable atoms and electron density were discussed in single-frequency and dual-frequency Ar discharges, respectively. Particularly, the effects of the pressure on the axial profile of the electron and Ar metastable state densities were also discussed. Furthermore, a simple rate model was employed and its results were compared with experiments to analyze the main production and loss processes of Ar metastable states. It is found that Ar metastable state is mainly produced by electron impact excitation from the ground state, and decayed by diffusion and collision quenching with electrons and neutral molecules. Besides, the addition of CF{sub 4} was found to significantly increase the metastable destruction rate by the CF{sub 4} quenching, especially for large CF{sub 4} content and high pressure, it becomes the dominant depopulation process.

  2. Exploiting metastability and thermal noise to build a reconfigurable hardware random number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daihyun; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Devadas, Srinivas; Jamali, Behnam; Abbott, Derek; Cole, Peter H.

    2005-05-01

    While pseudo random number generators based on computational complexity are widely used for most of cryptographic applications and probabilistic simulations, the generation of true random numbers based on physical randomness is required to guarantee the advanced security of cryptographic systems. In this paper we present a method to exploit manufacturing variations, metastablity, and thermal noise in integrated circuits to generate random numbers. This metastability based physical random number generator provides a compact and low-power solution which can be fabricated using standard IC manufacturing processes. Test-chips were fabricated in TSMC 0.18um process and experimental results show that the generated random bits pass standard randomness tests successfully. The operation of the proposed scheme is robust against environmental changes since it can be re-calibrated to new environmental conditions such as temperature and power supply voltage.

  3. Populations of metastable and resonant argon atoms in radio frequency magnetron plasmas used for deposition of indium-zinc-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2012-03-15

    This work reports optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the number density of Ar atoms in resonant ({sup 3}P{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}) and metastable ({sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}) states in rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} was fairly independent of pressure in the range of experimental conditions investigated, the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}P{sub 1} first sharply increased with pressure and then reached a plateau at values close to those of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels at pressures above about 50 mTorr. At such pressures, ultraviolet radiation from resonant states becomes trapped such that these levels behave as metastable states. For a self-bias voltage of -115 V and pressures in the 5-100 mTorr range, similar number densities of Ar resonant and metastable atoms were obtained for Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets, suggesting that, over the range of experimental conditions investigated, collisions between these excited species and sputtered Zn, In, and O atoms played only a minor role on the discharge kinetics. The metastable-to-ground state number density ratios were also fitted to the predictions of a global model using the average electron temperature, T{sub e}, as the only adjustable parameter. For all targets examined, the values of T{sub e} deduced from this method were in excellent agreement with those obtained from Langmuir probe measurements.

  4. Comment on ‘Correlating metastable-atom density, reduced electric field, and electron energy distribution in the post-transient stage of a 1 Torr argon discharge’ (2015 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 24 034009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, N.

    2016-06-01

    Several important errors and misinterpretations present in a recent publication by Franek et al (2015 Plasma Source Sci. Technol. 24 034009) are pointed out and discussed. In particular, it is shown that the electron densities deduced by the resonance cavity frequency shift technique are highly underestimated. So the conclusion of authors on validity of the method for the estimate of argon metastable density from the 420.1/419.8 nm emission intensity ratio is not justified. In a recent publication, hereafter referred as (Franek et al 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 034009), Franek et al have studied the correlation existing in argon plasma between 420.1/419.8 nm emission intensity ratio and combined metastable atoms density (Arm), electron density (n e) and reduced electric field (E/N). Experiments were carried out in a 1 Torr argon plasma afterglow, during which Arm was measured by Diode-Laser absorption and n e by frequency shift of a μ-wave resonance cavity into which the plasma tube was inserted. Authors concluded that in any argon plasma Arm can be deduced, without directly measuring it, from the 420.1/419.8 nm emission intensity ratio, provided that n e and E/N are known. The purpose of this comment is to point out several important errors present in that paper, dealing mostly with electron density measurement.

  5. Argon metastables in HiPIMS: validation of the ionization region model by direct comparison to time resolved tunable diode-laser diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.; Vitelaru, C.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T.

    2015-08-01

    The volume plasma interactions of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges operated with a Ti target is analyzed in detail by combining time-resolved diagnostics with modeling of plasma kinetics. The model employed is the ionization region model (IRM) with an improved and detailed treatment of the kinetics of the argon metastable (Arm) state, called m-IRM. The diagnostics used is tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) of the Arm state, which gives the line-of-sight density integrated along the laser path parallel to the target surface. The TD-LAS recordings exhibit quite complex temporal evolutions Arm(t), with distinct features that are shown to reflect the time evolution of the plasma (the electron density and temperature), and of the argon gas (gas rarefaction and refill). The Arm(t) function is thus a tracer for the most important aspects of internal discharge physics, and therefore suitable for model testing and validation. The IRM model is constructed to be locked to obey specific experimental macroscopic discharge parameters, specifically the discharge current ID(t) and the voltage UD(t). It has to this purpose been run with the appropriate process gas pressures (from 0.67 to 2.67 Pa), with the experimentally applied voltage pulse profiles UD(t), and with the resulting current pulse profiles ID(t) (with maxima from 0.5 to 70 A). It is shown that the model reproduces the features in the TD-LAS measurements: both the Arm(t) evolution in single pulses, and how the pulse shapes change with gas pressure and with pulse amplitude. The good agreement between the measurements and model output is in this work taken to validate the basic assumptions of the m-IRM. In addition, the m-IRM results have been used to unravel the connections between volume plasma kinetics and various features recorded in the TD-LAS measurement, and to generalize the foremost characteristics of the studied discharges.

  6. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. I. Argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Culver, Cody; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2014-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons emitted from excited atomic states are ubiquitous in material processing plasmas. The highly energetic photons can induce surface damage by driving surface reactions, disordering surface regions, and affecting bonds in the bulk material. In argon plasmas, the VUV emissions are due to the decay of the 1s{sub 4} and 1s{sub 2} principal resonance levels with emission wavelengths of 104.8 and 106.7 nm, respectively. The authors have measured the number densities of atoms in the two resonance levels using both white light optical absorption spectroscopy and radiation-trapping induced changes in the 3p{sup 5}4p→3p{sup 5}4s branching fractions measured via visible/near-infrared optical emission spectroscopy in an argon inductively coupled plasma as a function of both pressure and power. An emission model that takes into account radiation trapping was used to calculate the VUV emission rate. The model results were compared to experimental measurements made with a National Institute of Standards and Technology-calibrated VUV photodiode. The photodiode and model results are in generally good accord and reveal a strong dependence on the neutral gas temperature.

  7. Reply to comment on ‘Correlating metastable-atom density, reduced electric field, and electron energy distribution in the post-transient stage of a 1 Torr argon discharge’ 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 034009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, J. B.; Nogami, S. H.; Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Barnat, E. V.

    2016-06-01

    The attention to a detailed analysis by Sadeghi [1] of our paper [2], using Weatherford and Barnat [3] for reference information is appreciated and motivates us to clarify points in our paper referred to in the Comment [1]. In this Reply, we respond to the two remarks by Sadeghi [1] claiming to render as unjustified our original conclusion based on validity of the 420.1/419.8 nm emission intensity ratio method for the estimate of argon metastable density, and clear up other possible misinterpretations of the data presented in our paper [2].

  8. Nitrogen metastable (N2(A3 Σu + )) in a cold argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Shielding and gas composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseni, Sylvain; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) metastable species are detected and measured in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet by laser induced fluorescence. A shielding device is used to change the ambient conditions additionally to the feeding gas composition. Varying the amount of N2 and air admixed to the feeding gas as well as changing the shielding gas from N2 to air reveals that the highest N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) is achieved in the case of air admixtures in spite of the enhanced collisional quenching due to the presence of O2. The reasons for these observations are discussed in detail.

  9. Deactivation of krypton atoms in the metastable 5s({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state in collisions with krypton and argon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnyi, D A; L'dov, A Yu; Kholin, I V

    2009-09-30

    The collision deactivation of the metastable 5s[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) state of krypton atoms is studied by the absorption probe method in electron-beam-excited high-pressure Ar-Kr mixtures with a low krypton content. The rate constants of plasma-chemical reactions Kr* + Kr + Ar {yields} Kr{sub 2}* + Ar [(4.1{+-}0.4)x10{sup -33} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}] and Kr* + 2Ar {yields} ArKr* + Ar (less than 10{sup -35} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}) are measured for the first time and the rate constant of the reaction Kr* + Ar {yields} products + Ar [(3.8{+-}0.4)x10{sup -15} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}] is refined. (active media)

  10. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  11. Lunar exospheric argon modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hurley, D. M.; Hodges, R. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Argon is one of the few known constituents of the lunar exosphere. The surface-based mass spectrometer Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) deployed during the Apollo 17 mission first detected argon, and its study is among the subjects of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) and Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission investigations. We performed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutral atomic argon that we use to better understand its transport and storage across the lunar surface. We took into account several loss processes: ionization by solar photons, charge-exchange with solar protons, and cold trapping as computed by recent LRO/Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) mapping of Permanently Shaded Regions (PSRs). Recycling of photo-ions and solar radiation acceleration are also considered. We report that (i) contrary to previous assumptions, charge exchange is a loss process as efficient as photo-ionization, (ii) the PSR cold-trapping flux is comparable to the ionization flux (photo-ionization and charge-exchange), and (iii) solar radiation pressure has negligible effect on the argon density, as expected. We determine that the release of 2.6 × 1028 atoms on top of a pre-existing argon exosphere is required to explain the maximum amount of argon measured by LACE. The total number of atoms (1.0 × 1029) corresponds to ∼6700 kg of argon, 30% of which (∼1900 kg) may be stored in the cold traps after 120 days in the absence of space weathering processes. The required population is consistent with the amount of argon that can be released during a High Frequency Teleseismic (HFT) Event, i.e. a big, rare and localized moonquake, although we show that LACE could not distinguish between a localized and a global event. The density of argon measured at the time of LACE appears to have originated from no less than four such episodic events. Finally, we show that the extent of the PSRs that trap

  12. Thermophysical properties of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  13. Time Evolution of the Electron and Ar* Metastable Atom Densities in Pulsed Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sikimic, Brankica; Stefanovic, Ilija; Winter, Joerg; Denysenko, Igor; Sadeghic, Nader

    2011-11-29

    Metastable and electron densities of pulsed argon plasma containing nano-sized particles were measured by the means of Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Microwave Interferometry, respectively. Laser Induced Fluorescence was probing the Ar* metastable axial distribution during one dust growing cycle. The experimental results of the dust-free and dusty plasma afterglow were compared to the results obtained by a global model.

  14. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  15. Metastable configurations of small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Heylen, R; Skantzos, N S; Blanco, J Busquets; Bollé, D

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the number of metastable configurations of Ising small-world networks that are constructed upon superimposing sparse Poisson random graphs onto a one-dimensional chain. Our solution is based on replicated transfer-matrix techniques. We examine the denegeracy of the ground state and find a jump in the entropy of metastable configurations exactly at the crossover between the small-world and the Poisson random graph structures. We also examine the difference in entropy between metastable and all possible configurations, for both ferromagnetic and bond-disordered long-range couplings. PMID:16486247

  16. Metastable configurations of small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, R.; Skantzos, N. S.; Blanco, J. Busquets; Bollé, D.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the number of metastable configurations of Ising small-world networks that are constructed upon superimposing sparse Poisson random graphs onto a one-dimensional chain. Our solution is based on replicated transfer-matrix techniques. We examine the denegeracy of the ground state and find a jump in the entropy of metastable configurations exactly at the crossover between the small-world and the Poisson random graph structures. We also examine the difference in entropy between metastable and all possible configurations, for both ferromagnetic and bond-disordered long-range couplings.

  17. Calculations and analysis of cross sections required for argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, David Robert; Lee, Teck; Loch, Stuart D

    2010-01-01

    A large set of calculations has been carried out providing a basis for diagnostics of fusion plasmas through emission resulting from radiative deexcitation following charge transfer between hydrogen and highly charged argon ions, so-called argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. These results have been obtained using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method to treat charge transfer to states with principal quantum numbers up to 30 or more. Nine collision energies between 13.3333 and 250 keV/u pertinent to neutral beam injection have been considered for Arq+ (q=15-18) colliding with atomic hydrogen in both the ground and metastable states. Atomic orbital close coupling calculations have also been undertaken in order to provide a fully quantum mechanical test of the CTMC results for Ar18+ + H(1s) collisions. The results of the calculations are discussed here and the full set of data is made available through a web posting.

  18. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  19. The metastable brain.

    PubMed

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J A Scott

    2014-01-01

    Neural ensembles oscillate across a broad range of frequencies and are transiently coupled or "bound" together when people attend to a stimulus, perceive, think, and act. This is a dynamic, self-assembling process, with parts of the brain engaging and disengaging in time. But how is it done? The theory of Coordination Dynamics proposes a mechanism called metastability, a subtle blend of integration and segregation. Tendencies for brain regions to express their individual autonomy and specialized functions (segregation, modularity) coexist with tendencies to couple and coordinate globally for multiple functions (integration). Although metastability has garnered increasing attention, it has yet to be demonstrated and treated within a fully spatiotemporal perspective. Here, we illustrate metastability in continuous neural and behavioral recordings, and we discuss theory and experiments at multiple scales, suggesting that metastable dynamics underlie the real-time coordination necessary for the brain's dynamic cognitive, behavioral, and social functions. PMID:24411730

  20. The Metastable Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Kelso, J. A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Neural ensembles oscillate across a broad range of frequencies and are transiently coupled or “bound” together when people attend to a stimulus, perceive, think and act. This is a dynamic, self-assembling process, with parts of the brain engaging and disengaging in time. But how is it done? The theory of Coordination Dynamics proposes a mechanism called metastability, a subtle blend of integration and segregation. Tendencies for brain regions to express their individual autonomy and specialized functions (segregation, modularity) coexist with tendencies to couple and coordinate globally for multiple functions (integration). Although metastability has garnered increasing attention, it has yet to be demonstrated and treated within a fully spatiotemporal perspective. Here, we illustrate metastability in continuous neural and behavioral recordings, and we discuss theory and experiments at multiple scales suggesting that metastable dynamics underlie the real-time coordination necessary for the brain's dynamic cognitive, behavioral and social functions. PMID:24411730

  1. Polarization of metastable 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Morgan, Steven; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We have measured atomic polarization of metastable 129Xe in a pyrex cell by optical pumping, while metastability exchange optical pumping of 3He is routinely done. The atomic polarization of metastable Xe is on the order of 10%. Metastable xenon is created by electrodeless rf discharge. The hyperfine transition of metastable 129Xe is observed by microwave excitation. Atomic polarization can be demonstrated by comparison of the intensities of the transitions between different Zeeman sublevels, while pumping a specific optical transition of metastable Xe with circularly polarized light. This work offers insight into attempts to polarize 129Xe nuclei by metastability exchange optical pumping.

  2. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  3. A DSMC Study of Low Pressure Argon Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Work toward a self-consistent plasma simulation using the DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) method for examination of the flowfields of low-pressure high density plasma reactors is presented. Presently, DSMC simulations for these applications involve either treating the electrons as a fluid or imposing experimentally determined values for the electron number density profile. In either approach, the electrons themselves are not physically simulated. Self-consistent plasma DSMC simulations have been conducted for aerospace applications but at a severe computational cost due in part to the scalar architectures on which the codes were employed. The present work attempts to conduct such simulations at a more reasonable cost using a plasma version of the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO, on an IBM SP-2. Due to availability of experimental data, the GEC reference cell is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is examined thus affording a simple chemistry set with eight gas-phase reactions and five species: Ar, Ar(+), Ar(*), Ar(sub 2), and e where Ar(*) is a metastable.

  4. Metastable nematic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, Riccardo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    1996-07-01

    For nematic liquid crystals, we study the local stability of a radial hedgehog against biaxial perturbations. Our analysis employs the Landau - de Gennes functional to describe the free energy stored in a ball, whose radius is a parameter of the model. We find that a radial hedgehog may be either unstable or metastable, depending on the values of the elastic constants. For unstable hedgehogs, we give an explicit expression for the radius of the ball within which the instability manifests itself: it can be interpreted as the size of the biaxial core of the defect; it is of the same order of magnitude as the radius of the disclination ring predicted by Penzenstadler and Trebin's model. The metastable hedgehogs predicted by our model are the major novelty of the paper. They tell us that we may also expect truly uniaxial point defects, whose core contains no biaxial structure.

  5. Metal-atom fluorescence from the quenching of metastable rare gases by metal carbonyls

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was used to study the metal fluorescence resulting from the quenching of metastable rare-gas states by metal carbonyls. The data from the quenching or argon, neon, and helium by iron and nickel carbonyl agreed well with a restricted degree of freedom model indicating a concerted bond-breaking dissociation.

  6. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  7. Desensitization of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOEpatents

    Busse, James R.; Dye, Robert C.; Foley, Timothy J.; Higa, Kelvin T.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Sanders, Victor E.; Son, Steven F.

    2011-04-26

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  8. Cellular folding pathway of a metastable serpin.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Kshama; Ke, Haiping; Wang, Ning; Goodwin, Theresa; Gierasch, Lila M; Gershenson, Anne; Hebert, Daniel N

    2016-06-01

    Although proteins generally fold to their thermodynamically most stable state, some metastable proteins populate higher free energy states. Conformational changes from metastable higher free energy states to lower free energy states with greater stability can then generate the work required to perform physiologically important functions. However, how metastable proteins fold to these higher free energy states in the cell and avoid more stable but inactive conformations is poorly understood. The serpin family of metastable protease inhibitors uses large conformational changes that are downhill in free energy to inhibit target proteases by pulling apart the protease active site. The serpin antithrombin III (ATIII) targets thrombin and other proteases involved in blood coagulation, and ATIII misfolding can thus lead to thrombosis and other diseases. ATIII has three disulfide bonds, two near the N terminus and one near the C terminus. Our studies of ATIII in-cell folding reveal a surprising, biased order of disulfide bond formation, with early formation of the C-terminal disulfide, before formation of the N-terminal disulfides, critical for folding to the active, metastable state. Early folding of the predominantly β-sheet ATIII domain in this two-domain protein constrains the reactive center loop (RCL), which contains the protease-binding site, ensuring that the RCL remains accessible. N-linked glycans and carbohydrate-binding molecular chaperones contribute to the efficient folding and secretion of functional ATIII. The inability of a number of disease-associated ATIII variants to navigate the folding reaction helps to explain their disease phenotypes. PMID:27222580

  9. Complexity, Metastability and Nonextensivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, C.; Benedek, G.; Rapisarda, A.; Tsallis, C.

    Work and heat fluctuations in systems with deterministic and stochastic forces / E. G. D. Cohen and R. Van Zon -- Is the entropy S[symbol] extensive or nonextensive? / C. Tsallis -- Superstatistics: recent developments and applications / C. Beck -- Two stories outside Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Mori's Q-phase transitions and glassy dynamics at the onset of chaos / A. Robledo, F. Baldovin and E. Mayoral -- Time-averages and the heat theorem / A. Carati -- Fundamental formulae and numerical evidences for the central limit theorem in Tsallis statistics / H. Suyari -- Generalizing the Planck distribution / A. M. C. Soma and C. Tsallis -- The physical roots of complexity: renewal or modulation? / P. Grigolini -- Nonequivalent ensembles and metastability / H. Touchette and R. S. Ellis -- Statistical physics for cosmic structures / L. Pietronero and F. Sylos Labini -- Metastability and anomalous behavior in the HMF model: connections to nonextensive thermodynamics and glassy dynamics / A. Pluchino, A. Rapisarda and V. Latora -- Vlasov analysis of relaxation and meta-equilibrium / C. Anteneodo and R. O. Vallejos -- Weak chaos in large conservative systems - infinite-range coupled standard maps / L. G. Moyano, A. P. Majtey and C. Tsallis -- Deterministc aging / E. Barkai -- Edge of chaos of the classical kicked top map: sensitivity to initial conditions / S. M. Duarte Queirós and C. Tsallis -- What entropy at the edge of chaos? / M. Lissia, M. Coraddu and R. Tonelli -- Fractal growth of carbon schwarzites / G. Benedek ... [et al.] -- Clustering and interface propagation in interacting particle dynamics / A. Provata and V. K. Noussiou -- Resonant activation and noise enhanced stability in Josephson junctions / A. L. Pankratov and B. Spagnolo -- Symmetry breaking induced directed motions / C.-H. Chang and T. Y. Tsong -- General theory of Galilean-invariant entropic lattic Boltzmann models / B. M. Boghosian -- Unifying approach to the jamming transition in granular media and

  10. Modeling and simulation of ion-filtered inductively coupled plasma using argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chao; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Weiwang; Luo, Yi

    2015-03-01

    An ion-filtered inductively coupled plasma (IF-ICP) is proposed to reduce ion bombardment and provide high metastable species density for chemical vapor deposition. Argon plasma, which has simple reaction mechanism, is simulated to show the effects of ion filter. Compared to typical ICP, the maximum density of ions of IF-ICP is lower while that of metastable species is higher. The filter can absorb ions effectively and relatively small amount of metastable species, with the absorption coefficient proportional to its surface area. A proper gap between filter and substrate can achieve more metastable species and less ions on the substrate. The pressure and RF power need to be optimized based on the tradeoff between deposition rate and ion damage. The density of ions on the substrate can be reduced by two orders of magnitude while that of metastable species are maintained in the order of 1017 m-3 under the optimized conditions.

  11. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for

  12. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  13. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  14. Pulsed discharge production Ar* metastables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C.; Emmons, Daniel; Perram, Glen P.; Weeks, David E.; Bailey, William F.

    2016-03-01

    The production of relatively high densities of Ar* metastables (>1012 cm-3) in Ar/He mixtures, at total pressures close to 1 atm, is essential for the efficient operation of an optically pumped Ar* laser. We have used emission spectroscopy and diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to observe the production and decay of Ar* in a parallel plate pulsed discharge. With discharge pulses of 1 μs duration we find that metastable production is dominated by processes occurring within the first 100 ns of the gas break-down. Application of multiple, closely spaced discharge pulses yields insights concerning conditions that favor metastable production. This information has been combined with time-resolved measurements of voltage and current. The experimental results and preliminary modeling of the discharge kinetics are presented.

  15. Metastable metallic hydrogen glass

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W J

    2001-02-06

    pushing the molecules together sufficiently that an electron on one molecule can delocalize and move to an adjacent molecule, if the pressure is released the system will simply revert back to a diatomic insulator. Additives will probably be necessary to produce bonding which will inhibit the reverse transformation when pressure is released. One technique for rapidly quenching metallic fluid hydrogen is to use a thin micron-thick layer of condensed hydrogen contained between metal or diamond layers, which have a high thermal conductivity to quench shock temperature before pressure is released. An appropriate planar shock wave can probably be driven by a laser or small two-stage gun to achieve the necessary pressures, temperatures, and quench rates. In this way many experiments might be performed to find the appropriate combination of materials and shock-pressure history to achieve a shock-pressure-quenched metastable metallic hydrogen glass.

  16. Metastable vacua and complex deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Wetenhall, Ben

    2007-12-15

    We use the non-normalizable complex deformations to describe the stringy realizations of the metastable vacua in N=1, SU(N{sub c}) SUSY theories with N{sub f}>N{sub c} massive fundamental flavors. The consideration of the non-normalizable deformations requires a modified toric duality. The new approach considers the tachyon condensation between pairs of wrapped D5 branes and anti-D5 branes and the resulting mixing between some cycles in the geometry. We enlarge the class of metastable vacua to the case of branes-antibranes wrapped on cycles of deformed A{sub n} singularities.

  17. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  18. On a 'metastable' plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Stepan N; Rukhadze, Anri A; Samokhin, A A

    2001-09-30

    Attention is drawn to the insufficient validity of a number of conclusions concerning the fundamentals of statistical physics made in a paper of A M Tkachev and S I Yakovlenko [Quantum Electron. 30 1077 (2000)] (discussion)

  19. Special simulator to study metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydt, Mary Sue V.; Mourad, Samiha

    2000-08-01

    Metastability has been long documented as a problem in digital systems with asynchronous inputs. This problem has been analyzed in CMOS latches using a 2nd order small signal model. However, uses of a third order model taking into account that the effect of the feedback transistor. While second order models are helpful in understanding how to model the circuit in the region, they do not provide sufficient information to accurately predict the essential parameter (tau) the maximum time at which the circuit may leave the metastable state. The only way to analyze such a circuit is to simulate it, using a simulator that combines small signal and large signal analysis. Future work on metastability will include modeling the feedback transistor as a resistor, and determining whether such a model is a reasonable simplification. The simulator can be modified easily to model small transistor geometries devices and to study the effect of large signal noise, such as ground and power supply bounce, on metastability. The model may also be applied to an interconnect model to improve delay and cross-talk simulations.

  20. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  1. Influence of oxygen traces on an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive argon plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shouzhe; Wu Qi; Yan Wen; Wang Dezhen; Uhm, Han S.

    2011-10-15

    An atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharge source driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz has been developed experimentally that is capable of producing a homogeneous and cold glow discharge in O{sub 2}/Ar. With respect to the influence of oxygen component when diluted into argon plasma discharge on the discharge characteristics, the measurements of the electrical parameters (impedance, phase angle, resistance, and reactance) are made systematically and the densities of the metastable and resonant state of argon are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). It is shown that the admixture of oxygen into argon plasma not only changes the electric characteristics but also alters the optical emission spectra greatly due to strong interaction between the oxygen content and the argon in the plasma environment.

  2. Classification of knotted tori in 2-metastable dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Cencelj, Matija; Repovs, Dusan; Skopenkov, Mihail B

    2012-11-30

    This paper is devoted to the classical Knotting Problem: for a given manifold N and number m describe the set of isotopy classes of embeddings N{yields}S{sup m}. We study the specific case of knotted tori, that is, the embeddings S{sup p} Multiplication-Sign S{sup q}{yields}S{sup m}. The classification of knotted tori up to isotopy in the metastable dimension range m {>=} p + 3/2q + 2, p{<=}q, was given by Haefliger, Zeeman and A. Skopenkov. We consider the dimensions below the metastable range and give an explicit criterion for the finiteness of this set of isotopy classes in the 2-metastable dimension. Bibliography: 35 titles.

  3. Metastable Phases in Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Fabian; Baloh, Philipp; Kubel, Frank; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds contain both, pure water ice and phases of nitric acid hydrates. Preferentially for the latter, the thermodynamically stable phases have intensively been investigated in the past (e.g. nitric acid trihydrate, beta-NAT). As shown by Peter et al. [1] the water activity inside clouds is higher than expected, which might be explained by the presence of metastable stable phases (e.g. cubic ice). However, also metastable nitric acid hydrates might be important due to the inherent non-equilibrium freezing conditions in the upper atmosphere. The delta ice theory of Gao et al. [2] presents a model approach to solve this problem by involving both metastable ice and NAT as well. So it is of high interest to investigate the metastable phase of NAT (i.e. alpha-NAT), the structure of which was unknown up to the presence. In our laboratory a production procedure for metastable alpha-NAT has been developed, which gives access to neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements, where sample quantities of several Gramm are required. The diffraction techniques were used to solve the unknown crystalline structure of metastable alpha-NAT, which in turn allows the calculation of the vibrational spectra, which have also been recorded by us in the past. Rerefences [1] Peter, T., C. Marcolli, P. Spichtinger, T. Corti, M. B. Baker, and T. Koop. When dry air is too humid. Science, 314:1399-1402, 2006. [2] Gao, R., P. Popp, D. Fahey, T. Marcy, R. L. Herman, E. Weinstock, D. Baumgardener, T. Garrett, K. Rosenlof, T. Thompson, T. P. Bui, B. Ridley, S. C. Wofsy, O. B. Toon, M. Tolbert, B. Kärcher, Th. Peter, P. K. Hudson, A. Weinheimer, and A. Heymsfield. Evidence That Nitric Acid Increases Relative Humidity in Low-Temperature Cirrus Clouds, Science, 303:516-520, 2004. [3] Tizek, H., E. Knözinger, and H. Grothe. Formation and phase distribution of nitric acid hydrates in the mole fraction range xHNO3<0.25: A combined XRD and IR study, PCCP, 6

  4. Argon Purification Reference and Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-05-23

    This engineering note is a reference for future consideration on the purification of argon. The original concern was for the possibility of argon contamination from components in the cryostats over long-term storage. An argon purification system could also be useful for purifying the contents of the argon dewar. The general conclusion is that most of the systems researched are too expensive at this time, but the recommended choice would be Centorr Furnaces. There were three basic types of purification systems which were to be considered. The first was the molecular sieve. This method would have been the preferred one, because it was claimed that it could purify liquid argon, removing liquid oxygen from the argon. However, none of the commercial companies researched provided this type of purification for use with liquid argon. Most companies said that this type of purification was impossible, and tests at IB-4 confirmed this. The second system contained a copper oxide to remove gaseous oxygen from argon gas. The disadvantage of this system wass that the argon had to be heated to a gas, and then cooled back down to liquid. The third system was similar to the second, except that it used tungsten or another material like titanium. This system also needed to heat the argon to gas, however the advantage of this system was that it supposedly removed all contaminants, that is, everything except for inert gases. Of the three systems, the third is the type manufactured by Centorr Furnaces, which uses a titanium charge.

  5. Decay of metastable topological defects

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J. ); Vilenkin, A. Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 )

    1993-03-15

    We systematically analyze the decay of metastable topological defects that arise from the spontaneous breakdown of gauge or global symmetries. Quantum-mechanical tunneling rates are estimated for a variety of decay processes. The decay rate for a global string, vortex, domain wall, or kink is typically suppressed compared to the decay rate for its gauged counterpart. We also discuss the decay of global texture, and of semilocal and electroweak strings.

  6. Influence of metastable atoms in the simulation of hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shoujie; Liu, Shumin; Jing, Ha; Ouyang, Jiting

    2013-12-15

    The characteristics of hollow cathode discharge are investigated by using two-dimensional fluid model combined with a transport model for metastable atoms (F-M model) in argon. It shows that the stepwise ionization is one of main important mechanism for electrons production. The distribution of electric potential, density of electrons, ions, and metastable atoms are calculated with a pressure of 10 Torr and a voltage of 250 V. The peak density of electron and ion is 1.2×10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}, and the peak density of metastable atoms is 3.5×10{sup 13} cm{sup −3}. The results obtained in F-M model are compared with that in fluid model (without metastable atoms involved). Metastable atoms are found to play an important role in the discharge. In addition, with the increase of pressure and voltage, the percentage of stepwise ionization in the total ionization increase, and the difference of discharge characteristics simulated by these two kinds of models rises.

  7. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  8. Investigation of xenon metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    The electron configuration of a xenon atom in its metastable state consists of tightly bound core electrons with a single missing electron in the 5P shell, and a loosely bound ``valence electron'' in the 6S shell. For our current work, we have been using pyrex cells with internal tungsten electrodes, filled with isotopically enriched Xe129 gas. Ti-sapphire laser is used to pump the metastable atom from 6S2 to 6P2 and 6P3 at 823nm and 882nm respectively. The absorption spectrum is able to resolve the hyperfine structure of Xe129 in 6S2, 6P2 and 6P3 state. The hyperfine coefficients for 6S2, 6P2 agree with previously reported measurements. And the hyperfine coefficient for 6P3 state has not been reported before. If the pumping wavelength is locked at any one of the hyperfine transitions of Xenon129 atom, zero-field magnetic resonances of metastable Xenon atoms could be observed by pumping with circularly polarized laser beam. Since relaxation between magnetic sublevels is very fast due to the big depolarization collisional cross section, the linewidth of the magnetic resonant signal is broad.

  9. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  10. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  11. Parametric scaling of neutral and ion excited state densities in an argon helicon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarren, D.; Scime, E.

    2016-04-01

    We report measurements of the absolute density and temperature of ion and neutral excited states in an argon helicon source. The excited ion state density, which depends on ion density, electron density, and electron temperature, increases sharply with increasing magnetic field in the source. The neutral argon metastable density measurements are consistent with an increasing ionization fraction with increasing magnetic field strength. The ion temperature shows no evidence of increased heating with increasing magnetic field strength (which has only been observed in helicon sources operating at driving frequencies close to the lower hybrid frequency). The measurements were obtained through cavity ring down spectroscopy, a measurement technique that does not require the target excited state to be metastable or part of a fluorescence scheme; and is therefore applicable to any laser accessible atomic or ionic transition in a plasma.

  12. Effect of secondary emission on the argon plasma afterglow with large dust density

    SciTech Connect

    Denysenko, I. B.; Azarenkov, N. A.; Burmaka, G. P.; Stefanović, I.

    2015-02-15

    A zero-dimensional, space-averaged model for argon plasma afterglow with large dust density is developed. In the model, three groups of electrons in the plasma afterglow are assumed: (i) thermal electrons with Maxwellian distribution, (ii) energetic electrons generated by metastable-metastable collisions (metastable pooling), and (iii) secondary electrons generated at collisions of ions with the electrodes, which have sufficiently large negative voltages in the afterglow. The model calculates the time-dependencies for electron densities in plasma afterglow based on experimental decay times for metastable density and electrode bias. The effect of secondary emission on electron density in the afterglow is estimated by varying secondary emission yields. It is found that this effect is less important than metastable pooling. The case of dust-free plasma afterglow is considered also, and it is found that in the afterglow the effect of secondary emission may be more important than metastable pooling. The secondary emission may increase thermal electron density n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows on a few ten percentages. The calculated time dependencies for n{sub e} in dust-free and dusty plasma afterglows describe well the experimental results.

  13. Laser Cooling of Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti.

    An experiment on the laser cooling of a metastable helium beam has been carried out. This experiment is appropriate to be described theoretically under a semiclassical framework. The experiment is the first phase of a large experimental project, whose ultimate goal is to investigate the behavior of laser -cooled metastable helium atoms in the quantum mechanical domain. This first phase is to provide the foundation for the second phase, which will be described in a full quantum mechanical framework. To reach this goal, an atomic beam source and a detection and data acquisition system were designed and constructed to be used in both phases. A laser system that is necessary for the first phase was also designed and constructed. This experiment was designed so that the studies of the atomic behavior, both in the semiclassical and quantum mechanical regions, can be investigated almost simultaneously. This experiment mainly consists of a one-dimensional transverse Doppler cooling of a metastable helium beam. The theory of Doppler cooling, based upon previous work of others, is discussed in this thesis as well. A final velocity width (HWHM) of ~0.62 m/s has been achieved, which is about 2.5 times larger than the Doppler velocity predicted by the theory. The two most likely reasons for not obtaining the Doppler velocity have been carefully examined. Sub-Doppler cooling of the helium beam was also tried, but was unsuccessful. It is our belief that the very same reasons prevent us from achieving sub -Doppler cooling as well.

  14. Extinction of metastable stochastic populations.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Michael; Meerson, Baruch

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of extinction of a long-lived self-regulating stochastic population, caused by intrinsic (demographic) noise. Extinction typically occurs via one of two scenarios depending on whether the absorbing state n=0 is a repelling (scenario A) or attracting (scenario B) point of the deterministic rate equation. In scenario A the metastable stochastic population resides in the vicinity of an attracting fixed point next to the repelling point n=0 . In scenario B there is an intermediate repelling point n=n1 between the attracting point n=0 and another attracting point n=n2 in the vicinity of which the metastable population resides. The crux of the theory is a dissipative variant of WKB (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) approximation which assumes that the typical population size in the metastable state is large. Starting from the master equation, we calculate the quasistationary probability distribution of the population sizes and the (exponentially long) mean time to extinction for each of the two scenarios. When necessary, the WKB approximation is complemented (i) by a recursive solution of the quasistationary master equation at small n and (ii) by the van Kampen system-size expansion, valid near the fixed points of the deterministic rate equation. The theory yields both entropic barriers to extinction and pre-exponential factors, and holds for a general set of multistep processes when detailed balance is broken. The results simplify considerably for single-step processes and near the characteristic bifurcations of scenarios A and B. PMID:20365539

  15. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  16. Geometrically induced metastability and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aganagic, Mina; Aganagic, Mina; Beem, Christopher; Seo, Jihye; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-10-23

    We construct metastable configurations of branes and anti-branes wrapping 2-spheres inside local Calabi-Yau manifolds and study their large N duals. These duals are Calabi-Yau manifolds in which the wrapped 2-spheres have been replaced by 3-spheres with flux through them, and supersymmetry is spontaneously broken. The geometry of the non-supersymmetric vacuum is exactly calculable to all orders of the't Hooft parameter, and to the leading order in 1/N. The computation utilizes the same matrix model techniques that were used in the supersymmetric context. This provides a novel mechanism for breaking supersymmetry in the context of flux compactifications.

  17. Probing Metastability at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    2010-02-10

    Current attempts to understand supersymmetry (susy) breaking are focused on the idea that we are not in the ground state of the universe but, instead, in a metastable state that will ultimately decay to an exactly susy ground state. It is interesting to ask how experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will shed light on the properties of this future supersymmetric universe. In particular we ask how we can determine whether this final state has the possibility of supporting atoms and molecules in a susy background.

  18. Ionization in inductively coupled argon plasmas studied by optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Kwang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Contribution of stepwise ionization to total ionization was experimentally investigated in low-pressure inductively coupled argon plasmas. In the pressure range 3-50 mTorr, optical emission spectroscopy was employed to determine metastable fractions (metastable density relative to ground state density) by measuring the emission intensity of selected lines. The measured metastable fractions were in good agreement with the calculation, showing a dependence on the discharge pressure. The rate of stepwise ionization was estimated from the excited level densities (measurements and model predictions) and their ionization rate coefficients. It is observed that at relatively low discharge pressures (<10 mTorr) the ionization is mainly provided by the direct ionization, whereas at higher pressure the stepwise ionization is predominant with increasing absorbed power.

  19. Hydrothermal fluids and argon isotopes in quartz veins and cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    1988-06-01

    Argon isotopes from a number of sources are present in quartz veins and chert; in situ decay of potassium, parentless 40Ar leached or outgassed from surrounding rocks, atmospheric argon dissolved in ancient hydrothermal fluids, and, modern atmospheric argon. The manner in which the 40Ar- 39Ar techniques can be used to unscramble these components, by way of correlations with Cl and K, is described in relation to two parallel studies of vein quartz and the Gunflint chert. Information concerning several processes can be inferred, including: contributions of surface waters to trapped fluids (from the concentration of atmospheric argon in the fluids), degree of water-rock interaction (from the concentration of parentless 40Ar and/or the ratio of parentless to atmospheric argon), effects of dilution of primary hydrothermal brines by meteoric water (which results in a decrease in the ratio of both Cl and parentless 40Ar to atmospheric argon), effects of boiling (from low concentrations of atmospheric argon and an increase in Cl/40Ar ). The K-Ar chronology of deposition can also be inferred in suitable circumstances. In principle, the ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio of the ancient atmosphere can be determined from fluids free of parentless 40Ar. However, a ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio determined for a low salinity end member in Gunflint chert probably reflects the presence of modern meteoric water.

  20. Photoionization of argon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-01-01

    Argon clusters were produced in a free supersonic molecular beam expansion of pure argon at room temperature and the photoionization efficiency curves of the trimer through hexamer were measured in the wavelength regions from threshold to 700 Â. A study of the Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve as a function of nozzle stagnation pressure shows that fragmentation of heavier clusters can dominate the spectrum, even near threshold, and even when the nozzle conditions are such that the Ar⁺4 intensity is only a small fraction of the Ar⁺3 intensity. The Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve, obtained using nozzle stagnation conditions such that no heavier ions were detected, exhibits several broad peaks near threshold which show similarities to bands of the dimer. At high nozzle stagnation pressures, the photoionization efficiency curves for Ar⁺3 to Ar⁺6 are nearly identical due to the effects of fragmentation. These spectra exhibit two very broad features which are similar to features observed in the solid. The threshold regions for all the positive ions show extremely gradual onsets, making it difficult to determine the appearance potentials accurately. The appearance potentials for Ar⁺2 and Ar⁺3 are 855.0±1.5 and 865.0±1.5 Â, respectively, yielding a value of 0.18±0.05 eV for the dissociation energy of Ar⁺3. The appearance potentials for the heavier clusters Ar⁺4 through Ar⁺6 are all approximately 870±2 Â.

  1. Collision-induced decay of metastable baby Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Daniel A.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2000-11-15

    Many extensions of the standard model predict heavy metastable particles which may be modeled as solitons (Skyrmions of the Higgs field), relating their particle number to a winding number. Previous work has shown that the electroweak interactions admit processes in which these solitons decay, violating the standard model baryon number. We motivate the hypothesis that baryon-number-violating decay is a generic outcome of collisions between these heavy particles. We do so by exploring a (2+1)-dimensional theory which also possesses metastable Skyrmions. We use relaxation techniques to determine the size, shape, and energy of static solitons in their ground state. These solitons could decay by quantum-mechanical tunneling. Classically, they are metastable: only a finite excitation energy is required to induce their decay. We attempt to induce soliton decay in a classical simulation by colliding pairs of solitons. We analyze the collision of solitons with varying inherent stabilities and varying incident velocities and orientations. Our results suggest that winding-number violating decay is a generic outcome of collisions. All that is required is sufficient (not necessarily very large) incident velocity; no fine-tuning of initial conditions is required.

  2. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  3. Argon Dewar Relief Set Pressure Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-19

    This engineering note documents the calculations of Kelly Dixon, used to determine the maximum allowable set pressure for the argon dewar low relief valve, tag number PSV620A, Anderson Greenwood Type 526J. The original setting was 16 psig. This value was chosen in order to protect against cryostat overpressurization by the source dewar (see D0 Engineering Note 115), however, the following calculations will show that the set pressure can be raised to approximately 18.5 psig, which would result in a faster filling of the cryostat, along with a higher level of liquid argon. Three other engineering notes were revised to reflect the change in set pressure according to this note. They are notes 115, 219, and 263.

  4. Desensitization and recovery of metastable intermolecular composites

    DOEpatents

    Busse, James R.; Dye, Robert C.; Foley, Timothy J.; Higa, Kelvin T.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Sanders, Victor E.; Son, Steven F.

    2010-09-07

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  5. Metastable Tight Knots in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C. Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Knotted structures can spontaneously occur in polymers such as DNA and proteins, and the formation of knots affects biological functions, mechanical strength and rheological properties. In this work, we calculate the equilibrium size distribution of trefoil knots in linear DNA using off-lattice simulations. We observe metastable knots on DNA, as predicted by Grosberg and Rabin. Furthermore, we extend their theory to incorporate the finite width of chains and show an agreement between our simulations and the modified theory for real chains. Our results suggest localized knots spontaneously occur in long DNA and the contour length in the knot ranges from 600 to 1800 nm. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 1335938).

  6. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  7. The Structure of Metastable States in The Thomson Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, A. N.; Karchevskiy, M. N.; Kozinkin, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    A practical numerical method for the effective solution of the Thomson Problem is proposed. The developed iterative algorithm allows to conduct theoretical researches such as study of the number of asymptotic solutions depending on the particle count. Metastable states of charged point systems on a unit sphere were considered and the probability of falling into the basin of each state was obtained. Founded upon the algorithm and dual lattice representation approach, the framework for rapid construction of capped carbon nanotubes was created.

  8. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  9. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  10. Primary populations of metastable antiprotonic (4)He and (3)He atoms.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakaguchi, J; Tasaki, T; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2002-08-26

    Initial distributions of metastable antiprotonic (4)He and (3)He atoms over principal (n) and angular momentum (l) quantum numbers have been deduced using laser spectroscopy experiments. The regions n = 37-40 and n = 35-38 in the two atoms account for almost all of the observed fractions [(3.0 +/- 0.1)% and (2.4 +/- 0.1)%] of antiprotons captured into metastable states. PMID:12190401

  11. Detection of fast electrons in pulsed argon inductively-coupled plasmas using the 420.1-419.8 nm emission line pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffard, John B.; Wang, S.; Lin, Chun C.; Wendt, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Pulsed rf plasmas exhibit many differences as compared to continuous wave plasmas with the same average power levels, including large temporal variations in the electron temperature, with a sharp spike when the power is applied and falling dramatically in the afterglow. We present a comparison of time-resolved measurements of the effective electron temperature in pulsed inductively-coupled plasmas by means of (i) optical emission spectroscopy (OES) using different sets of argon emission lines and (ii) Langmuir probe measurements. One OES diagnostic used six strong Ar(2{{\\text{p}}x}\\to 1{{\\text{s}}y} ) emission lines in the 700-800 nm wavelength range, the second used only the Ar 420.1-419.8 nm line pair. For pulsed plasmas with long afterglow periods, the line pair method reveals the presence of a significant number of hot electrons (E≥slant 22 eV) at the start of the pulse. Under these conditions, the metastable atom density is very low, and the diagnostic using the Ar(2{{\\text{p}}x}\\to 1{{\\text{s}}y} ) emission lines is ineffective for determining the electron temperature. For later parts of the pulse and pulsed plasmas with short periods (i.e. 10 μs), the metastable density is high and the two OES methods yield similar results which are also in agreement with probe measurements.

  12. Metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua from conformal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Omura, Yuji

    2008-11-23

    We study the scenario that conformal dynamics leads to metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua. At a high energy scale, the superpotential is not R-symmetric, and has a supersymmetric minimum. However, conformal dynamics suppresses several operators along renormalization group flow toward the infrared fixed point. Then we can find an approximately R-symmetric superpotential, which has a metastable supersymmetry breaking vacuum, and the supersymmetric vacuum moves far away from the metastable supersymmetry breaking vacuum. We show a 4D simple model. Furthermore, we can construct 5D models with the same behavior, because of the AdS/CFT dual.

  13. Detection of sputtered metastable atoms by autoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wucher, A.; Berthold, W.; Oechsner, H.; Franzreb, K.

    1994-03-01

    We report on a scheme for the detection of sputter-generated metastable atoms that is based on the resonant excitation of an autoionizing state by single-photon absorption from a tunable laser. Using this technique, sputtered silver atoms ejected in the metastable 4{ital d}{sup 9}5{ital s}{sup 2}{ital D}{sub 5/2} state with an excitation energy of 3.75 eV have been detected. This represents the highest excitation energy of sputtered metastable atoms observed so far.

  14. Role of Metastable Pitting in Crevices on Crevice Stabilization in Alloys 625 and 22

    SciTech Connect

    B.A. Kehler; J.R. Scully

    2005-01-11

    The metastable pitting behavior inside crevices of alloys 625 and 22 was examined to obtain insight into differences in crevice corrosion susceptibility between alloys 625 and 22. Metastable corrosion event rates recorded as current-time transients were found to increase with increasing applied potential and temperature for both alloys. However, the increase was more significant for 625 as compared to alloy 22 and the cumulative number of events was greater. A strong correlation was obtained between the increase in event rates and decrease in crevice stabilization potential with temperature. Metastable peak heights, values for peak integrated charge, and current/pit depth (I/r) ratios were not strongly affected by these driving forces. The alloying content in alloy 22, traced to increased molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W), was rationalized to decrease the metastable event rate and hence, the cumulative number of events after a given time. However, metastable peak heights, values for peak integrated charge, and I/r ratios, as well as metastable peak shapes associated with individual events, were not strongly affected by alloy type in the narrow range of Mo contents explored here. Observed differences in resistance to crevice corrosion stabilization are rationalized to depend on differences in the cumulative number of metastable events occurring sufficiently close in space and time to contribute to the development of a critical crevice chemistry at specific depths in a crevice. The properties of individual events did not have a significant effect. Stable crevice corrosion eventually occurred at the sites where a row of metastable pits formed at a critical distance from the crevice mouth. This row of pit sites focused acidification, which contributed to local depassivation.

  15. Spectral intensity of the N2 emission in argon low-pressure arc discharges for lighting purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen is discussed as an alternative to hazardous mercury in lamps for general lighting. Molecular nitrogen bands emit in both the near-UV (the second positive system C3Πu → B3Πg) and the visible spectral range (the first positive system B3Πg → A3Σ+u), which reduces conversion losses. To analyse the potential of nitrogen, low-pressure arc discharges in an argon background were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The spectral intensity of the molecular nitrogen emission rises with increasing nitrogen content in the discharge and shows a maximum around 4 mbar of absolute pressure. With regard to the application as a light source, radiation efficiencies were determined, which are around 5% at maximum. In order to identify the main population processes a collisional radiative model for the nitrogen-argon system was established which reveals the high relevance of heavy-particle collisions due to a pressure of a few mbar. The decisive excitation reactions for the state N2 C3Πu are the well-known processes of energy pooling between metastable nitrogen molecules and energy transfer from metastable argon atoms. For the state N2 B3Πg the main population channels are collision-induced crossings within the nitrogen states, where the collision partner can be either a nitrogen molecule or an argon atom, and the quenching collisions with argon.

  16. PAMELA, DAMA, INTEGRAL and signatures of metastable excited WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay

    2009-09-01

    Models of dark matter with ~ GeV scale force mediators provide attractive explanations of many high energy anomalies, including PAMELA, ATIC, and the WMAP haze. At the same time, by exploiting the ~ MeV scale excited states that are automatically present in such theories, these models naturally explain the DAMA/LIBRA and INTEGRAL signals through the inelastic dark matter (iDM) and exciting dark matter (XDM) scenarios, respectively. Interestingly, with only weak kinetic mixing to hypercharge to mediate decays, the lifetime of excited states with δ < 2melectron is longer than the age of the universe. The fractional relic abundance of these excited states depends on the temperature of kinetic decoupling, but can be appreciable. There could easily be other mechanisms for rapid decay, but the consequences of such long-lived states are intriguing. We find that CDMS constrains the fractional relic population of ~ 100 keV states to be lsim 10-2, for a 1 TeV WIMP with σn = 10-40 cm2. Upcoming searches at CDMS, as well as xenon, silicon, and argon targets, can push this limit significantly lower. We also consider the possibility that the DAMA excitation occurs from a metastable state into the XDM state, which decays via e+e- emission, which allows lighter states to explain the INTEGRAL signal due to the small kinetic energies required. Such models yield dramatic signals from down-scattering, with spectra peaking at high energies, sometimes as high as ~ 1 MeV, well outside the usual search windows. Such signals would be visible at future Ar and Si experiments, and may be visible at Ge and Xe experiments, although γ-rays associated with nuclear excitations would complicate the signal for these heavier targets. We also consider other XDM models involving ~ 500 keV metastable states, and find they can allow lighter WIMPs to explain INTEGRAL as well.

  17. Metastability of a Supercompressed Fluid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ethan C.; Crane, Jonathan M.; Laderas, Ted G.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies showed that monomolecular films of extracted calf surfactant collapse at the equilibrium spreading pressure during quasi-static compressions but become metastable at much higher surface pressures when compressed faster than a threshold rate. To determine the mechanism by which the films become metastable, we studied single-component films of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC). Initial experiments confirmed similar metastability of POPC if compressed above a threshold rate. Measurements at different surface pressures then showed that rates of collapse, although initially increasing above the equilibrium spreading pressure, reached a sharply defined maximum and then slowed considerably. When heated, rapidly compressed films recovered their ability to collapse with no discontinuous change in area, arguing that the metastability does not reflect transition of the POPC film to a new phase. These observations indicate that in several respects, the supercompression of POPC monolayers resembles the supercooling of three-dimensional liquids toward a glass transition. PMID:14581205

  18. Metastability of Northern Hemisphere Teleconnection modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbey, James; O'Kane, Terence; Monselesan, Didier; Franzke, Christian; Horenko, Ilia

    2014-05-01

    This work applies the FEM-BV-VARX method to study of the large scale modes of variability in the Northern Hemisphere as manifest in 500hPa geopotential height fields. The FEM-BV-VARX method identifies metastable states of the system. The results for regional domains confirm that the teleconnection modes referred to as the NAO in the Atlantic domain, PNA in the Pacific domain, and Scandanavian blocking in the Eurasian domain, all exhibit metastability. For the full Northern Hemisphere domain the metastable state combines the AO and a midlatitude circumglobal wavetrain pattern. These results are shown in a set of reanalysis products from NCEP; the 20th century reanalysis, NNR1, and the CFSR coupled reanalysis. The reanalysis products are all able to simulate the structure and temporal switching of regime states. Decadal and multidecadal regimes are clearly apparent in the model affiliation sequence of metastable states and correspond to known transition points for the teleconnection modes.

  19. Studies of metastable neon atoms produced by electron-beam excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    In the optical method, electron-excitation cross sections of radiative atomic or molecular levels are measured by absolutely calibrating the optical radiation emitted when the excited species are produced by electron-beam excitation of a high-purity gas sample, However, this method is not applicable to metastable (nonradiating) excited levels. With a continuous-wave dye-laser beam intersecting the electron beam, the metastable species produced can be pumped to a higher, radiative level. The intensity of the resulting laser-induced fluorescence from the higher level can be measured to obtain the excitation cross section for production of the metastable level. The absolute number density of the metastable species can be determined by a similar method which uses a pulsed dye laser. This work describes the application of the pulsed-laser technique to the investigation of several aspects of electron-beam excitation of neon atoms in a static gas sample to the metastable 1s{sub 5} (2p{sup 5}3s{sup 3}P{sub 2}) level. In addition to spatially resolved number-density measurements, the temporal disappearance of the metastables from the collision region has been investigated. In the first 50 {mu}s after a fast cutoff of the electron beam, the decay curve of the metastable density is close to a single exponential form, with a time constant of 20 {mu}s. The magnitude of the laser-induced fluorescence per unit electron-beam current has been studied as a function of electron energy and ground-state neon density. Attempts to measure the cross section for exciting form the metastable levels to the higher excited 2p{sub 9} level (2p{sup 5}3p, J = 3) are also described.

  20. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  1. Negative Oxygen Ion Formation in a Pulsed Inductively RF Excited Argon-Oxygen Discharge and the Influence of Highly Excited Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsch, H.-M.; Manthey, C.; Döbele, H.-F.

    2003-10-01

    The temporal behavior of negative oxygen ions oxygen / argon mixtures was investigated in the afterglow of a pulsed inductively excited modified GEC reactor. The objective of this investigation is an improved understanding of the production reactions of the negative ions and the loss processes of negative ions during the plasma decay phase. Collisions of O-minus ions with O atoms and metastable oxygen molecules lead to considerable electron production in the afterglow. This late supply of electrons entails a delayed formation of a so-called ion-ion plasma. Discharges with admixtures of argon (up to 8:2 argon : oxygen) are also strongly electronegative. An increase of the absolute O-minus density is observed with increasing argon fraction. At low pressures and high contents of argon it is necessary to consider an additional production reaction channel for the negative ions in order to explain the measured increase of the negative ion density. Appearance potential mass spectroscopy measurements show an increase of highly excited oxygen molecules with increasing argon fraction. It is, therefore, likely that additional negative ions are generated by dissociative attachment of highly excited metastable oxygen molecules [1]. [1] D. Hayashi and K. Kadota, J. Appl. Phys. 83 (1998) 697 This project is funded by the Bundesminister für Bildung und Forschung BMBF (FKZ 13N8052).

  2. Optical Forces on Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher Scott

    Optical forces using lasers allow precise control over the motion of atoms. The bichromatic optical force (BF) is unique in its large magnitude and velocity range, arising from the absorption and stimulated emission processes. These properties were used to transversely collimate a beam of metastable helium (He*) using the 23S - 23P transition. The collimation created a very bright beam of He*, allowing experiments of neutral atom lithography. The He* beam was used to pattern material surfaces using a resist-based lithography technique, where the pattern was determined by either mechanical or optical masks. The optical masks produced features with a separation of half the wavelength of the light used. Patterning was successfully demonstrated with both IR and UV optical masks. The etched pattern resolution was ˜ 100 nm and limited by the material surface. Further experiments were performed studying the ability of the bichromatic force to cool. The finite velocity range of the BF allows estimation of a characteristic cooling time which is independent of the excited state lifetime, only depending on the atomic mass and optical transition energy. Past experiments, including the helium collimation used for neutral atom lithography, have demonstrated that the BF can collimate and longitudinally slow atomic beams, but required long interaction times that included many spontaneous emission (SE) events. The effect of SE can be mitigated, and is predicted to not be necessary for BF cooling. Since the BF cooling time is not related to the excited state lifetime, a transition can be chosen such that the cooling time is shorter than the SE cycle time, allowing direct laser cooling on atoms and molecules that do not have cycling transitions. Experiments using the helium 2 3S-3P transition were chosen because the BF cooling time (285 ns) is on the order of the average SE cycle time (260 ns). Numerical simulations of the experimental system were run predicting compression of the

  3. Incompatible Sets of Gradients and Metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. M.; James, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We give a mathematical analysis of a concept of metastability induced by incompatibility. The physical setting is a single parent phase, just about to undergo transformation to a product phase of lower energy density. Under certain conditions of incompatibility of the energy wells of this energy density, we show that the parent phase is metastable in a strong sense, namely it is a local minimizer of the free energy in an L 1 neighbourhood of its deformation. The reason behind this result is that, due to the incompatibility of the energy wells, a small nucleus of the product phase is necessarily accompanied by a stressed transition layer whose energetic cost exceeds the energy lowering capacity of the nucleus. We define and characterize incompatible sets of matrices, in terms of which the transition layer estimate at the heart of the proof of metastability is expressed. Finally we discuss connections with experiments and place this concept of metastability in the wider context of recent theoretical and experimental research on metastability and hysteresis.

  4. Exploration of Argon PSD with the MiniCLEAN 39Ar Spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronquest, Michael

    2013-04-01

    MiniCLEAN is a single-phase WIMP dark matter experiment which observes scintillation light from a 150kg fiducial mass liquid argon target. This design utilizes argon's powerful pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability in order to identify and separate electron recoil backgrounds from WIMP-induced nuclear recoil signals. Experimental knowledge of the efficacy of argon PSD, as a function of photoelectron statistics and electron recoil energy, would inform the design and physics reach of the next generation of detectors. MiniCLEAN will perform the best measurement to date of argon PSD by utilizing a novel technique of ``spiking'' the detector with additional amounts of 39Ar. This unstable isotope produces beta decays at a level of 1Bq/kg in natural argon, and thus presents a major background for argon based experiments. Produced using the irradiation of potassium salts, the 39Ar spike will be injected into MiniCLEAN to produce ``enriched argon'' with the data compared to a prior run using natural argon. The difference in the number and distribution of candidate events between the two runs will yield the magnitude and shape of the argon PSD leakage background PDF. This talk will review the motivation, production and use of the 39Ar spike in MiniCLEAN.

  5. Supersonic Argon Flow In An Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Izrar, B.; Dudeck, M.; Andre, P.; Elchinger, M. F.; Aubreton, J.

    2006-01-15

    The plasma properties inside a D.C. arc-jet operating with argon is analysed by means of a continuum description taking into account non equilibrium ionization processes and dissipative effects. The relaxation of the different physical processes inside the nozzle and the evolution of the Mach number are aanalysed.

  6. Multistability with a Metastable Mixed State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-09-01

    Complex dynamical systems often show multiple metastable states. In macroevolution, such behavior is suggested by punctuated equilibrium and discrete geological epochs. In molecular biology, bistability is found in epigenetics and in the many mutually exclusive states that a human cell can take. Sociopolitical systems can be single-party regimes or a pluralism of balancing political fractions. To introduce multistability, we suggest a model system of D mutually exclusive microstates that battle for dominance in a large system. Assuming one common intermediate state, we obtain D+1 metastable macrostates for the system, one of which is a self-reinforced mixture of all D+1 microstates. Robustness of this metastable mixed state increases with diversity D.

  7. Metastable Detection Using Cold Solid Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, William; Kedzierski, Wladek; Alsaiari, Fatimah

    2016-05-01

    Metastable particles produced in the interaction of electrons of carefully controlled energy with thermal gaseous target beams in a crossed beam set-up have been studied in the energy range from threshold to 300 eV. The e-beam is pulsed and the metastables produced drift to a solid nitrogen or rare gas detector held at 10 K. Here they form excimers which immediately radiate. The resultant photons are detected using a photomultiplier-filter combination. Time-of-flight techniques are used to separate these photons from prompt photons produced in the initial electron collision. With N2 as both target and detection matrix, the excimer emission is strongest in the green but still significant in the red spectral region. Excitation functions will be presented together with threshold measurements. These help to identify the metastable states being observed and the excitation mechanisms which are responsible. The authors thank NSERC and CFI (Canada) for financial support.

  8. Multistability with a metastable mixed state.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-09-01

    Complex dynamical systems often show multiple metastable states. In macroevolution, such behavior is suggested by punctuated equilibrium and discrete geological epochs. In molecular biology, bistability is found in epigenetics and in the many mutually exclusive states that a human cell can take. Sociopolitical systems can be single-party regimes or a pluralism of balancing political fractions. To introduce multistability, we suggest a model system of D mutually exclusive microstates that battle for dominance in a large system. Assuming one common intermediate state, we obtain D+1 metastable macrostates for the system, one of which is a self-reinforced mixture of all D+1 microstates. Robustness of this metastable mixed state increases with diversity D. PMID:23005273

  9. Kinetic Trapping of Metastable Amino Acid Polymorphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald’s Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  10. Kinetic trapping of metastable amino acid polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Azhad U; Dettmar, Christopher M; Sullivan, Shane Z; Zhang, Shijie; Jacobs, Kevin T; Kissick, David J; Maltais, Thora; Hedderich, Hartmut G; Bishop, Patricia A; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-02-12

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy measurements indicate that inkjet-printed racemic solutions of amino acids can produce nanocrystals trapped in metastable polymorph forms upon rapid solvent evaporation. Polymorphism impacts the composition, distribution, and physico-kinetic properties of organic solids, with energetic arguments favoring the most stable polymorph. In this study, unfavored noncentrosymmetric crystal forms were observed by SHG microscopy. Polarization-dependent SHG measurement and synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction analysis of individual printed drops are consistent with formation of homochiral crystal production. Fundamentally, these results provide evidence supporting the ubiquity of Ostwald's Rule of Stages, describing the hypothesized transitioning of crystals between metastable polymorphic forms in the early stages of crystal formation. Practically, the presence of homochiral metastable forms has implications on chiral resolution and on solid form preparations relying on rapid solvent evaporation. PMID:24451055

  11. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  12. Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-(E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.; Tandon, Hannah K.; Messinger, Joseph P.; Mlaver, Eli

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies of argon complexes with fluoroethylenes have revealed a preference for a geometry that maximizes the contact of the argon atom with heavy atoms on the fluoroethylene. We have observed a continuation of this trend when one of the fluorine atoms is replaced by chlorine. The argon-(E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene complex provides two competing heavy atom cavities, FCCF and FCCl, and the opportunity to examine whether the number of heavy atoms or the associated increase in polarizability is determinative of structure. The 5.6 -- 18.1 GHz chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrum of this species provides initial assignments and predictions for spectra obtained in a more sensitive and higher precision Balle-Flygare instrument. Transitions for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed and analyzed to provide geometric parameters for this non-planar complex. The spectrum is consistent with the argon atom located in the FCCl cavity, and the structure agrees well with ab initio predictions. Comparisons are made with Ar-1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene, (Z)-1-chloro-2-fluoroethylene, and Ar-vinyl chloride. Z. Kisiel, P.W. Fowler, and A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 2283 (1991).

  13. Observation of Metastable Structural Excitations and Concerted Atomic Motions on a Crystal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Golovchenko, Jene

    1992-11-01

    The addition of a small number of lead atoms to a germanium(111) surface reduces the energy barrier for activated processes, and with a tunneling microscope it is possible to observe concerted atomic motions and metastable structures on this surface near room temperature. The formation and annihilation of these metastable structural surface excitations is associated with the shift in position of large numbers of germanium surface atoms along a specific row direction like beads on an abacus. The effect provides a mechanism for understanding the transport of atoms on a semiconductor surface.

  14. On the Destabilization of Metastable Solid He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souris, F.; Qu, A.; Dupont-Roc, J.; Grucker, J.; Jacquier, Ph.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a metastable state of solid He has been produced by locally lowering the density of the solid below the melting density using a focused acoustic wave pulse. An unexpected instability of the solid has been found about 4 bar below the melting line. This paper reports on experiments precisely localizing in time the instability birth within the acoustic pulse. It is found that, as expected, the instability always appears during a depression swing of the wave. However a metastability pressure limit does not emerge clearly. Total stress duration seems also to play a role in the instability triggering, suggesting a fatigue effect.

  15. Two-Photon Ionization of Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechanski, James Poremba

    There have been relatively few investigations of multiphoton ionization from metastable helium. Of particular interest has been the work of Haberland et al. 1987 and Haberland and Oschwald 1988. In both the 1987 and 1988 papers they have described the two photon ionization of metastable helium. In each of these studies they have reported the occurrence of unexplained structure along the wings of their resonance profiles. Upon the performance of similar measurements by this study, the unexplained structure is not seen and the agreement of the experiment's measurements with the theoretical shape of the resonance curves has been good. To experimentally verify these resonance effects, we have used a tunable dye laser in conjunction with a time of flight mass spectrometer to create and detect ions from metastable helium by two-photon absorption. The use of a metastable state instead of the ground state is advantageous because of its proximity to the ionization continuum and its extended lifetime. Using a metastable state as a starting point for multiphoton absorption requires fewer photons to reach the ionization threshold. The extended lifetime of the state also makes it easy to access experimentally. For helium the singlet metastable state 2^1 S lies at 20.61 eV above the ground level with a natural lifetime of close to a millisecond. Two photons of 501.7 nm and 504.35 nm are required for the ionization processes in resonance with the 3^1P and the 3^1D states. This thesis is the accounting of the experimental process involved in the measurement of the dipole and quadrupole resonances of two photon ionization from singlet metastable helium. The study includes the description of the laser, electron gun assembly for metastable helium creation, and the time of flight mass spectrometer. A discussion of the theory of multiphoton processes is included along with the discussion of the data, its reduction and analysis, and a comparison with theoretical prediction. This study

  16. Use of propane as a quench gas in argon-filled proportional counters and comparison with other quench gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of propane and six other quench gases was carried out in argon-filled proportional counters. The objective of the study was to find the best gas mixture for optimizing the gas gain and the energy resolution as well as to understand the role of the ionization potential of quench gases in determining these parameters. It was found that the best gas gains and energy resolutions are obtained with propane, ethane, and isobutane in that order. The ionization potentials of these three lie below the argon metastable potentials and have the lowest value of resonance defect compared to the other quench gases. The better results obtained with these mixtures can be explained by an increased ionization yield resulting from the Penning effect. Propylene and trans-2-butene give inferior performance compared to the above three gases. Methane and carbon dioxide, the most commonly used quench gases in the argon-filled detectors, provide the worst results.

  17. Argon laser photocoagulation in the dog stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Salmon, P R; Kelly, D F; Calder, B M; Pearson, H; Weaver, B M; Read, A E

    1979-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is one of a number of methods currently under investigation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The Argon ion and Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd YAG) lasers are theoretically suitable as the beam from each may be transmitted via a flexible fibre. Argon laser photocoagulation has been shown to be effective and we have elucidated which factors determine its safety and efficacy. Studies on normal canine gastric mucosa showed that the depth of tissue damage depended chiefly on the total incident laser energy on any one spot, and that below 50 J the risk of perforation was extremely low. The energy density was much less important. The haemostatic effect depended more on the laser power. In artificial bleeding gastric ulcers in heparinised dogs the most effective level was 7--9 W, at which 22 out of 23 ulcers (96%) stopped bleeding completely, compared with one out of 12 controls. Photocoagulation was achieved in these cases with energies well within the safe limits. The procedure was effective endoscopically, and these results justify early clinical studies in man. PMID:573722

  18. Metastable dynamical patterns and their stabilization in arrays of bidirectionally coupled sigmoidal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Yo

    2013-12-01

    Transient patterns in a bistable ring of bidirectionally coupled sigmoidal neurons were studied. When the system had a pair of spatially uniform steady solutions, the instability of unstable spatially nonuniform steady solutions decreased exponentially with the number of neurons because of the symmetry of the system. As a result, transient spatially nonuniform patterns showed dynamical metastability: Their duration increased exponentially with the number of neurons and the duration of randomly generated patterns obeyed a power-law distribution. However, these metastable dynamical patterns were easily stabilized in the presence of small variations in coupling strength. Metastable rotating waves and their pinning in the presence of asymmetry in the direction of coupling and the disappearance of metastable dynamical patterns due to asymmetry in the output function of a neuron were also examined. Further, in a two-dimensional array of neurons with nearest-neighbor coupling, intrinsically one-dimensional patterns were dominant in transients, and self-excitation in these neurons affected the metastable dynamical patterns.

  19. Metastable states of highly excited heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Griffin, P. M.; Sellin, I. A.; Smith, W. W.; Donnally, B.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the method used and results obtained in an experimental study of the metastable states of highly stripped heavy ions, aimed at determining the lifetimes of such states by the rates of autoionization and radiation. The significance and limitations of the results presented are discussed.

  20. Reheating metastable O'Raifeartaigh models

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patrick; Craig, Nathaniel J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wacker, Jay G.

    2006-11-01

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  1. Reheating Metastable O'Raifeartaigh Models

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Nathaniel J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wacker, Jay G.

    2006-12-05

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  2. Reheating Metastable O'Raifeartaigh Models

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Nathaniel J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2006-12-13

    In theories with multiple vacua, reheating to a temperature greater than the height of a barrier can stimulate transitions from a desirable metastable vacuum to a lower energy state. We discuss the constraints this places on various theories and demonstrate that in a class of supersymmetric models this transition does not occur even for arbitrarily high reheating temperature.

  3. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  4. Radiative Lifetimes of Metastable Atomic Ions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamai, Anthony Gerard

    The natural radiative lifetimes of eleven metastable states of several atomic ions have been determined by monitoring for equal time intervals the photons emitted from an ion population containing the appropriate metastable species. The measured lifetimes range from 4.6 +/- 0.3 to 133 +/- 24 msec, and correspond to various low ionization states of the parent atoms. Of the eleven lifetimes, four are for states of mercury ions, six for noble gas ions, and one is for singly ionized nitrogen. The metastable ions were produced by electron bombardment of the appropriate neutral atomic vapor and stored inside a cylindrical, electrostatic ion trap. The pressure of the atomic vapor in the trapping volume ranged from 4 to 80 times 10^{ -8} Torr. The trap consists of a 5.0 cm diameter, 7.5 cm long cylinder with end caps and a concentric 0.003 cm diameter central cylinder maintained at a negative potential of about 150 volts. Electrons, produced by a tungsten dispenser cathode, are pulsed on for several msec, travel parallel to the trap axis, and acquire approximately 200 eV of kinetic energy before entering the ion confinement region. Following electron impact ionization of the atomic vapor, some of the photons emitted by the decaying metastable ion population emerge from the trap and are focused onto a 10 nm bandwidth interference filter. Photons transmitted by the filter are detected by a photomultiplier tube as a function of time, yielding a forbidden luminescence decay curve. As dictated by the composition of the photon decay curve, decay rates are obtained from a least-squares fit to the logarithm of either a single or a double component exponential decay. Mean decay rates are extrapolated to zero pressure of the parent atomic vapor using a straight -line least-squares fit; the radiative lifetimes of the metastable ions are obtained from the intercept of the pressure extrapolation.

  5. Effect of EDTA on the metastable zone width of ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N. P.; Meera, K.; Srinivasan, K.; Santhana Raghavan, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2000-06-01

    Enhancement of the metastable zone width in ammonium dihydrogen ortho phosphate (ADP) was achieved by the addition of 1 mol% of the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) to ADP solution. The metastable zone width studies were conducted and the nucleation parameters were calculated from the measurements of the dependence of the metastable zone width on the cooling rate.

  6. Metastable kinks in the orbifold.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Manuel; Trodden, Mark

    2008-02-01

    We consider static configurations of bulk scalar fields in extra-dimensional models in which the fifth dimension is an S1/Z2 orbifold. There may exist a finite number of such configurations, with the total number depending on the size of the orbifold interval. We perform a detailed Sturm-Liouville stability analysis that demonstrates that all but the lowest-lying configurations--those with no nodes in the interval--are unstable. We also present a powerful general criterion with which to determine which of these nodeless solutions are stable. The detailed analysis underlying the results presented in this Letter, and applications to specific models, are presented in a comprehensive companion paper [M. Toharia and M. Trodden, arXiv:hep-ph/0708.4008]. PMID:18352259

  7. On the lifetime of metastable states in self-gravitating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, P. H.

    2005-03-01

    We discuss the physical basis of the statistical mechanics of self-gravitating systems. We show the correspondance between statistical mechanics methods based on the evaluation of the density of states and partition function and thermodynamical methods based on the optimization of a thermodynamical potential (entropy or free energy). We address the question of the thermodynamic limit of self-gravitating systems, the justification of the mean-field approximation, the validity of the saddle point approximation near the transition point, the lifetime of metastable states and the fluctuations in isothermal spheres. In particular, we emphasize the tremendously long lifetime of metastable states of self-gravitating systems which increases exponentially with the number of particles N except in the vicinity of the critical point. More specifically, using an adaptation of the Kramers formula justified by a kinetic theory, we show that the lifetime of a metastable state scales as eNΔ s in microcanonical ensemble and eNΔ j in canonical ensemble, where Δ s and Δ j are the barriers of entropy and free energy j=s-β ɛ per particle respectively. The physical caloric curve must take these metastable states (local entropy maxima) into account. As a result, it becomes multi-valued and leads to microcanonical phase transitions and “dinosaur's necks” (Chavanis [CITE], [arXiv:astroph/0205426]; Chavanis & Rieutord [CITE], A&A, 412, 1). The consideration of metastable states answers the critics raised by D.H.E. Gross [cond-mat/0307535/0403582].

  8. Control of switching between metastable superconducting states in δ-MoN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Buh, Jože; Kabanov, Viktor; Baranov, Vladimir; Mrzel, Aleš; Kovič, Andrej; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting state in one-dimensional nanosystems is very delicate. While fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting wave function lead to the spontaneous decay of persistent supercurrents in thin superconducting wires and nanocircuits, discrete phase-slip fluctuations can also lead to more exotic phenomena, such as the appearance of metastable superconducting states in current-bearing wires. Here we show that switching between different metastable superconducting states in δ-MoN nanowires can be very effectively manipulated by introducing small amplitude electrical noise. Furthermore, we show that deterministic switching between metastable superconducting states with different numbers of phase-slip centres can be achieved in both directions with small electrical current pulse perturbations of appropriate polarity. The observed current-controlled bi-stability is in remarkable agreement with theoretically predicted trajectories of the system switching between different limit cycle solutions of a model one-dimensional superconductor. PMID:26687762

  9. Control of switching between metastable superconducting states in δ-MoN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buh, Jože; Kabanov, Viktor; Baranov, Vladimir; Mrzel, Aleš; Kovič, Andrej; Mihailovic, Dragan

    2015-12-01

    The superconducting state in one-dimensional nanosystems is very delicate. While fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting wave function lead to the spontaneous decay of persistent supercurrents in thin superconducting wires and nanocircuits, discrete phase-slip fluctuations can also lead to more exotic phenomena, such as the appearance of metastable superconducting states in current-bearing wires. Here we show that switching between different metastable superconducting states in δ-MoN nanowires can be very effectively manipulated by introducing small amplitude electrical noise. Furthermore, we show that deterministic switching between metastable superconducting states with different numbers of phase-slip centres can be achieved in both directions with small electrical current pulse perturbations of appropriate polarity. The observed current-controlled bi-stability is in remarkable agreement with theoretically predicted trajectories of the system switching between different limit cycle solutions of a model one-dimensional superconductor.

  10. Spontaneous SUSY breaking with anomalous U(1) symmetry by meta-stable vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-23

    We will discuss a SUSY breaking model with anomalous U(1) symmetry. We discard R-symmetry and allow non-renormalizable terms for the model. It will be shown that certain class of models, where the number of positively charged fields is larger than that of negatively charged fields, can have meta-stable SUSY breaking vacuum.

  11. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  12. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  13. Short-range Ising spin glasses: the metastate interpretation of replica symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Read, N

    2014-09-01

    Parisi's formal replica-symmetry-breaking (RSB) scheme for mean-field spin glasses has long been interpreted in terms of many pure states organized ultrametrically. However, the early version of this interpretation, as applied to the short-range Edwards-Anderson model, runs into problems because as shown by Newman and Stein (NS) it does not allow for chaotic size dependence, and predicts non-self-averaging that cannot occur. NS proposed the concept of the metastate (a probability distribution over infinite-size Gibbs states in a given sample that captures the effects of chaotic size dependence) and a nonstandard interpretation of the RSB results in which the metastate is nontrivial and is responsible for what was called non-self-averaging. In this picture, each state drawn from the metastate has the ultrametric properties of the old theory, but when the state is averaged using the metastate, the resulting mixed state has little structure. This picture was constructed so as to agree both with the earlier RSB results and with rigorous results. Here we use the effective field theory of RSB, in conjunction with the rigorous definitions of pure states and the metastate in infinite-size systems, to show that the nonstandard picture follows directly from the RSB mean-field theory. In addition, the metastate-averaged state possesses power-law correlations throughout the low-temperature phase; the corresponding exponent ζ takes the value 4 according to the field theory in high dimensions d, and describes the effective fractal dimension of clusters of spins. Further, the logarithm of the number of pure states in the decomposition of the metastate-averaged state that can be distinguished if only correlations in a window of size W can be observed is of order W(d-ζ). These results extend the nonstandard picture quantitatively; we show that arguments against this scenario are inconclusive. More generally, in terms of Parisi's function q(x), if q(0)≠∫(0)(1)dxq(x), then the

  14. Calibration of Electric Field Induced Energy Level Shifts in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    1999-10-01

    Argon is a commonly used gas in a number of discharges. As such it is an ideal candidate for spectroscopic based electric field measurements within the sheath and bulk discharge regions. Recently, measurements demonstrated the use of the Stark induced shifts of high lying energy levels in Argon to make spatially and temporally resolved electric field measurements [1]. However, that method relied on the cross calibration of known and calculable shifts in helium discharges to calibrate, in-situ, the energy level shifts in Argon. This poster shows the use of an atomic beam system to calibrate the electric field induced shift of high lying energy levels directly. In addition, data on very high lying argon levels, up to the 20 F manifold, were obtained. Comparison of our electric field induced energy level shift calibration curves with previous work will be shown. The possibility of using this system to calibrate energy level shifts in other gases of technological interest to the microelectronics and lighting industry will be discussed. [1]. J. B. Kim, K. Kawamura, Y. W. Choi, M. D. Bowden, K. Muraoka and V. Helbig, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 26(5), 1556 (1998). This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories and supported by the United States Department of Energy (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  15. On metastable regimes in stochastic Lamb system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidlin, M. I.; Komech, A. I.

    2006-04-01

    We consider the long time behavior of the coupled Hamilton system of one-dimensional string and nonlinear oscillator, in contact with a heat bath modeled by the white noise. For any temperature the system converges to a statistical equilibrium described by the Boltzmann equilibrium measure. The convergence is caused by radiation provided by the nonlinear coupling. If the oscillator potential has more than one well and the temperature is small, the relaxation time is large, and the system goes through a sequence of metastable states located near local minima of the potential. When both, the temperature and the radiation rate are small, the metastable states are distributions among the minima of the potential.

  16. Metastable spontaneous breaking of N = 2 supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Légeret, Benoît; Scrucca, Claudio A.; Smyth, Paul

    2013-05-01

    We show that contrary to the common lore it is possible to spontaneously break N = 2 supersymmetry even in simple theories without constant Fayet-Iliopoulos terms. We consider the most general N = 2 supersymmetric theory with one hypermultiplet and one vector multiplet without Fayet-Iliopoulos terms, and show that metastable supersymmetry breaking vacua can arise if both the hyper-Kähler and the special-Kähler geometries are suitably curved. We then also prove that while all the scalars can be massive, the lightest one is always lighter than the vector boson. Finally, we argue that these results also directly imply that metastable de Sitter vacua can exist in N = 2 supergravity theories with Abelian gaugings and no Fayet-Iliopoulos terms, again contrary to common lore, at least if the cosmological constant is sufficiently large.

  17. Metastable structure of Li13Si4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The Li13Si4 phase is one out of several crystalline lithium silicide phases, which is a potential electrode material for lithium ion batteries and contains a high theoretical specific capacity. By means of ab initio methods like density functional theory (DFT) many properties such as heat capacity or heat of formation can be calculated. These properties are based on the calculation of phonon frequencies, which contain information about the thermodynamical stability. The current unit cell of "Li13Si4" given in the ICSD database is unstable with respect to DFT calculations. We propose a modified unit cell that is stable in the calculations. The evolutionary algorithm EVO found a structure very similar to the ICSD one with both of them containing metastable lithium positions. Molecular dynamic simulations show a phase transition between both structures where these metastable lithium atoms move. This phase transition is achieved by a very fast one-dimensional lithium diffusion and stabilizes this phase.

  18. Universal metastability of sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Weijun

    Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is a natural mutation of the normal hemoglobin (HbA) found in the red blood cells of human body. Polymerization of HbS occurs when the concentration of deoxyHbS exceeds a well-defined solubility, which is the underlying cause of the Sickle Cell Disease. It has long been assumed that thermodynamic equilibrium is reached when polymerization comes to an end. However, in this thesis we demonstrate that in confined volume as well as in bulk solution, HbS polymerization terminates prematurely, leaving the solution in a metastable state. A newly developed Reservoir method as well as modulated excitation method were adopted for the study. This discovery of universal metastability gives us new insights into understanding the mechanism of sickle cell disease.

  19. Metastable dynamics in heterogeneous neural fields

    PubMed Central

    Schwappach, Cordula; Hutt, Axel; beim Graben, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of metastable states in heterogeneous neural fields that are connected along heteroclinic orbits. Such trajectories are possible representations of transient neural activity as observed, for example, in the electroencephalogram. Based on previous theoretical findings on learning algorithms for neural fields, we directly construct synaptic weight kernels from Lotka-Volterra neural population dynamics without supervised training approaches. We deliver a MATLAB neural field toolbox validated by two examples of one- and two-dimensional neural fields. We demonstrate trial-to-trial variability and distributed representations in our simulations which might therefore be regarded as a proof-of-concept for more advanced neural field models of metastable dynamics in neurophysiological data. PMID:26175671

  20. Metastability in bubbling AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Stefano; Pasini, Giulio; Puhm, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of probe M5 branes with dissolved M2 charge in bubbling geometries with SO(4) × SO(4) symmetry. These solutions were constructed by Bena-Warner and Lin-Lunin-Maldacena and correspond to the vacua of the maximally supersymmetric mass-deformed M2 brane theory. We find that supersymmetric probe M2 branes polarize into M5 brane shells whose backreaction creates an additional bubble in the geometry. We explicitly check that the supersymmetric polarization potential agrees with the one found within the Polchinski-Strassler approximation. The main result of this paper is that probe M2 branes whose orientation is opposite to the background flux can polarize into metastable M5 brane shells. These decay to a supersymmetric configuration via brane-flux annihilation. Our findings suggest the existence of metastable states in the mass-deformed M2 brane theory.

  1. Metastable dynamics in heterogeneous neural fields.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, Cordula; Hutt, Axel; Beim Graben, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of metastable states in heterogeneous neural fields that are connected along heteroclinic orbits. Such trajectories are possible representations of transient neural activity as observed, for example, in the electroencephalogram. Based on previous theoretical findings on learning algorithms for neural fields, we directly construct synaptic weight kernels from Lotka-Volterra neural population dynamics without supervised training approaches. We deliver a MATLAB neural field toolbox validated by two examples of one- and two-dimensional neural fields. We demonstrate trial-to-trial variability and distributed representations in our simulations which might therefore be regarded as a proof-of-concept for more advanced neural field models of metastable dynamics in neurophysiological data. PMID:26175671

  2. Stochastic basins of attraction for metastable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdukova, Larissa; Zheng, Yayun; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Basin of attraction of a stable equilibrium point is an effective concept for stability analysis in deterministic systems; however, it does not contain information on the external perturbations that may affect it. Here we introduce the concept of stochastic basin of attraction (SBA) by incorporating a suitable probabilistic notion of basin. We define criteria for the size of the SBA based on the escape probability, which is one of the deterministic quantities that carry dynamical information and can be used to quantify dynamical behavior of the corresponding stochastic basin of attraction. SBA is an efficient tool to describe the metastable phenomena complementing the known exit time, escape probability, or relaxation time. Moreover, the geometric structure of SBA gives additional insight into the system's dynamical behavior, which is important for theoretical and practical reasons. This concept can be used not only in models with small noise intensity but also with noise whose amplitude is proportional or in general is a function of an order parameter. As an application of our main results, we analyze a three potential well system perturbed by two types of noise: Brownian motion and non-Gaussian α-stable Lévy motion. Our main conclusions are that the thermal fluctuations stabilize the metastable system with an asymmetric three-well potential but have the opposite effect for a symmetric one. For Lévy noise with larger jumps and lower jump frequencies ( α = 0.5 ) metastability is enhanced for both symmetric and asymmetric potentials.

  3. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  4. Stochastic basins of attraction for metastable states.

    PubMed

    Serdukova, Larissa; Zheng, Yayun; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Basin of attraction of a stable equilibrium point is an effective concept for stability analysis in deterministic systems; however, it does not contain information on the external perturbations that may affect it. Here we introduce the concept of stochastic basin of attraction (SBA) by incorporating a suitable probabilistic notion of basin. We define criteria for the size of the SBA based on the escape probability, which is one of the deterministic quantities that carry dynamical information and can be used to quantify dynamical behavior of the corresponding stochastic basin of attraction. SBA is an efficient tool to describe the metastable phenomena complementing the known exit time, escape probability, or relaxation time. Moreover, the geometric structure of SBA gives additional insight into the system's dynamical behavior, which is important for theoretical and practical reasons. This concept can be used not only in models with small noise intensity but also with noise whose amplitude is proportional or in general is a function of an order parameter. As an application of our main results, we analyze a three potential well system perturbed by two types of noise: Brownian motion and non-Gaussian α-stable Lévy motion. Our main conclusions are that the thermal fluctuations stabilize the metastable system with an asymmetric three-well potential but have the opposite effect for a symmetric one. For Lévy noise with larger jumps and lower jump frequencies ( α=0.5) metastability is enhanced for both symmetric and asymmetric potentials. PMID:27475077

  5. Optimized Markov state models for metastable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnera, Enrico; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to identify target states that optimize a metastability index amongst a set of trial states and use these target states as milestones (or core sets) to build Markov State Models (MSMs). If the optimized metastability index is small, this automatically guarantees the accuracy of the MSM, in the sense that the transitions between the target milestones is indeed approximately Markovian. The method is simple to implement and use, it does not require that the dynamics on the trial milestones be Markovian, and it also offers the possibility to partition the system's state-space by assigning every trial milestone to the target milestones it is most likely to visit next and to identify transition state regions. Here the method is tested on the Gly-Ala-Gly peptide, where it is shown to correctly identify the expected metastable states in the dihedral angle space of the molecule without a priori information about these states. It is also applied to analyze the folding landscape of the Beta3s mini-protein, where it is shown to identify the folded basin as a connecting hub between an helix-rich region, which is entropically stabilized, and a beta-rich region, which is energetically stabilized and acts as a kinetic trap.

  6. Argon recovery from hydrogen depleted ammonia plant purge gas using a HARP Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, R.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    A number of ammonia plants employ membranes or cryogenic hydrogen recovery units to separate hydrogen contained in the purge gas for recycle to the ammonia synthesis loop. The resulting hydrogen depleted purge gas, which is usually used for fuel, is an attractive source of argon. This paper presents the novel features of a process which employs a combination of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) and cryogenic technology to separate the argon from this hydrogen depleted purge gas stream. This new proprietary Hybrid Argon Recovery Progress (HARP) plant is an effective alternative to a conventional all-cryogenic plant.

  7. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  8. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  9. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  10. THE USE OF MICROELECTRODES IN THE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF ELECTROLYTE COMPOSITION, POTENTIAL AND METALLURGICAL CONDITION ON NUCLEATION AND METASTABLE PITTING OF STAINLESS STEEL 316

    SciTech Connect

    Ilevbare, G O; Burstein, G T

    2004-09-23

    The study of stainless steel 316 has been undertaken in electrolytes containing various concentrations of chloride (Cl{sup -}) and perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) ions. The concentration of Cl{sup -} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in these electrolytes varied between 0.025 and 0.1 M in a variety of combinations. Results showed that the total number of nucleation and metastable pitting events increased as [Cl{sup -}] and potential increased. However, the percentage propagation rate of metastable pits from nucleations increased. The data also showed that the metallurgical condition of the specimen affected the number of nucleations and metastable pits generated.

  11. The Use of Microelectrodes in the Study of the Effects of Electrolyte Composition, Potential and Metallurgical Condition on Nucleation and Metastable Pitting of Stainless Steel 316

    SciTech Connect

    Ilevbare, G O; Burstein, G T

    2004-09-23

    The study of stainless steel 316 has been undertaken in electrolytes containing various concentrations of chloride (Cl{sup -}) and perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) ions. The concentration of Cl{sup -} and ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in these electrolytes varied between 0.025 and 0.1 M in a variety of combinations. Results showed that the total number of nucleation and metastable pitting events increased as [Cl{sup -}] and potential increased. However, the percentage propagation rate of metastable pits from nucleations increased. The data also showed that the metallurgical condition of the specimen affected the number of nucleations and metastable pits generated.

  12. The interaction of the theophylline metastable phase with water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, A. A.; Boldyrev, V. V.; Sidel'Nikov, A. A.; Chizhik, S. A.

    2008-07-01

    The conditions of hydration of the stable and metastable theophylline phases were determined. Two-phase metastable phase/monohydrate and stable phase/monohydrate equilibrium pressures were measured at 25, 30, and 35°C. The metastable phase began to react with water vapor at lower relative humidities than the stable phase. Processes that occurred with the metastable and stable theophylline phases over various water pressure ranges were considered. The metastable phase exhibited an unusual behavior at 25°C and relative humidity 47%. At constant water vapor pressure and temperature, theophylline was initially hydrated and then lost water and again became anhydrous. Two consecutive processes occurred in the system, the formation of theophylline monohydrate from the metastable phase and its decomposition to the stable phase. The ratio between the rates of these processes determined the content of the monohydrate at the given time moment.

  13. The effect of metastable pyroxene on the slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, Roberto; Hunen, Jeroen; Goes, Saskia

    2014-12-01

    Seismic studies show that some subducting slabs penetrate straight into the lower mantle, whereas others seem to flatten near the base of the mantle transition zone. Slab stagnation is often attributed to an increase in viscosity and phase transformations in the olivine system. However, recent mineral physics studies showed that due to extremely low transformational diffusion rates, low-density metastable pyroxene may persist into the transition zone in cool slabs. Here we use a dynamically fully self-consistent subduction model to investigate the influence of metastable pyroxene on the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere. Our results show that metastable pyroxene affects slab buoyancy at least as much as olivine metastability. However, unlike metastable olivine, which can inhibit slab penetration in the lower mantle only for cold, old, and fast slabs, metastable pyroxene is likely to also affect sinking of relatively young and slow slabs.

  14. Positive column of the glow discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovskiy, Valeriy; Artushenko, Ekaterina; Yegorenkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    We report the measurements we performed of the reduced electric field strength E / p in the positive column in the range of the gas pressure and tube radius product of 0.01 argon are obtained. The second model consists in considering the production and loss of charged particles and metastable atoms and obtaining a simple equation for the reduced electric field E / p depending on the discharge current density, gas pressure and tube radius. These models furnish a good description of experimental data in the whole range of pR values studied. and Scientific Center of Physical Technologies, Svobody Sq.6, Kharkov, 61022, Ukraine.

  15. Noise signatures of metastable resistivity states in ferromagnetic insulating manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Przybytek, J.; Fink-Finowicki, J.; Puźniak, R.; Markovich, V.; Jung, G.

    2015-07-28

    Pronounced noise signatures enabling one to discriminate metastable resistivity states in La{sub 0.86}Ca{sub 0.14}MnO{sub 3} single crystals have been observed. The normalized noise spectra for metastable resisitivity differ both in shape and magnitude, indicating that the metastable state is associated with transition of the electronic system into another local minimum of the potential landscape. Such scenario is consistent with freezing of the electronic system into a Coulomb glass state.

  16. Search for Metastability of 2s Muonic Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Bernard Wilhelm

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) to establish the conditions for the metastability of the 2S-state of muonic neon. The muonic atoms were formed by stopping negative muons in the neon-filled target chamber of the PSI cyclotron trap. A pair of intrinsic germanium detectors were used in coincidence to search for the two photon decay of the 2S-state. Both energy and time information from two photon events were written to disk for off-line analysis. Data were accumulated for neon pressures of 40 and 400 Torr. The data were then searched for evidence of two photon transitions from the 2S-state. The germanium detectors were sensitive to the K-, L- and M- series x-ray photons (with energies between 10 and 300 keV) emitted during the cascade of the muonic neon ion. The detectors were also used alone to record single photon events of the K- and L-series x rays. The observed intensity ratios of the K-series x rays provided a lower limit on the initial population of the 2S-state. For the pressure condition of 40 Torr of neon, the 2S population was found to be 1.75% +/- .15% of the total cascade. The number of events at 40 Torr that could be attributed to two photon decays of the 2S-state was found to be 30 +/- 52 corresponding to a 2S population of 3.8% +/- 6.5%. At 400 Torr of neon the observed number of 2S two photon decays was 7 +/- 41, placing an upper limit on the 2S population at 0.9% +/- 5.1% of the total cascade. These results, to within the experimental uncertainties, can neither establish nor exclude the metastability of 2S muonic neon.

  17. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  18. Metastable Krypton Beam Source via Two-Photon Pumping Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.W.; Young, L.

    2003-01-01

    Metastable beams of rare gas atoms have wide applications in chemical analysis of samples, as well as in aiding understanding of fundamental processes and physical attributes. Most current sources of metastable rare gas atomic beams, however, are limited in their flux density, which greatly reduces their utility in applications such as low level trace analysis and precision measurements. Previous work has demonstrated feasibility of metastable krypton production via two-photon pumping, and this paper extends that possibility into beam form. Further optimization on this scheme, moreover, promises 100-fold increase of metastable krypton flux density over that of an rf-driven discharge.

  19. Numerical modelling of the nonequilibrium expansion process of argon plasma flow through a nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fu-Zhi; Wang, Hai-Xing; Murphy, A. B.; Sun, Wei-Ping; Liu, Yu

    2013-12-01

    A two-temperature thermal and chemical nonequilibrium model is developed and applied to investigate the expansion processes of an argon plasma flow through a Laval nozzle. This model describes in a self-consistent manner the gas flow and heat transfer, the coupling of the electric energy deposited into the plasma, and the reaction kinetics including the contribution of excited species. It is found that the plasma is far from thermodynamic equilibrium in the entire argon plasma flow expansion process through a nozzle. Significant temperature discrepancies between electrons and heavy species are found in the cooler outer region. The dominant chemical kinetic processes in different plasma gas expansion regions are presented and discussed. It is noted that although the number density of excited argon atoms (Ar*) is much lower than that of other species in the argon plasma, Ar* play important roles in the ionization and recombination processes, and in arc attachment to the anode.

  20. Argon inclusion in sputtered films and the effect of the gas on molybdenum field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Reuss, Robert H.

    2001-04-01

    Residual gas analysis of a number of field emission displays showed that argon desorbed from molybdenum metal lines was the dominant gas in sealed vacuum packages. We present experimental results on the emission characteristics of molybdenum field emitter arrays in argon ambient. In argon, the emission current dropped rapidly similar to that in oxygenic gas ambients. Existing degradation models do not provide an adequate explanation for this behavior. Rather, we suggest a model based on shallow implantation of argon into the field emitter tips that increases the effective width of the tunneling barrier. Experimental support for this model comes from the following observations: emission current degraded only when the device was turned on; after gas exposure, significant current recovery which followed diffusion type behavior was noted; degradation and recovery rates were functions of partial pressure; and no detectable effects associated with sputtering were observed. This mechanism is also consistent with ion pumping known to occur in field emission displays.

  1. Transport mechanisms of metastable and resonance atoms in a gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu; Gorchakov, S.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-04-01

    Atoms in electronically excited states are of significant importance in a large number of different gas discharges. The spatio-temporal distribution particularly of the lower excited states, the metastable and resonance ones, influences the overall behavior of the plasma because of their role in the ionization and energy budget. This article is a review of the theoretical and experimental studies on the spatial formation and temporal evolution of metastable and resonance atoms in weakly ionized low-temperature plasmas. Therefore, the transport mechanisms due to collisional diffusion and resonance radiation are compared step by step. The differences in formation of spatio-temporal structures of metastable and resonance atoms in plasmas are attributed to these different transport mechanisms. The analysis is performed by obtaining solutions of the diffusion and radiation transport equations. Solutions of stationary and non-stationary problems by decomposition over the eigenfunctions of the corresponding operators showed that there is, on the one hand, an effective suppression of the highest diffusion modes and, on the other hand, a survival of the highest radiation modes. The role of the highest modes is illustrated by examples. In addition, the differences in the Green functions for the diffusion and radiation transport operators are discussed. Numerical methods for the simultaneous solution of the balance equations for metastable and resonance atoms are proposed. The radiation transport calculations consider large absorption coefficients according to the Lorentz contour of a spectral line. Measurements of the distributions of metastable and resonance atoms are reviewed for a larger number of discharge conditions, i.e. in the positive column plasma, afterglow plasma, constricted pulsed discharge, stratified discharge, magnetron discharge, and in a discharge with a cathode spot.

  2. Structure and metastability of N-lignocerylgalactosylsphingosine (cerebroside) bilayers.

    PubMed

    Reed, R A; Shipley, G G

    1987-01-26

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction have been used to study hydrated N-lignocerylgalactosylsphingosine (NLGS) bilayers. DSC of fully hydrated NLGS shows an endothermic transition at 69-70 degrees C, immediately followed by an exothermic transition at 72-73 degrees C; further heating shows a high-temperature (Tc = 82 degrees C), high-enthalpy (delta H = 15.3 kcal/mol NLGS) transition. Heating to 75 degrees C, cooling to 20 degrees C and subsequent reheating shows no transitions at 69-73 degrees C; only the high-temperature (82 degrees C), high-enthalpy (15.3 kcal/mol) transition. Two exothermic transitions are observed on cooling; for the upper transition its temperature (about 65 degrees C) and enthalpy (about 6 kcal/mol NLGS) are essentially independent of cooling rate, whereas the lower transition exhibits marked changes in both temperature (30----60 degrees C) and enthalpy (2.2----9.5 kcal/mol NLGS) as the cooling rate decreases from 40 to 0.625 Cdeg/min. On reheating, the enthalpy of the 69-70 degrees C transition is dependent on the previous cooling rate. The DSC data provide clear evidence of conversions between metastable and stable forms. X-ray diffraction data recorded at 26, 75 and 93 degrees C show clearly that NLGS bilayer phases are present at all temperatures. The X-ray diffraction pattern at 75 degrees C shows a bilayer periodicity d = 65.4 A, and a number of sharp reflections in the wide-angle region indicative of a crystalline chain packing mode. This stable bilayer form converts to a liquid-crystal bilayer phase; at 93 degrees C, the bilayer periodicity d = 59.1 A, and a diffuse reflection at 1/4.6 A-1 is observed. The diffraction pattern at 22 degrees C represents a combination of the stable and metastable low-temperature bilayer forms. NLGS exhibits a complex pattern of thermotropic changes related to conversions between metastable (gel), stable (crystalline) and liquid-crystalline bilayer phases. The structure and

  3. Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing; Duan Yixiang

    2013-01-21

    A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

  4. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  5. Modelling of RF Discharge in Argon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, P.; Virostko, P.; Hubicka, Z.; Bartos, P.

    2007-12-26

    An one-dimensional hybrid model of RF discharge in low-temperature argon plasma is presented in our paper. The hybrid model consists of two parts--particle model which simulates fast electrons while fluid model simulates slow electrons and positive argon ions. In the particle model the positions and velocities of fast electrons are calculated by means of deterministic Verlet algorithm while the collision processes are treated by the stochastic way. For the solution of fluid equations, for slow electrons and positive argon ions, the Scharfetter-Gummel exponential algorithm was used. Typical results of our calculations presented in this paper are total RF current and RF voltage waveforms on the planar substrate immersed into argon plasma. The next results which can be found here are the ion, electron and displacement current waveforms on the substrate. Especially, the knowledge of waveform of the ion current is very important for experimental physicists during the deposition of thin films.

  6. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  7. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  9. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  10. Metastable isomers - A new class of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Herbst, E.

    1979-01-01

    The abundances of a variety of metastable isomers of small organic molecules, analogous to HNC/HCN, in dense interstellar clouds are considered. These metastable species, some of which are thought to exist as intermediates in laboratory organic chemical reactions, are of considerable interest to chemists. Current ideas of gas-phase, ion-molecule chemistry are utilized to demonstrate that such metastable species should often be present in dense clouds in sufficient abundance to be observed. Unfortunately, the spectral constants of metastable isomers have rarely been determined in the laboratory, and quantum chemical calculations of a varying degree of accuracy must be utilized; results are included of some new quantum chemical calculations. The interstellar chemistry and expected microwave spectra of a representative sample of possibly important interstellar metastable isomers are discussed.

  11. Method for numerical simulations of metastable states

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, U.M.; Seiberg, N.

    1983-06-15

    We present a numerical simulation of metastable states near a first-order phase transition in the example of a U(1) lattice gauge theory with a generalized action. In order to make measurements in these states possible their decay has to be prevented. We achieve this by using a microcanonical simulation for a finite system. We then obtain the coupling constant (inverse temperature) as a function of the action density. It turns out to be nonmonotonic and hence not uniquely invertible. From it we derive the effective potential for the action density. This effective potential is not always convex, a property that seems to be in contradiction with the standard lore about its convexity. This apparent ''paradox'' is resolved in a discussion about different definitions of the effective potential.

  12. Polymorphism and metastable growth of DKDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min-hua; Fang, Chang-shui; Yu, Xi-ling; Wang, Min; Zheng, Tao-hong; Gao, Zhang-shou

    1981-05-01

    Single crystal K( H1- xDx) 2PO4, DKDP or deuterated pottassium dihydrogen phosphate in the low temperature tetragonal form is desired as single crystals for electro-optic applications. Its growth by slow cooling of aqueous solutions is limited by the fact that the temperature interval for cooling is usually limited by the upper temperature set by the tetragonal-monoclinic transition. The dependence of the transition temperature on deuterium concentration in solution has been studied. Careful studies showed that at moderate conditions of supersaturation the metastable tetragonal form persists and can be crystallized in the monoclinic stability field. These results were used to allow growth of good quality crystals over an extended temperature interval including the monoclinic stability region.

  13. Metastable orientational order of colloidal discoids

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Lilian C.; Schultz, Benjamin A.; Glaser, Jens; Engel, Michael; Szakasits, Megan E.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between phase separation and kinetic arrest is important in supramolecular self-assembly, but their effects on emergent orientational order are not well understood when anisotropic building blocks are used. Contrary to the typical progression from disorder to order in isotropic systems, here we report that colloidal oblate discoids initially self-assemble into short, metastable strands with orientational order—regardless of the final structure. The model discoids are suspended in a refractive index and density-matched solvent. Then, we use confocal microscopy experiments and Monte Carlo simulations spanning a broad range of volume fractions and attraction strengths to show that disordered clusters form near coexistence boundaries, whereas oriented strands persist with strong attractions. We rationalize this unusual observation in light of the interaction anisotropy imparted by the discoids. These findings may guide self-assembly for anisotropic systems in which orientational order is desired, such as when tailored mechanical properties are sought. PMID:26443082

  14. Metastable Atom Detection Using Solid N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, William; Kedzierski, Wladek; Lukic, Dragan

    2014-05-01

    Over the years our laboratory has been a center for the use of rare-gas matrices at temperatures below 70K in the detection and study of low energy atomic and molecular metastable particles [see Kedzierski et al., Can J Phys, 91, 1044, (2013) for Refs]. Recently we have extended this work to study the use of a solid nitrogen matrix at temperatures below 35K as a detector of O(1S) atoms. This proves to be at least as sensitive as any rare gas matrix though the lifetime of the excimer formed in the matrix is somewhat longer (~ 20 μs) than what is observed in a Xe matrix for example. The detailed performance of the detector as a function of temperature and other parameters will be presented at the conference. The authors thank NSERC and CFI, (Canada), for financial support.

  15. A well-structured metastable ceria surface

    SciTech Connect

    Olbrich, R.; Pieper, H. H.; Oelke, R.; Wilkens, H.; Wollschläger, J.; Reichling, M.; Zoellner, M. H.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-02-24

    By the growth of a 180 nm thick film on Si(111), we produce a metastable ceria surface with a morphology dominated by terraced pyramids with an oriented triangular base. Changes in the nanoscale surface morphology and local surface potential due to annealing at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 1150 K in the ultra-high vacuum are studied with non-contact atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. As the surface is stable in the temperature range of 300 K to 850 K, it is most interesting for applications requiring regular steps with a height of one O-Ce-O triple layer.

  16. Navigating the ribosome's metastable energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Munro, James B; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Spahn, Christian M T; Blanchard, Scott C

    2009-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which tRNA molecules enter and transit the ribosome during mRNA translation remains elusive. However, recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies offer important new findings into the ordered sequence of events underpinning the translocation process that help place the molecular mechanism within reach. In particular, new structural and kinetic insights have been obtained regarding tRNA movements through 'hybrid state' configurations. These dynamic views reveal that the macromolecular ribosome particle, like many smaller proteins, has an intrinsic capacity to reversibly sample an ensemble of similarly stable native states. Such perspectives suggest that substrates, factors and environmental cues contribute to translation regulation by helping the dynamic system navigate through a highly complex and metastable energy landscape. PMID:19647434

  17. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Hsu, S.; Vachaspati, T.; Watkins, R. |

    1992-11-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2) {sub R} {times} U(1){sub B-L} are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  18. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R. . Dept. of Physics); Hsu, S. . Lyman Lab. of Physics); Vachaspati, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Watkins, R. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1992-01-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2)[sub L] [times] SU(2) [sub R] [times] U(1)[sub B-L] are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  19. Selective removal of either metastable species from a mixed 3P 0,2 rare-gas metastable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Cook, T. B.; West, W. P.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    A tunable CW laser has been used to selectively remove either of the two metastable species, 3P 0,2, which are initially present in a neon metastable beam. The method is applicable to other rare gases and provides the opportunity for separate investigation of effects due to atoms in either the 3P 0 or 3P 2 state.

  20. Neutral atom lithography with metastable helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Claire Shean

    In this dissertation we describe our performance of resist assisted neutral atom lithography using a bright beam of metastable 23S1 Helium (He*). Metastable Helium atoms have 20 eV of internal energy making them easy to detect and able to destroy a resist. The He* is produced by a reverse flow DC discharge source and then collimated with the bichromatic force, followed by three optical molasses velocity compression stages. The atoms in the resulting beam have a mean longitudinal velocity of 1125 m/s and a divergence of 1.1 mrad. The typical beam flux is 2 x 109 atoms/mm2s through a 0.1mm diameter aperture 70 cm away from the source. The internal energy of the atoms damages the molecules of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of nonanethiol. The undisturbed SAM protects a 200 A layer of gold that has been evaporated onto a prepared Silicon wafer from a wet chemical etch. Two methods are used to pattern the He* atoms before they destroy the SAM. First, a Nickel micro mesh was used to protect the SAM. These experiments established an appropriate dosage and etch time for patterning. The samples were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and found to have an edge resolution of 63 nm. Then, patterning was accomplished using the dipole force the atoms experience while traversing a standing wave of lambda = 1083nm light tuned 500MHz below the 23S 1 → 23P2 transition. Depending on the intensity of the light, the He* atoms are focused or channeled into lines separated by lambda/2. The lines cover the entire exposed length of the substrate, about 3 mm. They are about 3 mm long, corresponding to about twice the beam waist of the laser standing wave. Thus there are 6 x 10 3 lines of length 5500lambda. These results agree with our numerical simulations of the experiment.

  1. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Achey, R.; Hunter, D.

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  2. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  3. Argon isotopic zoning in mantle phlogopite

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T.C.

    1988-06-01

    Incremental-heating and laser-probe /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar analyses were performed on phlogopite extracted from a garnet-lherzolite mantle nodule entrained by the Precambrian (1200 Ma) Premier kimberlite, South Africa. The spatial resolution of the laser probe has enabled the characterization of argon isotopic zoning in a single phlogopite grain. An apparent age contour map records lower ages (1.2 Ga) along grain margins and high apparent ages (up to 2.4 Ga) at the core. The latter ages are caused by excess argon contamination and subsequent partial diffusive loss, and have no age significance. Comparison with step-heating results indicates that argon spatial distributions inferred from in-vacuo step-heating experiments are, at best, grossly approximate. Variations in the laser-probe apparent ages were observed only laterally across the phlogopite cleavage surface, indicating that argon transport occurs preferentially along phlogopite cleavage planes. Age profiles, when modeled using one-dimensional radial geometry (cylindrical coordinates), do not conform to classical Fick's law diffusion, suggesting that the characteristic dimension of diffusion for argon in phlogopite may be highly variable within individual grains.

  4. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ö.; Tapan, İ.; Özmutlu, E. N.; Veenhof, R.

    2010-05-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  5. Enhancement of stability in systems with metastable states

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, B.; Augello, G.; Pizzolato, N.; Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.

    2007-12-06

    The investigation of noise-induced phenomena in far from equilibrium systems is one of the approach used to understand the behaviour of physical and biological complex systems. Metastability is a generic feature of many nonlinear systems, and the problem of the lifetime of metastable states involves fundamental aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The enhancement of the life-time of metastable states through the noise enhanced stability effect and the role played by the resonant activation phenomenon will be discussed in models of interdisciplinary physics: (i) Ising model (ii) Josephson junction; (iii) stochastic FitzHugh-Nagumo model; (iv) a population dynamics model, and (v) a market model with stochastic volatility.

  6. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A 2Σ+), O(5P), and N2(C 3Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  7. Characterization of argon direct-current glow discharge with a longitudinal electric field applied at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2014-01-01

    A direct-current-driven plasma jet is developed by applying a longitudinal electric field on the flowing argon at ambient air. This plasma shows a torch shape with its cross-section increased from the anode to the cathode. Comparison with its counterparts indicates that the gas flow plays a key role in variation of the plasma structure and contributes much to enlarging the plasma volume. It is also found that the circular hollow metal base promotes generation of plasma with a high-power volume density in a limited space. The optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnosis indicates that the plasma comprises many reactive species, such as OH, O, excited N2, and Ar metastables. Examination of the rotational and vibrational temperature indicates that the plasma is under nonequilibrium condition and the excited species OH(A (2)Σ(+)), O((5)P), and N2(C (3)Πu) are partly generated by energy transfer from argon metastables. The spatially resolved OES of plasma reveals that the negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column are distributed across the gas gap. The absence of the anode glow is attributed to the fact that many electrons in the vicinity of the anode follow ions into the positive column due to the ambipolar diffusion in the flowing gas. PMID:25205176

  8. Measurement of the photoionization cross section from the laser-populated 3D metastable levels in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of the absolute photoionization cross section from the 6s5d 3D metastable level of barium are presented. The 3D levels were selectively populated with a high-power tuneable dye laser. The number density was determined by observing the resulting depopulation of the ground state when pumping occurred.

  9. Measurement of the metastable lifetime for the 2s^2 2p^2 ^1So level in O^2+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Cadez, I.; Chutjian, A.; Niimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of the 1S0 level was found to be 540 +/- 27 ms. This is in good agreement with a previous measurement and with a number of theoretical calculations. Metastable lifetimes, when combined with collisional excitation rates, can provide a diagnostic for electron density Ne in a stellar or solar plasma.

  10. Metastable epitaxial magnets: A study of growth and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stella Zhong

    1997-11-01

    Recent advancement in the information storage industry is demanding more fundamental understanding of magnetic systems, especially the magnetic thin films, surfaces, and interfaces. In this work, we were focusing on ultrathin ferromagnetic thin films of Ni on Cu(100), Cu(110) and Cu(111) single crystal substrates, and FeNi and CoNi binary alloy films on Cu(100) with varying atomic concentration. The growth of these films by molecular beam epitaxy was monitored using a number of experimental techniques. A pseudomorphic layer-by-layer growth was achieved which resulted in an fcc metastable crystalline structure with a ferromagnetic phase. The magnetic anisotropy behavior of these thin films was monitored using surface magneto-optic Kerr effect magnetometer at both polar and longitudinal geometries, and various spin reorientation transitions were found. The measurements of Curie temperature as a variation of film thickness as well as atomic concentration resulted in the proposal of a finite-size scaling law. By using this scaling law, the bulk Curie temperature for these metastable fcc binary alloys can be extrapolated, showing that Fe atoms exist in a low-spin ferromagnetic phase. In the Ni films, a dimensionality crossover from bulk to a 2-dimensional system at a few monolayer thickness was established. By alloying, we have been able to tune the electron occupation number in the 3d band. Combined with the 3d electronic band structure information we have gained by using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy study of these systems at normal emission, a conclusion of continuous band filling in CoNi alloy system was drawn. However, FeNi films show a different behavior at a certain composition. The recent collaboration with synchrotron radiation facility has enabled us to quantitatively characterize the spin moment and orbital moment from each element. An x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) study was performed on CoNi alloy system, and resulted in the conclusion of

  11. High-pressure stabilization of argon fluorides.

    PubMed

    Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk

    2016-01-28

    On account of the rapid development of noble gas chemistry in the past half-century both xenon and krypton compounds can now be isolated in macroscopic quantities. The same does not hold true for the next lighter group 18 element, argon, which forms only isolated molecules stable solely in low temperature matrices or supersonic jet streams. Here we present theoretical investigations into a new high-pressure reaction pathway, which enables synthesis of argon fluorides in bulk and at room temperature. Our hybrid DFT calculations (employing the HSE06 functional) indicate that above 60 GPa ArF2-containing molecular crystals can be obtained by a reaction between argon and molecular fluorine. PMID:26742478

  12. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  13. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  14. Model reduction for slow-fast stochastic systems with metastable behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Smith, Matthew J.

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-steady-state approximation (or stochastic averaging principle) is a useful tool in the study of multiscale stochastic systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a model. The method is extended here to slow-fast systems in which the fast variables exhibit metastable behaviour. The key parameter that determines the form of the reduced model is the ratio of the timescale for the switching of the fast variables between metastable states to the timescale for the evolution of the slow variables. The method is illustrated with two examples: one from biochemistry (a fast-species-mediated chemical switch coupled to a slower varying species), and one from ecology (a predator-prey system). Numerical simulations of each model reduction are compared with those of the full system.

  15. Model reduction for slow–fast stochastic systems with metastable behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S. Jonathan; Smith, Matthew J.

    2014-05-07

    The quasi-steady-state approximation (or stochastic averaging principle) is a useful tool in the study of multiscale stochastic systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a model. The method is extended here to slow–fast systems in which the fast variables exhibit metastable behaviour. The key parameter that determines the form of the reduced model is the ratio of the timescale for the switching of the fast variables between metastable states to the timescale for the evolution of the slow variables. The method is illustrated with two examples: one from biochemistry (a fast-species-mediated chemical switch coupled to a slower varying species), and one from ecology (a predator–prey system). Numerical simulations of each model reduction are compared with those of the full system.

  16. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  17. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Alex W; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjürg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A; Merkt, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for (20)Ne and (22)Ne. PMID:22149785

  18. Propagation studies of metastable intermolecular composites (MIC).

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S. F.; Busse, J. R.; Asay, B. W.; Peterson, P. D.; Mang, J. T.; Bockmon, B.; Pantoya, M.

    2002-01-01

    Thermite materials are attractive energetic materials because the reactions are highly exothermic, have high energy densities, and high temperatures of combustion. However, the application of thermite materials has been limited because of the relative slow release of energy compared to other energetic materials. Engineered nano-scale composite energetic materials, such as Al/MoO{sub 3}, show promise for additional energetic material applications because they can react very rapidly. The composite material studied in this work consists of tailored, ultra-fine grain (30-200 nm diameter) aluminum particles that dramatically increase energy release rates of these thermite materials. These reactant clusters of fuel and oxidizer particles are in nearly atomic scale proximity to each other but are constrained from reaction until triggered. Despite the growing importance of nano-scale energetic materials, even the most basic combustion characteristics of these materials have not been thoroughly studied. This paper reports initial studies of the ignition and combustion of metastable intermolecular composites (MIC) materials. The goals were lo obtain an improved understanding of flame propagation mechanisms and combustion behaviors associated with nano-structured energetic materials. Information on issues such as reaction rate and behavior as a function of composition (mixture ratio), initial static charge, and particle size are essential and will allow scientists to design applications incorporating the benefits of these compounds. The materials have been characterized, specifically focusing on particle size, shape, distribution and morphology.

  19. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  20. Towards a Theory of Metastability in Open Quantum Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Guţă, Mădălin; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P

    2016-06-17

    By generalizing concepts from classical stochastic dynamics, we establish the basis for a theory of metastability in Markovian open quantum systems. Partial relaxation into long-lived metastable states-distinct from the asymptotic stationary state-is a manifestation of a separation of time scales due to a splitting in the spectrum of the generator of the dynamics. We show here how to exploit this spectral structure to obtain a low dimensional approximation to the dynamics in terms of motion in a manifold of metastable states constructed from the low-lying eigenmatrices of the generator. We argue that the metastable manifold is in general composed of disjoint states, noiseless subsystems, and decoherence-free subspaces. PMID:27367368

  1. The Importance of Kinetic Metastability: Some Common Everyday Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of kinetic metastability is illustrated in detail using several common household products and recommendations are made for how this important and widespread, but often neglected, phenomenon can be more effectively presented in the introductory chemistry textbook.

  2. Metastable polymorphs of hydrogen isotopes solidified near the triple point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozioziemski, B. J.; Chernov, A. A.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) , deuterium (D2) , and the 0.25D2-0.5DT-0.25T2 isotopic mixture of deuterium and tritium (D-T) each form a metastable solid state below their respective triple-point temperatures (TTP) . The metastable solid is observed to nucleate and grow from inside of a 5-10μm inner diameter borosilicate glass tube when the liquid hydrogens are slowly cooled through their respective TTP . These metastable solids have their triple-point temperature 15-43 mK below the stable hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystal of the same composition, a different growth habit, and recrystallize to the hcp solid. This metastable solid may be a crystal with unknown structure or, less likely, hcp with stacking faults and other defects.

  3. Towards a Theory of Metastability in Open Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; GuÅ£ǎ, Mǎdǎlin; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2016-06-01

    By generalizing concepts from classical stochastic dynamics, we establish the basis for a theory of metastability in Markovian open quantum systems. Partial relaxation into long-lived metastable states—distinct from the asymptotic stationary state—is a manifestation of a separation of time scales due to a splitting in the spectrum of the generator of the dynamics. We show here how to exploit this spectral structure to obtain a low dimensional approximation to the dynamics in terms of motion in a manifold of metastable states constructed from the low-lying eigenmatrices of the generator. We argue that the metastable manifold is in general composed of disjoint states, noiseless subsystems, and decoherence-free subspaces.

  4. Meta-Stable Brane Configurations by Quartic Superpotential for Bifundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun

    The type IIA nonsupersymmetric meta-stable brane configuration consisting of three NS5-branes, D4-branes and anti-D4-branes where the electric gauge theory superpotential has a quartic term for the bifundamentals besides a mass term is constructed. By adding the orientifold 4-plane and 6-plane to this brane configuration, we also describe the intersecting brane configurations of type IIA string theory corresponding to the meta-stable nonsupersymmetric vacua of corresponding gauge theories.

  5. Discovery of a metastable Al20Sm4 phase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Z.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Mendelev, M. I.; Ott, R. T.; Park, E.; Besser, M. F.; Kramer, M. J.; Ding, Z.; Wang, C. -Z.; et al

    2015-03-09

    In this study, we present an efficient genetic algorithm, integrated with experimental diffraction data, to solve a nanoscale metastable Al20Sm4 phase that evolves during crystallization of an amorphous magnetron sputtered Al90Sm10 alloy. The excellent match between calculated and experimental X-ray diffraction patterns confirms an accurate description of this metastable phase. Molecular dynamic simulations of crystal growth from the liquid phase predict the formation of disordered defects in the devitrified crystal.

  6. The effect of metastable pyroxene on the slab dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrusta, R.; Van Hunen, J.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Global seismic studies show variations near the base of mantle transition zone, where some slabs penetrate straight into the lower mantle, whereas others seem to flatten. The dynamics of cold subducting slabs are mainly controlled by negative thermal buoyancy forces and by buoyancy anomalies due to density contrasts of the different mineralogical phases. Recent experiments show that pyroxene dissolves into the denser garnet, forming the majorite-garnet, at very slow rates, and pyroxene can remain metastable to temperatures as high as 1400 °C.Because metastable pyroxene may potentially persist in subduction zones over large volumes and to great depths, a self-consistent subduction model has been used to investigate the influence of metastable phase on the dynamics of subducting oceanic lithosphere. The phase boundary of pyroxene to garnet (300 km equilibrium depth) is considered together with the phase transition of olivine to wadsleyite (410 km equilibrium), and ringwoodite to perovskite-magnesiowustite (670 km equilibrium). The kinetics of the phase transition for ol-wd and in px-gt are treated considering a temperature-dependent diffusion rate. To quantify the buoyant contributions of the metastable phase on the subduction dynamics, an extensive parameter sensitivity study has been performed.Results from this study illustrate that metastable pyroxene affects slab buoyancy at least as much as olivine metastability. Slab age and phase change kinetics are the most dominant parameters, and buoyancy effects are stronger for old subducting lithosphere and for low diffusion rates, favouring slab stagnation in the transition zone.

  7. Study of a contracted glow in low-frequency plasma-jet discharges operating with argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of a low frequency, atmospheric plasma-jet discharge in argon. The discharge has the characteristics of a contracted glow with a current channel of submillimeter diameter and a relatively high voltage cathode layer. In order to interpret the measurements, we consider the separate modeling of each region of the discharge: main channel and cathode layer, which must then be properly matched together. The main current channel was modeled, extending a previous work, as similar to an arc in which joule heating is balanced by lateral heat conduction, without thermal equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The cathode layer model, on the other hand, includes the emission of secondary electrons by ion impact and by additional mechanisms, of which we considered emission due to collision of atoms excited at metastable levels, and field-enhanced thermionic emission (Schottky effect). The comparison of model and experiment indicates that the discharge can be effectively sustained in its contracted form by the secondary electrons emitted by collision of excited argon atoms, whereas thermionic emission is by far insufficient to provide the necessary electrons.

  8. Study of a contracted glow in low-frequency plasma-jet discharges operating with argon

    SciTech Connect

    Minotti, F.; Giuliani, L.; Xaubet, M.; Grondona, D.

    2015-11-15

    In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical study of a low frequency, atmospheric plasma-jet discharge in argon. The discharge has the characteristics of a contracted glow with a current channel of submillimeter diameter and a relatively high voltage cathode layer. In order to interpret the measurements, we consider the separate modeling of each region of the discharge: main channel and cathode layer, which must then be properly matched together. The main current channel was modeled, extending a previous work, as similar to an arc in which joule heating is balanced by lateral heat conduction, without thermal equilibrium between electrons and heavy species. The cathode layer model, on the other hand, includes the emission of secondary electrons by ion impact and by additional mechanisms, of which we considered emission due to collision of atoms excited at metastable levels, and field-enhanced thermionic emission (Schottky effect). The comparison of model and experiment indicates that the discharge can be effectively sustained in its contracted form by the secondary electrons emitted by collision of excited argon atoms, whereas thermionic emission is by far insufficient to provide the necessary electrons.

  9. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  10. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  11. Thermal evolution of Venus with argon degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Korenaga, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Decades-old measurements of atmospheric and elemental surface composition constrain the history of Venus. In this study, we search for a model featuring continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime that predicts the present-day atmospheric mass of radiogenic argon and satisfies the other available constraints. For comparison, we also consider the end-member scenario of a single catastrophic resurfacing event. Thermal evolution simulations are performed that track the mass transport of argon and potassium and include a simple model of upwelling mantle plumes. Sensitivity analyses and linear regression are used to quantify the range of initial conditions that will produce desired values for key model output parameters. Decompression melting of passively upwelling mantle causes considerable mantle processing and crustal growth during the early evolution of Venus. Mantle plumes have negligible effects on recent crustal production, but may be important to local surface features. For a wide range of initial conditions, continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime predicts the correct amount of argon degassing, along with the absence of a global magnetic field, crustal and lithosphere thicknesses matching modern estimates, and volcanism consistent with the cratering record. Argon degassing does not uniquely constrain mantle dynamics, but the success of simple stagnant-lid models diminishes the need to invoke dramatic changes like catastrophic resurfacing.

  12. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  13. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  14. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  15. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  16. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  17. Metastable NAT in Ice-Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Óscar; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Cirrus Clouds contain, besides pure water ice, a rather large fraction of various hydrates. These are very important for the formation of the cloud, which is a yet not well understood process. We recently solved the structure of a metastable NAT phase (alpha-NAT), we believe to not only be present, but playing a major role in the formation of clouds. On the basis of previous work on this phase by Grothe et al. [1], we enhanced the production of alpha-NAT to the point, where we could produce enough sample to do neutron diffraction. This enabled us to solve the structure. Our quantum mechanical calculations, using this newly found structure, show a large affinity towards water-ice. With this in mind, we interlaced our results with the experiments of R. Iannarelli [2] to derive a new 3-step NAT-formation mechanism in ice-clouds, which could explain some of the observed kinetics better than the mechanism postulated in Zondlo et al. [3]. 1. Grothe, H., Tizek, H., Waller, D. & Stokes, D. The crystallization kinetics and morphology of nitric acid trihydrate. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 2232-2239 (2006) 2. Iannarelli, R. Multidiagnostic Observations on HCl and HNO3 Hydrate Films in the Temperature Range 170-205K: A Kinetic Study. PhD Thesis 21791, ETH Zürich, (2013). 3. Zondlo, M.A., Hudson, P.K., Prenni A.J. & Tolbert, M.A. Chemistry and microphysics of polar stratospheric clouds and Cirrus clouds. Ann. Rev. Phys. Chem., 51, 473-499 (2000).

  18. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  19. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  4. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF HIGH ENERGY CARBON, NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, E.A.; Appleby, A.; Jayko, M.

    1980-07-01

    Chemical yields of Fe{sup 3+} have been measured from FeSO{sub 4} solutions irradiated in the presence and absence of oxygen with carbon, neon, and argon ions from the Berkeley Bevalac facility. G(Fe{sup 3+}) decreases with increasing beam penetration and with increasing atomic number of the incident ion. The results are compared with current theoretical expectations of the behavior of these particles in an aqueous absorber. The chemical yields are consistently higher than theoretically predicted, by amounts varying from <6.2% (carbon ions) to <13.2% (argon ions). The additional yields are possibly attributable to fragmentation of the primary particle beams.

  5. On the OES line-ratio technique in argon and argon-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate capacitively coupled argon and argon-hydrogen-silane plasmas. The argon collisional-radiative model (CRM) used to extract the electron density and temperature from the spectra is presented. The electron energy distribution function, which is an input parameter to the model, is discussed in detail. Its strong variation with pressure is found to significantly influence the results for the (effective) temperature. For the analysis of the spectra the common line-ratio technique is applied. Special attention is paid to the choice of lines and a pair of line-ratios for optimum accuracy is suggested. For the argon gas mixture at high partial pressure of the admixed molecular gases the CRM reduces to a corona-like model, extended by a quenching term. The line-ratio method is found to fail under these conditions due to the strong depopulation of the argon 1s states. As a consequence, individual line intensities have to be used and an absolute calibration is required. An easy calibration method, which relies on the results obtained by the line-ratio method in pure argon, is proposed and applied.

  6. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED ARGON PLASMA AS AN ION SOURCE FOR MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solution aerosols are injected into an inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) to generate a relatively high number density of positive ions derived from elemental constituents. A small fraction of these ions is extracted through a sampling orifice into a differentially pumped vac...

  7. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  8. Melting of “non-magic” argon clusters and extrapolation to the bulk limit

    SciTech Connect

    Senn, Florian Wiebke, Jonas; Schumann, Ole; Gohr, Sebastian; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Pahl, Elke

    2014-01-28

    The melting of argon clusters Ar{sub N} is investigated by applying a parallel-tempering Monte Carlo algorithm for all cluster sizes in the range from 55 to 309 atoms. Extrapolation to the bulk gives a melting temperature of 85.9 K in good agreement with the previous value of 88.9 K using only Mackay icosahedral clusters for the extrapolation [E. Pahl, F. Calvo, L. Koči, and P. Schwerdtfeger, “Accurate melting temperatures for neon and argon from ab initio Monte Carlo simulations,” Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 47, 8207 (2008)]. Our results for argon demonstrate that for the extrapolation to the bulk one does not have to restrict to magic number cluster sizes in order to obtain good estimates for the bulk melting temperature. However, the extrapolation to the bulk remains a problem, especially for the systematic selection of suitable cluster sizes.

  9. Ab initio pair potential energy curve for the argon atom pair and thermophysical properties for the dilute argon gas. II. Thermophysical properties for low-density argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Jäger, Benjamin; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2010-12-01

    A recent argon-argon interatomic potential energy curve determined from quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations and described with an analytical representation [B. Jäger, R. Hellmann, E. Bich, and E. Vogel, Mol. Phys. 107, 2181 (2009); 108, 105 (2010)] was used to calculate the most important thermophysical properties of argon governed by two-body interactions. Second pressure, acoustic, and dielectric virial coefficients as well as viscosity and thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density were computed for natural argon from 83 to 10,000 K. The calculated values for the different thermophysical properties are compared with available experimental data and values computed for other argon-argon potentials. This extensive analysis shows that the proposed potential is superior to all previous ones and that the calculated thermophysical property values are accurate enough to be applied as standard values for the complete temperature range of the calculations.

  10. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-10-15

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts.

  11. Stable and Metastable Equilibria in the Pb-Cd System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ying-Yu; Paik, J.-S.; Zhang, C.; Perepezko, J. H.; Chang, Y. A.

    2013-07-01

    Thermodynamic and phase diagram data in the Pb-Cd system are reevaluated. A substitutional solution model is used for the liquid and fcc and hcp phases. The stable and metastable equilibria of this system are calculated using the thermodynamic equations derived from equilibrium data. Besides the well-established eutectic reaction at 521 K (248 °C), one stable monotectic reaction at 548 K (275 °C) is found due to the existence of a stable liquid miscibility gap. The stable monotectic reaction has been missed in all previous evaluations. Experimental verifications of the stable and metastable phase equilibria are provided using droplet samples and undercooled liquid alloys. A differential thermal analysis (DTA) method is applied to determine the phase reaction temperatures using both traditional heating and cooling processes and a specially designed cycling process. Additional microstructural evidence is used to elucidate the nature of the phase reactions. The refined thermodynamic descriptions are based upon both the thermochemical and phase diagram stable and metastable data. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is good. All experimental stable and metastable results are well explained by the new Pb-Cd phase diagram calculations within the experimental accuracy limits. Combined experimental and thermodynamic modeling procedures developed for determining the stable and metastable phase equilibria yield a highly reliable overall phase diagram assessment and a quantitative basis for the interpretation of non-equilibrium solidification processing.

  12. Photoassociative Spectroscopy of Ultracold Argon and Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. K.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on photoassociative spectroscopy experiments performed separately on ultracold 40 Ar and ultracold 84 Kr with the spectroscopy laser tuned around the trapping transition for each species (ns[ 3 / 2 ] 2 --> np[ 5 / 2 ] 3 where n = 4 for argon and n = 5 for krypton). Previous studies in argon observed several discrete features in the spectrum that have now been positively identified as arising from otherwise undetectable frequency sidebands on the spectroscopy laser and not from molecular structure. Spectra have been taken over a range of laser intensities and show a broad (several GHz) signature of single photon photo-association, but with no individual vibrational levels resolved. We will discuss our results and compare our spectra to those obtained in ultracold, noble gas photoassociative spectroscopy experiments conducted by other groups in recent years. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award, No. PHY-0855290.

  13. Argon ion pollution of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Power Satellite (SPS) would require the injection of large quantities of propellant to transport material from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the construction site at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). This injection, in the form of approx 10 to the 32nd power, 2 KeV argon ions (and associated electrons) per SPS, is comparable to the content of the plasmasphere (approx 10 to the 31st power ions). In addition to the mass deposited, this represents a considerable injection of energy. The injection is examined in terms of a simple model for the expansion of the beam plasma. General features of the subsequent magnetospheric convection of the argon are also examined.

  14. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  15. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  16. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  17. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carminati, L.

    2005-10-12

    The construction of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed and commissioning is in progress. After a brief description of the detector layout, readout electronics and calibration, a review of the present status of the integration and the detector qualification is reported. Finally a selection of performance results obtained during several test beams will be presented with particular attention to linearity, uniformity, position reconstruction and {gamma}/{pi}0 separation.

  18. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  19. Insights into discharge argon mediated biofilm inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Danni; Azzam, Robin; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in biomedical sciences. Conventional sterilization and decontamination methods are not suitable for new and more sophisticated biomaterials. In this paper, the efficiency and effectiveness of gas discharges in inactivation and removal of biofilms on biomaterials were studied. We found that although discharge oxygen, nitrogen and argon all demonstrated excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, gases with distinct chemical/physical properties underwent different mechanisms of action. Discharge oxygen and nitrogen mediated decontamination was associated with strong etching effects, which can cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. On the contrary, although discharge argon at low powers maintained excellent antibacterial ability, it had negligible etching effects. Based on these results, an effective decontamination approach using discharge argon was established in which bacteria and biofilms were killed in situ and then removed from contaminated biomaterials. This novel procedure is applicable for a wide range of biomaterials and biomedical devices in an in vivo and clinical setting. PMID:24070412

  20. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  1. Visible light responsive systems based on metastable-state photoacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most fundamental processes in nature. Metastable-state photoacids can reversibly generate a large proton concentration under visible light with moderate intensity. which provides a general approach to control various proton transfer processes. Several applications of mPAHs have been demonstrated recently including control of acid-catalyzed reactions, volume-change of hydrogels, polymer conductivity, bacteria killing, odorant release, and color change of materials. They have also been utilized to control supramolecular assemblies, molecular switches, microbial fuel cells and cationic sensors. In this talk, the mechanism, structure design, and applications of metastable-state photoacids are introduced. Recent development of different types of metastable-state photoacids is presented. Challenges and future work are also discussed.

  2. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the impact of hot metastable oxygen atoms on the product yields and rate coefficients of atmospheric reactions involving O( (sup 1)D). The contribution of the metastable oxygen atoms to the thermal balance of the terrestrial atmosphere between 50 and 200 km has been determined. We found that the presence of hot O((sup l)D) atoms in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere significantly increases the production rate of the rotationally-vibrationally excited NO molecules. The computed yield of the NO molecules in N2O+ O((sup 1)D) atmospheric collisions, involving non-Maxwellian distributions of the metastable oxygen atoms, is more than two times larger than the NO-yield at a thermal equilibrium. The calculated non-equilibrium rate and yield functions are important for ozone and nitrous oxide modeling in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  3. Energetic Metastable Oxygen and Nitrogen Atoms in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili; Dalgarno, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes our research performed under NASA Grant NAG5-11857. The three-year grant have been supported by the Geospace Sciences SR&T program. We have investigated the energetic metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the terrestrial stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere. Hot atoms in the atmosphere are produced by solar radiation, the solar wind and various ionic reactions. Nascent hot atoms arise in ground and excited electronic states, and their translational energies are larger by two - three orders of magnitude than the thermal energies of the ambient gas. The relaxation kinetics of hot atoms determines the rate of atmospheric heating, the intensities of aeronomic reactions, and the rate of atom escape from the planet. Modeling of the non-Maxwellian energy distributions of metastable oxygen and nitrogen atoms have been focused on the determination of their impact on the energetics and chemistry of the terrestrial atmosphere between 25 and 250 km . At this altitudes, we have calculated the energy distribution functions of metastable O and N atoms and computed non-equilibrium rates of important aeronomic reactions, such as destruction of the water molecules by O(1D) atoms and production of highly excited nitric oxide molecules. In the upper atmosphere, the metastable O(lD) and N(2D) play important role in formation of the upward atomic fluxes. We have computed the upward fluxes of the metastable and ground state oxygen atoms in the upper atmosphere above 250 km. The accurate distributions of the metastable atoms have been evaluated for the day and night-time conditions.

  4. Sensitivity of Granular Force Chain Orientation to Disorder-Induced Metastable Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikawa, N.; Bandi, M. M.; Katsuragi, H.

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional system of photoelastic disks subject to vertical tapping against gravity was experimentally monitored from ordered to disordered configurations by varying bidispersity. The packing fraction ϕ , coordination number Z , and an appropriately defined force-chain orientational order parameter S all exhibit as similar sharp transition with a small increase in disorder. A measurable change in S , but not ϕ and Z , was detected under tapping. We find disorder-induced metastability does not show configurational relaxation, but can be detected via force-chain reorientations.

  5. Numerical Study of the Structure of Metastable Configurations for the Thomson Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, A. N.; Bugueva, T. V.; Kozinkin, L. A.

    2016-05-01

    A numerical method is proposed for solving the Thomson problem - finding stable positions for a system of N point charges distributed on a sphere that minimize the potential energy of the system. The behavior of this system is essentially nonlinear, and the number of metastable structures grows exponentially with N. This makes the problem of finding all stable configurations extremely difficult. The results of testing of the developed algorithm and of numerical study of the properties of the local potential energy minima for a system of point charges are presented.

  6. The response of the inductively coupled argon plasma to solvent plasma load: spatially resolved maps of electron density obtained from the intensity of one argon line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, D. G. J.; Blades, M. W.

    1994-12-01

    A survey of spatially resolved electron number density ( ne) in the tail cone of the inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) is presented: all of the results of the survey have been radially inverted by numerical, asymmetric Abel inversion. The survey extends over the entire volume of the plasma beyond the exit of the ICAP torch; It extends over distances of z = 5-25 mm downstream from the induction coil, and over radial distances of ± 8 mm from the discharge axis. The survey also explores a range of inner argon flow rates ( QIN), solvent plasma load ( Qspl) and r.f. power: moreover, it explores loading by water, methanol and chloroform. Throughout the survey, ne was determined from the intensity of one, optically thin argon line, by a method which assumes that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) for argon lies close to local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The validity of this assumption is reviewed. Also examined are the discrepancies between ne from this method and ne from Stark broadening measurements. With the error taken into account, the results of the survey reveal how time averaged values of ne in the ICAP respond over an extensive, previously unexplored range of experimental parameters. Moreover, the spatial information lends insight into how the thermal conditions and the transport of energy respond. Overall, the response may be described in terms of energy consumption along the axial channel and thermal pinch within the induction region. The predominating effect depends on the solvent plasma load, the solvent composition, the robustness of the discharge, and the distribution of solvent material over the argon stream.

  7. Surviving in a metastable de Sitter space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Sitender Pratap; Mondal, Swapnamay; Sen, Ashoke; Verma, Mritunjay

    2015-09-01

    In a metastable de Sitter space any object has a finite life expectancy beyond which it undergoes vacuum decay. However, by spreading into different parts of the universe which will fall out of causal contact of each other in future, a civilization can increase its collective life expectancy, defined as the average time after which the last settlement disappears due to vacuum decay. We study in detail the collective life expectancy of two comoving objects in de Sitter space as a function of the initial separation, the horizon radius and the vacuum decay rate. We find that even with a modest initial separation, the collective life expectancy can reach a value close to the maximum possible value of 1.5 times that of the individual object if the decay rate is less than 1% of the expansion rate. Our analysis can be generalized to any number of objects, general trajectories not necessarily at rest in the comoving coordinates and general FRW space-time. As part of our analysis we find that in the current state of the universe dominated by matter and cosmological constant, the vacuum decay rate is increasing as a function of time due to accelerated expansion of the volume of the past light cone. Present decay rate is about 3.7 times larger than the average decay rate in the past and the final decay rate in the cosmological constant dominated epoch will be about 56 times larger than the average decay rate in the past. This considerably weakens the lower bound on the half-life of our universe based on its current age.

  8. Metastable bcc phase formation in the Nb-Cr system

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Schwarz, R.B.; Perepezko, J.H.; Plantz, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    Extended metastable bcc solid solutions of Nb-Xat.%Cr (X = 35, 50, 57, 77, 82, and 94) were synthesized by two-anvil splat-quenching. In addition, bcc (Nb-67at.%Cr) was prepared by mechanically alloying mixtures of niobium and chromium powders. The lattice parameters were measured by X-ray diffraction and the Young`s moduli were measured by low-load microindentation. The composition dependence of the lattice parameters and elastic moduli show a positive deviation with respect to a rule of mixtures. During continuous heating at 15C/min., the metastable precursor bcc phases decomposed at temperatures above 750C to uniformly refined microstructures.

  9. Magnetic properties of metastable Fe Pd alloys by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Hiromasa; O'Handley, Robert C.; Kuji, Toshiro

    2007-03-01

    Metastable Fe-Pd powder samples with various Pd content were synthesized by mechanical alloying. Their fundamental properties, i.e., structure, magnetization and coercive fore are discussed. The saturation magnetizations of the metastable Fe-Pd powders gradually decreases with increasing Pd content. The coercive forces observed in as-milled samples are all less than 40 Oe. However, some of the heat-treated samples, notably, Pd content around 55 at% with L1 0 structure, shows Hc up to 1589 Oe.

  10. Hyperfine resonances in metastable ^129Xe discharge cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Steven W.; Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We have measured the hyperfine resonance linewidths of metastable ^129Xe in electrodeless rf discharge cells. The linewidths on the order of 10 kHz for Xe pressures of a few millitorr are dominated by collisions with other Xe atoms and no buffer gases are present. Additional contributions come from collisions with the walls as well as with impurities which may be drawn off the cell walls due to the harsh plasma environment. If used for small atomic clocks, metastable noble gases could require less power and would be relatively insensitive to temperature variations when compared with alkali metal atoms.