Science.gov

Sample records for argon tpc detectors

  1. Muon-induced background to proton decay in the p →K+ ν decay channel with large underground liquid argon TPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, J.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Richardson, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.

    2015-06-01

    Large liquid argon TPC detector programs such as LBNE and LAGUNA-LBNO will be able to make measurements of the proton lifetime which will outperform Cherenkov detectors in the proton decay channel p →K+ ν. At the large depths which are proposed for such experiments, a non-negligible source of isolated charged kaons may be produced in the showers of cosmogenic muons. We present an estimate of the cosmogenic muon background to proton decay in the p →K+ ν channel. The simulation of muon transport to a depth of 4 km w.e. is performed in the MUSIC framework and the subsequent propagation of muons and secondary particles in the vicinity of a cylindrical 20 kt LAr target is performed using GEANT4. An exposure time of 100 years is considered, with a rate of <0.0012 events/kt/year at 90% CL predicted from our simulations.

  2. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  3. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  4. DarkSide-50: A WIMP Search with a Two-phase Argon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, P. D.; Agnes, P.; Alton, D.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Crippa, L.; DAngelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Humble, P.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Joliet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P. D.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Nelson, A.; Okounkova, M.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Papp, L.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Perfetto, F.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvarov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A.; Westerdale, R.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    DarkSide-50 is a two phase argon TPC for direct dark matter detection which is installed at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory, Italy. DarkSide-50 has a 50-kg active volume and will make use of underground argon low in 39Ar. The TPC is installed inside an active neutron veto made with boron-loaded high radiopurity liquid scintillator. The neutron veto is installed inside a 1000 m3 water Cherenkov muon veto. The DarkSide-50 TPC and cryostat are assembled in two radon-free clean rooms to reduce radioactive contaminants. The overall design aims for a background free exposure after selection cuts are applied. The expected sensitivity for WIMP-nucleon cross section is of the order of 10-45 cm2 for WIMP masses around 100 GeV/c2. The commissioning and performance of the detector are described. Details of the low-radioactivity underground argon and other unique features of the projects are reported.

  5. Front-End ASIC for Liquid Argon TPC

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, G.; Li, S.; D'Andragora, A.; Nambiar, N.; Rescia, S.; Vernon, E.; Chen, H.; Lanni, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Thorn, C.; Yu, B.

    2011-06-15

    We present a front-end application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a wire based time-projection-chamber (TPC) operating in liquid Argon (LAr). The LAr TPC will be used for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The ASIC must provide a low-noise readout of the signals induced on the TPC wires, digitization of those signals at 2 MSamples/s, compression, buffering and multiplexing. A resolution of better than 1000 rms electrons at 200 pF input capacitance for an input range of 300 fC is required, along with low power and operation in LAr (at 87 K). We include the characterization of a commercial technology for operation in the cryogenic environment and the first experimental results on the analog front end. The results demonstrate that complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistors have lower noise and much improved dc characteristics at LAr temperature. Finally, we introduce the concept of '1/f equivalent' to model the low-frequency component of the noise spectral density, for use in the input metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor optimization.

  6. Optical readout of a two phase liquid argon TPC using CCD camera and THGEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrokoridis, K.; Ball, F.; Carroll, J.; Lazos, M.; McCormick, K. J.; Smith, N. A.; Touramanis, C.; Walker, J.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study into the use of CCDs to image secondary scintillation light generated by THick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEMs) in a two phase LAr TPC. A Sony ICX285AL CCD chip was mounted above a double THGEM in the gas phase of a 40 litre two-phase LAr TPC with the majority of the camera electronics positioned externally via a feedthrough. An Am-241 source was mounted on a rotatable motion feedthrough allowing the positioning of the alpha source either inside or outside of the field cage. Developed for and incorporated into the TPC design was a novel high voltage feedthrough featuring LAr insulation. Furthermore, a range of webcams were tested for operation in cryogenics as an internal detector monitoring tool. Of the range of webcams tested the Microsoft HD-3000 (model no:1456) webcam was found to be superior in terms of noise and lowest operating temperature. In ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure 1 ppm pure argon gas, the THGEM gain was ≈ 1000 and using a 1 msec exposure the CCD captured single alpha tracks. Successful operation of the CCD camera in two-phase cryogenic mode was also achieved. Using a 10 sec exposure a photograph of secondary scintillation light induced by the Am-241 source in LAr has been captured for the first time.

  7. A Large Liquid Argon TPC for Off-axis NuMI Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Menary, Scott

    2006-07-11

    The ICARUS collaboration has shown the power of the liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) technique to image events with bubble-chamber-like quality. I will describe a proposed long-baseline {nu}e appearance experiment utilizing a large ({>=} 15 kton1) LArTPC placed off-axis of Fermilab's NuMI {nu}{mu} beam. The total LArTPC program as it presently stands, which includes a number of smaller R and D projects designed to examine the key design issues, will be outlined.

  8. Integrated plan for LArTPC neutrino detectors in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Baller, B.; Fleming, B.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    We present an integrated R&D plan aimed at demonstrating the ability to build a very large Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC), on a scale suitable for use as a Far Detector for the LBNE neutrino oscillation experiment. This plan adopts current LArTPC R&D-related activities and proposes new ones to address questions that go beyond those being answered by the current efforts. We have employed a risk evaluation strategy to identify questions that can be answered (or risks that can be mitigated) through one or more R&D steps. In summary form, the plan consists of the following pre-existing components: (1) The Materials Test Stand program, now in operation at Fermilab, addressing questions pertaining to maintenance of argon purity; (2) Existing electronics test stands at FNAL and BNL; (3) The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator (LAPD) now being assembled at Fermilab; (4) The ArgoNeuT prototype LArTPC, now running in the NuMI beam; (5) The MicroBooNE experiment, proposed as a physics experiment that will advance our understanding of the LArTPC technology, now completing its conceptual design phase; (6) A software development effort that is well integrated across present and planned LArTPC detectors. We are proposing to add to these efforts the following: (1) A membrane cryostat mechanical prototype to evaluate and gain expertise with this technology; (2) An installation and integration prototype, to understand issues pertaining to detector assembly, particularly in an underground environment; (3) A {approx} 5% scale electronics systems test to understand system-wide issues as well as individual component reliability. (4) A calibration test stand that would consist of a small TPC to be exposed to a test beam for calibration studies, relevant for evaluation of physics sensitivities. We have developed a timeline and milestones for achieving these goals as discussed in Section 4. The proposed activities necessary for the final design of LAr20 are complete by CD3 in

  9. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  10. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  11. MicroBooNE and the Road to Large Liquid Argon Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagiorgi, G.

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC's) provide a promising technology for multi-kiloton scale detectors aiming to address-among other pressing particle physics questions-the possibility of short and long baseline electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance. MicroBooNE, a 170 ton LArTPC under construction, is the next necessary step in a phased R&D effort toward construction and stable operation of larger-scale LArTPC's. This development effort also leans heavily on the ArgoNeuT and LAr1 LArTPC R&D experiments at Fermilab. In addition to advancing the LArTPC technology, these projects also provide unique physics opportunities. For example, Micro-BooNE will be located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab, at ∼470 m from neutrino production. Thus, in addition to measuring a suite of low energy neutrino cross sections on argon, MicroBooNE will investigate the anomalous low energy excess seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Furthermore, the neutrino beam energy and relatively short baseline provide MicroBooNE with sensitivity to high-∼m2 neutrino oscillations. These proceedings summarize the role of the MicroBooNE detector in the US LArTPC R&D program, present its physics reach, and briefly discuss the physics potential of a dedicated near-future neutrino oscillation program at the Booster Neutrino Beamline, as a way to maximize the physics output of the Fermilab LArTPC R&D projects.

  12. WA105: a large-scale demonstrator of the Liquid Argon double phase TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonazzo, A.; WA105 Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The physics case for a large underground detector devoted to neutrino oscillation measurements, nucleon decay and astrophysics is compelling. A time projection chamber based on the dual-phase liquid Argon technique is an extremely attractive option, allowing for long drift distances, low energy threshold and high readout granularity. It has been extensively studied in the LAGUNA-LBNO Design Study and is one of the two designs foreseen for the modules of the DUNE detector in the US. The WA105 experiment envisages the construction of a large scale prototype at CERN, to validate technical solutions and perform physics studies with charged particle beams.

  13. Photon Detection System for LBNE Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2014-03-01

    The LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is the next generation accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment planned in US. The experiment will use a new muon-neutrino beam sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics goal of the LBNE is a definitive determination the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta-23, and precise measurement of CP violation in neutrino oscillation. Neutrino interaction in LAr result in charged particles producing ionization and scintillation light signals. Dedicated photon detection system is under design for use in the LBNE LArTPC far detectors. The baseline design couples wavelength-shifter coated ultraviolet transmitting acrylic to 3 mm2 silicon photomultipliers. By detecting scintillation light we aim to improve event reconstruction capabilities and efficiently separate neutrino events from background. Current status of the system will be described.

  14. A TPC detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Beiser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Weiman, H.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-04-01

    The design of the time projection chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx}200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described.

  15. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  17. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Zander

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss the outcome of recent research and development of wavelength-shifting lightguides for LArTPCs. The response of the lightguides was characterized in both air and liquid argon. Attenuation lengths over 100cm were consistently measured in air, which is an important step in the development of meter-scale lightguides for future LArTPCs. Additionally, good agreement was found between simulations and measurements performed in air and liquid argon. Such agreement indicates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of lightguide production. Zander Moss for the MIT Light Collection R&D Group.

  18. Performance and technical challenges of liquid argon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, Brian; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers offer the possibility of incredible resolution of particle interactions. This review outlines the ongoing research and development towards the realization of a multi-kiloton scale detector. The ICARUS and ArgoNeuT experiments which make use of liquid argon time projection chamber technology are also described.

  19. New Measurement of ^39Ar in Underground Argon with a Low Background Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingke

    2012-03-01

    A low background liquid argon detector has been developed for sensitive measurements of the beta radioactive ^39Ar in argon from underground sources. The measurement is motivated by the need to improve on earlier studies that showed no sign of ^39Ar in certain sources of underground argon, but with a limited sensitivity of ˜ 5% relative to ^39Ar in atmospheric argon[1]. We will report preliminary measurements taken with the low background detector that was commissioned and operated at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) in Virginia. A combination of passive and active background reduction techniques resulted in a very low background and a null result with sensitivity to ^39Ar less than 1% of atmospheric. The results confirm that underground argon is well suited for direct detection of dark matter WIMPs. [4pt] [1] D. Acosta-Kane et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 587:46 (2008)

  20. Current and future liquid argon neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.

    2015-05-15

    The liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detector technology provides an opportunity for precision neutrino oscillation measurements, neutrino cross section measurements, and searches for rare processes, such as SuperNova neutrino detection. These proceedings review current and future LArTPC neutrino experiments. Particular focus is paid to the ICARUS, MicroBooNE, LAr1, 2-LArTPC at CERN-SPS, LBNE, and 100 kton at Okinoshima experiments.

  1. TPC Detectors for Neutrino-less Double-Beta Decay and Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Azriel

    2012-10-01

    Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are increasingly becoming the particle detector technology of choice for rare event searches such as neutrino-less double beta decays and direct WIMP dark matter interactions. At present time, experiments using xenon-filled TPCs are producing some of the best limits for both of these searches. TPCs offer 3D ionization-track imaging as well as calorimetric energy measurements both of which are important handles for the identification of the rare sought-after events while discarding background events due to cosmic rays or due to radioactive decays in the detector or surrounding materials. Particle identification, beyond that provided by the particle range and dE/dx information, is also available from the relative amount of ionization and excitation losses and is essential for the WIMP searches. The contiguous gas or liquid volume at the heart of a TPC is continuously purified to remove contaminants that would otherwise deteriorate the detector performance or produce backgrounds. The fiducial volume for the event searches can be defined after the fact and is typically chosen to be well separated from the physical boundaries of the working gas or liquid to avoid surface events that often are problematic and much harder to reject in solid state detectors. The scalability of the TPC is one of its most important advantages in a field where ever increasing detector masses are required to achieve the required sensitivities. Detectors of O(100) kg scale are in operation and construction and ton to multi-ton detectors are being planned and expected to come on-line in the next years. In this talk I will describe the various types of TPCs in use or planned and will discuss their potential for achieving the exciting goals of discovering the dark matter particle and observing neutrino-less double beta decays.

  2. Light yield in DarkSide-10: A prototype two-phase argon TPC for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Alton, D.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Beltrame, P.; Benziger, J.; Bonfini, G.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cline, D.; Cocco, A. G.; Condon, C.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; De Haas, E.; Derbin, A.; Di Pietro, G.; Dratchnev, I.; Durben, D.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghag, C.; Ghiano, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guo, C.; Guray, G.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Kayunov, A.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Shields, E.; Li, P.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, L.; Lund, A.; Lung, K.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P. D.; Mohayai, T.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Nelson, A.; Nemtzow, A.; Nurakhov, N.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, L.; Perfetto, F.; Pinsky, L.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Sands, W.; Seigar, M.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Teymourian, A.; Thompson, J.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wang, H.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zehfus, M.; Zhong, W.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the DarkSide program of direct dark matter searches using two-phase argon TPCs, a prototype detector with an active volume containing 10 kg of liquid argon, DarkSide-10, was built and operated underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. A critically important parameter for such devices is the scintillation light yield, as photon statistics limits the rejection of electron-recoil backgrounds by pulse shape discrimination. We have measured the light yield of DarkSide-10 using the readily-identifiable full-absorption peaks from gamma ray sources combined with single-photoelectron calibrations using low-occupancy laser pulses. For gamma lines of energies in the range 122-1275 keV, we get light yields averaging 8.887±0.003(stat)±0.444(sys) p.e./keVee. With additional purification, the light yield measured at 511 keV increased to 9.142±0.006(stat) p.e./keVee.

  3. The Liquid Argon Calorimeter system for the SLC Large Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Fox, J.D.; Smith, S.R.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper the physical packaging and the logical organization of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) electronics system for the Stanford Linear Collider Large Detector (SLD) at SLAC are described. This system processes signals from approximately 44,000 calorimeter towers and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged within the detector itself as opposed to an external electronics support rack. The signal path from the towers in the liquid argon through the vacuum to the outside of the detector is explained. The organization of the control logic, analog electronics, power regulation, analog-to-digital conversion circuits, and fiber optic drivers mounted directly on the detector are described. Redundancy considerations for the electronics and cooling issues are discussed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Liquid-Argon Time Projection Chambers in the U.S

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detectors are ideally suited for studying neutrino interactions and probing the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. The ability to drift ionization particles over long distances in purified argon and to trigger on abundant scintillation light allows for excellent particle identification and triggering capability. Recent U.S. based work in the development of LAr TPC technology for massive kiloton size detectors will be discussed in this talk, including details of the ArgoNeuT (Argon Neutrino Test) test-beam project, which is a 175 liter LAr TPC exposed to Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beamline.

  5. TPC-like readout for thermal neutron detection using a GEM-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, B.; Hertenberger, R.; Biebel, O.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2016-07-01

    Spatial resolution of less than 200 μm is challenging for thermal neutron detection. A novel readout scheme based on the time-projection-chamber (TPC) concept is used in a gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detector [1]. Thermal neutrons are captured in a single 2 μm thick Boron-10 converter cathode and secondary Helium and Lithium ions are produced with a combined energy of 2.8 MeV. These ions have sufficient energy to form straight tracks of several mm length. With a time resolving 2-dimensional readout of 400 μm pitch in both directions, based on APV25 chips, the ions are tracked and their respective origin in the cathode converter foil is reconstructed. Using an Ar-CO2 93:7% gas mixture, a resolution of 100 μm (FWHM 235 μm) has been observed with a triple GEM-detector setup at the Garching neutron source (FRMII) for neutrons of 4.7 Å.

  6. A 3-D image chamber for the liquid argon TPC based on multi-layer printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cennini, P.; Cittolin, S.; Revol, J. P.; Rubbia, C.; Tian, W. H.; Li, X.; Picchi, P.; Cavanna, F.; Piano Mortari, G.; Verdecchia, M.; Cline, D.; Liu, Y.; Muratori, G.; Otwinowski, S.; Wang, H.; Zhou, M.; Bettini, A.; Casagrande, F.; Centro, S.; De Vecchi, C.; Pepato, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Rossi, P.; Ventura, S.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Dolfini, R.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Piazzoli, A.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, U. L.; Scannicchio, D.; Periale, L.; Suzuki, S.

    1994-08-01

    In our research and development programme for the ICARUS experiment we have developed a novel three-dimensional readout scheme for a liquefied noble gas TPC, where no charge multiplication process takes place. The design avoids completely wire grids and is based on the multilayer circuit technique. As a consequence it is intrinsically safe and suited to be used in large and modular structures as those foreseen for ICARUS. We describe here how the electrodes structure can be simplified leading to the new design principles and we present the results obtained with a small prototype chamber in a 100 GeV μ beam.

  7. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, D.; Bremer, J.; Gendotti, A.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Loew, T.; Mladenov, D.; Montanari, C.; Murphy, S.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Rubbia, A.; Sharma, R.; Smargianaki, D.; Stewart, J.; Vignoli, C.; Wilson, P.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study neutrinos from a new beam from Fermilab. These cryostats will be engineered, constructed, commissioned, and qualified by an international engineering team. This contribution presents the on-going effort on the development of the cryostats and details the requirements and the current status of the design.

  8. First tests of a Micromegas TPC in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.; Lepeltier, V.; Ronan, M.

    2004-12-10

    Since the summer of 2003, a large Micromegas TPC prototype (1000 channels, 50 cm drift, 50 cm diameter) has been operated in a 2T superconducting magnet at Saclay. A description of this apparatus and first results from cosmic ray tests are presented. Additional measurements using simpler detectors with a laser source, an X-ray gun and radio-active sources are discussed. Drift velocity and gain measurements, electron attachment and aging studies for a Micromegas TPC are presented. In particular, using simulations and measurements, it is shown that an $Argon-CF_4$ mixture is optimal for operation at a future Linear Collider.

  9. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, M.; Bremer, J.; Geynisman, M.; Hentschel, S.; Montanari, D.; Nessi, M.; Norris, B.

    2015-12-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these installations (parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). This paper gives an overview of the installations involved in these cryogenic projects, describes the functional demands made to these cryogenic systems and presents the initial studies on which these future cryogenic systems will be based.

  10. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  11. Study of pion photo-production using a TPC detector to determine beam asymmetries from polarized HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilgul, Serdar A.

    The Laser Electron Gamma Source facility (LEGS) provides intense, polarized, tagged gamma-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the NSLS at BNL, Upton, NY. A series of double-polarization experiments (beam and target) has been completed to study the helicity structure of the nucleon. Neutral-pion measurements were completed in 2005 by using the Spin ASYmmetry detector system (SASY) which covers a large solid angle and allows for detection of a large range of neutral pions. Charged-pion experiments were completed in 2006. This new experiment yields data on the beam asymmetry Sigma for a polarized Hydrogen Deuterium (HD) target from the 2006 data. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC), surrounded by two-Tesla magnet, was built and incorporated into SASY to identify the pion charge and so separate neutron and proton reactions. The TPC provides snap-shots of ionizing tracks of particles produced by 300-422 MeV polarized photons on a polarized HD target. A polarized HD target was developed and used in these experiments.

  12. Extreme argon purity in a large, non-evacuated cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Tope, Terry; Adamowski, Mark; Carls, B.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Skup, E.; Stancari, M.; Yang, T.

    2014-01-29

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) show promise as scalable devices for the large detectors needed for long-baseline neutrino oscillation physics. Over the last several years at Fermilab a staged approach to developing the technology for large detectors has been developed. The TPC detectors require ultra-pure liquid argon with respect to electronegative contaminants such as oxygen and water. The tolerable electronegative contamination level may be as pure as 60 parts per trillion of oxygen. Three liquid argon cryostats operated at Fermilab have achieved the extreme purity required by TPCs. These three cryostats used evacuation to remove atmospheric contaminants as the first purification step prior to filling with liquid argon. Future physics experiments may require very large detectors with tens of kilotonnes of liquid argon mass. The capability to evacuate such large cryostats adds significant cost to the cryostat itself in addition to the cost of a large scale vacuum pumping system. This paper describes a 30 ton liquid argon cryostat at Fermilab which uses purging to remove atmospheric contaminants instead of evacuation as the first purification step. This cryostat has achieved electronegative contamination levels better than 60 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent. The results of this liquid argon purity demonstration will strongly influence the design of future TPC cryostats.

  13. Pad TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Hilke, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A new kind of TPC is described, in which no sense wires exist but gas amplification is obtained from a single parallel gap. A mesh separates the drift volume from the amplifying gap. The anode is segmented into circular rows of narrow pads for rphi measurement by centroid finding and into wide circular pads for dE/dx sampling. The expected advantages of this technique are: better, track angle independent rphi resolution (no need for wire pulse height corrections); better two-track separation if more electronic channels can be afforded; less dead space from frame structures; reduced positive feedback and slower chamber deterioration by deposit formation on the anode. Very tight construction tolerances are the principle drawback. The properties of the Pad TPC are discussed in view of large scale construction and first test results are presented.

  14. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; VanGemert, J. K.; Conrad, J. M.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone. We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  15. Expected performance of an ideal liquid argon neutrino detector with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorel, M.

    2014-10-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about 10-3. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our results are based on detailed simulations, with neutrino interactions modelled according to the GENIE event generator, while the charge and light responses of a large LAr ideal detector are described by the Geant4 and NEST simulation tools. A neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent level, for few-GeV neutrino interactions that are fully contained. We argue that the construction of large LAr detectors with sufficiently high light collection efficiencies is in principle possible.

  16. A prototype of a directional detector for non-baryonic dark matter search: MIMAC (Micro-TPC Matrix of Chambers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grignon, C.; Bernard, G.; Billard, J.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Koumeir, C.; Mayet, F.; Santos, D.; Colas, P.; Ferrer, E.; Giomataris, I.; Allaoua, A.; Lebreton, L.

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a micro-tpc using a pixelized bulk micromegas coupled to dedicated acquisition electronics as a read-out allowing to reconstruct the three dimensional track of a few keV recoils. The prototype has been tested with the Amande facility at the IRSN-Cadarache providing monochromatic neutrons. The first results concerning discrimination of a few keV electrons and proton recoils are presented.

  17. Radon backgrounds in the DEAP-1 liquid-argon-based Dark Matter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaudruz, P.-A.; Batygov, M.; Beltran, B.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Cai, B.; Caldwell, T.; Chen, M.; Chouinard, R.; Cleveland, B. T.; Contreras, D.; Dering, K.; Duncan, F.; Ford, R.; Gagnon, R.; Giuliani, F.; Gold, M.; Golovko, V. V.; Gorel, P.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hakobyan, R.; Hallin, A. L.; Harvey, P.; Hearns, C.; Jillings, C. J.; Kuźniak, M.; Lawson, I.; Li, O.; Lidgard, J.; Liimatainen, P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Mathew, R.; McDonald, A. B.; McElroy, T.; McFarlane, K.; McKinsey, D.; Muir, A.; Nantais, C.; Nicolics, K.; Nikkel, J.; Noble, T.; O'Dwyer, E.; Olsen, K. S.; Ouellet, C.; Pasuthip, P.; Pollmann, T.; Rau, W.; Retiere, F.; Ronquest, M.; Skensved, P.; Sonley, T.; Tang, J.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Veloce, L.; Ward, M.

    2015-03-01

    The DEAP-1 7 kg single phase liquid argon scintillation detector was operated underground at SNOLAB in order to test the techniques and measure the backgrounds inherent to single phase detection, in support of the DEAP-3600 Dark Matter detector. Backgrounds in DEAP are controlled through material selection, construction techniques, pulse shape discrimination, and event reconstruction. This report details the analysis of background events observed in three iterations of the DEAP-1 detector, and the measures taken to reduce them. The 222 Rn decay rate in the liquid argon was measured to be between 16 and 26 μBq kg-1. We found that the background spectrum near the region of interest for Dark Matter detection in the DEAP-1 detector can be described considering events from three sources: radon daughters decaying on the surface of the active volume, the expected rate of electromagnetic events misidentified as nuclear recoils due to inefficiencies in the pulse shape discrimination, and leakage of events from outside the fiducial volume due to imperfect position reconstruction. These backgrounds statistically account for all observed events, and they will be strongly reduced in the DEAP-3600 detector due to its higher light yield and simpler geometry.

  18. Resolving the mass hierarchy with atmospheric neutrinos using a liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Sankar, S. Uma

    2008-10-01

    We explore the potential offered by large-mass liquid argon detectors for determination of the sign of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}, or the neutrino mass hierarchy, through interactions of atmospheric neutrinos. We give results for a 100 kT sized magnetized detector which provides separate sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and, over a limited energy range, to {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub e}. We also discuss the sensitivity for the unmagnetized version of such a detector. After including the effect of smearing in neutrino energy and direction and incorporating the relevant statistical, theoretical, and systematic errors, we perform a binned {chi}{sup 2} analysis of simulated data. The {chi}{sup 2} is marginalized over the presently allowed ranges of neutrino parameters and determined as a function of {theta}{sub 13}. We find that such a detector offers superior capabilities for hierarchy resolution, allowing a >4{sigma} determination for a 100 kT detector over a 10-year running period for values of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.05. For an unmagnetized detector, a 2.5{sigma} hierarchy sensitivity is possible for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}=0.04.

  19. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. GLADE Global Liquid Argon Detector Experiment: a letter of intent to FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-05-13

    The recent measurements of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, which controls the observable size of any CP violation effects, open a window of opportunity to take advantage of the world's most powerful existing neutrino beam together with recent successes in development of the ultimate detector technology for the detection of electron neutrinos : a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber. During this proposed project a 5kt LAr detector (GLADE) will be developed by European groups to be put in a cryostat in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the US and will start taking data in 3-5 years time to address the neutrino mass ordering. The successful fruition of this project, along with nominal exposure at NO{nu}A and T2K, together with information from double beta decay experiments could ascertain that neutrinos are Dirac particles in the next decade.

  1. The Development of a 2000L Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and its Application to the Search for Proton Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming

    A new type of particle detector, the liquid argon time projection chamber, is developed and systematically tested using cosmic ray muons with a three ton prototype. The main technical problems, such as the liquid argon purity, wire chamber configuration, low noise electronics, and their long term stability, are solved after two years of run. Most of the basic parameters associated with the liquid argon TPC technology, the charge drift velocity, the spatial resolution, charge recombination and diffusion, are extracted. In order to apply this technique to solar neutrino physics, a measurement of the intrinsive radioactive Ar^{42} was performed and the results are compatible with current limits. An application to the search for proton decay with the liquid argon TPC technique is studied and some preliminary results are reported.

  2. Development of an anti-Compton veto for HPGe detectors operated in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicskó Csáthy, J.; Aghaei Khozani, H.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.

    2011-10-01

    A proof of concept detector is presented for scintillation light detection in liquid argon using silicon photo-multipliers. The aim of the work is to build an anti-Compton veto for germanium detectors operated directly in liquid argon as in the GERDA experiment. Wavelength shifting fibers are used to collect the scintillation light and to guide it to Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPC). Sufficient light yield was achieved to realize an effective anti-Compton veto. Properties of the MPPC were studied at cryogenic temperatures and are additionally reported.

  3. Design of single phase liquid argon detectors for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastler, Daniel E.

    2012-05-01

    Within our current understanding of the makeup of the universe, dark matter makes up 25% of the total energy and over 80% of the matter in the universe. Little is known about the makeup of dark matter, but its existence has been indirectly measured using the rotation curves of galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the Cosmic Microwave Background. To gain a greater understanding of this component of the universe, direct detection of dark matter is a major objective in particle astrophysics. One popular candidate for dark matter is the weakly interacting massive particle, or WIMP. The allowed rate of interaction between a WIMP and normal matter is extremely low, requiring new detection technologies with greater sensitivity to be explored. Though several experiments have already been conducted, no direct detection experiment has unambiguously identified a dark matter signal. This work explores the use of noble liquids, in a single liquid phase design, to detect single scatters of dark matter particles. The goal of current experiments is to investigate matter-dark-matter interaction cross-sections down to 10--45cm2. With that in mind, the MiniCLEAN detector has been designed with a 500 kg liquid argon detector volume and will be viewed by a spherical 4pi configuration of 92 photo-multiplier tubes. In order to determine the ability for single phase noble liquid to detect nuclear recoils from dark matter, several R&D experiments have been performed. These experiments undertook the measurement of how dark-matter-like nuclear recoils and background-like electronic recoils behave in liquid argon. In addition to reviewing the measurements of pulse shape discrimination and other noble liquid properties, my measurement of the scintillation efficiency is described. The scintillation efficiency characterizes the differing energy responses for nuclear and electron recoils. This was the first measurement of the scintillation efficiency in liquid argon for nuclear recoils over a wide

  4. SN-detection in LAr-TPC and the quest for (ν-Ar) cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanna, F.

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus cross sections are of relevance to supernova astrophysics. These cross-sections can be grouped into three categories, those that affect supernova dynamics, supernova nucleosynthesis, and terrestrial supernova neutrino detection, each of which would benefit from experimental study. In this report only the relevance of an accurate knowledge of neutrino-target nucleus cross sections for SN detection will be discussed, in particular for the case of Argon, the active target material of LAr-TPC detectors currently under construction or proposed for future very massive underground experiments.

  5. Performance of the electronics for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter system of the SLC large detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, E.; Abt, I.; Haller, G.M.; Honma, A.

    1988-10-01

    Results of performance tests on electronics for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) for the SLD experiment at SLAC are presented. The behavior of a sub-unit called a ''tophat,'' which processes 720 detector signals, is described. The electronics consists of charge sensitive preamplifiers, analog memories, A/D converters, and associated control and readout circuitry. An internal charge injection system is used to calibrate the overall response of the devices. Linearity is better than 1% of 0--28 pC charge at the input of the amplifiers. Noise (expressed as equivalent input charge) is less than 3000 electrons at a shaping time of 4 ..mu..s, with a slope of 2600 e/sup /minus///nF. Crosstalk to adjacent channels is less than 0.5%. The power consumption at a duty cycle of 13% is 61 W. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Cold Electronics Development for the LBNE LAr TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, C.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; D'Andragora, Alessio; Li, Shaorui; Nambiar, Neena; Rescia, Sergio; Vernon, Emerson; Chen, Hucheng; Lanni, Francesco; Makowiecki, Don; Radeka, Veljko; Yu, Bo

    The LBNE Project is developing a design for multiple 20 kiloton liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers to be used as the far detector for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment. An essential component of this design is a complete electronic readout system designed to operate in LAr (at 90K). This system is being implemented as a CMOS ASIC, in 180 nm commercial technology, that will provide low-noise readout of the signals induced on the TPC wires, digitization of those signals at 2 MS/s, zero-suppression, buffering and output multiplexing to a small number of cryostat feed-throughs. A resolution better than 1000 rms electrons at 200 pF input capacitance for an input range of 300 fC is required, along with low power (<15mW/channel) and operation in LAr with a lifetime greater than 15 years. An analog-only frontend has been successfully completed and fully evaluated, and will be used in the MicroBooNE LAr TPC. A prototype of the digital section has been fabricated and is being evaluated. The results demonstrate that CMOS transistors have lower noise and much improved dc characteristics at LAr temperature. We will describe the progress to date and plans for the remaining development.

  7. ArgoNeuT: A Physics-Minded Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitz, Joshua

    2009-05-01

    ArgoNeuT is a 170 liter Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector set in the on-axis NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The experiment's research/design goals and physics possibilities, including a charged current quasi-elastic cross section and MA parameter measurement, are reviewed. Also, the results of the above-ground cosmic ray commissioning run with accompanying event displays and reconstructed muon tracks and the current status of the experiment are shown.

  8. Dark Sector Searches in LArTPC Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himwich, Elizabeth; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiments, which allow for excellent event characterization and topological visualization, are sensitive to the distinct signatures of theorized low-energy dark sector phenomena. With the unique technology of LArTPC experiments, it is possible to perform a quasi-model independent dark sector search that can encompass a number of models. This talk will discuss the dark sector search in LArTPC experiments as well as the sensitivity of the MicroBooNE and Lar1-ND experiments to dark sector signatures predicted by leptophobic models, which has been evaluated based on simulated signal and background event rates.

  9. Front end electronics for the STAR TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.R.; Barale, P.; Beuville, E.

    1995-10-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance detector now being built to study high energy heavy ion collisions. It detects charged particles with a large time projection chamber. The 136,600 TPC pads are instrumented with waveform digitizers, implemented in custom low noise preamplifier/shaper and switched capacitor array/ADCs ICs. The system is highly integrated with all analog functions mounted on small cards that plug into the TPC. Detector mounted readout boards multiplex data from 1,152 channels onto a 1.5 Gbit/sec fiber optic link to the data acquisition system.

  10. PERFORMANCE OF THE LEAD/LIQUID ARGON SHOWER COUNTER SYSTEM OF THE MARK II DETECTOR AT SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Briggs, D.D.; Carithers, W.C.; Dieterle, W.E.; Eaton, M.W.; Lankford, A.J.; Pang, C.Y.; Vella, E.N.; Breidenbach, M.; Dorfan, J.M.; Hanson, G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Jenni, P.; Luth, V.

    1980-05-01

    The shower counter system of the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector is a large lead/liquid argon system of the type pioneered by Willis and Radekal; however, it differs in most details and is much larger than other such detectors currently in operation, It contains, for example, 8000 liters of liquid argon and 3000 channels of low noise electronics, which is about eight times the size of the system of Willis et al. in the CERN ISR. This paper reports, with little reference to design, on the operation and performance of the Mark II system during approximately a year and a half of operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's e{sup +}-e{sup -} facility, SPEAR. The design and construction of the system have previously been described and a detailed discussion of all aspects -- design, construction, operation, and performance -- is in preparation.

  11. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  12. Low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon for a coherent neutrino-nucleus scatter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, Michael P.

    ~ 4 e-- per keVr at 8 keVr. For gaseous Ar, the nuclear ionization quench factor is predicted to be ~ 0.13 at 10 keVr, which is the upper limit on this quantity obtained from the atomic collision model. In order to confidently apply the predictions of the ionization yield model, several experiments have been carried out for its validation. A single-phase Ar detector is used to both understand the processes occurring in the amplification region of a dual-phase Ar detector and to measure the nuclear ionization quench factor (ratio of the ionization signal produced in a nuclear recoil compared to that produced in an electron recoil of equal energy) in gaseous Ar. Using a portable neutron generator based on the 7Li(p,n)7 Be reaction, the nuclear ionization quench factor at 13 keVr was measured in gaseous Ar to be 0:138--0:012, which is in good agreement with the predictions of the ionization yield model. The absolute ionization yield was not measurable in gaseous Ar, because single ionization electron sensitivity has not been achieved in the single-phase Ar detector. The Gamma or Neutron Argon Recoils Resulting in Liquid Ionization (G/NARRLI) detector is a dual-phase Ar detector, which was developed to measure the ionization yield at energies below 10 keVr. While operating the G/NARRLI detector, high purity was achieved, extending the electron lifetime to ≈ 100 -- 200 micros. The ultimate sensitivity was achieved by detecting the single ionization electron peak. Detection of the single electron peak allowed absolutely calibrated spectroscopy to be performed using 55Fe to produce a 6 keV peak and 37Ar to produce a peak at 2.822 keV and a low-energy peak at 270 eV. Spectroscopic detection of the 270 eV peak represents the lowest energy measured to date in a dual-phase Ar detector. The electron yields for the 55Fe and 37Ar sources were used for the validation of the electron transport code, which was in good agreement with the modeling results. An effort was made to

  13. A FORWARD TPC FOR STAR.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHUTTAUF,A. AND THE STAR COLLABORATION

    1999-05-10

    Two Forward Time Projection Chambers (FTPC) provide charge and momentum information in the pseudorapidity range between 2.5 < |{eta}| < 4.0. A radial TPC scheme is used, where ionization electrons drift in an electric field perpendicular to the axial solenoidal magnetic field. Curved proportional wire chambers with pad readout record the track information via 19200 electronic channels. We report on measurements with various gas mixtures in a prototype chamber with and without magnetic field. The design and construction of a curved readout chamber is described. Based on the prototype measurements and the final layout of the detector the expected performance in measuring accuracy and two-track-separation is given.

  14. Development of STAR TPC for use at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.H.

    1993-10-01

    A large TPC is a main element in the STAR detector system to be used at RHIC. The TPC will provide dE/dx and tracking for the expected 4000 charged particles emitted in the pseudo rapidity window of -1 < {eta} < +1. Much of the design work has been completed on this detector and prototyping is underway. We will report on the design of this TPC and present results of prototype tests of the pad plane structure that reads out the TPC. We are investigating the use of alternative gases to improved two track resolution and momentum resolution. A new method for providing spatial calibrations with fixed photoelectric sources in the TPC is also being developed. Results of these studies will be reported.

  15. Data links for the EOS TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Bieser, F.; Jones, R.; McParland, C.

    1990-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of high speed data links and slower configuration control links used between the EOS TPC detector and the data processing electronics. Data rates of 5MBytes/s/link are maintained over 30m with optical isolation. Pedestal subtraction, hit detection, and data reordering are performed online. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  16. MicroBooNE: A New Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber detectors are well suited to study neutrino interactions, and are an intriguing option for future massive detectors capable of measuring the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. These detectors combine fine-grained tracking with calorimetry, allowing for excellent imaging and particle identification ability. In this talk the details of the MicroBooNE experiment, a 175 ton LArTPC which will be exposed to Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beamline starting in 2011, will be presented. The ability of MicroBooNE to differentiate electrons from photons gives the experiment unique capabilities in low energy neutrino interaction measurements.

  17. TPC magnet cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.W.

    1980-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) magnet at LBL and its compensation solenoids are adiabatically stable superconducting solenoid magnets. The cryogenic system developed for the TPC magnet is discussed. This system uses forced two-phase tubular cooling with the two cryogens in the system. The liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are delivered through the cooled load by forced tubular flow. The only reservoirs of liquid cryogen exist in the control dewar (for liquid helium) and the conditioner dewar (for liquid nitrogen). The operation o these systems during virtually all phases of system operation are described. Photographs and diagrams of various system components are shown, and cryogenic system data are presented in the following sections: (1) heat leaks into the TPC coil package and the compensation solenoids; (2) heat leaks to various components of the TPC magnet cryogenics system besides the magnets and control dewar; (3) the control dewar and its relationship to the rest of the system; (4) the conditioner system and its role in cooling down the TPC magnet; (5) gas-cooled electrical leads and charging losses; and (6) a summation of the liquid helium and liquid nitrogen requirements for the TPC superconducting magnet system.

  18. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber research and development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Buchanan, N.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Gehman, V.; Greenlee, H.; Guardincerri, E.; Jones, B.; Junk, T.; Katori, T.; Kirby, M.; Lang, K.; Loer, B.; Marchionni, A.; Maruyama, T.; Mauger, C.; Menegolli, A.; Montanari, D.; Mufson, S.; Norris, B.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sanders, R.; Soderberg, M.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A.; Tope, T.; Touramanis, C.; Thorn, C.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Yu, B.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-05-01

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in seven topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity, ii) Cryogenics, iii) TPC and High Voltage, iv) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, v) Scintillation Light Detection, vi) Calibration and Test Beams, and vii) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  19. Performance of a liquid argon time projection chamber exposed to the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Arneodo, F.; Cavanna, F.; Mitri, I. De; Mortari, G. Piano; Benetti, P.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Calligarich, E.; Cesana, E.; Dolfini, R.; Mauri, F.; Montanari, C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Terrani, M.; Vignoli, C.; Bonesini, M.; Boschetti, B.; Cavalli, D.; Curioni, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of the first exposure of a Liquid Argon TPC to a multi-GeV neutrino beam. The data have been collected with a 50 liters ICARUS-like chamber located between the CHORUS and NOMAD experiments at the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF). We discuss both the instrumental performance of the detector and its capability to identify and reconstruct low-multiplicity neutrino interactions.

  20. CAMAC interface for TPC data-acquisition electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sidman, S.; Olson, S.; Jared, R.

    1983-06-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a detector used for high-energy physics research at the Stanford PEP Accelerator. TPC requires about 17,000 channels of data acquisition, which samples on command the input to each channel at a 10 MHz rate. This high data rate is made possible by means of Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), intelligent digitizers, and a sophisticated trigger system. The TPC-CAMAC interface described here was developed to allow experiments of smaller scale than the complete TPC to use the standard data acquisition portion of the TPC electronics, namely the amplifier, CCD and digitizer bins. These three bins, when properly interconnected and controlled by the interface control bin, form a transient digitizer with a depth of 455 samples and a maximum width of 256 channels per bin set.

  1. The darkside multiton detector for the direct dark matter search

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C. E.; Agnes, P.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Asner, D. M.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Condon, C.; Crippa, L.; D’Angelo, D.; D’Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Foxe, M.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M. Y.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Hime, A.; Humble, P.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P. X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Lukyachenko, G.; Ma, Y. Q.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Markov, D.; Martoff, J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Montanari, D.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Odrzywolek, A.; Orrell, J. L.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, B.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Recine, K.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Rossi, B.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smallcomb, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Suvurov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S. E.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Williams, R.; Wojcik, M.; Xu, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zhong, W. L.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-01-01

    Although the existence of dark matter is supported by many evidences, based on astrophysical measurements, its nature is still completely unknown. One major candidate is represented by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which could in principle be detected through their collisions with ordinary nuclei in a sensitive target, producing observable low-energy (<100 keV) nuclear recoils. The DarkSide program aims at the WIPMs detection using a liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC). In this paper we quickly review the DarkSide program focusing in particular on the next generation experiment DarkSide-G2, a 3.6-ton LAr-TPC. The different detector components are described as well as the improvements needed to scale the detector from DarkSide-50 (50 kg LAr-TPC) up to DarkSide-G2. Finally, the preliminary results on background suppression and expected sensitivity are presented.

  2. The darkside multiton detector for the direct dark matter search

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aalseth, C. E.; Agnes, P.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Asner, D. M.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Although the existence of dark matter is supported by many evidences, based on astrophysical measurements, its nature is still completely unknown. One major candidate is represented by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which could in principle be detected through their collisions with ordinary nuclei in a sensitive target, producing observable low-energy (<100 keV) nuclear recoils. The DarkSide program aims at the WIPMs detection using a liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC). In this paper we quickly review the DarkSide program focusing in particular on the next generation experiment DarkSide-G2, a 3.6-ton LAr-TPC. The different detector components are described as wellmore » as the improvements needed to scale the detector from DarkSide-50 (50 kg LAr-TPC) up to DarkSide-G2. Finally, the preliminary results on background suppression and expected sensitivity are presented.« less

  3. Results from the STAR TPC system test

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, W.; Bieser, F.; Bossingham, R.

    1996-12-31

    A system test of various components of the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) detector, operating in concern, has recently come on-line. Communication between a major sub-detector, a sector of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), and the trigger, data acquisition and slow controls systems has been established, enabling data from cosmic ray muons to be collected. First results from an analysis of the TPC data are presented. These include measurements of system noise, electronic parameters such as amplifier gains and pedestal values, and tracking resolution for cosmic ray muons and laser induced ionization tracks. A discussion on the experience gained in integrating the different components for the system test is also given.

  4. The STAR TPC front end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.R.; Barale, P.; Beuville, E.

    1995-10-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) uses a large time projection chamber. Each of the 136,600 pads is instrumented with a waveform digitizer, implemented in custom low noise preamplifier/shaper and switched capacitor array/ADCs ICs. The system is highly integrated with all analog functions mounted on small cards that plug into the TPC. Detector mounted readout boards multiplex data from 1152 channels onto a 1.5 Gbit/sec fiber optic link to the data acquisition system.

  5. Highly integrated electronics for the star TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, A.A.; Bieser, F.; Hearn, W.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Millaud, J.; Noggle, T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Wieman, H.

    1991-12-31

    The concept for the STAR TPC front-end electronics is presented and the progress toward the development of a fully integrated solution is described. It is the goal of the R+D program to develop the complete electronics chain for the STAR central TPC detector at RHIC. It is obvious that solutions chosen e.g. for ALEPH are not adequate for the 150000 channels that need to be instrumented for readout. It will be necessary to perform all the signal processing, digitization and multiplexing directly on the detector in order to reduce per channel cost and the amount of cabling necessary to read out the information. We follow the approach chosen by the EOS TPC project, where the readout electronics on the detector consists of an integrated preamplifier, a hybrid shaping amplifier, an integrated switched capacitor array and a highly multiplexed ADC. The STAR electronics will be further integrated so that approximately 16 channels of the preamplifier, the shaper, the analog store and the ADC will be contained in two integrated circuits located directly on the pad plane.

  6. First Tests of a New Fast Waveform Digitizer for PMT Signal Read-out from Liquid Argon Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szelc, A. M.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Cortopassi, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Mini, G.; Pietropaolo, F.; Romboli, A.; Segreto, E.; Acciarri, R.

    A new generation Waveform Digitizer board as been recently made available on the market by CAEN. The new board CAEN V1751 with 8 Channels per board, 10 bit, 1 GS/s Flash ADC Waveform Digitizer (or 4 channel, 10 bit, 2 GS/s Flash ADC Waveform Digitizer -Dual Edge Sampling mode) with threshold and Auto-Trigger capabilities provides an ideal (relatively low-cost) solution for reading signals from liquid Argon detectors for Dark Matter search equipped with an array of PMTs for the detection of scintillation light. The board was extensively used in real experimental conditions to test its usefulness for possible future uses and to compare it with a state of the art digital oscilloscope. As results, PMT Signal sampling at 1 or 2 GS/s is appropriate for the reconstruction of the fast component of the signal scintillation in Argon (characteristic time of about 4 ns) and the extended dynamic range, after a small customization, allows for the detection of signals in the range of energy needed. The bandwidth is found to be adequate and the intrinsic noise is very low.

  7. Reconstructing Michel Electrons in the MicroBooNE Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratelli, David

    2016-03-01

    MicroBooNE is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab which began collecting neutrino data in October 2015. MicroBooNE aims to explore the low-energy excess in the νe spectrum reported by MiniBooNE as well as perform ν-Ar cross-section measurements. In this talk, we present the current status of reconstructing Michel electrons from cosmic ray muons in the MicroBooNE detector. These Michel electrons are distributed uniformly inside the detector, and serve as a natural and powerful calibration source to study the detector's response for low energy (10s of MeV) interactions as a function of position. We have developed a reconstruction software tool to successfully identify such Michel electrons which could be of benefit to LArTPC experiments generically.

  8. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  9. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  10. The DarkSide-50 outer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdale, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D’Angelo, D.; D’Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; DSkorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; The DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detection experiment searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. For experiments like DarkSide-50, neutrons are one of the primary backgrounds that can mimic WIMP signals. The experiment consists of three nested detectors: a liquid argon time projection chamber surrounded by two outer detectors. The outermost detector is a 10 m by 11 m cylindrical water Cherenkov detector with 80 PMTs, designed to provide shielding and muon vetoing. Inside the water Cherenkov detector is the 4 m diameter spherical boron-loaded liquid scintillator veto, with a cocktail of pseudocumene, trimethyl borate, and PPO wavelength shifter, designed to provide shielding, neutron vetoing, and in situ measurements of the TPC backgrounds. We present design and performance details of the DarkSide-50 outer detectors.

  11. A measurement of the absorption of liquid argon scintillation light by dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; Chiu, C. S.; Conrad, J. M.; Ignarra, C. M.; Katori, T.; Toups, M.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10-4 cm-1ppm-1, corresponding to an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10-21 cm2molecule-1. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, where a concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuation length due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  12. Anode-coupled readout for light collection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Toups, M.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper will discuss a new method of signal read-out from photon detectors in ultra-large, underground liquid argon time projection chambers. In this design, the signal from the light collection system is coupled via capacitive plates to the TPC wire-planes. This signal is then read out using the same cabling and electronics as the charge information. This greatly benefits light collection: it eliminates the need for an independent readout, substantially reducing cost; it reduces the number of cables in the vapor region of the TPC that can produce impurities; and it cuts down on the number of feed-throughs in the cryostat wall that can cause heat-leaks and potential points of failure. We present experimental results that demonstrate the sensitivity of a LArTPC wire plane to photon detector signals. We also simulate the effect of a 1 μs shaping time and a 2 MHz sampling rate on these signals in the presence of noise, and find that a single photoelectron timing resolution of ~30 ns can be achieved.

  13. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  14. Readout system of TPC/MPD NICA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, A. V.; Bajajin, A. G.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cheremukhina, G. A.; Fateev, O. V.; Korotkova, A. M.; Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Lukstins, J.; Movchan, S. A.; Razin, S. V.; Rybakov, A. A.; Vereschagin, S. V.; Zanevsky, Yu. V.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zruyev, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector in the MPD/NICA. The information on charge-particle tracks in the TPC is registered by the MWPG with cathode pad readout. The frontend electronics (FEE) are developed with use of modern technologies such as application specific integrated circuits (ASIC), field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA), and data transfer to a concentrator via a fast optical interface. The main parameters of the FEE are as follows: total number of channels, ~95 000; data stream from the whole TPC, 5 GB/s; low power consumption, less than 100 mW/ch; signal to noise ratio (S/N), 30; equivalent noise charge (ENC), <1000e- ( C in = 10-20 pF); and zero suppression (pad signal rejection ~90%). The article presents the status of the readout chamber construction and the data acquisition system. The results of testing FEE prototypes are presented.

  15. Spatial resolution of the PEP-4 time projection chamber - The PEP-4 TPC collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Badtke, D.H.; Bakken, J.A.; Barbaro-Galtier, A.; Barnes, A.V.; Barnett, B.A.; Blumenfeld, B.

    1983-02-01

    The spatial resolution and response of the segmented cathode pads of the PEP- 4 TPC have been measured with data taken at 8.5 atmospheres of 80% Argon-20% Methane gas with a 4kG magnetic field. The dependence of the spatial resolution and pad response on drift distance and track-anode crossing angle is presented.

  16. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Christopher M.

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  17. Future upgrade and physics perspectives of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Taku

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposes major detector upgrades to fully exploit the increase of the luminosity of the LHC in RUN 3 and to extend the physics reach for rare probes at low transverse momentum. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is one of the main tracking and PID devices in the central barrel of ALICE. The maximum trigger rate of the TPC is currently limited to about 3.5 kHz by the operation of a gating grid system. In order to make full use of the luminosity in RUN 3, the TPC is foreseen to be operated in an ungated mode with continuous readout. The existing MWPC readout will be replaced by a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) based readout, which provides intrinsic ion capture capability without gating. Extensive detector R&D employing Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous detector (Micromegas) technologies, and simulation studies to advance the techniques for the corrections of space-charge distortions have been performed since 2012. In this paper, the expected detector performance and the status of the R&D program to achieve this ambitious goal are described.

  18. Simulation of the transition radiation detection conditions in the ATLAS TRT detector filled with argon and krypton gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, A. S.; Maevskiy, A. S.

    2015-12-15

    Performance of the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) at the ATLAS experiment with argon and krypton gas mixtures was simulated. The efficiency of transition radiation registration, which is necessary for electron identification, was estimated along with the electron identification capabilities under such conditions.

  19. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; et al.

    2015-04-21

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  20. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; B. Carls; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; Dharmapalan, R.; Foreman, W.; Hahn, A.; Johnson, M.; Jones, B. J.P.; Junk, T.; Lang, K.; Lockwitz, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mauger, C.; Montanari, C.; Mufson, S.; Nessi, M.; Back, H. Olling; Petrillo, G.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sinins, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spooner, N.; Stancari, M.; Strauss, T.; Terao, K.; Thorn, C.; Tope, T.; Toups, M.; Urheim, J.; Water, R. Van de; Wang, H.; Wasserman, R.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Yang, T.

    2015-07-28

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  1. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; B. Carls; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the currentmore » efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.« less

  2. Summary of the second workshop on liquid argon time projection chamber research and development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Artrip, D.; Baller, B.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Carls, B.; Chen, H.; Deptuch, G.; Epprecht, L.; Dharmapalan, R.; Foreman, W.; Hahn, A.; Johnson, M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Junk, T.; Lang, K.; Lockwitz, S.; Marchionni, A.; Mauger, C.; Montanari, C.; Mufson, S.; Nessi, M.; Olling Back, H.; Petrillo, G.; Pordes, S.; Raaf, J.; Rebel, B.; Sinins, G.; Soderberg, M.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Stancari, M.; Strauss, T.; Terao, K.; Thorn, C.; Tope, T.; Toups, M.; Urheim, J.; Van de Water, R.; Wang, H.; Wasserman, R.; Weber, M.; Whittington, D.; Yang, T.

    2015-07-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: i) Argon Purity and Cryogenics, ii) TPC and High Voltage, iii) Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, iv) Scintillation Light Detection, v) Calibration and Test Beams, and vi) Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  3. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  4. A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Bromberg, C.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; Gallagher, H.; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

    2005-09-01

    Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very

  5. The iTPC upgrade for BES-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    STAR has proposed to upgrade the inner sectors of the STAR TPC to increase the segmentation on the inner padplane and to renew the inner sector wires. The upgrade will provide better momentum resolution, better dE/dx resolution and, most importantly, it will provide improved acceptance at high rapidity to | η| <= 1.5 compared to the current TPC configuration of | η| <= 1 and to extend the pt coverage towards lower pt. The enhanced measurement capabilities of STAR after the iTPC upgrade are a vital part of the BES-II effort for 2019-2020. The expanded rapidity coverage provides a major benefit for many analyses, especially those sensitive to changes in correlation lengths near a critical point, like the net-proton Kurtosis which exhibits interesting energy trends that only appear near the edge of the current STAR acceptance. In the area of dielectron measurements it reduces hadron contamination from a dominant source of uncertainty to an expected statistical uncertainty of only 10%, and will enable significantly improved understanding of in-medium modifications. In this talk I will discuss the physics impact and give a technical overview of the detector upgrade. This work was supported in part by the Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  6. Readout system of TPC/MPD NICA project

    SciTech Connect

    Averyanov, A. V.; Bajajin, A. G.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cheremukhina, G. A.; Fateev, O. V.; Korotkova, A. M.; Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Lukstins, J.; Movchan, S. A.; Razin, S. V.; Rybakov, A. A.; Vereschagin, S. V. Zanevsky, Yu. V.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zruyev, V. N.

    2015-12-15

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector in the MPD/NICA. The information on charge-particle tracks in the TPC is registered by the MWPG with cathode pad readout. The frontend electronics (FEE) are developed with use of modern technologies such as application specific integrated circuits (ASIC), field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA), and data transfer to a concentrator via a fast optical interface. The main parameters of the FEE are as follows: total number of channels, ∼95 000; data stream from the whole TPC, 5 GB/s; low power consumption, less than 100 mW/ch; signal to noise ratio (S/N), 30; equivalent noise charge (ENC), <1000e{sup –} (C{sub in} = 10–20 pF); and zero suppression (pad signal rejection ∼90%). The article presents the status of the readout chamber construction and the data acquisition system. The results of testing FEE prototypes are presented.

  7. Protonated water clusters in TPC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yunus; Kalkan, Yalçın; Veenhof, Rob

    2016-07-01

    Water vapour is added to the ALICE TPC gas to enhance its stability. These polar molecules create large protonated water clusters around a H+ core. In this context, the reactions H3O+(H2O)n-1 +H2 O →H3O+(H2O)n (n=1-9) were studied in the gas phase. Structures for these clusters are suggested and the most stable structures for each cluster size are shown. The thermodynamic parameters Δ Hn-1,n0,Δ Gn-1,n0,Δ Sn-1,n0 and equilibrium constants Kn-1,n for the reaction were calculated to determine the size of the water clusters. The results are close to experimental data found in the literature. Protonated water clusters at stp have a size of 6-9 which corresponds to a mass of 127.1 - 181.2 g / mole.

  8. The EOS TPC analysis shell

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.L.

    1991-03-01

    Key features of the general purpose event-based-data analysis shell (TAS) for the EOS TPC at LBL are described including the code development/code management procedures used. The architecture is designed with a view towards a distributed and multi-processing environment. TAS is interfaced seamlessly with the CERN PAW program and provides a consistent environment for both on-line and off-line analysis. The data model used is relational tables and the data structure definitions are maintained in a commercial database (INFORMIX). The interface for analysis modules is specified and enhances group participation in the development process. The use of commercial database as a data dictionary for both the table definitions and parameters used in the TAS kernel is extremely useful and productive. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Test Beam Results for ALICE TPC Upgrade Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, James; Alice Tpc-Upgrade Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ALICE detector is one of four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and its main purpose is to study the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector within ALICE, and currently has an intrinsic rate limitation of 3 kHz. The LHC will be upgraded during Long Shutdown 2 in 2018 to have Pb-Pb collision rates up to 50 kHz, and so the TPC readout must be accordingly upgraded. This will be done by replacing the current Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber assembly, which uses a gating grid to prevent ion backflow, with Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structures (MMGs), which allow for continuous rather than gated readout. A substantial R&D effort is underway for a 4-GEM design, as well as an alternate 2-GEM/MMG design. Prototypes of each design were tested in November-December 2014 at the PS and SPS beams at CERN; the results for the 2-GEM/MMG chambers will be presented.

  10. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  11. Design and Analysis for the DarkSide-10 Two-Phase Argon Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Christina Elena

    Astounding evidence for invisible "dark" matter has been found from galaxy clusters, cosmic and stellar gas motion, gravitational lensing studies, cosmic microwave background analysis, and large scale galaxy surveys. Although all studies indicate that there is a dominant presence of non-luminous matter in the universe (about 22 percent of the total energy density with 5 times more dark matter than baryonic matter), its identity and its "direct" detection (through non-gravitational effects) has not yet been achieved. Dark matter in the form of massive, weakly interacting particles (WIMPs) could be detected through their collisions with target nuclei. This requires detectors to be sensitive to very low-energy (less than 100 keV) nuclear recoils with very low expected rates (a few interactions per year per ton of target). Reducing the background in a direct dark matter detector is the biggest challenge. A detector capable of seeing such low-energy nuclear recoils is difficult to build because of the necessary size and the radio- and chemical- purity. Therefore it is imperative to first construct small-scale prototypes to develop the necessary technology and systems, before attempting to deploy large-scale detectors in underground laboratories. Our collaboration, the DarkSide Collaboration, utilizes argon in two-phase time projection chambers (TPCs). We have designed, built, and commissioned DarkSide-10, a 10 kg prototype detector, and are designing and building DarkSide-50, a 50 kg dark matter detector. The present work is an account of my contribution to these efforts. The two-phase argon TPC technology allows powerful discrimination between dark matter nuclear recoils and background events. Presented here are simulations, designs, and analyses involving the electroluminescence in the gas phase from extracted ionization charge for both DarkSide-10 and DarkSide-50. This work involves the design of the HHV systems, including field cages, that are responsible for

  12. Two experiments in neutrino physics: Double beta decay of cadmium-116 and the efficiency of an argon-40 neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Manojeet

    1999-03-01

    This thesis contains work concerning two experiments related to searches for neutrino masses. 1. QRPA calculations of double-β-decays have not been able to reproduce data in the A = 100 system. We propose the A = 116 system-because of its smaller deformation-as a simpler system to test QRPA calculations. We performed two experiments that determine the previously unknown electron capture (EC) decay branch of 116In to be (2.27 ± 0.63) × 10- 2%, from which we deduce logft = 4.39- 0.15+0.10. We then used this EC logft value along with the well known βsp- logft values to predict the 2ν double-β decay rate of 116Cd to the g.s. and the first excited 0+ state of 116Sn. The prediction shows that the contribution to the double-β decay rate from the g.s could exceed the total decay rate indicating a cancellation of contributions from the excited states of 116In. 2. We studied β-delayed proton and γ emission from 40Ti decay. We found t1/over 2 = 53.6 ± 0.6 ms and observed 28 proton groups that we organized into a 40Ti decay with 21 branches. The reduced transition strengths of these decay branches were then used to compute the neutrino detection efficiency of the ICARUS liquid argon time-projection chamber. Our integrated GT strength is about 20% larger than the theoretical prediction. We found 40Ar(/nu,e) cross-sections (for an electron energy threshold W = 5 MeV) of (13.8 ± 0.3) × 10-43cm2, (74.0 ± 1.6) × 10- 43cm2 and (3.2 ± 0.1) × 10- 41cm2 for 8B neutrinos, hep neutrinos and supernova neutrinos characterized by a temperature of 4.5 MeV.

  13. Analysis of TPC Single Sextant U-238/U-235 Engineering In-Beam Data

    SciTech Connect

    Tony Hill

    2012-09-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4p- detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. This TPC has been shipped and installed at LANSCE and is collecting further engineering data for the full system scale up next year.

  14. Image Processing Techniques applied to Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, Jessica; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Large scale Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers(LArTPC), like MicroBooNE, offer new ways to study neutrino cross sections and neutrino oscillations. The data from these LArTPCs are very detailed images of charged particles passing through the detector. A plethora of hit finding, cluster finding and tracking algorithms have been implemented to process data coming from MicroBooNE, but it is still possible that particle tracks that are easily visible by eye are being missed during data processing. Because the human eye sometimes does a better job at finding particle tracks that are sometimes missed by data processing, using Image Processing algorithms which emulate the human eye in conjunction with the already implemented algorithms could be beneficial. In particular Edge Detection algorithms could be useful due to the fact that tracks will often have defined deposited energy along straight lines. This talk will cover preliminary data processed with Edge Detection algorithms, and discussion of what the potential benefits are to this approach to LArTPC data analysis. On behalf of the MicroBooNE Collaboration.

  15. Effects of high beam rates on TPC's

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Hallman, T.J. ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. (C

    1992-02-06

    The TPC's (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchroton) were exposed to silicon ion fluxes equivalent to more than 10{sup 7} minimum ionizing particles per second to measure the distortion of the electric field caused by positive ions in the drift region. Results of these tests are presented and the consequences for the TPC based experiment at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) are discussed.

  16. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Smits, R. G.; Taylor, J. D.; Vanslyke, V.; Barrera, F.; Petersen, H.; Rago, C. E.; Rinta, R. I.; Talaska, D.; Watt, R. D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin.

  17. A time projection chamber for high-rate experiments: Towards an upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzer, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for three-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. of the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region of the MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires offers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built with the largest active volume to date for a detector of this type. It has been commissioned with cosmic rays and with particle beams at the FOPI experiment at GSI, and was employed for a physics measurement with pion beams. For the future operation of the ALICE TPC at the CERN LHC beyond 2019, where Pb-Pb collision rates of 50 kHz are expected, it is planned to replace the existing MWPCs by GEM detectors, operated in a continuous, triggerless readout mode, thus allowing an increase in event rate by a factor of 100. As a first step of the R&D program, a prototype of an Inner Readout Chamber was equipped with large-size GEM foils and exposed to beams of protons, pions and electrons from the CERN PS. In this paper, new results are shown concerning ion backflow, spatial and momentum resolution of the FOPI GEM-TPC, detector calibration, and dE/dx resolution with both detector prototypes. The perspectives of a GEM-TPC for ALICE with continuous readout will be discussed.

  18. TPC spectrometer for measuring the e/sup +/ spectrum in. mu. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) being used at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) for a high-statistics normal muon-decay experiment is described. It is shown how the experiment will improve upon the limits of the weak-interaction coupling constants by a factor of 5 through the measurement of the positron momentum and direction of emission with respect to the muon-polarization vector for 10/sup 8/ decays of stopped, polarized, positive muons. The TPC apparatus is described, and it is shown that even though more work is to be done to improve the detector acceptance and individual coordinate resolutions, for certain track topologies, the TPC already has a momentum resolution of 0.7% (sigma).

  19. Enhanced trigger for the NIFFTE fissionTPC in presence of high-rate alpha backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear physics and nuclear energy communities call for new, high precision measurements to improve existing fission models and design next generation reactors. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking experiment (NIFFTE) has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unrivaled precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's TPC lab, where it measures spontaneous fission from radioactive sources to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. To measure 244Cm, we've developed a fission trigger to reduce the data rate from alpha tracks while maintaining a high fission detection efficiency. In beam, alphas from 239Pu are a large background when detecting fission fragments; implementing the fission trigger will greatly reduce this background. The implementation of the cathode fission trigger in the fissionTPC will be presented along with a detailed study of its efficiency.

  20. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  1. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  2. Tetragonal Red and Yellow HgI2-CdI2 Crystals for X- and Gamma-ray Solid-State Detectors Directionally Solidified Under Argon Pressure of 20 atm

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, T.; Marin, C.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Burger, A.; Bliss, Mary

    2006-12-29

    Ternary Hg1-xCdxI2 (0argon pressure of ~ 20 atm. For 0 < x < 0.15, the crystals appear red (the same color as pure HgI2). For x>0.15 the crystals are yellow. In the full compositional range 0detectors.

  3. Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC): State of the Council 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Raghunath; Wakou, Nicholas; Carman, Forrest; Majdalany, Michael

    The Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) is a non-profit corporation founded to define transaction processing and database benchmarks and to disseminate objective, verifiable performance data to the industry. Established in August 1988, the TPC has been integral in shaping the landscape of modern transaction processing and database benchmarks over the past twenty-two years. This paper provides an overview of the TPC's existing benchmark standards and specifications, introduces two new TPC benchmarks under development, and examines the TPC's active involvement in the early creation of additional future benchmarks.

  4. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  5. HARPO: beam characterization of a TPC for gamma-ray polarimetry and high angular-resolution astronomy in the MeV-GeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaobo; Bernard, Denis; Bruel, Philippe; Frotin, Mickael; Geerebaert, Yannick; Giebels, Berrie; Gros, Philippe; Horan, Deirdre; Louzir, Marc; Poilleux, Patrick; Semeniouk, Igor; Attié, David; Calvet, Denis; Colas, Paul; Delbart, Alain; Sizun, Patrick; Götz, Diego; Amano, Sho; Kotaka, Takuya; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Minamiyama, Yasuhito; Takemoto, Akinori; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Miyamoto, Shuji; Daté, Schin; Ohkuma, Haruo

    2015-11-01

    A time projection chamber (TPC) can be used to measure the polarization of gamma rays with excellent angular precision and sensitivity in the MeV-GeV energy range through the conversion of photons to e+e- pairs. The Hermetic ARgon POlarimeter (HARPO) prototype was built to demonstrate this concept. It was recently tested in the polarized photon beam at the NewSUBARU facility in Japan. We present this data-taking run, which demonstrated the excellent performance of the HARPO TPC.

  6. Simulation of double beta decay in the ''SeXe'' TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, F.

    2007-04-01

    In 2004, the NEMO collaboration has started some preliminary studies for a next-generation double beta decay experiment: SuperNEMO. The possibility to use a large gaseous TPC has been investigated using simulation and extrapolation of former experiments. In this talk, I report on the reasons why such techniques have not been selected in 2004 and led the NEMO collaboration to reuse the techniques implemented within the NEMO3 detector.

  7. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-24

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E{sub γ} > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 10{sup 13}γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  8. Strange particle measurements from the EOS TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, M.

    1995-02-01

    A high statistics sample of {Lambda}`s produced in 2 GeV/nucleon {sup 5}8Ni + {sup nat}Cu collisions has been obtained with the EOS Time Projection Chamber at the Bevalac. The coverage of the EOS TPC is essentially 100% for y > y{sub cm} and extends down to P{sub T} = 0 where interesting effects such as collective radial expansion may be important. In addition, the detection of a majority of the charged particles in the TPC, along with the presence of directed flow for protons and heavier fragments at this beam energy, allows for the correlation of A production with respect to the event reaction plane. Our preliminary analysis indicates the first observation of a sidewards flow signature for A`s. Comparisons with the cascade code ARC are made.

  9. Recent developments on the star detector system at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, H.; Adams, D. L.; Added, N.; Agakishiev, H.; Akimenko, S. A.; Aluyshin, A.; Aluyshin, M.; Amelin, N.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Arestov, Y. I.; Aslanyan, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Averichev, G.; Bacher, A.; Badalian, R.; Baldwin, A.; Barish, K.; Batourine, V.; Belikov, N. L.; Bellwied, R.; Belousov, V.; Bennett, S.; Best, D.; Bichsel, H.; Bielecki, J.; Bieser, F.; Biswas, N. N.; Bland, L.; Blyth, C.; Bonner, B. E.; Bossingham, R.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, W.; Brown, C.; Brown, R. L.; Budilov, V.; Caines, H.; Cameron, J.; Carlin, N.; Carroll, J.; Cebra, D.; Chalyguine, A.; Chance, J.; Chen, W.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Chujko, B.; Consiglio, C.; Cooper, G.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J.; Crawford, H. J.; Davidenko, A. M.; Das, A.; Dawson, J. W.; Dereschikov, A. A.; Deweerd, A.; Didenko, L.; Dominik, W.; Draper, J. E.; Duck, I.; Edwards, W. R.; Eckardt, V.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J. M.; Eppley, G.; Eremeev, R.; Erin, V.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Fadeev, N.; Faine, V.; Fateev, O.; Feshchenko, A.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K. J.; Ford, C. W., Jr.; Gagunashvili, N.; Garg, U.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gazdzicki, M.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gilkes, M.; Grachov, A.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Guarino, V. J.; Gushin, E.; Haberichter, W. N.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Harris, J.; Heppelmann, S.; Hill, D. A.; Hill, N.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, J.; Huang, H.; Humanic, T.; Igo, G. J.; Ioukaev, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Jones, P.; Judd, E.; Kadija, K.; Kaplan, M.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Karev, A.; Karol, P. J.; Kasprzyk, T.; Keane, D.; Kinder-Geiger, K.; Klein, S.; Kolobashkina, L.; Kolomyichenko, A.; Komisarcík, K.; Konstantinov, A.; Kossarev, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kouzmine, N.; Kovalenko, A.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krivokhizhin, V.; Kunde, G.; Kutuev, R.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Ladygin, V.; Lasiuk, B.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Lisa, M.; Ljubicic, A.; Llope, W.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Marx, J.; Matheus, R.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Y.; Matushevsky, E.; McShane, T. S.; Medved, K.; Mekhdiev, R.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N.; Mitchell, J.; Mitsyn, V.; Moore, F.; Muresan, L.; Muresan, R.; Musulmanbekov, J.; Mutchler, G. S.; Mysnick, A.; Nann, H.; Nelson, J.; Nevski, P.; Nikitin, V.; Nikonov, E.; Nomokonov, P.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nystrand, J.; Odintsov, V.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilivie, C.; Olson, D.; Oltchak, A.; Ososkov, G.; Ott, G.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S.; Pavlinov, A.; Pavluk, A.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Peryt, W.; Peshekhonov, D.; Peshekhonov, V.; Pilipenko, D.; Piskunov, N.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Price, L.; Prindle, D.; Protrebenikova, E.; Pruneau, C.; Rai, G.; Ray, L.; Razin, S.; Renfordt, R. E.; Ridiger, A.; Riley, P.; Rinckel, T.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H.-G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rhrich, D.; Rollefson, A.; Romero, J. L.; Roufanov, I.; Runco, M.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sandweiss, J.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schafer, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, P.; Shabunov, A.; Shafranov, M.; Shafranova, M.; Shalnov, A.; Shestermanov, K.; Shimanskiy, S.; Skoro, G.; Slaughter, J.; Slavin, N.; Smirnoff, N.; Smirnov, G.; Smykov, L.; Soloviev, L.; Somov, S.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E.; Stock, R.; Stone, N.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Strbele, H.; Strokovsky, E.; Sugarbaker, E.; Sustich, A.; Symons, T. J.; Szanto, E.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Thomas, J.; Tikhonov, V.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trofimov, V.; Tsay, O.; Tull, C.; Turner, K.; Tustonic, T.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Usubov, Z.; Vandermolen, S.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasendina, V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vasiliev, V.; Vigdor, S.; Viola, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Vranic, D.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Watson, J.; Weerasundara, D.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wilson, K.; Wissink, S.; Wold, D.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhidkov, N.; Zhiltsov, V.; Zoulkarneev, R.

    1998-08-01

    A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. We report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  10. Bustling argon: biological effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas in group 18 of the periodic table. Certificated to exist in air atmosphere merely one century ago, discovery of argon shows interesting stories of researching and exploring. It was assumed to have no chemical activity. However, argon indeed present its biological effect on mammals. Narcotic effect of argon in diving operation and neur-protective function of argon in cerebral injury demonstrate that argon has crucial effect and be concentrated on is necessary. Furthermore, consider to be harmless to human, argon clinical application in therapy would be another option. PMID:24088583

  11. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energymore » regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.« less

  12. The CAPTAIN liquid argon neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2015-01-01

    The CAPTAIN liquid argon experiment is designed to make measurements of scientific importance to long-baseline neutrino physics and physics topics that will be explored by large underground detectors. The experiment employs two detectors – a primary detector with approximately 10-ton of liquid argon that will be deployed at different facilities for physics measurements and a prototype detector with 2-ton of liquid argon for configuration testing. The physics programs for CAPTAIN include measuring neutron interactions at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, measuring neutrino interactions in medium energy regime (1.5–5 GeV) at Fermilab's NuMI beam, and measuring neutrino interactions in low energy regime (< 50 MeV) at stopped pion sources for supernova neutrino studies.

  13. An optical readout TPC (O-TPC) for studies in nuclear astrophysics with gamma-ray beams at HIγS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Stave, S. C.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Breskin, A.; Bromberger, B.; Chechik, R.; Dangendorf, V.; Delbar, Th; France, R. H., III; Henshaw, S. S.; Kading, T. J.; Martel, P. P.; McDonald, J. E. R.; Seo, P.-N.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weller, H. R.; Young, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    We report on the construction, tests, calibrations and commissioning of an Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) detector operating with a CO2(80%) + N2(20%) gas mixture at 100 and 150 Torr. It was designed to measure the cross sections of several key nuclear reactions involved in stellar evolution. In particular, a study of the rate of formation of oxygen and carbon during the process of helium burning will be performed by exposing the chamber gas to intense nearly mono-energetic gamma-ray beams at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIγS) facility. The O-TPC has a sensitive target-drift volume of 30x30x21 cm3. Ionization electrons drift towards a double parallel-grid avalanche multiplier, yielding charge multiplication and light emission. Avalanche-induced photons from N2 emission are collected, intensified and recorded with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, providing two-dimensional track images. The event's time projection (third coordinate) and the deposited energy are recorded by photomultipliers and by the TPC charge-signal, respectively. A dedicated VME-based data acquisition system and associated data analysis tools were developed to record and analyze these data. The O-TPC has been tested and calibrated with 3.183 MeV alpha-particles emitted by a 148Gd source placed within its volume with a measured energy resolution of 3.0%. Tracks of alpha and 12C particles from the dissociation of 16O and of three alpha-particles from the dissociation of 12C have been measured during initial in-beam test experiments performed at the HIγS facility at Duke University. The full detection system and its performance are described and the results of the preliminary in-beam test experiments are reported.

  14. The Origins and Evolution of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Idea

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, David

    2012-09-19

    In February 1974, I conceived an idea for a tracking detector with only one spatial projection, thereby eliminating ambiguities that occur in conventional detector systems based on wires. I called it the “Time Projection Chamber”, or TPC, a name that has stuck even though the concept has evolved considerably over the following decades. I will recount the history leading to its conception and development in that now distant epoch, and will attempt to show why this is an interesting and instructive story and how the idea may continue to extend scientific reach in the coming era.

  15. Directional Neutron Detection and TPC Developments and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2009-03-24

    LLNL is involved with a number of TPC projects spanning basic science to homeland security. This talk outlines the TPC work at LLNL and specifically focuses on the neutron TPC. A number of TPC projects are now underway at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and there is currently a ramp up in the infrastructure both in equipment and people to support these efforts. In place are high pressure vessels for xenon studies up to 50bar, larger vessels up to 100 litters at 10bar, clean room facilities, extensive electronics development, dedicated lab space and a assortment of radioactive sources.

  16. Design and performance of TOPAZ TPC-trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, R.; Tsukada, K.; Ujiie, N.; Shirahashi, A.

    1988-02-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is widely used in the high energy physics experiment. The authors developed the new track finding algorithm by using the TOPAZ-TPC. The logic not only finds the number of tracks, but also calculates their vertex positions. It also takes care of the sector boundary crossing tracks. The proto-type TPC-Trigger has been tested at the in-beam experiment and has shown good performance. The authors achieved the vertex resolution of less than 10cm (r.m.s.) in the beam direction. The improved TPC-Trigger system is being used in October 1987 beam run.

  17. How to Advance TPC Benchmarks with Dependability Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Raquel; Poess, Meikel; Nambiar, Raghunath; Patil, Indira; Vieira, Marco

    Transactional systems are the core of the information systems of most organizations. Although there is general acknowledgement that failures in these systems often entail significant impact both on the proceeds and reputation of companies, the benchmarks developed and managed by the Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) still maintain their focus on reporting bare performance. Each TPC benchmark has to pass a list of dependability-related tests (to verify ACID properties), but not all benchmarks require measuring their performances. While TPC-E measures the recovery time of some system failures, TPC-H and TPC-C only require functional correctness of such recovery. Consequently, systems used in TPC benchmarks are tuned mostly for performance. In this paper we argue that nowadays systems should be tuned for a more comprehensive suite of dependability tests, and that a dependability metric should be part of TPC benchmark publications. The paper discusses WHY and HOW this can be achieved. Two approaches are introduced and discussed: augmenting each TPC benchmark in a customized way, by extending each specification individually; and pursuing a more unified approach, defining a generic specification that could be adjoined to any TPC benchmark.

  18. Muon tomography of rock density using Micromegas-TPC telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, Fanny; Busto, José; Gaffet, Stéphane; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Jurgen; Salin, Pierre; Decitre, Jean-Baptiste; Lázaro Roche, Ignacio; Martin, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g., seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The current work is based on a recently developed method to investigate in situ the density of rocks using a measurement of the muon flux, whose attenuation depends on the quantity of matter the particles travel through and hence on the rock density and thickness. The present project (T2DM2) aims at performing underground muon flux measurements in order to characterize spatial and temporal rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measured with a new muon telescope device using Micromegas-Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detectors. The first step of the work presented covers the muon flux simulation based on the Gaisser model (Gaisser T., 1990), for the muon flux at the ground level, and on the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the propagation of muons through the rock. The results show that the muon flux distortion caused by density variations is enough significant to be observed at 500 m depth for measurement times of about one month. This time-scale is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes within the unsaturated Karst zone where LSBB is located. The work now focuses on the optimization of the detector layout along the LSBB galleries in order to achieve the best sensitivity.

  19. Future prospects of the TPC idea

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, D.R.

    1980-07-01

    General aspects affecting TPC size, readout plane characteristics and operation in the LEP environment are presented, with the general conclusion that modest improvements relative to PEP-4 can be realized in several areas. The problem of positive ion reduction is discussed according to two qualitatively new operating modes, asynchronous and synchronous gating. Either gating mode appears to offer a means to eliminate almost completely the ion return flux. Some speculative ideas involving 3-component gas mixtures, low-mass components and parallel plane geometry are presented as future possibilities.

  20. A study of the trace 39Ar content in argon from deep underground sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Guray, G.; Hohman, T.; Holtz, D.; Ianni, An.; Laubenstein, M.; Loer, B.; Love, C.; Martoff, C. J.; Montanari, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nelson, A.; Rountree, S. D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wright, A.

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of argon from deep underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct dark matter detection experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low-background single-phase liquid argon detector that was built to study the 39Ar content of this underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon, or 6.6 mBq/kg specific 39Ar activity.

  1. Team Primacy Concept (TPC) Based Employee Evaluation and Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniute, Eivina I.; Alfred, Mary V.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how employees learn from Team Primacy Concept (TPC) based employee evaluation and how they use the feedback in performing their jobs. TPC based evaluation is a form of multirater evaluation, during which the employee's performance is discussed by one's peers in a face-to-face team setting. The study used Kolb's…

  2. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  3. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  4. TPC in γ-ray astronomy above pair-creation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, D.

    2013-02-01

    We examine the performance of a TPC as a γ-ray telescope above the pair-creation threshold. The contributions to the photon angular resolution are studied and their dependence on energy is obtained. The effective area per detector unit mass for such a thin detector is the conversion mass attenuation coefficient. The differential sensitivity for the detection of a point-like source is then derived. Finally, the measurement of track momentum from deflections due to multiple scattering is optimized.These analytical results are exemplified numerically for a few sets of detector parameters. TPCs show an impressive improvement in sensitivity with respect to existing pair-creation-based telescopes in the [MeV-GeV] energy range, even with the modest detector parameters of this study. In addition, gas TPCs allow an improvement in angular resolution of about one order of magnitude.

  5. Measurement of Gain and Drift Velocity of the Prototype AT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael; Soussi Tanani, Rim; Cortesi, Marco; Mittig, Wolfgang; Fritsch, Adam

    2015-10-01

    The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is used to study reactions induced by radioactive ions in a detector gas that serves both as the target and tracking medium. It employs gaseous amplification of the primary electrons that drift to the amplification gap to track and measure charged particles traversing the active gaseous volume of the chamber. A setup consisting of two THGEMs (Thick Gas Electron Multipliers) stacked on a Micromegas (Micro mesh gas amplifier) device was tested in the PAT-TPC in June and July of 2015. A 337-Si laser, a 252Cf spontaneous fission source, and an α source were used to ionize target gas molecules in the active volume. Electron drift velocity was measured as a function of the electric field held across the volume and for varying gas compositions ranging from pure H2 to a 95:5 H2:C4H10 mixture. Analysis of the tests provided information on conditions for optimal gain for the setup used in an August 2015 PAT-TPC experiment at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory and other future experiments. Data and results will be presented. Funded in part thanks to College of Wooster and NSF Grant Nos. PHy-1430152, MRI09-23087, and PHY09-69456.

  6. Recent results from the PEP4-TPC on quark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, W.

    1983-11-12

    The physics goals for the PEP-4/PEP-9 experiment concentrate on two areas: the fragmentation properties of quarks and gluons produced in e+e- annihilation, and the investigation of hadron production in 2-photon collisions. Only the first of these topics is addressed. Despite the many successes of QCD in the description of deep inelastic reactions, the basic fragmentation process of quarks and gluons is not very well understood. This lack of knowledge has been shown to jeopardize precise test of QCD, such as the accurate determination of the strong coupling constant. With its ability to disentangle complex hadronic events and to identify most of the final state particles, the TPC allows new and more sensitive tests of fragmentation models. A brief description of the detector is given and particle identification by ionization energy loss is described. Next, the inclusive production of stable hadrons and of resonances is discussed, and limits on the inclusive production of fractional charged particles are given. A new analysis of long-range correlations in e+e- annihilation is given.

  7. The design and implementation of TPC encoder and decoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, L. J.; Wang, Z. B.; Yuan, J. B.; Zheng, L. H.

    2016-02-01

    Based on the analysis and simulation of TPC codec principle and iteration decoding algorithm based on Chase 2, the design and implementation methods of TPC encoder and decoder are presented in this paper. In particular, circuit design and implementation flow of soft-input soft-output modified method in decoder algorithm and iteration decoding are analyzed. Aiming at (64,57,4) TPC, when the iteration times is 3 and the uncertain position number is 3, simulation and implementation results show that at least 6.8dB encoding gain can be obtained under the condition of BER=10-6

  8. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carminati, L.

    2005-10-12

    The construction of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic calorimeter has been completed and commissioning is in progress. After a brief description of the detector layout, readout electronics and calibration, a review of the present status of the integration and the detector qualification is reported. Finally a selection of performance results obtained during several test beams will be presented with particular attention to linearity, uniformity, position reconstruction and {gamma}/{pi}0 separation.

  9. Behavior of TPC's in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, A.; Eisemann, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. ); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L

    1991-12-13

    TPC's (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10{sup 7} minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  10. Simulations of Charged-Current Supernova νe Events in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Steven; Grant, Christopher; Pantic, Emilija; Svoboda, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Although it is still in its infancy, the study of supernova neutrinos has proven to be a fertile topic for fundamental science. A mere two dozen events recorded from supernova 1987A, the only supernova neutrino source observed so far, have led to numerous publications on a wide variety of topics. This bountiful scientific harvest has prompted the neutrino physics community to prepare to make more detailed observations of the neutrinos that will be produced in the next nearby supernova. Because of their unique νe sensitivity, liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) experiments such as DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) have the potential to make valuable contributions to this detection effort. To better understand the expected SN νe signal in a LArTPC, we have developed a Monte Carlo event generator called MARLEY (Model of Argon Reaction Low-Energy Yields) for charged-current νe reactions on argon. By combining MARLEY with LArSoft, a LArTPC simulation package, we have obtained the most detailed predictions currently available for the response of a LArTPC to supernova νe. We will discuss the implications of these results for the design and operation of LArTPCs sensitive to SN neutrinos.

  11. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  12. Drift parameters optimization of a TPC polarimeter: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhee, K.; Radhakrishna, V.; Koushal, V.; Baishali, G.; Vinodkumar, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    Time Projection Chamber (TPC) based X-ray polarimeters using Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) are currently being developed to make sensitive measurement of polarization in 2-10 keV energy range. The emission direction of the photoelectron ejected via photoelectric effect carries the information of the polarization of the incident X-ray photon. Performance of a gas based polarimeter is affected by the operating drift parameters such as gas pressure, drift field and drift-gap. We present simulation studies carried out in order to understand the effect of these operating parameters on the modulation factor of a TPC polarimeter. Models of Garfield are used to study photoelectron interaction in gas and drift of electron cloud towards GEM. Our study is aimed at achieving higher modulation factors by optimizing drift parameters. Study has shown that Ne/DME (50/50) at lower pressure and drift field can lead to desired performance of a TPC polarimeter.

  13. Lunar exospheric argon modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, G. R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Hurley, D. M.; Hodges, R. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Argon is one of the few known constituents of the lunar exosphere. The surface-based mass spectrometer Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) deployed during the Apollo 17 mission first detected argon, and its study is among the subjects of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) and Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission investigations. We performed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutral atomic argon that we use to better understand its transport and storage across the lunar surface. We took into account several loss processes: ionization by solar photons, charge-exchange with solar protons, and cold trapping as computed by recent LRO/Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) mapping of Permanently Shaded Regions (PSRs). Recycling of photo-ions and solar radiation acceleration are also considered. We report that (i) contrary to previous assumptions, charge exchange is a loss process as efficient as photo-ionization, (ii) the PSR cold-trapping flux is comparable to the ionization flux (photo-ionization and charge-exchange), and (iii) solar radiation pressure has negligible effect on the argon density, as expected. We determine that the release of 2.6 × 1028 atoms on top of a pre-existing argon exosphere is required to explain the maximum amount of argon measured by LACE. The total number of atoms (1.0 × 1029) corresponds to ∼6700 kg of argon, 30% of which (∼1900 kg) may be stored in the cold traps after 120 days in the absence of space weathering processes. The required population is consistent with the amount of argon that can be released during a High Frequency Teleseismic (HFT) Event, i.e. a big, rare and localized moonquake, although we show that LACE could not distinguish between a localized and a global event. The density of argon measured at the time of LACE appears to have originated from no less than four such episodic events. Finally, we show that the extent of the PSRs that trap

  14. Herman Feshbach Prize in Theoretical Nuclear Physics Xiangdong Ji, University of Maryland PandaX-III: high-pressure gas TPC for Xe136 neutrinoless double beta decay at CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong; PandaX-III Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PandaX-III in China's Jinping Underground Lab is a new neutrinoless double beta decay experiment using Xe136 high-pressure gas TPC. The first phase of the experiment uses a 4 m3 gas detector with symmetric Micromegas charge readout planes. The gas TPC allows full reconstruction of the event topology, capable of distinguishing the two electron events from gamma background with high confidence level. The energy resolution can reach about 3% FWHM at the beta decay Q-value. The detector construction and the experimental lab is currently under active development. In this talk, the current status and future plan are reported.

  15. Load on Trough Bellows Following an Argon Spill

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, K.; /Fermilab

    1988-07-12

    In the case of a gross argon spill from the DO detector, the liquid argon is caught in three plenums. These plenums are to be connected by bellows to make a horizontal trough open at one end for removing the argon. The design of these bellows is dependent on the maximum argon load they must carry. Bellows to connect the three argon-catching plenums in the DO detector must be able to carry at least 92 lbs of argon when closed and 231 lbs when open, plus the load due to argon in the convolutions. Examples of such loads and the method for their calculations are contained in the Discussion. It should be noted that a set of assumptions was used in these calculations. First, we considered a uniform channel and uniform flow. Second, we used a value for Manning's n meant for a similar, but not exactly the same, case. Finally, we were forced to define an average depth, d, to be used to state the hydraulic radius, R, and area of flow, A. These facts may warrant consideration in future calculations.

  16. Recent developments on the STAR detector system at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.; Adams, D.L.; Added, N.

    1997-12-01

    The STAR detector system is designed to provide tracking, momentum analysis and particle identification for many of the mid-rapidity charged particles produced in collisions at the RHIC collider. A silicon vertex detector (SVT) provides three layers of tracking near the interaction point. This is followed by the main time projection chamber (TPC), which continues tracking out to 200 cm radial distance from the interaction region. The detector design also includes an electromagnetic calorimeter, various trigger detectors, and radial TPCs in the forward region. The entire system is enclosed in a 0.5 T solenoid magnet. A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. The authors report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  17. Overview of TPC Benchmark E: The Next Generation of OLTP Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Trish

    Set to replace the aging TPC-C, the TPC Benchmark E is the next generation OLTP benchmark, which more accurately models client database usage. TPC-E addresses the shortcomings of TPC-C. It has a much more complex workload, requires the use of RAID-protected storage, generates much less I/O, and is much cheaper and easier to set up, run, and audit. After a period of overlap, it is expected that TPC-E will become the de facto OLTP benchmark.

  18. A Monte Carlo analysis of the liquid xenon TPC as gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, E.; Bolotnikov, A.; Chen, D.; Mukherjee, R.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo modeling of a coded aperture x ray telescope based on a high resolution liquid xenon TPC has been performed. Results on efficiency, background reduction capability and source flux sensitivity are presented. We discuss in particular the development of a reconstruction algorithm for events with multiple interaction points. From the energy and spatial information, the kinematics of Compton scattering is used to identify and reduce background events, as well as to improve the detector response in the few MeV region. Assuming a spatial resolution of 1 mm RMS and an energy resolution of 4.5 percent FWHM at 1 MeV, the algorithm is capable of reducing by an order of magnitude the background rate expected at balloon altitude, thus significantly improving the telescope sensitivity.

  19. Meson and baryon correlation studies using the PEP-TPC/2. gamma. Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1991-03-01

    Results on vector meson, and strange and charmed-baryon production are presented for data taken during the period 1982--1986 using the TPC/2{gamma} detector at PEP. Vector mesons ({rho}{sup 0}, K{sup *} and {phi}) with 0, 1 and 2 strange quarks are used to obtain redundant measures of strange-quark suppression and of the vector to pseudoscalar ratio in hadronization. Measurements of the production rates of {Lambda}, {Xi}{sup {minus}}, {Omega} and {Xi}{sup *0} hyperons and for the {Lambda}{sub c} and of rapidity correlations between {Lambda}{bar {Lambda}} pairs provide sensitive tests of baryon production in fragmentation models. In addition, two- and three-particle correlations between like sign pions provide further evidence for the Bose-Einstein effect in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions including the relativistic motion of particle sources. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Thermophysical properties of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  1. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  2. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    H. Oona; J.C. Solem; L.R. Veeser, C.A. Ekdahl; P.J. Rodriquez; S.M. Younger; W. Lewis; W.D. Turley

    1997-08-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal.

  3. Fission cross section uncertainties with the NIFFTE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgio, Samuele; Niffte Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear data such as neutron-induced fission cross sections play a fundamental role in nuclear energy and defense applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become increasingly dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate in the expected performances of existing and future systems. It is important therefore that uncertainties in nuclear data are minimized and fully understood. For this reason, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) uses a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. The presentation will discuss how the capabilities of the NIFFTE TPC allow to directly measures systematic uncertainties in fission cross sections, in particular for what concerns fission-fragment identification, and target and beam uniformity. Preliminary results from recent analysis of 238U/235U and 239Pu/235U data collected with the TPC will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Slow Control System for the NIFFTE Collaboration TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringle, Erik; Niffte Collaboration Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    As world energy concerns continue to dominate public policy in the 21st century, the need for cleaner and more efficient nuclear power is necessary. In order to effectively design and implement plans for generation IV nuclear reactors, more accurate fission cross-section measurements are necessary. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration, in an effort to meet this need, has constructed a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which aims to reduce the uncertainty of the fission cross-section to less than 1%. Using the Maximum Integration Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) framework, slow control measurements are integrated into a single interface to facilitate off-site monitoring. The Hart Scientific 1560 Black Stack will be used with two 2564 Thermistor Scanner Modules to monitor internal temperature of the TPC. A Prologix GPIB to Ethernet controller will be used to interface the hardware with MIDAS. This presentation will detail the design and implementation of the slow control system for the TPC. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Energy Research.

  5. The commissioning of the O-TPC at TUNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, P.-N.; Ahmed, M. W.; Clinton, E. R.; Howell, C. R.; Stave, S. C.; Weller, H. R.; Young, A. H.; Gai, M.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2008-04-01

    We are commissioning the Optical Readout Time Projection Chamber (O-TPC) that will be used in an experiment at the HIgS facility at TUNL for studying oxygen formation during stellar helium burning by studying the time reversed ^16O(,)^12C reaction. The initial calibration of the O-TPC was carried out at the LNS at Avery Point with a CMAC based data acquisition system. The tests at TUNL used a VME based data acquisition system that also controls a CCD camera. Under stable conditions an energy resolution as good as 2.6% was measured for the charge signal and single and double tracks of alpha particles from a ^148Gd source were recorded in the CCD camera. These tracks were analyzed using an automated pattern recognition algorithm that allows us to extract that track centroid (from which the scattering angle is deduced) as well as DE/DX along the track. The azimuthal angle of the track is deduced from the Time Projection. The O-TPC is found to be ready for accepting beams from the HIgS facility.

  6. Argon Purification Reference and Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-05-23

    This engineering note is a reference for future consideration on the purification of argon. The original concern was for the possibility of argon contamination from components in the cryostats over long-term storage. An argon purification system could also be useful for purifying the contents of the argon dewar. The general conclusion is that most of the systems researched are too expensive at this time, but the recommended choice would be Centorr Furnaces. There were three basic types of purification systems which were to be considered. The first was the molecular sieve. This method would have been the preferred one, because it was claimed that it could purify liquid argon, removing liquid oxygen from the argon. However, none of the commercial companies researched provided this type of purification for use with liquid argon. Most companies said that this type of purification was impossible, and tests at IB-4 confirmed this. The second system contained a copper oxide to remove gaseous oxygen from argon gas. The disadvantage of this system wass that the argon had to be heated to a gas, and then cooled back down to liquid. The third system was similar to the second, except that it used tungsten or another material like titanium. This system also needed to heat the argon to gas, however the advantage of this system was that it supposedly removed all contaminants, that is, everything except for inert gases. Of the three systems, the third is the type manufactured by Centorr Furnaces, which uses a titanium charge.

  7. First results of a large-area cryogenic gaseous photomultiplier coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Coimbra, A. E. C.; Erdal, E.; Israelashvili, I.; Rappaport, M. L.; Shchemelinin, S.; Vartsky, D.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Breskin, A.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss recent advances in the development of cryogenic gaseous photomultipliers (GPM), for possible use in dark matter and other rare-event searches using noble-liquid targets. We present results from a 10 cm diameter GPM coupled to a dual-phase liquid xenon (LXe) TPC, demonstrating—for the first time—the feasibility of recording both primary (``S1'') and secondary (``S2'') scintillation signals. The detector comprised a triple Thick Gas Electron Multiplier (THGEM) structure with cesium iodide photocathode on the first element; it was shown to operate stably at 180 K with gains above 105, providing high single-photon detection efficiency even in the presence of large α particle-induced S2 signals comprising thousands of photoelectrons. S1 scintillation signals were recorded with a time resolution of 1.2 ns (RMS). The energy resolution (σ/E) for S2 electroluminescence of 5.5 MeV α particles was ~ 9%, which is comparable to that obtained in the XENON100 TPC with PMTs. The results are discussed within the context of potential GPM deployment in future multi-ton noble-liquid detectors.

  8. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  9. Development of a dedicated readout ASIC for TPC based X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Deng, Zhi; Li, Hong; Liu, Yinong; Feng, Hua

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry with time projection chambers was firstly proposed by JK Black in 2007 and has been greatly developed since then. It measured two dimensional photoelectron tracks with one dimensional strip and the other dimension was estimated by the drift time from the signal waveforms. A readout ASIC, APV25, originally developed for CMS silicon trackers was used and has shown some limitations such as waveform sampling depth. A dedicated ASIC was developed for TPC based X-ray polarimeters in this paper. It integrated 32 channel circuits and each channel consisted of an analog front-end and a waveform sampler based on switched capacitor array. The analog front-end has a charge sensitive preamplifier with a gain of 25 mV/fC, a CR-RC shaper with a peaking time of 25 ns, a baseline holder and a discriminator for self-triggering. The SCA has a buffer latency of 3.2 μs with 64 cells operating at 20 MSPS. The ASIC was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of the analog front-end was measured to be 274.8 e+34.6 e/pF. The effective resolution of the SCA was 8.8 bits at sampling rate up to 50 MSPS. The total power consumption was 2.8 mW per channel. The ASIC was also tested with real TPC detectors and two dimensional photoelectron tracks have been successfully acquired. More tests and analysis on the sensitivity to the polarimetry are undergoing and will be presented in this paper.

  10. Operation of a liquid argon time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.

    1983-02-01

    For the first time, the operation of a three-dimensional liquid argon time projection chamber has been demonstrated. This was accomplished in a 50 liter test detector using a readout plane with a woven structure etched on a PC-board.

  11. TPC2 controls pigmentation by regulating melanosome pH and size.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Boyle, Judith A; Aradi, Al E; Christian, Keith A; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2016-05-17

    Melanin is responsible for pigmentation of skin and hair and is synthesized in a specialized organelle, the melanosome, in melanocytes. A genome-wide association study revealed that the two pore segment channel 2 (TPCN2) gene is strongly linked to pigmentation variations. TPCN2 encodes the two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) protein, a cation channel. Nevertheless, how TPC2 regulates pigmentation remains unknown. Here, we show that TPC2 is expressed in melanocytes and localizes to the melanosome-limiting membrane and, to a lesser extent, to endolysosomal compartments by confocal fluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Immunomagnetic isolation of TPC2-containing organelles confirmed its coresidence with melanosomal markers. TPCN2 knockout by means of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR-associated 9 gene editing elicited a dramatic increase in pigment content in MNT-1 melanocytic cells. This effect was rescued by transient expression of TPC2-GFP. Consistently, siRNA-mediated knockdown of TPC2 also caused a substantial increase in melanin content in both MNT-1 cells and primary human melanocytes. Using a newly developed genetically encoded pH sensor targeted to melanosomes, we determined that the melanosome lumen in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells and primary melanocytes subjected to TPC2 knockdown is less acidic than in control cells. Fluorescence and electron microscopy analysis revealed that TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells have significantly larger melanosomes than control cells, but the number of organelles is unchanged. TPC2 likely regulates melanosomes pH and size by mediating Ca(2+) release from the organelle, which is decreased in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells, as determined with the Ca(2+) sensor tyrosinase-GCaMP6. Thus, our data show that TPC2 regulates pigmentation through two fundamental determinants of melanosome function: pH and size. PMID:27140606

  12. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  13. The Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Bode, R.; Fennema, A.; Chutjian, A.; MacAskill, J. A.; Darrach, M. R.; Clegg, S. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Cremers, D.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Argon Geochronology Experiment (AGE). Potassium-Argon dating is shown along with cosmic ray dating exposure. The contents include a flow diagram of the Argon Geochronology Experiment, and schematic diagrams of the mass spectrometer vacuum system, sample manipulation mechanism, mineral heater oven, and the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Operation with elemental abundances is also described.

  14. Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC): Twenty Years Later - A Look Back, a Look Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambiar, Raghunath Othayoth; Lanken, Matthew; Wakou, Nicholas; Carman, Forrest; Majdalany, Michael

    The Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC) [1] is a non-profit corporation founded to define transaction processing and database benchmarks and to disseminate objective, verifiable TPC performance data to the industry. Established in August 1988, the TPC has been integral in shaping the landscape of modern transaction processing and database benchmarks over the past twenty years. Today the TPC is developing an energy efficiency metric and a new ETL benchmark, as well as investigating new areas for benchmark development in 2010 and beyond.

  15. Isentropic compression of argon

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Oona, H.

    1997-06-01

    The compression was done in an MC-1 flux compression (explosive) generator, in order to study the transition from an insulator to a conductor. Since conductivity signals were observed in all the experiments (except when the probe is removed), both the Teflon and the argon are becoming conductive. The conductivity could not be determined (Teflon insulation properties unknown), but it could be bounded as being {sigma}=1/{rho}{le}8({Omega}cm){sub -1}, because when the Teflon breaks down, the dielectric constant is reduced. The Teflon insulator problem remains, and other ways to better insulate the probe or to measure the conductivity without a probe is being sought.

  16. Exploration of Argon PSD with the MiniCLEAN 39Ar Spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronquest, Michael

    2013-04-01

    MiniCLEAN is a single-phase WIMP dark matter experiment which observes scintillation light from a 150kg fiducial mass liquid argon target. This design utilizes argon's powerful pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capability in order to identify and separate electron recoil backgrounds from WIMP-induced nuclear recoil signals. Experimental knowledge of the efficacy of argon PSD, as a function of photoelectron statistics and electron recoil energy, would inform the design and physics reach of the next generation of detectors. MiniCLEAN will perform the best measurement to date of argon PSD by utilizing a novel technique of ``spiking'' the detector with additional amounts of 39Ar. This unstable isotope produces beta decays at a level of 1Bq/kg in natural argon, and thus presents a major background for argon based experiments. Produced using the irradiation of potassium salts, the 39Ar spike will be injected into MiniCLEAN to produce ``enriched argon'' with the data compared to a prior run using natural argon. The difference in the number and distribution of candidate events between the two runs will yield the magnitude and shape of the argon PSD leakage background PDF. This talk will review the motivation, production and use of the 39Ar spike in MiniCLEAN.

  17. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  18. A 4. pi. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Van Dijk, J.H. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K. ); Biswas, N.; Kenney, P.; Piekarz, J. (Notre Dame Univ

    1990-01-01

    The primary physics objective of the 4{pi} TPC magnetic spectrometer proposal is to search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In previous workshops we have discussed what the possible hadronic signatures of such a state of matter would be. Succinctly, the QGP is a direct prediction of non-perturbative QCD. Therefore the question of the existence of this new state of matter bears directly on the validity of non-perturbative QCD. However, since non-perturbative QCD has never been established, it is apparent that what may await us is a host of new phenomena that will go beyond the standard model.

  19. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  20. Heavy ion reaction measurements with the EOS TPC (looking for central collisions with missing energy)

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.H.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    The EOS TPC was constructed for complete event measurement of heavy ion collisions at the Bevalac. We report here on the TPC design and some preliminary measurements of conserved event quantities such as total invariant mass, total momentum, total A and Z.

  1. Photoionization of argon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-01-01

    Argon clusters were produced in a free supersonic molecular beam expansion of pure argon at room temperature and the photoionization efficiency curves of the trimer through hexamer were measured in the wavelength regions from threshold to 700 Â. A study of the Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve as a function of nozzle stagnation pressure shows that fragmentation of heavier clusters can dominate the spectrum, even near threshold, and even when the nozzle conditions are such that the Ar⁺4 intensity is only a small fraction of the Ar⁺3 intensity. The Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve, obtained using nozzle stagnation conditions such that no heavier ions were detected, exhibits several broad peaks near threshold which show similarities to bands of the dimer. At high nozzle stagnation pressures, the photoionization efficiency curves for Ar⁺3 to Ar⁺6 are nearly identical due to the effects of fragmentation. These spectra exhibit two very broad features which are similar to features observed in the solid. The threshold regions for all the positive ions show extremely gradual onsets, making it difficult to determine the appearance potentials accurately. The appearance potentials for Ar⁺2 and Ar⁺3 are 855.0±1.5 and 865.0±1.5 Â, respectively, yielding a value of 0.18±0.05 eV for the dissociation energy of Ar⁺3. The appearance potentials for the heavier clusters Ar⁺4 through Ar⁺6 are all approximately 870±2 Â.

  2. The LUX-Zeplin Dark Matter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Jeremy; Lux-Zeplin (Lz) Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) detector is a second generation dark matter experiment that will operate at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Experiment as a follow-up to the LUX detector, currently the world's most sensitive WIMP direct detection experiment. The LZ detector will contain 7 tonnes of active liquid xenon with a 5.6 tonne fiducial mass in the TPC. The TPC is surrounded by an active, instrumented, liquid-xenon ``skin'' region to veto gammas, then a layer of liquid scintillator to veto neutrons, all contained within a water shield. Modeling the detector is key to understanding the expected background, which in turn leads to a better understanding of the projected sensitivity, currently expected to be 2e-48 cm2 for a 50 GeV WIMP. I will discuss the current status of the LZ experiment as well as its projected sensitivity.

  3. Large solid angle tracking of Monte Carlo events of heavy ion collisions in TPC magnetic spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.P.V.

    1986-01-01

    The collision of 15 GeV/nucleon sulfur and carbon or oxygen ions with various fixed targets such as carbon, sulfur, and gold is to be observed in the MPS magnetic spectrometer with a time projection chamber (TPC) module. This TPC will be placed just downstream of the target and be able to track approximately 50% of all charged particles. The design and construction of the TPC is proceeding, and prototypes of the TPC readout system have been tested and production devices are to be delivered. A TPC track reconstruction program has been developed. Monte Carlo events have been generated and tracked. The track reconstruction program consists of three parts: a local pattern recognition which associates contiguous readouts on adjacent readout wires to form a single hit; a subroutine which positions the hits into slices in the vertical plane; and the track reconstruction section. (LEW)

  4. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  5. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  6. Performance simulation studies for the ALICE TPC GEM upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, M.

    2016-07-01

    To be able to exploit the anticipated interaction rate of 50 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions during run 3 of the LHC (beyond 2019), the ALICE TPC will be upgraded to allow continuous readout. As this is not possible with the current Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) based amplification, the readout will be replaced with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) readout chambers that can suppress ~ 99% of the ion back flow. The space charge of the remaining 1% ion back flow, however, will cause significant distortions to the measured tracks of order cm. Simulation studies to characterize the distortions and test correction strategies have been performed, which show that the intrinsic momentum resolution, without these distortions, can be recovered.

  7. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyk, John; Kim, T.; Freytsis, M.; Button-Shafer, J.; Kadyk, J.; Vahsen, S.E.; Wenzel, W.A.

    2007-12-21

    Two layers of GEMs and the ATLAS Pixel Chip, FEI3, have been combined and tested as a prototype for Time Projection Chamber (TPC) readout at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The double-layer GEM system amplifies charge with gain sufficient to detect all track ionization. The suitability of three gas mixtures for this application was investigated, and gain measurements are presented. A large sample of cosmic ray tracks was reconstructed in 3D by using the simultaneous timing and 2D spatial information from the pixel chip. The chip provides pixel charge measurement as well as timing. These results demonstrate that a double GEM and pixel combination, with a suitably modified pixel ASIC, could meet the stringent readout requirements of the ILC.

  8. Upgrade of the ALICE TPC FEE online radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RØed, K.; Alme, J.; Askeland, E.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Helstrup, H.; Kiss, T.; Lippmann, C.; Rehman, A.; Röhrich, D.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the radiation monitoring system on the Readout Control Unit (RCU) of the the ALICE TPC Front End Electronics. In Run 1, Single Event Upsets (SEUs) in the configuration memory of an SRAM based FPGA were counted, and the results from different run periods with stable beam conditions are presented. For Run 2, a new RCU, the RCU2, has been designed in order to achieve higher data readout rates and increase radiation tolerance. The RCU2 also includes a new radiation monitor solution with increased sensitivity, which is based on counting the number of SEUs in dedicated SRAM memories. The paper presents this new solution together with the results from the targeted irradiation campaigns.

  9. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  10. Effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Benetti, P.; Calaprice, F.; Calligarich, E.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Gallo, V.; Grandi, L.; Meng, G.; Modena, I.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Roncadelli, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.

    2010-06-01

    A dedicated test of the effects of Nitrogen contamination in liquid Argon has been performed at the INFN-Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) within the WArP R&D program. A detector has been designed and assembled for this specific task and connected to a system for the injection of controlled amounts of gaseous Nitrogen into the liquid Argon. The purpose of the test is to detect the reduction of the Ar scintillation light emission as a function of the amount of the Nitrogen contaminant injected in the Argon volume. A wide concentration range, spanning from ~ 10-1 ppm up to ~ 103 ppm, has been explored. Measurements have been done with electrons in the energy range of minimum ionizing particles (γ-conversion from radioactive sources). Source spectra at different Nitrogen contaminations are analyzed, showing sensitive reduction of the scintillation yield at increasing concentrations. Direct PMT signal acquisition exploiting high time resolution by fast waveform recording allowed high precision extraction of the main characteristics of the scintillation light emission in contaminated LAr. In particular, the decreasing behavior in lifetime and relative amplitude of the slow component is found to be appreciable starting from Script O(1 ppm) of Nitrogen concentrations. The rate constant of the quenching process induced by Nitrogen in liquid Ar has been found to be kQ(N2) = 0.11 ± 0.01 μs-1ppm-1, consistent with a previous measurement of this quantity but with significant improvement in precision. On the other hand, no evidence for absorption by N2 impurities has been found up to the higher concentrations here explored.

  11. TPC-V: A Benchmark for Evaluating the Performance of Database Applications in Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Priya; Reza Taheri, H.

    For two decades, TPC benchmarks have been the gold standards for evaluating the performance of database servers. An area that TPC benchmarks had not addressed until now was virtualization. Virtualization is now a major technology in use in data centers, and is the number one technology on Gartner Group's Top Technologies List. In 2009, the TPC formed a Working Group to develop a benchmark specifically intended for virtual environments that run database applications. We will describe the characteristics of this benchmark, and provide a status update on its development.

  12. First measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Bernstein, A.; Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Rebassoo, Finn O.; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid phase argon has long been used as a target medium for particle detection via scintillation light. Recently there has been considerable interest in direct detection of both hypothetical darkmatter particles and coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. These as-yet unobserved neutral particle interactions are expected to result in a recoiling argon atom O(keV), generally referred to in the literature as a nuclear recoil. This prompts the question of the available electromagnetic signal in a liquid argon detector. In this Letter we report the first measurement of the ionization yield (Qy), detected electrons per unit energy, resulting from nuclear recoils in liquid argon, measured at 6.7 keV. This is also the lowest energy measurement of nuclear recoils in liquid argon.

  13. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  14. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, A.; Eisemann, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. |; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B.

    1991-12-13

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10{sup 7} minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  15. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  16. Quenching gas for detectors of charged particles

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1974-01-22

    Operation of detectors of charged particles such as wire counters and Geiger-Muller tubes is improved by filling the counters with a quenching-gas mixture of argon, isobutane and methylchloroform. (Official Gazette)

  17. Radiative Properties of Argon Gas-Puff Implosions on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, Nicholas; Qi, Niansheng; de Grouchy, Phil; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Pikuz, Sergei; Giuliani, John; Dasgupta, Arati; Apruzese, John; Clark, Robert; Hammer, David; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Gas-puff Z-pinch experiments were performed on the 1 MA COBRA pulsed power generator at Cornell University. The gas puffs were injected into the load region from a triple nozzle. The load region had an anode-cathode gap of 2.5 cm. The standard diagnostics on COBRA include time-integrated pinhole cameras, a time-integrated axially resolved x-ray spectrometer, filtered photo-conducting detectors, and time-gated XUV cameras. We will focus mainly on results from pinhole images and x-ray spectra from argon gas puffs including some with a SO2 dopant. The x-ray time-integrated pinhole images feature a tight axially uniform plasma column with a diameter of approximately 1 mm for argon gas implosion. The x-ray spectrometer used mica crystals (2d =19.84 Å) and captured the argon K-shell radiation from different crystal reflections. A 1-D multi-zone argon and sulfur non-LTE kinetics code with radiation transport is used to model the K-shell emission for the purpose of inferring the plasma conditions and the interaction of gas from the inner annulus with the central jet. This work is supported by DOE/NNSA.

  18. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Construction, Integration, Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksa, Martin

    2006-10-27

    The ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter system consists of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. The liquid argon sampling technique, with an accordion geometry was chosen for the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (EMB) and adapted to the end cap (EMEC). The hadronic end cap calorimeter (HEC) uses a copper-liquid argon sampling technique with flat plate geometry and is subdivided in depth in two wheels per end-cap. Finally, the forward calorimeter (FCAL) is composed of three modules employing cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps.The construction of the full calorimeter system is complete since mid-2004. Production modules constructed in the home institutes were integrated into wheels at CERN in 2003-2004, and inserted into the three cryostats. They passed their first complete cold test before the lowering into the ATLAS cavern. Results of quality checks (e.g. electrical, mechanical, ...) performed on all the 190304 read-out channels after cool down will be reported. End 2004 the ATLAS barrel electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter was installed in the ATLAS cavern and since summer 2005 the front-end electronics are being connected and tested. Results of this first commissioning phase will be shown to demonstrate the high standards of quality control for our detectors.

  19. Demonstration and comparison of photomultiplier tubes at liquid Argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, R.; Antonello, M.; Boffelli, F.; Cambiaghi, M.; Canci, N.; Cavanna, F.; Cocco, A. G.; Deniskina, N.; Di Pompeo, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Kryczynski, P.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Palamara, O.; Pandola, L.; Perfetto, F.; Piano Mortari, G. B.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rubbia, C.; Segreto, E.; Szelc, A. M.; Triossi, A.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Zani, A.

    2012-01-01

    Liquified noble gases are widely used as a target in direct Dark Matter searches. Signals from scintillation in the liquid, following energy deposition from the recoil nuclei scattered by Dark Matter particles (e.g. WIMPs), should be recorded down to very low energies by photosensors suitably designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures. Liquid Argon based detectors for Dark Matter searches currently implement photomultiplier tubes for signal read-out. In the last few years PMTs with photocathodes operating down to liquid Argon temperatures (87 K) have been specially developed with increasing Quantum Efficiency characteristics. The most recent of these, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Mod. R11065 with peak QE up to about 35%, has been extensively tested within the R&D program of the WArP Collaboration. During these tests the Hamamatsu PMTs showed excellent performance and allowed obtaining a light yield around 7 phel/keVee in a Liquid Argon detector with a photocathodic coverage in the 12% range, sufficient for detection of events down to few keVee of energy deposition. This shows that this new type of PMT is suited for experimental applications, in particular for new direct Dark Matter searches with LAr-based experiments.

  20. Searching for dark matter with single phase liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr.

    The first hint that we fail to understand the nature of a large fraction of the gravitating matter in the universe came from Fritz Zwicky's measurements of the velocity distribution of the Coma cluster in 1933. Using the Virial theorem, Zwicky found that galaxies in the cluster were orbiting far too fast to remain gravitationally bound when their mass was estimated by the brightness of the visible matter. This led to the postulation that some form of non-luminous dark matter is present in galaxies comprising a large fraction of the galactic mass. The nature of this dark matter remains yet unknown over 80 years after Zwicky's measurements despite the efforts of many experiments. Dark matter is widely believed to be a beyond the Standard Model particle which brings the dark matter problem into the realm of particle physics. Supersymmetry is one widely explored extension of the Standard model, from which particles meeting the constraints on dark matter properties can naturally arise. These particles are generically termed weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and are a currently favored dark matter candidate. A variety of experimental efforts are underway aimed towards direct detection of dark matter through observation of rare scattering of WIMPs in terrestrial detectors. Single phase liquid argon detectors are an appealing WIMP detection technique due to the scintillation properties of liquid argon and the scalability of the single phase approach. The MiniCLEAN dark matter detector is a single phase liquid argon scintillation scintillation detector with a 500 kg active mass. The modular design offers 4pi coverage with 92 optical cassettes, each containing TPB coated acrylic and a cryogenic photomultiplier tube. The MiniCLEAN detector has recently completed construction at SNOLAB. The detector is currently being commissioned, and will soon begin operation with the liquid argon target. Utilizing advanced pulse-shape discrimination techniques, MiniCLEAN will

  1. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    PubMed

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size. PMID:18798666

  2. The Gridpix Detector: History and Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, Harry; Aarnink, Tom; Aarts, Arno; van Bakel, Niels; Berbee, Edward; Berkien, Ad; van Beuzekom, Martin; Bosma, Marten; Campbell, Michael; Chefdeville, Max; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Fornaini, Alessandro; Fransen, Martin; Giganon, Arnaud; Giomataris, Ioannis; Gotink, Wim; de Groot, Nicolo; Hartjes, Fred; van der Heijden, Bas; Hessey, Nigel; Jansweijer, Peter; Konig, Adriaan; Koppert, Wilco; Llopart, Xavi; de Nooij, Lucie; van der Putten, Sipho; Rövekamp, Joop; Salm, Cora; Bello, D. San Segundo; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Smits, Sander; Timmermans, Jan; Verkooijen, Hans; Visschers, Jan; Visser, Jan; Wijnen, Thei; Wyrsch, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    In 2000, the requirements for a large TPC for experiments at a new linear collider were formulated. Both the GEM and Micromegas gas amplification systems had matured, such that they could be practically applied. With the Medipix chip, a pixel-segmented anode readout became possible, offering an unprecedented level of granularity and sensitivity. The single electron sensitive device is a digital detector capable to record and transfer all information of the primary ionization, provided that it can be made discharge proof.

  3. Lysosomal two-pore channel subtype 2 (TPC2) regulates skeletal muscle autophagic signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Hui; Duann, Pu; Komazaki, Shinji; Park, Ki Ho; Li, Haichang; Sun, Mingzhai; Sermersheim, Mathew; Gumpper, Kristyn; Parrington, John; Galione, Antony; Evans, A Mark; Zhu, Michael X; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-02-01

    Postnatal skeletal muscle mass is regulated by the balance between anabolic protein synthesis and catabolic protein degradation, and muscle atrophy occurs when protein homeostasis is disrupted. Autophagy has emerged as critical in clearing dysfunctional organelles and thus in regulating protein turnover. Here we show that endolysosomal two-pore channel subtype 2 (TPC2) contributes to autophagy signaling and protein homeostasis in skeletal muscle. Muscles derived from Tpcn2(-/-) mice exhibit an atrophic phenotype with exacerbated autophagy under starvation. Compared with wild types, animals lacking TPC2 demonstrated an enhanced autophagy flux characterized by increased accumulation of autophagosomes upon combined stress induction by starvation and colchicine treatment. In addition, deletion of TPC2 in muscle caused aberrant lysosomal pH homeostasis and reduced lysosomal protease activity. Association between mammalian target of rapamycin and TPC2 was detected in skeletal muscle, allowing for appropriate adjustments to cellular metabolic states and subsequent execution of autophagy. TPC2 therefore impacts mammalian target of rapamycin reactivation during the process of autophagy and contributes to maintenance of muscle homeostasis. PMID:25480788

  4. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cooldown was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling, liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cooldown, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  5. Thermal information regarding the cooldown and operation of liquid argon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.A.; Cooper, W.E.; Dixon, K.D.; Krempetz, K.J.; Mulholland, G.T.; Primdahl, K.; Urbin, J.B.

    1993-07-01

    Three liquid argon calorimeters were cooled down and operated as part of the D-Zero detector at Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The largest vessel contains 248 metric tons of uranium and copper plates and 19 kL (5000 gal.) of liquid argon. The other two vessels are mirror images, each containing 185 metric tons of uranium and stainless steel plates and 12.1 kL (3200 gal.) of liquid argon. The cool down was accomplished by convection heat transfer between boiling liquid nitrogen filled finned heat exchangers and argon gas inside the vessels. Information regarding the general internal geometry of the calorimeters, cool down, operation, and steady state heat loads will be presented.

  6. Tetrapac (tpc), a novel genotype of Neisseria gonorrhoeae affecting epithelial cell invasion, natural transformation competence and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Fussenegger, M; Kahrs, A F; Facius, D; Meyer, T F

    1996-03-01

    We characterized a novel mutant phenotype (tetrapac, tpc) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) associated with a distinctive rough-colony morphology and bacterial growth in clusters of four. This phenotype, suggesting a defect in cell division, was isolated from a mutant library of Ngo MS11 generated with the phoA minitransposon TnMax4. The tpc mutant shows a 30% reduction in the overall murein hydrolase activity using Escherichia coli murein as substrate. Tetrapacs can be resolved by co-cultivation with wild-type Ngo, indicating that Tpc is a diffusible protein. Interestingly, Tpc is absolutely required for the natural transformation competence of piliated Ngo. Mutants in tpc grow normally, but show a approximately 10-fold reduction in their ability to invade human epithelial cells. The tpc sequence reveals an open reading frame of approximately 1 kb encoding a protein (Tpc) of 37 kDa. The primary gene product exhibits an N-terminal leader sequence typical of lipoproteins, but palmitoylation of Tpc could not be demonstrated. The ribosomal binding site of tpc is immediately downstream of the translational stop codon of the folC gene coding for an enzyme involved in folic acid biosynthesis and one-carbon metabolism. The tpc gene is probably co-transcribed from the folC promoter and a promoter located within the folC gene. The latter promoter sequence shares significant homology with E. coli gearbox consensus promoters. All three mutant phenotypes, i.e. the cell separation defect, the transformation deficiency and the defect in cell invasion can be restored by complementation of the mutant with an intact tpc gene. To some extent the tcp phenotype is reminiscent of iap in Listeria, lytA in Streptococcus pneumoniae and lyt in Bacillus subtilis, all of which are considered to represent murein hydrolase defects. PMID:8730876

  7. Dysregulation of lysosomal morphology by pathogenic LRRK2 is corrected by TPC2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hockey, Leanne N.; Kilpatrick, Bethan S.; Eden, Emily R.; Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen; Futter, Clare E.; Schapira, Anthony H.; Marchant, Jonathan S.; Patel, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two-pore channels (TPCs) are endolysosomal ion channels implicated in Ca2+ signalling from acidic organelles. The relevance of these ubiquitous proteins for human disease, however, is unclear. Here, we report that lysosomes are enlarged and aggregated in fibroblasts from Parkinson disease patients with the common G2019S mutation in LRRK2. Defects were corrected by molecular silencing of TPC2, pharmacological inhibition of TPC regulators [Rab7, NAADP and PtdIns(3,5)P2] and buffering local Ca2+ increases. NAADP-evoked Ca2+ signals were exaggerated in diseased cells. TPC2 is thus a potential drug target within a pathogenic LRRK2 cascade that disrupts Ca2+-dependent trafficking in Parkinson disease. PMID:25416817

  8. Peach Bottom Turbine Trip Simulations with RETRAN Using INER/TPC BWR Transient Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kao Lainsu; Chiang, Show-Chyuan

    2005-03-15

    The work described in this paper is benchmark calculations of pressurization transient turbine trip tests performed at the Peach Bottom boiling water reactor (BWR). It is part of an overall effort in providing qualification basis for the INER/TPC BWR transient analysis method developed for the Kuosheng and Chinshan plants. The method primarily utilizes an advanced system thermal hydraulics code, RETRAN02/MOD5, for transient safety analyses. Since pressurization transients would result in a strong coupling effect between core neutronic and system thermal hydraulics responses, the INER/TPC method employs the one-dimensional kinetic model in RETRAN with a cross-section data library generated by the Studsvik-CMS code package for the transient calculations. The Peach Bottom Turbine Trip (PBTT) tests, including TT1, TT2, and TT3, have been successfully performed in the plant and assigned as standards commonly for licensing method qualifications for years. It is an essential requirement for licensing purposes to verify integral capabilities and accuracies of the codes and models of the INER/TPC method in simulating such pressurization transients. Specific Peach Bottom plant models, including both neutronics and thermal hydraulics, are developed using modeling approaches and experiences generally adopted in the INER/TPC method. Important model assumptions in RETRAN for the PBTT test simulations are described in this paper. Simulation calculations are performed with best-estimated initial and boundary conditions obtained from plant test measurements. The calculation results presented in this paper demonstrate that the INER/TPC method is capable of calculating accurately the core and system transient behaviors of the tests. Excellent agreement, both in trends and magnitudes between the RETRAN calculation results and the PBTT measurements, shows reliable qualifications of the codes/users/models involved in the method. The RETRAN calculated peak neutron fluxes of the PBTT

  9. Scintillation photon detection in liquid argon at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Bruce; Adams, Brice; Baugh, Brian; Buchanan, Norm; Bugel, Len; Conrad, Janet; Davis, Ronald; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Miner, Bill; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Pordes, Stephen; Rebel, Brian; Smith, Paul; Toups, Matt; Urheim, Jon; Warner, David; Wongjirad, Taritree; Whittington, Denver

    2015-04-01

    The proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) aims to answer outstanding questions relating to neutrino physics and other phenomena, such as proton decay and supernova neutrinos. The proposed far detector design calls for a multi-kiloton liquid argon time-projection chamber at a long baseline. In addition to its utility as a target material, liquid argon scintillates in the far UV, providing further physics information and serving as a trigger for non-beam events. The photon detection system in development for the LBNF far detector includes a mechanism for capturing and transporting the light, a method to detect the photons (silicon photomultipliers), and the necessary readout electronics. Testing in liquid argon has occurred at the ``TallBo'' facility at Fermilab to characterize and compare the performance of these systems. In this talk, we present the details of these photon detection systems and the latest results of testing.

  10. Microstructures and Argon age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Fitz Gerald, John; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Microstructures can be dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but certain conditions apply. In particular the nature of the physical processes that took place during development of need be identified, and the pattern of gas release (and/or retention) during their evolution in nature, and subsequently in the mass spectrometer, during the measurement process. Most researchers cite temperature as the sole variable of importance. There is a belief that there is a single "closure temperature" or a "closure interval" above which the mineral is incapable of retaining radiogenic argon. This is a false conception. Closure is practically relevant only in circumstances that see a rock cooled relatively rapidly from temperatures that were high enough to prevent significant accumulation of radiogenic argon, to temperatures below which there is insignificant loss of radiogenic argon through the remainder of the geological history. These conditions accurately apply only to a limited subset - for example to rocks that cool rapidly from a melt and thereafter remain at or close to the Earth's surface, without subsequent ingress of fluids that would cause alteration and modification of microstructure. Some minerals in metamorphic rocks might display such "cooling ages" but in principle these data are difficult to interpret since they depend on the rate of cooling, the pressures that applied, and the subsequent geological history. Whereas the science of "cooling ages" is relatively well understood, the science of the Argon Partial Retention Zone is in its infancy. In the Argon PRZ it is evident that ages should (and do) show a strong correlation with microstructure. The difficulty is that, since diffusion of Argon is simultaneously multi-path and multi-scale, it is difficult to directly interrogate the distinct reservoirs that store gas populations and thus the age information that can be recorded as to the multiple events during the history of an individual microstructure. Laser

  11. Darkside-20k: A 20 ton Liquid Argon Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Henning; Darkside-20k Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Darkside-20k detector is the next step in the Darkside dark matter search program at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. The Darkside detectors have grown in fiducial mass starting with 10kg in Darkside10, to 50 kg in Darkside50, and finally a proposed 20,000 kg fiducial mass, Darkside20k. The Darkside detectors are dual-phase argon TPCs that combine the very powerful scintillation pulse-shape analysis and ionization information to discriminate against background events. Two unique aspects to the Darkside program is the use of an external neutron veto based on borated liquid scintillator, and the use of low radioactivity argon from underground sources as the target. Argon from the atmosphere has an 39Ar activity of 1Bq/kg, which would be the limiting background, but the underground argon is essentially free of 39Ar. Additionally, the detector is placed in a water Cherenkov muon veto. Combining all these techniques allows Darkside-20k to achieve a background-free 100 t-yr exposure accumulated in a 5 yr run. Darkside-20k is expected to start operations in 2020 with data taking starting in 2021, and will be sensitive to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross sections of 1×10-47 cm2 (1x10-46 cm2) for WIMPs of 1 TeV/c2 (10 TeV/c2) mass.

  12. Penning transfer in argon-based gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Ö.; Tapan, İ.; Özmutlu, E. N.; Veenhof, R.

    2010-05-01

    Penning transfers, a group of processes by which excitation energy is used to ionise the gas, increase the gas gain in some detectors. Both the probability that such transfers occur and the mechanism by which the transfer takes place, vary with the gas composition and pressure. With a view to developing a microscopic electron transport model that takes Penning transfers into account, we use this dependence to identify the transfer mechanisms at play. We do this for a number of argon-based gas mixtures, using gain curves from the literature.

  13. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  14. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. G.; Dardin, S. M.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Peskov, V.; Wenzel, W. A.

    2004-12-01

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon (xe) in the high electric field ( >7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure-dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure-independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure-dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure-independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure-dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  15. SiPMs characterization and selection for the DUNE far detector photon detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Maricic, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) together with the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) hosted at the Fermilab will provide a unique, world-leading program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of neutrino physics and astrophysics. CP violation in neutrino flavor mixing is one of its most important potential discoveries. Additionally, the experiment will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure the neutrino mixing parameters which may potentially reveal new fundamental symmetries of nature. Moreover, the DUNE is also designed for the observation of nucleon decay and supernova burst neutrinos. The photon detection (PD) system in the DUNE far detector provides trigger for cosmic backgrounds, enhances supernova burst trigger efficiency and improves the energy resolution of the detector. The DUNE adopts the technology of liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) that requires the PD sensors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), to be carefully chosen to not only work properly in LAr temperature, but also meet certain specifications for the life of the experiment. A comprehensive testing of SiPMs in cryostat is necessary since the datasheet provided by the manufactures in the market does not cover this temperature regime. This paper gives the detailed characterization results of SenSL C-Series 60035 SiPMs, including gain, dark count rate (DCR), cross-talk and after-pulse rate. Characteristic studies on SiPMs from other vendors are also discussed in order to avoid any potential problems associated with using a single source. Moreover, the results of the ongoing mechanical durability tests are shown for the current candidate, SenSL B/C-Series 60035 SiPMs.

  16. Final Report for the UNIVERSITY-BASED DETECTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, James E

    2013-04-22

    The U.S Linear Collider Detector R&D program, supported by the DOE and NSF umbrella grants to the University of Oregon, made significant advances on many critical aspects of the ILC detector program. Progress advanced on vertex detector sensor development, silicon and TPC tracking, calorimetry on candidate technologies, and muon detection, as well as on beamline measurements of luminosity, energy, and polarization.

  17. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R&D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors.

  18. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  19. Performance Evaluation of the COBRA GEM for the Application of the TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaki, Kohei; Hamagaki, Hideki; Gunji, Taku; Yamaguchi, Yorito

    2014-09-01

    Suppression of the back-drifting ions from avalanche region to drift space (IBF: Ion Backflow) is the key for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) since IBF easily distorts the drift field. To suppress IBF, Gating Grid system is widely used for the TPC but this limits the data taking rate. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has advantages in the reduction of IBF and high rate capability. By adopting GEM, it is possible to run a TPC continuously under high rate and high multiplicity conditions. Motivated by the study of IBF reduction for RICH with Thick COBRA, which has been developed by F. A. Amero et al., we developed COBRA GEMs for the application of a TPC. With a stack configuration, IBF reaches about 0.1 ~ 0.5%, which is ×5--10 better IBF than the standard GEMs. However, the measured energy resolution with COBRA is 20% (σ) and this is much worse than the resolution with standard GEMs. Measurement of long-time stability of gain indicates that gain of COBRA varies significantly due to charging up effect. Simulation studies based on Garfield++ are performed for understanding quantitatively the reasons of worse energy resolution and instability of gain. In this presentation, we will report the simulation studies together with the measured performance of the COBRA GEM.

  20. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  1. Performance of the fissionTPC and the Potential to Advance the Thorium Fuel Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The NIFFTE fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a powerful tool that is being developed to take precision measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections of transuranic elements. During the last run at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) the fully instrumented TPC took data for the first time. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow cross section systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance from this run will be shared. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors including the abundance of thorium verses uranium, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor safety, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium fueled nuclear reactors will also be discussed.

  2. Measuring Cross-Section and Estimating Uncertainties with the fissionTPC

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, N.; Manning, B.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this document is to outline the prescription for measuring fission cross-sections with the NIFFTE fissionTPC and estimating the associated uncertainties. As such it will serve as a work planning guide for NIFFTE collaboration members and facilitate clear communication of the procedures used to the broader community.

  3. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain 39Ar at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 ±0.2 )×103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 ±43 ) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 ×10-44 cm2 (8.6 ×10-44 cm2 , 8.0 ×10-43 cm2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV /c2 (1 TeV /c2 , 10 TeV /c2 ).

  4. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2015-06-12

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  5. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  6. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnes, P.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 ± 0.2) × 103 relative to atmospheric argon. Here, we report a background-free null result from (2616 ± 43) kg d ofmore » data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 × 10–44 cm2 (8.6 × 10–44 cm2, 8.0 × 10–43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2).« less

  7. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnes, P.

    2016-04-08

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain Ar-39 at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 +- 43) kg d of data, accumulatedmore » over 70.9 live-days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2 , 10 TeV/c2).« less

  8. Low Radioactivity Argon Dark Matter Search Results from the DarkSide-50 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnes, P.

    2015-10-02

    Our DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of lowradioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1.4 ±0.2) x 103 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon was also found to contain (2.05 ± 0.13)mBq=kg of 85Kr. We also found no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 ± 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10-44 cm2 (8.6 x 10-44 cm2, 8.0 x 10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV=c2 (1TeV=c2, 10TeV=c2).

  9. DarkSide-50 WIMP search results with low radioactivity argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xin; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, DarkSide-50 is the first physics detector of the DarkSide dark matter search program. The experiment features a dual-phase Time Projection Chamber as the WIMP detector, surrounded by an organic liquid-scintillator neutron veto and a water-Cherenkov muon detector. We report the results from the first use of low radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources in a dark matter search. We have determined that underground argon is depleted in 39Ar by a factor (1 . 4 +/- 0 . 2) ×103 relative to atmospheric argon whose 39Ar activity is 1 bq/kg. The underground argon is also found to contain (2 . 05 +/- 0 . 13) mBq/kg of 85Kr. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36 . 9 +/- 0 . 6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2 . 0 ×10-44 cm2 (8 . 6 ×10-44 cm2, 8 . 0 ×10-43 cm2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c2 (1 TeV/c2, 10 TeV/c2). DS-50 will continue dark matter search with the underground argon target for a total of 3 years. See also the DS-50 presentations by E. Edkins and G. Koh.

  10. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  11. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  12. Neutrino-Argon Interaction with GENIE Event Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneanu, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    Neutrinos are very special particles, have only weak interactions, except gravity, and are produced in very different processes in Nuclear and Particle Physics. Neutrinos are, also, messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe. Therefore, its can give us information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise. The underground instrumentation including a variety of large and very large detectors, thanks to technical breakthroughs, have achieved new fundamental results like the solution of the solar neutrino puzzle and the evidence for Physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary interactions in the neutrino sector with non-vanishing neutrino masses and lepton flavour violation. Two of the LAGUNA (Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics) detectors, namely: GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) [1] and LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astrophysics) [2] could be emplaced in ``Unirea'' salt mine from Slănic-Prahova, Romania. A detailed analysis of the conditions and advantages is necessary. A few results have been presented previously [3]. In the present work, we propose to generate events and compute the cross sections for interactions between neutrino and Argon-40, to estimate possible detection performances and event types. For doing this, we use the code GENIE (G_enerates E_vents for N_eutrino I_nteraction E_xperiments) [4]. GENIE Code is an Object-Oriented Neutrino MC Generator supported and developed by an international collaboration of neutrino interaction experts.

  13. Neutrino-Argon Interaction with GENIE Event Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chesneanu, Daniela

    2010-11-24

    Neutrinos are very special particles, have only weak interactions, except gravity, and are produced in very different processes in Nuclear and Particle Physics. Neutrinos are, also, messengers from astrophysical objects, as well as relics from Early Universe. Therefore, its can give us information on processes happening in the Universe, during its evolution, which cannot be studied otherwise. The underground instrumentation including a variety of large and very large detectors, thanks to technical breakthroughs, have achieved new fundamental results like the solution of the solar neutrino puzzle and the evidence for Physics beyond the Standard Model of elementary interactions in the neutrino sector with non-vanishing neutrino masses and lepton flavour violation.Two of the LAGUNA(Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics) detectors, namely: GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) and LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astrophysics) could be emplaced in 'Unirea' salt mine from Slanic-Prahova, Romania. A detailed analysis of the conditions and advantages is necessary. A few results have been presented previously. In the present work, we propose to generate events and compute the cross sections for interactions between neutrino and Argon-40, to estimate possible detection performances and event types. For doing this, we use the code GENIE(G lowbar enerates E lowbar vents for N lowbar eutrino I lowbar nteraction E lowbar xperiments). GENIE Code is an Object-Oriented Neutrino MC Generator supported and developed by an international collaboration of neutrino interaction experts.

  14. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the Gerda 0ν β β -experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Pelczar, K.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-10-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the Gerda experiment. Similar to Gerda, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m^3, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to Gerda. Suppression factors of a few times 10^3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6)× 10^{-2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of Gerda Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural ^{42}Ar abundance (parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2ν β β -decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in Gerda Phase II is pursued.

  15. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  16. Search for a QGP with a TPC spectrometer, and QGP signals predicted by new event generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-12-08

    The BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice Collaboration has developed and successfully tested a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer to search for OGP signals produced by ion beams at AGS. Test data with 14.5 GeV/c /times/ A Oxygen ions incident on a Pb target has been obtained. These include a 78-prong nuclear interaction in the MPS magnet which was pattern recognized with an efficiency approx.75%. A cascade and plasma event generator has also been developed, the predictions of which are used to illustrate how our technique can detect possible plasma signals at AGS and RHIC. A 4..pi.. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer has been proposed for RHIC. The new event generator predicts striking central rapidity bump QGP signals at RHIC for p, /bar p/, ..pi../sup +-/, K/sup +-/, etc., produced by 100 GeV/c /times/ A Au on Au collisions and these are presented. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Track reconstruction based on Hough-transform for nTPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Li-Bo; Li, Yu-Lan; Huang, Meng; He, Bin; Li, Yuan-Jing

    2014-12-01

    A GEM-TPC prototype, which will be used as a fast neutron spectrometer based on the recoil proton method, is designed and being constructed in Tsinghua University. In order to derive the recoil angle of the recoil proton, tracks of recoil proton in the TPC sensitive volume must be reconstructed. An algorithm based on Hough-transform for track finding and least square method for track fitting was developed in this paper. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation data given by Geant4, a detailed track reconstruction process was introduced and the spectrum of induced fast neutron was derived here. The results show that the algorithm was effective and high-performance. With the recoil angle of the proton less than 30°, a 4.4% FWHM neutron energy resolution was derived for 5 MeV induced fast neutron, and the detection efficiency was about 2×10-4.

  18. Two-pore Channels Enter the Atomic Era: Structure of Plant TPC Revealed.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sandip; Penny, Christopher J; Rahman, Taufiq

    2016-06-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) are intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable ion channels that are expressed on acidic Ca(2+) stores. They are co-regulated by voltage and Ca(2+) in plant vacuoles and by the second messenger NAADP in animal endo-lysosomes. Two new studies of plant TPC structures reveal essential features of their architecture and provide mechanistic insight into their workings. PMID:27156118

  19. TPC2 mediates new mechanisms of platelet dense granule membrane dynamics through regulation of Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Andrea L.; Boyle, Judith A.; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet dense granules (PDGs) are acidic calcium stores essential for normal hemostasis. They develop from late endosomal compartments upon receiving PDG-specific proteins through vesicular trafficking, but their maturation process is not well understood. Here we show that two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) is a component of the PDG membrane that regulates PDG luminal pH and the pool of releasable Ca2+. Using a genetically encoded Ca2+ biosensor and a pore mutant TPC2, we establish the function of TPC2 in Ca2+ release from PDGs and the formation of perigranular Ca2+ nanodomains. For the first time, Ca2+ spikes around PDGs—or any organelle of the endolysosome family—are visualized in real time and revealed to precisely mark organelle “kiss-and-run” events. Further, the presence of membranous tubules transiently connecting PDGs is revealed and shown to be dramatically enhanced by TPC2 in a mechanism that requires ion flux through TPC2. “Kiss-and-run” events and tubule connections mediate transfer of membrane proteins and luminal content between PDGs. The results show that PDGs use previously unknown mechanisms of membrane dynamics and content exchange that are regulated by TPC2. PMID:26202466

  20. Structure of Voltage-gated Two-pore Channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2015-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca2+. Ca2+ binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices (IS6 helices) from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain (VSD2) whose conformational changes are coupled to the pair of inner helices (IIS6 helices) from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca2+ or Ba2+ can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing VSD2 in the resting state and shifts voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba2+ bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  1. Structure of the voltage-gated two-pore channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-03-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here we present the crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca(2+). Ca(2+) binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain, the conformational changes of which are coupled to the pair of inner helices from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca(2+) or Ba(2+) can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing the second voltage-sensing domain in the resting state and shift voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba(2+)-bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  2. Safety related issues of the unexpected Argon release into the tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorowski, M.; Malecha, Z. M.; Polinski, J.

    2015-12-01

    Modern physics laboratories require very large amounts of cryogenics fluids. Often the fluid must be transported along the tunnels or stored in the underground cavities. Currently, there are several ongoing projects where very large amounts of liquid (LAr) or gaseous Argon (GAr) will be used. One of them is a part of the LAGUNA-LBNO (Large Apparatus studying Grand Unification and Neutrino Astrophysics and Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations) design study, where the GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) neutrino detector is considered. In order for it to properly operate, it requires the appropriate environment (it must be located in a deep, underground cavity) and approximately 150,000 tons of LAr. This huge amount of cryogen must be transported down the tunnel in cryogenic-tank trucks or by using pipelines. In both cases, there is a risk of uncontrolled LAr or GAr leakage into the tunnel, which can be dangerous for people, as well as during the installation itself. The presented work focuses on the risk analysis and consequences of unexpected Argon leakage into the tunnel. It shows the mathematical model and numerical tools which can serve to model the Argon cloud propagation, temperature distribution, and Oxygen deficiency. The results present a series of numerical experiments for Argon leakage into the tunnel with different external conditions (e.g. different ventilation regimes).

  3. Modelling of RF Discharge in Argon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, P.; Virostko, P.; Hubicka, Z.; Bartos, P.

    2007-12-26

    An one-dimensional hybrid model of RF discharge in low-temperature argon plasma is presented in our paper. The hybrid model consists of two parts--particle model which simulates fast electrons while fluid model simulates slow electrons and positive argon ions. In the particle model the positions and velocities of fast electrons are calculated by means of deterministic Verlet algorithm while the collision processes are treated by the stochastic way. For the solution of fluid equations, for slow electrons and positive argon ions, the Scharfetter-Gummel exponential algorithm was used. Typical results of our calculations presented in this paper are total RF current and RF voltage waveforms on the planar substrate immersed into argon plasma. The next results which can be found here are the ion, electron and displacement current waveforms on the substrate. Especially, the knowledge of waveform of the ion current is very important for experimental physicists during the deposition of thin films.

  4. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  5. Flexible Support Liquid Argon Heat Intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-05-18

    A device in the flexible support system for the Central Calorimeter is the Liquid Argon Heat Intercept. The purpose of this apparatus is to intercept heat outside the inner vessel so that bubbles do not form inside. If bubbles did happen to form inside the vessel, they would cause an electric arc between the read-out board and the absorption plates, thus destroying the pre-amplifier. Since this heat intercept is located in the center of the flexible support, it must also support the load of the Central Caloimeter. Figure 1 shows how the intercept works. The subcooled liquid argon is driven through a 1/4-inch x 0.049-inch w tube by hydrostatic pressure. the ambient heat boils the subcooled argon. The gaseous argon flows through the tube and is condensed at the top of the vessel by a 100 kW cooling coil. This process is rpesent in all four flexible support systems.

  6. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An argon gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of argon in a gas mixture to aid...

  8. Tracking Detectors in the STAR Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Howard

    2015-04-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is designed to measure and identify the thousands of particles produced in 200 Gev/nucleon Au on Au collisions. This talk will focus on the design and construction of two of the main tracking detectors in the experiment, the TPC and the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) pixel detector. The TPC is a solenoidal gas filled detector 4 meters in diameter and 4.2 meters long. It provides precise, continuous tracking and rate of energy loss in the gas (dE/dx) for particles at + - 1 units of pseudo rapidity. The tracking in a half Tesla magnetic field measures momentum and dE/dX provides particle ID. To detect short lived particles tracking close to the point of interaction is required. The HFT pixel detector is a two-layered, high resolution vertex detector located at a few centimeters radius from the collision point. It determines origins of the tracks to a few tens of microns for the purpose of extracting displaced vertices, allowing the identification of D mesons and other short-lived particles. The HFT pixel detector uses detector chips developed by the IPHC group at Strasbourg that are based on standard IC Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This is the first time that CMOS pixel chips have been incorporated in a collider application.

  9. Accurate γ and MeV-electron track reconstruction with an ultra-low diffusion Xenon/TMA TPC at 10 atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Diego; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; Azevedo, C.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Gómez, H.; Iguaz, F. J.; Lagraba, A.; Le Coguie, A.; Mols, J. P.; Şahin, Ö.; Rodríguez, A.; Ruiz-Choliz, E.; Segui, L.; Tomás, A.; Veenhof, R.

    2015-12-01

    We report the performance of a 10 atm Xenon/trimethylamine time projection chamber (TPC) for the detection of X-rays (30 keV) and γ-rays (0.511-1.275 MeV) in conjunction with the accurate tracking of the associated electrons. When operated at such a high pressure and in 1%-admixtures, trimethylamine (TMA) endows Xenon with an extremely low electron diffusion (1.3 ± 0.13 mm - σ (longitudinal), 0.95 ± 0.20 mm - σ (transverse) along 1 m drift) besides forming a convenient 'Penning-Fluorescent' mixture. The TPC, that houses 1.1 kg of gas in its fiducial volume, operated continuously for 100 live-days in charge amplification mode. The readout was performed through the recently introduced microbulk Micromegas technology and the AFTER chip, providing a 3D voxelization of 8 mm × 8 mm × 1.2 mm for approximately 10 cm/MeV-long electron tracks. Resolution in energy (ε) at full width half maximum (R) inside the fiducial volume ranged from R = 14.6 % (30 keV) to R = 4.6 %(1.275 MeV). This work was developed as part of the R&D program of the NEXT collaboration for future detector upgrades in the search of the neutrino-less double beta decay (ββ 0 ν) in 136Xe, specifically those based on novel gas mixtures. Therefore we ultimately focus on the calorimetric and topological properties of the reconstructed MeV-electron tracks. In particular, the obtained energy resolution has been decomposed in its various contributions and improvements towards achieving the R = 1.4 %√{ 1 MeV / ε } levels obtained in small sensors are discussed.

  10. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  11. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huajie

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  12. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Achey, R.; Hunter, D.

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  13. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  14. Development of a Photon Detection System in Liquid Argon for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Denver; Adams, Brice; Baptista, Brian; Baugh, Brian; Gebhard, Mark; Lang, Michael; Mufson, Stuart; Musser, James; Smith, Paul; Urheim, Jon

    2014-03-01

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will be a premier facility for exploring long-standing questions about the boundaries of the standard model. Acting in concert with the liquid argon time projection chambers underpinning the far detector design, the LBNE photon detection system will capture ultraviolet scintillation light in order to provide valuable timing information for event reconstruction. The team at Indiana University is exploring a design based on acrylic waveguides coated with a wavelength-shifting compound, combined with silicon photomultipliers, to collect and record scintillation light from liquid argon. Large-scale tests of this design are being conducted at the ``TallBo'' liquid argon dewar facility at Fermilab, where performance studies with cosmic ray events are helping steer decisions for the final detector design. We present an overview of the design and function of this photon detection system and the latest results from the analysis of data collected during these tests. Photon Detector R&D Team at Indiana University.

  15. Argon isotopic zoning in mantle phlogopite

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T.C.

    1988-06-01

    Incremental-heating and laser-probe /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar analyses were performed on phlogopite extracted from a garnet-lherzolite mantle nodule entrained by the Precambrian (1200 Ma) Premier kimberlite, South Africa. The spatial resolution of the laser probe has enabled the characterization of argon isotopic zoning in a single phlogopite grain. An apparent age contour map records lower ages (1.2 Ga) along grain margins and high apparent ages (up to 2.4 Ga) at the core. The latter ages are caused by excess argon contamination and subsequent partial diffusive loss, and have no age significance. Comparison with step-heating results indicates that argon spatial distributions inferred from in-vacuo step-heating experiments are, at best, grossly approximate. Variations in the laser-probe apparent ages were observed only laterally across the phlogopite cleavage surface, indicating that argon transport occurs preferentially along phlogopite cleavage planes. Age profiles, when modeled using one-dimensional radial geometry (cylindrical coordinates), do not conform to classical Fick's law diffusion, suggesting that the characteristic dimension of diffusion for argon in phlogopite may be highly variable within individual grains.

  16. The search for cluster structure in 14C with the prototype AT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Adam Louis

    Certain light nuclei are known to have inherent cluster structuring, and the nature of the triple-alpha structure of carbon isotopes is a subject of active discussion in nuclear physics. Clustering in neutron-rich nuclei is of particular interest as such work could shed light on how neutrons affect alpha clustering, making 14C a logical candidate for such a study. Cluster structure in 14C was investigated at the University of Notre Dame with the prototype Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). A 38.2 MeV secondary beam of 10Be was incident on an active target volume containing He:CO2 90:10 gas at 1 atm, in which trajectories of beam particles and reaction products were measured using the tracking capabilities of the prototype AT-TPC. Angular correlations of 10Be and alpha particles were used to reconstruct kinematics of scattering. Excitation functions and angular distributions were measured in both elastic and inelastic channels, which unraveled a number of resonances in 14C. Spin-parity assignments have been made for the elastic resonances by R-matrix analysis. Evidence of a positive-parity rotational band has been indicated by the 14C resonances. The proposed level scheme and the strong resonance strength observed in the inelastic channel are in line with the prediction by the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) method indicating linear-chain structure in 14C. The results also demonstrate unique and powerful potentials of active-target technology in radioactive-beam experiments and are an important step toward the construction of the full-scale AT-TPC for the ReA3 facility at NSCL.

  17. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bratrud, L.; Castro, A.; Costa, F.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kiss, T.; Langøy, R.; Lien, J.; Lippmann, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Rehman, A. Ur; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Stuart, M.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Yang, S.; Österman, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level irradiation test results as well as the first commissioning results of the RCU2. Furthermore, it will be concluded with a discussion of the planned updates in firmware.

  18. Detectors for the Superconducting Super Collider, design concepts, and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the need of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems. 29 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    SciTech Connect

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-06-25

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  20. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  1. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  2. High-pressure stabilization of argon fluorides.

    PubMed

    Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk

    2016-01-28

    On account of the rapid development of noble gas chemistry in the past half-century both xenon and krypton compounds can now be isolated in macroscopic quantities. The same does not hold true for the next lighter group 18 element, argon, which forms only isolated molecules stable solely in low temperature matrices or supersonic jet streams. Here we present theoretical investigations into a new high-pressure reaction pathway, which enables synthesis of argon fluorides in bulk and at room temperature. Our hybrid DFT calculations (employing the HSE06 functional) indicate that above 60 GPa ArF2-containing molecular crystals can be obtained by a reaction between argon and molecular fluorine. PMID:26742478

  3. Fourth workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fatyga, M.; Moskowitz, B.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: physics at RHIC; flavor flow from quark-gluon plasma; space-time quark-gluon cascade; jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions; parton distributions in hard nuclear collisions; experimental working groups, two-arm electron/photon spectrometer collaboration; total and elastic pp cross sections; a 4{pi} tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer; hadron spectroscopy; efficiency and background simulations for J/{psi} detection in the RHIC dimuon experiment; the collision regions beam crossing geometries; Monte Carlo simulations of interactions and detectors; proton-nucleus interactions; the physics of strong electromagnetic fields in collisions of relativistic heavy ions; a real time expert system for experimental high energy/nuclear physics; the development of silicon multiplicity detectors; a pad readout detector for CRID/tracking; RHIC TPC R D progress and goals; development of analog memories for RHIC detector front-end electronic systems; calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment; construction of a highly segmented high resolution TOF system; progress report on a fast, particle-identifying trigger based on ring-imaging and highly integrated electronics for a TPC detector.

  4. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  5. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  6. A highly accurate interatomic potential for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Ronald A.

    1993-09-01

    A modified potential based on the individually damped model of Douketis, Scoles, Marchetti, Zen, and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 76, 3057 (1982)] is presented which fits, within experimental error, the accurate ultraviolet (UV) vibration-rotation spectrum of argon determined by UV laser absorption spectroscopy by Herman, LaRocque, and Stoicheff [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 4535 (1988)]. Other literature potentials fail to do so. The potential also is shown to predict a large number of other properties and is probably the most accurate characterization of the argon interaction constructed to date.

  7. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  8. Noble liquid detectors for fundamental physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curioni, A.

    2009-12-01

    Noble liquid detectors come in many sizes and configurations and cover a lot of ground as particle and radiation detectors: from calorimeters for colliders to imaging detectors for neutrino physics and proton decay to WIMP Dark Matter detectors. It turns out that noble liquid detectors are a mature technology for imaging and spectroscopy of gamma rays and for neutron detection, a fact that makes them suitable for applications, e.g. cargo scanning and Homeland Security. In this short paper I will focus on liquid xenon and liquid argon, which make excellent detectors for hypothetical WIMP Dark Matter and neutrinos and for much less exotic gamma rays.

  9. Design and Construction of Prototype Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Fisher

    2012-03-23

    The Lepton Quark Studies (LQS) group is engaged in searching for dark matter using the Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) (Carlsbad, NM). DMTPC is a direction-sensitive dark matter detector designed to measure the recoil direction and energy deposited by fluorine nuclei recoiling from the interaction with incident WIMPs. In the past year, the major areas of progress have been: to publish the first dark matter search results from a surface run of the DMTPC prototype detector, to build and install the 10L prototype in the underground laboratory at WIPP which will house the 1 m{sup 3} detector, and to demonstrate charge and PMT readout of the TPC using prototype detectors, which allow triggering and {Delta}z measurement to be used in the 1 m{sup 3} detector under development.

  10. ALICE HLT TPC Tracking of Pb-Pb Events on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Szostak, Artur; Kretz, Matthias; Kollegger, Thorsten; Breitner, Timo; Alt, Torsten

    2012-12-01

    The online event reconstruction for the ALICE experiment at CERN requires processing capabilities to process central Pb-Pb collisions at a rate of more than 200 Hz, corresponding to an input data rate of about 25 GB/s. The reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the most compute intensive step. The TPC online tracker implementation combines the principle of the cellular automaton and the Kalman filter. It has been accelerated by the usage of graphics cards (GPUs). A pipelined processing allows to perform the tracking on the GPU, the data transfer, and the preprocessing on the CPU in parallel. In order for CPU pre- and postprocessing to keep step with the GPU the pipeline uses multiple threads. A splitting of the tracking in multiple phases searching for short local track segments first improves data locality and makes the algorithm suited to run on a GPU. Due to special optimizations this course of action is not second to a global approach. Because of non-associative floating-point arithmetic a binary comparison of GPU and CPU tracker is infeasible. A track by track and cluster by cluster comparison shows a concordance of 99.999%. With current hardware, the GPU tracker outperforms the CPU version by about a factor of three leaving the processor still available for other tasks.

  11. Structure, inhibition and regulation of two-pore channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kintzer, Alexander F; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-03-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) comprise a subfamily (TPC1-3) of eukaryotic voltage- and ligand-gated cation channels with two non-equivalent tandem pore-forming subunits that dimerize to form quasi-tetramers. Found in vacuolar or endolysosomal membranes, they regulate the conductance of sodium and calcium ions, intravesicular pH, trafficking and excitability. TPCs are activated by a decrease in transmembrane potential and an increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations, are inhibited by low luminal pH and calcium, and are regulated by phosphorylation. Here we report the crystal structure of TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana at 2.87 Å resolution as a basis for understanding ion permeation, channel activation, the location of voltage-sensing domains and regulatory ion-binding sites. We determined sites of phosphorylation in the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal domains that are positioned to allosterically modulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) activation. One of the two voltage-sensing domains (VSD2) encodes voltage sensitivity and inhibition by luminal Ca(2+) and adopts a conformation distinct from the activated state observed in structures of other voltage-gated ion channels. The structure shows that potent pharmacophore trans-Ned-19 (ref. 17) acts allosterically by clamping the pore domains to VSD2. In animals, Ned-19 prevents infection by Ebola virus and other filoviruses, presumably by altering their fusion with the endolysosome and delivery of their contents into the cytoplasm. PMID:26961658

  12. The vacuolar Ca2+-activated channel TPC1 regulates germination and stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Peiter, Edgar; Maathuis, Frans J M; Mills, Lewis N; Knight, Heather; Pelloux, Jérôme; Hetherington, Alistair M; Sanders, Dale

    2005-03-17

    Cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) is a ubiquitous signalling component in plant cells. Numerous stimuli trigger sustained or transient elevations of [Ca2+]cyt that evoke downstream stimulus-specific responses. Generation of [Ca2+]cyt signals is effected through stimulus-induced opening of Ca2+-permeable ion channels that catalyse a flux of Ca2+ into the cytosol from extracellular or intracellular stores. Many classes of Ca2+ current have been characterized electrophysiologically in plant membranes. However, the identity of the ion channels that underlie these currents has until now remained obscure. Here we show that the TPC1 ('two-pore channel 1') gene of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a class of Ca2+-dependent Ca2+-release channel that is known from numerous electrophysiological studies as the slow vacuolar channel. Slow vacuolar channels are ubiquitous in plant vacuoles, where they form the dominant conductance at micromolar [Ca2+]cyt. We show that a tpc1 knockout mutant lacks functional slow vacuolar channel activity and is defective in both abscisic acid-induced repression of germination and in the response of stomata to extracellular calcium. These studies unequivocally demonstrate a critical role of intracellular Ca2+-release channels in the physiological processes of plants. PMID:15772667

  13. Study of Stellar Helium Burning with O-TPC at TUNL/HIγS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, P.-N.; Young, A. H.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Gai, M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Clinton, E. R.; Henshaw, S. S.; Howell, C. R.; Perdue, B. A.; Stave, S. C.; Sun, C.; Weller, H. R.; Wu, Y.; Martel, P. P.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendrof, V.; Tittermeier, K.; Breskin, A.

    2008-10-01

    The Optical-readout Timing Projection Chamber (O-TPC), operating with a CO2(80%)+N2(20%) gas mixure at 150 Torr, has been successfully commissioned at TUNL/HIγS with alpha-particles from a ^148Gd standard source. The O-TPC will be used to study the ^16O(γ,α)^12C reaction, the time-reversed reaction of the oxygen formation in stellar helium burning. This reaction is considered to be of major importance since it determines the C/O ratio that in turn determines the final state of a supernova (black hole or neutron star). While we studied this reaction at 9.55 MeV, on the 1^- resonance of ^16O, we also took an advantage of the powerful detection system to investigate the ^16O(γ,3α) reaction at 10.53, 10.84, and 11.16 MeV gamma energy from HIγS, spanning the 1^- resonance of ^12C located at 10.84 MeV which may or may not contribute to carbon formation during stellar helium burning. We will describe these two recent experiment and preliminary results from our data analysis that is in progress both at Yale and TUNL/Duke University.

  14. ArgoNeuT: A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Test in the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, M.

    2009-10-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber detectors are ideally suited for studying neutrino interactions and probing the parameters that characterize neutrino oscillations. The ability to drift ionization particles over long distances in purified argon and to trigger on abundant scintillation light allows for excellent particle identification and triggering capability. In these proceedings the details of the ArgoNeuT test-beam project will be presented after a brief introduction to the detector technique. ArgoNeuT is a 175 liter detector exposed to Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beamline. The first neutrino interactions observed in ArgoNeuT will be presented, along with discussion of the various physics analyses to be performed on this data sample.

  15. Liquid Argon Dielectric Breakdown Studies with the MicroBooNE Purification System

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Carls, B.; James, C.; Johnson, B.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Lundberg, B.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Rebel, B.; Zeller, G. P.; Zuckerbrot, M.

    2014-11-04

    The proliferation of liquid argon time projection chamber detectors makes the characterization of the dielectric properties of liquid argon a critical task. To improve understanding of these properties, a systematic study of the breakdown electric field in liquid argon was conducted using a dedicated cryostat connected to the MicroBooNE cryogenic system at Fermilab. An electrode sphere-plate geometry was implemented using spheres with diameters of 1.3 mm, 5.0 mm, and 76 mm. The MicroBooNE cryogenic system allowed measurements to be taken at a variety of electronegative contamination levels ranging from a few parts-per-million to tens of parts-per-trillion. The cathode-anode distance was varied from 0.1 mm to 2.5 cm. The results demonstrate a geometric dependence of the electric field strength at breakdown. This study is the first time that the dependence of the breakdown field on stressed cathode area has been shown for liquid argon.

  16. Thermal evolution of Venus with argon degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Korenaga, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Decades-old measurements of atmospheric and elemental surface composition constrain the history of Venus. In this study, we search for a model featuring continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime that predicts the present-day atmospheric mass of radiogenic argon and satisfies the other available constraints. For comparison, we also consider the end-member scenario of a single catastrophic resurfacing event. Thermal evolution simulations are performed that track the mass transport of argon and potassium and include a simple model of upwelling mantle plumes. Sensitivity analyses and linear regression are used to quantify the range of initial conditions that will produce desired values for key model output parameters. Decompression melting of passively upwelling mantle causes considerable mantle processing and crustal growth during the early evolution of Venus. Mantle plumes have negligible effects on recent crustal production, but may be important to local surface features. For a wide range of initial conditions, continuous evolution in the stagnant-lid regime predicts the correct amount of argon degassing, along with the absence of a global magnetic field, crustal and lithosphere thicknesses matching modern estimates, and volcanism consistent with the cratering record. Argon degassing does not uniquely constrain mantle dynamics, but the success of simple stagnant-lid models diminishes the need to invoke dramatic changes like catastrophic resurfacing.

  17. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  18. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  19. Antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon.

    PubMed

    Spaggiari, Sabrina; Kepp, Oliver; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Chaba, Kariman; Adjemian, Sandy; Pype, Jan; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Lemaire, Marc; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-08-15

    Although chemically non-reactive, inert noble gases may influence multiple physiological and pathological processes via hitherto uncharacterized physical effects. Here we report a cell-based detection system for assessing the effects of pre-defined gas mixtures on the induction of apoptotic cell death. In this setting, the conventional atmosphere for cell culture was substituted with gas combinations, including the same amount of oxygen (20%) and carbon dioxide (5%) but 75% helium, neon, argon, krypton, or xenon instead of nitrogen. The replacement of nitrogen with noble gases per se had no effects on the viability of cultured human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Conversely, argon and xenon (but not helium, neon, and krypton) significantly limited cell loss induced by the broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor staurosporine, the DNA-damaging agent mitoxantrone and several mitochondrial toxins. Such cytoprotective effects were coupled to the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity, as demonstrated by means of a mitochondrial transmembrane potential-sensitive dye and by assessing the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. In line with this notion, argon and xenon inhibited the apoptotic activation of caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy coupled to automated image analysis. The antiapoptotic activity of argon and xenon may explain their clinically relevant cytoprotective effects. PMID:23907115

  20. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  1. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  2. Proceedings of the symposium on RHIC detector R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.; Stevens, A.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Development of Analog Memories for RHIC Detector Front-end Electronic Systems; Monolithic Circuit Development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Highly Integrated Electronics for the STAR TPC; Monolithic Readout Circuits for RHIC; New Methods for Trigger Electronics Development; Neurocomputing methods for Pattern Recognition in Nuclear Physics; The Development of a Silicon Multiplicity Detector System; The Vertex Detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration; Simulations of Silicon Vertex Tracker for STAR Experiment at RHIC; Calorimeter/Absorber Optimization for a RHIC Dimuon Experiment (RD-10 Project); Applications of the LAHET simulation Code to Relativistic Heavy Ion Detectors; Highly Segmented, High Resolution Time-of-Flight System; Research and Development on a Sub 100 Picosecond Time-of-Flight System Based on Silicon Avalance Diodes; Behavior of TPC`s in a High Particle Flux Environment; Generic R&D on Undoped Cesium Iodide and Lead Fluoride; and A Transition Radiation Detector for RHIC Featuring Accurate Tracking and dE/dx Particle Identification. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  4. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa (25... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36...

  8. Absence of intracellular ion channels TPC1 and TPC2 leads to mature-onset obesity in male mice, due to impaired lipid availability for thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lear, Pamela V; González-Touceda, David; Porteiro Couto, Begoña; Viaño, Patricia; Guymer, Vanessa; Remzova, Elena; Tunn, Ruth; Chalasani, Annapurna; García-Caballero, Tomás; Hargreaves, Iain P; Tynan, Patricia W; Christian, Helen C; Nogueiras, Rubén; Parrington, John; Diéguez, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular calcium-permeable channels have been implicated in thermogenic function of murine brown and brite/beige adipocytes, respectively transient receptor potential melastin-8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid-4. Because the endo-lysosomal two-pore channels (TPCs) have also been ascribed with metabolic functionality, we studied the effect of simultaneously knocking out TPC1 and TPC2 on body composition and energy balance in male mice fed a chow diet. Compared with wild-type mice, TPC1 and TPC2 double knockout (Tpcn1/2(-/-)) animals had a higher respiratory quotient and became obese between 6 and 9 months of age. Although food intake was unaltered, interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) maximal temperature and lean-mass adjusted oxygen consumption were lower in Tpcn1/2(-/-) than in wild type mice. Phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase expression, lipid density and expression of β-adrenergic receptors were also lower in Tpcn1/2(-/-) BAT, whereas mitochondrial respiratory chain function and uncoupling protein-1 expression remained intact. We conclude that Tpcn1/2(-/-) mice show mature-onset obesity due to reduced lipid availability and use, and a defect in β-adrenergic receptor signaling, leading to impaired thermogenic activity, in BAT. PMID:25545384

  9. On the OES line-ratio technique in argon and argon-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate capacitively coupled argon and argon-hydrogen-silane plasmas. The argon collisional-radiative model (CRM) used to extract the electron density and temperature from the spectra is presented. The electron energy distribution function, which is an input parameter to the model, is discussed in detail. Its strong variation with pressure is found to significantly influence the results for the (effective) temperature. For the analysis of the spectra the common line-ratio technique is applied. Special attention is paid to the choice of lines and a pair of line-ratios for optimum accuracy is suggested. For the argon gas mixture at high partial pressure of the admixed molecular gases the CRM reduces to a corona-like model, extended by a quenching term. The line-ratio method is found to fail under these conditions due to the strong depopulation of the argon 1s states. As a consequence, individual line intensities have to be used and an absolute calibration is required. An easy calibration method, which relies on the results obtained by the line-ratio method in pure argon, is proposed and applied.

  10. a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mao-Tung

    The construction and successful test of a large liquid argon time projection chamber prototype detector is presented. This effort is a part of the ICARUS project which is aimed at the development of new detector techniques to uncover the very rare events like proton decay and solar neutrinos. The construction and test of this detector has been carried out at CERN from 1989 until the present time. The charge lifetime measured is 3.19 +/- 0.13 ms. We also report on a precision measurement of lifetime by a laser monitoring chamber and the operation of the recirculation system essential to keeping liquid for a long time. We show that a liquid argon detector is very well suited to study mass-enhanced neutrino oscillation (MSW effect) from the Sun by detecting simultaneous two modes of reaction. Ratio of two modes provides a model independent probe of neutrino oscillation, free of deviations from different solar models. Contour plots are presented at various threshold energies.

  11. Use of propane as a quench gas in argon-filled proportional counters and comparison with other quench gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, P. C.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental investigation of propane and six other quench gases was carried out in argon-filled proportional counters. The objective of the study was to find the best gas mixture for optimizing the gas gain and the energy resolution as well as to understand the role of the ionization potential of quench gases in determining these parameters. It was found that the best gas gains and energy resolutions are obtained with propane, ethane, and isobutane in that order. The ionization potentials of these three lie below the argon metastable potentials and have the lowest value of resonance defect compared to the other quench gases. The better results obtained with these mixtures can be explained by an increased ionization yield resulting from the Penning effect. Propylene and trans-2-butene give inferior performance compared to the above three gases. Methane and carbon dioxide, the most commonly used quench gases in the argon-filled detectors, provide the worst results.

  12. The function of the two-pore channel TPC1 depends on dimerization of its carboxy-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Larisch, Nina; Kirsch, Sonja A; Schambony, Alexandra; Studtrucker, Tanja; Böckmann, Rainer A; Dietrich, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) constitute a family of intracellular cation channels with diverse permeation properties and functions in animals and plants. In the model plant Arabidopsis, the vacuolar cation channel TPC1 is involved in propagation of calcium waves and in cation homeostasis. Here, we discovered that the dimerization of a predicted helix within the carboxyl-terminus (CTH) is essential for the activity of TPC1. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the interaction of the two C-termini and pointed towards the involvement of the CTH in this process. Synthetic CTH peptides dimerized with a dissociation constant of 3.9 µM. Disruption of this domain in TPC1 either by deletion or point mutations impeded the dimerization and cation transport. The homo-dimerization of the CTH was analyzed in silico using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the study of aggregation, followed by atomistic MD simulations. The simulations revealed that the helical region of the wild type, but not a mutated CTH forms a highly stable, antiparallel dimer with characteristics of a coiled-coil. We propose that the voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive conformation of TPC1 depends on C-terminal dimerization, adding an additional layer to the complex regulation of two-pore cation channels. PMID:26781468

  13. Ab initio pair potential energy curve for the argon atom pair and thermophysical properties for the dilute argon gas. II. Thermophysical properties for low-density argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Jäger, Benjamin; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2010-12-01

    A recent argon-argon interatomic potential energy curve determined from quantum-mechanical ab initio calculations and described with an analytical representation [B. Jäger, R. Hellmann, E. Bich, and E. Vogel, Mol. Phys. 107, 2181 (2009); 108, 105 (2010)] was used to calculate the most important thermophysical properties of argon governed by two-body interactions. Second pressure, acoustic, and dielectric virial coefficients as well as viscosity and thermal conductivity in the limit of zero density were computed for natural argon from 83 to 10,000 K. The calculated values for the different thermophysical properties are compared with available experimental data and values computed for other argon-argon potentials. This extensive analysis shows that the proposed potential is superior to all previous ones and that the calculated thermophysical property values are accurate enough to be applied as standard values for the complete temperature range of the calculations.

  14. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-10-15

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts.

  15. Dissociation-excitation reactions of argon metastables with carbon dioxide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study showing that a metastable argon-carbon dioxide reaction results in dissociation of carbon dioxide and electronic excitation of one of the products, carbon monoxide or oxygen. A flow system using a 2450-MHz discharge was used to produce metastable argon atoms. Metastable argon in the afterglow was confirmed by adding nitrogen to the afterglow. Without addition of carbon dioxide no argon line emission, or any other emission, is observed from the reaction zone. Absence of argon line emission produced by recombination indicates the absence of charged species.

  16. Tetraphenyl-butadiene films: VUV-Vis optical characterization from room to liquid argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    A thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor's optical window is the most common solution to down convert argon VUV scintillation light in current and planned liquid argon based experiments for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. Characterization of the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  17. SAMPA chip: a new ASIC for the ALICE TPC and MCH upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, S. H. I.; Bregant, M.; Chambert, V.; Espagnon, B.; Hernandez Herrera, H. D.; Mahmood, S. M.; Moraes, D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Noël, G.; Pilyar, A.; Russo, P.; Sanches, B. C. S.; Tambave, G. J.; Tun-Lanoë, K. M. M.; van Noije, W.; Velure, A.; Vereschagin, S.; Weber, T. O.; Zaporozhets, S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the SAMPA, an ASIC designed for the upgrade of read-out front end electronics of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Muon Chambers (MCH). SAMPA is made in a 130 nm CMOS technology with 1.25 V nominal voltage supply and includes 32 channels, with selectable input polarity, and five possible combinations of shaping time and sensitivity. Each channel comprises a Charge Sensitive Amplifier, a semi-Gaussian shaper and a 10-bit ADC, followed by a Digital Signal Processor. A prototype in a multi project run was submitted to evaluate the performance of each of these blocks. The experimental results of the tests on these building blocks are presented, showing a substantial agreement with requirements.

  18. Argon ion pollution of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of a Solar Power Satellite (SPS) would require the injection of large quantities of propellant to transport material from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to the construction site at Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). This injection, in the form of approx 10 to the 32nd power, 2 KeV argon ions (and associated electrons) per SPS, is comparable to the content of the plasmasphere (approx 10 to the 31st power ions). In addition to the mass deposited, this represents a considerable injection of energy. The injection is examined in terms of a simple model for the expansion of the beam plasma. General features of the subsequent magnetospheric convection of the argon are also examined.

  19. Argon Dewar Relief Set Pressure Modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-03-19

    This engineering note documents the calculations of Kelly Dixon, used to determine the maximum allowable set pressure for the argon dewar low relief valve, tag number PSV620A, Anderson Greenwood Type 526J. The original setting was 16 psig. This value was chosen in order to protect against cryostat overpressurization by the source dewar (see D0 Engineering Note 115), however, the following calculations will show that the set pressure can be raised to approximately 18.5 psig, which would result in a faster filling of the cryostat, along with a higher level of liquid argon. Three other engineering notes were revised to reflect the change in set pressure according to this note. They are notes 115, 219, and 263.

  20. Photoassociative Spectroscopy of Ultracold Argon and Krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. K.; Williams, W. D.; Sukenik, C. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on photoassociative spectroscopy experiments performed separately on ultracold 40 Ar and ultracold 84 Kr with the spectroscopy laser tuned around the trapping transition for each species (ns[ 3 / 2 ] 2 --> np[ 5 / 2 ] 3 where n = 4 for argon and n = 5 for krypton). Previous studies in argon observed several discrete features in the spectrum that have now been positively identified as arising from otherwise undetectable frequency sidebands on the spectroscopy laser and not from molecular structure. Spectra have been taken over a range of laser intensities and show a broad (several GHz) signature of single photon photo-association, but with no individual vibrational levels resolved. We will discuss our results and compare our spectra to those obtained in ultracold, noble gas photoassociative spectroscopy experiments conducted by other groups in recent years. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation, Award, No. PHY-0855290.

  1. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  2. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  3. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  4. Insights into discharge argon mediated biofilm inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Danni; Azzam, Robin; Liang, Jun F.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in biomedical sciences. Conventional sterilization and decontamination methods are not suitable for new and more sophisticated biomaterials. In this paper, the efficiency and effectiveness of gas discharges in inactivation and removal of biofilms on biomaterials were studied. We found that although discharge oxygen, nitrogen and argon all demonstrated excellent antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, gases with distinct chemical/physical properties underwent different mechanisms of action. Discharge oxygen and nitrogen mediated decontamination was associated with strong etching effects, which can cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. On the contrary, although discharge argon at low powers maintained excellent antibacterial ability, it had negligible etching effects. Based on these results, an effective decontamination approach using discharge argon was established in which bacteria and biofilms were killed in situ and then removed from contaminated biomaterials. This novel procedure is applicable for a wide range of biomaterials and biomedical devices in an in vivo and clinical setting. PMID:24070412

  5. Distribution and Abundance of Mars' Atmospheric Argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Nelli, Steven; Murphy, Jim; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Janes, K. D.; Crombie, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    One and one half Mars years (MY 26 and 27) of atmospheric Argon measurements are described and studied in the context of understanding how Argon, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. Argon data are from the 2001 Mars Odyssey Gamma Subsystem (GS) of the suite of three instruments comprising the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). A comprehensive data analysis including gamma-ray production and attenuation by the atmosphere is included. Of particular interest is the enhanced abundance of Ar over the observed Ar abundance at lower latitudes at south (up to a factor of 10) and north (up to a factor of 4) polar regions during winter. Calibration of the measurements to actual Ar abundance is possible because GS measurements cover the same latitude and season as measurements made by the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) on Viking Landers 1 and 2 (VL1 and VL2). [2].

  6. Pulse-shape discrimination and energy resolution of a liquid-argon scintillator with xenon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, C. G.; Bernard, E. P.; Lippincott, W. H.; Nikkel, J. A.; Shin, Y.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2014-06-01

    Liquid-argon scintillation detectors are used in fundamental physics experiments and are being considered for security applications. Previous studies have suggested that the addition of small amounts of xenon dopant improves performance in light or signal yield, energy resolution, and particle discrimination. In this study, we investigate the detector response for xenon dopant concentrations from 9 ± 5 ppm to 1100 ± 500 ppm xenon (by weight) in 6 steps. The 3.14-liter detector uses tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) wavelength shifter with dual photomultiplier tubes and is operated in single-phase mode. Gamma-ray-interaction signal yield of 4.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV improved to 5.0 ± 0.1 photoelectrons/keV with dopant. Energy resolution at 662 keV improved from (4.4 ± 0.2)% (σ) to (3.5 ± 0.2)% (σ) with dopant. Pulse-shape discrimination performance degraded greatly at the first addition of dopant, slightly improved with additional additions, then rapidly improved near the end of our dopant range, with performance becoming slightly better than pure argon at the highest tested dopant concentration. Some evidence of reduced neutron scintillation efficiency with increasing dopant concentration was observed. Finally, the waveform shape outside the TPB region is discussed, suggesting that the contribution to the waveform from xenon-produced light is primarily in the last portion of the slow component.

  7. Operation of a 1-liter-volume gaseous argon proportional scintillation counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, K.; Foxe, M.; Bernstein, A.; Hagmann, C.; Jovanovic, I.; Sorensen, P.; Stoeffl, W. S.; Winant, C. D.

    2010-09-01

    We have built a gas-phase argon ionization detector to measure small nuclear recoil energies (<10 keVee). In this paper, we describe the detector response to X-ray and gamma calibration sources, including analysis of pulse shapes, software triggers, optimization of gas content, and energy- and position-dependence of the signal. We compare our experimental results against simulation using a 5.9-keV X-ray source, as well as higher-energy gamma sources up to 1332 keV. We conclude with a description of the detector, DAQ, and software settings optimized for a measurement of the low-energy nuclear quenching factor in gaseous argon. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funded by Lab-wide LDRD. LLNL-JRNL-415990-DRAFT.

  8. Study of space-charge dependence on IBF for GEM and Micromegas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukawa, Kentaro; Hamagaki, Hideki; Gunji, Taku; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Terasaki, Kohei

    2014-09-01

    The MWPC is widely used in a Time Projection Chamber (TPC). To prevent ions created around amplification region from back drifting into the drift space, gating grid system is widely used in the TPC. However, the data taking rate is limited by the operation of the gating grid and the TPC with gating grid system cannot be suitable for the high rate experiments. Micor-Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGD) are the possible solutions to overcome the high rate limitations. GEM and Micromegas can absorb positive ions on its electrode or mesh and can reduce the ion backflow into the drift space. In this study, we aim to evaluate performance of ion back flow suppression of GEM and Micromegas detector as a function of space-charge density. We also did the simulation studies using Garfield + + to assess the reproducibility of the space-charge density dependence of the ion back flow obtained in the measurement. In this talk, we will report the overall performances (space-charge density and field dependences of the ion backflow) of GEM and micromegas detectors studied in the measurements and simulations.

  9. 46 CFR § 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2015-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2015-10-01 2015-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. § 151.50-36 Section § 151.50-36... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172...

  10. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  11. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  12. Basic processes in time-projection like detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sauli, F.

    1984-01-01

    There is a general feeling that unpleasant surprises may still appear in the operation of time projection chambers, and that some modifications of the original design (e.g., the choice of the wire and pad geometry and of the gas mixing) may result in improved performances. The purpose of these notes is, after a short discussion of some physical processes involved in the TPC-like detectors operation, to point out the areas where detailed information is still lacking and where problems have been found or may be expected. If possible, a solution or a line of research are offered to overcome the problems.

  13. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  14. First proof of topological signature in the high pressure xenon gas TPC with electroluminescence amplification for the NEXT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, P.; Laing, A.; López-March, N.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Álvarez, V.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Borges, F. I. G.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Diesburg, M.; Esteve, R.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; González-Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Henriques, C. A. O.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Lebrun, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez-Lema, G.; Martínez, A.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Novella, P.; Nygren, D.; Para, A.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J. T.; Yahlali, N.; Yepes-Ramírez, H.

    2016-01-01

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe in a high-pressure xenon gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Q ββ . This paper presents the first demonstration that the topology provides extra handles to reject background events using data obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype.

  15. Optimization of the HypTPC field cage for E42/E45 experiments at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Andrey; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, Hyo Sang

    2014-04-01

    Computations of electric field and the electron drift volume of the HypTPC for E42 experiment have been accomplished with FEM and Garfield software. The double side strips field cage with shielding flange has been developed. The advantage of application a Kapton based field cage with mirror strips has been proved. According to a simulation results the spatial resolution of 300m in x-y plane and 600m in drift direction must be achieved.

  16. A first walk on the DarkSide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davini, S.; Agnes, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; et al

    2016-05-31

    DarkSide-50 (DS-50) at Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), Italy, is a direct dark matter search experiment based on a TPC with liquid argon. DS-50 has completed its first dark matter run using atmospheric argon as target. Here, the DS-50 detector performances and the results of the first physics run are reviewed in this proceeding.

  17. The DarkSide Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Agnes, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cariello, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Catalanotti, S.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; De Deo, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guan, M. Y.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Kendziora, C.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kurlej, A.; Li, P. X.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meyers, P. D.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Musico, P.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Papp, L.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Segreto, E.; Shields, E.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    DarkSide-50 at Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), Italy, is a direct dark matter search experiment based on a liquid argon TPC. DS-50 has completed its first dark matter run using atmospheric argon as target. The detector performances and the results of the first physics run are presented in this proceeding.

  18. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.; McEachran, R. P.

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  19. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  20. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Boyle, G J; McEachran, R P; Cocks, D G; White, R D

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies. PMID:25903897

  1. Argon laser photocoagulation in the dog stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Salmon, P R; Kelly, D F; Calder, B M; Pearson, H; Weaver, B M; Read, A E

    1979-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is one of a number of methods currently under investigation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The Argon ion and Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd YAG) lasers are theoretically suitable as the beam from each may be transmitted via a flexible fibre. Argon laser photocoagulation has been shown to be effective and we have elucidated which factors determine its safety and efficacy. Studies on normal canine gastric mucosa showed that the depth of tissue damage depended chiefly on the total incident laser energy on any one spot, and that below 50 J the risk of perforation was extremely low. The energy density was much less important. The haemostatic effect depended more on the laser power. In artificial bleeding gastric ulcers in heparinised dogs the most effective level was 7--9 W, at which 22 out of 23 ulcers (96%) stopped bleeding completely, compared with one out of 12 controls. Photocoagulation was achieved in these cases with energies well within the safe limits. The procedure was effective endoscopically, and these results justify early clinical studies in man. PMID:573722

  2. Investigating 3-body Decays of Cluster States with the PAT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Lisa; Ayyad Limonge, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Meisel, Z.; Bechetti, F. D.; Fritsch, A.; Howard, A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent model calculations with most advanced methods for cluster states have shown the need of experimental data to probe the structure of light exotic nuclei, including those with α-clustering, such as 14C. The Prototype Active Target Time Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) allows us to investigate these types of structures, giving access to the full excitation function with a single beam energy. This type of experiment measures resonances in 14C that can be compared to the models. With an improved Micromegas pad plane with a circular backgammon design we are able to investigate 3-body decays in addition to 2-body scattering. The measurements were carried out by resonant alpha-scattering on 10Be beam delivered by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame. We also observed the 3-body decay of the Hoyle State in 12C from a 12N or 12B beam with the same device. Preliminary results will be presented. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  3. TREX-DM: a low background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguaz, F. J.; Garza, J. G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J. F.; Cebrián, S.; Dafni, T.; García, J. A.; Irastorza, I. G.; Lagraba, A.; Luzón, G.; Peiró, A.

    2016-05-01

    Dark Matter experiments are recently focusing their detection techniques in low-mass WIMPs, which requires the use of light elements and low energy threshold. In this context, we describe the TREX-DM experiment, a low background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection. Its main goal is the operation of an active detection mass ~0.3 kg, with an energy threshold below 0.4 keVee and fully built with previously selected radiopure materials. This work describes the commissioning of the actual setup situated in a laboratory on surface and the updates needed for a possible physics run at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in 2016. A preliminary background model of TREX-DM is also presented, based on a Geant4 simulation, the simulation of the detector’s response and two discrimination methods: a conservative muon/electron and one based on a neutron source. Based on this background model, TREX-DM could be competitive in the search for low-mass WIMPs. In particular it could be sensitive, e.g., to the low-mass WIMP interpretation of the DAMA/LIBRA and other hints in a conservative scenario.

  4. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  5. Particle tracking with a Timepix based triple GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, S. P.; Murtas, F.; Alozy, J.; Curioni, A.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Silari, M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper details the response of a triple GEM detector with a 55 μmetre pitch pixelated ASIC for readout. The detector is operated as a micro TPC with 9.5 cm3 sensitive volume and characterized with a mixed beam of 120 GeV protons and positive pions. A process for reconstruction of incident particle tracks from individual ionization clusters is described and scans of the gain and drift fields are performed. The angular resolution of the measured tracks is characterized. Also, the readout was operated in a mixed mode where some pixels measure drift time and others charge. This was used to measure the energy deposition in the detector and the charge cloud size as a function of interaction depth. The future uses of the device, including in microdosimetry are discussed.

  6. On the geometrical design of integrated Micromegas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Carballo, V. M.; Salm, C.; Smits, S. M.; Schmitz, J.; Chefdeville, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the operational characteristics of several integrated Micromegas detectors. These detectors called InGrids are made by means of micro-electronic fabrication techniques. These techniques allow a large variety of detector geometry to be made and studied. Gain, gain homogeneity and energy resolution were measured for various amplification gap sizes, hole pitches and hole diameters in Argon/Isobutane. Gain measurements as a function of gap thickness are compared to the Rose and Korff formula and a model of the detector gain. Our model uses electric field maps and MAGBOLTZ calculated amplification coefficients.

  7. Application of gas chromatographic method in simultaneous measurements of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, J.; Bielewski, J.; Sliwka, I.

    2012-04-01

    Helium concentration in groundwater is a fine indicator in water dating in a range from a hundred to tens of thousands of years. Gas chromatography (GC) measurements of helium can be used as an alternative to mass spectrometry (MS) determinations of 4He for groundwater dating [1]. Argon and neon concentrations mainly serve for determining the temperature of recharge and the air excess which is needed to correct measured values of helium concentration [2] . A chromatographic measurement system of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwater is presented [3]. Water samples are taken from groundwater with a precise procedure without contamination with air in a special stainless steel vessels of volume equal to 2900 cm3. Helium is extracted from water samples using the head-space method. After enrichment by cryotrap method helium is analyzed in the gas chromatograph equipped with the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) with detection limit of about 2.8 ng He. The helium limit of detection of presented method is 1,2·10-8 cm3STP/gH2O [4]. We are currently working on adapting the method of cryogenic enrichment of helium concentration for simultaneous measurements of the concentration of helium, argon and neon using single sample of groundwater. Neon will be measured with the thermal conductivity detector and capillary column filled with molecular sieve 5A. Argon will be analyzed also with the thermal conductivity detector and packed column filled with molecular sieve 5A. This work was supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the polish National Science Centre. [1] A. Zuber, W. Ciężkowski, K. Różański (red.), Tracer methods in hydrogeological studies - a methodological guide. Wroclaw University of Technology Publishing House, Wroclaw, 2007 (in polish). [2] P. Mochalski, Chromatographic method for the determination of Ar, Ne and N2 in water, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, 2003 (in polish). [3] A. Żurek, P

  8. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  9. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  10. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 868.1075 - Argon gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Argon gas analyzer. 868.1075 Section 868.1075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1075 Argon gas analyzer. (a) Identification....

  13. Extreme-ultraviolet beam-foil spectroscopy of highly ionized neon and argon. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Demarest, J.A.

    1986-08-01

    A study of the extreme-ultraviolet radiation emitted by ion beams of highly ionized neon and argon after passage through thin foils was conducted. A grazing-incidence spectrometer was equipped with a position-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector, which improved the detection efficiency by two orders of magnitude. The position information of the MCP was determined to be linear over 90% of the 50-mm-wide detector. Spectra spanning regions of over 100 A were accumulated at a resolution of less than 1 A. A wavelength calibration based on a second order equation of spectrometer position was found to result in an accuracy of - 0.1 A. Over 40 transitions of Ne VIII, Ne IX, and Ne X were observed in the wavelength region from 350 to 30 A from n=2-3,4,5; n=3-4,5,6,7,8; n=4-6,7; and n=5-9. An intensity calibration of the detection system allowed the determination of the relative populations of n=3 states of Ne VIII and Ne IX. An overpopulation of states with low orbital angular momenta support electron-capture predictions by the first-order Born approximation. The argon beam-foil data confirmed the wavelength predictions of 30 previously unobserved transitions in the wavlength region from 355 to 25 A from n=2-2; n=3-4; n=4-5,6,7; and n=6-8. Lifetime determinations were made by the simultaneous measurement of 26 argon lines in the spectral region from 295-180 A. Many of the n=2-2 transitions agreed well with theory.

  14. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Olivier; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2015-02-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton (pp) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η| < 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5 < |η| < 4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5 K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and timing boards. In the first three years of LHC operation, approximately 27 fb-1 of pp collision data were collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7-8 TeV. Throughout this period, the calorimeter consistently operated with performances very close to specifications, with high data-taking efficiency. This is in large part due to a sophisticated data monitoring procedure designed to quickly identify issues that would degrade the detector performance, to ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. After a description of the detector design, main characteristics and operation principles, this paper details the data quality assessment procedures developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, when more than 98% of the luminosity recorded by ATLAS had high quality LAr calorimeter data suitable for physics analysis.

  15. A Demonstration of Light Guides for Light Detection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are a developing technology that is becoming a popular choice for neutrino and dark matter experiments due to the low cost of the LAr as a target material and the high signal effciency and background rejection that these detectors can achieve. When excited by a passing charged particle created in a neutrino interaction, argon produces scintillation light at 128 nm. Several types of systems exist for detecting this light. Most involve shifting the wavelength of the light using Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB), resulting in visible light which is detected by a PMT.I will discuss our work on a new system under development for light detection in LAr which uses acrylic lightguides. The lightguides are coated with a thin film consisting of TPB embedded in polystyrene. This system could provide a solution to some of the issues associated with scaling existing systems for a larger future LAr detector. Though we are only in the preliminary stages of this R&D, we have shown that the results are already suffcient for triggering.

  16. A system to test the effects of materials on the electron drift lifetime in liquid argon and observations on the effect of water

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Jaskierny, W.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    A materials test system (MTS) has been developed at FNAL to assess the suitability of materials for use in a large liquid argon time projection chamber. During development of the MTS, it was noted that controlling the cryostat pressure with a 'raining' condenser reduced the electron drift lifetime in the liquid argon. The effect of condensing has been investigated using a series of passive materials to filter the condensate. We report the results of these studies and of tests on different candidate materials for detector construction. The inferred reduction of electron drift lifetime by water concentrations in the parts per trillion is of particular interest.

  17. Improved installation prototype for measurement of low argon-37 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Sergei; Dubasov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    On-site Inspection (OSI) is a key element of verification of State Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out. One of the most significant evidence of n underground nuclear explosion (UNE) is detection above background concentrations of argon-37 in near surface air. Argon-37 is formed in large amounts at interaction of neutrons of UNE with the potassium which is a part of the majority of rocks. Its estimated contents for the 100th days after explosion with a energy of 1000 t of TNT near a surface can vary from 1 to 1000 mBq/m3. The background concentrations of argon-37 in subsoil air vary 1 do100 mBq/m3. Traditionally, for argon-37 activity measurement the gas-proportional counters are used. But at Khlopin Radium institute the developments of the new type of highly sensitive and low-background installation capable to provide the required range of measurements of the argon-37 concentration are conducted. The liquid scintillation method of the registration of the low-energetic argon-37 electrons is the basic installation principle and as scintillator, the itself condensed air argon sample is used. Registration of scintillations of liquid argon is made by means of system from 3 PMT which cathodes are cooled near to the temperature of liquid nitrogen together with the measuring chamber in which placed the quartz glass ampule, containing the measured sample of the liquefied argon. For converse the short wavelength photons (λ = 127 nm) of liquid argon scintillations to more long-wave, corresponding to the range of PMT sensitivity, the polymer film with tetra-phenyl-butadiene (TPB) is provided. Even the insignificant impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and others gaseous in the liquid argon samples can to cause the quenching of scintillation, especially their slow components. To account this effect and it influence on change of registration

  18. Effect of Emergency Argon on FCF Operational Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Solbrig

    2011-12-01

    The following report presents analyses of operational incidents which are considered in the safety analysis of the FCF argon cell and the effect that the operability of the emergency argon system has on the course of these incidents. The purpose of this study is to determine if the emergency argon system makes a significant difference in ameliorating the course of these incidents. Six incidents were considered. The following three incidents were analyzed. These are: 1. Cooling failing on 2. Vacuum Pump Failing on 3. Argon Supplies Failing on. In the remaining three incidents, the emergency argon supply would have no effect on the course of these transients since it would not come on during these incidents. The transients are 1. Loss of Cooling 2. Loss of power (Differs from above by startup delay till the Diesel Generators come on.) 3. Cell rupture due to an earthquake or other cause. The analyses of the first three incidents are reported on in the next three sections. This report is issued realizing the control parameters used may not be optimum, and additional modeling must be done to model the inertia of refrigeration system, but the major conclusion concerning the need for the emergency argon system is still valid. The timing of some events may change with a more accurate model but the differences between the transients with and without emergency argon will remain the same. Some of the parameters assumed in the analyses are Makeup argon supply, 18 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -6 iwg., shuts off when pressure is = -3.1 iwg. 170,000 ft3 supply. Min 1/7th always available, can be cross connected to HFEF argon supply dewar. Emergency argon supply, 900 cfm, initiates when pressure is = -8 iwg. shuts off when pressure is =-4 iwg. reservoir 220 ft3, refilled when tank farm pressure reduces to 1050 psi which is about 110 ft3.

  19. Argon Adsorption on Open Carbon Nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brice; Calvillo, Angel; Khanal, Pravin; Migone, Aldo; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    We have measured adsorption isotherms for argon adsorbed on a 0.1692 g sample of chemically-opened carbon nanohorns. Two clear substeps are visible in the adsorption data, corresponding to groups of stronger binding sites (lower pressure substep) and weaker binding sites (higher pressure substep). We have measured adsorption at eight different temperatures in the range between approximately 70 and 110 K. The space at the interior of the individual nanohorns is accessible to sorbates in these chemically opened nanohorns. Consequently, higher loadings are obtained on these samples when compared to those measured on unopened (as-produced) nanohorns. Results for the kinetics of adsorption, the effective specific surface area, and the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of sorbent loading will be presented and compared to results from other gases adsorbed on nanohorns. This work was supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1006428.

  20. Photoassociative spectroscopy of ultracold metastable argon

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M. K.; Ranjit, G.; Sukenik, C. I.; Walhout, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present results of photoassociative spectroscopy performed on ultracold metastable argon atoms in a magneto-optical trap. Ion spectra are obtained with laser detuning up to a few gigahertz below the 4s[3/2]{sub 2}{yields}4p[5/2]{sub 3} trapping transition at 811 nm and with intensities in a range of {approx}(10{sup 2}-10{sup 5})I{sub Sat}. We also compute dipole-dipole potentials for both singly and doubly excited diatomic molecules and use a Leroy-Bernstein analysis to determine the approximate vibrational spacings in the (s+p) and (p+p) manifolds. Based on this theoretical framework, we explain a broad background feature in our data and suggest that double-excitation mechanisms are likely responsible for sharp dips in the ion signal.

  1. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  2. Attosecond Time-Resolved Autoionization of Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang He; Chini, Michael; Chen Shouyuan; Zhang Changhua; Cheng Yan; Wu Yi; Thumm, Uwe; He Feng; Chang Zenghu

    2010-10-01

    Autoionization of argon atoms was studied experimentally by transient absorption spectroscopy with isolated attosecond pulses. The peak position, intensity, linewidth, and shape of the 3s3p{sup 6}np {sup 1}P Fano resonance series (26.6-29.2 eV) were modified by intense few-cycle near infrared laser pulses, while the delay between the attosecond pulse and the laser pulse was changed by a few femtoseconds. Numerical simulations revealed that the experimentally observed splitting of the 3s3p{sup 6}4p {sup 1}P line is caused by the coupling between two short-lived highly excited states in the strong laser field.

  3. Large vessel sealing with the argon laser.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; Lyons, R; White, G; Klein, S R; Pizzurro, D; Abergel, R P; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser-welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas. Twelve animals had bilateral femoral vessels studied, with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks (four animals for each type of repair), and were evaluated histologically by hematoxylin and eosin, elastin, and trichrome stains; biochemically by the formation of [3H]hydroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis; and mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welding may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large-diameter venotomies, arteriotomies, and arteriovenous fistulas, as healing is comparable to that seen with suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:3306233

  4. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  5. Argon laser treatment of radiation proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, J.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation therapy for malignant gynecologic disease and prostatic cancer has resulted in increased survival and cure rates. This modality has unfortunately produced debilitating radiation proctitis. Recently, five patients were seen with continuous rectal bleeding secondary to radiation disease of the rectum. Four of these patients were women who were being treated for cervical carcinoma and one was a man with prostatic cancer. These patients were refractory to steroid retention enemas, iron therapy, and benproperine enema therapy. Treatment was accomplished using the argon laser with a 300-micron fiber passed via flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscope. The most proximal areas were treated first. One and a half watts at 0.5 pulses was used. Up to 50 pulses were delivered per therapy session. The fiber was placed in contact with the lesion and circumferentially for 0.5 cm surrounding each suspected area. Bleeding stopped in the four women after two sessions and in the man after four sessions.

  6. Explosive cavitation in superheated liquid argon.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, V E; Pavlov, P A; Baidakov, V G

    2008-06-21

    The kinetics of explosive boiling-up of liquid argon has been investigated at negative pressures created by the reflection of a compression pulse 3-5 mus long from the free surface of a liquid by the method of liquid pulse heating on a thin platinum wire (with a rate of temperature increase of about 1 Kmus). The limiting superheats T(*) (stretches p(*)), the effective nucleation rate J(*), and the derivative G(T)=(d ln JdT)(T=T(*) ) have been determined by experimental data on the thermal perturbation of a wire probe and the results of solution of the problem on the initial stage of explosive boiling-up of a liquid. The experimental data are compared with homogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:18570511

  7. Active Target detectors for studies with exotic beams: Present and next future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, W.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Bazin, D.; Ahn, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Montes, F.; Shore, A.; Suzuki, D.; Usher, N.; Yurkon, J.; Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A.; Roberts, A. L.; Tang, X. D.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Reaccelerated radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier, which are starting to be available from the ReA3 accelerator at NSCL and in next future at FRIB, will open up new opportunities for the study of nuclear structure near the drip lines. Efficient measurement techniques must be developed to compensate for the limited intensity of the most exotic beams. The Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) constructed at MSU solves this problem by providing the increased luminosity of a thick target while maintaining a good energy resolution by tracking the reaction vertex over an essentially 4 π solid angle. The AT-TPC and similar detectors allow us to take full advantage of the radioactive ion beams at present and future nuclear physics facilities to explore the frontier of rare isotopes.

  8. Underground operation of the ICARUS T600 LAr-TPC: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbia, C.; Antonello, M.; Aprili, P.; Baibussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Barzè, L.; Benetti, P.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Carbonara, F.; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D. B.; Cocco, A. G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dequal, D.; Dermenev, A.; Dolfini, R.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golan, T.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Karbowniczek, P.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Lantz, M.; Mania, S.; Mannocchi, G.; Mauri, F.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Muraro, S.; Otwinowski, S.; Palamara, O.; Palczewski, T. J.; Periale, L.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Prata, M.; Przewlocki, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Sala, P.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Stefan, D.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wachala, T.; Wang, H.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Zmuda, J.

    2011-07-01

    Important open questions are still present in fundamental Physics and Cosmology, like the nature of Dark Matter, the matter-antimatter asymmetry and the validity of the Standard Model of particle interactions. Addressing these questions requires a new generation of massive particle detectors to explore the subatomic and astrophysical worlds. ICARUS T600 is the first large mass (760 tons) example of a new generation of detectors able to combine the imaging capabilities of the old famous ``bubble chamber'' with the excellent energy measurement of huge electronic detectors. ICARUS T600 now operates at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory and is used to study cosmic rays, neutrino oscillations and the proton decay. The potential for doing physics of this novel telescope is presented through a few examples of neutrino interactions reconstructed with unprecedented detail. Detector design and early operation are also reported.

  9. Scintillation Light from Cosmic-Ray Muons in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, Denver Wade; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2015-11-13

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  10. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, D.; Mufson, S.; Howard, B.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a composite model. Both models find τT = 1.52 μs for the decay time constant of the Ar2* triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the ``early'' light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE ≈ 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS ≈ 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value ~0.3 found by dark matter and double β-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  11. BoNuS: Development and Use of a Radial TPC using Cylindrical GEMs

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Fenker; Nathan Baillie; Peter Bradshaw; S. Bultmann; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Michael Christy; Gail Dodge; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Josh Evans; Robert Fersch; Kevin Giovanetti; Keith Griffioen; Mikayel Ispiryan; Chandana Jayalath; Narbe Kalantarians; Cynthia Keppel; Sebastian Kuhn; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Vladas Tvaskis; Jixie Zhang

    2007-11-28

    To provide new access to information about nucleon structure from electron-neutron interactions, a specialized aystem of target and detector was developed at Jefferson Lab. It allows identification and measurement of spectator protons produced in e X scattering events. The detector is a radial time-projection chamber optimized for the acceptance of low-momentum protons. Gas gain is provided by three cascaded curved Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs), the first application of GEMs in any configuration other than flat.

  12. Hydrothermal fluids and argon isotopes in quartz veins and cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    1988-06-01

    Argon isotopes from a number of sources are present in quartz veins and chert; in situ decay of potassium, parentless 40Ar leached or outgassed from surrounding rocks, atmospheric argon dissolved in ancient hydrothermal fluids, and, modern atmospheric argon. The manner in which the 40Ar- 39Ar techniques can be used to unscramble these components, by way of correlations with Cl and K, is described in relation to two parallel studies of vein quartz and the Gunflint chert. Information concerning several processes can be inferred, including: contributions of surface waters to trapped fluids (from the concentration of atmospheric argon in the fluids), degree of water-rock interaction (from the concentration of parentless 40Ar and/or the ratio of parentless to atmospheric argon), effects of dilution of primary hydrothermal brines by meteoric water (which results in a decrease in the ratio of both Cl and parentless 40Ar to atmospheric argon), effects of boiling (from low concentrations of atmospheric argon and an increase in Cl/40Ar ). The K-Ar chronology of deposition can also be inferred in suitable circumstances. In principle, the ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio of the ancient atmosphere can be determined from fluids free of parentless 40Ar. However, a ( 40Ar /36Ar ) ratio determined for a low salinity end member in Gunflint chert probably reflects the presence of modern meteoric water.

  13. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziglo, M. J.; Nelson, A. E.; Heo, G.; Major, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm -2) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation ( p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  14. Gating of the two-pore cation channel AtTPC1 in the plant vacuole is based on a single voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Jaślan, D; Mueller, T D; Becker, D; Schultz, J; Cuin, T A; Marten, I; Dreyer, I; Schönknecht, G; Hedrich, R

    2016-09-01

    The two-pore cation channel TPC1 operates as a dimeric channel in animal and plant endomembranes. Each subunit consists of two homologous Shaker-like halves, with 12 transmembrane domains in total (S1-S6, S7-S12). In plants, TPC1 channels reside in the vacuolar membrane, and upon voltage stimulation, give rise to the well-known slow-activating SV currents. Here, we combined bioinformatics, structure modelling, site-directed mutagenesis, and in planta patch clamp studies to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage-dependent channel gating in TPC1 in its native plant background. Structure-function analysis of the Arabidopsis TPC1 channel in planta confirmed that helix S10 operates as the major voltage-sensing site, with Glu450 and Glu478 identified as possible ion-pair partners for voltage-sensing Arg537. The contribution of helix S4 to voltage sensing was found to be negligible. Several conserved negative residues on the luminal site contribute to calcium binding, stabilizing the closed channel. During evolution of plant TPC1s from two separate Shaker-like domains, the voltage-sensing function in the N-terminal Shaker-unit (S1-S4) vanished. PMID:27270880

  15. SPiRIT-TPC with GET readout electronics for the study of density dependent symmetry energy of high dense matter with Heavy RI collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Tadaaki; SPiRIT Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is a fundamental property of nuclear matter that describes the relationships between the parameters for a nuclear system, such as energy, density and temperature. An international collaboration, named SPiRIT, to study the nuclear EoS has been formed recently. One of the main devices of experimental setup is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which will be installed into the SAMURAI dipole magnet at RIKEN-RIBF. The TPC can measure charged pions, protons and light ions simultaneously in heavy RI collisions, and those will be used as probes to study the asymmetric dense nuclear matter. In addition to the status of the SPiRIT project, testing of SPiRIT-TPC with GET electronics will be presented in this talk. GET, general electronics for TPC, is a project for the development of novel electronics for TPC supported by NSF and ANR. This work is supported in part by the Japan Grant-in-Aide award and the US DOE grant DE-SC0004835 and JUSEIPEN.

  16. Cell-specific compartmentation of mineral nutrients is an essential mechanism for optimal plant productivity— another role for TPC1?

    PubMed Central

    Gilliham, Matthew; Athman, Asmini; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Conn, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuoles of different leaf cell-types vary in their capacity to store specific mineral elements. In Arabidopsis thaliana potassium (K) accumulates preferentially in epidermal and bundle sheath cells whereas calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) are stored at high concentrations only in mesophyll cells. Accumulation of these elements in a particular vacuole can be reciprocal, i.e. as [K]vac increases [Ca]vac decreases. Mesophyll-specific Ca-storage involves CAX1 (a Ca2+/H+ antiporter) and Mg-storage involves MRS2-1/MGT2 and MRS2-5/MGT3 (both Mg2+-transporters), all of which are preferentially expressed in the mesophyll and encode tonoplast-localised proteins. However, what controls leaf-cell [K]vac is less well understood. TPC1 encodes the two-pore Ca2+ channel protein responsible for the tonoplast-localised SV cation conductance, and is highly expressed in cell-types that not preferentially accumulate Ca. Here, we evaluate evidence that TPC1 has a role in maintaining differential K and Ca storage across the leaf, and propose a function for TPC1 in releasing Ca2+ from epidermal and bundle sheath cell vacuoles to maintain low [Ca]vac. Mesophyll-specific Ca storage is essential to maintain apoplastic free Ca concentration at a level that does not perturb a range of physiological parameters including leaf gas exchange, cell wall extensibility and growth. When plants are grown under serpentine conditions (high Mg/Ca ratio), MGT2/MRS2-1 and MGT3/MRS2-5 are required to sequester additional Mg2+ in vacuoles to replace Ca2+ as an osmoticum to maintain growth. An updated model of Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport in leaves is presented as a reference for future interrogation of nutritional flows and elemental storage in plant leaves. PMID:22067997

  17. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  18. Muon Charge Sign Determination in LArIAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubasis, Brandon; LArIAT Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    LArTPC In A Test beam experiment (LArIAT) at the Fermilab aims to calibrate and characterize liquid argon time projection chambers with a beam of charges particles. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) are ideal neutrino detectors which has full 3D-imaging and particle Identification (PID) capability. Processes for which the μ undergoes capture vs. decay in LArIAT TPC for sign-determination (without magnetic field) is one area of studies we are currently interested in. Systematic study of the processes following μ- capture in argon have never been performed and LArTPC sign-determination capability has never been explored. Statistical analysis on topological criteria can be used to determine the sign of a particle's charge (without magnetic field). LArIAT test beam with selectable polarity will provide data for direct measurement of the sign separation efficiency (and purity) for muons.

  19. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  20. Argon laser treatment of urethral stricture and vesical neck contracture.

    PubMed

    Adkins, W C

    1988-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the argon laser wavelength allow a precise incision with excellent hemostasis and negligible heating of adjacent tissues resulting in less scarring. These qualities are used to advantage in the treatment of strictures. The argon laser was used to perform 13 internal urethrotomies and ten vesical neck incisions. The operative method used is similar to optical internal urethrotomy. The argon probe incises hemostatically, reducing the need for extensive fulguration of tissues at the operative site and thereby reducing the tendency for more scar tissue to form and compromise the operation. The same hemostasis reduces the need for postoperative indwelling urethral catheterization. Utility of the argon device in most instances allows treatment to be conducted on an outpatient basis without general anesthesia and without use of postoperative urethral catheters, yielding an effective, cost-saving therapy. PMID:3210887

  1. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  2. The two pore channel TPC2 is dispensable in pancreatic β-cells for normal Ca²⁺ dynamics and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Cane, Matthew C; Parrington, John; Rorsman, Patrik; Galione, Antony; Rutter, Guy A

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) signals are central to the stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells by glucose and other agents, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Whilst Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels on the plasma membrane is a key trigger for glucose-stimulated secretion, mobilisation of Ca(2+) from acidic stores has been implicated in the control of more localised Ca(2+) changes and membrane potential. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), generated in β-cells in response to high glucose, is a potent mobiliser of these stores, and has been proposed to act through two pore channels (TPC1 and TPC2, murine gene names Tpcn1 and Tpcn2). Whilst the role of TPC1 in the control of Ca(2+) mobilisation and insulin secretion was recently confirmed, conflicting data exist for TPC2. Here, we used the selective and efficient deleter strain, Ins1Cre to achieve β-cell selective deletion of the Tpcn2 gene in mice. βTpcn2 KO mice displayed normal intraperitoneal and oral glucose tolerance, and glucose-stimulated Ca(2+) dynamics and insulin secretion from islets were similarly normal. GLP-1-induced Ca(2+) increases involved an increase in oscillation frequency from 4.35 to 4.84 per minute (p=0.04) at 8mM glucose, and this increase was unaffected by the absence of Tpcn2. The current data thus indicate that TPC2 is not absolutely required for normal glucose- or incretin-stimulated insulin secretion from the β-cell. Our findings suggest that TPC1, whose expression tended to increase in Tpcn2 null islets, might be sufficient to support normal Ca(2+) dynamics in response to stimulation by nutrients or incretins. PMID:26769314

  3. The two pore channel TPC2 is dispensable in pancreatic β-cells for normal Ca2+ dynamics and insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cane, Matthew C.; Parrington, John; Rorsman, Patrik; Galione, Antony; Rutter, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are central to the stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells by glucose and other agents, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Whilst Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels on the plasma membrane is a key trigger for glucose-stimulated secretion, mobilisation of Ca2+ from acidic stores has been implicated in the control of more localised Ca2+ changes and membrane potential. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), generated in β-cells in response to high glucose, is a potent mobiliser of these stores, and has been proposed to act through two pore channels (TPC1 and TPC2, murine gene names Tpcn1 and Tpcn2). Whilst the role of TPC1 in the control of Ca2+ mobilisation and insulin secretion was recently confirmed, conflicting data exist for TPC2. Here, we used the selective and efficient deleter strain, Ins1Cre to achieve β-cell selective deletion of the Tpcn2 gene in mice. βTpcn2 KO mice displayed normal intraperitoneal and oral glucose tolerance, and glucose-stimulated Ca2+ dynamics and insulin secretion from islets were similarly normal. GLP-1-induced Ca2+ increases involved an increase in oscillation frequency from 4.35 to 4.84 per minute (p = 0.04) at 8 mM glucose, and this increase was unaffected by the absence of Tpcn2. The current data thus indicate that TPC2 is not absolutely required for normal glucose- or incretin-stimulated insulin secretion from the β-cell. Our findings suggest that TPC1, whose expression tended to increase in Tpcn2 null islets, might be sufficient to support normal Ca2+ dynamics in response to stimulation by nutrients or incretins. PMID:26769314

  4. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  5. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  6. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  7. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti. PMID:22447067

  8. Study of argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen injection

    SciTech Connect

    Mazánková, V.; Krčma, F.; Trunec, D.

    2013-10-28

    In this work, the reaction kinetics in argon flowing afterglow with nitrogen addition was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. The DC flowing post-discharge in pure argon was created in quartz tube at the total gas pressure of 1000 Pa and discharge power of 60 W. The nitrogen was added into the afterglow at the distance of 9 cm behind the active discharge. The optical emission spectra were measured along the flow tube. The argon spectral lines and after nitrogen addition also nitrogen second positive system (SPS) were identified in the spectra. The measurement of spatial dependence of SPS intensity showed a very slow decay of the intensity and the decay rate did not depend on the nitrogen concentration. In order to explain this behavior a kinetic model for reaction in afterglow was developed. This model showed that C {sup 3}Π{sub u} state of molecular nitrogen, which is the upper state of SPS emission, is produced by excitation transfer from argon metastables to nitrogen molecules. However, the argon metastables are also produced at Ar{sub 2}{sup +} ion recombination with electrons and this limits the decay of argon metastable concentration and it results in very slow decay of SPS intensity.

  9. First Argon Gas Puff Experiments With 500 ns Implosion Time On Sphinx Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Maury, P.; Grunenwald, J.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J.-P.; Ritter, S.; Combes, P.; Smaniotto, O.; Lample, R.; Coleman, P. L.; Krishnan, M.

    2009-01-21

    Experiments have been performed at the SPHINX driver to study potential of an Argon Gas Puff load designed by AASC. We present here the gas Puff hardware and results of the last shot series.The Argon Gas Puff load used is injected thanks to a 20 cm diameter nozzle. The nozzle has two annuli and a central jet. The pressure and gas type in each of the nozzle plena can be independently adjusted to tailor the initial gaz density distribution. This latter is selected as to obtain an increasing radial density from outer shell towards the pinch axis in order to mitigate the RT instabilities and to increase radiating mass on axis. A flashboard unit produces a high intensity UV source to pre-ionize the Argon gas. Typical dimensions of the load are 200 mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Pressures are adjusted to obtain an implosion time around 550 ns with a peak current of 3.5 MA.With the goal of improving k-shell yield a mass scan of the central jet was performed and implosion time, mainly given by outer and middle plena settings, was kept constant. Tests were also done to reduce the implosion time for two configurations of the central jet. Strong zippering of the radiation production was observed mainly due to the divergence of the central jet over the 40 mm of the load height. Due to that feature k-shell radiation is mainly obtained near cathode. Therefore tests were done to mitigate this effect first by adjusting local pressure of middle and central jet and second by shortening the pinch length.At the end of this series, best shot gave 5 kJ of Ar k-shell yield. PCD detectors showed that k-shell x-ray power was 670 GW with a FWHM of less than 10 ns.

  10. First Argon Gas Puff Experiments With 500 ns Implosion Time On Sphinx Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Maury, P.; Grunenwald, J.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J.-P.; Ritter, S.; Combes, P.; Smaniotto, O.; Lample, R.; Coleman, P. L.; Krishnan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been performed at the SPHINX driver to study potential of an Argon Gas Puff load designed by AASC. We present here the gas Puff hardware and results of the last shot series. The Argon Gas Puff load used is injected thanks to a 20 cm diameter nozzle. The nozzle has two annuli and a central jet. The pressure and gas type in each of the nozzle plena can be independently adjusted to tailor the initial gaz density distribution. This latter is selected as to obtain an increasing radial density from outer shell towards the pinch axis in order to mitigate the RT instabilities and to increase radiating mass on axis. A flashboard unit produces a high intensity UV source to pre-ionize the Argon gas. Typical dimensions of the load are 200 mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Pressures are adjusted to obtain an implosion time around 550 ns with a peak current of 3.5 MA. With the goal of improving k-shell yield a mass scan of the central jet was performed and implosion time, mainly given by outer and middle plena settings, was kept constant. Tests were also done to reduce the implosion time for two configurations of the central jet. Strong zippering of the radiation production was observed mainly due to the divergence of the central jet over the 40 mm of the load height. Due to that feature k-shell radiation is mainly obtained near cathode. Therefore tests were done to mitigate this effect first by adjusting local pressure of middle and central jet and second by shortening the pinch length. At the end of this series, best shot gave 5 kJ of Ar k-shell yield. PCD detectors showed that k-shell x-ray power was 670 GW with a FWHM of less than 10 ns.

  11. A Proposal to Upgrade the Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard; Michael, LeVine; Jonathan, Bouchet; Stephane, Bouvier; Artemios, Geromitsos; Gerard, Guilloux; Sonia, Kabana; Christophe, Renard; Howard, Matis; Jim, Thomas; Vi Nham, Tram

    2007-11-05

    The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) was built by a collaboration of Nantes, Strasbourg and Warsaw collaborators. It is a beautiful detector; it can provide 500 mu m scale pointing resolution at the vertex when working in combination with the TPC. It was first used in Run 4, when half the SSD was installed in an engineering run. The full detector was installed for Run 5 (the Cu-Cu run) and the operation and performance of the detector was very successful. However, in preparation for Run 6, two noisy ladders (out of 20) were replaced and this required that the SSD be removed from the STAR detector. The re-installation of the SSD was not fully successful and so for the next two Runs, 6 and 7, the SSD suffered a cooling system failure that allowed a large fraction of the ladders to overheat and become noisy, or fail. (The cause of the SSD cooling failure was rather trivial but the SSD could not be removed betweens Runs 6 and 7 due to the inability of the STAR detector to roll along its tracks at that time.)

  12. Electron densities and energies of a guided argon streamer in argon and air environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, S.; Hofmann, S.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the temporally and spatially resolved electron densities and mean energies of a guided argon streamer in ambient argon and air obtained by Thomson laser scattering. The plasma is driven by a positive monopolar 3.5 kV pulse, with a pulse width of 500 ns and a frequency of 5 kHz which is synchronized with the high repetition rate laser system. This configuration enables us to use the spatial and temporal stability of the guided streamer to accumulate a multitude of laser/plasma shots by a triple grating spectrometer equipped with an ICCD camera and to determine the electron parameters. We found a strong initial ne-overshoot with a maximum of 7 × 1019 m-3 and a mean electron energy of 4.5 eV. This maximum is followed by a fast decay toward the streamer channel. Moreover, a 2D distribution of the electron density is obtained which exhibits a peculiar mushroom-like shape of the streamer head with a diameter significantly larger than that of the emission profile. A correlation of the width of the streamer head with the expected pre-ionization channel is found.

  13. Concerning Apparent Similarity of Structures of Fluoropolymer Surfaces Exposed to an Argon Plasma or Argon Ion Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Covington, M. Alan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) C(sub 1s) spectra of fluoropolymers exposed to either an argon plasma or argon ion beam show remarkable similarity, implying that the surface-modification reactions for these two processes likely proceed through comparable mechanisms, revolving predominantly ion-surface interactions. The importance of working with a monochromatized x-ray source for XPS analysis of the surface-modified fluoropolymers is once again emphasized.

  14. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AbouZeid, Hass; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particle flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 88 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 9 fb-1 (as of June, 2012) of data have been collected at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating almost optimally, with performances very close to the specifications.

  15. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  16. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for

  17. Measurement of the response of the ATLAS liquid argon barrel calorimeter to electrons at the 2004 combined test-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Aharrouche, M.; Ma, H.; Adam-Bourdarios, C.; Aleksa, M.; Banfi, D.; Benchekroun, D.; Benslama, K.; Boonekamp, M.; Carli, T.; Carminati, L.; Chen, H.; Citterio, M.; Dannheim, D.; Delmastro, M.; Derue, F.; Di Girolamo, B.; El Kacimi, M.; Fanti, M.; Froeschl, R.; Fournier, D.; Grahn, K.-J.; Kado, M.; Kerschen, N.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lampl, W.; Laplace, S.; Lechowski, M.; Lelas, D.; Liang, Z.; Loureiro, K.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mazzanti, M.; McPherson, R.; Meng, Z.; Paganis, S.; Prieur, D.; Puzo, P.; Ridel, M.; Riu, I.; Rousseau, D.; Sauvage, G.; Schwemling, P.; Simon, S.; Spano, F.; Straessner, A.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, F.; Thioye, M.; Unal, G.; Wilkens, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I. and Zhang, H.

    2010-03-11

    During summer and fall 2004, the response of a full slice of the ATLAS barrel detector to different particles was studied in controlled beam. One module of the ATLAS liquid argon barrel calorimeter - identical to the production modules and read out by the final front-end and back-end electronics - was used for electromagnetic calorimetry. This paper presents and discusses the electron performance of the LAr barrel calorimeter, including linearity, uniformity, and resolution with different amounts of material upstream the calorimeter and energies ranging from 1 to 250 GeV.

  18. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  19. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; Farooq, S.; Fleming, B.; Greenlee, H.; Hatcher, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; Klein, E.; Lang, K.; Laurens, P.; Mehdiyev, R.; Page, B.; Palamara, O.; Partyka, K.; Rameika, G.; Rebel, B.; Santos, E.; Schukraft, A.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Szelc, A.  M.; Weber, M.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) × 10⁻³⁸cm² / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) × 10⁻³⁹ cm² / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  20. Electron recombination in low-energy nuclear recoils tracks in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks of recoiled atoms in liquid argon (LAr) detectors. The analysis is based on the results of computer simulations which use realistic models of electron transport and reactions. The calculations reproduce the recent experimental results of the ionization yield from 6.7 keV nuclear recoils in LAr. The statistical distribution of the number of electrons that escape recombination is found to deviate from the binomial distribution, and estimates of recombination fluctuations for nuclear recoils tracks are obtained. A study of the recombination kinetics shows that a significant part of electrons undergo very fast static recombination, an effect that may be responsible for the weak drift-field dependence of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in some noble liquids. The obtained results can be useful in the search for hypothetical dark matter particles and in other studies that involve detection of recoiled nuclei.

  1. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; et al

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) × 10⁻³⁸cm² / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) × 10⁻³⁹ cm² / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  2. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, R; Adams, C; Asaadi, J; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fleming, B; Greenlee, H; Hatcher, R; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Klein, E; Lang, K; Laurens, P; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Partyka, K; Rameika, G; Rebel, B; Santos, E; Schukraft, A; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G P

    2014-12-31

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6(-1.0)(+1.2)(stat)(-0.4)(+0.3)(syst)×10(-38)  cm(2)/Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5(-2.1)(+2.6)(stat)(-0.7)(+0.6)(syst)×10(-39)  cm(2)/Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV. PMID:25615307

  3. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.

    2015-01-20

    In this study, we report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) x 10-38 cm2/Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) x 10-39 cm2/Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  4. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  5. Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, J. B. R.; Brack, J.; Daw, E.; Dorofeev, A.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Fox, J. R.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Gold, M.; Harmon, L. J.; Harton, J. L.; Landers, J. M.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Miller, E. H.; Monte, A.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N.; Pipe, M.; Robinson, M.; Sadler, S. W.; Scarff, A.; Snowden-Ifft, D. P.; Spooner, N. J. C.; Telfer, S.; Walker, D.; Warner, D.; Yuriev, L.

    2014-11-01

    Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~ 100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 m3 DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a factor of ~ 10 reduction in internal radon rates. Levels are found to be consistent with the sum from separate radon emanation measurements of the internal materials and also with direct measurement using an attached alpha spectrometer. The current DRIFT detector, DRIFT-IId, is found to have sensitivity to 222Rn of 2.5 μBql-1 with current analysis efficiency, potentially opening up DRIFT technology as a new tool for sensitive radon assay of materials.

  6. Characteristics of Knock in Hydrogen-Oxygen-Argon SI Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N; Rapp, V; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-02-23

    A promising approach for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is to employ a working fluid with a high specific heat ratio such as the noble gas argon. Moreover, all harmful emissions are eliminated when the intake charge is composed of oxygen, nonreactive argon, and hydrogen fuel. Previous research demonstrated indicated thermal efficiencies greater than 45% at 5.5 compression ratio in engines operating with hydrogen, oxygen, and argon. However, knock limits spark advance and increasing the efficiency further. Conditions under which knock occurs in such engines differs from typical gasoline fueled engines. In-cylinder temperatures using hydrogen-oxygen-argon are higher due to the high specific heat ratio and pressures are lower because of the low compression ratio. Better understanding of knock under these conditions can lead to operating strategies that inhibit knock and allow operation closer to the knock limit. In this work we compare knock with a hydrogen, oxygen, and argon mixture to that of air-gasoline mixtures in a variable compression ratio cooperative fuels research (CFR) engine. The focus is on stability of knocking phenomena, as well as, amplitude and frequency of the resulting pressure waves.

  7. Development of a multi-channel readout ASIC for a fast neutron spectrometer based on GEM-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yi-Nong; Li, Yu-Lan

    2014-10-01

    A multi-channel front-end ASIC has been developed for a fast neutron spectrometer based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)-Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Charge Amplifier and Shaping Amplifier for GEM (CASAGEM) integrates 16+1 channels: 16 channels for anodes and 1 channel for cathode. The gain and the shaping time are adjustable from 2 to 40 mV/fC and from 20 to 80 ns, respectively. The prototype ASIC is fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. An evaluation Print Circuit Board (PCB) was also developed for chip tests. In total 20 chips have been tested. The integrated nonlinearity is less than 1%. The equivalent noise electrons is less than 2000e when the input capacitor is 50 pF. The time jitter is less than 1 ns. The design and the test results are presented in the paper.

  8. A simulation of the optical attenuation of TPB coated light-guide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.

    2013-10-01

    This note is provided as a supplementary section to accompany the paper [1] which has been included in these proceedings. It describes some simple simulations which were performed in order to understand the attenuation behaviors of acrylic light-guides operated in air and argon, which were characterized in [2]. Whilst these simulations are only at the level of sophistication of a toy model, they illustrate interesting non-exponential light attenuation effects and the differences between operating light-guide based detectors in argon and air environments. We investigate the effects of surface absorption, surface roughness and wavelength dependence, and use a model tuned on the light-guide attenuation curve measured in air to make a prediction of the light-guide attenuation curve in argon. This curve is compared with data from a liquid argon test stand, and an improvement over a simple exponential model is observed.

  9. Improved background rejection in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments using a magnetic field in a high pressure xenon TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, J.; Cervera, A.; Hernando, J. A.; Imzaylov, A.; Monrabal, F.; Muñoz, J.; Nygren, D.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the application of an external magnetic field could lead to an improved background rejection in neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay experiments using a high-pressure xenon (HPXe) TPC. HPXe chambers are capable of imaging electron tracks, a feature that enhances the separation between signal events (the two electrons emitted in the 0νββ decay of 136Xe) and background events, arising chiefly from single electrons of kinetic energy compatible with the end-point of the 0νββ decay (0Qββ). Applying an external magnetic field of sufficiently high intensity (in the range of 0.5-1 Tesla for operating pressures in the range of 5-15 atmospheres) causes the electrons to produce helical tracks. Assuming the tracks can be properly reconstructed, the sign of the curvature can be determined at several points along these tracks, and such information can be used to separate signal (0νββ) events containing two electrons producing a track with two different directions of curvature from background (single-electron) events producing a track that should spiral in a single direction. Due to electron multiple scattering, this strategy is not perfectly efficient on an event-by-event basis, but a statistical estimator can be constructed which can be used to reject background events by one order of magnitude at a moderate cost (about 30%) in signal efficiency. Combining this estimator with the excellent energy resolution and topological signature identification characteristic of the HPXe TPC, it is possible to reach a background rate of less than one count per ton-year of exposure. Such a low background rate is an essential feature of the next generation of 0νββ experiments, aiming to fully explore the inverse hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  10. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  11. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  12. Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-(E)-1-CHLORO-1,2-DIFLUOROETHYLENE Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.; Tandon, Hannah K.; Messinger, Joseph P.; Mlaver, Eli

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies of argon complexes with fluoroethylenes have revealed a preference for a geometry that maximizes the contact of the argon atom with heavy atoms on the fluoroethylene. We have observed a continuation of this trend when one of the fluorine atoms is replaced by chlorine. The argon-(E)-1-chloro-1,2-difluoroethylene complex provides two competing heavy atom cavities, FCCF and FCCl, and the opportunity to examine whether the number of heavy atoms or the associated increase in polarizability is determinative of structure. The 5.6 -- 18.1 GHz chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrum of this species provides initial assignments and predictions for spectra obtained in a more sensitive and higher precision Balle-Flygare instrument. Transitions for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed and analyzed to provide geometric parameters for this non-planar complex. The spectrum is consistent with the argon atom located in the FCCl cavity, and the structure agrees well with ab initio predictions. Comparisons are made with Ar-1-chloro-1-fluoroethylene, (Z)-1-chloro-2-fluoroethylene, and Ar-vinyl chloride. Z. Kisiel, P.W. Fowler, and A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys. 95, 2283 (1991).

  13. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  14. Recent operational performance of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Apsimon, R.J.; Flower, P.S.; Freeston, K.A.; Hallewell, G.D.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Paterson, C.N.; Sharp, P.H.; Uden, C.N.; Davenport, M.

    1985-10-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the Time Projection chambers (TPCs) of the Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH). Details are given of the TPC high voltage system and its monitoring and control. In addition, the operation and monitoring of the readout is described together with results of tests on the performance of the front end amplifiers. The operation of the RICH TPCs and electronics during the first data run of WA69, in 1984, is discussed together with relevant results from laboratory tests. Results from the preliminary analysis of a sample of data from the 1984 run are also presented.

  15. Superconductivity of compressed solid argon from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takahiro; Asano, Masamichi; Suzuki, Naoshi; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    We present first-principles calculations on the superconductivity of solid argon under high pressure. Solid argon is found to take the double hexagonal close-packed structure in pressure range from 420 to 690 GPa, where an insulator-to-metal transition occurs at around 590 GPa. The crystal structure transforms into the hexagonal close-packed structure at 690 GPa and into the face-centered cubic structure at 2300 GPa. The superconducting critical temperature is gradually increased with the successive phase transitions and reaches the maximum value of 12 K at 2600 GPa due to the enhancement of the Fermi surface nesting.

  16. Study of fluid mechanical helium argon ion laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An approach to an argon ion laser based on gasdynamic techniques is presented. Improvement in efficiency and power output are achieved by eliminating high heat rejection problems and plasma confinement of the seal-off conventional lasers. The process of producing population inversion between the same energy levels, as in the conventional argon ion laser, has been divided into two phases by separating each other from the processes of ionization and subsequent excitation. Line drawings and graphs are included to amplify the theoretical presentation.

  17. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  18. Common Blepharitis Related to Phthiriasis Palpebrarum: Argon Laser Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Sundu, Cem; Dinç, Erdem; Kurtuluş, Umut Can; Yıldırım, Özlem

    2015-09-01

    A 42-year-old woman was admitted to Mersin University, Department of Ophthalmology Clinic with itching and burning sensation of the right eye for 3 weeks. In her slit-lamp examination, nits and lice, attached to the upper and lower eyelashes of her right eye, were observed. Lice and nits were destroyed by argon laser phototherapy and were removed with the help of a fine forceps thereafter. Argon laser phototherapy is a quick, effective, and safe treatment modality for phthiriasis palpebrarum. PMID:26470938

  19. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  20. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  1. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  2. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  3. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  4. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  5. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  6. Analyzing the Structure of 14O with TwinSol and AT-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Louis; Ahns Research Group Team, Prof.; Twinsol Group Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Nuclei are known to exhibit clustering, a phenomenon in which the structure of the nucleus forms clusters resembling alpha particles. Understanding the origins of alpha clusterization is an important aspect of nuclear structure and the formation of light elements in astrophysical environments. One of the places in which these cluster structures have been found is in the 14C nucleus. Due to isospin symmetry, the symmetry between a proton and neutron with respect to the nuclear force, we expect cluster structures to exist in 14C's mirror nucleus, 14O. In order to look for cluster states in 14O, we will use resonant scattering of a 10C beam with a 4He target. The first step wasto study the viability of producing a radioactive 10C beam using a 10B + 3He reaction. The 10C beam will separated from other reaction products using a pair of superconducting solenoid magnets called TwinSol. The production yields of 10C have been measured using a beta-decay detector and silicon gamma detector. By fitting the beta and gamma decay data, we have been able to analyze the reactions yields of the 10B + 3He reaction and determined this to be a viable reaction to create a 10C beam. Now we will implant our 10C beam onto a 4He active-target in a time projection chamber. The time projection chamber will allow us to measure the paths and times of the reactions in the 4He gas chamber. Using this data, we will study the properties and structures of the 14O nucleus.

  7. Aging tests of ethylene contaminated argon/ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Bauer, G.

    1994-09-22

    We report on aging tests of argon/ethane gas with a minor (1800 ppM) component of ethylene. The measurements were first conducted with the addition of alcohol to test the suppression of aging by this additive, with exposure up to {approx}1.5 C/cm. Tests have included: a proportional tube with ethanol, another with isopropyl alcohol, and for comparison a tube has also been run with ethanol and argon/ethane from CDF`s old (ethylene-free) ethane supply. The aging test with ethanol showed no difference between the ethylene-free and the ethylene tube. Furthermore, raw aging rates of argon/ethane and argon/ethane/ethylene were measured by exposing tubes without the addition of alcohol to about 0.1 C/cm. Again, no significant difference was observed. In conclusion, we see no evidence that ethylene contamination up to 1800 ppM has any adverse effect on wire aging. However, this level of ethylene does seem to significantly suppress the gas gain.

  8. Supersonic Argon Flow In An Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Izrar, B.; Dudeck, M.; Andre, P.; Elchinger, M. F.; Aubreton, J.

    2006-01-15

    The plasma properties inside a D.C. arc-jet operating with argon is analysed by means of a continuum description taking into account non equilibrium ionization processes and dissipative effects. The relaxation of the different physical processes inside the nozzle and the evolution of the Mach number are aanalysed.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  10. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models. PMID:24559345

  11. Experimental and numerical study of high intensity argon cluster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korobeishchikov, N. G.; Kalyada, V. V.; Shmakov, A. A.; Zarvin, A. E.; Skovorodko, P. A.

    2014-12-09

    Experimental and numerical investigations of expansion of argon with homogeneous condensation in supersonic conical nozzle and in free jet behind it were carried out. Optimal parameters (stagnation pressure, nozzle-skimmer distance) for the formation of cluster beam with maximum intensity were determined. Two available models for nonequilibrium nucleation were tested. The numerical results are in satisfactory agreement with the measured data.

  12. Irradiation simulation of zirconium using high energy argon implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, D. Q.; Bai, X. D.; Pan, F.

    2007-03-01

    In order to simulate the irradiation damage, the argon ion was implanted in the zirconium with fluence ranging from 1×10 16 to 1×10 17 ions/cm 2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV at liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the effect of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of zirconium was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) was employed to examine the phase transformation due to the argon ion implantation. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted zirconium in a 1 M H 2SO 4 solution. From XPS, there existed adsorbed carbon and a little of oxygen (depth less than 20 nm) in the surface of samples, zirconium changed from zirconia to metallic zirconium along the depth direction. From GAXRD, the argon-implanted samples are little oxidized. It was found that the corrosion resistance of implanted samples declined with increasing the fluence, which is attributed to the removing of oxide protection layer and the irradiation damage.

  13. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.; Shen, Z. J.

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  14. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the <0.5% level at the collector mirror location using the cusp magnetic field alone. Plasma also is rejected using a low argon density (<1x1014cm-3). We have measured the tin ion flow pattern toward the large area annular beam dump. Scaling of the cusp design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  15. Calibration of Electric Field Induced Energy Level Shifts in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    1999-10-01

    Argon is a commonly used gas in a number of discharges. As such it is an ideal candidate for spectroscopic based electric field measurements within the sheath and bulk discharge regions. Recently, measurements demonstrated the use of the Stark induced shifts of high lying energy levels in Argon to make spatially and temporally resolved electric field measurements [1]. However, that method relied on the cross calibration of known and calculable shifts in helium discharges to calibrate, in-situ, the energy level shifts in Argon. This poster shows the use of an atomic beam system to calibrate the electric field induced shift of high lying energy levels directly. In addition, data on very high lying argon levels, up to the 20 F manifold, were obtained. Comparison of our electric field induced energy level shift calibration curves with previous work will be shown. The possibility of using this system to calibrate energy level shifts in other gases of technological interest to the microelectronics and lighting industry will be discussed. [1]. J. B. Kim, K. Kawamura, Y. W. Choi, M. D. Bowden, K. Muraoka and V. Helbig, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 26(5), 1556 (1998). This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories and supported by the United States Department of Energy (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  16. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  17. Using dimethylether as a drift gas in a high precision drift tube detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, B.; Marin, A.; Coan, T.; Beatty, J.; Ahlen, S.

    1990-01-01

    Excellent spatial resolution (34 microns) has been obtained using dimethylether, (CH3)2O at 1 atm in a small drift tube detector. This is better by at least a factor of 2 compared to previous work (about 80 microns) with a conventional gas (a 50-50 argon-ethane mixture) in the same detector. The Lorentz angle and the gas amplification have been measured over a wide range of electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Overview of the data acquisition electronics system design for the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    The SLD Detector will contain five major electronics subsystems: Vertex, Drift, Liquid Argon Calorimeter, Cerenkov Ring Imaging, and Warm Iron Calorimeter. To implement the approximately 170,000 channels of electronics, extensive miniaturization and heavy use of multiplexing techniques are required. Design criteria for each subsystem, overall system architecture, and the R and D program are described.

  19. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N₂ density [N₂]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H₂O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H₂O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H₂O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  20. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  1. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  2. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  3. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our primary interest is the detection and measurement of muons and the design of the muon detector and trigger for the SDC. We have been concentrating on the design of the forward muon system (in the approximate pseudo-rapidity region of 1.5 <{vert bar} {eta} {vert bar}<2.5 corresponding to azimuthal angles of 9.4{degrees} to 26. 0{degrees}) and at present are responsible for the engineering design of the detector support system in this rapidity region. We are also participating in the development of a liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter adapted to the bunch structure of the SSC machine. At present a LAr calorimeter still remains an option for the choice of calorimetry for the SDC. Recent measurements at BNL in a 20 GeV pion beam confirm that many of the problems associated with long signal collection times of LAr can be solved.

  4. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  5. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  6. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  7. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) peel.

    PubMed

    Dranca, Florina; Oroian, Mircea

    2016-07-01

    The present study describes the extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant peel using ultrasonic treatments and methanol and 2-propanol as extraction solvents. The extraction yields were optimized by varying the solvent concentration, ultrasonic frequency, temperature and time of ultrasonic treatment. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results showed that for TPC extraction the optimal condition were obtained with a methanol concentration of 76.6%, 33.88 kHz ultrasonic frequency, a temperature of 69.4 °C and 57.5 min extraction time. For TMA the optimal condition were the following: 54.4% methanol concentration, 37 kHz, 55.1 °C and process time of 44.85 min. PMID:26701808

  8. Proceedings: EPRI/NRC/TPC workshop on seismic soil-structure interaction analysis techniques using data from Lotung, Taiwan: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    A two-and-a-half-day workshop on evaluation of seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis techniques was held in Palo Alto on December 9--11, 1987. The workshop was co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Taiwan Power Company (TPC) as part of the joint research program on SSI method evaluation. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of the blind prediction analyses and results comparisons against the forced vibration test measurements and recorded earthquake response data from the EPRI/TPC large-scale seismic experiment in Lotung, Taiwan, Republic of China. These proceedings contain the text of the presentation materials as well as the summaries of panel session discussions.

  9. EPRI/NRC/TPC workshop on seismic soil-structure interaction analysis techniques using data from Lotung, Taiwan: Proceedings: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    A two-and-a-half-day workshop on evaluation of seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis techniques was held in Palo Alto on December 9--11, 1987. The workshop was co-sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Taiwan Power Company (TPC) as part of the joint research program on SSI method evaluation. The primary objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of the blind prediction analyses and results comparisons against the forced vibration test measurements and recorded earthquake response data from the EPRI/TPC large-scale seismic experiment in Lotung, Taiwan, Republic of China. These proceedings contain the test of the presentation materials as well as the summaries of panel session discussions.

  10. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  11. Laboratory measurements of the x-ray emission following dielectronic recombination onto highly charged argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bulbul, Esra; Hell, Natalie; Foster, Adam; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Porter, Frederick Scott; Smith, Randall K.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap to measure the X-ray emission following resonant dielectronic recombination (DR) onto helium-like and lithium-like argon as a function of electron energy. These measurements were completed by sweeping the energy of EBIT-I's near mono-energetic electron beam from below threshold for DR resonance to above threshold for direct excitation of K-shell transitions in helium-like argon. The X-ray emission was recorded as a function of electron beam energy using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer, whose energy resolution is ~ 5 eV, and also a relatively low resolution, solid-state X-ray detector. These results will be useful when analyzing and interpreting high resolution spectra from celestial sources measured with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory (formerly known as Astro-H), as well as data measured using instruments on the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories. Specifically, these data will help determine if the feature detected at ~ 3.56 keV (Bulbul et al. 2014, Boyarsky et al. 2014) in clusters is the result of the decay of a sterile neutrino, a long sought after dark matter particle candidate. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and Chandra Grant AR5-16012A.

  12. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampl, W.

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadron calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadron calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at centre of mass energies of 7-8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter has been operating almost optimally, with performance very close to specifications. The talk will cover all aspects of these first years of operation, including the calibration efforts and the data quality assessment procedure. The excellent performance achieved will also be briefly reviewed, especially in the context of the recently announced discovery of the Higgs boson.

  13. A ROS-Assisted Calcium Wave Dependent on the AtRBOHD NADPH Oxidase and TPC1 Cation Channel Propagates the Systemic Response to Salt Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew J.; Choi, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Plants exhibit rapid, systemic signaling systems that allow them to coordinate physiological and developmental responses throughout the plant body, even to highly localized and quickly changing environmental stresses. The propagation of these signals is thought to include processes ranging from electrical and hydraulic networks to waves of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytoplasmic Ca2+ traveling throughout the plant. For the Ca2+ wave system, the involvement of the vacuolar ion channel TWO PORE CHANNEL1 (TPC1) has been reported. However, the precise role of this channel and the mechanism of cell-to-cell propagation of the wave have remained largely undefined. Here, we use the fire-diffuse-fire model to analyze the behavior of a Ca2+ wave originating from Ca2+ release involving the TPC1 channel in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We conclude that a Ca2+ diffusion-dominated calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism is insufficient to explain the observed wave transmission speeds. The addition of a ROS-triggered element, however, is able to quantitatively reproduce the observed transmission characteristics. The treatment of roots with the ROS scavenger ascorbate and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium and analysis of Ca2+ wave propagation in the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (AtrbohD) knockout background all led to reductions in Ca2+ wave transmission speeds consistent with this model. Furthermore, imaging of extracellular ROS production revealed a systemic spread of ROS release that is dependent on both AtRBOHD and TPC1. These results suggest that, in the root, plant systemic signaling is supported by a ROS-assisted calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism intimately involving ROS production by AtRBOHD and Ca2+ release dependent on the vacuolar channel TPC1. PMID:27261066

  14. A ROS-Assisted Calcium Wave Dependent on the AtRBOHD NADPH Oxidase and TPC1 Cation Channel Propagates the Systemic Response to Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew J; Choi, Won-Gyu; Gilroy, Simon; Morris, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Plants exhibit rapid, systemic signaling systems that allow them to coordinate physiological and developmental responses throughout the plant body, even to highly localized and quickly changing environmental stresses. The propagation of these signals is thought to include processes ranging from electrical and hydraulic networks to waves of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) traveling throughout the plant. For the Ca(2+) wave system, the involvement of the vacuolar ion channel TWO PORE CHANNEL1 (TPC1) has been reported. However, the precise role of this channel and the mechanism of cell-to-cell propagation of the wave have remained largely undefined. Here, we use the fire-diffuse-fire model to analyze the behavior of a Ca(2+) wave originating from Ca(2+) release involving the TPC1 channel in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We conclude that a Ca(2+) diffusion-dominated calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism is insufficient to explain the observed wave transmission speeds. The addition of a ROS-triggered element, however, is able to quantitatively reproduce the observed transmission characteristics. The treatment of roots with the ROS scavenger ascorbate and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium and analysis of Ca(2+) wave propagation in the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (AtrbohD) knockout background all led to reductions in Ca(2+) wave transmission speeds consistent with this model. Furthermore, imaging of extracellular ROS production revealed a systemic spread of ROS release that is dependent on both AtRBOHD and TPC1 These results suggest that, in the root, plant systemic signaling is supported by a ROS-assisted calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism intimately involving ROS production by AtRBOHD and Ca(2+) release dependent on the vacuolar channel TPC1. PMID:27261066

  15. Proportional electroluminescence in two-phase argon and its relevance to rare-event experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Nosov, V.; Shekhtman, L.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2015-10-01

    Proportional electroluminescence (EL) in gaseous Ar has for the first time been systematically studied in the two-phase mode, at 87 K and 1.00 atm. Liquid argon had a minor (56 ppm) admixture of nitrogen, which allowed to understand, inter alia, the effect of N2 doping on the EL mechanism in rare-event experiments using two-phase Ar detectors. The measurements were performed in a two-phase cryogenic avalanche detector (CRAD) with EL gap located directly above the liquid-gas interface. The EL gap was optically read out in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), near 128 nm (Ar excimer emission), and in the near ultraviolet (UV), at 300-450 nm (N2 second positive system emission), via cryogenic photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a Geiger-mode APD (GAPD). Proportional electroluminescence was measured to have an amplification parameter of 109 ± 10 photons per drifting electron per kV overall in the VUV and UV, of which 51 ± 6% were emitted in the UV. The measured EL threshold, at an electric field of 3.7 ± 0.2 kV/cm, was in accordance with that predicted by the theory. The latter result is particularly relevant to DarkSide and SCENE dark matter search-related experiments, where the operation electric field was thereby on the verge of appearance of the S2 (ionization-induced) signal. The results obtained pave the way to the development of N2-doped two-phase Ar detectors with enhanced sensitivity to the S2 signal.

  16. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Chan, C.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Phillips, G.C.; Roberts, J.B.

    1988-07-18

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of approx.2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of approx.25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  17. First proof of topological signature in the high pressure xenon gas TPC with electroluminescence amplification for the NEXT experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ferrario, P.

    2016-01-19

    The NEXT experiment aims to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of xenon in a high-pressure 136Xe gas TPC using electroluminescence (EL) to amplify the signal from ionization. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qββ. This paper presents the first demonstration that the topology provides extra handles to reject background events using data obtained with the NEXT-DEMO prototype. Single electrons resulting from the interactions of 22Na 1275 keV gammas and electron-positron pairs produced by conversions of gammas from the 228Th decay chain were used tomore » represent the background and the signal in a double beta decay. Furthermore, these data were used to develop algorithms for the reconstruction of tracks and the identification of the energy deposited at the end-points, providing an extra background rejection factor of 24.3 ± 1.4 (stat.)%, while maintaining an efficiency of 66.7 ± 1% for signal events.« less

  18. Operation of a THGEM-based detector in low-pressure Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, M.; Yurkon, J.; Stolz, A.

    2015-02-01

    In view of a possible application as a charge-particle track readout for an Active Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC), the operating properties of THick Gaseous Electron Multipliers (THGEM) in pure low-pressure Helium were investigated. This paper includes the effective gain dependence on pressure for different detector configurations (single-, double-, triple-cascade setup), long-term gain stability and energy resolution from tracks of 5.5 MeV alpha particles. Stable operational conditions and maximum detector gains of 104-107 have been achieved in pure Helium at pressure ranging from 100 torr up to 760 torr. Energy resolution of 6.65% (FWHM) for 690 keV of energy deposited by 5.5 MeV alpha particles at 350 torr was measured. The expected energy resolution for the full track is around 2.4% (FWHM). These results, together with the robustness of THGEM electrodes against spark damage, make THGEM structures highly competitive compared to other technologies considered for TPC applications in an active target operating with pure noble gases, requiring a high dynamic range and a wide operating pressure range down to few hundred torr.

  19. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  20. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  1. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  2. XUV radiation from gaseous nitrogen and argon target laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, P.; Vrbová, M.; Brůža, P.; Pánek, D.; Krejčí, F.; Kroupa, M.; Jakůbek, J.

    2012-06-01

    Laser plasma created in gaseous target is studied as a source of radiation in the "water window" wavelength range. Plasma is created by focusing an 800 mJ/7 ns Nd:YAG laser pulse into the gas-puff target. Using nitrogen gas results in emission of an intense quasi-monochromatic radiation with the wavelength 2.88 nm, corresponding to the quantum transition 1s2p → 1s2 of helium -like nitrogen ion. The emission spectrum with argon target covers all the water window range. Laboratory and computer experiments have been performed for both target gases. The spatial distributions of emitted energy in the water window spectral range were compared. The total emitted energy with argon was one order higher than with nitrogen.

  3. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  4. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yichen; Tsang, Thomas; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2016-04-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev-Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  5. [Experience with argon laser in urological diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rothauge, C F; Nöske, H D; Kraushaar, J

    1981-09-01

    The application of the Argon laser in urology has proved to be effective in resecting recurrent, exophytic urothelial tumors of the bladder up to the size of a raspberry. In cases of wide spread bladder tumors we only perform a radiation of the resected area as local recurrence prophylaxis following transurethral resection. The urethroscopic Argon laser irradiation makes laser urethrotomy and evaporisation of urethral strictures possible. Furthermore, a curative and conservative treatment of urethral tumors is possible in combination with chemotherapy. The same applies for the penis carcinoma. Urethral ruptures are also successfully treated by urethroscopic laser recanalization. A determination of the ureteral submucosal course, which may allow a prognosis about the probable maturation, is possible in cases of cystoureteral reflux with the help of laser diaphanoscopy. PMID:7197839

  6. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. I. Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Kenji; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were carried out to investigate the dynamics of evaporation and condensation for argon at the temperature of 80 and 100 K. From the decrease of the survival probability of vapor molecules, the ratio of self reflection to collision is estimated to be 12%-15%, only weakly dependent on the temperature. This suggests that argon vapor molecules are in the condition of almost complete capture, and the condensation is considered to be a barrierless process. The total ratio of reflection which is evaluated with the flux correlation of condensation and evaporation is 20% at both temperature. The difference between these two ratios of reflection is ascribed to a phenomenon that vapor molecules colliding with the surface drive out other liquid molecules. This molecule exchange at the surface is as important as the self-reflection, and the conventional picture of condensation as a unimolecular chemical reaction is not appropriate.

  7. Argon-assisted growth of epitaxial graphene on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Tyagi, Parul; Mowll, Tyler R.; Ventrice, Carl A., Jr.; Hannon, James B.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of graphene by catalytic decomposition of ethylene on Cu(111) in an ultrahigh vacuum system was investigated with low-energy electron diffraction, low-energy electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Attempts to form a graphene overlayer using ethylene at pressures as high as 10 mTorr and substrate temperatures as high as 900 ∘C resulted in almost no graphene growth. By using an argon overpressure, the growth of epitaxial graphene on Cu(111) was achieved. The suppression of graphene growth without the use of an argon overpressure is attributed to Cu sublimation at elevated temperatures. During the initial stages of growth, a random distribution of rounded graphene islands is observed. The predominant rotational orientation of the islands is within ±1∘ of the Cu(111) substrate lattice.

  8. Near infrared photodissociation spectra of the aniline +-argon ionic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, T.; Douin, S.; Boudin, N.; Bréchignac, Ph.

    2006-02-01

    The near infrared spectra of the ionic complexes aniline(NH 2) +-argon and aniline(ND 2) +-argon have been measured by laser photodissociation spectroscopy. The bands observed from 10 500 to 13 500 cm -1 have been assigned to the D1(A˜2A2)←D0(X˜2B1) electronic transition within the solvated chromophore. They are characterized by a long vibrational progression involving the 6a mode. On the basis of CASSCF calculations, a large change of geometry along this coordinate is found while the amino group remains in the ring plane. Therefore, a change of the conjugation of the ring rather than a charge transfer is inferred. This is thought to be the origin of the extent of the progression.

  9. Experimental investigations of argon and xenon ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The multipole thruster was used to investigate the use of argon and xenon propellants as possible alternatives to the electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole approach was used because of its general high performance level. The design employed, using flat and cylindrical rolled sections of sheet metal, was selected for ease of fabrication, design, assembly, and modification. All testing was conducted in a vacuum facility and the pumping was accomplished by a 0.8 m diffusion pump together with liquid nitrogen cooled liner. Minimum discharge losses were in the 200-250 ev. ion range for both argon and xenon. Flatness parameters were typically in the 0.70-0.75 range.

  10. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  11. Intramolecular interaction and dynamics of the cationic argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Ragnetti, F.; Zuhrt, C.; Zuelicke, L.

    1996-12-31

    For the simplest cationic argon cluster, Ar{sub 3}{sup +}, the topographical characteristics of the ground-state potential energy surface (PES), the mode coupling and the claswsical intramolecular dynamics are studied; PES data have been obtained by the diatomics-in-molecules approach of Kuntz et al. The results show that Ar{sub 3}{sup +} s a rather floppy system with rapid vibrational energy redistribution and early onset of classical chaos.

  12. Interference and PCI in argon Auger (e, 2e) spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, D. K.; Williams, J. F.

    1997-06-01

    Angle-dependent interference is observed in electron-impact ionization (e, 2e) coincidence experiments on the argon 0953-4075/30/12/013/img1 and 0953-4075/30/12/013/img2 Auger transitions. Recapture of the slow ejected electron from the Auger process leads to interference with the satellite-state ionization processes. The post-collision interaction (PCI) and interference effects are quantified for a large range of excess energies.

  13. Gastric explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Freiman, John Saul; Hampe, Toni

    2014-12-01

    We describe the occurrence of an iatrogenic explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation in a 70-year-old man undergoing gastroscopy. Combustible gases in the stomach may have been released by bacterial overgrowth as a result of partial gastric outlet obstruction (caused by a gastric tumor) and reduced acidity (from proton pump inhibitor therapy). We propose a stepwise process during upper endoscopy to prevent this devastating complication, comprising aspiration, preinsufflation with CO2, and then coagulation. PMID:25041867

  14. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  15. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  16. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop towards the Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuto; Nishikawa, Koichiro

    2011-07-01

    "Neutrino physics is largely an art of learning a great deal by observing nothing" (Haim Harari, 1988) was our general understanding of the field for the ~25 years previous. A new neutrino era was abruptly brought from outer space by a burst of SN1987A neutrinos. The detection of neutrinos from SN1987A gave a new impetus to neutrino research. As we know, new discoveries of neutrinos have since been made. Neutrinos were no longer mysterious, but attained particle citizenship. Giant liquid argon charge imaging experiments have the prospect of opening the door to the second new era in neutrino physics. The coming era would provoke not evolution, but revolution in particle physics. However, paving the way for the new era requires not evolutionary, but revolutionary detector developments. I hope this workshop will be conducive to reaping a rich harvest from its activities. In 1993, Professor Carlo Rubbia presented "The Renaissance of Experimental Neutrino Physics" in which he discussed various possibilities of shooting neutrino beams from CERN towards Gran Sasso, Super-Kamiokande at Kamioka and DUMAND in Hawaii. Now KEK hopes to shoot neutrino beams from J-PARC to Kamioka, Okinoshima, Korea and Gran Sasso. Signature Atsuto SuzukiDirector General, KEK J-PARC has moved into a new phase of operation. The commissioning of the accelerator complex and experiment facilities has begun, and it is urgent to attain initial design performance as soon as possible. For the immediate future, KEK has a 5 year plan. The plan includes the upgrade of the J-PARC accelerator to a multi-Mega-Watt facility, and detector R&Ds to form the basis for a next step in the neutrino experiment. One of the main issues of the future neutrino experiment will be the search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, which demands much more precision than studying neutrino oscillation or non-zero theta13. This naturally requires a very massive detector with higher precision than presently available

  17. Sensor and Instrumentation Development for Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Nicholas; Febbraro, Micheal; Pain, Steven; Aidala, Christine; Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron

    2015-10-01

    In the study of nuclear science, there is an ever increasing need for better efficiency and resolution in In nuclear sciences, new detectors with improved detection efficiency and energy resolution are constantly needed to drive experimental discovery and accuracy. Certain cryogenic liquids, particularly liquid noble gases such as Argon and Xenon, are very sensitive to energy deposited by ionizing particles and have many other useful properties for detector development. Developing these cryogenic liquids to operate with known detection methods offers exciting opportunities for experimental setups and has a wide variety of uses with regards to nuclear studies, such as gamma ray, neutron, and neutrino detection. However, operating at such low temperatures presents many complications when trying to effectively control and maintain detectors. In this poster, I will present some of the equipment and systems developed for particular low temperature applications. This will include the use of platinum resistance thermometers, capacitance-based liquid level sensors, and various systems used to regulate fluid flow for cryogenic detector systems.

  18. TACTIC: A new detector for Nuclear Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. P.; Amaudruz, P. A.; Bruskiewich, P.; Buchmann, L.; Chipps, K. A.; Hager, U.; Laird, A. M.; Martin, L.; Ruprecht, G.; Shotter, A. C.; Walden, P.

    2011-09-01

    Directly measuring nuclear astrophysics reactions presents unique challenges. Low energy reaction products and small reaction cross sections are just two of the issues that the TACTIC detector addresses. TACTIC is the "TRIUMF Annular Chamber for Tracking and Identification of Charged-particles" detector being developed by TRIUMF and the University of York, UK. TACTIC is a cylindrical, active-target TPC providing high detection efficiency; a "shielding" cathode traps the ionization created by the beam and allows for higher intensities than typical TPCs. The 480 anode signals are collected through custom preamplifiers, digital electronics and acquisition systems. Acquisition and analysis software is also undergoing extensive development. Amplification of the small signals is accomplished using a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). The fill gas, He-CO2, provides both particle detection and a homogeneous, variable-thickness target for studying reactions on αs, such as 8Li(α,n)11B. A preliminary study of this flagship reaction was carried out in June 2009 and the results are providing feedback into the development of the final detector and infrastructure.

  19. Determining the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation in NoVA with a second off-axis detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Pascoli, Silvia; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP

    2005-10-01

    We consider a Super-NOVA-like experimental configuration based on the use of two detectors in a long-baseline experiment as NOVA. We take the far detector as in the present NOVA proposal and add a second detector at a shorter baseline. The location of the second off-axis detector is chosen such that the ratio L/E is the same for both detectors, being L the baseline and E the neutrino energy. We consider liquid argon and water- Cerenkov techniques for the second off-axis detector and study, for different experimental setups, the detector mass required for the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, for different values of {theta}{sub 13}. We also study the capabilities of such an experimental setup for determining CP-violation in the neutrino sector. Our results show that by adding a second off-axis detector a remarkable enhancement on the capabilities of the current NOVA experiment could be achieved.

  20. Neuroprotection by Argon Ventilation after Perinatal Asphyxia: A Safety Study in Newborn Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Alderliesten, Thomas; Favie, Laurent M. A.; Neijzen, Robert W.; Auwärter, Volker; Nijboer, Cora H. A.; Marges, Roland E. J.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; Kempf, Jürgen; van Bel, Frank; Groenendaal, Floris

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia is ineffective in 45% of neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Xenon has additive neuroprotective properties, but is expensive, and its application complicated. Argon gas is cheaper, easier to apply, and also has neuroprotective properties in experimental settings. The aim was to explore the safety of argon ventilation in newborn piglets. Methods Eight newborn piglets (weight 1.4–3.0 kg) were used. Heart rate, blood pressure, regional cerebral saturation, and electrocortical brain activity were measured continuously. All experiments had a 30 min. baseline period, followed by three 60 min. periods of argon ventilation alternated with 30 min argon washout periods. Two animals were ventilated with increasing concentrations of argon (1h 30%, 1 h 50%, and 1 h 80%), two were subjected to 60 min. hypoxia (FiO2 0.08) before commencing 50% argon ventilation, and two animals received hypothermia following hypoxia as well as 50% argon ventilation. Two animals served as home cage controls and were terminated immediately. Results Argon ventilation did not result in a significant change of heart rate (mean ± s.d. −3.5±3.6 bpm), blood pressure (−0.60±1.11 mmHg), cerebral oxygen saturation (0.3±0.9%), electrocortical brain activity (−0.4±0.7 µV), or blood gas values. Argon ventilation resulted in elevated argon concentrations compared to the home cage controls (34.5, 25.4, and 22.4 vs. 7.3 µl/ml). Conclusion Ventilation with up to 80% argon during normoxia, and 50% argon after hypoxia did not affect heart rate, blood pressure, cerebral saturation and electrocortical brain activity. Clinical safety studies of argon ventilation in humans seem justified. PMID:25460166

  1. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  2. Ice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An ice detector is provided for the determination of the thickness of ice on the outer surface on an object (e.g., aircraft) independently of temperature or the composition of the ice. First capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and temperature gauge are embedded in embedding material located within a hollowed out portion of the outer surface. This embedding material is flush with the outer surface to prevent undesirable drag. The first capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and the temperature gauge are respectively connected to first capacitive measuring circuit, second capacitive measuring circuit, and temperature measuring circuit. The geometry of the first and second capacitive gauges is such that the ratio of the voltage outputs of the first and second capacitance measuring circuits is proportional to the thickness of ice, regardless of ice temperature or composition. This ratio is determined by offset and dividing circuit.

  3. GOSSIP: A vertex detector combining a thin gas layer as signal generator with a CMOS readout pixel array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Llopart, X.; Colas, P.; Giganon, A.; Giomataris, Y.; Chefdeville, M.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; van der Graaf, H.; Kluit, P.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.; Schmitz, J.

    2006-05-01

    A small TPC has been read out by means of a Medipix2 chip as direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50 μm above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He/isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90%. With this new readout technology for gas-filled detectors we recorded many image frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as δ-rays. With a gas layer thickness of only 1 mm, the device could be applied as vertex detector, outperforming all Si-based detectors.

  4. Survey of the response of standard limited streamer tubes over the complete range of three-component gas mixtures of isobutane, CO/sub 2/, argon

    SciTech Connect

    Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Burrows, P.; Cartwright, S.L.; Gonzalez, S.; Lath, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M.

    1989-07-01

    We present the results of a systematic study of three-component gas mixtures containing argon, isobutane, and carbon dioxide. The study used production-type chambers from the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter (WIC), instrumented with standard pleastic streamert tubes, and triggered by cosmic-ray muons. Pulse height spectra are presented as a function of high voltage, over a wide range of mixtures of these three gases. Various features and similarities observed throughout this three-dimensional mixture space are important clues to understanding the underlying physics of discharge mechanisms in wire detectors. 15 refs., 17 figs.

  5. A combined TEM and X-ray microanalytical study of argon in aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, R. J.; Goodhew, P. J.

    1988-07-01

    A series of aluminium samples have been implanted at room temperature with a low dose of argon ions. The development of argon bubbles from the initially sub-microscopic argon clusters has been studied by annealing the samples to a series of temperatures up to 0.97 Tm. The argon content of selected volumes of each sample has been determined by X-ray analysis in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). This result has then been compared with that calculated from measurements of bubble sizes taken from TEM micrographs of the visible bubble population in the same volume of the sample. The results indicate that sub-microscopic argon clusters may survive after annealing to temperatures as high as 500°C. Evidence is also found for the trapping of argon at the air formed surface oxide-metal interfaces.

  6. Measuring the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section on Water using the Near Detector of T2K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi

    2012-10-01

    The Near Detector of the T2K Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment comprises of several sub-detectors working together to study neutrino interactions. The neutrinos are provided by a powerful off-axis, accelerator generated neutrino beam located at the J-PARC facility in Tokai, Japan. The first sub-detector in the path of travelling neutrinos, the Pi-Zero Detector (P0D), is made of layers of scintillating plastic, lead, brass and bags of water. The next sub-detector, the Tracker, consists of alternating Time Projection Chambers (TPC) and Fine Grained scintillator Detectors (FGD). We outline the procedure for extracting a muon neutrino charged current cross section on water-only by selecting muons originating in the P0D and travelling through the Tracker. We compare data collected while the P0D water bags are filled with water against data from P0D water bags filled with air. A detailed detector simulation utilizing NEUT and GENIE neutrino interaction generators is used in conjunction with a Bayesian Unfolding scheme to correct for detector effects in the data. The end result is a model-independent double differential neutrino cross section as a function of muon momentum and direction.

  7. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  8. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively coupled Argon RF discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Meister, D.C.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the energies and angular distributions of positive ions in an inductively coupled argon plasma in a GEC reference cell. Use of two separate ion detectors allowed measurement of ion energies and fluxes as a function of position as well as ion angular distributions on the discharge centerline. The inductive drive on our system produced high plasma densities (up to 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} electron densities) and relatively stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single feature well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy was independent of rf power and varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 29 eV to 12 eV as pressure increased form 2.4 m Torr to 50 mTorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 5 degrees to 12.5 degrees, or equivalently, transverse temperatures varied form 0.2 to 0.5 eV with the distributions broadening as either pressure or RF power were increased.

  9. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  10. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  11. Composition of the atmosphere at the surface of Mars - Detection of argon-36 and preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the Martian atmosphere was determined by the mass spectrometer in the molecular analysis experiment. The presence of argon and nitrogen was confirmed and a value of 1 to 2750 plus or minus 500 for the ratio of argon-36 to argon-40 was established. A preliminary interpretation of these results suggests that Mars had a slightly more massive atmosphere in the past, but that much less total outgassing has occurred on Mars than on earth.

  12. Spectroscopic modeling of an argon-doped shock-ignition implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-10-15

    We present results from the spectral postprocessing of a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation of an argon-doped, warm-shell shock-ignition implosion with a detailed atomic and radiation physics model. The argon tracer is added to the deuterium filling in the core for diagnostic purposes. Spectral features in the emergent intensity distribution in the photon energy range of the argon K-shell spectrum that have potential for diagnostic application are discussed.

  13. The effects of argon in the bioenergetics of the hamster and the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen consumption was examined in hamsters and rats exposed to normoxic mixtures of argon at 1 atm. In fasted and nonfasted animals, no marked change in O2 utilization was detectable at 22 C. However, at 7 C a significant decrease in oxygen consumption was observed where the animals were exposed in argon. The data are interpreted in terms of the greater thermal conductivity of nitrogen. The study was prompted by conflicting reports on the metabolic effects of argon and helium.

  14. Infrared spectrum of the complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide in argon and nitrogen matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Baas, F.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The complex of formaldehyde with carbon dioxide has been studied by infrared spectroscopy in argon and nitrogen matrices. The shifts relative to the free species show that the complex is weak and similar in argon and nitrogen. The results give evidence for T-shaped complexes, which are isolated in several configurations. Some evidence is also presented which indicates that, in addition to the two well-known sites in argon, carbon dioxide can be trapped in a third site.

  15. Argon Laser Photoablation for Treating Benign Pigmented Conjunctival Nevi

    PubMed Central

    Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Al-Gehedan, Saeed M.; Alasbali, Tariq; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Lotfy, Nancy M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of argon laser photoablation of benign conjunctival pigmented nevi with different clinical presentations. Patients and Methods: This interventional case series was conducted between July 2014 and January 2015. Patients presenting with benign conjunctival nevi were included. Data were collected on the clinical features at presentation, argon laser photoablation, and follow-up at 8 and 24 weeks. Postoperative photography allowed recording of the success of each case and the overall success rate. Complete removal of conjunctival pigments was considered an absolute success. Partial pigmentation requiring repeat laser treatment was considered a qualified success. Results: There were 14 eyes (four right eyes and ten left eyes) with benign pigmented conjunctival nevi. There were three males and eight females in the study sample. The median age was 36 (25% percentile: 26 years). Three patients had bilateral lesions. The nevi were located temporally in nine eyes, nasally in three eyes, and on the inferior bulbar conjunctiva in two eyes. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of nevi were 5 ± 2 mm and 4 ± 2.7 mm, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 5 months. Following laser treatment, no eyes had subconjunctival hemorrhage, infection, scarring, neovascularization, recurrence, or corneal damage. The absolute success rate of laser ablation was 79%. Three eyes with elevated nevi had one to three sessions of laser ablation resulting in a qualified success rate of 100%. Conclusions: Argon laser ablation was a safe and effective treatment for the treatment of selective benign pigmented conjunctival nevi in Arab patients. PMID:27555708

  16. Foam injection moulding of a TPO/TPC-blend and the effect of different nucleating agents on the resulting foam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The manufacturing of car interior parts with a soft touch surface is possible in a one-step injection moulding process, in which an injection moulded carrier is overmoulded with a compatible foamed thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). In contrast to the complex conventional process the structural foaming of the TPE component allows a saving of one material component as it combines a compact skin and a foamed core. Furthermore the manufacturing process can be achieved on a two component injection moulding machine which offers a much higher economic efficiency. One approach to reach an adhesion between a reinforced PP carrier and the foamed TPE component including good surface resistance is the use of an olefinic-/polyester-based TPE blend (TPO/TPC-blend). This paper is going to show the possibility to process a TPO/TPC-blend system by foam injection moulding with MuCell® and how the resulting foam structure can be influenced by various nucleating agents. For this purpose particles which differ in type, form and size were added in various concentrations to the TPE-blend. Before the structure elucidation of the foamed samples the particle dispersion and their effects on the polymers rheological properties were investigated. Finally abrasion tests were performed to investigate the influence of the particles on the performance characteristics of the foamed blend system. The results showed that the foam structure as well as the surface quality of the foamed TPO/TPC-blend can be improved with the use of suitable nucleating agents. Furthermore the abrasion properties can be advanced with appropriate additives in the right dosage.

  17. Use of the argon aiming beam in visual function testing.

    PubMed

    Kelley, J S

    1978-12-01

    The aiming beam of the argon laser photocoagulator can be a useful tool in visual function testing. Applied with the slit lamp delivery system and fundus contact lens, it clearly documents the size of the blind spot surrounding the optic nerve head and the normal area of nonfunctional retina in the periphery. The size of pathologic field defects can be recorded on fundus photographs or retinal drawings by an observer. Safety precautions must be taken to protect all patients from excessive laser energy. PMID:736394

  18. A Mini-helicon Thruster in Argon and Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.

    2015-11-01

    Our small helicon discharge, 5 cm in diam and 5 cm long, using a commercial Nd permanent magnet, has been used previously to eject an argon ion beam suitable for spacecraft propulsion. The specific impulse can be increased by biasing the conducting top plate of the discharge. Thrusters normally use xenon for propulsion because of its high mass and low ionization potential. We have now tested the mini-helicon thruster in xenon. The entire device is small enough to be brought to a poster session and shown there.

  19. Flash pyrolysis of coal by an argon ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.S.; Egsgaard, H.

    1994-12-31

    A novel approach to laser induced pyrolysis of coal by using the visible blue-green emission from an argon ion laser is presented. The gaseous pyrolysis products are identified by on-line gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Five different subbituminous to bituminous coals have been studied and results for the low-molecular weight hydrocarbons up to C{sub 3} are discussed. Mechanisms for the formation of the unsaturated hydrocarbons, ethylene and acetylene, during laser pyrolysis of coal have been disclosed utilizing deuterium as a buffer gas in the pyrolysis cell.

  20. Low energy argon ion irradiation surface effects on triglycine sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragó, Carmen; Plaza, José L.; Marqués, Manuel I.; Gonzalo, Julio A.

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study of the effects of low energy (1-2 keV) argon ion (Ar+) irradiation on Triglycine Sulfate (TGS) has been performed. Ferroelectric parameters, such as the Curie temperature TC determined from the dielectric constant peaks ɛ(T), or the remnant polarization Pr, and coercive field Ec, obtained from the hysteresis loops, show interesting differences between samples irradiated in ferroelectric and paraelectric phases, respectively. The radiation damage seems to be superficial, as observed by AFM microscope, and the surface alteration in both phases becomes eventually notorious when the radiation dosage increases.

  1. Argon flash candle. Quarterly report, April--June 1964

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Several additional argon flash candles have been fired during the quarter. Several shots both straight-in and at 45{degrees} with and without the prism were fired. Some interesting data were obtained from pseudo-spectrograph shots performed by interposing filters in the light path of the camera and using both glass and Plexiglas simultaneously on the candle front. From these shots, we were able to better illustrate some of the differences in glass and Plexiglas with regard to diffusion and light scattering, as well as spectral transmission characteristics.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Argon at High Pressures and High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Goncharov, A. F.; Dalton, D. A.; Ojwang, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Konopkova, Z.; Lazor, P.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate data on the thermal conductivity of argon at high pressures and high temperatures is essential to unraveling the nature of the Earth’s interior. Argon is a common pressure-transmitting medium in diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments, which is commonly used for studying the properties of minerals at pressures and temperatures native to the mantel and core. We used a transient heating technique (Beck et al., 2007) in a symmetric DAC up to 50 GPa and 2500 K. A thin iridium foil (1 μm thick) positioned in a recessed gasket hole filled with argon served as a heat absorber (coupler) to pump thermal energy into the sample. We used 6 μs width pulses from electronically modulated Yb-based fiber laser. We determined the temperature of the coupler with 500 ns time resolution by applying the Planck function to its thermal emission spectrum, and doing this over time yields temperature verses time for the coupler. Using finite element (FE) calculation methods we simulated the heat flux transfer in the DAC cavity using the experimentally determined geometric and laser heating parameters. The thermochemical parameters of Ir and Ar were determined by scaling the ambient pressure data using the available equations of state. The temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Ar was determined by fitting the results of FE calculations to the experimentally determined time dependent coupler temperature. We used the results of the theoretical calculations (Tretiakov & Scandolo, 2004) as the initial input. The results for the pressure and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of Ar will be reported at the meeting. This work is supported by NSF EAR 0711358, NSF-REU, Carnegie Institution of Washington, and DOE-NNSA (CDAC). Beck, P; Goncharov, A.F., Struzhkin, V.V., Militzer, B, Mao, H.K, Hemley, R.J. (2007). Measurement of thermal diffusivity at high pressure using a transient heating technique, Appl Phys. Lett. 91, 181914-(1-3). Tretiakov, K. V. & S. Scandolo (2004

  3. High intensity, argon ion laser-jet photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. Marshall; Schnapp, Karlyn A.; Hannemann, Klaus; Ho, Douglas M.; Memarian, Hamid R.; Azadnia, Ardeshir; Pinhas, Allan R.; Figley, Timothy M.

    A new technique for the study of high intensity solution photochemistry has been developed. With this laser-jet technique, a high velocity microjet is irradiated with the focussed output of an argon ion laser. Under these extremely high intensity conditions, photochemically generated transient species with suitable absorption properties are excited further and produce relatively large amounts of photoproducts which are not observed under low intensity conditions. The application of this laser-jet technique in the study of the photochemistry of radicals, biradicals, photoenols and the higher excited states of carbonyl and polycyclic aromatic compounds is described.

  4. Dissociation rate of bromine diatomics in an argon heat bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razner, R.; Hopkins, D.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of a collection of 300 K bromine diatomics embedded in a heat bath of argon atoms at 1800 K was studied by computer, and a dissociation-rate constant for the reaction Br2 + BR + Ar yields Br + Ar was determined. Previously published probability distributions for energy and angular momentum transfers in classical three-dimensional Br2-Ar collisions were used in conjunction with a newly developed Monte Carlo scheme for this purpose. Results are compared with experimental shock-tube data and the predictions of several other theoretical models. A departure from equilibrium is obtained which is significantly greater than that predicted by any of these other theories.

  5. Argon Analyses of Lherzolic Shergottites Y984028 and Y000097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic Martian meteorites Yamato (Y) 984028 and Y000027/47/97 have similar textures, mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic composition and are possibly paired. We analyzed the argon isotopic composition of Y984028 whole rock (WR) and pyroxene mineral separates (Px) in order to evaluate their trapped Ar components and compare with Y000097 Ar data. WR and Px yield an apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra of roughly 2 Ga, much older than the crystallization age determined by other isotopic techniques. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr ages for Y984028 are approximately 170 Ma. This discrepancy is likely the byproduct of several coexisting Ar components, such as radiogenic 40Ar*, cosmogenic Ar, and trapped Ar from the multiple minerals, as well as multiple source origins. Similarly, the reported Ar-39-Ar-40 age of Y000097 is approximately 260 Ma with a Rb-Sr age of 147+/- 28 Ma and a Sm-Nd age of 152 +/- 13 Ma [4]. Apparently Ar-Ar ages of both Y984028 and Y000097 show trapped Ar components. Stepwise temperature extractions of Ar from Y984028 Px show several Arcomponents released at different temperatures. For example, intermediate temperature data (800-1100 C) are nominally consistent with the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr radiometric ages (approximately 170 Ma) with an approximately Martian atmosphere trapped Ar composition with a Ar-40-Ar-36 ratio of approximately 1800. Based on K/Ca distribution, we know that Ar-39 at both lower and intermediate temperatures is primarily derived from plagioclase and olivine. Argon released during higher temperature extractions (1200-1500 C), however, differs significantly. The thermal profile of argon released from Martian meteorites is complicated by multiple sources, such as Martian atmosphere, Martian mantle, inherited Ar, terrestrial atmosphere, cosmogenic Ar. Obviously, Ar release at higher temperatures from Px should contain little terrestrial atmospheric component. Likewise, Xe-129/Xe-132 from high temperature extractions (1200-1800 C) gives a value above that

  6. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  7. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    PubMed

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  8. Transport Properties of Equilibrium Argon Plasma in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Laricchiuta, A.; Chikhaoui, A.; Kustova, E. V.; Giordano, D.

    2005-05-16

    Electron electrical conductivity coefficients of equilibrium Argon plasma in a magnetic field are calculated up to the 12th Chapman-Enskog approximation at pressure of 1 atm and 0.1 atm for temperatures 500K-20000K; the magnetic Hall parameter spans from 0.01 to 100. The collision integrals used in the calculations are discussed. The convergence properties of the different approximations are assessed. The degree of anisotropy introduced by the presence of the magnetic field is evaluated. Differences with the isotropic case can be very substantial. The biggest effects are visible at high ionization degrees, i.e. high temperatures, and at strong magnetic fields.

  9. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, E.; Pencheva, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  10. Ionization coefficients for argon in a micro-discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschel, Thomas; Stefanović, Ilija; Malović, Gordana; Marić, Dragana; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2013-08-01

    Ionization coefficients are measured for electrons in a dc micro-discharge in argon from optical emission profiles. The micro-discharge is operated in the Townsend regime between two parallel-plate electrodes. Axial profiles of emission are obtained with sufficient resolution to provide spatial ionization coefficients. The measured coefficients agree very well with the data obtained from other sources, indicating the operation of the discharge in the Townsend regime and also that Townsend mechanisms do not need extension to describe such discharges.

  11. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  12. HARP: high-pressure argon readout for calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco-Luque, M.; Fabjan, C.W.; Frandsen, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Steel tubes of approximately 8 mm O.D., filled with Argon gas to approx. 200 bar, are considered as the active element for a charge collecting sampling calorimeter readout system. The tubes are permanently sealed and operated in the ion chamber mode, with the charge collection on a one-millimeter concentric anode. We present the motivation for such a device, including Monte Carlo predictions of performance. The method of construction and signal collection are discussed, with initial results on leakage and ageing of the filling gas. A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter is described.

  13. Sterilization of bacterial endospores by an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Lim, Jin P.; Li, Shou Z.

    2007-06-25

    Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. However, the spore-killing efficiency of the atmospheric-pressure argon-oxygen jet depends very sensitively on the oxygen concentration in the argon gas.

  14. The readout of a GEM or Micromegas-equipped TPC by means of the Medipix2 CMOS sensor as direct anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, P.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Llopart, X.; Schmitz, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    We have applied the Medipix2 pixel CMOS chip as direct anode readout for a TPC. For the gas amplification two options have been investigated: (i) a three-stage GEM system and (ii) a Micromegas mesh. The structure of the cloud of primary electrons, left after interactions of 55Fe quanta with the gas is visible with unprecedented precision. This proof-of-principle is an essential step in our project to realize a monolithic pixel sensor with integrated Micromegas, to be developed specially for the readout of TPCs, and applicable for drift chambers in general.

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizenec, P.

    2014-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid Argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, around 27 fb-1 of data have been collected at a unprecedented center of mass energies between 7 TeV and 8 TeV. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating with performances very close to the specification ones. After 2019, the instantaneous luminosity will reach 2-3 × 1034 cm-2s-1, well above the luminosity for which the calorimeter was designed. In order to preserve its triggering capabilities, the detector will be upgraded with a new fully digital trigger system with a refined granularity. In 2023, the instantaneous luminosity will ultimately reach 5-7 × 1034 cm-2s-1, requiring a complete replacement of the readout electronics. Moreover, with an increased particle flux, several phenomena (liquid argon boiling, space charge effects...) will affect the performance of the forward calorimeter (FCal). A replacement with a new FCal with smaller LAr gaps or a new calorimeter module are considered. The performance of these new

  16. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers.

  17. Liquid argon scintillation read-out with silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canci, N.; Cattadori, C.; D'Incecco, M.; Lehnert, B.; Machado, A. A.; Riboldi, S.; Sablone, D.; Segreto, E.; Vignoli, C.

    2013-10-01

    Silicon photosensors represent a viable alternative to standard photomultipliers in fields such as communications and medical imaging. We explored the interesting possibility of using these sensors in combination with liquid argon (LAr) for astroparticle physics applications such as neutrino, dark matter and double beta decay experiments. In fact, silicon photosensors have detection efficiencies comparable with those of the highest performance PMTs and can be manufactured with high level of radiopurity. In particular within the on-going R&D activity of the SILENT project (Low background and low noise techniques for double beta decay physics funded by ASPERA) a large area SiPM (Silicon PhotoMultiplier - Hamamatsu S11828-3344M - 1.7 cm2 area) has been installed in a LAr scintillation chamber of 0.5 liters volume together with a cryogenic photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu R11065) used as a reference. The liquid argon chamber has been exposed to many gamma sources of different energies and single photoelectron response and light yield for the SiPM and PMT have been measured and compared. In this contribution the results of the tests, and the ongoing R&D to optimize the SiPM for cryogenic and for ultralow background applications, are reported, as well as the possible application in the GERDA experiment on Double Beta Decay Searches of 76Ge.

  18. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-19

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power {theta} necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v{sub en}, and gas temperature T{sub g}. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency {omega}/2{pi} = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T{sub g} are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L {approx_equal} 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  19. Investigation of a Mercury-Argon Hot Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamsley, Robert Charles

    Classical absorption and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments are used to investigate processes in the cathode region of a Hg-Ar hot cathode discharge. The absorption and LIF measurements are used to test the qualitative understanding and develop a quantitative model of a hot cathode discharge. The main contribution of this thesis is a model of the negative glow region that demonstrates the importance of Penning ionization to the ionization balance in the negative glow. We modeled the excited argon balance equation using a Monte Carlo simulation. In this simulation we used the trapped radiative decay rate of the resonance levels and the Penning ionization rate as the dominant loss terms in the balance equation. The simulated data is compared to and found to agree with absolute excited argon densities measured in a classical absorption experiment. We found the primary production rate per unit volume of excited Ar atoms in the simulation is sharply peaked near the cathode hot spot. We used the ion production rate from this simulation and a Green's function solution to the ambipolar diffusion equation to calculate the contribution of Penning ionization to the total ion density. We compared the results of this calculation to our experimental values of the Hg ^+ densities in the negative glow. We found that Penning ionization is an important and possibly the dominant ionization process in the negative glow.

  20. A DSMC Study of Low Pressure Argon Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Work toward a self-consistent plasma simulation using the DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo) method for examination of the flowfields of low-pressure high density plasma reactors is presented. Presently, DSMC simulations for these applications involve either treating the electrons as a fluid or imposing experimentally determined values for the electron number density profile. In either approach, the electrons themselves are not physically simulated. Self-consistent plasma DSMC simulations have been conducted for aerospace applications but at a severe computational cost due in part to the scalar architectures on which the codes were employed. The present work attempts to conduct such simulations at a more reasonable cost using a plasma version of the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO, on an IBM SP-2. Due to availability of experimental data, the GEC reference cell is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is chosen to conduct preliminary investigations. An argon discharge is examined thus affording a simple chemistry set with eight gas-phase reactions and five species: Ar, Ar(+), Ar(*), Ar(sub 2), and e where Ar(*) is a metastable.

  1. Argon hydrochloride, Ar.HCl, bond energy by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miziolek, A. W.; Pimentel, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared absorption of argon (200 to 760 torr) and hydrogen chloride (2 to 6 torr) mixtures is reexamined in the missing Q branch region (spectral region between 2860 and 3010 wavelength/cm) at temperatures ranging from 195 to 298 K. The temperature dependence of two absorption features of the argon hydrogen chloride complex, at 2887 and 2879 wavelength/cm, leads to a bond energy estimate that depends on the assumptions made about the internal degrees of freedom of the complex. It is shown that agreement with experiment can be reached for well depths near 1.2 kcal/mole. This result is relatively insensitive to the choice of the vibrational frequencies and anharmonicities, but does depend on the extent to which the energy level manifolds are truncated to avoid molecular excitation in excess of the bond energy. The bond energy is found to deviate from the commonly accepted value of 0.4 kcal/mole. Possible causes for the discrepancy are considered.

  2. Elastic properties of liquid and solid argon in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Schappert, Klaus; Pelster, Rolf

    2013-10-16

    We have measured sorption isotherms and determined the intrinsic longitudinal elastic modulus β(Ar,ads) of nanoconfined material via ultrasonic measurements combined with a special effective medium analysis. In the liquid regime the adsorbate only contributes to the measured effective properties when the pores are completely filled and the modulus is bulklike. At partial fillings its contribution is cancelled out by the high compressibility of the vapour phase. In contrast, at lower temperatures frozen argon as well as underlying liquid surface layers cause a linear increase of the effective longitudinal modulus upon filling. During sorption the contribution of the liquid surface layers near the pore wall β(Ar,surf) increases with the thickness of the solid layers reaching the bulk value β(Ar,liquid) only in the limit of complete pore filling. We interpret this effect as due to the gradual stiffening of the solid argon membrane. The measurements and their analysis show that longitudinal ultrasonic waves are well suited to the study of the elastic properties and liquid-solid phase transitions in porous systems. This method should also help to detect the influence of nanoconfinement on elastic properties in further research. PMID:24057946

  3. Argon Triple-Point Device for Calibration of SPRTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziej, B.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Kowal, A.; Steur, P. P. M.; Pavese, F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an apparatus for the calibration of long-stem platinum resistance thermometers at the argon triple point , designed at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structural Research, Poland (INTiBS). A hermetically sealed cell filled at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Italy with high purity gas (6N) is the main element of this apparatus. The cell is placed in a cryostat fully immersed in liquid nitrogen. A temperature-controlled shield ensures the quasi-adiabatic condition needed for proper realization of the phase transition. A system for correcting the temperature distribution along the thermometer well is also implemented. The cell cooling and argon solidification is carried out by filling the thermometer well with liquid nitrogen. A LabVIEW computer program written at INTiBS automatically controls the triple-point realization process. The duration of a melting plateau in the apparatus lasts for about 24 h. The melting width for between 20 % and 80 % was mK. The reproducibility of the plateau temperature is better than.

  4. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  5. The effect of accelerated argon ions on the retina.

    PubMed

    Krebs, W; Krebs, I; Merriam, G R; Worgul, B V

    1988-07-01

    It has been postulated that high energy heavy ions cause a unique form of damage in living tissue, which results from the high linear energy transfer of accelerated single particles. We have searched for these single-particle effects, so-called "microlesions," in composite electron micrographs of retinas of rats which had been irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy of 570 MeV/amu argon ions. The calculated rate of energy deposition of the radiation in the retina was about 100 keV/micron and the influence was four particles per 100 micron 2. Different areas of the irradiated retinas which combined would have been expected to be traversed by approximately 2400 particles were examined. We were unable to detect ultrastructural changes in the irradiated retinas distinct from those of controls. The spatial cellular densities of pigment epithelial and photoreceptor cells remained within the normal range when examined at 24 h and at 6 months after irradiation. These findings suggest that the retina is relatively resistant to heavy-ion irradiation and that under the experimental conditions the passage of high energy argon ions does not cause retinal microlesions that can be detected by ultrastructural analysis. PMID:3393633

  6. Effect of argon ion bombardment on amorphous silicon carbonitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batocki, R. G. S.; Mota, R. P.; Honda, R. Y.; Santos, D. C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films were synthesized by radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Vapor Chemical Deposition (PECVD) using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) as precursor compound. Then, the films were post-treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) in argon atmosphere from 15 to 60 min. The hardness of the film enhanced after ion implantation, and the sample treated at 45 min process showed hardness greater than sixfold that of the untreated sample. This result is explained by the crosslinking and densification of the structure. Films were exposed to oxygen plasma for determining of the etching rate. It decreased monotonically from 33 Å/min to 19 Å/min for the range of process time, confirming structural alterations. Hydrophobic character of the a-SiCN:H films were modified immediately after ion bombardment, due to incorporation of polar groups. However, the high wettability of the films acquired by the ion implantation was diminished after aging in air. Therefore, argon PIII made a-SiCN:H films mechanically more resistant and altered their hydrophobic character.

  7. Correction of NPL-2013 estimate of the Boltzmann constant for argon isotopic composition and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, Michael; Yang, Inseok; Mark, Darren F.; Underwood, Robin; Sutton, Gavin; Machin, Graham

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, a team from NPL, Cranfield University and SUERC published an estimate of the Boltzmann constant based on precision measurements of the speed of sound in argon. A key component of our results was an estimate of the molar mass of the argon gas used in our measurements. To achieve this we made precision comparison measurements of the isotope ratios found in our experimental argon against the ratios of argon isotopes found in atmospheric air. We then used a previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios to calibrate the relative sensitivity of the mass spectrometer to different argon isotopes. The previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios was carried out at KRISS using a mass spectrometer calibrated using argon samples of known isotopic composition, which had been prepared gravimetrically. We report here a new measurement made at KRISS in October 2014, which directly compared a sample of our experimental gas against the same gravimetrically-prepared argon samples. We consider that this direct comparison has to take precedence over our previous more indirect comparison. This measurement implies a molar mass which is 2.73(60) parts in 106 lighter than our 2013 estimate, a shift which is seven times our 2013 estimate of the uncertainty in the molar mass. In this paper we review the procedures used in our 2013 estimate of molar mass; describe the 2014 measurement; highlight some questions raised by the large change in our estimate of molar mass; and describe how we intend to address the inconsistencies between them. We also consider the effect of a new estimate of the low pressure thermal conductivity of argon at 273.16 K. Finally we report our new best estimate of the Boltzmann constant with revised uncertainty, taking account of the new estimates for the molar mass and the thermal conductivity of the argon.

  8. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  9. A large superconducting detector magnet without an iron return path

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes a detector magnet which returns flux between the coils rather than through an iron return path. This actively shielded, uniform field 2 T magnet can be fabricated in separate parts which can be manufactured on the SSC site. This magnet can be built so that central field is uniform enough to permit a TPC detector to be used without iron poles. The field outside of the coil can be made to fall of as R/sup /minus/N/ power where N approaches 9. A major advantage of the magnet described in the paper is that there is no pole piece to block the particle jets emanating from the collision region in the forward and backward directions. Inexpensive materials such as earth and concrete can be used to provide the mass needed to analyze particles such as mu mesons. As a result, problems such as experimental hall subsidence can be reduced. Perhaps the cost of such an experiment can also be reduced. This type of magnet would require experimenters to rethink their experimental concepts. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  11. The influence of microstructures on the relationship between argon retentivity and chemical composition of hornblende

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Pringle-Goodell, L. )

    1988-08-01

    This paper discusses isotope dating of hornblende separates from the Connemara, western Ireland. The dating is based on potassium/argon dates and the author provides a rebuttal of an earlier paper which dismisses any correlation between iron content in the hornblende and the Argon isotope dates for the same mineral.

  12. Influence of longitudinal argon flow on DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Xu, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the influence of longitudinal argon flow on the DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. It is found that the charges exhibit distinct dynamic behaviors at different argon flow velocities, accompanied by a considerable change in the discharge structure. The positive argon flow allows for the reduction of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions, and even leads to the disappearance of negative glow. The negative argon flow gives rise to the enhancement of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions. These observations are attributed to the fact that the gas flow convection influences the transport of charges through different manners by comparing the argon flow velocity with the ion drift velocity. The findings are important for improving the chemical activity and work efficiency of the plasma source by controlling the gas flow in practical applications.

  13. Surface treatment of para-aramid fiber by argon dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ruxi; Yu, Junrong; Hu, Chengcheng; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Jing; Hu, Zuming

    2012-10-01

    This paper is focused on influence of argon dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the adhesive performance and wettability of para-aramid fibers and three parameters including treated power, exposure time and argon flux were detected. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was greatly increased by 28% with 300 W, 60 s, 2 L min-1 argon flux plasma treatment. The content of oxygen atom and oxygen-containing polar functional groups were enhanced after the argon plasma treated, so as the surface roughness, which contributed to the improvement of surface wettability and the decrease of contact angle with water. However, long-time exposure, exorbitant power or overlarge argon flux could partly destroy the prior effects of the treatment and damage the mechanical properties of fibers to some degree.

  14. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wenting; Li Guo; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Wang Huabo; Zeng Shi; Gao Xing; Luo Huiying

    2007-06-15

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure {alpha}-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  15. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  16. In situ X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Analysis of Aromatic Polyester Surface Treated with Argon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narushima, Kazuo; Okamoto, Nanami

    2013-10-01

    Effects of surface modification treatment by argon plasma processing of two types of aromatic polyester, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(oxybenzonate-co-oxynaphthoate) (POCO), were investigated. This paper presents a description of our experiment and a discussion of the surface modification mechanism, which uses a simple and inexpensive procedure to conduct analysis without breaking vacuum after plasma processing. In situ analysis of the chemical composition of a polymer surface was attempted without exposing the sample to air after argon plasma processing. In particular, the respective actions of each active species were investigated for electrons and ions in argon plasma. Electrons and ions in argon plasma break some polymer bonds. Specifically, ester groups are broken and oxygen atoms are kicked out in PET and POCO. No oxygen functional group is formed after argon plasma processing, but such groups are formed if the sample is exposed to air.

  17. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  18. Fluorescence Spectrum of SiO in an Argon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullman, R.; Hormes, J.; Schroeder, W.; Wiggenhauser, H.

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence from SiO matrix isolated in argon has been investigated in the wavelength region 120-300 nm. Fluorescence emission spectra from the valence states, A1Π, E1Σ+ and G1Π, revealed that nearly all radiation comes from one channel at 305 nm, which was analysed as originating from the b3Π-X1Σ+ transition. Contrary to the A1Π and G1Π states, the E1Σ+ state also decays radiatively, although weakly, through two other channels situated in the vicinity of 305 nm. These two channels were believed to originate from the a3Σ+-X1Σ+ and e3Σ--X1Σ+ transitions.

  19. Low-energy ion implantation: Large mass fractionation of argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, TH.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The isotropic signatures of noble gases in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets are considerably evolved when compared to signatures observed in the solar wind. The mechanisms driving the evolution of planetary volatiles from original compositions in the solar accretion disk are currently poorly understood. Modeling of noble-gas compositional histories requires knowledge of fractionating processes that may have operated through the evolutionary stages. Since these gases are chemically inert, information on noble-gas fractionation processes can be used as probes. The importance of understanding these processes extends well beyond 'noble-gas planetology.' Trapped argon acquired by low-energy implantation (approximately less than 100 eV) into solids is strongly mass fractionated (approximately greater than or equal to 3 percent/amu). This has potential implications for the origin and evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres.

  20. Collisionless "thermalization" in the sheath of an argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this "thermalization" can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities).