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Sample records for argonne national laboratories

  1. Argonne National Laboratory 1985 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Kopta, J.A.; Hale, M.R.

    1987-08-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1985 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1985. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPB), lists all nonrestricted 1985 publications submitted to TPS by Laboratory's Divisions. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles - Listed by first author, ANL Reports - Listed by report number, ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports - Listed by report number, Non-ANL Numbered Reports - Listed by report number, Books and Book Chapters - Listed by first author, Conference Papers - Listed by first author, Complete Author Index.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index.

  3. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Push technology at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, R. E.; Woell, Y. N.

    1999-04-06

    Selective dissemination of information (SDI) services, also referred to as current awareness searches, are usually provided by periodically running computer programs (personal profiles) against a cumulative database or databases. This concept of pushing relevant content to users has long been integral to librarianship. Librarians traditionally turned to information companies to implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. This paper describes how a push technology was implemented on a large scale for scientists and engineers at Argonne National Laboratory, explains some of the challenges to designers/maintainers, and identifies the positive effects that SDI seems to be having on users. Argonne purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents data (all subject areas except Humanities), and scientists no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. Argonne's database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne-University of Chicago Current Contents Electronic Search Service).

  5. Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, R.E.; Daley, J.G.; Roach, P.D.

    1986-06-01

    Stirling engine research at Argonne National Laboratory has been focused at (1) development of mathematical models and analytical tools for predicting component and engine performance, and (2) experimental research into fundamental heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena occurring in Stirling cycle devices. A result of the analytical effort has been the formation of a computer library specifically for Stirling engine researchers and developers. The library contains properties of structural materials commonly used, thermophysical properties of several working fluids, correlations for heat transfer calculations and general specifications of mechanical arrangements (including various drive mechanisms) that can be utilized to model a particular engine. The library also contains alternative modules to perform analysis at different levels of sophistication, including design optimization. A reversing flow heat transfer facility is operating at Argonne to provide data at prototypic Stirling engine operating conditions under controlled laboratory conditions. This information is needed to validate analytical models.

  6. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  7. Proposed environmental remediation at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating proposed environmental remediation activity at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), Argonne, Illinois. The environmental remediation work would (1) reduce, eliminate, or prevent the release of contaminants from a number of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and two radiologically contaminated sites located in areas contiguous with SWMUs, and (2) decrease the potential for exposure of the public, ANL-E employees, and wildlife to such contaminants. The actions proposed for SWMUs are required to comply with the RCRA corrective action process and corrective action requirements of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency; the actions proposed are also required to reduce the potential for continued contaminant release. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  8. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy`s. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  9. Battery testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1993-03-25

    Argonne National Laboratory's Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) tests advanced batteries under simulated electric and hybrid vehicle operating conditions. The ADL facilities also include a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, in a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The battery evaluations and post-test examinations help identify factors that limit system performance and life, and the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming these limitations. Since 1991, performance characterizations and/or life evaluations have been conducted on eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/S, Zn/Br, Ni/MH, Ni/Zn, Ni/Cd, Ni/Fe, and lead-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy's. Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE/OTT/EHP), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Transportation Program. The results obtained are discussed.

  10. Description of the Argonne National Laboratory target making facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Greene, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given to some recent developments in the target facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Highlights include equipment upgrades which enable us to provide enhanced capabilities for support of the Argonne Heavy-Ion ATLAS Accelerator Program. Work currently in progress is described and future prospects discussed. 8 refs.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2001--FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, S.D.

    2000-12-07

    This Institutional Plan describes what Argonne management regards as the optimal future development of Laboratory activities. The document outlines the development of both research programs and support operations in the context of the nation's R and D priorities, the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne, and expected resource constraints. The Draft Institutional Plan is the product of many discussions between DOE and Argonne program managers, and it also reflects programmatic priorities developed during Argonne's summer strategic planning process. That process serves additionally to identify new areas of strategic value to DOE and Argonne, to which Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds may be applied. The Draft Plan is provided to the Department before Argonne's On-Site Review. Issuance of the final Institutional Plan in the fall, after further comment and discussion, marks the culmination of the Laboratory's annual planning cycle. Chapter II of this Institutional Plan describes Argonne's missions and roles within the DOE laboratory system, its underlying core competencies in science and technology, and six broad planning objectives whose achievement is considered critical to the future of the Laboratory. Chapter III presents the Laboratory's ''Science and Technology Strategic Plan,'' which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne's vision, and describes how Argonne's strategic goals and objectives support DOE's four business lines. The balance of Chapter III comprises strategic plans for 23 areas of science and technology at Argonne, grouped according to the four DOE business lines. The Laboratory's 14 major initiatives, presented in Chapter IV, propose important advances in key areas of fundamental science and technology development. The ''Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan'' in Chapter V includes strategic plans for human resources; environmental protection, safety, and health; site and

  12. Argonne National Laboratory-East evolution of solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Trychta, K.; McHenry, J.; Thuot, J.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of Argonne National Laboratory`s current general refuse disposal and material recycling programs, how they were developed, and where they are going. In order to better understand the current situation, a brief description of the facilities past practices is explained. ANL is a multi-program research and development center owned by DOE and operated by the University of Chicago. Argonne`s primary facilities are on a 1,700 acre site, 27 miles southwest of Chicago. Fifty-seven major buildings house approximately 4,500 employees at the site.

  13. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1984-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1983 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 19 references, 8 figures, 49 tables.

  14. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1985-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1984 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. 20 refs., 8 figs., 46 tabs.

  15. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1979 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, Argonne effluent water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environemetal penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measuremenets were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  16. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1982-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1981 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  17. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Duffy, T. L.; Sedlet, J.

    1981-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory for 1980 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and foodstuffs; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and measurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  18. Chemical management system at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Morss, H.S.; Hischier, R.C.; Keto, D.N.; Woodring, J.L.; Davis, J.T.; Sherva, B.

    1995-07-01

    The Argonne Chemical Management System (CMS) is comprised of several applications and the Infrastructure Modules. The Infrastructure Modules, which provide the integrated computing software foundation, include a security processor, common tables, reporting framework, utilities, and other facilities common to applications processing chemical information. The MSDS Sheets were scanned and the images stored for automated faxing to the requester. User searches are accomplished based on ``search`` data keyed into the Oracle Tables; the desired MSDS is subsequently faxed. The system has been designed as an ``open`` system and is totally portable. During development and production the CMS has operated in VAX, VMS, Sun Unix, and Hewlett-Packard HP-UX environments. The only restrictions are that the MSDS Faxing Server must operate under Unix and the bar code scanning processes are accomplished using a portable PC. The current system consists of 20 Oracle Tables, over 350 columns of data, 25 Standard reports, 45 screens, and a number of utilities. With the Oracle RDBMS the computing platform may be sized to the volume of data and processing activity. The Laboratory`s implementation is on an HP 9000 Model H50 with 256 megabytes of memory, 32 concurrent users, and 8 gigabytes of disk storage that is primarily for the MSDS images.

  19. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2013-04-19

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  1. Photographic as-builts for Argonne National Laboratory-West

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, E.K.; Wiegand, C.V.

    1995-04-19

    Located 35 miles West of Idaho Falls, Idaho, Argonne National Laboratory-West operates a number of nuclear facilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) through the University of Chicago. Part of the present mission of Argonne National Laboratory-West includes shutdown of the EBR-II Reactor. In order to accomplish this task the Engineering-Drafting Department is exploring cost effective methods of providing as-building services. A new technology of integrating photographic images and AUTOCAD drawing files is considered one of those methods that shows promise.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, T. M.; Gomez, J. L.; Moos, L. P.

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  7. The ATLAS Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is a superconducting low-energy heavy ion accelerator. Its primary purpose is to provide beams for research in nuclear structure physics. This report begins with a brief history of ATLAS and then describes the current design of the facility. Also summarized are the experimental equipment and research programs. It concludes with a proposal for turning ATLAS into a radioactive beam facility.

  8. Materials technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Betten, P.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne is actively involved in the research and development of new materials research and development (R D). Five new materials technologies have been identified for commercial potential and are presented in this paper as follows: (1) nanophase materials, (2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of ceramics, (3) superconductivity developments and technology transfer mechanisms, and (4) COMMIX computer code modeling for metal castings, and (5) tribology using ion-assisted deposition (IAB). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress.

  10. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress.

  11. Site characteristics of Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.W.

    1995-01-01

    This report reviews the geology and topography of the Argonne National Laboratory, near Lemont, Illinois. It describes the thickness and stratigraphy of soils, glacial till, and bedrock in and adjacent to the laboratory and support facilities. Seismic surveys were also conducted through the area to help determine the values of seismic wave velocities in the glacial till which is important in determining the seismic hazard of the area. Borehole log descriptions are summarized along with information on area topography.

  12. Change in argonne national laboratory: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mozley, A

    1971-10-01

    , William B. Cannon, who is vice president of programs and projects of the University of Chicago, and a small selection of staff members believe that the Laboratory is going through a natural and inevitable process of change consonant with altered missions and objectives in an atomic energy laboratory. The general mood, however, demonstrates the Jeffersonian insight, as relevant in science as in politics, that only democratic governance provides salutary checks and balances when things go wrong. The point deserves close scrutiny when Argonne's tripartite contract comes up for renegotiation in October 1971. Fundamentally Argonne's relations with its sponsoring agency remain at the center of its progress and future plans. Despite administrative and management changes, there is little doubt that he who pays the piper calls the tune. In common with other federal contract research and development adjuncts, Argonne has undoubtedly undergone tightening and winnowing away of flexibility in the past 6 years. In the nuclear reactor program the consequences have been strongly felt, and stringent national budgets have widened the tendency in the research domain. The impact of these changes and of AEC's attitude to basic research raise large questions for the future of the national laboratories. Few doubt that these "major national assets," with their outstanding scientific and technical personnel and equipment, fulfill a unique function and are here to stay, though their missions may undergo some change; the question of their most effective direction and handling, however, remains crucial for those concerned with priorities and decision-making for science. A recent review of 40 national federal adjuncts (30,31) has indicated that the primary sponsoring agency obtains better performance from a center that has a relatively high degree of independence than from one that is tightly controlled. The point is confirmed at Argonne where the present tendency (particularly on the nuclear reactor

  13. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2002 - FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, S. D.

    2001-11-29

    The national laboratory system provides a unique resource for addressing the national needs inherent in the mission of the Department of Energy. Argonne, which grew out of Enrico Fermi's pioneering work on the development of nuclear power, was the first national laboratory and, in many ways, has set the standard for those that followed. As the Laboratory's new director, I am pleased to present the Argonne National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2002 through FY 2007 on behalf of the extraordinary group of scientists, engineers, technicians, administrators, and others who are responsible for the Laboratory's distinguished record of achievement. Like our sister DOE laboratories, Argonne uses a multifaceted approach to advance U.S. R and D priorities. First, we assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers to address complex problems. For example, our initiative in Functional Genomics will bring together biologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and staff of the Advanced Photon Source to develop complete maps of cellular function. Second, we cultivate specific core competencies in science and technology; this Institutional Plan discusses the many ways in which our core competencies support DOE's four mission areas. Third, we serve the scientific community by designing, building, and operating world-class user facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, and the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System. This Plan summarizes the visions, missions, and strategic plans for the Laboratory's existing major user facilities, and it explains our approach to the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator. Fourth, we help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers through educational programs, many of which involve bright young people in research. This Plan summarizes our vision, objectives, and strategies in the education area, and it gives statistics on student and faculty participation. Finally, we

  14. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  15. Microscale chemistry technology exchange at Argonne National Laboratory - east.

    SciTech Connect

    Pausma, R.

    1998-06-04

    The Division of Educational Programs (DEP) at Argonne National Laboratory-East interacts with the education community at all levels to improve science and mathematics education and to provide resources to instructors of science and mathematics. DEP conducts a wide range of educational programs and has established an enormous audience of teachers, both in the Chicago area and nationally. DEP has brought microscale chemistry to the attention of this huge audience. This effort has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Environmental Management Operations organization within Argonne. Microscale chemistry is a teaching methodology wherein laboratory chemistry training is provided to students while utilizing very small amounts of reagents and correspondingly small apparatus. The techniques enable a school to reduce significantly the cost of reagents, the cost of waste disposal and the dangers associated with the manipulation of chemicals. The cost reductions are achieved while still providing the students with the hands-on laboratory experience that is vital to students who might choose to pursue careers in the sciences. Many universities and colleges have already begun to switch from macroscale to microscale chemistry in their educational laboratories. The introduction of these techniques at the secondary education level will lead to freshman being better prepared for the type of experimentation that they will encounter in college.

  16. Environmental monitoring at Argonne National Laboratory. Annual report for 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1983-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne Ntaional Laboratory for 1982 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in air, surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water; and of the environmental penetrating radiation dose. Sample collections and masurements were made at the site boundary and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. Some on-site measurements were made to aid in the interpretation of the boundary and off-site data. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. The potential radiation dose to off-site population groups is also estimated.

  17. Capabilities for spent fuel characterization at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Neimark, L.A.; Strain, R.V.

    1994-10-01

    Summaries of the status of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy have highlighted the need to obtain a better understanding of the current physical and chemical condition of the SNF as a foundation for establishing a clear path forward for the fuel`s eventual geologic disposal in a long-term repository. To initiate obtaining the required information, DOE has generated an SNF Characterization Plan based on the needs for characterizing the materials stored at the individual major DOE storage sites. The principal focus of the plan is to characterize those fuel attributes that are key to the safe handling, transportation, and storage of the SNF. The drivers for specific attributes are regulatory requirements, resolution of technical issues, or a design need. Argonne National Laboratory`s facilities in Illinois and Idaho possess capabilities that can be used to address many of the characterization issues that have been raised. This paper will describe these capabilities.

  18. Frontiers: Research Highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1996-01-01

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  19. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  20. Sodium carbonate facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.D.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-09-01

    The Sodium Carbonate Facility, located at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was designed and built as an addition to the existing Sodium Processing Facility. The Sodium Process and Sodium Carbonate Facilities will convert radioactive sodium into a product that is acceptable for land disposal in Idaho. The first part of the process occurs in the Sodium Process Facility where radioactive sodium is converted into sodium hydroxide (caustic). The second part of the process occurs in the Sodium Carbonate Facility where the caustic solution produced in the Sodium Process Facility is converted into a dry sodium carbonate waste suitable for land disposal. Due to the radioactivity in the sodium, shielding, containment, and HEPA filtered off-gas systems are required throughout both processes.

  1. Sodium-sulfur technology evaluation at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahey, T.P.; Tummillo, A.F.; Hogrefe, R.L.; Christianson, C.C.; Biwer, R.; Webster, C.E.; Lee, J.; Miller, J.F.; Marr, J.J.; Smaga, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory (ADL) at Argonne National Laboratory has completed evaluation of the Ford Aerospace and Communication Corp. (FACC) technology in the form of four load-levelling (LL) cells, five electric vehicle (EV) cells, and a sub-battery of 89 series connected EV cells. The ADL also has initiated evaluation of the Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) sodium-sulfur (PB) battery technology in the form of 8 individual cells. The evaluation of the FACC-LL cells consisted of an abbreviated performance characterization followed by life-cycle tests on two individual cells and life-cycle tests only on the two other individual cells. The evaluation indicated that the technology was improving, but long-term (life) reliability was not yet adequate for utility applications. The cells exhibited individual cycle lives ranging from 659 to over 1366 cycles, which is equivalent to 2 1/2 to 5 1/2 years in utility use. It was also found that full-cell capacity could only be maintained by applying a special charge regime, regularly or periodically, that consisted of a constant-current followed by a constant-voltage.

  2. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  3. TRUEX processing of plutonium analytical solutions at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Hutter, J.C.; Leonard, R.A.; Wygmans, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    The TRUEX (TRansUranic EXtraction) solvent extraction process was developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Department of Energy. A TRUEX demonstration completed at ANL involved the processing of analytical and experimental waste generated there and at the New Brunswick Laboratory. A 20-stage centrifugal contactor was used to recover plutonium, americium, and uranium from the waste. Approximately 84 g of plutonium, 18 g of uranium, and 0.2 g of americium were recovered from about 118 liters of solution during four process runs. Alpha decontamination factors as high as 65,000 were attained, which was especially important because it allowed the disposal of the process raffinate as a low-level waste. The recovered plutonium and uranium were converted to oxide; the recovered americium solution was concentrated by evaporation to approximately 100 ml. The flowsheet and operational procedures were modified to overcome process difficulties. These difficulties included the presence of complexants in the feed, solvent degradation, plutonium precipitation, and inadequate decontamination factors during startup. This paper will discuss details of the experimental effort.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to

  5. Groundwater plume control with phytotechnologies at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, S.; Negri, M. C.; Quinn, J.; Wozniak, J.,; McPherson, J.

    2002-07-16

    In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various methods including Applied Natural Science's TreeWell{reg_sign} system. The goal of the installation was to protect downgradient surface and groundwater by hydraulic control of the contaminated plume. This goal was to be accomplished by intercepting the contaminated groundwater with the tree roots, removing moisture from the upgradient soil area, reducing water infiltration, preventing soil erosion, degrading and/or transpiring the residual VOCs, and removing tritium from the subsoil and groundwater. The U.S. EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program (SITE) and ANL-E evaluated the demonstration. The effectiveness of the various plantings was monitored directly through groundwater measurements and samples, and indirectly via soil moisture probes, plant tissue analysis, microbial studies, geochemical analysis, and sap flow monitoring. A weather station with data logging equipment was installed. ANL-E modeled the predicted effect of the plants on the groundwater using MODFLOW. The demonstration has lasted three growing seasons and continues. This paper presents the results of the sampling, monitoring, and modeling efforts to date. The project was not only successful in reducing the groundwater contaminant flow and the contaminants at the source; it also provides insight into the techniques that are useful for measuring and predicting the effectiveness of future similar projects.

  6. Electric vehicle battery testing and development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smaga, J.A.; Gillie, K.R.; Webster, C.E.; Tummillo, A.F.; Kulaga, J.K.; Marr, J.J. )

    1992-12-01

    The Electric Vehicle Battery Testing and Development Project for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) does selected electric vehicle (EV) battery performance evaluations and special application tests in support of the EPRI Electric Transportation Program. Overall, this program provides information to aid the design and development of improved components and systems for electric vehicles. The Electrochemical Technology Department in the Chemical Technology Division of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) manages the project under the sponsorship and direction of the EPRI Electric Transportation Program. This report summarizes the work in this program from January through December 1991. Technical tasks and activities encompassed battery testing, post-test teardown analyses and special technology/application-related studies. Battery testing activities included evaluation of nickel/iron, lead-acid, nickel/cadmium, and nickel/metal-hydride EV battery technologies. Post-test analyses examined 6Vl60 and 3ET205 lead-acid cells. Special studies/analyses were conducted to examine Ni/Fe battery outgas composition and electrolyte variations, the self-discharge loss of nickel/metal-hydride cells, the effects of partial discharge operation on the available energy of Ni/Cd modules, and the effect of charge method/return/pulse-currents on Ni/Fe battery performance.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  8. Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datesman, Aaron; Pearson, John; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Divan, Ralu; Downes, Thomas; Chang, Clarence; McMahon, Jeff; Meyer, Stephan; Carlstrom, John; Logan, Daniel; Perera, Thushara; Wilson, Grant; Novosad, Valentyn

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

  9. Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Divan, R.; Downes, T.; Chang, C.; McMahon, J.; Meyer, S.; Carlstrom, J.; Logan, D.; Perera, T.; Wilson, G.; Novosad, V.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory, east hazardous waste shipment data validation

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.; Graden, C.; Coveleskie, A.

    1995-09-01

    At the request of EM-331, the Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) is conducting an evaluation of data regarding past hazardous waste shipments from DOE sites to commercial TSDFs. The intent of the evaluation is to find out if, from 1984 to 1991, DOE sites could have shipped hazardous waste contaminated with DOE-added radioactivity to commercial TSDFs not licensed to receive radioactive material. A team visited Argonne National Laboratory, East (ANL-E) to find out if any data existed that would help to make such a determination at ANL-E. The team was unable to find any relevant data. The team interviewed personnel who worked in waste management at the time. All stated that ANL-E did not sample and analyze hazardous waste shipments for radioactivity. Waste generators at ANL-E relied on process knowledge to decide that their waste was not radioactive. Also, any item leaving a building where radioisotopes were used was surveyed using hand-held instrumentation. If radioactivity above the criteria in DOE Order 5400.5 was found, the item was considered radioactive. The only documentation still available is the paperwork filled out by the waste generator and initialed by a health physics technician to show no contamination was found. The team concludes that, since all waste shipped offsite was subjected at least once to health physics instrumentation scans, the waste shipped from ANL-E from 1984 to 1991 may be considered clean.

  11. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  12. The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    SciTech Connect

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1998-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  15. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Test and evaluation of an Argonne National Laboratory bulk assay calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; Fellers, C.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1981-06-30

    The Argonne National Laboratory bulk assay calorimeter (BAC) was subjected to a series of tests, using plutonium-238 heat standards, to evaluate the performance of the calorimeter over its operating range. The results of these tests provide baseline information of the instrument performance under laboratory conditions.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory-East summary site environmental report for calendar year 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2004-03-08

    Argonne performs research and development in many areas of science and technology. General fields of research at Argonne include, but are not limited to, biosciences, biotechnology, chemical engineering, chemistry, decision and information sciences, energy systems and technology, high energy physics, materials science, math and computer science, nuclear reactors, physics, and environmental science. Argonne is not, and never has been, a weapons laboratory. Several missions provide focus for Argonne scientists. Basic research helps better understand the world, and applied research helps protect and improve it. For example, the prairies of Argonne provide sites for environmental studies that provide valuable information about invader species and the food webs within ecosystems. Argonne also operates world-class research facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), which is a national research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Scientists use high brilliance X-rays from the APS for basic and applied research in many fields. Argonne also seeks to ensure our energy future. Currently, scientists and engineers are developing cleaner and more efficient energy sources, such as fuel cells and advanced electric power generation. Argonne has spent much of its history on developing nuclear reactor technology. That research is now being applied to American and Soviet nuclear reactors to improve the safety and life of the reactors. Other Argonne research seeks to improve the way we manage our environment. For example, Argonne scientists created a new catalyst that could help carmakers eliminate 95 percent of nitrogen-oxide emitted by diesel engines by the year 2007. Research and development solutions such as these will help protect our ecosystems.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the environmental report for the Argonne National Laboratory-East for the year of 1995. Topics discussed include: general description of the site including climatology, geology, seismicity, hydrology, vegetation, endangered species, population, water and land use, and archaeology; compliance summary; environmental program information; environmental nonradiological program information; ground water protection; and radiological monitoring program.

  19. GROUNDWATER PLUME CONTROL WITH PHYTOTECHNOLOGIES AT THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY-EAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1999 Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) designed and installed a series of engineered plantings consisting of a vegetative cover system and approximately 800 hybrid poplars and willows rooting at various predetermined depths. The plants were installed using various meth...

  20. Additive synthesis with DIASS-M4C on Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWERparallel System (SP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H.; Ralley, D.; Restrepo, J.; Tiepei, S.

    1995-12-31

    DIASS-M4C, a digital additive instrument was implemented on the Argonne National Laboratory`s IBM POWER parallel System (SP). This paper discusses the need for a massively parallel supercomputer and shows how the code was parallelized. The resulting sounds and the degree of control the user can have justify the effort and the use of such a large computer.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model

    ScienceCinema

    Ted Bohn

    2010-01-08

    As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid to not only handle the new load, but make electricity cheap and efficient for everyone? Argonne engineer Ted Bohn explains a model of a "smart grid" that gives consumers the power to choose their own prices and sources of electricity.

  3. Argonne National Laboratory Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Bohn

    2009-10-13

    As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid to not only handle the new load, but make electricity cheap and efficient for everyone? Argonne engineer Ted Bohn explains a model of a "smart grid" that gives consumers the power to choose their own prices and sources of electricity.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health/quality assurance oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Winner, G.L.; Siegfried, Y.S.; Forst, S.P.; Meshenberg, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been incorporated into a self-paced, computerized, training session.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory-East summary site environmental report for calendar year 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2003-02-20

    This report is a summary of the actions taken by Argonne National Laboratory in 2001 to keep the public and environment safe. Over the last year, Argonne has monitored, evaluated, and taken steps to control problems or potential problems on its DuPage County site. The problems that have or might occur are things like spilled or leaked radiological waste, non-radiological wastes or hazardous materials. Argonne is keeping its promise to be a good neighbor, and this report confirms its commitment to its neighbors, both human and environmental. Argonne's commitment to have minimal effect on the environment was tested vigorously over 2001. Argonne's first priority is keeping the people around it safe. This was verified through tests done on the air. The air can be the most damaging way to pollute an area. This is why Argonne was so extensive in its testing. They followed guidelines of the Clean Air Act, which covers radioactive emissions, asbestos, and conventional air pollutants. Air was tested, and after all calculations were finished, the effect on the public was found to be so minimal that it almost didn't register. The sources of pollutants from Argonne are exhausts from laboratories and other facilities, the steam plant that provides space heating for Argonne's buildings, and emissions from emergency generators when they are operating. The traces that were found were evaluated and reduced, even though they were originally well within regulatory limits. The same trends--further reduction of concentrations that were already safe--were found in the water analysis, as well. Water was sampled and evaluated many times over the course of the year, and what was found was good news. The radiological elements were very minimal, and most of the trace amounts were due to naturally occurring radiological sources. The only measurements that exceeded standards a few times were of total dissolved solids (TDS), essentially road salts dissolved in rainwater runoff. These problems

  6. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1986-03-01

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose.

  7. Office of Inspector General report on audit of support services subcontracts at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    Department of Energy (Department) policy prohibits the use of subcontracts awarded by management and operating contractors to provide direct support to Headquarters program offices. When support is necessary, program offices are required to use the Headquarters procurement organization, not the management and operating contractors. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the program offices were obtaining direct support for their programs through subcontracts awarded by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Despite the Department`s policy, program offices in four major Departmental divisions used 24 subcontracts awarded by Argonne to provide direct support for their programs in Fiscal Year 1996. The program offices acquired the subcontractor services through Argonne because they believed that Argonne`s procurement organization could provide the services faster than the Headquarters procurement organization. As a result, the Department may have paid more than necessary for the services, while many of the safeguards against noncompliance with laws and regulations that are normally provided by the Department`s procurement process were lost. The authors recommended that the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health; the Assistant secretary for Environmental Management; the Director, Office of Energy Research; and the Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (1) direct program managers to discontinue the practice of acquiring support services from subcontractors hired by Argonne; and (2) establish management controls to ensure that program managers acquire support services through the Department`s normal procurement process, and not through management and operating contractors. Management concurred with the audit finding and recommendations and initiated corrective action.

  8. Radiological safety at Argonne national laboratory's heavy ion research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, R. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1985-05-01

    This paper discusses the radiological safety system to be employed at the Argonne tandem—linac accelerator system (ATLAS). The design parameters of ATLAS that affect safety have remained unchanged since ATLAS construction began in 1982. The specialized radiological safety considerations of ATLAS were discussed in 1982 [1]. This paper will present the details of the hardware, the administrative controls, and the radiation monitoring that will be in effect when beam is produced in April 1985. The experimental hall utilizing the maximum energy beam ( ˜ 27 MeV per nucleon) from the completed ATLAS has been partitioned with shielding blocks into its final configuration. Because scientists want access to some of the partitioned-off areas while beam is present in other areas, an interlock and logic system allowing such occupancy has been designed. The rationale and hardware of the system will be discussed. Since one of the potential radiation hazards is high-energy forward-directed neutrons from any location where the beam impinges (such as collimators, bending and focussing systems, experimental targets, and beam stops), radiation surveys and hazard assessments are necessary for the administrative controls that allow occupancy of various areas. Because of the various uses of ATLAS, neutrons (the dominant beam hazard) will be non-existent in some experiments and will be of energies ≳ 10 MeV for a few experiments. These conditions may exist at specific locations during beam preparation but may change rapidly when beam is finally delivered to an experimental area. Monitoring and assessing such time varying and geographically changing hazards will be a challenge since little data will be available on source terms until various beams are produced of sufficient intensity and energy to make measurements. How the operating division for ATLAS and the Argonne safety division are addressing this aspect through administrative controls will also be discussed.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory contributions to the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    A total of sixteen papers with authors from Argonne National Laboratory were presented at the First International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology (ISFNT), held in Tokyo, Japan, in April 1988. The papers cover the results of recent investigations in blanket design and analysis, fusion neutronics, materials experiments in liquid metal corrosion and solid breeders, tritium recovery analysis, experiments and analysis for liquid metal MHD, reactor safety and economic analysis, and transient electromagnetic analysis.

  10. Derived concentration guideline levels for Argonne National Laboratory's building 310 area.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S., Dr.; Yu, C ., Dr.

    2011-08-12

    The derived concentration guideline level (DCGL) is the allowable residual radionuclide concentration that can remain in soil after remediation of the site without radiological restrictions on the use of the site. It is sometimes called the single radionuclide soil guideline or the soil cleanup criteria. This report documents the methodology, scenarios, and parameters used in the analysis to support establishing radionuclide DCGLs for Argonne National Laboratory's Building 310 area.

  11. 77 FR 61740 - Argonne National Laboratory; Notice of Decision on Application for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    .... Applicant: Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Lemont, IL 60439. Instrument: Klystron. Manufacturer: Thales Components Corp., France. Intended Use: See notice at 77 FR 25960, May 2, 2012. Date...

  12. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  15. Development and analysis of a meteorological database, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Price, Thomas H.; Ishii, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    A database of hourly values of air temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation from January 1, 1948, to September 30, 2003, primarily using data collected at the Argonne National Laboratory station, was developed for use in continuous-time hydrologic modeling in northeastern Illinois. Missing and apparently erroneous data values were replaced with adjusted values from nearby stations used as 'backup'. Temporal variations in the statistical properties of the data resulting from changes in measurement and data-storage methodologies were adjusted to match the statistical properties resulting from the data-collection procedures that have been in place since January 1, 1989. The adjustments were computed based on the regressions between the primary data series from Argonne National Laboratory and the backup series using data obtained during common periods; the statistical properties of the regressions were used to assign estimated standard errors to values that were adjusted or filled from other series. Each hourly value was assigned a corresponding data-source flag that indicates the source of the value and its transformations. An analysis of the data-source flags indicates that all the series in the database except dewpoint have a similar fraction of Argonne National Laboratory data, with about 89 percent for the entire period, about 86 percent from 1949 through 1988, and about 98 percent from 1989 through 2003. The dewpoint series, for which observations at Argonne National Laboratory did not begin until 1958, has only about 71 percent Argonne National Laboratory data for the entire period, about 63 percent from 1948 through 1988, and about 93 percent from 1989 through 2003, indicating a lower reliability of the dewpoint sensor. A basic statistical analysis of the filled and adjusted data series in the database, and a series of potential evapotranspiration computed from them using the computer program LXPET (Lamoreux Potential

  16. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-03-27

    This booklet is designed to inform the public about what Argonne National Laboratory is doing to monitor its environment and to protect its employees and neighbors from any adverse environmental impacts from Argonne research. The Downers Grove South Biology II class was selected to write this booklet, which summarizes Argonne's environmental monitoring programs for 2006. Writing this booklet also satisfies the Illinois State Education Standard, which requires that students need to know and apply scientific concepts to graduate from high school. This project not only provides information to the public, it will help students become better learners. The Biology II class was assigned to condense Argonne's 300-page, highly technical Site Environmental Report into a 16-page plain-English booklet. The site assessment relates to the class because the primary focus of the Biology II class is ecology and the environment. Students developed better learning skills by working together cooperatively, writing and researching more effectively. Students used the Argonne Site Environmental Report, the Internet, text books and information from Argonne scientists to help with their research on their topics. The topics covered in this booklet are the history of Argonne, groundwater, habitat management, air quality, Argonne research, Argonne's environmental non-radiological program, radiation, and compliance. The students first had to read and discuss the Site Environmental Report and then assign topics to focus on. Dr. Norbert Golchert and Mr. David Baurac, both from Argonne, came into the class to help teach the topics more in depth. The class then prepared drafts and wrote a final copy. Ashley Vizek, a student in the Biology class stated, 'I reviewed my material and read it over and over. I then took time to plan my paper out and think about what I wanted to write about, put it into foundation questions and started to write my paper. I rewrote and revised so I think the amount of

  17. Low-level radioactive waste management at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, C.M.; Shearer, T.L.; Nelson, R.A.

    1997-05-19

    This paper is an overview of the low-level radioactive waste management practices and treatment systems at Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E). It addresses the systems, processes, types of waste treated, and the status and performance of the systems. ANL-E is a Department of Energy laboratory that is engaged in a variety of research projects, some of which generate radioactive waste, in addition a significant amount of radioactive waste remains from previous projects and decontamination and decommissioning of facilities where this work was performed.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory - West's approach to filter characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T. A.

    1999-02-10

    Like other DOE facilities, ANL-W uses a variety of nuclear grade, industrial grade, or furnace-type particulate filters to control airborne radioactivity and hazardous contaminants in radiological containment structures or processes. As designed, these filters entrain and ultimately concentrate contaminants in the media. Toxic metal contaminants include cadmium, chromium, lead; and mercury present in sufficient concentrations to exhibit the hazardous waste characteristic of toxicity as defined in 40 CFR 261.24. Radionuclide contaminants deposited in the media may at times accumulate in sufficient quantity to classify the filter as transuranic or remote-handled waste. Upon their removal from the ventilation system, these particulate filters become wastes, which must be characterized to determine their hazardous and radioactive classifications. A well defined filter characterization process is essential for the proper/consistent waste characterization and minimization and for maintaining personnel radiological exposures as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) (1,2). ANL-W has developed an approach to filter sampling and characterization to meet these needs. The ANL-W filter sampling and characterization process is designed to ensure representative sampling and/or process knowledge is utilized in characterizing the filters. The data obtained through sampling and/or process knowledge is used to show compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (3) and Treatment/Storage/Disposal Facility Waste Acceptance Criteria. The ANL-W filter characterization involves the collection of process information, filter handling and sampling, sample analysis, data management filter characterization, and waste handling. Each element of the process is streamlined to ensure proper characterization while minimizing radiological exposure to maintenance workers, samplers, laboratory personnel, and waste handlers.

  19. Special Report on "Allegations of Conflict of Interest Regarding Licensing of PROTECT by Argonne National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-01

    In February 2009, the Office of Inspector General received a letter from Congressman Mark Steven Kirk of Illinois, which included constituent allegations that an exclusive technology licensing agreement by Argonne National Laboratory was tainted by inadequate competition, conflicts of interest, and other improprieties. The technology in question was for the Program for Response Options and Technology Enhancements for Chemical/Biological Terrorism, commonly referred to as PROTECT. Because of the importance of the Department of Energy's technology transfer program, especially as implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act matures, we reviewed selected aspects of the licensing process for PROTECT to determine whether the allegations had merit. In summary, under the facts developed during our review, it was understandable that interested parties concluded that there was a conflict of interest in this matter and that Argonne may have provided the successful licensee with an unfair advantage. In part, this was consistent with aspects of the complaint from Congressman Kirk's constituent.

  20. Diagnostic studies on lithium-ion cells at Argonne National Laboratory: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Daniel P.

    2010-04-01

    High-power and high-energy lithium-ion cells are being studied at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) program. Cells ranging in capacity from 1 mAh to 1Ah, and containing a variety of electrodes and electrolytes, are examined to determine suitable material combinations that will meet and exceed the FCVT performance, cost, and safety targets. In this article, accelerated aging of 18650-type cells, and characterization of components harvested from these cells, is described. Several techniques that include electrochemical measurements, analytical electron microscopy, and x-ray spectroscopy were used to study the various cell components. Data from these studies were used to identify the most likely contributors to property degradation and determine mechanisms responsible for cell capacity fade and impedance rise.

  1. Theory Institute in Automated Reasoning held at Argonne National Laboratory, August 6--10, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wos, L.

    1990-08-01

    On August 6--10, 1990, Argonne National Laboratory hosted a Theory Institute in Automated Reasoning. The institute was organized by the Mathematics and Computer Science Division and was supported by special funding from Argonne's Physical Research Program Administration. The focus of the Institute was on the obstacles confronting the effective automation of reasoning. The objective was to lay the groundwork for formulating a theory governing the interrelationship of representation, inference rule, and strategy. Here we summarize the activities that took place during the week-long Institute. We also present an evaluation of the progress achieved-progress that includes the solution of challenge questions, the increasing use of both our database of problems and our automated reasoning program OTTER, and the discovery of new used for OTTER. 7 refs.

  2. Universities, National Laboratories, and Man's Environment, Argonne Universities Association Conference (Chicago, Illinois, July 27-29, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This is a report of the Conference on Universities, National Laboratories, and Man's Environment. The conference was sponsored by the Argonne Universities Association (AUA), a consortium of 30 universities. Reports and discussions of the following three sessions are presented: Universities and National Laboratories Together Must Help Solve…

  3. Status report on the Advanced Photon Source Project at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, R.H. Sr.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is designed as a national synchrotron radiation user facility which will provide extremely bright, highly energetic x-rays for multidisciplinary research. When operational, the Advanced Photon Source will accelerate positrons to a nominal energy of 7 GeV. The positrons will be manipulated by insertion devices to produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than any currently available for research. Accelerator components, insertion devices, optical elements, and optical-element cooling schemes have been and continue to be the subjects of intensive research and development. A call for Letters of Intent from prospective users of the Advanced Photon Source has resulted in a substantial response from industrial, university, and national laboratory researchers.

  4. Status report on the Advanced Photon Source Project at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, R.H. Sr.

    1989-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is designed as a national synchrotron radiation user facility which will provide extremely bright, highly energetic x-rays for multidisciplinary research. When operational, the Advanced Photon Source will accelerate positrons to a nominal energy of 7 GeV. The positrons will be manipulated by insertion devices to produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than any currently available for research. Accelerator components, insertion devices, optical elements, and optical-element cooling schemes have been and continue to be the subjects of intensive research and development. A call for Letters of Intent from prospective users of the Advanced Photon Source has resulted in a substantial response from industrial, university, and national laboratory researchers.

  5. The Chemical Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory: Applying chemical innovation to environmental problems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Chemical Technology Division is one of the largest technical divisions at Argonne National Laboratory, a leading center for research and development related to energy and environmental issues. Since its inception in 1948, the Division has pioneered in developing separations processes for the nuclear industry. The current scope of activities includes R&D on methods for disposing of radioactive and hazardous wastes and on energy conversion processes with improved efficiencies, lower costs, and reduced environmental impact. Many of the technologies developed by CMT can be applied to solve manufacturing as well as environmental problems of industry.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory summary site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.

    2009-05-22

    This summary of Argonne National Laboratory's Site Environmental Report for calendar year 2007 was written by 20 students at Downers Grove South High School in Downers Grove, Ill. The student authors are classmates in Mr. Howard's Bio II course. Biology II is a research-based class that teaches students the process of research by showing them how the sciences apply to daily life. For the past seven years, Argonne has worked with Biology II students to create a short document summarizing the Site Environmental Report to provide the public with an easy-to-read summary of the annual 300-page technical report on the results of Argonne's on-site environmental monitoring program. The summary is made available online and given to visitors to Argonne, researchers interested in collaborating with Argonne, future employees, and many others. In addition to providing Argonne and the public with an easily understandable short summary of a large technical document, the participating students learn about professional environmental monitoring procedures, achieve a better understanding of the time and effort put forth into summarizing and publishing research, and gain confidence in their own abilities to express themselves in writing. The Argonne Summary Site Environmental Report fits into the educational needs for 12th grade students. Illinois State Educational Goal 12 states that a student should understand the fundamental concepts, principles, and interconnections of the life, physical, and earth/space sciences. To create this summary booklet, the students had to read and understand the larger technical report, which discusses in-depth many activities and programs that have been established by Argonne to maintain a safe local environment. Creating this Summary Site Environmental Report also helps students fulfill Illinois State Learning Standard 12B5a, which requires that students be able to analyze and explain biodiversity issues, and the causes and effects of extinction. The

  7. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    W. C. Adams

    2007-05-25

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory’s Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

  8. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  9. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  10. System description of the ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) Slurry Loop Testing facility (SLTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Cox, S.A.; Brewer, W.E.; Hacker, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes a test loop specifically designed for dense slurries. The loop provides flow velocity and medium composition calibrations within 1%, as well as online rheometric characterization in non-Newtonian, laminar flow, by means of several unique calibration facilities developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Two horizontal test sections of 6 and 12 m length, as well as a vertical test section of 6 m length, are provided for flowmeter calibration; up to 5 flowmeters can be accommodated simultaneously. In addition to the online calibration schemes, which rank this test loop among the most accurate facilities currently existing, extensive laboratory characterization of grab samples is available. Initial work with coal/oil and coal/water slurries ranged over 60% solids. 18 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  12. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega Studies: A Case Study at Argonne National Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1992 more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the life span and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology mega studies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals, and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research. PMID:22004930

  13. An in-house alternative to traditional SDI services at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, R.E.; Dominiak, R.R.

    1997-02-20

    Selective Dissemination of Information (SDIs) are based on automated, well-defined programs that regularly produce precise, relevant bibliographic information. Librarians have typically turned to information vendors such as Dialog or STN international to design and implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. Because Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents tapes (all subject areas excluding Humanities). ANL scientists enjoy the benefit of in-house developments with BASISplus software programming and no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. The database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne Current Contents Electronic Search Service). Through collaboration with librarians on Boolean logic and selection of terms, users can now design their own personal profiles to comb the new data, thereby avoiding service fees from outside providers. Based on the feedback from scientists, it seems that this new service can help transform the ANL distributed libraries into more efficient central functioning entities that better serve the users. One goal is to eliminate the routing of paper copies of many new journal issues to different library locations for users to browse; instead users may be expected to rely more on electronic dissemination of both table of contents and customized SDIs for new scientific and technical information.

  14. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K.J.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  15. Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed.

  16. Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R.; Garlock, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

  17. NNWSI waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report: January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.

    1988-11-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project is investigating the tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste form under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and the performance of experiments designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1986. This report summarizes progress during the period January--June 1987, 19 refs., 17 figs., 20 tabs.

  18. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Deployment of Phytotechnology in the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hybrid poplar and hybrid willow trees were planted for several environmental objectives at the Argonne National Laboratory - East, near Chicago, IL. Some trees were planted to clean TCE and other solvents from soil, some were planted to control surface water flow on a landfill, a...

  20. Environmental Assessment for Enhanced Operations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-06-27

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with continued and enhanced operation of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), including modifications, upgrades, and new facilities, at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois. This proposed action is needed to meet DOE's mission of sponsoring cutting-edge science and technology. Continued operation would include existing research activities. In 2002, 23 user teams had beamlines in use in 28 sectors of the experiment hall, and approximately 2,000 individual users visited annually (see Section 3.1.1). Enhanced scientific capabilities would include research on Biosafety Level-3 (BSL-3) materials in an existing area originally constructed for such work, and would not require new construction or workforce (see Section 3.1.2). A new experimental unit, the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), would be constructed along the west side of the APS facility and would be used for bench-scale research in nanoscience (see Section 3.1.3). Under the No Action Alternative, current APS operations would continue. However, initiation of BSL-3 research would not occur, and the proposed CNM research facility would not be constructed. The environmental consequences of the Proposed Action are minor. Potential effects to the environment are primarily related to ecological effects during construction and operation of the proposed CNM and human health effects during BSL-3 activities. The potential ecological effects of construction and operation of the CNM would be impacts of stormwater runoff into a restored wetland to the north of the CNM. DOE would minimize stormwater impacts during construction of the CNM by ensuring adequate erosion control before and during construction. Stormwater impacts would be minimized during operation of the CNM by

  1. Testing shields in the Argonne National Laboratory fuel conditioning facility support areas.

    PubMed

    Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

    1997-01-01

    Testing has been completed for two lightly shielded areas that support operations in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Operational requirements dictated the use of a radiography source containing 0.44 TBq (12 Ci) of 192Ir to challenge reinforced concrete and steel shields that surround a decontamination, maintenance, and repair area for contaminated equipment used in hot cell operations. A more intense source containing 0.89 TBq (24 Ci) of 192Ir was used to test lead shot and steel shields around tanks in a radioactive liquid waste system and the boundaries of the room that contained it. Measurement procedures were developed to find design flaws and construction deficiencies while minimizing radiation exposure to test participants. While the shields are adequate to limit gamma ray deep dose equivalents to 10 mSv y(-1) (1 rem y(-1)) or less to facility personnel, several modifications were necessary to assure that the attenuation is adequate to keep dose rates less than 5 microSv h(-1) (0.5 mrem h(-1)) in normally occupied areas. PMID:8972837

  2. Evaluation of the Argonne National Laboratory servo-controlled calorimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The control system of a replacement mode, twin-bridge, water-bath calorimeter originally built by Mound EG&G Applied Technologies was modified by Argonne National Laboratory. The calorimeter was upgraded with a PC-based computer control and data acquisition system. The system was redesigned to operate in a servo-control mode, and a preheater was constructed to allow pre-equilibration of samples. The instrument was sent to the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for testing and evaluation of its performance in the field using heat source standards and plutonium process materials. The important parameters for calorimeter operation necessary to satisfy the nuclear materials control and accountability requirements of the Plutonium Facility were evaluated over a period of several months. These parameters include calorimeter stability, measurement precision and accuracy, and average measurement time. The observed measurement precision and accuracy were found to be acceptable for most accountability measurements, although they were slightly larger than the values for calorimeters in routine use at the Plutonium Facility. Average measurement times were significantly shorter than measurement times for identical items in the Plutonium Facility calorimeters. Unexplained shifts in the baseline measurements were observed on numerous occasions. These shifts could lead to substantial measurement errors if they are not very carefully monitored by the operating facility. Detailed results of the experimental evaluation are presented in this report.

  3. Development and pilot demonstration program of a waste minimization plan at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Wentz, C.A.; Thuot, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    In response to US Department of Energy directives, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a waste minimization plan aimed at reducing the amount of wastes at this national research and development laboratory. Activities at ANL are primarily research- oriented and as such affect the amount and type of source reduction that can be achieved at this facility. The objective of ANL's waste minimization program is to cost-effectively reduce all types of wastes, including hazardous, mixed, radioactive, and nonhazardous wastes. The ANL Waste Minimization Plan uses a waste minimization audit as a systematic procedure to determine opportunities to reduce or eliminate waste. To facilitate these audits, a computerized bar-coding procedure is being implemented at ANL to track hazardous wastes from where they are generated to their ultimate disposal. This paper describes the development of the ANL Waste Minimization Plan and a pilot demonstration of the how the ANL Plan audited the hazardous waste generated within a selected divisions of ANL. It includes quantitative data on the generation and disposal of hazardous waste at ANL and describes potential ways to minimize hazardous wastes. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Authorized limits for disposal of PCB capacitors from Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.-J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-12-22

    This report contains data and analyses to support the approval of authorized release limits for the clearance from radiological control of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors in Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These capacitors contain PCB oil that must be treated and disposed of as hazardous waste under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). However, they had been located in radiological control areas where the potential for neutron activation existed; therefore, direct release of these capacitors to a commercial facility for PCB treatment and landfill disposal is not allowable unless authorized release has been approved. Radiological characterization found no loose contamination on the exterior surface of the PCB capacitors; gamma spectroscopy analysis also showed the radioactivity levels of the capacitors were either at or slightly above ambient background levels. As such, conservative assumptions were used to expedite the analyses conducted to evaluate the potential radiation exposures of workers and the general public resulting from authorized release of the capacitors; for example, the maximum averaged radioactivity levels measured for capacitors nearest to the beam lines were assumed for the entire batch of capacitors. This approach overestimated the total activity of individual radionuclide identified in radiological characterization by a factor ranging from 1.4 to 640. On the basis of this conservative assumption, the capacitors were assumed to be shipped from Argonne to the Clean Harbors facility, located in Deer Park, Texas, for incineration and disposal. The Clean Harbors facility is a state-permitted TSCA facility for treatment and disposal of hazardous materials. At this facility, the capacitors are to be shredded and incinerated with the resulting incineration residue buried in a nearby landfill owned by the company. A variety of receptors that have the potential of receiving radiation exposures were

  5. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled ``Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan`` undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan'' undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  8. Management of wildlife causing damage at Argonne National Laboratory-East, DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The DOE, after an independent review, has adopted an Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) which evaluates use of an Integrated Wildlife Damage Management approach at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois (April 1995). In 1994, the USDA issued a programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that covers nationwide animal damage control activities. The EA for Management of Wildlife Causing Damage at ANL-E tiers off this programmatic EIS. The USDA wrote the EA as a result of DOE`s request to USDA to prepare and implement a comprehensive Wildlife Management Damage Plan; the USDA has authority for animal damage control under the Animal Damage Control Act of 1931, as amended, and the Rural Development, Agriculture and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 1988. DOE has determined, based on the analysis in the EA, that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. Evaluation of P-101 course ``Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE`` Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois July 16, 1991--July 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,`` (P-101) which was conducted July 16 to 26, 1991 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  10. Evaluation of P-101 course Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE'' Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois July 16, 1991--July 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Orientation to Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE,'' (P-101) which was conducted July 16 to 26, 1991 at Argonne National Laboratory, in Argonne, Illinois. The first part of the report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction was very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained appropriate knowledge from the course.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2004-08-12

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for calendar year 2003. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1999-08-26

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1998. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the US Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Moos, L.P.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1991. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. Chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities.

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

  15. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1993. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities.

  16. Vitrification as a low-level radioactive mixed waste treatment technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mazer, J.J.; No, Hyo J.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is developing plans to use vitrification to treat low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) generated onsite. The ultimate objective of this project is to install a full-scale vitrification system at ANL-E capable of processing the annual generation and historic stockpiles of selected LLMW streams. This project is currently in the process of identifying a range of processible glass compositions that can be produced from actual mixed wastes and additives, such as boric acid or borax. During the formulation of these glasses, there has been an emphasis on maximizing the waste content in the glass (70 to 90 wt %), reducing the overall final waste volume, and producing a stabilized low-level radioactive waste glass. Crucible glass studies with actual mixed waste streams have produced alkali borosilicate glasses that pass the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. These same glass compositions, spiked with toxic metals well above the expected levels in actual wastes, also pass the TCLP test. These results provide compelling evidence that the vitrification system and the glass waste form will be robust enough to accommodate expected variations in the LLMW streams from ANL-E. Approximately 40 crucible melts will be studied to establish a compositional envelope for vitrifying ANL-E mixed wastes. Also being determined is the identity of volatilized metals or off-gases that will be generated.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1995-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1994. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK COMPUTER CODE, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  18. Pulsed neutrons: one year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500-MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of approx. 10 ..mu..A. Neutron-scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering, we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 MeV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientific merit of submitted proposals.

  19. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) for 1996. To evaluate the effects of ANL-E operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL-E site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL-E effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL-E, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL-E environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations that govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory-East site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Kolzow, R.G.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the results of the Environmental Protection Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1992. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the CAP-88 version of the EPA-AIRDOSE/RADRISK computer code, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory--East site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Moos, L.P.

    1991-07-01

    This report discusses the results of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) for 1990. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared to applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides was measured in air, surface water, groundwater, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. The results of the surveillance program are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations, is used in this report. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to the various laws and regulations which govern waste handling and disposal is discussed. This report also discusses progress being made on environmental corrective actions and restoration projects from past activities.

  2. Wetlands of Argonne National Laboratory-East DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.; LaGory, K.E.

    1994-03-01

    Jurisdictional wetlands of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) site in DuPage County, Illinois, were delineated in the summer and autumn of 1993 in accordance with the 1987 US Army Corps of Engineers methodology. Potential wetland sites with an area greater than 500 m{sup 2} (0.05 ha [0.124 acre]) were identified for delineation on the basis of aerial photographs, the DuPage County soil survey, and reconnaissance-level field studies. To qualify as a jurisdictional wetland, an area had to support a predominance of hydrophytic vegetation as well as have hydric soil and wetland hydrology. Thirty-five individual jurisdictional wetlands were delineated at ANL-E, totaling 180,604 m{sup 2} (18.1 ha [44.6 acres]). These wetlands were digitized onto the ANL-E site map for use in project planning. Characteristics of each wetland are presented -- including size, dominant plant species and their indicator status, hydrologic characteristics (including water source), and soil characteristics.

  3. Waste characterization for radioactive liquid waste evaporators at Argonne National Laboratory - West.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, B. D.

    1999-02-15

    Several facilities at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) generate many thousand gallons of radioactive liquid waste per year. These waste streams are sent to the AFL-W Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) where they are processed through hot air evaporators. These evaporators remove the liquid portion of the waste and leave a relatively small volume of solids in a shielded container. The ANL-W sampling, characterization and tracking programs ensure that these solids ultimately meet the disposal requirements of a low-level radioactive waste landfill. One set of evaporators will process an average 25,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste, provide shielding, and reduce it to a volume of six cubic meters (container volume) for disposal. Waste characterization of the shielded evaporators poses some challenges. The process of evaporating the liquid and reducing the volume of waste increases the concentrations of RCIU regulated metals and radionuclides in the final waste form. Also, once the liquid waste has been processed through the evaporators it is not possible to obtain sample material for characterization. The process for tracking and assessing the final radioactive waste concentrations is described in this paper, The structural components of the evaporator are an approved and integral part of the final waste stream and they are included in the final waste characterization.

  4. Alternative catalyst and exhaust gas sensor work at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Iton, L.E.; Maroni, V.A.; Dieckman, S.L.; Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1994-12-31

    Research programs at Argonne National Laboratory in the areas of automobile emissions monitoring and control are described. The mandate to improve automobile efficiency while reducing Pollution requires the development of new catalysts for exhaust emissions control that are capable of functioning efficiently under lean-burn engine operating conditions. It is also desirable that the use of expensive noble metal catalysts be avoided. NO{sub x} emissions will not be efficiently controlled by the current three-way, supported noble metal catalysts under lean-burn conditions. New catalysts are being sought that could effect the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by exhaust hydrocarbons in the presence of oxygen. Molecular sieve zeolites of the ZSM-5 and ferrierite types, ion-exchanged with copper ions, are the best of the catalysts known to effect this chemistry, but the mechanism of the SCR is still not understood. In this project the authors will first undertake the investigation of the SCR of NO using model reactions to test postulated mechanistic pathways. Initial experiments have been devised to investigate the possible participation of metal alkyl complexes, metal oxime complexes, N-alkyl-N-nitroso-alkylaminato-metal complexes, and metal nitrile complexes in the zeolites. ANL will also develop microsensors, based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensing techniques, and a micro mass-spectrometer (MS) for tailpipe or engine-out emission monitoring. The sensor configurations and sensing techniques of the proposed SAW and micro-MS are described.

  5. Inspection and monitoring plan, contaminated groundwater seeps 317/319/ENE Area, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-11

    During the course of completing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) in the 317/319/East-Northeast (ENE) Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), groundwater was discovered moving to the surface through a series of groundwater seeps. The seeps are located in a ravine approximately 600 ft south of the ANL-E fence line in Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve. Samples of the seep water were collected and analyzed for selected parameters. Two of the five seeps sampled were found to contain detectable levels of organic contaminants. Three chemical species were identified: chloroform (14--25 {micro}g/L), carbon tetrachloride (56--340 {micro}g/L), and tetrachloroethylene (3--6 {micro}g/L). The other seeps did not contain detectable levels of volatile organics. The nature of the contaminants in the seeps will also be monitored on a regular basis. Samples of surface water flowing through the bottom of the ravine and groundwater emanating from the seeps will be collected and analyzed for chemical and radioactive constituents. The results of the routine sampling will be compared with the concentrations used in the risk assessment. If the concentrations exceed those used in the risk assessment, the risk calculations will be revised by using the higher numbers. This revised analysis will determine if additional actions are warranted.

  6. Pulsed neutrons: One year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, G. H.

    1983-05-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500 MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of ≈ 10 μA. Neutron scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer, and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 meV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientifi cmerit of submitted proposals.

  7. Waste minimization and pollution prevention in D&D operations at the Argonne National Laboratory-East site

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.; Ditch, R.W.; Fellhauer, C.R.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is implementing waste minimization and pollution prevention activities into its conduct of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects. Many of these activities are rather straight forward and simple approaches, yet they are often overlooked and not implemented as often as they should or could be. Specific activities involving recycling and reuse of materials and structures, which have proven useful in lowering decommissioning and disposal costs on D&D projects at ANL are presented.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division: Semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the research activity of the High Energy Physics Division at the Argonne National Laboratory for the period, July 1986-December 1986. Some of the topics included in this report are: high resolution spectrometers, computational physics, spin physics, string theories, lattice gauge theory, proton decay, symmetry breaking, heavy flavor production, massive lepton pair production, collider physics, field theories, proton sources, and facility development. (LSP)

  9. Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Physics Division annual report, January--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K.J.

    1997-08-01

    The past year has seen several of the Physics Division`s new research projects reach major milestones with first successful experiments and results: the atomic physics station in the Basic Energy Sciences Research Center at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source was used in first high-energy, high-brilliance x-ray studies in atomic and molecular physics; the Short Orbit Spectrometer in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator (TJNAF) Facility that the Argonne medium energy nuclear physics group was responsible for, was used extensively in the first round of experiments at TJNAF; at ATLAS, several new beams of radioactive isotopes were developed and used in studies of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics; the new ECR ion source at ATLAS was completed and first commissioning tests indicate excellent performance characteristics; Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of mass-8 nuclei were performed for the first time with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions using state-of-the-art computers, including Argonne`s massively parallel IBM SP. At the same time other future projects are well under way: preparations for the move of Gammasphere to ATLAS in September 1997 have progressed as planned. These new efforts are imbedded in, or flowing from, the vibrant ongoing research program described in some detail in this report: nuclear structure and reactions with heavy ions; measurements of reactions of astrophysical interest; studies of nucleon and sub-nucleon structures using leptonic probes at intermediate and high energies; atomic and molecular structure with high-energy x-rays. The experimental efforts are being complemented with efforts in theory, from QCD to nucleon-meson systems to structure and reactions of nuclei. Finally, the operation of ATLAS as a national users facility has achieved a new milestone, with 5,800 hours beam on target for experiments during the past fiscal year.

  11. Yucca Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Fortner, J.A.; Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.

    1995-02-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1993-September 1994. Studies have been performed to evaluate the performance of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under unsaturated conditions (low volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with simulated waste glasses have been in progress for over eight years and demonstrate that actinides from initially fresh glass surfaces will be released as a result of the spallation of reacted glass layers from the surface, as the small volume of water passes over the waste form. Studies are also underway to evaluate the performance of spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO{sub 2} in projected repository conditions. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for nine years and show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that form on the sample surface is similar to that observed in natural analogues. The reaction of spent fuel samples under conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for nearly two years, and the results suggest that spent fuel follows the same reaction progress as UO{sub 2}. The release of individual fission products and transuranic elements was not congruent, with the release being controlled by the formation of small particles or colloids that are suspended in solution and transported away from the waste form. The reaction progress depends on the composition of the spent fuel samples used and, likely, on the composition of the groundwater that contacts the waste form.

  12. Nanoscience and nanofabrication at Argonne National Laboratory: The art of making small

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2014-03-01

    Over a decade ago the Department of Energy started the design, and construction of five Nanoscale Science Research Centers at different national laboratories with the objective to provide research opportunities in Nanoscience for the scientific community worldwide. The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) at Argonne National Laboratory was constructed in 2006, and opened its doors to the user community in 2007. Currently the CNM hosts over 400 user proposals a year. There are six research groups at the CNM that do work in nanophotonics, electronic and magnetic materials and devices, nanobio interfaces, nanofabrication and devices, x-ray nanoscale microscopy and theory and modeling. I work in the Nanofabrication and Devices group and my research career has covered the use of x-rays, electrons and ions in the pursuit of making the smaller and smaller structures and devices. At the CNM I have been able to push the limits of electron beam lithography, and expand the use of ion beams to large area nanofabrication. Some of our accomplishments include determining liquid-polymer interactions as a function of temperature, redefining proximity effect correction at the nanoscale (NanoPEC), measuring to less than 0.5% error the backscatter range for 100 KV electron beams and finding that the range is a function of the density of the substrate, fabrication of plasmonic slit waveguides, and using ions to create complex three dimensional structures for use in fluidics. None of these accomplishments are possible without detailed understanding of the physics and chemistry mechanisms involved during fabrication. This requires extensive theory and simulation work to validate our experimental results. The fruit of our work then is a full understanding of ``why'' we use certain processes for nanofabrication and not just a simple set of process recipes. A summary of all these activities will be discussed at the presentation. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under

  13. Compliance, assurance, and pollution prevention at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) - process and operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, M. A.; Trychta, K.

    2000-02-10

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is a multi-program laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ANL-E has incorporated its environmental compliance functions and pollution prevention (P2) activities into its processes. Examples of this include standard project and experimental reviews, targeted process analysis, and regulatory and oversight audits. ANL-E's implementation process has allowed them to meet regulatory drivers as well as internal goals with minimal resources. This paper reviews these processes and implementation of the environmental and pollution prevention requirements which have led to an award winning P2 program.

  14. Decontamination and reconditioning of the Argonne National Laboratory-West Casting Laboratory alpha glove box

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W. Jr.; Burke, L.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Casting Laboratory (CL) alpha glove box was used to melt and cast metallic uranium and plutonium fuels as part of the Department of Energy`s Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. This highly contaminated alpha glove box was decontaminated and reconditioned to allow a change in mission. The goal of reconditioning was to install experimental apparatus and to improve contamination control prior to introducing plutonium-238 into the CL glove box. Construction of a glove box containment structure and an increase in room ventilation were required. A temporary breathing air station was provided for personnel protection as well as personnel comfort. The historical contamination levels, the decontamination techniques, and the results of decontamination also are presented. The health physics aspects of the CL alpha glove box project may be applicable to other glove box refurbishment or decommissioning projects.

  15. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. ); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  16. NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report, January--June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Biwer, B.M.

    1990-04-01

    The Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory is performing experiments in support of the waste package development of the Yucca Mountain Project (formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project). Experiments in progress include (1) the development and performance of a durability test in unsaturated conditions, (2) studies of waste form behavior in an irradiated atmosphere, (3) studies of behavior in water vapor, and (4) studies of naturally occurring glasses to be used as analogues for waste glass behavior. This report documents progress made during the period of January--June 1988. 21 refs., 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Post-test analysis of lithium-ion battery materials at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareno, Javier; Dietz-Rago, Nancy; Bloom, Ira

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical performance is often limited by surface and interfacial reactions at the electrodes. However, routine handling of samples can alter the very surfaces that are the object of study. Our approach combines standardized testing of batteries with sample harvesting under inert atmosphere conditions. Cells of different formats are disassembled inside an Argon glove box with controlled water and oxygen concentrations below 2 ppm. Cell components are characterized in situ, guaranteeing that observed changes in physicochemical state are due to electrochemical operation, rather than sample manipulation. We employ a complementary set of spectroscopic, microscopic, electrochemical and metallographic characterization to obtain a complete picture of cell degradation mechanisms. The resulting information about observed degradation mechanisms is provided to materials developers, both academic and industrial, to suggest new strategies and speed up the Research & Development cycle of Li-ion and related technologies. This talk will describe Argonne's post-test analysis laboratory, with an emphasis on capabilities and opportunities for collaboration. Cell disassembly, sample harvesting procedures and recent results will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies, Hybrid and Electric Systems, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+, 17.9% for 39K10+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 12.4% for 133Cs27+. For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times—the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  19. Global climate change and international security. Report on a conference held at Argonne National Laboratory, May 8--10, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, M.

    1991-12-31

    On May 8--10, 1991, the Midwest Consortium of International Security Studies (MCISS) and Argonne National Laboratory cosponsored a conference on Global Climate Change and International Security. The aim was to bring together natural and social scientists to examine the economic, sociopolitical, and security implications of the climate changes predicted by the general circulation models developed by natural scientists. Five themes emerged from the papers and discussions: (1) general circulation models and predicted climate change; (2) the effects of climate change on agriculture, especially in the Third World; (3) economic implications of policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (4) the sociopolitical consequences of climate change; and (5) the effect of climate change on global security.

  20. The path to the future: The role of science and technology at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Reck, R.A.

    1996-04-30

    Today some scientists are concerned that present budget considerations in Washington will make it impossible for the US to maintain its preeminence in important areas of science and technology. In the private sector there has been a demise of substantive R & D efforts through most of the major industries. For DOE a lack of future support for science and technology would be an important issue because this could impact DOE`s abilities to solve problems in its major areas of concern, national security, energy, environment. In fact some scientists maintain that were the present trend to continue unabated it could lead to a national security issue. Preeminence in science and technology plays a critical role in our nation`s position as the leader of world democracy. In contrast with this point of view of gloom and doom, however, in this presentation I hope to bring to you what I see as an exciting message of good news. Today I will list the important opportunities and challenges for the future that I note for ANL, the leadership role that I believe ANL can play and the qualities that will help our laboratory to maintain its status as an outstanding DOE National Laboratory.

  1. Argonne's Laboratory computing center - 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, R.; Pieper, G. W.

    2008-05-28

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (1012 floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2007, there were over 60 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national computing facilities, and improving the scientific reach and

  2. Do you want to build such a machine? : Designing a high energy proton accelerator for Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, E.

    2004-04-05

    Argonne National Laboratory's efforts toward researching, proposing and then building a high-energy proton accelerator have been discussed in a handful of studies. In the main, these have concentrated on the intense maneuvering amongst politicians, universities, government agencies, outside corporations, and laboratory officials to obtain (or block) approval and/or funds or to establish who would have control over budgets and research programs. These ''top-down'' studies are very important but they can also serve to divorce such proceedings from the individuals actually involved in the ground-level research which physically served to create theories, designs, machines, and experiments. This can lead to a skewed picture, on the one hand, of a lack of effect that so-called scientific and technological factors exert and, on the other hand, of the apparent separation of the so-called social or political from the concrete practice of doing physics. An exception to this approach can be found in the proceedings of a conference on ''History of the ZGS'' held at Argonne at the time of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron's decommissioning in 1979. These accounts insert the individuals quite literally as they are, for the most part, personal reminiscences of those who took part in these efforts on the ground level. As such, they are invaluable raw material for historical inquiry but generally lack the rigor and perspective expected in a finished historical work. The session on ''Constructing Cold War Physics'' at the 2002 annual History of Science Society Meeting served to highlight new approaches circulating towards history of science and technology in the post-WWII period, especially in the 1950s. There is new attention towards the effects of training large numbers of scientists and engineers as well as the caution not to equate ''national security'' with military preparedness, but rather more broadly--at certain points--with the explicit ''struggle for the hearts and minds of

  3. Historic preservation requirements and the evaluation of cold war era nuclear facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-East.

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, K. L.

    1999-04-08

    Project design for the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of federal facilities must address the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act which includes compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Section 106 of the NHPA requires that Federal agencies consider any effect their activities may have on historic properties. While a cultural property is not usually considered historic until it has reached an age of 50 years or older, special consideration is given to younger properties if they are of exceptional importance in demonstrating unique development in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, or culture. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) D&D program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), site properties are evaluated within the context of the Cold War Era and within themes associated with nuclear technology. Under this program, ANL-E staff have conducted archival research on three nuclear reactor facilities, one accelerator, and one laboratory building. DOE and ANL-E have been working closely with the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency (IHPA) to determine the eligibility of these properties for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1998, in consultation with the IHPA, the DOE determined that the reactor facilities were eligible. Memoranda of Agreement were signed between the DOE and the IHPA stipulating mitigation requirements for the recordation of two of these properties. The laboratory building was recently determined eligible and will likely undergo similar documentation procedures. The accelerator was determined not eligible. Similar studies and determinations will be required for all future D&D projects.

  4. Performance of the Argonne National Laboratory electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Vondrasek, R.; Kolomiets, A.; Levand, A.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2011-05-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the Californium rare ion breeder upgrade (CARIBU), a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), has been constructed and commissioned. Charge breeding efficiencies up to 15.6% have been realized for stable beams with a typical breeding time of 10 ms/charge state. The CARIBU system has been undergoing commissioning tests utilizing a 100 mCi {sup 252}Cf fission source. A charge breeding efficiency of 14.8 {+-} 5% has been achieved for the first radioactive beam of {sup 143}Cs{sup 27+}.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory high-performance network support of APS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, M.J.; McMahon, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under the Scientific Facilities Initiative, IPNS is planning to double its operation to 32 weeks/yr. Additional scientific and technical support staff will be added for the greatly expanded user program. The IPNS Upgrade Feasibility Study was published in April 1995 and is a thoroughly documented study on a 1-MW pulsed spallation neutron source at Argonne, including cost and schedule. A new booster target ({sup 235}U-Mo alloy) has been designed that will increase the neutron flux by a factor of {approximately}3 and construction will begin soon. A new small angle diffractometer (SAND) is in the final stages of commissioning, a prototype inelastic scattering spectrometer for Chemical Excitations (CHEX) was recently constructed and an upgraded quasielastic spectrometer (QENS) has been designed. IPNS has gained considerable operating experience with solid methane moderators, including controlled heating at periodic intervals in order to anneal the accumulated radiation induced stored energy.

  6. Status and future direction of the melt attack and coolability experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Binder, J.L.; Hill, D.J.

    2001-02-02

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program has been underway at Argonne National Laboratory addressing the ability of water to quench and thermally stabilize a molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) when the interaction is flooded from above. In this program, which has been sponsored by the EPRI-headed Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) international consortium, large scale reactor material integral effects experiments have been conducted, in parallel with related modeling efforts. Plans are currently being developed for continued utilization of the MACE facility under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to achieve the following objectives: (i) resolution of the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a redirected program which focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests; and (ii) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional MCCI under dry cavity conditions. In terms of the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, separate effects tests are planned to provide data on key melt coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests. The results of these tests will provide both confirmatory evidence and test data to support development of validated models for extrapolation to plant conditions. In terms of dry cavity conditions, reactor material tests are planned to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term 2-D MCCI; in particular, lateral vs. axial power split. This paper describes the essential elements of the program to address these two remaining important LWR safety issues.

  7. Vibratory response of a mirror support/positioning system for the Advanced Photon Source project at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Basdogan, I.; Shu, Deming; Kuzay, T.M.; Royston, T.J.; Shabana, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    The vibratory response of a typical mirror support/positioning system used at the experimental station of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) project at Argonne National Laboratory is investigated. Positioning precision and stability are especially critical when the supported mirror directs a high-intensity beam aimed at a distant target. Stability may be compromised by low level, low frequency seismic and facility-originated vibrations traveling through the ground and/or vibrations caused by flow-structure interactions in the mirror cooling system. The example case system has five positioning degrees of freedom through the use of precision actuators and rotary and linear bearings. These linkage devices result in complex, multi-dimensional vibratory behavior that is a function of the range of positioning configurations. A rigorous multibody dynamical approach is used for the development of the system equations. Initial results of the study, including estimates of natural frequencies and mode shapes, as well as limited parametric design studies, are presented. While the results reported here are for a particular system, the developed vibratory analysis approach is applicable to the wide range of high-precision optical positioning systems encountered at the APS and at other comparable facilities.

  8. NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation] waste form testing at Argonne National Laboratory; Semiannual report, July--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Ebert, W.L.; Mazer, J.J.; Biwer, B.M.

    1988-07-01

    Tests are ongoing at Argonne National Laboratory to examine the reaction of glass with water under conditions that may exist in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Examination of glass reaction using the Unsaturated Test method as applied to simulated defense glass (SRL 165 black frit based) and simulated West Valley glass (ATM-10) is ongoing. The tests on SRL 165 glass have been ongoing for 104 weeks with nonstoichiometric release of Li, Na, B, and actinide elements being observed throughout the test period. The tests on ATM-10 glass have been in progress for 26 weeks and it is too early in the test cycle to assess the glass reaction. The influence of penetrating gamma radiation on the reaction of synthetic nuclear waste glasses in tuff groundwater was also investigated. Modified MCC-1 static leaching experiments were performed under radiation exposures of 1 {times} 10{sup 3} R/h and O R/h at 90{degree}C. The groundwater was acidified by nitrous and nitric acids radiolytically produced in the air. The high bicarbonate ion concentration of the groundwater prevented the pH from dropping below 6.4, however. The glass reaction, as measured by the release of glass species and the thickness of an alteration layer formed on the glass surface, was not measurably affected by radiation. 24 refs., 34 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. Waste reduction efforts through evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East.

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, T. S.; Cohen, A. B.; Tsai, H.; Kettman, W. C.; Trychta, K.

    1999-11-08

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years.

  10. Evaluation of NDE Round-Robin Exercises Using the NRC Steam Generator Mockup at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Muscara, Joseph; Kupperman, David S.; Bakhtiari, Sasab; Park, Jang-Yul; Shack, William J.

    2002-07-01

    This paper discusses round-robin exercises using the NRC steam generator (SG) mock-up at Argonne National Laboratory to assess inspection reliability. The purpose of the round robins was to assess the current reliability of SG tubing inservice inspection, determine the probability of detection (POD) as function of flaw size or severity, and assess the capability for sizing of flaws. For the round robin and subsequent evaluation completed in 2001, eleven teams participated. Bobbin and rotating coil mock-up data collected by qualified industry personnel were evaluated. The mock-up contains hundreds of cracks and simulations of artifacts such as corrosion deposits and tube support plates that make detection and characterization of cracks more difficult in operating steam generators than in most laboratory situations. An expert Task Group from industry, Argonne National Laboratory, and the NRC have reviewed the signals from the laboratory-grown cracks used in the mock-up to ensure that they provide reasonable simulations of those obtained in the field. The mock-up contains 400 tube openings. Each tube contains nine 22.2-mm (7/8-in.) diameter, 30.5-cm (1-ft) long, Alloy 600 test sections. The flaws are located in the tube sheet near the roll transition zone (RTZ), in the tube support plate (TSP), and in the free-span. The flaws are primarily intergranular stress corrosion cracks (axial and circumferential, ID and OD) though intergranular attack (IGA) wear and fatigue cracks are also present, as well as cracks in dents. In addition to the simulated tube sheet and TSP the mock-up has simulated sludge and magnetite deposits. A multiparameter eddy current algorithm, validated for mock-up flaws, provided a detailed isometric plot for every flaw and was used to establish the reference state of defects in the mock-up. The detection results for the 11 teams were used to develop POD curves as a function of maximum depth, voltage and the parameter m p, for the various types of

  11. DOE/EA-1519: Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Zero Power Reactors (Building 315) at Argonne National Laboratory (April 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-04-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to decontaminate and decommission the Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) facilities located in Building 315 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in Argonne, Illinois (Figure 1-1). The proposed action would occur in two phases: ZPR-6 would be the focus of Phase I and ZPR-9 would be the focus of Phase II. DOE has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. {section} 4321 et seq., and applicable regulations (Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Parts 1500-1508 and 10 CFR Part 1021). This section describes the reactors and their current status.

  12. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  13. Determination of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples by gamma spectroscopy at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, W.E.; Heinrich, R.R.; Lamoureux, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    We currently have six Ge/Ge(Li) detectors that are being used for gamma counting of environmental samples (three with horizontal geometry, three with vertical geometry). The detectors were calibrated for close-geometry efficiency by counting standards in a set configuration (a height of 6.4 cm in a 4-oz. wide-mouthed Naglene bottle) immediately adjacent to the cryostat face. This configuration was chosen so that the standards would be symmetrical to the centers of both the horizontal and vertical detectors. Two solid standards were prepared by adding a known amount of Standard Reference Material NBL No. 6-A (Pitchblende) and NBL No. 7-A (Monazite Sand) to a blanked soil and mixing. Homogeneity of the standards was checked by counting each standard at each quadrant (on a horizontal detector). The final mixtures showed less than 1% deviation between the high and low quadrant counts. Two liquid secondary standards were prepared from stock solutions of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 131/I, and /sup 110m/Ag, which has been characterized as point sources using several detector efficiency curves. These efficiencies were determined using point source standards from the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). All standards had activity levels that allowed less than 1% counting statistics to be obtained on the major peaks (i.e., those with stronger branching ratio) within two hours. Analysis of the resulting data yield smooth efficiency curves for each of the six detectors. Although the standard compositions varied, solid and liquid, the densities were all approx. =1.0 g/cm/sup 3/. 3 refs.

  14. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  15. The ANL electric vehicle battery R D program for DOE-EHP. [ANL (Argonne National Laboratory); EHP (Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-15

    The Electrochemical Technology Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides technical and programmatic support to DOE's Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division (DOE-EHP). The goal of DOE-EHP is to advance promising electric-vehicle (EV) propulsion technologies to levels where industry will continue their commercial development and thereby significantly reduce air pollution and petroleum consumption due to the transportation sector of the economy. In support of this goal, ANL provides research, development, testing/evaluation, post-test analysis, modeling, and project management on advanced battery technologies for DOE-EHP. This report summarizes the battery-related activities undertaken during the period of January 1, 1993 through March 31, 1993. In this report, the objective, background, technical progress, and status are described for each task. The work is organized into the following task areas: 1.0 Project Management; 2.0 Sodium/Metal Chloride R D; 3.0 Microreference Electrodes for Lithium/Polymer Batteries.

  16. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of 61 plutonium gloveboxes in D-Wing, Building 212 Argonne National Laboratory-East: Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, C.L.; Rose, R.W.

    1996-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is a government-owned, contractor operated, multipurpose research facility located 25 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on 689 hectares (1,700 acres) in DuPage County, Illinois, as shown in Figure 1.1. Building 212 is located in the central area of ANL-E, as shown in Figure 1.2. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the risk of radioactive material release from the contaminated glovebox systems and to make the laboratories available for unrestricted use. The following work objectives were established: (1) Identify and remove radioactive materials for return to ANL-E Special Materials control. (2) Remove and package the radioactively contaminated materials and equipment from the gloveboxes. (3) Decontaminate the gloveboxes to nontransuranic (non-TRU) levels. (4) Size-reduce and package the gloveboxes and support systems. (5) Document and dispose of the radioactive and mixed waste. (6) Decontaminate, survey, and release the nine laboratories and corridor areas for unrestricted use.

  18. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  19. Argonne's Laboratory computing resource center : 2006 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, R. B.; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Drugan, C. D.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-05-31

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. In September 2002 the LCRC deployed a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX to address Laboratory needs for mid-range supercomputing. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the 50 fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2006, there were 76 active projects on Jazz involving over 380 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to foster growth in the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to offer more scientific data management capabilities, expanding Argonne staff use of national

  20. Results of direct containment heating integral experiments at 1/40th scale at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-09-01

    A series of integral tests have been completed that investigate the effect of scale and containment atmosphere initial composition on Direct Containment Heating (DCH) phenomena at 1/40 linear scale. A portion of these experiments were performed as counterparts to integral experiments conducted at 1/10th linear scale at Sandia National Laboratories. The tests investigated DCH phenomena in a 1/40th scale mockup of Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry. The test apparatus was a scaled down version of the SNL apparatus and included models of the reactor vessel lower head, containment cavity, instrument tunnel, lower subcompartment structures and the upper dome. A High Pressure Melt Ejection (HPME) was produced using steam as a blowdown gas and iron-alumina thermite with chromium as a core melt simulant. The results of the counterpart experiments indicated no effect of scale on debris/gas heat transfer and debris metal oxidation with steam. However, the tests indicated a slight effect of scale on hydrogen combustion, the results indicating slightly more efficient combustion with increasing scale. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the subcompartment structures in trapping debris exiting the cavity and preventing it from reaching the upper dome. The test results also indicated that a 50% air -- 50% steam atmosphere prevented hydrogen combustion. However, a 50% air - 50% nitrogen did not prevent hydrogen combustion in a HPME with all other conditions being nominally the same.

  1. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D.

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  2. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center : 2005 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, R. B.; Coghlan, S. C; Kaushik, D. K.; Riley, K. R.; Valdes, J. V.; Pieper, G. P.

    2007-06-30

    Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center in the spring of 2002 to help meet pressing program needs for computational modeling, simulation, and analysis. The guiding mission is to provide critical computing resources that accelerate the development of high-performance computing expertise, applications, and computations to meet the Laboratory's challenging science and engineering missions. The first goal of the LCRC was to deploy a mid-range supercomputing facility to support the unmet computational needs of the Laboratory. To this end, in September 2002, the Laboratory purchased a 350-node computing cluster from Linux NetworX. This cluster, named 'Jazz', achieved over a teraflop of computing power (10{sup 12} floating-point calculations per second) on standard tests, making it the Laboratory's first terascale computing system and one of the fifty fastest computers in the world at the time. Jazz was made available to early users in November 2002 while the system was undergoing development and configuration. In April 2003, Jazz was officially made available for production operation. Since then, the Jazz user community has grown steadily. By the end of fiscal year 2005, there were 62 active projects on Jazz involving over 320 scientists and engineers. These projects represent a wide cross-section of Laboratory expertise, including work in biosciences, chemistry, climate, computer science, engineering applications, environmental science, geoscience, information science, materials science, mathematics, nanoscience, nuclear engineering, and physics. Most important, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. The LCRC continues to improve the computational science and engineering capability and quality at the Laboratory. Specific goals include expansion of the use of Jazz to new disciplines and Laboratory initiatives, teaming with Laboratory infrastructure providers to develop

  3. Upgrade of 400,000 gallon water storage tank at Argonne National Laboratory-West to UCRL-15910 high hazard seismic requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J.; Harris, B.G.

    1993-10-01

    As part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Project at Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL-W), it was necessary to strengthen an existing 400,000 gallon flat-bottom water storage tank to meet UCRL-15910 (currently formulated as DOE Standard DOE-STD-1020-92, Draft) high hazard natural phenomena requirements. The tank was constructed in 1988 and preliminary calculations indicated that the existing base anchorage was insufficient to prevent buckling and potential failure during a high hazard seismic event. General design criteria, including ground motion input, load combinations, etc., were based upon the requirements of UCRL-15910 for high hazard facilities. The analysis and capacity assessment criteria were based on the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the Generic Implementation Procedure developed by the Seismic Qualification Utilities Group (SQUG). Upgrade modifications, consisting of increasing the size of the foundation and installing additional anchor bolts and chairs, were necessary to increase the capacity of the tank anchorage/support system. The construction of the upgrades took place in 1992 while the tank remained in service to allow continued operation of the EBR-II reactor. The major phases of construction included the installation and testing of 144 1/14in. {times} 15in., and 366 1in. {times} 16in. epoxied concrete anchors, placement of 220 cubic yards of concrete heavily reinforced, and installation of 24 1-1/2in. {times} 60in. tank anchor bolts and chairs. A follow-up inspection of the tank interior by a diver was conducted to determine if the interior tank coating had been damaged by the chair welding. The project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  4. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  5. Argonne National Laboratory Expedited Site Characterization: First International Symposium on Integrated Technical Approaches to Site Characterization - Proceedings Volume

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-08

    Laboratory applications for the analysis of PCBS (polychlorinated biphenyls) in environmental matrices such as soil/sediment/sludge and oil/waste oil were evaluated for potential reduction in waste, source reduction, and alternative techniques for final determination. As a consequence, new procedures were studied for solvent substitution, miniaturization of extraction and cleanups, minimization of reagent consumption, reduction of cost per analysis, and reduction of time. These new procedures provide adequate data that meet all the performance requirements for the determination of PCBS. Use of the new procedures reduced costs for all sample preparation techniques. Time and cost were also reduced by combining the new sample preparation procedures with the power of fast gas chromatography. Separation of Aroclor 1254 was achieved in less than 6 min by using DB-1 and SPB-608 columns. With the greatly shortened run times, reproducibility can be tested quickly and consequently with low cost. With performance-based methodology, the applications presented here can be applied now, without waiting for regulatory approval.

  6. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO

  7. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman

    2009-11-18

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing—everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  8. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    ScienceCinema

    Pete Beckman

    2010-01-08

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing?everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently.

  9. Green Supercomputing at Argonne

    ScienceCinema

    Beckman, Pete

    2013-04-19

    Pete Beckman, head of Argonne's Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) talks about Argonne National Laboratory's green supercomputing?everything from designing algorithms to use fewer kilowatts per operation to using cold Chicago winter air to cool the machine more efficiently. Argonne was recognized for green computing in the 2009 HPCwire Readers Choice Awards. More at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/news091117.html Read more about the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at http://www.alcf.anl.gov/

  10. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema

    Eric Isaccs

    2010-01-08

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  11. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Isaccs

    2009-09-17

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  12. Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, R. B.

    2011-05-13

    Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

  13. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  14. Employment at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    E. S. Peterson; C. A. Allen

    2007-04-01

    Scientists enter the National Laboratory System for many different reasons. For some, faculty positions are scarce, so they take staff-scientist position at national laboratories (i.e. Pacific Northwest, Idaho, Los Alamos, and Brookhaven). Many plan to work at the National Laboratory for 5 to 7 years and then seek an academic post. For many (these authors included), before they know it it’s 15 or 20 years later and they never seriously considered leaving the laboratory system.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  16. Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliom, Laura R.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has identified technology transfer to U.S. industry as a laboratory mission which complements our national security mission and as a key component of the Laboratory's future. A number of technology transfer mechanisms - such as CRADA's, licenses, work-for-others, and consortia - are identified and specific examples are given. Sandia's experience with the Specialty Metals Processing Consortium is highlighted with a focus on the elements which have made it successful. A brief discussion of Sandia's potential interactions with NASA under the Space Exploration Initiative was included as an example of laboratory-to-NASA technology transfer. Viewgraphs are provided.

  17. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  18. High Technology School-to-Work Program at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Argonne's High Technology School-to-Work Program for Chicago Public School Students. Supported by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Chicago Public Schools, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago.

  19. High Technology School-to-Work Program at Argonne

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne's High Technology School-to-Work Program for Chicago Public School Students. Supported by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Chicago Public Schools, Argonne National Laboratory and the City of Chicago.

  20. Talking with some directors of the U.S. national laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncone, Kelly

    2005-06-01

    JOM surveyed the leaders of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) national laboratories for perspectives on some of the U.S. science and engineering community’s most pressing issues regarding R&D, globalization, national security, and budget constraints. The journal posed the same five questions to each lab director. What follows are responses from six of the directors: Michael R. Anastasio, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Dan Arvizu, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); John J. Grossenbacher, Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Thomas O. Hunter, Sandia National Laboratories; Robert Rosner, Argonne National Laboratory; and Jeffrey Wadsworth, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  1. Argonne nuclear pioneer: Leonard Koch

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Leonard Koch joined Argonne National Laboratory in 1948. He helped design and build Experimental Breeder Reactor-1 (EBR-1), the first reactor to generate useable amounts of electricity from nuclear energy.

  2. Argonne National Lab - Theory and Computing Sciences, Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, Pete

    2009-01-01

    Argonne's new TCS building houses all of Argonne's computing divisions, and is designed to foster collaboration of the Manhattan Project model "Getting the best people together and having them work on a problem with singular determination." More at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/tcs0910.html

  3. Preparing for radiological assessments in the event of a tornado strike at Argonne National Lab. -East

    SciTech Connect

    Goodkind, M.E.; Klimczak, C.A.; Munyon, W.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory located 22 miles southwest of downtown Chicago on a wooded, 1700-acre site. The principal nuclear facilities at ANL include a large fast neutron source (Intense Pulse Neutron Source) in which high-energy protons strike a uranium target to produce neutrons for research studies; [sup 60]Co irradiation sources; chemical and metallurgical plutonium laboratories, some of which are currently being decommissioned; several large hot cell facilities designed for work with multicurie quantities of actinide elements and irradiated reactor fuel materials; a few small research reactors currently in different phases of being decommissioned; and a variety of research laboratories handling many different sources in various chemical and physical forms. The hazards analysis for the ANL site shows that tornado strikes are a serious threat. The site has been struck twice in the past 20 yr, receiving only minor building damage and no release of radioactivity to the environment. Although radioactive materials in general are handled in areas that provide good tornado protection, ANL is prepared to address the problems that would occur should there be a loss of control of radioactive materials due to severe building damage.

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Drigert, M.W.

    1995-08-01

    M. W. Drigert has been associated with many research programs done with the Argonne-Notre Dame BGO {gamma}-ray facility. Within the collaboration he is responsible for the maintenance and continuous upgrade of the software used to analyze the data taken with the facility. Among the present tasks under way are the migration of the analysis software to UNIX platforms and the expansion of the software`s graphics capabilities. M. W. Drigert has been heavily involved in the superdeformation studies in the Dy and Pb mass regions. He has also been interested in the study of octupole stability in the light actinide mass region. Future research plans include further studies of nuclei in the light actinide region, with the emphasis on using the FMA in conjunction with the Ge detectors from the {gamma}-ray facility to investigate nuclei which can only be populated by charged particle evaporation channels.

  5. Argonne OutLoud Public Lecture Series: Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Blomquist

    2012-12-10

    On November 15, 2012, Argonne National Laboratory opened its doors to the public for a presentation/discussion titled "Getting to Know Nuclear: Past, Present and Future." The speaker was Argonne researcher Roger Blomquist. The event was the latest in the Argonne OutLoud Public Lecture Series. For more information, visit the Argonne Nuclear Engineering Division website (http://www.ne.anl.gov/About/headlines...).

  6. Argonne ARPA-E Battery Research

    ScienceCinema

    Amine, Khalil; Sinkula, Michael

    2013-04-19

    Argonne National Laboratory and Envia Systems annouced a licensing agreement for Argonne's patented electrode material technology. Envia plans to commercialize these materials for use in energy storage devices for the next generation of electric, plug-in and hybrid electric vehicles. General Motors Company, LG Chem, BASF and Toda Kyoga have also licensed this suite of Argonne's technologies. For more information visit us at http://www.anl.gov

  7. Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program at Argonne

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program for Renewable Energy at Argonne National Laboratory. Principal Contacts; Harold Myron (ANL), Anthony Dvorak (ANL), Freddie Cardenas (BIA). Supported by; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Education, and Argonne National Laboratory

  8. Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Bureau of Indian Education Many Farms Training Program for Renewable Energy at Argonne National Laboratory. Principal Contacts; Harold Myron (ANL), Anthony Dvorak (ANL), Freddie Cardenas (BIA). Supported by; United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Education, and Argonne National Laboratory

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory`s 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory`s Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram.

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Mary

    2010-06-02

    Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  12. A National Natural Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Savannah River Site, a national environmental research park that shelters wild animals and idle nuclear reactors. Outlines research conducted at the site that focuses on the recovery of ecosystems after disturbance related to the operation of nuclear reactors and other land uses. (LZ)

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  14. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  15. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. INEL is a multiprogram, laboratory site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Overall site management is provided by the DOE Field Office, Idaho; however, the DOE Field Office, Chicago has responsibility for the Argonne National Laboratory-West facilities and operations through the Argonne Area Office. In addition, the Idaho Branch Office of the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office has responsibility for the Naval Reactor Facility (NRF) at the INEL. The assessment included all DOE elements having ongoing program activities at the site except for the NRF. In addition, the Safety and Health Subteam did not review the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. facilities and operations. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from June 17 to August 2, 1991, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES H) disciplines; management; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal INEL site requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractors management of ES H/quality assurance programs was conducted.

  16. National Water Quality Laboratory Profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raese, Jon W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Water Quality Laboratory determines organic and inorganic constituents in samples of surface and ground water, river and lake sediment, aquatic plant and animal material, and precipitation collected throughout the United States and its territories by the U.S. Geological Survey. In water year 1994, the Laboratory produced more than 900,000 analytical results for about 65,000 samples. The Laboratory also coordinates an extensive network of contract laboratories for the determination of radiochemical and stable isotopes and work for the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Contamination Hydrology Program. Heightened concerns about water quality and about the possible effects of toxic chemicals at trace and ultratrace levels have contributed to an increased demand for impartial, objective, and independent data.

  17. Testing activities at the National Battery Test Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornstra, F.; Deluca, W. H.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    The National Battery Test Laboratory (NBTL) is an Argonne National Laboratory facility for testing, evaluating, and studying advanced electric storage batteries. The facility tests batteries developed under Department of Energy programs and from private industry. These include batteries intended for future electric vehicle (EV) propulsion, electric utility load leveling (LL), and solar energy storage. Since becoming operational, the NBTL has evaluated well over 1400 cells (generally in the form of three- to six-cell modules, but up to 140-cell batteries) of various technologies. Performance characterization assessments are conducted under a series of charge/discharge cycles with constant current, constant power, peak power, and computer simulated dynamic load profile conditions. Flexible charging algorithms are provided to accommodate the specific needs of each battery under test. Special studies are conducted to explore and optimize charge procedures, to investigate the impact of unique load demands on battery performance, and to analyze the thermal management requirements of battery systems.

  18. The National Teacher Enhancement Program (K-8) coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Teachers need help, not harassment. So do the establishments in which teachers practice their profession. Community resources must be marshalled to provide help to local schools and teachers. In 1990 the National Science Foundation (NSF) established a unique educational activity named the National Teacher Enhancement Program (NTEP). NSF took advantage of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored educational programs and resources at several large DOE contractor labs that had had prior experience with DOE supported teacher enhancement programs. While DOE concentrated on teacher enhancement activities for secondary teachers, the NSF concentrated on teachers from grades K-8. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the lead organization for both administering and coordinating the grant. Other participating laboratories are Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FERMI), Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) with some support functions provided by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). The program calls for a three week duration workshop to be conducted at each lab followed by in-service training and other activities during the year. The NSF/NTEP protocol calls for networking among the participating organizations and some of the teachers. An assessment effort is also an integral part of the program. 2 refs.

  19. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - GEOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    These reports summarize pollution prevention opportunity assessments conducted jointly by EPA and DOE at the Geochemistry Laboratory and the Manufacturing and Fabrication Repair Laboratory at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories facility in Albuquerque, New Mex...

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  1. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  2. Argonne's SpEC Module

    ScienceCinema

    Harper, Jason

    2014-06-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  3. Argonne's SpEC Module

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Jason

    2014-05-05

    Jason Harper, an electrical engineer in Argonne National Laboratory's EV-Smart Grid Interoperability Center, discusses his SpEC Module invention that will enable fast charging of electric vehicles in under 15 minutes. The module has been licensed to BTCPower.

  4. Argonne National Laboratory HVEM Summer Institute lecture - kinetics II

    SciTech Connect

    Westmacott, K.H.

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to outline some of the ways in which the High Voltage Electron Microscope can be used to study the kinetics of secondary defect shrinkage and precipitate particle growth and dissolution. In many cases, good agreement between the predictions of theory and the experimental observations are found and this provides not only insights into the mechanisms underlying the processes, but also quantitative measurement of parameters of metallurgical importance. To summarize, some of the advantages of the HVEM in kinetic studies include: (1) unlike bulk studies where only average behavior is measured, precise measurements on individual particles may be made; (2) in some systems it is useful for rapidly establishing phase boundaries, (3) anomolous behavior such as may occur by interactions with lattice defects and boundaries may be studied (4) growth and dissolution mechanisms may be established, (5) phase stability in an irradiation environment may be studied directly.

  5. 2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-06-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. 2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-08-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  7. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grazis, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  8. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grazis, B.M.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  9. Proactive maintenance initiatives at Argonne National Laboratory-West

    SciTech Connect

    Duckwitz, N.R.; Duncan, L.W.; Whipple, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    In the late 1980`s, ANL-W Management foresaw a need to provide dedicated technical support for maintenance supervisors. Maintenance supervisors were facing increased challenges to ensure all environmental, safety, and waste management regulations were followed in daily maintenance activities. This increased burden was diverting supervisory time away from on-the-job supervision. Supervisors were finding less time for their ``mentor`` roles to ensure maintenance focused on finding and correcting root causes. Additionally the traditional maintenance organization could not keep up with the explosion in predictive maintenance technologies. As a result, engineers were tasked to provide direct technical support to the maintenance organization. Today the maintenance technical support group consists of two mechanical engineers, two electrical engineers and an I&C engineer. The group provides a readily available, quick response resource for crafts people and their supervisors. They can and frequently do ask the support group for help to determine the root cause and to effect permanent fixes. Crafts and engineers work together informally to make an effective maintenance team. In addition to day-to-day problem solving, the technical support group has established several maintenance improvement programs for the site. This includes vibration analysis of rotating machinery, testing of fuel for emergency diesel generators, improving techniques for testing of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and capacity testing of UPS and emergency diesel starting batteries. These programs have increased equipment reliability, reduced conventional routine maintenance, reduced unexpected maintenance, and improved testing accuracy. This paper will discuss the interaction of the technical support group within the maintenance department. Additionally the maintenance improvement programs will be presented along with actual cases encountered, the resolutions and lessons learned.

  10. The Argonne radon-in-air analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, H.F.

    1995-12-31

    The methods used or developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the measurement of radon in air are being summarized here. The radon calibration work has been entirely maintained during the last several years by F. Markun (Analytic Services Section).

  11. Sandia National Laboratories embraces ISDN

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, L.F.; Eldridge, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a multidisciplinary research and development laboratory located on Kirtland Air Force Base, has embraced Integrated Services Digital Network technology as an integral part of its communication network. Sandia and the Department of Energy`s Albuquerque Operations Office have recently completed the installation of a modernized and expanded telephone system based, on the AT&T 5ESS telephone switch. Sandia is committed to ISDN as an integral part of data communication services, and it views ISDN as one part of a continuum of services -- services that range from ISDN`s asynchronous and limited bandwidth Ethernet (250--1000 Kbps) through full bandwidth Ethernet, FDDI, and ATM at Sonet rates. Sandia has demonstrated this commitment through its use of ISDN data features to support critical progmmmatic services such as access to corporate data base systems. In the future, ISDN will provide enhanced voice, data communication, and video services.

  12. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  13. Argonne's 2012 Earth Day Event

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Argonne's 2012 Earth Day event drew crowds from across the laboratory. Argonne and U.S. Department of Energy employees toured booths and interactive displays set up by Argonne programs and clubs. Several of Argonne's partners participated, including U.S. Department of Energy, University of Chicago, Abri Credit Union, DuPage County Forest Preserve, DuPage Water Commission, PACE and Morton Arboretum. Argonne scientists and engineers also participated in a poster session, discussing their clean energy research.

  14. International aspects of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The national laboratories of the Department of Energy can rightly claim to be called international laboratories because of their role in international research and development activities. These laboratories have staff that pursue internationally acclaimed research with both national and international colleagues and have facilities that support these endeavors.

  15. Argonne`s Expedited Site Characterization: An integrated approach to cost- and time-effective remedial investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Walker, J.L.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Meyer, W.T.

    1995-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a methodology for remedial site investigation that has proven to be both technically superior to and more cost- and time-effective than traditional methods. This methodology is referred to as the Argonne Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). Quality is the driving force within the process. The Argonne ESC process is abbreviated only in time and cost and never in terms of quality. More usable data are produced with the Argonne ESC process than with traditional site characterization methods that are based on statistical-grid sampling and multiple monitoring wells. This paper given an overview of the Argonne ESC process and compares it with traditional methods for site characterization. Two examples of implementation of the Argonne ESC process are discussed to illustrate the effectiveness of the process in CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) and RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) programs.

  16. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    SciTech Connect

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  18. Argonne's contribution to regional development : successful examples.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y. I.

    2000-11-14

    Argonne National Laboratory's mission is basic research and technology development to meet national goals in scientific leadership, energy technology, and environmental quality. In addition to its core missions as a national research and development center, Argonne has exerted a positive impact on its regional economic development, has carried out outstanding educational programs not only for college/graduate students but also for pre-college students and teachers, and has fostered partnerships with universities for research collaboration and with industry for shaping the new technological frontiers.

  19. DATA RECOVERY EFFORTS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Saleem Salaymeh; Michael Ehinger

    2010-07-01

    Abstract was already submitted. Could not find the previous number. Would be fine with attaching/update of old number. Abstract Below: Modern nuclear facilities will have significant process monitoring capability for their operators. These systems will also be used for domestic safeguards applications, which has led to research over new diversion-detection algorithms. Curiously missing from these efforts are verification and validation data sets. A tri-laboratory project to locate the existing data sets and recover their data has yielded three major potential sources of data. The first is recovery of the process monitoring data of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, which now has a distributable package for algorithm developers. The second data set is extensive sampling and process data from Savannah River National Laboratory’s F- and H-canyon sites. Finally, high fidelity data from the start-up tests at the Barnwell Reprocessing Facility is in recovery. This paper details the data sets and compares their relative attributes.

  20. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W.; James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T.

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  1. Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.S.; Arvizu, D.E.

    1993-10-01

    Transferring technology to the private sector to help improve the competitiveness of key US industries is now an official mission of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) defense program national laboratories. We believe that national laboratories can play an important role in addressing US industrial competitiveness. Sandia is seeking to match laboratory strengths with industry-defined market needs in targeted industrial sectors. Sandia, like other national and federal laboratories, is developing an aggressive technology transfer program. This paper provides a brief review of our program and provides a snap-shot of where we are at today.

  3. Metamaterials program at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert

    2010-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Metamaterial Science and Technology Program has developed novel HPC-based design tools, wafer scale 3D fabrication processes, and characterization tools to enable thermal IR optical metamaterial application studies.

  4. Department of Energy national laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Trivelpiece, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a transcript of the testimony of Alvin W. Travelpiece before the Congressional Subcommittee on Research and Development. Emphasis is placed on the importance of funding nuclear programs to assure national well-being; and, past accomplishments in the nuclear programs are reviewed. (FSD)

  5. The Future of the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D.

    1997-12-31

    The policy debate that has surrounded the national laboratories of the Department of Energy since the end of the Cold War has been very confusing. Initially, with the passage of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989, the laboratories were encouraged to form cooperative arrangements with industry to maintain their technology base and give a boost for U.S. industrial competitiveness. But in the 104th Congress, technology transfer programs were severely constrained.

  6. Inverter testing at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Bonn, R.H.; Sittler, G.

    1997-04-01

    Inverters are key building blocks of photovoltaic (PV) systems that produce ac power. The balance of systems (BOS) portion of a PV system can account for up to 50% of the system cost, and its reliable operation is essential for a successful PV system. As part of its BOS program, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) maintains a laboratory wherein accurate electrical measurements of power systems can be made under a variety of conditions. This paper outlines the work that is done in that laboratory.

  7. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  8. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. The OCS administration at the INEL was the sixth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The INEL Organization is somewhat different from other DOE facilities are which the OCS was administered, due to the presence of six different major operating contractors. The seven organizations assessed at the INEL are: (1) Argonne National Laboratory -- West; (2) DOE Fire Department/Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory; (3) EG G Idaho Incorporated; (4) MK Ferguson; (5) Protection Technology Incorporated; (6) Rockwell; and (7) Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Incorporated. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries by organization, Supervisory Level, Staff Classification, and department within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratory’s engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nation’s nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INL’s Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nation’s premier applied science laboratories.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, William R. Jr.

    1999-08-26

    The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

  11. Challenges of Implementing Iranian National Laboratory Standards

    PubMed Central

    Safadel, N; Dahim, P; Anjarani, S; Rahnamaye Farzami, M; Samiee, S Mirab; Amini, R; Farsi, Sh; Mahdavi, S; Khodaverdian, K; Rashed Marandi, F

    2013-01-01

    After four years of publishing the Iranian National Laboratory Standard and following a strategic plan to implement its requirements, it was decided to review the taken actions, evaluating the achievements and the failures, as well as analyzing the gaps and planning the interventional activities to resolve the problems. A thorough evaluation revealed that the progress of implementation process varies considerably in different provinces, as well as in laboratories in different public and private sectors. Diversity and heterogeneousity of laboratories throughout the country is one of unresolvable problems. Although we encounter shortage of resources in the country, improper allocation or distribution of resources and budgets make the problems more complicated. Inadequacy of academic training in laboratory sciences has resulted in necessity of holding comprehensive post-graduate training courses. Revising academic curriculum of laboratory sciences could be mostly helpful, moreover there should be organized, training courses with pre-determined practical topics. providing specific technical guidelines, to clarify the required technical details could temporarily fill the training gaps of laboratory staff. Inadequate number of competent auditors was one of the difficulties in universities. Another important challenge returns to laboratory equipment, developing the national controlling system to manage the laboratory equipment in terms of quality and accessibility has been planned in RHL. At last cultural problems and resistance to change are main obstacles that have reduced the pace of standardization, it needs to rationalize the necessity of establishing laboratory standards for all stakeholders. PMID:23865029

  12. Creating the laboratory`s future; A strategy for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    ``Creating The Laboratory`s Future`` describes Livermore`s roles and responsibilities as a Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory and sets the foundation for decisions about the Laboratory`s programs and operations. It summarizes Livermore`s near-term strategy, which builds on recent Lab achievements and world events affecting their future. It also discusses their programmatic and operational emphases and highlights program areas that the authors believe can grow through application of Lab science and technology. Creating the Laboratory`s Future reflects their very strong focus on national security, important changes in the character of their national security work, major efforts are under way to overhaul their administrative and operational systems, and the continuing challenge of achieving national consensus on the role of the government in energy, environment, and the biosciences.

  13. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  14. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  15. ISO 14001 IMPLEMENTATION AT A NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGGS,S.L.K.

    2001-06-01

    After a tumultuous year discovering serious lapses in environment, safety and health management at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Department of Energy established a new management contract. It called for implementation of an IS0 14001 Environmental Management System and registration of key facilities. Brookhaven Science Associates, the managing contractor for the Laboratory, designed and developed a three-year project to change culture and achieve the goals of the contract. The focus of its efforts were to use IS0 14001 to integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission, and manage its programs in a manner that protected the ecosystem and public health. A large multidisciplinary National Laboratory with over 3,000 employees and 4,000 visiting scientists annually posed significant challenges for IS0 14001 implementation. Activities with environmental impacts varied from regulated industrial waste generation, to soil activation from particle accelerator operations, to radioactive groundwater contamination from research reactors. A project management approach was taken to ensure project completion on schedule and within budget. The major work units for the Environmental Management System Project were as follows: Institutional EMS Program Requirements, Communications, Training, Laboratory-wide Implementation, and Program Assessments. To minimize costs and incorporate lessons learned before full-scale deployment throughout the Laboratory, a pilot process was employed at three facilities. Brookhaven National Laboratory has completed its second year of the project in the summer of 2000, successfully registering nine facilities and self-declaring conformance in all remaining facilities. Project controls, including tracking and reporting progress against a model, have been critical to the successful implementation. Costs summaries are lower than initial estimates, but as expected legal requirements, training, and assessments are key cost

  16. Database activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trahern, C.G.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary lab in the DOE system of research laboratories. Database activities are correspondingly diverse within the restrictions imposed by the dominant relational database paradigm. The authors discuss related activities and tools used in RHIC and in the other major projects at BNL. The others are the Protein Data Bank being maintained by the Chemistry department, and a Geographical Information System (GIS)--a Superfund sponsored environmental monitoring project under development in the Office of Environmental Restoration.

  17. National Water Quality Laboratory - A Profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raese, Jon W.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) is a full-service laboratory that specializes in environmental analytical chemistry. The NWQL's primary mission is to support USGS programs requiring environmental analyses that provide consistent methodology for national assessment and trends analysis. The NWQL provides the following: high-quality chemical data; consistent, published, state-of-the-art methodology; extremely low-detection levels; high-volume capability; biological unit for identifying benthic invertebrates; quality assurance for determining long-term water-quality trends; and a professional staff.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: The First Fifty Years

    SciTech Connect

    MORA,CARL J.

    1999-11-03

    On Nov. 1, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories celebrates its 50th birthday. Although Sandia has its roots in the World War II-era Manhattan Project, Sandia began operating as a separate nuclear weapons engineering laboratory under the management of AT&T on Nov. 1, 1949. Today the lab employs more than 7,000 people at its two sites in Albuquerque and Livermore, California, and has research and development missions in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and U.S. economic competitiveness. Lockheed Martin Corporation operates Sandia for the US. Department of Energy.

  19. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  1. Vertebrates of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, W.J.; Connelly, J.W.; Halford, D.K.; Reynolds, T.D.

    1984-07-01

    Abundance, habitat use, and seasonal occurrence are reported for the 5 fish, 1 amphibian, 9 reptile, 159 bird and 37 mammal species recorded on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory National Environmental Research Park in southeastern Idaho. An additional 45 species, for which site records are lacking, were listed as possibly occurring because portions of their documented range and habitat overlap the INEL. Species of special concern on the federal and state level are discussed. 41 references, 4 tables.

  2. Explosive detection program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief, general description of the Explosive Detection Program at Sandia National Laboratories is given. The six major topics of the program are: (1) Coated or Uncoated Metallic Preconcentrators; (2) a Derivatization Study; (3) a Portable Ion Mobility Spectrometer; (4) an Explosive Screening Portal; (5) Mass Spectrometer Development; and (6) an Explosive Vapor Generator.

  3. Introduction to the National Information Display Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Curtis R.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the National Information Display Laboratory (NIDL) are described in viewgraph form. The NIDL is a Center of Excellence in softcopy technology with the overall goal to develop new ways to satisfy government information needs through aggressive user support and the development of advanced technology. Government/industry/academia participation, standards development, and various display technologies are addressed.

  4. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  5. TREATABILITY DATABASE (NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed and is continuing to expand a database on the effectiveness of proven treatment technologies in the removal/destruction of chemicals in various types of media, including water, wastewater, soil, debris, sludge, and se...

  6. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM (NELAP) SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nation has long suffered from the inefficiencies and inconsistencies of the current multiple environmental laboratory accreditation programs. In the 1970's, EPA set minimum standards for a drinking water certification program. The drinking water program was adopted by the s...

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hot spot mobile laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, B

    1999-08-27

    Gross alpha/beta/tritium liquid The Hot Spot Mobile Laboratory is an asset used to analyze samples (some high hazard) from the field. Field laboratories allow the quick turnaround of samples needed to establish weapon condition and hazard assessment for the protection of responders and the public. The Hot Spot Lab is configured to fly anywhere in the world and is staffed by expert scientists and technicians from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory who perform similar functions in their routine jobs. The Hot Spot Team carries sample control kits to provide responding field teams with the procedures, tools, and equipment for sample collection and field measurements. High-hazard samples brought back from the field are prepared for analysis in HEPA-filtered gloveboxes staffed by technicians from LLNL's Plutonium Facility. The samples are passed on to the Mobile Laboratory which carries a variety of radiological and chemical analytical equipment in portable configuration for use in the field. Equipment and personnel can also deploy special assets to local hospitals or the field for detection of plutonium in a lung or wound. Quick assessment of personnel contamination is essential for time-critical medical intervention. In addition to pulling the trailer, the Hot Spot Truck also stores some of the equipment, consumables, and a PTO generator. The Hot Spot Laboratory has the capability to be self-sufficient for several weeks when deployed to determine Pu uptake.

  8. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  9. PYROPROCESSING PROGRESS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Chuck; B. R. Westphal; Johnson, T.; Li, S.; Marsden, K.; Goff, K. M.

    2007-09-01

    At the end of May 2007, 830 and 2600 kilograms of EBR-II driver and blanket metal fuel have been treated by a pyroprocess since spent fuel operations began in June 1996. A new metal waste furnace has completed out-of-cell testing and is being installed in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility. Also, ceramic waste process development and qualification is progressing so integrated nuclear fuel separations and high level waste processes will exist at Idaho National Laboratory. These operations have provided important scale-up and performance data on engineering scale operations. Idaho National Laboratory is also increasing their laboratory scale capabilities so new process improvements and new concepts can be tested before implementation at engineering scale. This paper provides an overview of recent achievements and provides the interested reader references for more details.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories participation in the National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Boyes, J.; Boyer, W.; Chael, J.; Cook, D.; Cook, W.; Downey, T.; Hands, J.; Harjes, C.; Leeper, R.; McKay, P.; Micano, P.; Olson, R.; Porter, J.; Quintenz, J.; Roberts, V.; Savage, M.; Simpson, W.; Seth, A.; Smith, R.; Wavrik, M.; Wilson, M.

    1996-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility is a $1.1B DOE Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion facility supporting the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. The goal of the facility is to achieve fusion ignition and modest gain in the laboratory. The NIF project is responsible for the design and construction of the 192 beam, 1.8 MJ laser necessary to meet that goal. - The project is a National project with participation by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (URLLE) and numerous industrial partners. The project is centered at LLNL which has extensive expertise in large solid state lasers. The other partners in the project have negotiated their participation based on the specific expertise they can bring to the project. In some cases, this negotiation resulted in the overall responsibility for a WBS element; in other cases, the participating laboratories have placed individuals in the project in areas that need their individual expertise. The main areas of Sandia`s participation are in the management of the conventional facility design and construction, the design of the power conditioning system, the target chamber system, target diagnostic instruments, data acquisition system and several smaller efforts in the areas of system integration and engineering analysis. Sandia is also contributing to the technology development necessary to support the project by developing the power conditioning system and several target diagnostics, exploring alternate target designs, and by conducting target experiments involving the ``foot`` region of the NIF power pulse. The project has just passed the mid-point of the Title I (preliminary) design phase. This paper will summarize Sandia`s role in supporting the National Ignition Facility and discuss the areas in which Sandia is contributing. 3 figs.