Sample records for arid alluvial basins

  1. Impacts of urbanization on groundwater quality and recharge in a semi-arid alluvial basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Lohse, Kathleen A.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; McLain, Jean E. T.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryThe management of groundwater resources is paramount in semi-arid regions experiencing urban development. In the southwestern United States, enhancing recharge of urban storm runoff has been identified as a strategy for augmenting groundwater resources. An understanding of how urbanization may impact the timing of groundwater recharge and its quality is a prerequisite for mitigating water scarcity and identifying vulnerability to contamination. We sampled groundwater wells along the Rillito Creek in southern Arizona that had been previously analyzed for tritium in the late 1980s to early 1990s and analyzed samples for tritium ( 3H) and helium-3 ( 3H/ 3He) to evaluate changes in 3H and age date groundwaters. Groundwater samples were also analyzed for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and basic water quality metrics. Substantial changes in 3H values from waters sampled in the early 1990s compared to 2009 were identified after accounting for radioactive decay and indicate areas of rapid recharge. 3H- 3He groundwater ages ranged from 22 years before 2009 to modern recharge. CFC-11, -12 and -113 concentrations were anomalously high across the basin, and non-point source pollution in runoff and/or leaky infrastructure was identified as the most plausible source of this contamination. CFCs were strongly and positively correlated to nitrate ( r2 = 0.77) and a mobile trace metal, nickel ( r2 = 0.71), suggesting that solutes were derived from a similar source. Findings from this study suggest new waters from urban non-point sources are contributing to groundwater recharge and adversely affecting water quality. Reducing delivery of contaminants to areas of focused recharge will be critical to protect future groundwater resources.

  2. Hydraulic Processes in Channels of Water-Lain Alluvial Piedmonts in Arid Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, K. R.; Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Alluvial piedmonts (including alluvial fans) comprise over 70% of the habitable area of the Southwest and thus flooding on these landforms is important for scientific study and risk assessment. Direct measurement of hydraulic processes operating during geomorphically effective floods is nearly impossible because bankfull flows are short lived and infrequent (recurrence intervals of many decades), and because they inundate complicated dowstream-branching networks of channels and overbank areas. Thus other methods must be employed to understand hydraulic processes. We have made three important observations regarding water-lain alluvial piedmonts in arid lands and the channels on them. First, the channels exhibit a characteristic geometric pattern in which narrow deep reaches repetitively alternate with shallow wide reaches. There is an associated alternation in bed gradient where the steepest beds lead into narrow reaches and the least-steep beds occur at the transition from narrow to wide reaches. Second, flow branches only at the upper half of shallow wide reaches. Third, the piedmonts are hydraulically steep given the available bed material, meaning that the local occurrence of supercritical flow is inevitable. In the present study we hypothesized that the channel expansion/contraction pattern is the result of the spatial alternation of supercritical and subcritical flow, although the reach-averaged Froude number (F) is approximately unity. We tested this by combining 1) field measurements of reconstructed water depth in channels and on nearby overbank areas for an extreme flood that occurred near Tucson, Arizona, 2) topography from post-flood field surveys and pre-flood aerial photography, and 3) a simple hydraulic model for a reach with length of two expansion/contraction wavelengths. In the model, flow was driven by the water surface gradient (imposed by field measurements). A logarithmic velocity structure and quasi-uniform flow were assumed. The input parameter was discharge, and cross sectional area was imposed from the field data. Hydraulic roughness was back calculated from the velocity structure equation for each cross section and was evaluated for reasonableness. The hypothesis that F spatially alternates about critical is clearly demonstrated by this analysis. The hypothesis that the reach-averaged F is unity for bankfull flows in the study reach is consistent with the data. This suggests that the flow hydraulics set the gradient of active alluvial piedmonts. It follows that piedmont gradient, channel dimensions and bed and bank material can be used in conjunction with the reach averaged F=1 criterion to evaluate the nature of flood hazards on hydraulically steep alluvial piedmonts in arid lands without further assumptions about the hydrologic regime.

  3. 10Be in Quartz Gravel from the Gobi Desert and Evolutionary History of Alluvial Sedimentation in the Ejina Basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history of the Gobi deserts developed from alluvial sediments in arid regions has great significance in unraveling changes in both tectonic activity and climate. However, such work is limited by a lack of suitable dating material preserved in the Gobi Desert, but cosmogenic 10Be has great potential to date the Gobi deserts. In the present study, 10Be in quartz gravel from the Gobi deserts of the Ejina Basin in Inner Mongolia of China has been measured to assess exposure ages. Results show that the Gobi Desert in the northern margin of the basin developed 420 ka ago, whereas the Gobi Desert that developed from alluvial plains in the Heihe River drainage basin came about during the last 190 ka. The latter developed gradually northward and eastward to modern terminal lakes of the river. These temporal and spatial variations in the Gobi deserts are a consequence of alluvial processes influenced by Tibetan Plateau uplift and tectonic activities within the Ejina Basin. Possible episodes of Gobi Desert development within the last 420 ka indicate that the advance/retreat of alpine glaciers during glacial/interglacial cycles might have been the dominant factor to influencing the alluvial intensity and water volume in the basin. Intense floods and large water volumes would mainly occur during the short deglacial periods.

  4. Response of active tectonics on the alluvial Baghmati River, Himalayan foreland basin, eastern India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vikrant Jain; R. Sinha

    2005-01-01

    Active tectonics in a basin plays an important role in controlling a fluvial system through the change in channel slope. The Baghmati, an anabranching, foothills-fed river system, draining the plains of north Bihar in eastern India has responded to ongoing tectonic deformation in the basin. The relatively flat alluvial plains are traversed by several active subsurface faults, which divide the

  5. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Kunlun Mountains and Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibet: A framework for examining the links between glaciation, lake level changes and alluvial fan formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Haizhou, M.; Barnard, P.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Qaidam Basin in Northern Tibet is one of the largest hyper-arid intermontane basins on Earth. Alluvial fans, pediment surfaces, shorelines and a thick succession of sediments within the basin, coupled with moraines and associated landforms in the adjacent high mountain catchments of the Kunlun Mountains, record a complex history of Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental change and landscape evolution. The region provides an ideal natural laboratory to examine the interaction between tectonics and climate within a continent-continent collision zone, and to quantify rates of landscape evolution as controlled by climate and the associated glacial and hydrological changes in hyper-arid and adjacent high-altitude environments. Geomorphic mapping, analysis of landforms and sediments, and terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure and optically stimulated luminescence dating serve to define the timing of formation of Late Quaternary landforms along the southern and northwestern margins of the Qaidam Basin, and in the Burhan Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains adjacent to the basin on the south. These dates provide a framework that suggests links between climatic amelioration, deglaciation, lake desiccation and alluvial fan evolution. At least three glacial advances are defined in the Burham Budai Shan of the Kunlun Mountains. On the northern side of this range these occurred in the penultimate glacial cycle or early in the last glacial cycle, during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)/Lateglacial and during the Holocene. On the south side of the range, advances occurred during the penultimate glacial cycle, MIS-3, and possibly the LGM, Lateglacial or Holocene. Several distinct phases of alluvial fan sedimentation are likewise defined. Alluvial fans formed on the southern side of the Kunlun Mountains prior to 200 ka. Ice-contact alluvial fans formed during the penultimate glacial and during MIS-3. Extensive incised alluvial fans that form the main valley fills north of the Burham Budai and extend into the Qaidam Basin are dated to ???30 ka. These ages suggest that there was a period of alluvial fan aggradation and valley filling that persisted until desiccation of the large lakes in the Qaidam Basin post ???30 ka led to base level lowering and active incision of streams into the valley fills. The continued Lateglacial and Holocene desiccation likely led to further degradation of the valley fills. Ice wedge casts in the Qaidam Basin date to ???15 ka, indicating significant Lateglacial climatic amelioration, while Holocene loess deposits north of the Burham Bdudai suggest that aridity has increased in the region since the early Holocene. From these observations, we infer that the major landscape changes within high glaciated mountains and their adjacent hyper-arid intermontane basins, such as the Kunlun Mountains and Qaidam Basin, occur rapidly over millennial timescales during periods of climatic instability. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  6. Variation in sedimentology and architecture of Eocene alluvial strata, Wind River and Washakie basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.E.; Larson, E.E. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Eocene continental, alluvial strata of the Wind River Formation (Wind River Basin) and the Cathedral Bluffs Member of the Wasatch Formation (Washakie basin) provide two examples of Laramide intermontane basin aggradation. These alluvial sediments primarily represent overbank flood deposits marginal to channel complexes. Their sedimentology and architecture, although grossly similar, appear to vary somewhat with proximity to Laramide uplifts. In both cases, repetitive sedimentation on the floodplain produced a succession of depositional couplets, each composed of a light-gray sand overlain by a red clay-rich silt or sand. The lower sands are tabular bodies that, near their distal margins, taper discernibly. They commonly display planar and ripple-drift laminations. Upper clay-rich layers, which are laminated, are also generally tabular. Those floodplain strata depositional proximal to Laramide uplifts show little evidence of scouring prior to deposition of the next, overlying couplet. Most of these sedimentary layers, therefore, are laterally continuous (up to 2 km). This alluvial architecture results in relatively uniform porosity laterally within depositional units but variable porosity stratigraphically through the sequence. In contrast, alluvial sediments deposited farther from the Laramide uplifts have undergone sporadic incision (either during rising flood stage or subsequently) followed by aggradation. As a result, many of these floodplain couplets are discontinuous laterally and, hence, exhibit large-scale lateral variability in porosity. Both alluvial sequences have undergone similar types and extents of burial diagenesis.

  7. Abo Formation alluvial facies and Associated Basin Fill, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen W. Speer

    1986-01-01

    Outcrops of the Abo Formation (Wolfcampian to early Leonardian age) in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico record the evolution of a dry alluvial fan system as it was deposited off the pedernal uplift into the Orogrande basin. The location and orientation of present-day outcrops allow us to observe an inferred east-to-west transverse facies tract consisting of: (1) proximal

  8. Abo Formation alluvial facies and Associated Basin Fill, Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, S.W.

    1986-03-01

    Outcrops of the Abo Formation (Wolfcampian to early Leonardian age) in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico record the evolution of a dry alluvial fan system as it was deposited off the pedernal uplift into the Orogrande basin. The location and orientation of present-day outcrops allow us to observe an inferred east-to-west transverse facies tract consisting of: (1) proximal alluvial fans (lower Abo), which are contiguous in places with underlying Laborcita Formation fan-deltaic sediments; (2) medial anastomosed streams (middle Abo); and (3) distal low-gradient mud-dominated flood basins characterized by either distributary streams (upper Abo) or clastic tidal flats (Lee Ranch Tongue of the Abo) with associated marine carbonates (Pendejo Tongue of the Hueco Formation). Tectonism in the Pedernal highlands, which climaxed during the Late Pennsylvanian, apparently continued well into the Wolfcampian in this region, as evidenced by a major basal Abo unconformity and distinct stacked megasequences of lower Abo alluvial fan lithofacies. However, by the middle Abo, tectonic activity had quiesced and the uplift began eroding and retreating to the north and east. By the late Abo, a pediment surface had formed that was subsequently onlapped by upper Abo and eventually Yeso Formation sediments.

  9. Alluvial and bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin; eastern Colorado's dual ground-water resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1989-01-01

    Large volumes of ground water are contained in alluvial and bedrock aquifers in the semiarid Denver basin of eastern Colorado. The bedrock aquifer, for example, contains 1.2 times as much water as Lake Erie of the Great Lakes, yet it supplies only about 9 percent of the ground water used in the basin. Although this seems to indicate underutilization of this valuable water supply, this is not necessarily the case, for many factors other than the volume of water in the aquifer affect the use of the aquifer. Such factors as climatic conditions, precipitation runoff, geology and water-yielding character of the aquifers, water-level conditions, volume of recharge and discharge, legal and economic constraints, and water-quality conditions can ultimately affect the decision to use ground water. Knowledge of the function and interaction of the various parts of this hydrologic system is important to the proper management and use of the ground-water resources of the region. The semiarid climatic conditions on the Colorado plains produce flash floods of short duration and large peak-flow rates. However, snowmelt runoff from the Rocky Mountains produces the largest volumes of water and is typically of longer duration with smaller peak-flow rates. The alluvial aquifer is recharged easily from both types of runoff and readily stores and transmits the water because it consists of relatively thin deposits of gravel, sand, and clay located in the valleys of principal streams. The bedrock aquifer is recharged less easily because of its greater thickness (as much as 3,000 feet) and prevalent layers of shale which retard the downward movement of water in the formations. Although the bedrock aquifer contains more than 50 times as much water in storage as the alluvial aquifer, it does not store and transmit water as readily as the alluvial aquifer. For example, about 91 percent of the water pumped from wells is obtained from the alluvial aquifer, yet water-level declines generally have not exceeded 40 feet. By contrast, only 9 percent of the water pumped from wells is obtained from the bedrock aquifer, yet water-level declines in this aquifer have exceeded 500 feet in some areas. Depth to water in the alluvial aquifer generally is less than 40 feet, while depth to water in the bedrock aquifer may exceed 1,000 feet in some areas. Cost of pumping water to the surface and cost of maintaining existing supplies in areas of rapidly declining water levels in the bedrock aquifer affect water use. Water use is also affected by the generally poorer quality water found in the alluvial aquifer and, to a lesser extent, by the greater susceptibility of the alluvial aquifer to pollution from surface sources. Because of these factors, the alluvial aquifer is used primarily as a source of irrigation supply, which is the largest water use in the area. The bedrock aquifer is used primarily as a source of domestic or municipal supply, which is the smaller of the two principal uses, even though the bedrock aquifer contains 50 times more stored ground water than the alluvial aquifer.

  10. Evaluation of groundwater recharge in Choushui River alluvial fan and Mingchu Basin for specific rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zong Sheng; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2014-05-01

    Sound groundwater resources planning and management are lack in the Choushui River alluvial fan, resulting in the occurrence of serious land subsidence and seawater intrusion. Even the disasters induced by overpumping of groundwater pose a potential threat on the Taiwan High Speed Rail. In addition to improving the water resources management in the alluvial fan, the development of groundwater resources in the neighboring hills. Mingchu Basin, which is located on the midstream segment of the Choushui River and comprised of the gravel formation of Pleistocene, is an effective solution to resolve the problem in limited water resources. Moreover, the Dongpurui River and Qingshui River both converge into Choushui River in this basin. Because of wide drainage areas and good hydrogeological conditions, the Mingchu Basin is considered a high potential recharging region of groundwater. This work is to evaluate the groundwater recharge in the Choushui River alluvial fan and Mingchu Basin, using the WASH123D model equipped with the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) to simulate the interaction of surface water and groundwater for specific five rainfall events. This study particularly focuses on the simulation of the groundwater flow, and evaluates the effect of different rainfall events on the groundwater recharge. First, to meet in-situ hydrogeological structure and hydraulic parameters, the GMS is used to construct hydrogeological database, mesh, hydrogeological parameters, initial condition and boundary conditions. Then, simulated parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity and pumping rates, need to be calibrated and verified in the model. After the calibration and verification, the simulated groundwater flow can reflect actual groundwater situation. Finally, when specific five rainfall events impose on the ground, groundwater recharge can be determined using the groundwater model.

  11. Estimating the age of arid-zone alluvial fan surfaces using roughness measurements from spaceborne radar backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetz, G.; Mushkin, A.; Blumberg, D. G.; Baer, G.; Trabelsky, E.

    2012-12-01

    Alluvial fan surfaces respond to geologic and climate changes as they record the deposition and erosion processes that govern their evolution, which amongst others is manifested in the micro and meso scale topography of the surface. Remote sensing provides a regional view that is very useful for mapping. Some previous publications have demonstrated that relative dating can also be achieved by remote sensing using techniques common in planetary geology such as overlap relationships. This work focuses on the use of radar backscatter as suggested originally by Evans et al., (1992) to map ages but here we will try to provide an absolute geologic age. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the use of radar backscatter to constrain surface roughness as a calibrated proxy for estimating age of alluvial surfaces. With the unique regional spatial perspective provided by spaceborne imaging, we aim at providing a new and complementary regional perspective for studying neotectonic and recent landscape evolution processes as well as paleoclimate. Moreover, the method (by radar backscattering measure) can be applied to the geomorphology of other planets. The current study is located in the southeastern part of the Negev desert, Israel on the late Pleistocene - Holocene Shehoret alluvial fan sequence. High resolution (0.5 cm) 3D roughness measurements were collected using a ground-based LIDAR (Leica HDS 3000) and these show a robust relationship between independently obtained OSL surface age and surface roughness; the fan surfaces become smoother with time over 103-105 yr timescales. Spaceborne backscatter radar data respond primarily to surface slope, roughness at a scale comparable to the radar wavelength, and other parameters such as dielectric properties of the surface. Therefore, radar can provide a good quantitative indication of surface roughness in arid zones, where vegetation cover is low. Preliminary results show a relationship between surface age and roughness and the radar cross section extracted from polarimetric spaceborne data. The best result is found in cross polarization (HV), L-band measured at an incidence angle of 38°.

  12. Distinguishing early groundwater alteration effects from pedogenesis in ancient alluvial basins: examples from the Palaeogene of southern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, N. L.; Wright, V. P.; Azevedo, T. M.

    1996-08-01

    Colour mottling and horizons of secondary carbonates are common in ancient alluvial sequences and are normally interpreted as pedogenic features. They have been used to assess palaeoclimates, soil drainage conditions and deposition rates. Palaeogene alluvial deposits in the Sado and Lisbon basins of Portugal exhibit prominent colour variations and mottle patterns, as well as carbonate accumulations both at the bases of fining-upwards cyclothems and as thick units (up to 20 m) capping alluvial megasequences. However, these colour and carbonate features are interpreted as the products of shallow, saline, reducing groundwaters, unrelated to pedogenesis. Such non-pedogenic products are easily mistaken for soil-formed ones and criteria for differentiating the two are reviewed to assist interpretations in other alluvial deposits. Key criteria are thickness, gradational tops and bases, absence of soil horizon features, occurrence in coarser alluvium and prevalence of hydromorphic colour and mottling patterns.

  13. Sedimentary and tectonic evolution of Plio–Pleistocene alluvial and lacustrine deposits of Fucino Basin (central Italy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gian Paolo Cavinato; Claudio Carusi; Massimo Dall'Asta; Enrico Miccadei; Tommaso Piacentini

    2002-01-01

    The Fucino Basin was the greatest lake of the central Italy, which was completely drained at the end of 19th century. The basin is an intramontane half-graben filled by Plio–Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine deposits located in the central part of the Apennines chain, which was formed in Upper Pliocene and in Quaternary time by the extensional tectonic activity.The analysis of

  14. Response of active tectonics on the alluvial Baghmati River, Himalayan foreland basin, eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vikrant; Sinha, R.

    2005-09-01

    Active tectonics in a basin plays an important role in controlling a fluvial system through the change in channel slope. The Baghmati, an anabranching, foothills-fed river system, draining the plains of north Bihar in eastern India has responded to ongoing tectonic deformation in the basin. The relatively flat alluvial plains are traversed by several active subsurface faults, which divide the area in four tectonic blocks. Each tectonic block is characterized by association of fluvial anomalies viz. compressed meanders, knick point in longitudinal profiles, channel incision, anomalous sinuosity variations, sudden change in river flow direction, river flow against the local gradient and distribution of overbank flooding, lakes, and waterlogged area. Such fluvial anomalies have been identified on the repetitive satellite images and maps and interpreted through DEM and field observations to understand the nature of vertical movements in the area. The sub-surface faults in the Baghmati plains cut across the river channel and also run parallel which have allowed us to observe the effects of longitudinal and lateral tilting manifested in avulsions and morphological changes.

  15. Paleoecological inferences of recent alluvial damming of a lake basin due to retrogressive permafrost thaw slumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, R.; Delaney, S.; Lamoureux, S. F.; Kokelj, S. V.; Pisaric, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Expected climate impacts of future warming in the Arctic include thawing of permafrost landscapes in northern latitudes. Thawing permafrost is expected to have major consequences on hydrological dynamics, which will affect the limnological conditions of Arctic lakes and ponds. In this study we obtained a sediment core from a small lake (informally named "FM1") near Fort McPherson, Northwest Territories, Canada, with a large retrogressive thaw slump (nearly 1 kilometre in diameter) within its catchment. A radiocarbon date from the base of the FM1 sediment core suggests the lake formed between 990-1160 Cal AD. The analysis of aerial photographs indicate the thaw slump initiated between 1970-1990, and sediment geochemistry analysis indicated major changes in sediment content at 54-cm sediment core depth. Analyses of subfossil midge (Chironomidae) fossils inferred that, pre-slump, lake FM1 was shallow with a large bog or wetland environment, with midge assemblages dominated by taxa such as Limnophyes and Parametriocnemus. Post-thaw midge assemblages were dominated by subfamily Chironominae (Tribe Tanytarsini and Tribe Chironomini) taxa, and the appearance of deepwater-associated taxa such as Sergentia suggests that lake FM1 deepened, possibly as a result of alluvial damming from slump materials washing into the lake near its outlet. Most recent stratigraphic intervals infer a reversion back to shallower conditions, with a slight recovery of bog or wetland-associated midge taxa, possibly due to rapid basin infilling from increased deposition rates of catchment-derived materials. Results emphasize that there may be a variety of different outcomes to Arctic lake and pond ecosystems as a result of permafrost thawing, contingent on system-specific characteristics such as slump location relative to the lake basin, and relative inflow and outflow locations within the lake basin.

  16. Palaeohydrological and palaeoecological studies on South Cameroonian alluvial sedimentary basins - New evidence on the palaeoenvironmental evolution of western Central Africa since the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangen, M.

    2009-04-01

    A new valuable and innovative contribution will be presented to ascertain the timing and extension of climatic and ecological changes in western equatorial Africa. Main focus is laid on the dynamics of climate, fluvial systems and the high sensitive tropical ecosystems (dense evergreen and semi-deciduous rain forest and savanna-rain forest margin) since the Late Pleistocene (~50 kyrs. BP). For this purpose extended fieldworks were carried out in South Cameroon (2004-2008) by the ReSaKo-Project (sub-project of DFG-Project 510) with abundant investigations on alluvial sedimentary basins of equatorial tropical fluvial systems. Suitable alluvial sediment-archives for palaeoenvironmental research were uncovered along selected braiding, meandering and anabranching/anastomosing reaches of major southwestern, into the Gulf of Guinea (Ntem, Nyong and Sanaga) and southeastern, into the Congo basin (Boumba, Dja and Ngoko) draining rivers (RUNGE et al. 2006, SANGEN 2008). Among geomorphological investigations and cross section discussions, 150 corings (Edelman, 20 cm layers) reaching maximum depths of 550 cm were carried out on river benches, levees, cut-off and periodical branches, islands and terraces as well as in seasonal inundated floodplains and backswamps. Corresponding sedimentary profiles and catenae recovered multilayered, sandy to clayey alluvia containing sedimentary form-units and palaeosurfaces which contribute to the reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental conditions in western equatorial Africa. Several (59) radiocarbon (AMS) dated samples (Erlangen and Lecce) from fossil organic layers and macro-rests embedded in these units yielded Late Pleistocene to recent ages (14C-ages around 48 to 0.2 kyrs. BP), spanning also the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Holocene record. Abrupt grain-size modifications and alternating form-units (sandy and clayey layers, palaeosurfaces) in the stratigraphic records display fluctuations in the fluvial-morphological response of the fluvial systems to climatic variability and other extrinsic and intrinsic impacts. Although the sedimentary record varies among the studied river reaches, fossil organic sediment layers (palaeosurfaces) containing valuable proxy data were found in almost all alluvia basins of examined southern Cameroonian rivers. Around 56 ^13C-values corresponding to the dated samples (-31.4 to -18.0 ) evidence that despite major disturbances of the African rain forest over geological times (MALEY 2001) mainly rain forest ecosystems have prevailed during the corresponding time periods, presumably as gallery forests, which were able to persist in this fluvial habitat ("fluvial refuge"), even during arid periods (e.g. LGM). The results are consistent with earlier findings from lacustrine (SERVANT & SERVANT-VILDARY 2000), marine (WELDEAB et al. 2007) and additional sediment archives (GASSE et al. 2008) and will add additional insights and information to the unravelling of the complex respond of the African monsoon, the Central African ecosystems and fluvial systems to Late Quaternary climatic and environmental fluctuations within a globally teleconnected system. References: GASSE, F., CHALIé, F., VINCENS, A., WILLIAMS, M.A.J. & WILLIAMSON, D. (2008): Climatic patterns in equatorial and southern Africa from 30,000 to 10,000 years ago reconstructed from terrestrial and near-shore proxy data. Quaternary Science Reviews, 27 (25-26), 2316-2340. MALEY, J. (2001): The impact of arid phases on the African rain forest through geological history. In: WEBER, W., WHITE, L., VEDDER, A., NAUGHTON-TREVES, L. (Eds.): African rain forest ecology and conservation - An interdisciplinary perspective. Yale University Press, New Haven, 68-87. RUNGE, J., EISENBERG, J., SANGEN, M. (2006): Geomorphic evolution of the Ntem alluvial basin and physiogeographic evidence for Holocene environmental changes in the rain forest of SW Cameroon (Central Africa) - preliminary results. Z. Geomorph. N.F., Suppl. Bd. 145, 63-79. SERVANT, M. & SERVANT-VILDARY, S. (2000): Dynamique à long terme des

  17. Hydrogeology and simulation of flow between the alluvial and bedrock aquifers in the upper Black Squirrel Creek basin, El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Anticipated increases in pumping from the bedrock aquifers in El Paso County potentially could affect the direction and rate of flow between the alluvial and bedrock aquifers and lower water levels in the overlying alluvial aquifer. The alluvial aquifer underlies about 90 square miles in the upper Black Squirrel Creek Basin of eastern El Paso County. The alluvial aquifer consists of unconsolidated alluvial deposits that unconformably overlie siltstones, sandstones, and conglomerate (bedrock aquifers) and claystone, shale, and coal (bedrock confining units) of the Denver Basin. The bedrock aquifers (Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers) are separated by confining units (upper and lower Denver and the Laramie confining units) and overlie a relatively thick and impermeable Pierre confining unit. The Pierre confining unit is assumed to be a no-flow boundary at the base of the alluvial/ bedrock aquifer system. During 1949-90, substantial water-level declines, as large as 50 feet, in the alluvial aquifer resulted from withdrawals from the alluvial aquifer for irrigation and municipal supplies. Average recharge to the alluvial aquifer from infiltration of precipitation and surface water was an estimated 11.97 cubic feet per second and from the underlying bedrock aquifers was an estimated 0.87 cubic foot per second. Water-level data from eight bedrock observation wells and eight nearby alluvial wells indicate that, locally, the alluvial and bedrock aquifers probably are hydraulically connected and that the alluvial aquifer in the upper Black Squirrel Creek Basin receives recharge from the Denver and Arapahoe aquifers but-locally recharges the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer. Subsurface-temperature profiles were evaluated as a means of estimating specific discharge across the bedrock surface (the base of the alluvial aquifer). However, assumptions of the analytical method were not met by field conditions and, thus, analyses of subsurface-temperature profiles did not reliably estimate specific discharge across the bedrock surface. The vertical hydraulic diffusivity of a siltstone and sandstone in the lower Denver confining unit was estimated, by an aquifer test, to be about 8 x 10'4 square foot per day. Physical and chemical characteristics of water from the bedrock aquifers in the study area generally differ from the physical and chemical characteristics of water from the alluvial aquifer, except for the physical and chemical characteristics of water from one bedrock well, which is completed in the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer. In the southern part of the study area, physical and chemical characteristics of ground water indicate downward flow of water from the alluvial aquifer to the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer. A three-dimensional numerical model was used to evaluate flow of water between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. Simulation of steady-state conditions indicates that flow from the bedrock aquifers to the alluvial aquifer was about 7 percent of recharge to the alluvial aquifer, about 0.87 cubic foot per second. The potential effects of withdrawal from the alluvial and bedrock aquifers at estimated (October 1989 to September 1990) rates and from the bedrock aquifers at two larger hypothetical rates were simulated for a 50-year projection period. The model simulations indicate that water levels in the alluvial aquifer will decline an average of 8.6 feet after 50 years of pumping at estimated October 1989 to September 1990 rates. Increases in withdrawals from the bedrock aquifers in El Paso County were simulated to: (1) Capture flow that currently discharges from the bedrock aquifers to springs and streams in upland areas and to the alluvial aquifer, (2) induce flow downward from the alluvial aquifer, and (3) accelerate the rate of waterlevel decline in the alluvial aquifer.

  18. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  19. Changes in alluvial architecture associated with Eocene hyperthermals: Preliminary results from the Bighorn Basin Coring Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acks, R.; Kraus, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was followed by two lesser hyperthermal events: ETM2 and H2 both at ~53.7 Ma. The carbon isotope excursion for ETM2 was approximately half that of the PETM and the H2 excursion even smaller, indicating lower increases in temperature than during the PETM. The paleohydrologic responses to these events are less well understood than the response to PETM warming. Although the ETM2 and H2 events are better known from marine than continental strata, both events have been identified from outcrops of the alluvial Willwood Formation from the Deer Creek and Gilmore Hill areas of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming (Abels et al., 2012). Here, we analyze two cores drilled from stratigraphically equivalent Willwood strata from Gilmore Hill. The cores provide an opportunity to examine the impact of these events on the architecture of fluvial strata. Willwood strata are composed largely of channel sandstones, heterolithic deposits generated by channel avulsion, and paleosols that formed on overbank deposits. The paleosols provide qualitative and quantitative information on changes in soil moisture and precipitation through this interval. The cores also show a distinct change in the stacking of paleosols The core is subdivided into three parts: (1) the lowest ~third has thinner, more densely spaced paleosols, (2) the middle has thicker paleosols that are more widely spaced, and (3) the upper third has thicker and more common channel sandstones interspersed with avulsion deposits and fewer red paleosols; this corresponds to the hyperthermal interval. In particular, a ~20 m thick sandstone complex caps the section and appears to truncate part of the hyperthermal interval. Although vertical variations in alluvial architecture can reflect tectonic or climatic change, the correspondence of the sandstone-rich part of the cores with the hyperthermals suggests climate was the major control on their formation. Thick purple paleosols associated with the hyperthermals at Deer Creek suggest wetter conditions, and our preliminary interpretation is that a change to wetter conditions caused increased discharge and deposition of coarser (sandy) sediment. The thick sandstone complex at Gilmore Hill is underlain by paleosols with abundant calcrete nodules, which indicate drier soil conditions prior to deposition of the sandstone, and the change from drier to wetter conditions probably also caused increased sediment yield.

  20. Hydrogeologic features of the alluvial deposits in the Greybull River valley, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, M.E.; Head, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer along the Greybull River in Wyoming, consists principally of the Greybull terrace doposits and flood-plain alluvium but also includes Burlington terrace deposits east of Burlington, the McKinnie terrace, and the younger, generally undissected alluvial-fan deposits. Well-log data and 18 surface-resistivity measurements at four localities indicate that the thickness of the alluvial aquifer is as much as 60 feet thick only near Burlington and Otto. The most favorable area for development of ground water from the alluvial aquifer is near Burlington and Otto where relatively large amounts of water can be obtained from the Greybull terrace deposits and the flood-plain alluvium. Elsewhere, the deposits of the alluvial aquifer yield only small amounts of water to wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Relations between climatic variability and hydrologic time series from four alluvial basins across the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, R.T.; Dettinger, M.D.; Newhouse, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrologic time series of groundwater levels, streamflow, precipitation, and tree-ring indices from four alluvial basins in the southwestern United States were spectrally analyzed, and then frequency components were reconstructed to isolate variability due to climatic variations on four time scales. Reconstructed components (RCs), from each time series, were compared to climatic indices like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North American Monsoon (NAM), and El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), to reveal that as much as 80% of RC variation can be correlated with climate variations on corresponding time scales. In most cases, the hydrologic RCs lag behind the climate indices by 1-36 months. In all four basins, PDO-like components were the largest contributors to cyclic hydrologic variability. Generally, California time series have more variation associated with PDO and ENSO than the Arizona series, and Arizona basins have more variation associated with NAM. ENSO cycles were present in all four basins but were the largest relative contributors in southeastern Arizona. Groundwater levels show a wide range of climate responses that can be correlated from well to well in the various basins, with climate responses found in unconfined and confined aquifers from pumping centers to mountain fronts. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  2. Distinctive characteristics of a streamflow-dominated alluvial fan deposit: Sanghori area, Kyongsang Basin (Early Cretaceous), southeastern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H. R.; Rhee, C. W.; Chough, S. K.

    1997-05-01

    In the northwestern part of the non-marine Kyongsang Basin (Early Cretaceous), conglomeratic deposits occur at intervals along the northern basin margin and grade basinward into interbedded sandstone and mudstone. One of these conglomeratic deposits, referred to as the Sanghori deposit, is 150 m thick and characterized by amalgamated sheets of conglomerate and sandstone (facies assemblages 1 and 2) alternating with interbedded sandstone and purple siltstone (facies assemblage 3). Facies assemblage 1 comprises clast-supported, disorganized and organized sheet conglomerates interbedded with massive to stratified sandstones. This assemblage is interpreted as the product of proximal gravel-bed stream deposition. Facies assemblage 2 consists of trough and planar cross-stratified and horizontally stratified sandstones. It represents sandy braided-stream deposits in which sand bars and dunes were common. Sedimentary facies and architecture of the coarse-grained facies assemblages suggest that the gravel-bed and sandy braided streams were wide and shallow, and rapidly aggraded during flash floods. Facies assemblage 3 consists of interbedded purple siltstone and tabular sandstone which show evidence of weak pedogenic modification and bioturbation. These characteristics are interpreted as the result of floodplain processes. Sediments were supplied from the north and dispersed radially, forming a streamflow-dominated alluvial-fan system. The Sanghori alluvial system was most probably fed from a large drainage basin, resulting in the predominance of streamflow deposits and rounded clasts. The alternation of the gravel-bed stream and floodplain deposits was due to autocyclic switching of active fan sectors under the conditions of relatively slow and steady basin subsidence.

  3. Mapping and assessment of degraded land in the Heihe River Basin, arid northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shanzhong; Cai, Yumin

    2007-01-01

    Land degradation is a great threat in the Heihe River Basin, located in the arid inland of northwestern China and land desertification is one of the main aspects of environmental changes in this basin. Previous studies have focused on water resource utilization and soil erosion, but the status of degraded land in the Heihe River Basin, such as its distribution, extent and precise characteristics is often inadequately known. Based on field observations and TM images from the year 2003, this study provides classification and evaluation information concerning the degraded land in the basin of the Heihe River. There are five types of degraded land types in the Heihe River Basin: water eroded in the southern mountains, sandified and vegetation degraded near the oases, aridized in the low reaches, and salinized in the lowlands. The total degraded area covers 29,355.5 km2, 22.58% of the land in the study area. Finally, degraded land in the Heihe River Basin was evaluated according to changes in the physical structure and chemical components of soils, land productivity, secondary soil salt, and water conditions.

  4. Hydrogeologic features of the alluvial deposits in the Owl Creek Valley, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, M.E.; Head, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The alluvial acquifer principally of the flood-plain alluvium and part of the Arapahoe Ranch terrace deposits and consists subordinately of alluvial-fan deposits. Thickness of the alluvial aquifer is generally 20 to 40 feet. Dissolved-solids concentration of water in the alluvial aquifer ranges from about 500 to more than 3,000 milligrams per liter. The most favorable areas for groundwater development are the flood-plain alluvium and part of the Arapahoe Ranch terrace deposits; however, in much of these units, the water contains more than 2,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Measurements of specific conductance of the flow of Owl Creek indicate a progressive increase in the down stream direction and range between 15 and 355 micromhos per centimeter at 25C per mile. The increases are due to return flow of irrigation water, inflow from tributaries, and inflow from groundwater. Conspicuous terraces in Owl Creek Valley included an unnamed terrace at 500 feet above Owl Creek, the Embar Ranch terrace 160 to 120 feet above the creek, and the Arapahoe Ranch terrace 50 to 20 feet above the creek. (USGS)

  5. A quantified study method and its application to sustainable management of water resources in arid basins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    QiTing Zuo; KeFa Zhou; Jun Xia; Xi Chen; YongQin Wang

    2007-01-01

    According to the features of the basins in arid areas, in this paper a quantified study framework of sustainable management\\u000a of water resources is developed, and the contents include mainly the quantification rules, index system, basic models and\\u000a quantification method. A quantified study method (M-D method) about sustainable management of water resources is put forward\\u000a based on the simulation and

  6. Natural vegetation of the Carolinas: Classification and description of the Piedmont alluvial plant communities of the Cape Fear, Neuse, and TarPamlico River Basins

    E-print Network

    Peet, Robert K.

    Natural vegetation of the Carolinas: Classification and description of the Piedmont alluvial plant communities of the Cape Fear, Neuse, and TarPamlico River Basins By Elizabeth R. Matthews1. weakley@unc.edu 4 Department of Plant Biology, 4206 Gardner Hall Box 7612, North Carolina State

  7. Pedogenic and early diagenetic processes in Palaeogene alluvial fan and lacustrine deposits from the Sado Basin (S Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, N. L. V.

    2002-04-01

    The Palaeogene deposits of the Sado Basin were deposited in a continental basin that shows a typical pattern with alluvial fans system in the margins of the basin, passing towards distal areas of mudflat facies where, in some areas, the installation of shallow water bodies favoured the development of palustrine conditions. The deposits of this basin vary form coarse conglomerates and sandstones to palustrine carbonates. These sediments were affected by pedogenesis and early diagenetic processes that promoted important modifications on their primary features. These modifications have been studied by the analyses of four profiles, developed on proximal, middle and distal fan deposits and the fourth one on lacustrine deposits. The overall analyses of the sedimentological, pedogenic, diagenetic features and their relationships indicate that three main processes took place throughout the basin: soil formation, palygorskite neoformation and dolomitization. Soil formation processes led to illuviation of clays and carbonate precipitation mostly around roots. Pedogenic carbonates increase towards distal areas, whereas hydromorphic features are present throughout the basin. Palygorskite neoformation was partially diagenetic, being maximum in proximal areas and palustrine deposits. This neoformation is attributed to the percolation of alkaline Mg-rich soil and groundwaters through smectitic-rich sediments, promoting important clay transformation. Dolomitization was an early diagenetic process that occurred mainly in carbonate-rich deposits of distal and lacustrine environments, as a result of the increasing Mg/Ca ratio of the percolating groundwaters. In all these processes there has been a close spatial and temporal interplay between pedogenesis and diagenesis, driven by the chemistry of soil particles and groundwaters.

  8. Predicting the Affects of Climate Change on Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Productivity of Semi-arid Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, L.; Tyler, S. W.; Zheng, C.; Pohll, G. M.; Yao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Many arid and semi-arid regions around the world are experiencing water shortages that have become increasingly problematic. Since the late 1800s, upstream diversions in Nevada's Walker River have delivered irrigation supply to the surrounding agricultural fields resulting in a dramatic water level decline of the terminal Walker Lake. Salinity has also increased because the only outflow from the lake is evaporation from the lake surface. The Heihe River basin of northwestern China, a similar semi-arid catchment, is also facing losses from evaporation of terminal locations, agricultural diversions and evapotranspiration (ET) of crops. Irrigated agriculture is now experiencing increased competition for use of diminishing water resources while a demand for ecological conservation continues to grow. It is important to understand how the existing agriculture in these regions will respond as climate changes. Predicting the affects of climate change on groundwater flow, surface water flow, ET and agricultural productivity of the Walker and Heihe River basins is essential for future conservation of water resources. ET estimates from remote sensing techniques can provide estimates of crop water consumption. By determining similarities of both hydrologic cycles, critical components missing in both systems can be determined and predictions of impacts of climate change and human management strategies can be assessed.

  9. Clay sized fraction and powdered whole-rock X-ray analyses from alluvial basin deposits in central and southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the study of the water quality and geochemistry of Southwest Alluvial Basins (SWAB) in parts of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas, which is a Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program, whole rock x-ray analysis and clay-size fraction mineralogy (x-ray) analysis of selected samples from alluvial basin deposits were done to investigate the types of minerals and clay types present in the aquifers. This was done to determine the plausible minerals and clay types in the aquifers that may be reacting with groundwater and affecting the water quality. The purpose of this report is only to present the whole rock x-ray and clay-fraction mineralogy data. Nineteen surface samples or samples from outcrop of Tertiary and Quaternary alluvial basin deposits in the central and southern Rio Grande rift were collected and analyzed. The analysis of the samples consisted of grain size analysis, and clay-size fraction mineralogy and semiquantitative analysis of the relative abundance of different clay mineral groups present. (USGS)

  10. Potential incremental seepage losses in an alluvial channel in the Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional, digital, cross-sectional model was used to simulate seepage of water from an alluvial channel, which had the general characteristic of the Rio Grande channel, into the underlying alluvium within the reach from Cochiti Dam to Elephant Butte Reservoir. Seepage rates were determined for losing and gaining reaches, and reaches affected by pumping of ground water. The seepage rates were computed for stream surcharges (height of additional water applied on top of base flow) ranging from 0.5 foot to 3 feet and for application periods ranging from 1 to 100 days. The net seepage rates, which were nearly identical for each type of reach, ranged from 0.0 cubic foot per second per mile of channel length for a 0.5 foot surcharge applied for 1 day to 0.37 cubic foot per second per mile of channel length for a 3 feet surcharge applied for 100 days, followed by a 180 day seepage return flow from the aquifer. (USGS)

  11. Recharge estimation in a large semi-arid basin using storage - discharge relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulovic, Nena; Larsen, Joshua; Reading, Lucy; McIntyre, Neil; Jarihani, Abdollah; Sabburg, Letitia; Undershultz, Jim

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of flow recession in the absence of precipitation have long been used to infer upstream catchment storage properties. An intriguing aspect of this storage - discharge relationship occurs when changes in flow recession occur following a rainfall event due to increased storage. The main assumption in this case is that additional groundwater recharge has increased the storage within flow systems connected to the stream, which is then reflected in the increased recessional flow. Using flow records from 4 catchments (~100 km2) across the headwaters of the semi-arid Condamine Basin (and the unconfined section of the Surat artesian groundwater basin) within central eastern Australia, we evaluate and compare storage -discharge relationships and the change in storage for large individual events. Converting this to recharge resulted in low values compared to a number of independent recharge estimation techniques (chloride mass balance, water balance, groundwater hydrograph analysis). This discrepancy may arise because of some inherent differences between the techniques, however some important assumptions in the storage - discharge analysis are worth exploring. These include: the impact of evapotranspiration (ET) on the flow recession, which is largely unaccounted for, and is likely to be significant in semi-arid environments, and the bias towards larger events within the analysis, which is related to the difficulty associated with incorporating the large number of small events within automated time series analysis. We propose accounting for these limitations through the inclusion of remote sensing based ET estimates, and the use of multiple automated hydrograph separation techniques in extracting flow recession periods for analysis, and preferably those with lower user subjectivity. Overcoming these limitations is essential if catchment storage - discharge analysis techniques are to be more broadly applied to groundwater recharge estimation problems, especially in data poor semi-arid areas where the need for a better understanding of available water resources is only increasing.

  12. Ground water in the alluvial deposits of Cottonwood Creek Basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacy, B.L.

    1960-01-01

    Cottonwood Creek basin is a 377 square mile area in central Oklahoma. The rim of the basin has altitudes as high as 1,300 feet, and the mouth is at an altitude of 910. Deposits of Quaternary age consist of alluvium along the stream courses and high terrace deposits along the southern rim of the basin. The alluvium contains a high percentage of clay and silt, ranges in thickness from a few inches to 40 feet, and underlies about 36 square miles of the basin. Sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Permian age, which form the bedrock, consist of the Garber sandstone along the eastern edge, the Hennessey shale through the central part, and Flowerpot shale along the western edge. Replenishment of water in the alluvium is from precipitation, lateral seepage and runoff from adjoining areas, and infiltration from the stream channels during high flows. The major use of ground water in the alluvium is transpiration by cottonwood and willow trees. Virtually no water is withdrawn from the alluvium by wells. (available as photostat copy only)

  13. Interaction of a river with an alluvial basin aquifer: Stable isotopes, salinity and water budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastoe, Christopher J.; Hutchison, William R.; Hibbs, Barry J.; Hawley, John; Hogan, James F.

    2010-12-01

    SummaryDetailed sets of tracer data (isotopes, salinity) and the results of MODFLOW modeling of water budgets provide an unprecedented opportunity for comparing modeling with field data in the area where the Rio Grande enters the Hueco Bolson basin of Texas and Chihuahua. Water from the Rio Grande has recharged the Hueco Bolson aquifer to a depth of 300 m below the surface in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez area, the depth of infiltration corresponding to the depth of ancestral Rio Grande fluvial sediments. Groundwater beneath the river exhibits complex isotope and salinity stratification. Post-dam (post -1916, type A) river water has infiltrated to depths up to 80 m. Pre-dam (type B) river water has infiltrated to 300 m depth near downtown El Paso, and has mixed with, or been displaced further downstream by high-salinity native Hueco Bolson groundwater (type C, present in the basin north of the river). Salinity and isotope boundaries do not correspond precisely. Isotope stratification corresponds to water residence time and (for type C) to degree of evaporation; the highest salinities are associated with the most evaporated water. Modeling of water budgets in the basin fill beneath the river predicts present-day mixing of water types B and C where changing rates of pumping have caused a reversal of groundwater flow direction between El Paso and Ciudad Juárez, and deep recharge of type B water under conditions prevailing in the 1960s.

  14. Simulation of Carbon-14 Migration Through a Thick Unsaturated Alluvial Basin Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martian, P.; Larentzos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Flat is one of several areas on the Nevada Test Site that was used for underground nuclear testing. Extensive testing performed in the unsaturated and saturated zones have resulted in groundwater contamination and surface subsidence craters in the vicinity of the underground test areas. Simulation of multiphase 14C transport through the thick Yucca Flat alluvial basin was performed to estimate the magnitude of radionuclide attenuation occurring within the unsaturated zone. Parameterization of the 14C transport in the multiphase flow and transport simulator (FEHM) was verified with experimental data collected from a large unsaturated soil column experiment. The experimental data included 14C as a radio-labeled bicarbonate solution, SF6 gas, and lithium bromide solution breakthroughs. Two representative simulation cases with working points located at shallow and deep depths relative to the water table were created to investigate the impact of subsidence crater-enhanced recharge, crater-playa areal extent, gas-phase partitioning, solid-phase partitioning, and a reduced permeability/porosity compressed zone created during the explosion on 14C transport. The representative shallow test had a detonation point located 175 m below land surface, and the deep test had a working point 435 m below land surface in a 500 m deep unsaturated zone. Carbon-14 transport is influenced by gas-phase diffusion and sorption within the alluvium. Gas-phase diffusion is an attenuation mechanism that transports 14C gas as 14CO2 throughout the unsaturated zone and exposes it to a large amount of soil moisture, resulting in dilute concentrations. The simulations indicated that the majority of the 14C inventory remains in the unsaturated zone over a 1,000-year time period after detonation because gas-phase diffusion moves the bulk of the 14C away from the higher recharge occurring in crater playas. Retardation also plays a role in slowing advective aqueous phase transport to the water table.

  15. Geohydrology, water quality, and preliminary simulations of ground-water flow of the alluvial aquifer in the Upper Black Squirrel Creek basin, El Paso County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckles, D.R.; Watts, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Black Squirrel Creek basin in eastern El Paso County, Colorado, is underlain by an alluvial aquifer and four bedrock aquifers. Groundwater pumpage from the alluvial aquifer has increased since the mid-1950's, and water level declines have been substantial; the bedrock aquifers virtually are undeveloped. Groundwater pumpage for domestic, stock, agricultural, and municipal uses have exceeded recharge for the past 25 years. The present extent of the effect of pumpage on the alluvial aquifer was evaluated, and a groundwater flow model was used to simulate the future effect of continued pumpage on the aquifer. Measured water level declines from 1974 through 1984 were as much as 30 ft in an area north of Ellicott, Colorado. On the basis of the simulations, water level declines from October 1984 to April 1999 north of Ellicott might be as much as 20 to 30 ft and as much as 1 to 10 ft in most of the aquifer. The groundwater flow models provided a means of evaluating the importance of groundwater evapotranspiration at various stages of aquifer development. Simulated groundwater evapotranspiration was about 43% of the outflow from the aquifer during predevelopment stages but was less than 3% of the outflow from the aquifer during late-development stages. Analyses of 36 groundwater samples collected during 1984 indicated that concentrations of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen generally were large. Samples from 5 of the 36 wells had concentrations of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen that exceeded drinking water standards. Water from the alluvial aquifer generally is of suitable quality for most uses. (USGS)

  16. Seismic Velocities and Thicknesses of Alluvial Deposits along Baker Creek in the Great Basin National Park, East-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allander, Kip K.; Berger, David L.

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how proposed large-scale water withdrawals in Snake Valley may affect the water resources and hydrologic processes in the Great Basin National Park, the National Park Service needs to have a better understanding of the relations between streamflow and groundwater flow through alluvium and karst topography of the Pole Canyon Limestone. Information that is critical to understanding these relations is the thickness of alluvial deposits that overlay the Pole Canyon Limestone. In mid-April 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service used seismic refraction along three profiles adjacent to Baker Creek to further refine understanding of the local geology. Two refractors and three distinct velocity layers were detected along two of the profiles and a single refractor and two distinct velocity layers were detected along a third profile. In the unsaturated alluvium, average velocity was 2,000 feet per second, thickness ranged from about 7 to 20 feet along two profiles downstream of the Narrows, and thickness was at least 100 feet along a single profile upstream of the Narrows. Saturated alluvium was only present downstream of the Narrows - average velocity was 4,400 feet per second, and thickness ranged from about 40 to 110 feet. The third layer probably represented Pole Canyon Limestone or Tertiary granitic rock units with an average velocity of 12,500 feet per second. Along the upstream and middle profiles (profiles 3 and 1, respectively), the depth to top of the third layer ranged from at least 60 to 110 feet below land surface and is most likely the Pole Canyon Limestone. The third layer at the farthest downstream profile (profile 2) may be a Tertiary granitic rock unit. Baker Creek is disconnected from the groundwater system along the upstream profile (profile 3) and streamflow losses infiltrate vertically downward to the Pole Canyon Limestone. Along the downstream and middle profiles (profiles 2 and 1, respectively), the presence of a shallow water table indicates that low permeability Tertiary granitic rock may extend across the Baker Creek Drainage intersecting the Pole Canyon Limestone. The Tertiary granitic rock may be acting as a barrier to groundwater flow within the Pole Canyon Limestone.

  17. Sahra integrated modeling approach to address water resources management in semi-arid river basins

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E. P.; Gupta, Hoshin V. (Hoshin Vijai),; Brookshire, David S.; Liu, Y. (Yuqiong)

    2004-01-01

    Water resources decisions in the 21Sf Century that will affect allocation of water for economic and environmental will rely on simulations from integrated models of river basins. These models will not only couple natural systems such as surface and ground waters, but will include economic components that can assist in model assessments of river basins and bring the social dimension to the decision process. The National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA) has been developing integrated models to assess impacts of climate variability and land use change on water resources in semi-arid river basins. The objectives of this paper are to describe the SAHRA integrated modeling approach and to describe the linkage between social and natural sciences in these models. Water resources issues that arise from climate variability or land use change may require different resolution models to answer different questions. For example, a question related to streamflow may not need a high-resolution model whereas a question concerning the source and nature of a pollutant will. SAHRA has taken a multiresolution approach to integrated model development because one cannot anticipate the questions in advance, and the computational and data resources may not always be available or needed for the issue to be addressed. The coarsest resolution model is based on dynamic simulation of subwatersheds or river reaches. This model resolution has the advantage of simplicity and social factors are readily incorporated. Users can readily take this model (and they have) and examine the effects of various management strategies such as increased cost of water. The medium resolution model is grid based and uses variable grid cells of 1-12 km. The surface hydrology is more physically based using basic equations for energy and water balance terms, and modules are being incorporated that will simulate engineering components such as reservoirs or irrigation diversions and economic features such as variable demand. The fine resolution model is viewed as a tool to examine basin response using best available process models. The fine resolution model operates on a grid cell size of 100 m or less, which is consistent with the scale that our process knowledge has developed. The fine resolution model couples atmosphere, surface water and groundwater modules using high performance computing. The medium and fine resolution models are not expected at this time to be operated by users as opposed to the coarse resolution model. One of the objectives of the SAHRA integrated modeling task is to present results in a manner that can be used by those making decisions. The application of these models within SAHRA is driven by a scenario analysis and a place location. The place is the Rio Grande from its headwaters in Colorado to the New Mexico-Texas border. This provides a focus for model development and an attempt to see how the results from the various models relate. The scenario selected by SAHRA is the impact of a 1950's style drought using 1990's population and land use on Rio Grande water resources including surface and groundwater. The same climate variables will be used to drive all three models so that comparison will be based on how the three resolutions partition and route water through the river basin. Aspects of this scenario will be discussed and initial model simulation will be presented. The issue of linking economic modules into the modeling effort will be discussed and the importance of feedback from the social and economic modules to the natural science modules will be reviewed.

  18. The influence of river regulation and land use on floodplain forest regeneration in the semi-arid upper Colorado River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northcott, K.; Andersen, D.C.; Cooper, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    Flow regulation effects on floodplain forests in the semi-arid western United States are moderately well understood, whereas effects associated with changes in floodplain land use are poorly documented. We mapped land cover patterns from recent aerial photos and applied a classification scheme to mainstem alluvial floodplains in 10 subjectively selected 4th order hydrologic units (subbasins) in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to document land use patterns (floodplain development) and assess their effects on Fremont cottonwood forest (CF) regeneration. Three of the mainstem rivers were unregulated, five were moderately regulated and two were highly regulated. We classified polygons as Undeveloped (with two categories, including CF) and Developed (with five categories). We ground-truthed 501 randomly selected polygons (4-28% of the floodplain area in each subbasin) to verify classification accuracy and to search for cottonwood regeneration, defined as stands established since regulation began or 1950, whichever is most recent. From 40% to 95% of the floodplain area remained undeveloped, but only 19-70% of the floodplain area was classified as forest. Regeneration occupied a mean of 5% (range 1-17%) of the floodplain. The likelihood of the presence of regeneration in a polygon was reduced 65% by development and independently in a complex manner by flow regulation. Our analyses indicate that floodplain forests may be in jeopardy on both regulated and unregulated rivers and that information on historical forest extent is needed to better understand their current status in the UCRB. Conservation efforts need to be coordinated at a regional level and address the potentially adverse affects of both flow regulation and floodplain development.

  19. How Widely Applicable is River Basin Management? An Analysis of Wastewater Management in an Arid Transboundary Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowsky, Ines; Almog, Ram; Becker, Nir; Feitelson, Eran; Klawitter, Simone; Lindemann, Stefan; Mutlak, Natalie

    2010-05-01

    The basin scale has been promoted universally as the optimal management unit that allows for the internalization of all external effects caused by multiple water uses. However, the basin scale has been put forward largely on the basis of experience in temperate zones. Hence whether the basin scale is the best scale for management in other settings remains questionable. To address these questions this paper analyzes the economic viability and the political feasibility of alternative management options in the Kidron/Wadi Nar region. The Kidron/Wadi Nar is a small basin in which wastewater from eastern Jerusalem flows through the desert to the Dead Sea. Various options for managing these wastewater flows were analyzed ex ante on the basis of both a cost benefit and a multi-criteria analysis. The paper finds that due to economies of scale, a pure basin approach is not desirable from a physical and economic perspective. Furthermore, in terms of political feasibility, it seems that the option which prompts the fewest objections from influential stakeholder groups in the two entities under the current asymmetrical political setting is not a basin solution either, but a two plant solution based on an outsourcing arrangement. These findings imply that the river basin management approach can not be considered the best management approach for the arid transboundary case at hand, and hence is not unequivocally universally applicable.

  20. Geophysical and hydrogeologic investigations of two primary alluvial aquifers embedded in the southern San Andreas fault system: San Bernardino basin and upper Coachella Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisely, Beth Ann

    This study of alluvial aquifer basins in southern California is centered on observations of differential surface displacement and the search for the mechanisms of deformation. The San Bernardino basin and the Upper Coachella Valley aquifers are bound by range fronts and fault segments of the southern San Andreas fault system. I have worked to quantify long-term compaction in these groundwater dependent population centers with a unique synthesis of data and methodologies using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and groundwater data. My dissertation contributes to the understanding of alluvial aquifer heterogeneity and partitioning. I model hydrogeologic and tectonic interpretations of deformation where decades of overdraft conditions and ongoing aquifer development contribute to extreme rapid subsidence. I develop the Hydrogeologic InSAR Integration (HII) method for the characterization of surface deformation in aquifer basins. The method allows for the separation of superimposed hydraulic and/or tectonic processes in operation. This formalization of InSAR and groundwater level integration provides opportunities for application in other aquifer basins where overdraft conditions may be causing permanent loss of aquifer storage capacity through compaction. Sixteen years of SAR data for the Upper Coachella Valley exhibit rapid vertical surface displacement (? 48mm/a) in sharply bound areas of the western basin margin. Using well driller logs, I categorize a generalized facies analysis of the western basin margin, describing heterogeneity of the aquifer. This allowed for assessment of the relationships between observed surface deformation and sub-surface material properties. Providing the setting and context for the hydrogeologic evolution of California's primary aquifers, the mature San Andreas transform fault is studied extensively by a broad range of geoscientists. I present a compilation of observations of creep, line integrals across the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary, and strain tensor volumes for comparison to the Working Group 2007 (UCERF 2) seismicity-based deformation model. I find that the moment accumulation across the plate boundary is consistent with the deformation model, suggesting fault displacement observations within the plate boundary zone accurately capture the strain across the plate boundary. This dissertation includes co-authored materials previously published, and also includes unpublished work currently under revisions for submission to a technical journal.

  1. Estimates of recharge in two arid basin aquifers: a model of spatially variable net infiltration and its implications (Red Light Draw and Eagle Flats, Texas, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Wendy Marie; Sharp, John M.

    2013-12-01

    Methods of estimating recharge in arid basin aquifers (such as the 1 % rule, Maxey-Eakin method, storm-runoff infiltration and others) overlook the potential contribution of direct recharge on the basin floors. In the Trans-Pecos region of west Texas, USA, this has resulted in potential recharge and solute flux to basin aquifers being ignored. Observed trends in groundwater nitrate (NO3 -) concentrations and the presence of young (<70 years old) water in the basins indicate that recharge is occurring through the basin floors. A spatially variable net infiltration model (INFIL 3.0.1) was used to estimate the volume and spatial distribution of potential recharge to two basins: Red Light Draw and Eagle Flats. The INFIL model provides insight into the mechanisms by which recharge and solute flux occurs in arid basin systems. This method demonstrated that recharge is widespread; it is not limited to the mountainous areas and mountain-front recharge mechanisms, and up to 15 % of total potential recharge in these basins occurs across widespread areas of the basin floors. Models such as this should improve scientific understanding and sustainable management of arid basin aquifers in Texas and elsewhere.

  2. Regional groundwater-flow model of the Redwall-Muav, Coconino, and alluvial basin aquifer systems of northern and central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.; Blasch, Kyle W.; Callegary, James B.; Leake, Stanley A.; Graser, Leslie F.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical flow model (MODFLOW) of the groundwater flow system in the primary aquifers in northern Arizona was developed to simulate interactions between the aquifers, perennial streams, and springs for predevelopment and transient conditions during 1910 through 2005. Simulated aquifers include the Redwall-Muav, Coconino, and basin-fill aquifers. Perennial stream reaches and springs that derive base flow from the aquifers were simulated, including the Colorado River, Little Colorado River, Salt River, Verde River, and perennial reaches of tributary streams. Simulated major springs include Blue Spring, Del Rio Springs, Havasu Springs, Verde River headwater springs, several springs that discharge adjacent to major Verde River tributaries, and many springs that discharge to the Colorado River. Estimates of aquifer hydraulic properties and groundwater budgets were developed from published reports and groundwater-flow models. Spatial extents of aquifers and confining units were developed from geologic data, geophysical models, a groundwater-flow model for the Prescott Active Management Area, drill logs, geologic logs, and geophysical logs. Spatial and temporal distributions of natural recharge were developed by using a water-balance model that estimates recharge from direct infiltration. Additional natural recharge from ephemeral channel infiltration was simulated in alluvial basins. Recharge at wastewater treatment facilities and incidental recharge at agricultural fields and golf courses were also simulated. Estimates of predevelopment rates of groundwater discharge to streams, springs, and evapotranspiration by phreatophytes were derived from previous reports and on the basis of streamflow records at gages. Annual estimates of groundwater withdrawals for agriculture, municipal, industrial, and domestic uses were developed from several sources, including reported withdrawals for nonexempt wells, estimated crop requirements for agricultural wells, and estimated per capita water use for exempt wells. Accuracy of the simulated groundwater-flow system was evaluated by using observational control from water levels in wells, estimates of base flow from streamflow records, and estimates of spring discharge. Major results from the simulations include the importance of variations in recharge rates throughout the study area and recharge along ephemeral and losing stream reaches in alluvial basins. Insights about the groundwater-flow systems in individual basins include the hydrologic influence of geologic structures in some areas and that stream-aquifer interactions along the lower part of the Little Colorado River are an effective control on water level distributions throughout the Little Colorado River Plateau basin. Better information on several aspects of the groundwater flow system are needed to reduce uncertainty of the simulated system. Many areas lack documentation of the response of the groundwater system to changes in withdrawals and recharge. Data needed to define groundwater flow between vertically adjacent water-bearing units is lacking in many areas. Distributions of recharge along losing stream reaches are poorly defined. Extents of aquifers and alluvial lithologies are poorly defined in parts of the Big Chino and Verde Valley sub-basins. Aquifer storage properties are poorly defined throughout most of the study area. Little data exist to define the hydrologic importance of geologic structures such as faults and fractures. Discharge of regional groundwater flow to the Verde River is difficult to identify in the Verde Valley sub-basin because of unknown contributions from deep percolation of excess surface water irrigation.

  3. Large alluvial fans on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.

    2005-04-01

    Several dozen distinct alluvial fans, 10 to ~40 km long downslope, have been observed in highlands craters. Within a search region between 0° and 30°S, alluvial fan-containing craters were found only between 18° and 29°S, and they all occur at around +/-1 km of the MOLA-defined Martian datum. Within the study area they are not randomly distributed but instead form three distinct clusters. Fans typically descend >1 km from where they disgorge from their alcoves. Longitudinal profiles show that their surfaces are very slightly concave with a mean slope of 2°. Many fans exhibit very long, narrow, low-relief ridges radially oriented downslope, often branching at their distal ends, suggestive of distributaries. Morphometric data for 31 fans were derived from MOLA data and compared with terrestrial fans with high-relief source areas, terrestrial low-gradient alluvial ramps in inactive tectonic settings, and older Martian alluvial ramps along crater floors. The Martian alluvial fans generally fall on the same trends as the terrestrial alluvial fans, whereas the gentler Martian crater floor ramps are similar in gradient to the low-relief terrestrial alluvial surfaces. For a given fan gradient, Martian alluvial fans generally have greater source basin relief than terrestrial fans in active tectonic settings. This suggests that the terrestrial source basins either yield coarser debris or have higher sediment concentrations than their Martian counterpoints. Martian fans (and terrestrial Basin and Range fans) have steeper gradients than the older Martian alluvial ramps (and terrestrial low-relief alluvial surfaces), which is consistent with the construction of Martian fans from dominantly gravel-sized sediment (rather than sand and silt). Martian fans are relatively large and of low gradient, similar to terrestrial fluvial fans rather than debris flow fans (although gravity-scaling uncertainties make the flow regime forming Martian fans uncertain). However, evidence of bedforms accentuated by differential erosion, such as scroll bars, supports the contention that these are fluvially formed fans. Martian fans, at least those in Holden crater, apparently formed around the time of the Noachian-Hesperian boundary. We infer that these fans formed during an episode of enhanced precipitation (probably snow) and runoff, which exhibited both sudden onset and termination.

  4. Mapping Ecological Processes and Ecosystem Services for Prioritizing Restoration Efforts in a Semi-arid Mediterranean River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabucchi, Mattia; O'Farrell, Patrick J.; Notivol, Eduardo; Comín, Francisco A.

    2014-06-01

    Semi-arid Mediterranean regions are highly susceptible to desertification processes which can reduce the benefits that people obtain from healthy ecosystems and thus threaten human wellbeing. The European Union Biodiversity Strategy to 2020 recognizes the need to incorporate ecosystem services into land-use management, conservation, and restoration actions. The inclusion of ecosystem services into restoration actions and plans is an emerging area of research, and there are few documented approaches and guidelines on how to undertake such an exercise. This paper responds to this need, and we demonstrate an approach for identifying both key ecosystem services provisioning areas and the spatial relationship between ecological processes and services. A degraded semi-arid Mediterranean river basin in north east Spain was used as a case study area. We show that the quantification and mapping of services are the first step required for both optimizing and targeting of specific local areas for restoration. Additionally, we provide guidelines for restoration planning at a watershed scale; establishing priorities for improving the delivery of ecosystem services at this scale; and prioritizing the sub-watersheds for restoration based on their potential for delivering a combination of key ecosystem services for the entire basin.

  5. The effect of vegetation and beaver dams on geomorphic recovery rates of incised streams in the semi-arid regions of the Columbia River basin, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pollock; T. Beechie; C. Jordan

    2005-01-01

    Channel incision is a common occurrence in semi-arid regions of the Columbia River basin and throughout the world, where a fragile balance between climate, vegetation and geology makes channels susceptible to changes in hillslope erosion, stream discharge and sediment yield. Incision is defined as a rapid downcutting and lowering of the stream bed such that it reduces the frequency and

  6. Sensitivity of a semi-arid tropical lake basin to environmental changes (Lake Ihotry basin, South-West of Madagascar)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Vallet-Coulomb; A. Maurin; F. Gasse; L. Ferry; L. Robison

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study is to analyse the sensitivity of water ressources in a large semi-arid catchment, based on few hydro-meteorological and satellite images analysis. The site is located in the south-west of Madagascar. The catchment, which surface is 3000 km^2, is limited in its eastern side by a North-south relief up to 1000m high. The most important part

  7. Aquifer Geometry and Hydrochemical Framework of the Shallow Alluvial Aquifers in the Western Part of the Yamuna River Basin, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shadab Khurshid

    The Yamuna basin constitutes a part of the Ganga plain which is one of the most densely populated regions and one of the largest groundwater repositories on the earth. Agricultural activities, population growth, rapid industrialization, and unplanned urbanization in the plain have resulted in various geo-environmental hazards, in particular, deterioration of groundwater quality. This studies the aquifer geometry and geochemical

  8. Alluvial Fan-lacustrine Sedimentation and its Tectonic Implications in the Cretaceous Athgarh Gondwana Basin, Orissa, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Banabehari Mishra; Krishna Lal Pandya; Wataru Maejima

    2004-01-01

    The Athgarh Formation is the northernmost extension of the east coast Upper Gondwana sediments of Peninsular India. The formation of the present area is a clastic succession of 700 m thick and was built against an upland scarp along the north and northwestern boundary of the basin marked by an E-W-ENE-WSW boundary fault. A regular variation in the dominant facies

  9. Estimating the Changes and Impact Factors of Evapotranspiration in the Semi-arid Laohahe Basin, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Ren, L.; Yu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is one important component of hydrological cycle in semi-arid regions, which can not be availably space-based measured. Remote sensors can make spatially resolved measurements over large areas, providing both spatial distribution and visualization of complex processes of evapotranspiration. In this paper, the spatial distribution of daily ET over Laohahe Basin in northeast China with area of 18112 km2 was assessed by using the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model. A series of available Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite images on clouds-free days over the growing season (from April to October) in 2008 are used to estimate ET at a spatial resolution of 1 km. Harmonic Analysis of NDVI Time Series (HANTS) is then applied to generate a time series of daily ET over a year period by filling the gaps in the observation series for clouds. Finally, the results were validated with the water balance for the whole study area. The impact of ground parameters on evapotranspiration of the study area was quantified. The result indicates that (1) the SEBAL algorithm can be used to effectively estimate the ET in the Laohahe Basin; (2) The vegetation types, NDVI, and terrain have a direct effect on the spatial distribution of ET. These results can be used to provide current, reliable land use information for management and decision-making in the Laohahe Basin.

  10. Late Eocene arid climate in Asia inferred from multi-proxy sclerochronology using oyster shells from the Tarim Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougeois, Laurie; de Rafélis, Marc; Reichart, Gert-Jan; de Nooijer, Lennart J.; Nicollin, Florence; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2013-04-01

    The Asian climate is characterized by a strong duality between monsoon dominant climate in southeastern Asia and arid climate in central Asia. Based on climate modelling, this pattern has been explained by two main driving mechanisms associated to the Indo-Asia collision: uplift of Tibetan Plateau and/or retreat of an epicontinental sea formerly covering Asia. However, climate proxies are lacking to test these hypotheses and understand how and when this climate pattern was established. The aim of this study is to develop a new method to understand the Late Eocene climate in central Asia, when the Paratethys was still covering the continent. A crucial task to this end is to reconstruct the climate seasonality in central Asia: when and how the climate changed from a probably temperate climate, due to the sea presence, to an arid climate? Did this climate change have an impact on the monsoon intensification in southestern Asia? Here we use bivalve sclerochronology to assess the Eocene climate variability on seosonal time scales in Central Asia. Well preserved oyster shells (Sokolowia buhsii, Grewingk) were sampled in marine sediments from Lutetian to Bartonian age in southwestern Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China (Aertashi and Kezi sections). The Paratethys sea was shallow and partially closed, thus the challenge is to distinguish temperature from salinity effects on the biomineralization. Here, we present a new method using multi-proxy approach. The fossils were cut perpendicularly to the maximum growth axis to expose incremental yearly growth lines of the shell to be analysed. We first obtained Mg/Ca record using LA ICP-MS indicative of the temperature variations. We then recovered an isotopic sclerogeochemistry (?18Oc) record using micromilling extraction to assess the ?18Ow (and thereby the salinity) of the sea. Results show that seasonal temperature variability was considerable. Furthemore salinity increase during summers indicating a negative water balance. Thus, we infer that central Asian climate was already very arid during the Late Eocene, although the Paratethys sea was still covering the Asian continent. This is an apparent contradiction with the first assumption of a temperate climate before sea retreat but is in agreement with coeval palynological data from the Tarim Basin and with recent climate models of Eocene Asian monsoons.

  11. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of an alluvial fan–fan delta environment: stratigraphic and geodynamic implications – An example from the Keuper Chaunoy Sandstones, Paris Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvie Bourquin; Christophe Rigollet; Philippe Bourges

    1998-01-01

    Facies analysis of the Chaunoy Formation, conducted as the first stage of this study, reveals that the corresponding fluvial system essentially involved bedload deposition, 2-D and 3-D megaripple migration, and debris-flow deposition. Such processes are characteristic of alluvial fan depositional environments. These alluvial fan deposits pass laterally eastward into a shallow lacustrine environment. In stage 2 of the study, electrofacies

  12. Identifying sources of groundwater nitrate contamination in a large alluvial groundwater basin with highly diversified intensive agricultural production.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, K M; King, A M; Harter, T

    2013-08-01

    Groundwater quality is a concern in alluvial aquifers underlying agricultural areas worldwide. Nitrate from land applied fertilizers or from animal waste can leach to groundwater and contaminate drinking water resources. The San Joaquin Valley, California, is an example of an agricultural landscape with a large diversity of field, vegetable, tree, nut, and citrus crops, but also confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs, here mostly dairies) that generate, store, and land apply large amounts of liquid manure. As in other such regions around the world, the rural population in the San Joaquin Valley relies almost exclusively on shallow domestic wells (?150 m deep), of which many have been affected by nitrate. Variability in crops, soil type, and depth to groundwater contribute to large variability in nitrate occurrence across the underlying aquifer system. The role of these factors in controlling groundwater nitrate contamination levels is examined. Two hundred domestic wells were sampled in two sub-regions of the San Joaquin Valley, Stanislaus and Merced (Stan/Mer) and Tulare and Kings (Tul/Kings) Counties. Forty six percent of well water samples in Tul/Kings and 42% of well water samples in Stan/Mer exceeded the MCL for nitrate (10mg/L NO3-N). For statistical analysis of nitrate contamination, 78 crop and landuse types were considered by grouping them into ten categories (CAFO, citrus, deciduous fruits and nuts, field crops, forage, native, pasture, truck crops, urban, and vineyards). Vadose zone thickness, soil type, well construction information, well proximity to dairies, and dominant landuse near the well were considered. In the Stan/Mer area, elevated nitrate levels in domestic wells most strongly correlate with the combination of very shallow (?21 m) water table and the presence of either CAFO derived animal waste applications or deciduous fruit and nut crops (synthetic fertilizer applications). In Tulare County, statistical data indicate that elevated nitrate levels in domestic well water are most strongly associated with citrus orchards when located in areas with a very shallow (?21 m) water table. Kings County had relatively few nitrate MCL exceedances in domestic wells, probably due to the deeper water table in Kings County. PMID:23800783

  13. Why conceptual groundwater flow models matter: a trans-boundary example from the arid Great Basin, western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, J.; Nelson, S. T.; Mayo, A. L.; Tingey, D. G.

    2012-09-01

    Spring and Snake valleys, western USA, are scheduled for development and groundwater export to Las Vegas, Nevada (USA). New work, compared to published studies, illustrates the critical role of conceptual models to underpin water withdrawals in arid regions. Interbasin flow studies suggest that 30-55 % of recharge to Snake Valley arrives from adjacent Spring Valley. This study, however, suggest little or no interbasin flow; rather, Spring and Snake valleys comprise separate systems. Contrary to expectation, ?D and ?18O contours are perpendicular to proposed interbasin flow paths. 14C age gradients up to 10 ka along interbasin flow paths indicate that old waters are not displaced by such fluxes. 14C and 3H patterns indicate local recharge occurs in adjacent mountain ranges and is transferred to basin-fill by losing streams, mountain front recharge, and upward leakage from carbonate bedrock beneath basins. The choice of conceptual models is critical for groundwater development. Simple analyses of water withdrawals indicate that monitoring discharges at desert springs is an inadequate protective measure. Once flows decline, recovery is lengthy even if pumping is stopped. The conceptual framework behind quantitative evaluations of sustainable yield is critical to determine the ability of a groundwater system to deliver sustained withdrawals.

  14. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  15. Intensified pluvial conditions during the twentieth century in the inland Heihe River Basin in arid northwestern China over the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chun; Yang, Bao; Burchardt, Iris; Hu, Xiaoli; Kang, Xingcheng

    2010-06-01

    Past streamflow variability is of special significance in the inland river basin, i.e., the Heihe River Basin in arid northwestern China, where water shortage is a serious environmental and social problem. However, the current knowledge of issues related to regional water resources management and long-term planning and management is limited by the lack of long-term hydro-meteorological records. Here we present a 1009-year annual streamflow (August-July) reconstruction for the upstream of the Heihe River in the arid northwestern China based on a well-replicated Qilian juniper ( Sabina przewalskii Kom.) ring-width chronology. This reconstruction accounts for 46.9% of the observed instrumental streamflow variance during the period 1958-2006. Considerable multidecadal to centennial flow variations below and above the long-term average are displayed in the millennium streamflow reconstruction. These periods 1012-1053, 1104-1212, 1259-1352, 1442-1499, 1593-1739 and 1789-1884 are noteworthy for the persistence of low-level river flow, and for the fact that these low streamflow events are not found in the observed instrumental hydrological record during the recent 50 years. The 20th century witnessed intensified pluvial conditions in the upstream of the Heihe River in the arid northwestern China in the context of the last millennium. Comparison with other long-term hydrological reconstructions indicates that the intensification of the hydrological cycle in the twentieth century from different regions could be attributable to regional to large-scale temperature increase during this time. Furthermore, from a practical perspective, the streamflow reconstruction can serve as a robust database for the government to work out more scientific and more reasonable water allocation alternatives for the Heihe River Basin in arid northwestern China.

  16. Sensitivity of a semi-arid tropical lake basin to environmental changes (Lake Ihotry basin, South-West of Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet-Coulomb, C.; Maurin, A.; Gasse, F.; Ferry, L.; Robison, L.

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the study is to analyse the sensitivity of water ressources in a large semi-arid catchment, based on few hydro-meteorological and satellite images analysis. The site is located in the south-west of Madagascar. The catchment, which surface is 3000 km^2, is limited in its eastern side by a North-south relief up to 1000m high. The most important part of the catchment is made of a sandy plain, with a very poorly structured hydrographic network. The average annual precipitation varies in the catchment from 600 mm in the plain to 1000 mm in the mountains, with an an average temperature of 25^oC and an annual potential evapotranspiration rate of almost 2000mm. In the plain, surface and subsurface water circulation converges to Lake Ihotry, which has no surface outlet. The lake, very shallow, usually undergoes hudge seasonnal and inter-annual variations in water surface (from 60 to 120 km^2) and in water conductivity (from 7 to 23 mS/cm). In the catchment, no river flow data are available, partly because of the great instability of the hydrographic network. A dynamic model of lake water and salinity balances is used to establish the lake water balance and the temporal variations of water inflows, based on the daily data of precipitation, lake level and pan evaporation obtained during a 3 years field measurement campain. These results provide indirect data for validating a catchment hydrological model. We present the first results of the application of a semi-distributed hydrological modelling approach based on the determination of hydrological response units (HRU). The analysis of four stereoscopic couples of panchromatic SPOT scenes (10m resolution), allows to elaborate a digital elevation model and a vegetation map. The cultivated areas represent more than 20% of the total surface of the catchment, that is more than half of the plain. The delineation of the HRU’s is mainly based on the vegetation map, which seems to be a good integrator of the combined effects of pedology, geology, and topography on hydrological caracteristics. The hydrologic connectivity between the different HRU’s is established using available geological and geomorphological data. The catchment model will be used to study the sensitivity of the hydrological system to environmental changes in the different types of HRU. Special attention will be paid to the impact of irrigated cultivation on water availability and water salinity.

  17. Hydrogeology of an ancient arid closed basin: implications for tabular sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeologic modeling shows that tabular-type uranium deposits in the Grants uranium region of the San Juan basin, New Mexico, formed in zones of ascending and discharging regional ground-water flow. The association of either lacustrine mudstone or actively subsiding structures and uranium deposits can best be explained by the occurrence of lakes at topographic depressions where ground water having different sources and compositions is likely to converge, mix, and discharge. Ascending and discharging flow also explains the association of uranium deposits with underlying evaporites and suggests a brine interface. The simulations contradict previous suggestions that ground water moved downward in the mudflat. -Author

  18. Groundwater quality and management in arid and semi-arid regions: Case study, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Ripperdan, Robert; Wang, Tao; Encarnación, John

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a model budget for groundwater in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The stable isotopic composition and hydrochemistry of groundwater samples collected from different aquifers were determined to identify recharge sources and water quality. Stable isotopic values suggest that shallow alluvial and fracture zone aquifers are recharged from seasonal precipitation, while groundwater in deeper sedimentary sub-basins is paleowater that was recharged during periods of less arid regional climate. Hydrochemical analysis indicates elevated salinity in each aquifer type, which is attributed to leaching and dissolution of terrestrial salts and to mixing with marine water. Groundwater from sedimentary sub-basin aquifers can be treated and used for drinking and domestic purposes. Groundwater from shallow alluvial and fracture zone wells is suitable for animal husbandry and mineral ore dressing. A model water budget shows that approximately 4.8 × 109 m3 of recoverable groundwater is stored in sedimentary sub-basin aquifers, or approximately 550 years of water at present utilization rates.

  19. A multidisciplinary program for assessing the sustainability of water resources in semi-arid basin in Morocco: SUDMED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Chehbouni; R. Escadafal; G. Dedieu; S. Errouane; G. Boulet; B. Duchemin; B. Mougenot; V. Sminonneaux; J. Seghieri; F. Timouk

    2003-01-01

    Regions classified as semi-arid or arid constitute roughly one-third of the total global land cover. Within these regions, the dynamic water balance is the single most critical factor in the sustainability of the ecosystems and human populations. In this coontext, the SUDMED program has been designed to acheive two related objectives: (i) improvement of our overall to our overall understanding

  20. Linkages between snow ablation and atmospheric boundary-layer conditions in a semi-arid basin of Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott I.; Prowse, Terry D.; Bonsal, Barrie R.

    2014-09-01

    High-elevation snowpacks provide critical inputs to the hydrological system of mountainous semi-arid regions where summer precipitation is insufficient to maintain adequate discharges for ecological and economic needs. The Okanagan Basin in Western Canada is an example of such a system, as most of the summer streamflow is derived from snowmelt. To better understand how snowmelt events vary as a result of atmospheric conditions, this study developed statistical models using upper-air atmospheric data for evaluating changes in snowpack ablation. Specifically, radiosonde data were statistically linked with detailed ground-based measurements of snowmelt and associated streamflow. Statistical models were developed based on data from the 2007 ablation season and concurrent data from the 850 hPa geopotential height. These models explained 57-68% of the variance in snowmelt for 2007, and were extended to predict snowmelt for the radiosonde period of record (1972-2012). Time-series analyses showed significant trends toward higher winter and spring temperatures, vertical temperature gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer in spring, and earlier dates for snowmelt and freshet initiation. Significant negative trends were also found towards decreasing spring precipitation. More broadly, ablation-season climatic and hydrological variables were significantly positively correlated with the winter and spring Multivariate El Niño Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation indices, in which the positive (negative) phase was associated with higher (lower) magnitude and frequency of melt events. This combination of strong correlations and significant temporal trends indicates that with projected air-temperature increases, the magnitude and duration of melt events are likely to increase, particularly during favourable phases of the above teleconnections.

  1. Geomorphology and morphometric characteristics of alluvial fans, Guadalupe Mountains National Park and adjacent areas, west Texas and New Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Given, Jeffrey Lyle

    2004-09-30

    This study qualitatively and quantitatively analyzes the geomorphology of alluvial fans in the Guadalupe Mountains Region (GMR) of west Texas and south-central New Mexico. Morphometric data for 31 alluvial fans and drainage basins ha ve been...

  2. Understanding hydrologic budgets, dynamics in an arid basin and explore spatial scaling properties using Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator (PAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, K.; Shen, C.; Salve, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Southern California hot desert hosts a fragile ecosystem as well as a range of human economic activities, primarily mining, energy production and recreation. This inland arid landscape is characterized by occasional intensive precipitation events and year-round strong potential evapotranspiration. In this landscape, water and especially groundwater is vital for ecosystem functions and human use. However, the impact of recent development on the sustainability of groundwater resources in the area has not been thoroughly investigated. We apply an integrated, physically-based hydrologic-land surface model, the Process-based Adaptive Watershed Simulator + Community Land Model (PAWS+CLM) to evaluate the sustainability of the groundwater resources in the area. We elucidate the spatio-temporal patterns of hydrologic fluxes and budgets. The modeling results indicate that mountain front recharge is the essential recharging mechanism for the alluvial aquifer. Although pumping activities do not exceed annual-average recharge values, they are still expected to contribute significantly to groundwater drawdown in business-as-usual scenario. The impact of groundwater withdrawals is significant on the desert ecosystem. The relative importance of groundwater flow on NPP rises significantly as compared to other ecosystems. We further evaluate the fractal scaling properties of soil moisture in this very arid system and found the relationship to be much more static in time than that found in a humid continental climate system. The scaling exponents can be predicted using simple functions of the mean. Therefore, multi-scale model based on coarse-resolution surrogate model is expected to perform well in this system. The modeling result is also important for assessing the groundwater sustainability and impact of human activities in the desert environment.

  3. Large to intermediate-scale aquifer heterogeneity in fine-grain dominated alluvial fans (Cenozoic As Pontes Basin, northwestern Spain): insight based on three-dimensional geostatistical reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falivene, O.; Cabrera, L.; Sáez, A.

    2007-08-01

    Facies reconstructions are used in hydrogeology to improve the interpretation of aquifer permeability distribution. In the absence of sufficient data to define the heterogeneity due to geological processes, uncertainties in the distribution of aquifer hydrofacies and characteristics may appear. Geometric and geostatistical methods are used to understand and model aquifer hydrofacies distribution, providing models to improve comprehension and development of aquifers. However, these models require some input statistical parameters that can be difficult to infer from the study site. A three-dimensional reconstruction of a kilometer scale fine-grain dominated Cenozoic alluvial fan derived from more than 200 continuously cored, closely spaced, and regularly distributed wells is presented. The facies distributions were reconstructed using a genetic stratigraphic subdivision and a deterministic geostatistical algorithm. The reconstruction is only slightly affected by variations in the geostatistical input parameters because of the high-density data set. Analysis of the reconstruction allowed identification in the proximal to medial alluvial fan zones of several laterally extensive sand bodies with relatively higher permeability; these sand bodies were quantified in terms of volume, mean thickness, maximum area, and maximum equivalent diameter. These quantifications provide trends and geological scenarios for input statistical parameters to model aquifer systems in similar alluvial fan depositional settings.

  4. Isotopic evidence for climatic influence on alluvial-fan development in Death Valley, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald I. Dorn; M. J. DeNiro; H. O. Ajie

    1987-01-01

    At least three semiarid to arid cycles are recorded by ..delta..¹³C values of organic matter in layers of rock varnishes on surfaces of Hanaupah Canyon and Johnson Canyon alluvial fans, Death Valley, California. These isotopic paleoenvironmental signals are interpreted as indicating major periods of fan aggradation during relatively more humid periods and fan entrenchment during subsequent lengthy arid periods.

  5. Environmental impacts on the hydrology of ephemeral streams and alluvial aquifers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Kuells; V. Marx; A. Bittner; R. Ellmies; M. Seely

    2009-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions alluvial groundwater resources of ephemeral streams are highly important for water supplies and ecosystems. Recent projects have studied processes of indirect recharge in situ and in detail (Dahan et al., 2008; Klaus et al., 2008). Still, little is known about the vulnerability of these aquifers to environmental impacts like surface dam constructions, land-use changes and

  6. [Influence of soil salinization on soil animal community in an arid oasis of middle Heihe River basin].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Liang; Li, Feng-Rui; Niu, Rui-Xue; Liu, Chang-An; Liu, Qi-Jun

    2012-06-01

    An investigation was conducted on the status of soil salinization and the structure of soil animal community across six land use/cover types in an arid oasis of middle Heihe River basin, and the methods of redundancy analysis, regression analysis, and path analysis were adopted to analyze the responses of the soil animal community under different land use/cover types and different management modes to the various status of soil salinization. The six land use/cover types were 21-year old shrub land without irrigation and fertilization, 28-year old poplar and 33-year-old pine plantations with irrigation, 27- and 100-year-old farmlands with irrigation and fertilization, and natural grassland, from which all the other five land use/cover types were converted. The results demonstrated that land cover change in the absence of management practices did not lead to a significant change in the abundance and group richness of the soil animal community, while land cover change in the presence of management practices resulted in a significant change in the soil animal community. The evolvement of the soil animal community structure was co-affected by soil pH, soluble salt content, and Na+, Cl, HCO3-, and Mg2+ concentrations, among which, soil soluble salt and Na had the greatest contribution, being the key affecting factors. The abundance and group richness of the soil animal community had significant negative exponential correlations with soil soluble salt content and Na+ concentration, and significant quadratic correlations with soil Mg2+ and HCO3- concentrations. The calculated ecological threshold values of soil Mg2+ and HCO3- concentrations for the abundance and group richness of the soil animal community were 38.7-39.4 mg x kg(-1) and 324.9-335.3 mg x kg(-1), at which, the abundance and group richness reached their peaks 40-43 individuals x m(-2) and 13-14 families x m(-2), respectively. When the Mg2+ and HCO3- concentrations increased further, the abundance and group richness decreased. PMID:22937643

  7. End-Pleistocene to Holocene paleoenvironmental record from piston corer samples and the challenge of stratigraphic correlation of playa sediment data with a connected alluvial apron from Damghan Basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büdel, Christian; Hoelzmann, Philipp; Wennrich, Volker; Majid Padashi, Sajed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The study yields a first characterization and correlation of the end-Pleistocene to Holocene sediment archive of playa and playa lake deposits in the Damghan Basin, northern Iran. The Basin sediments are deposited since Mio- and Pliocene, which is valid for the connected alluvial fans, too. These are covering the area between the playa and mountains and while prograding from the mountain ranges they deliver gravels and fine-sediments to the basins sink. The processes on the studied alluvial apron are described and dated already and can be explained in seven morphodynamic phases, which are linked to a general lake level high-stand in north-east Iran at about 8000-9000 years ago. If and how these phases are passed on from the alluvial record down to the playa sediment record is aim of this study. Today the salt pans margins are highly affected by salt tectonic drifting and access was suboptimal. Only here drilling could be performed through about 280 centimeters of salt-crust unfrequently intercalated with loamy layers. For yielding undisturbed playa sediment records sampling was performed with inliner-tubes deployed in a piston corer (Kullenberg type). Thus at two different drilling sites in summation seven cores could be taken, down to a maximum depth of 129 cm and 1000 cm. Back in Germany the cores had been opened and initially described, photographed and optically scanned with a core logger. Regarding future studies, the aim was a best possible comprehensive documentation of the cores. Therefore basically grainsize measurements (laser diffraction), multi element analyses (XRF, ICP-OES, titrimetry) and mineralogical measurements (XRD) had been deployed on samples taken from every single previously identified layer. Continuous elemental data was secured by use of a XRF-scanning core logger. The sedimentological description together with laboratory element analyses shows saline conditions in the first three meters coincide with general coarser grain sizes. The next three meters are made up by homogenous partly laminated deposits, rich auf clay and silt and with a decreased content of sulphur and halite. Regular Peaks of sulfate and calcium within this unit presumably indicate post-sedimentary precipitation of gypsum. The homogenous sediment unit is followed by layers clearly set up in three major phases of up-fining sediments. Higher Al and Mg contents following this sedimentation phases suggest a considerable amount of syn-sedimentary clay mineral enrichment. The alignment of alluvial fan phases and phases recorded in the playa is challenging. As figured out before, the focused signals in the study are linked to non-local factors affecting supra-regional land surface alteration. But 0 to less than 1 % organic carbon contents decrease the chance of deriving a valid sediment dating and the possibility of chrono-stratigraphic correlation. Anyway, the clear transitional zone from halite dominated to more or less halite-free sediments can serve as a guideline to the development of further correlations.

  8. HYDRO-MICROMETEOROLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS ACROSS MOUNTAIN ISLAND FOREST, GRASSLAND AND RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEMS OF A SEMI-ARID BASIN 1760

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observations from a sky Island forested ecosystem in the semi-arid southwestern U.S.established that the type of ecosystems represented by the Mt Bigelow site in the Santa Catalina Mountain Ranges, NE of Tucson Arizona, respond to an annual wet-dry cycle instead of a hot-cold (summer-winter) cycle t...

  9. Tectonic and climatic control on geomorphological and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure basin, southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robustelli, Gaetano; Ermolli, Elda Russo; Petrosino, Paola; Jicha, Brian; Sardella, Raffaele; Donato, Paola

    2014-06-01

    The morpho-tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure intramontane basin (Calabria-Lucania boundary, southern Apennines) has been assessed through facies analysis, morphostratigraphy and geomorphological correlation with adjacent areas. The Mercure basin, one of the most active seismogenic zones of the southern Apennines, is a favorable area for reconstructing the main stages of landscape evolution of the axial zone because of its capability to record changes in base level during the Quaternary. In addition, the presence of both erosional and depositional Palaeosurfaces is a useful marker for reconstructing tectonic and morphogenetic events, and hence to detect the role played by tectonics and climate in its genesis, evolution and extinction. The present study identifies the key role of tectonics and denudation, combined with high-frequency floods, as mechanisms controlling alluvial sedimentation in the study area. During endorheic conditions, denudational processes driven by pulses of extensional deformation of the basin margin caused strong alluvial inputs that resulted in the development of alluvial fans. Alluvial facies are mainly characterized by turbulent, subaerial, hyperconcentrated flood flows deposited during the glacial, semi-arid conditions of MIS 14. The retrogradational stacking pattern of the alluvial system indicates decreasing rates of tectonic activity along with declining river gradients. The Mercure coalescing alluvial fans were inundated by lake transgression during MIS 13 in response to (i) abrupt tectonic subsidence at the basin margins and (ii) large decrease of coarse sediment supply due to the interplay among climate, tectonics and catchment size changes. In this regard, it is suggested that tectonic control on the drainage network along with climate and long-term slope evolution may have caused marked pulses in sediment supply, thus influencing the arrangement of facies associations in the sedimentary succession. In addition, the study points out that the main tectonic landforms developed during each period of the landscape evolution well correspond with some active fault segments.

  10. Regional potentiometric-surface map of the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system in Snake Valley and surrounding areas, Juab, Millard, and Beaver Counties, Utah, and White Pine and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Philip M.; Masbruch, Melissa D.; Plume, Russell W.; Buto, Susan G.

    2011-01-01

    Water-level measurements from 190 wells were used to develop a potentiometric-surface map of the east-central portion of the regional Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system in and around Snake Valley, eastern Nevada and western Utah. The map area covers approximately 9,000 square miles in Juab, Millard, and Beaver Counties, Utah, and White Pine and Lincoln Counties, Nevada. Recent (2007-2010) drilling by the Utah Geological Survey and U.S. Geological Survey has provided new data for areas where water-level measurements were previously unavailable. New water-level data were used to refine mapping of the pathways of intrabasin and interbasin groundwater flow. At 20 of these locations, nested observation wells provide vertical hydraulic gradient data and information related to the degree of connection between basin-fill aquifers and consolidated-rock aquifers. Multiple-year water-level hydrographs are also presented for 32 wells to illustrate the aquifer system's response to interannual climate variations and well withdrawals.

  11. The earliest well-dated archeological site in the hyper-arid Tarim Basin and its implications for prehistoric human migration and climatic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, WenXia; Yu, LuPeng; Lai, ZhongPing; Madsen, David; Yang, Shengli

    2014-07-01

    The routes and timing of human occupation of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are crucial for understanding the evolution of Tibetan populations and associated paleoclimatic conditions. Many archeological sites have been found in/around the Tarim Basin, on the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Unfortunately, most of these sites are surface sites and cannot be directly dated. Their ages can only be estimated based on imprecise artifact comparisons. We recently found and dated an archeological site on a terrace along the Keriya River. Our ages indicate that the site was occupied at ~ 7.0-7.6 ka, making it the earliest well-dated archeological site yet identified in the Tarim Basin. This suggests that early human foragers migrated into this region prior to ~ 7.0-7.6 ka during the early to mid-Holocene climatic optimum, which may have provided the impetus for populating the region. We hypothesize that the Keriya River, together with the other rivers originating from the TP, may have served as access routes onto the TP for early human foragers. These rivers may also have served as stepping stones for migration further west into the now hyper-arid regions of the Tarim Basin, leading ultimately to the development of the Silk Road.

  12. Rain Basin Design Implications for Soil Microbial Activity and N-mineralization in a Semi-arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rain basins have been an increasingly popular Green Infrastructure (GI) solution to the redistribution of water flow caused by urbanization. This study was conducted to examine how different approaches to basin design, specifically mulching (gravel vs. compost and gravel), influence the water availability of rain basins and the effects this has on the soil microbial activity of the basins. Soil microbes are a driving force of biogeochemical process and may impact the carbon and nitrogen dynamics of rain basin GI. In this study we sampled 12 different residential-scale rain basins, differing in design established at Biosphere 2, Arizona in 2013. Soil samples and measurements were collected before and after the onset of the monsoon season in 2014 to determine how the design of basins mediates the transition from dry to wet conditions. Soil abiotic factors were measured, such as moisture content, soil organic matter (SOM) content, texture and pH, and were related to the microbial biomass size within the basins. Field and lab potential N-mineralization and soil respiration were measured to determine how basin design influences microbial activity and N dynamics. We found that pre-monsoon basins with compost had higher moisture contents and that there was a positive correlation between the moisture content and the soil microbial biomass size of the basins. Pre-monsoon data also suggests that N-mineralization rates for basins with compost were higher than those with only gravel. These design influences on basin-scale biogeochemical dynamics and nitrogen retention may have important implications for urban biogeochemistry at neighborhood and watershed scales.

  13. A multi-method approach to quantify groundwater/surface water-interactions in the semi-arid Hailiutu River basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Yangxiao; Wenninger, Jochen; Uhlenbrook, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Identification and quantification of groundwater and surface-water interactions provide important scientific insights for managing groundwater and surface-water conjunctively. This is especially relevant in semi-arid areas where groundwater is often the main source to feed river discharge and to maintain groundwater dependent ecosystems. Multiple field measurements were taken in the semi-arid Bulang sub-catchment, part of the Hailiutu River basin in northwest China, to identify and quantify groundwater and surface-water interactions. Measurements of groundwater levels and stream stages for a 1-year investigation period indicate continuous groundwater discharge to the river. Temperature measurements of stream water, streambed deposits at different depths, and groundwater confirm the upward flow of groundwater to the stream during all seasons. Results of a tracer-based hydrograph separation exercise reveal that, even during heavy rainfall events, groundwater contributes much more to the increased stream discharge than direct surface runoff. Spatially distributed groundwater seepage along the stream was estimated using mass balance equations with electrical conductivity measurements during a constant salt injection experiment. Calculated groundwater seepage rates showed surprisingly large spatial variations for a relatively homogeneous sandy aquifer.

  14. Valley-fill alluviation during the Little Ice Age (ca. A.D. 1400-1880), Paria River basin and southern Colorado Plateau, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hereford, R.

    2002-01-01

    Valley-fill alluvium deposited from ca. A.D. 1400 to 1880 is widespread in tributaries of the Paria River and is largely coincident with the Little Ice Age epoch of global climate variability. Previous work showed that alluvium of this age is a mappable stratigraphic unit in many of the larger alluvial valleys of the southern Colorado Plateau. The alluvium is bounded by two disconformities resulting from prehistoric and historic arroyo cutting at ca. A.D. 1200-1400 and 1860-1910, respectively. The fill forms a terrace in the axial valleys of major through-flowing streams. This terrace and underlying deposits are continuous and interfinger with sediment in numerous small tributary valleys that head at the base of hillslopes of sparsely vegetated, weakly consolidated bedrock, suggesting that eroded bedrock was an important source of alluvium along with in-channel and other sources. Paleoclimatic and high-resolution paleoflood studies indicate that valley-fill alluviation occured during a long-term decrease in the frequency of large, destructive floods. Aggradation of the valleys ended about A.D. 1880, if not two decades earlier, with the beginning of historic arroyo cutting. This shift from deposition to valley entrenchment near the close of the Little Ice Age generally coincided with the beginning of an episode of the largest floods in the preceding 400-500 yr, which was probably caused by an increased recurrence and intensity of flood-producing El Nin??o events beginning at ca. A.D. 1870.

  15. Bedload transport in alluvial channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bravo-Espinosa, M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Lopes, V.L.

    2003-01-01

    Hydraulic, sediment, land-use, and rock-erosivity data of 22 alluvial streams were used to evaluate conditions of bedload transport and the performance of selected bedload-transport equations. Transport categories of transport-limited (TL), partially transport-limited (PTL), and supply-limited (SL) were identified by a semiquantitative approach that considers hydraulic constraints on sediment movement and the processes that control sediment availability at the basin scale. Equations by Parker et al. in 1982, Schoklitsch in 1962, and Meyer-Peter and Muller in 1948 adequately predicted sediment transport in channels with TL condition, whereas the equations of Bagnold in 1980, and Schoklitsch, in 1962, performed well for PTL and SL conditions. Overall, the equation of Schoklitsch predicted well the measured bedload data for eight of 22 streams, and the Bagnold equation predicted the measured data in seven streams.

  16. Assessment of the hydrogeochemistry and groundwater quality of the Tarim River Basin in an extreme arid region, NW China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Jin, Zhangdong; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of the major and trace elements in the groundwater of the Tarim River Basin (TRB), the largest inland river basin of China, were analyzed before and during rainy seasons to determine the hydrogeochemistry and to assess the groundwater quality for irrigation and drinking purposes. The groundwater within the TRB was slightly alkaline and characterized by high ionic concentrations. The groundwater in the northern sub-basin was fresh water with a Ca(2+)-HCO3(-) water type, whereas the groundwater in the southern and central sub-basins was brackish with a Na(+)-Cl(-) water type. Evaporite dissolution and carbonate weathering were the primary and secondary sources of solutes in the groundwater within the basin, whereas silicate weathering played a minor role. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), water quality index (WQI), and sodium percentage (%Na) indicated that the groundwater in the northern sub-basin was suitable for irrigation and drinking, but that in the southern and central sub-basins was not suitable. The groundwater quality was slightly better in the wet season than in the dry season. The groundwater could be used for drinking after treatment for B(3+), F(-), and SO4(2-) and for irrigation after control of the sodium and salinity hazards. Considering the high corrosivity ratio of the groundwater in this area, noncorrosive pipes should be used for the groundwater supply. For sustainable development, integrated management of the surface water and the groundwater is needed in the future. PMID:24221557

  17. Holocene fire occurrence and alluvial responses at the leading edge of pinyon-juniper migration in the Northern Great Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weppner, Kerrie N.; Pierce, Jennifer L.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2013-09-01

    Fire and vegetation records at the City of Rocks National Reserve (CIRO), south-central Idaho, display the interaction of changing climate, fire and vegetation along the migrating front of single-leaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla) and Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma). Radiocarbon dating of alluvial charcoal reconstructed local fire occurrence and geomorphic response, and fossil woodrat (Neotoma) middens revealed pinyon and juniper arrivals. Fire peaks occurred ~ 10,700-9500, 7200-6700, 2400-2000, 850-700, and 550-400 cal yr BP, whereas ~ 9500-7200, 6700-4700 and ~ 1500-1000 cal yr BP are fire-free. Wetter climates and denser vegetation fueled episodic fires and debris flows during the early and late Holocene, whereas drier climates and reduced vegetation caused frequent sheetflooding during the mid-Holocene. Increased fires during the wetter and more variable late Holocene suggest variable climate and adequate fuels augment fires at CIRO. Utah juniper and single-leaf pinyon colonized CIRO by 3800 and 2800 cal yr BP, respectively, though pinyon did not expand broadly until ~ 700 cal yr BP. Increased fire-related deposition coincided with regional droughts and pinyon infilling ~ 850-700 and 550-400 cal yr BP. Early and late Holocene vegetation change probably played a major role in accelerated fire activity, which may be sustained into the future due to pinyon-juniper densification and cheatgrass invasion.

  18. The problems of overexploitation of aquifers in semi-arid areas: the Murcia Region and the Segura Basin (South-east Spain) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Estrella, T.

    2012-05-01

    A general analysis of the problems arising from aquifer exploitation in semi-arid areas such as the Autonomous Region of Murcia, which belongs to the Segura Basin is presented, with particular reference to the Ascoy-Sopalmo aquifer, which is the most overexploited aquifer in Spain. It has suffered intense overabstraction over the last forty years, given renewable water resources of 2 Mm3 yr-1 and abstractions amounting to as much as 55 Mm3 yr-1. This has resulted in the drying of springs, continuous drawdown of water levels (5 m yr-1); piezometric drops (over 30 m in one year, as a consequence of it being a karstic aquifer); increase in pumping costs (elevating water from more than 320 m depth); abandoning of wells (45 reduced to 20), diminishing groundwater reserves, and deteriorating water quality (progressing from a mixed sodium bicarbonate-chloride facies to a sodium chloride one). This is a prime example of poor management with disastrous consequences. In this sense, a series of internal measures is proposed to alleviate the overexploitation of this aquifer and of the Segura Basin, with the aim of contributing to a sustainable future.

  19. REACH SPECIFIC CHANNEL STABILIZATION BASED ON COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION OF VALLEY FILL HISTORY, ALLUVIAL ARCHITECTURE AND GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY IN A MOUNTAIN STREAM IN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN, NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kingston meadow, located in the Toiyabe Range, is one of many wet meadow complexes threatened by rapid channel incision in the mountain ranges of the central Great Basin. Channel incision can lower the baselevel for groundwater discharge and de-water meadow complexes resulting in...

  20. Linking the End of Glaciation in Gondwana to Aridity in the Tropics: Coupled Sr Chemostratigraphy and Cyclostratigraphy From the Permian Basin, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasbury, E. T.; Hemming, N. G.; Saller, A. H.; Dickson, J.

    2007-05-01

    Crowell (1978) suggested the Earth was poised on the brink of glaciation throughout the Paleozoic and that closure of the low-latitude seaway between North America and Europe was responsible for diversion of moisture- laden currents to the south to feed the long-lived Carboniferous-Permian glaciers. This same diversion of currents also produced dramatic aridity in the tropics. This is seen in changes in paleosol types as well as in widespread loess and erg deposits. It also coincides with a dramatic decline in Sr isotopes across the Carboniferous-Permian boundary. Sr chemostratigraphy from cores taken across this boundary on the Central Basin Platform (CBP) of the Permian Basin in Texas show the same dramatic shift as seen in data from the type sections in the Urals across this boundary. This confirms that the fusulinid based stage boundaries for the Permian Basin are correct. On the CBP, high-frequency high-amplitude cycles end at a major stepback of the shelf margin at Abo/Clearfork time (Sakmarian). We suggest this transgression represents the end of major Gondwanan glaciation. If we assume the decline in 87Sr/86Sr is reflecting the aridity of the topics and calculate the reduction in continental Sr flux to the oceans, we can relate this to decreased silicate weathering and the consequent increase in atmospheric CO2. Assuming crustal values of [Sr] of 350 ppm, congruent weathering, that the total number of moles of Sr in the ocean is the same as today, and that all of the change is due to a change in flux of Sr from the continents, the change from a late Carboniferous 87Sr/86Sr high of 0.7082 to a value of 0.7078 (the end of cyclothems), equates to an increase in the ocean-atmosphere system of approximately 4 * 106 gigatons of carbon. Preindustrial carbon concentration in the atmosphere is estimated at 578 gigatons. Obviously there are feedbacks that will remove some of the carbon from the ocean-atmosphere system, perhaps to the biosphere, but this simple calculation shows that no special circumstances are needed to account for the increase in pCO2 shown by published proxy data. It also demonstrates why a model that only considers tectonic changes might fail to reproduce this part of the Sr curve. However, the 87Sr/86Sr continues to decrease to a late Permian low of 0.7069 without reversal while the proxy data show a decrease in pCO2 in the middle Permian to near Carboniferous values. Nevertheless, the change is coincident with a flattening in the most recently published Permian Sr curve.

  1. Volcanic-sedimentary features in the Serra Geral Fm., Paraná Basin, southern Brazil: Examples of dynamic lava-sediment interactions in an arid setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petry, Karla; Jerram, Dougal A.; de Almeida, Delia del Pilar M.; Zerfass, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    The formation of volcanic-sedimentary interaction features in extreme arid environments is not a commonly described process. Specifically the occurrence of dynamically mixed sediments and juvenile igneous clasts as peperites, for water has been considered one major important factor in the processes of magma dismantling and mingling with unconsolidated sediment to form such deposits. The study area, located in south Brazil, shows a sequence of lava flows and intertrapic sandstone layers from the Paraná Basin, associated with the formation of clastic dykes, flow striations, peperite and 'peperite-like' breccias. Four processes are suggested for the genesis of the peperites: (a) fragmentation of the flow front and base; (b) sand injection; (c) dune collapse; (d) magma cascade downhill. The continued flow of a lava, while its outer crust is already cooling, causes it to break, especially in the front and base, fragments falling in the sand and getting mixed with it, generating the flow front 'peperite-like' breccia. The weight of the lava flow associated to shear stress at the base cause sand to be injected inwards the flow, forming injection clastic dykes in the cooled parts and injection peperite in the more plastic portions. The lava flow may partially erode the dune, causing the dune to collapse and forming the collapse 'peperite-like' breccia. The shear stress at the base of a flowing lava striates the unconsolidated sand, forming the flow striations. The sand that migrates over a cooled, jointed lava flow may get caught in the cavities and joints, forming the filling clastic dykes. These deposits are analogous to those found in the Etendeka, NW Namibia, and show that sediment-lava interactions in arid settings are widespread throughout the Paraná-Etendeka province during the onset of flood volcanism.

  2. Aridity in the monsoon zone as indicated by desert dune formation in the Gregory Lakes basin, northwestern Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. E. Fitzsimmons; G. H. Miller; N. A. Spooner; J. W. Magee

    2012-01-01

    Desert dunes within the monsoon-fed Gregory Lakes basin form valuable archives for Quaternary paleoenvironments, in a region where such records are scarce. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) chronologies from two dunes identify the timing of eolian processes, interpreted as a complex response to aridification and increased sediment availability during lake transgressions and associated fluvial activity. The earliest eolian deposition in our

  3. Sedimentary facies, depositional environments and palaeogeographic evolution of the Neogene Denizli Basin, SW Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alçiçek, Hülya; Varol, Baki; Özkul, Mehmet

    2007-12-01

    The Denizli Basin (southwestern Anatolia, Turkey) contains a record of environmental changes dating since the Early Miocene. Detailed facies analysis of the Neogene formations in this half-graben enables us to document successive depositional regimes and palaeogeographic settings. Sedimentation commenced in the Early Miocene with the deposition of alluvial-fan and fluvial facies (K?z?lburun Formation). At this stage, alluvial fans sourced from elevated areas to the south prograded towards the basin centre. The Middle Miocene time saw the establishment of marginal lacustrine and wetland environments followed by the development of a shallow lake (Sazak Formation). The uppermost part of this unit consists of evaporitic saline lake and saline mudflat facies that grade upward into brackish lacustrine deposits of Late Miocene-Pliocene age (Kolankaya Formation). The lake became shallower at the end of the Pliocene time, as is indicated by expansion shoreface/foreshore facies. In the Early Quaternary, the Denizli Basin was transformed into a graben by the activation of ESE-trending normal faults. Alluvial fans were active at the basin margins, whereas a meandering river system occupied the basin central part. Oxygen isotope data from carbonates in the successive formations show an alternation of wetter climatic periods, when fresh water settings predominated, and very arid periods, when the basin hosted brackish to hypersaline lakes. The Neogene sedimentation was controlled by an active, ESE-trending major normal fault along the basin's southern margin and by climatically induced lake-level changes. The deposition was more or less continuous from the Early Miocene to Late Pliocene time, with local unconformities developed only in the uppermost part of the basin-fill succession. The unconformable base of the overlying Quaternary deposits reflects the basin's transformation from a half-graben into a graben system.

  4. Inland Aridification of NW China Since the Late Middle Eocene: Stable Isotope Evidence from Western Qaidam Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Garzione, C. N.; Pullen, A. T.; Chang, H.; Molnar, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Cenozoic paleoclimate reconstructions of China, based on pollens, fossils and sedimentary deposits, show a change from planetary aridity to inland aridity of NW China by the early Miocene. However, the initiation of this paleoclimate transition is not well-documented and might be much earlier. The surface uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, the retreat of the Para-Tethys sea, and global cooling have all been suggested to influence the establishment of this inland aridity, although their relative significance remains obscure. This paper presents a stable isotope study of a 4435 m long sedimentary section from the western Qaidam Basin, northern Tibetan Plateau, that spans from the late middle Eocene to late Miocene. The lowermost and uppermost parts of the section are dominated by fluvial and alluvial fan deposits, while the majority of the middle of the section represents palustrine, lower fan delta and marginal to shallow lacustrine fine-grained sediments intercalated with coarse sandstone and conglomerate. Our isotope data show sporadic aridity events in the late middle Eocene to early Oligocene, which might mark the transition from planetary aridity to, or the initiation of, inland aridity in NW China, due to the retreat of the Para-Tethys sea, a process that might be significantly influenced by the early topographic growth of the south-central Tibetan Plateau. A negative shift in oxygen isotope values around 19 Ma is also in accordance with other geological evidence suggesting the Oligocene-early Miocene growth of the Kunlun mountains south of the Qaidam basin. Later intensification of aridity occurred at ~12 Ma that corresponds with a regional climate change event, which we attribute to the upward and outward growth of the northern Tibetan Plateau. The final establishment of extreme inland aridity that is comparable to present day was most likely established at ~3.1-2.6 Ma in the Qaidam basin, and therefore global cooling and northern hemisphere glaciation is a major candidate for the cause.

  5. Using cosmogenic nuclides to contrast rates of erosion and sediment yield in a semi-arid, arroyo-dominated landscape, Rio Puerco Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bierman, P.R.; Reuter, J.M.; Pavich, M.; Gellis, A.C.; Caffee, M.W.; Larsen, J.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of in-situ-produced 10Be and 26Al in 52 fluvial sediment samples shows that millennial-scale rates of erosion vary widely (7 to 366 m Ma-1) through the lithologically and topographically complex Rio Puerco Basin of northern New Mexico. Using isotopic analysis of both headwater and downstream samples, we determined that the semi-arid, Rio Puerco Basin is eroding, on average, about 100 m Ma-1. This rapid rate of erosion is consistent with estimates made using other techniques and is likely to result from a combination of easily eroded lithologies, sparse vegetation, and monsoon-dominated rainfall. Data from 331 stream water samples collected by the US Geological Survey between 1960 and 1995 are consistent with basin-wide, average chemical denudation rates of only about 1??4 m Ma-1; thus, the erosion rates we calculate may be considered rates of sediment generation because physical weathering accounts for almost 99 per cent of mass loss. The isotopic data reveal that sediment is generally well mixed downstream with the area-weighted average sediment generation rate for 16 headwater samples (234 ton km-2 a-1 for basin area 170 to 1169 km2) matching well that estimated from a single sample collected far downstream (238 ton km-2 a-1, basin area = 14 225 km2). A series of 15 samples, collected from an arroyo wall and representing deposition through the late Holocene, indicates that 10Be concentration in sediment delivered by the fluvial system has not changed appreciably over the last 1200 years despite at least two cycles of arroyo cutting and filling. Other samples (n = 21) were collected along the drainage network. Rio Puerco erosion rates scale directly with a variety of metrics describing vegetation, precipitation, and rock erodibility. Using the headwater basins for calibration, the erosion rates for both the downstream samples and also the data set as a whole, are best modelled by considering a combination of relief and vegetation metrics, both of which co-vary with precipitation and erodibility as inferred from lithology. On average, contemporary sediment yields, determined by monitoring suspended-sediment discharge, exceed cosmogenically determined millennial-scale erosion rates by nearly a factor of two. This discrepancy, between short-term rates of sediment yield and long-term rates of erosion, suggests that more sediment is currently being exported from the basin than is being produced. Because the failure of incised channel walls and the head cutting of arroyo complexes appear to be the main sources of channel sediment today, this incongruence between rates of sediment supply and sediment yield is likely to be transitory, reflecting the current states of the arroyo cycle and perhaps the influence of current or past land-use patterns. Copyright ?? 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Stable isotopes of lake and fluid inclusion brines, Dabusun Lake, Qaidam Basin, western China: Hydrology and paleoclimatology in arid environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenbo Yang; Ronald J. Spencer; H. Roy Krouse; Tim K. Lowenstein; E. Casas

    1995-01-01

    The Qaidam Basin, underlain by salt, is the largest (120,000 km2) on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, western China. Numerous shallow to ephemeral saline lakes and dry saline pans are present on the Qarhan Salt Plain. Dabusun Lake, the largest (about 200 km2), contains high salinity Na?Mg?Cl brines. Whereas it precipitates halite, it is fringed by a potash salt flat.The dominant inflow

  7. Tectonically induced climate and its control on the distribution of depositional systems in a continental foreland basin, Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William S.; Suttner, Lee J.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2007-12-01

    Continental sediments of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) in Wyoming are subdivided into three depositional systems: perennial to intermittent alluvial, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial, and playa. Chert-bearing sandstones, conglomerates, carbonaceous mudrocks, blocky mudrocks, and skeletal limestones were deposited by perennial to intermittent alluvial systems. Carbonaceous mudrocks contain abundant wood fragments, cuticle and cortical debris, and other vascular plant remains representing deposition in oxbow lakes, abandoned channels, and on floodplains under humid to seasonal conditions. Intraformational conglomerates, sandstones, bioturbated and blocky mudrocks with caliche nodules, and bioturbated limestones characterize deposition in intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems. Bioturbated limestones are encased in bioturbated mudrocks with abundant pseudo-slickensides. The presence of caliche nodules in some of the blocky to bioturbated mudrocks is consistent with supersaturation and precipitation of calcium carbonate from groundwater under semi-arid conditions. Caliche nodules, pseudo-slickensides, and carbonate-rich floodplain sediments are interpreted to have been deposited by intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems under seasonal to semi-arid climatic conditions. Laminated mudrocks, siltstones, vuggy carbonates, bedded to nodular evaporites, pebbly mudrocks, and diamictites were deposited in evaporative alkaline lakes or playas. Pebbly mudrocks and diamictites are interpreted to represent deposition from channelized and unchannelized hyperconcentrated flows on a playa, resulting from intense rain events within the basin. The areal abundance and distribution of these depositional systems change systematically across the overfilled portion of the Early Cretaceous Cordilleran foreland basin in Wyoming. The lower part (A-interval) of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations is characterized by deposits of perennial to intermittent rivers that existed 300 to 1000 km east of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt. Proximal to the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, the A-interval of the Cloverly Formation and upper Ephraim Formation of the Gannett Group are typified by deposits of intermittent to ephemeral rivers and their associated floodplains. In the middle part (B-interval) of the Cloverly Formation, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems expand to 600 km into the basin. The upper part (C-interval) of the Cloverly Formation is characterized by playa deposits in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins and intermittent to ephemeral alluvial deposits along the front of the ancestral Sevier Mountains. Deposits of perennial to intermittent alluvial systems in the C-interval of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations are restricted to the Black Hills region, almost 900 km to the east of the Sevier Mountains. The change in the areal distribution of depositional systems through time within this continental foreland basin may be attributed to the development of a rain shadow associated with the uplift of the Sevier Mountains in the Early Cretaceous.

  8. Identification of spatiotemporal patterns of biophysical droughts in semi-arid region - a case study of the Karkheh river basin in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, B.; Abbaspour, K. C.; Lehmann, A.; Wehrli, B.; Yang, H.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims at identifying historical patterns of meteorological, hydrological, and agricultural (inclusively biophysical) droughts in the Karkheh River Basin (KRB), one of the nine benchmark watersheds of the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food. Standardized precipitation index (SPI), standardized runoff index (SRI), and soil moisture deficit index (SMDI) were used to represent the above three types of droughts, respectively. The three drought indices were compared across temporal and spatial dimensions. Variables required for calculating the indices were obtained from the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) constructed for the region. The model was calibrated based on monthly runoff and yearly wheat yield using the Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) algorithm. Five meteorological drought events were identified in the studied period (1980-2004), of which four corresponded with the hydrological droughts with 1-3 month lag. The meteorological droughts corresponded well with the agricultural droughts during dry months (May-August), while the latter lasted for a longer period of time. Analysis of drought patterns showed that southern parts of the catchment were more prone to agricultural drought, while less influenced by hydrological drought. Our analyses highlighted the necessity for monitoring all three aspects of drought for a more effective watershed management. The analysis on different types of droughts in this study provides a framework for assessing their possible impacts under future climate change in semi-arid areas.

  9. Influences of Leaf Area Index estimations on water balance modeling in a Mediterranean semi-arid basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigante, V.; Iacobellis, V.; Manfreda, S.; Milella, P.; Portoghese, I.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, the role played by vegetation parameters, necessary to the hydrological distributed modeling, is investigated focusing on the correct use of remote sensing products for the evaluation of hydrological losses in the soil water balance. The research was carried out over a medium-sized river basin in Southern Italy, where the vegetation status is characterised through a data-set of multi-temporal NDVI images. The model adopted uses one layer of vegetation whose status is defined by the Leaf Area Index (LAI), which is often obtained from NDVI images. The inherent problem is that the vegetation heterogeneity - including soil disturbances - has a large influence on the spectral bands and so the relation between LAI and NDVI is not unambiguous. We present a rationale for the basin scale calibration of a non-linear NDVI-LAI regression, based on the comparison between NDVI values and literature LAI estimations of the vegetation cover in recognized landscape elements of the study catchment. Adopting a process-based model (DREAM) with a distributed parameterisation, the influence of different NDVI-LAI regression models on main features of water balance predictions is investigated. The results show a significant sensitivity of the hydrological losses and soil water regime to the alternative LAI estimations. These crucially affects the model performances especially in low-flows simulation and in the identification of the intermittent regime.

  10. Temporal variations of atmospheric water vapor ?D and ?18O above an arid artificial oasis cropland in the Heihe River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xue-Fa

    2015-04-01

    The high temporal resolution measurements of ?D, ?18O, and deuterium excess (d) of atmospheric water vapor provide an improved understanding of atmospheric and ecohydrological processes at ecosystem to global scales. Isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy has recently allowed high-frequency in situ measurements of atmospheric water vapor isotopic ratios in China (Wen et al., 2008, Journal of Hydrology; Wen et al., 2012, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology). For our group, in situ and continuous observations of ?D, ?18O, and d of atmospheric water vapor have been performed at the surface air in Beijing (Wen et al., 2010, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres; Zhange et al., 2011, Journal of Geographical Sciences), a winter wheat and summer maize cropland in Luancheng (Wen et al., 2012, Oecologia; Xiao et al., 2012, Global Change Biology), a grassland in Duolun (Hu et al., 2014, Journal of Geophysical Research- Biogeosciences), a spring maize cropland (Huang and Wen, 2014, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres) and a subtropical coniferous plantation (Yang et al., 2015, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology). In this study (Huang and Wen, 2014), ?D, ?18O, and d of water vapor and their flux ratios were continuously measured from May to September 2012 using an in situ technique above an arid artificial oasis in the Heihe River Basin, which has a typical continental arid climate. The monthly ?D and ?18O increased slowly and then decreased, whereas the monthly d showed a steady decrease. ?D, ?18O, and d exhibited a marked diurnal cycle, indicating the influence of the entrainment, local evapotranspiration (ET), and dewfall. The departures of ?D, ?18O, and d from equilibrium prediction were significantly correlated with rain amount, relative humidity (RH), and air temperature (T). The "amount effect" was observed during one precipitation event. ?D and ?18O were log linear dependent on water vapor mixing ratio with respective R2 of 17% and 14%, whereas d was significantly correlated with local RH and T, suggesting the less influence of air mass advection and more important contribution of the local source of moisture to atmospheric water vapor. Throughout the experiment, the local ET acted to increase ?D and ?18O, with isofluxes of 102.5 and 23.50mmolm-2 s-1‰, respectively. However, the dominated effect of entrainment still decreased ?D and ?18O by 10.1 and 2.24‰, respectively. Both of the local ET and entrainment exerted a positive forcing on the diurnal variability in d.

  11. A debris flow deposit in alluvial, coal-bearing facies, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA: Evidence for catastrophic termination of a mire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, S.B.; Stanton, R.W.; Flores, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Coal and clastic facies investigations of a Paleocene coal-bearing succession in the Grass Creek coal mine, southwestern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, suggest that disruption of peat accumulation in recurrent mires was caused by the repetitive progradation of crevasse splays and, ultimately, by a catastrophic mass movement. The mass movement, represented by deposits of debris flow, marked the termination of significant peat accumulation in the Grass Creek coal mine area. Megascopic and microscopic analyses of coal beds exposed along the mine highwalls suggest that these deposits developed in low-lying mires, as evidenced primarily by their ash yields and maceral composition. Disruption of peat accumulation in successive mires was caused by incursions of sediment into the mire environments. Termination by crevasse splay progradation is represented by coarsening-upward successions of mudrock and tabular, rooted sandstone, which overlie coal beds in the lower part of the coal-bearing interval. A more rapid process of mire termination by mass movement is exemplified by a debris flow deposit of diamictite, which overlies the uppermost coal bed at the top of the coal-bearing interval. The diamictite consists of a poorly sorted, unstratified mixture of quartzite cobbles and pebbles embedded in a claystone-rich or sandy mudstone matrix. Deposition of the diamictite may have taken place over a matter of weeks, days, or perhaps even hours, by catastrophic flood, thus reflecting an instantaneous process of mire termination. Coarse clastics and mud were transported from the southwest some 20-40 km as a viscous debris flow along stream courses from the ancestral Washakie Range to the Grass Creek area, where the flow overrode a low-lying mire and effectively terminated peat accumulation. ?? 1994.

  12. Evaluation of the importance of clay confining units on groundwater flow in alluvial basins using solute and isotope tracers: the case of Middle San Pedro Basin in southeastern Arizona (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Candice B.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Eastoe, Chris; Dickinson, Jesse E.; Meixner, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    As groundwater becomes an increasingly important water resource worldwide, it is essential to understand how local geology affects groundwater quality, flowpaths and residence times. This study utilized multiple tracers to improve conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow in the Middle San Pedro Basin in southeastern Arizona (USA) by determining recharge areas, compartmentalization of water sources, flowpaths and residence times. Ninety-five groundwater and surface-water samples were analyzed for major ion chemistry (water type and Ca/Sr ratios) and stable (18O, 2H, 13C) and radiogenic (3H, 14C) isotopes, and resulting data were used in conjunction with hydrogeologic information (e.g. hydraulic head and hydrostratigraphy). Results show that recent recharge (<60 years) has occurred within mountain systems along the basin margins and in shallow floodplain aquifers adjacent to the San Pedro River. Groundwater in the lower basin fill aquifer (semi confined) was recharged at high elevation in the fractured bedrock and has been extensively modified by water-rock reactions (increasing F and Sr, decreasing 14C) over long timescales (up to 35,000 years BP). Distinct solute and isotope geochemistries between the lower and upper basin fill aquifers show the importance of a clay confining unit on groundwater flow in the basin, which minimizes vertical groundwater movement.

  13. Combining SAR with LANDSAT for Change Detection of Riparian Buffer Zone in a Semi-arid River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, N.

    2006-12-01

    A combination of RADARSAT-1 and Landsat 5 TM satellite images linking the soil moisture variation with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) measurements were used to accomplish remotely sensed change detection of riparian buffer zone in the Choke Canyon Reservoir Watershed (CCRW), South Texas. The CCRW was selected as the study area contributing to the reservoir, which is mostly agricultural and range land in a semi-arid coastal environment. This makes the study significant due to the interception capability of non-point source impact within the riparian buffer zone and the maintenance of ecosystem integrity region wide. First of all, an estimation of soil moisture using RADARSAT-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite imagery was conducted. With its all-weather capability, the RADARSAT-1 is a promising tool for measuring the surface soil moisture over seasons. The time constraint is almost negligible since the RADARSAT-1 is able to capture surface soil moisture over a large area in a matter of seconds, if the area is within its swath. RADARSAT-1 images presented at here were captured in two acquisitions, including April and September 2004. With the aid of five corner reflectors deployed by Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), essential radiometric and geometric calibrations were performed to improve the accuracy of the SAR imagery. The horizontal errors were reduced from initially 560 meter down to less than 5 meter at the best try. Then two Landsat 5 TM satellite images were summarized based on its NDVI. The combination of and NDVI and SAR data obviously show that soil moisture and vegetation biomass wholly varies in space and time in the CCRW leading to identify the riparian buffer zone evolution over seasons. It is found that the seasonal soil moisture variation is highly tied with the NDVI values and the change detection of buffer zone is technically feasible. It will contribute to develop more effective management strategies for non-point source pollution control, bird habitat monitoring, and grazing and live stock handlings in the future. Future research focuses on comparison of soil moisture variability within RADARSAT-1 footprints and NDVI variations against interferometric SAR for studying riparian ecosystem functioning on a seasonal basis.

  14. A comparison and integration of tree-ring and alluvial records of fire history at the Missionary Ridge Fire, Durango, Colorado, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erica Bigio; Thomas W. Swetnam; Christopher H. Baisan

    2010-01-01

    We used tree-ring and alluvial sediment methods to reconstruct past fire regimes for a mixed conifer forest within a 1 km2 drainage basin which was severely burned by a wildfire near Durango, Colorado. Post-fire debris flow events incised the valley-filling alluvial sediments in the lower basin, and created exposures of fire-related of deposits of late-Holocene age. Tree-ring and alluvial sediment

  15. Vegetation and geomorphic significance of the riparian greenline in the Sprague River basin, southern Oregon: implications for biogeomorphic monitoring of riparian corridors in semi-arid mountain valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. L.; Leeseberg, C.

    2009-12-01

    Like many regions in the western U.S., valley-floor environments of the semi-arid Sprague River basin of southern Oregon are heavily irrigated and widely grazed by cattle. To better understand the impacts of grazing and other land uses on river quality, the Klamath Tribes have begun a long-term, basin-wide program aimed at: (1) establishing baseline geomorphic and vegetative conditions along the Sprague River and its tributaries, and (2) monitoring changes in these conditions over time. Because of its widespread use and ease of application, determining the composition of the lowest line of perennial vegetation above baseflow, or the “greenline,” has been included. The goal of this paper is to summarize results of 38 greenline surveys conducted at 19 sites in 2008-9 and to explore geomorphic hypotheses that may explain vegetation patterns evident in the surveys. Spikerush (Eleocharis ssp.) and reed-canary grass (Phalaris arudinacea) were the most commonly occurring vegetation in the greenline across all sites. Because these species are aggressive colonizers, they indicate high availability of fresh alluvium, which may be associated with sustained channel-bank disturbance. Sedges dominated some portions of the greenline at most of the sites, but occurred in less abundance. The late successional or early-to-late transitional state of these sedges, combined with their relatively low frequency, further supports the hypothesis that channel-bank systems remain chronically disturbed and dynamic. Grazing is common, but variable in intensity, at nearly all of the study sites, likely contributing to the persistence of channel-bank disturbance. Among meandering channels, the richness of dominant species (i.e., “community diversity”) was higher on the outer bends than on the inner bends of meanders at 10 of 12 sites. The variability of geomorphic surfaces (old floodplain, new floodplain, failed bank, accreted toe, etc.) incorporated in the greenline by the spatially discontinuous processes of channel-bank erosion and failure on the outer meander bends appears to increase the types of habitats surveyed and their combined biodiversity. In contrast, the spatial continuity of bar accretion on the inner meander bends appears to result in a more uniform geomorphic setting with fewer dominant species in the greenline. Despite widespread recognition that geomorphic processes influence riparian vegetation, factors such as the type and severity of bank erosion, the location of the survey with respect to meander geometry, and the type of geomorphic surface underlying greenline observations are not explicitly included in published guidance for biogeomorphic monitoring of the riparian greenline. Inclusion of such factors would improve communication, study design, and application of research by fluvial geomorphologists, riparian ecologists, and resource managers utilizing the greenline methodology.

  16. Combined estimation of specific yield and natural recharge in a semi-arid groundwater basin with irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maréchal, J. C.; Dewandel, B.; Ahmed, S.; Galeazzi, L.; Zaidi, F. K.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryA water budget approach is developed to jointly estimate specific yield and natural recharge in an unconfined aquifer with significant seasonal water table fluctuations. Water table fluctuations are due to distinct seasonality in groundwater recharge. The separation of the hydrologic year into two (or more) extended seasons of recharge (wet season) and no-recharge (dry season) with accompanying changes in water table allows for a split use of the water table fluctuation (WTF) method, first to estimate specific yield from the water table drop during the dry season (no recharge) and, second, to estimate recharge from the water table rise during the wet season, after considering all other water budget components explicitly. The latter includes explicit computation of groundwater storage with the WTF method. The application of the WTF method requires a large number of water level measurements throughout the unconfined aquifer before and after each season. The advantage of the method is that specific yield and recharge are estimated at the scale of interest to basin hydrologic studies and that the method requires no extensive in situ instrumentation network. Here, the method is demonstrated through a case study in a fractured hard-rock aquifer subject to intensive groundwater pumping for irrigation purposes.

  17. Point sources of emerging contaminants along the Colorado River Basin: Source water for the arid Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones-Lepp, Tammy L.; Sanchez, Charles; Alvarez, David A.; Wilson, Doyle C.; Taniguchi-Fu, Randi-Laurant

    2012-01-01

    Emergingcontaminants (ECs) (e.g., pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, personal care products) have been detected in waters across the UnitedStates. The objective of this study was to evaluate pointsources of ECs along the ColoradoRiver, from the headwaters in Colorado to the Gulf of California. At selected locations in the ColoradoRiver Basin (sites in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and California), waste stream tributaries and receiving surface waters were sampled using either grab sampling or polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS). The grab samples were extracted using solid-phase cartridge extraction (SPE), and the POCIS sorbents were transferred into empty SPEs and eluted with methanol. All extracts were prepared for, and analyzed by, liquid chromatography-electrospray-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-ITMS). Log Dow values were calculated for all ECs in the study and compared to the empirical data collected. POCIS extracts were screened for the presence of estrogenic chemicals using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. Extracts from the 2008 POCIS deployment in the Las Vegas Wash showed the second highest estrogenicity response. In the grab samples, azithromycin (an antibiotic) was detected in all but one urban waste stream, with concentrations ranging from 30 ng/L to 2800 ng/L. Concentration levels of azithromycin, methamphetamine and pseudoephedrine showed temporal variation from the Tucson WWTP. Those ECs that were detected in the main surface water channels (those that are diverted for urban use and irrigation along the ColoradoRiver) were in the region of the limit-of-detection (e.g., 10 ng/L), but most were below detection limits.

  18. The origin of groundwater in Zhangye Basin, northwestern China, using isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiansheng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Xiaoxu; Su, Zhiguo; Yong, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Zhangye Basin, in arid northwestern China, has recently been repeatedly flooded by rising groundwater. Isotope signatures of sampled waters gained insight into the recharge source of the groundwater. The summer Heihe River water and most of the spring water in Zhangye and Yongchang basins plotted above the global meteoric water line (GMWL) on the ?18O-?D plot. The spring water had R/Ra ratio >1, low TDS and high tritium, which indicates origin from Qilian Mountain glacier meltwater. The groundwater of Qilian Mountains was transported to the Hexi Corridor (in which Zhangye Basin is located) through underground fault zones. Additionally, some of the groundwater in the alluvial plain, and all spring water surrounding Zhangye Basin, plotted below the GMWL on the ?18O-?D plot along an evaporation line, and had R/Ra ratio < 1 and high TDS. It is proposed that the Tibetan rivers or lakes source the Hexi Corridor groundwater through either the NE-trending or NW-trending buried fault zones. The isotopic signatures presented as part of this study rule out the conventional viewpoint that groundwater of the Zhangye Basin was recharged by local precipitation and infiltration of Heihe River water on the alluvial plain.

  19. Implementation of Drainage Water Management in Open Ditch Drainage Systems of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased riverine nutrients linked to agricultural activities in the Mississippi River Basin have contributed to degraded surface waters within the basin as well as to the hypoxic zone along the Louisiana Gulf coast. In the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV), these nutrients are transported from agr...

  20. Large alluvial fans on Mars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey M. Moore; Alan D. Howard

    2005-01-01

    Several dozen distinct alluvial fans, 10 to ?40 km long downslope, have been observed in highlands craters. Within a search region between 0° and 30°S, alluvial fan-containing craters were found only between 18° and 29°S, and they all occur at around ±1 km of the MOLA-defined Martian datum. Within the study area they are not randomly distributed but instead form

  1. Integration of channel and floodplain suites. I. Developmental sequence and lateral relations of alluvial paleosols.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The lower Eocene Willwood Formation of the Bighorn Basin, northwest Wyoming, consists of about 770 m of alluvial rocks that exhibit extensive mechanical and geochemical modifications resulting from Eocene pedogenesis. Five arbitrary stages are proposed to distinguish these soils of different maturities in the Willwood Formation. An inverse relationship exists between soil maturity and short-term sediment accumulation rate. Illustrates several important principles of soil-sediment interrelationships in aggrading alluvial systems that have broad application to other deposits.-from Authors

  2. Spatio-temporal variations of precipitation in arid and semiarid regions of China: The Yellow River basin as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Juntai; Singh, Vijay P.; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Yongqin David

    2014-03-01

    Daily precipitation data from 64 precipitation gauging stations within the Yellow River basin were analyzed by defining 17 precipitation indices with the aim to investigate space and time changes in precipitation characteristics. The modified Mann-Kendall trend test method was used to detect trends in the precipitation series. The influence of Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) on the basin precipitation was also investigated. Results indicate that: (1) the Yellow River basin is dominated by decreasing precipitation and precipitation deficit may further deteriorate the shortage of water resources. The middle Yellow River basin may encounter increasingly serious shortage of water resources and higher risk of floods would be expected in the lower Yellow River basin; (2) a higher risk of droughts can be expected in spring and autumn and precipitation in winter is increasing, which imply evident seasonality and seasonal shifts of precipitation changes within the basin; (3) short-duration consecutive precipitation events are prevalent in the basin and frequency and amount of short-duration consecutive precipitation events are increasing; (4) precipitation extremes are not dominant in the Yellow River basin, except for some regions in the North China Plain and rainstorm events are generally decreasing; and (5) no evident impact of IPO on the precipitation in the Yellow River basin is found. In this case, precipitation deficit would be a major problem the basin-scale water resources management may face in the future.

  3. Fluoride hazard and assessment of groundwater quality in the semi-arid Upper Panda River basin, Sonbhadra district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Janardhana Raju; Sangita Dey; Wolfgang Gossel; Peter Wycisk

    2012-01-01

    Around 9000 inhabitants in the Panda River basin, Sonbhadhra District, Uttar Pradesh, India, are vulnerable to a “silent” dental and skeletal fluorosis from groundwater consumption. The fluoride source and seasonal groundwater quality variation were studied by collecting 65 groundwater samples in the Upper Panda River basin. Major rock types are phyllites and granite gneissic rocks. Fluoride concentrations are in the

  4. Integrated Water Resources Planning and Management in Arid\\/Semi-arid Regions: Data, Modeling, and Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Gupta; Y. Liu; T. Wagener; M. Durcik; C. Duffy; E. Springer

    2005-01-01

    Water resources in arid and semi-arid regions are highly sensitive to climate variability and change. As the demand for water continues to increase due to economic and population growth, planning and management of available water resources under climate uncertainties becomes increasingly critical in order to achieve basin-scale water sustainability (i.e., to ensure a long-term balance between supply and demand of

  5. Late Quaternary paleodrainage reconstruction of the Maros River alluvial fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Tímea; Sümeghy, Borbála; Sipos, György

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the extensive Maros alluvial fan is densely (0.78 km/km2) covered by paleochannels. The aim of the present study is to reconstruct the final (late Quaternary) stage of the alluvial fan development by identifying paleodrainage directions and determining morphology and pattern of the paleochannels and the age of their activity. On the surface of the alluvial fan, 18 meandering, braided, anastomosing, or misfit paleochannel zones were identified. The existence of these channels indicates that the main process of the fan development was avulsion rather than lateral channel shift, and the overbank floodplain accumulation played a minor role as the paleochannels were not buried. The oldest paleodrainages (A-C) shifted towards north from the east-west-axis of the alluvial fan, draining water to the Körös basin. The similar age (18.7 ± 2.3 ka-14.2 ± 1.4 ka) of the paleochannel zones indicates rapid avulsions or the coexistence of paleodrainages. In the northern half of the alluvial fan, the last large (D) paleodrainage change occurred 12.4 ± 2.1 ka, when the channel turned westward. A large meandering channel functioned for a period (12.4 ± 2.1 ka-9.6 ± 1.3 ka); and with the coexisting misfit channels, these channels drained a considerable amount of water (Qb = 2500 m3/s). In the next development phase (E paleodrainages), the Maros flowed north; but after a sharp bend, it turned toward the south, and it started to form the southern lobe of the alluvial fan. These channels existed between 8.5 ± 0.9 ka and 3.5 ± 0.4 ka and had a bankfull discharge of 1000-2000 m3/s. The last (F) paleodrainage of the Maros River existed for a short time (1.9 ± 0.3 ka-1.6 ± 0.3 ka) and indicated decreasing discharge (Qb = 1400 m3/s). In the final phase of the alluvial fan evolution, the present-day course of the river was developed, and its discharge decreased further (680 m3/s).

  6. Co-contamination of As and F in alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Kim, B.; Zhu, W.; Lee, E.; Ko, K.

    2010-12-01

    Co-contamination of As and F is frequently observed in alluvial aquifers of many countries including Argentina, Mexico, China, and Pakistan. However, processes causing this phenomenon are still poorly understood. In arid or semi-arid areas, the aquifers are generally under oxidizing condition and As and F show a good correlation. In contrast, groundwaters under reducing condition generally show a poorer correlation. In this study, we explored the geochemical mechanisms causing the co-contamination of As and F and their poorer correlation in the reducing environment by investigating alluvial groundwaters of the Mankyeong River floodplain, Korea. For this study, we collected 72 groundwater samples from 42 shallow wells placed into the alluvial aquifer. Desorption experiments using soils collected from the study area were also performed. Groundwater chemistry data showed that waters are under strong reducing condition and the reductive dissolution of Fe oxides was the main process increasing As concentration in groundwaters. The co-contamination was also observed in the study area and F did not show a good correlation with As. F showed concentrations increasing with pH. Desorption experiments also showed the dependences of As and F on pH. The experiments using soils treated with Na citrate-NaHCO3-dithonite solution indicated that iron oxides were the main phases hosting both As and F in soils. In our study area, pH of groundwaters increases due to a series of reduction reactions, and which increased F concentration by desorption from iron oxides. This result suggests that sharing the same adsorption hosts and the pH increased by reduction reactions are the main reason for the co-occurrence of As and F in alluvial groundwater under reducing environments. The lack of correlation between As and F was derived by the precipitation of As as sulfides in sulfate reducing condition. However, the correlation could be much better in the oxidizing condition because As released from iron oxides by pH increase cannot be removed as sulfides.

  7. INFLUENCE OF SEDIMENT SUPPLY, LITHOLOGY, AND WOOD DEBRIS ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF BEDROCK AND ALLUVIAL CHANNELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field surveys in the Willapa River basin, Washington State, indicate that the drainage area?channel slope threshold describing the distribution of bedrock and alluvial channels is influenced by the underlying lithology and that local variations in sediment supply can overwhelm ba...

  8. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Constantz, Jim; Ferre, Ty P.A.; Leake, Stanley A.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water recharge in the arid and semiarid southwestern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology, and vegetation across widely ranging spatial and temporal scales. Present-day recharge tends to be narrowly focused in time and space. Widespread water-table declines accompanied agricultural development during the twentieth century, demonstrating that sustainable ground-water supplies are not guaranteed when part of the extracted resource represents paleorecharge. Climatic controls on ground-water recharge range from seasonal cycles of summer monsoonal and winter frontal storms to multimillennial cycles of glacial and interglacial periods. Precipitation patterns reflect global-scale interactions among the oceans, atmosphere, and continents. Large-scale climatic influences associated with El Ni?o and Pacific Decadal Oscillations strongly, but irregularly, control weather in the study area, so that year-to-year variations in precipitation and ground-water recharge are large and difficult to predict. Proxy data indicate geologically recent periods of naturally occurring multidecadal droughts unlike any in the modern instrumental record. Any anthropogenically induced climate change will likely reduce ground-water recharge through diminished snowpack at higher elevations. Future changes in El Ni?o and monsoonal patterns, both crucial to precipitation in the study area, are highly uncertain in current models. Current land-use modifications influence ground-water recharge through vegetation, irrigation, and impermeable area. High mountain ranges bounding the study area?the San Bernadino Mountains and Sierra Nevada to the west, and the Wasatch and southern Colorado Rocky Mountains to the east?provide external geologic controls on ground-water recharge. Internal geologic controls stem from tectonic processes that led to numerous, variably connected alluvial-filled basins, exposure of extensive Paleozoic aquifers in mountainous recharge areas, and distinct modes of recharge in the Colorado Plateau and Basin and Range subregions. The chapters in this professional paper present (first) an overview of climatic and hydrogeologic framework (chapter A), followed by a regional analysis of ground-water recharge across the entire study area (chapter B). These are followed by an overview of site-specific case studies representing different subareas of the geographically diverse arid and semiarid southwestern United States (chapter C); the case studies themselves follow in chapters D?K. The regional analysis includes detailed hydrologic modeling within the framework of a high-resolution geographic-information system (GIS). Results from the regional analysis are used to explore both the distribution of ground-water recharge for mean climatic conditions as well as the influence of two climatic patterns?the El Ni?o-Southern Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation?that impart a high degree of variability to the hydrologic cycle. Individual case studies employ a variety of geophysical and geochemical techniques to investigate recharge processes and relate the processes to local geologic and climatic conditions. All of the case studies made use of naturally occurring tracers to quantify recharge. Thermal and geophysical techniques that were developed in the course of the studies are presented in appendices. The quantification of ground-water recharge in arid settings is inherently difficult due to the generally low amount of recharge, its spatially and temporally spotty nature, and the absence of techniques for directly measuring fluxes entering the saturated zone from the unsaturated zone. Deep water tables in arid alluvial basins correspond to thick unsaturated zones that produce up to millennial time lags between changes in hydrologic conditions at the land surface and subsequent changes in recharge to underlying ground water. Recent advances in physical, chemical, isotopic, and modeling techniques have foster

  9. Anabranching Channel Patterns: the Kingdom of Large Alluvial Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo

    2015-04-01

    For a long time anabranching patterns were primarily restricted to "exotic and remote" zones in arid systems such as Australia. For that reason, they were not accepted as a major topic of discussion in our discipline, which was based on concepts principally derived from case studies in braided and meandering rivers of the Northern Hemisphere. However, anabranching alluvial patterns are widespread in a variety of environments and scales, from arid small rivers to alluvial reaches of giant rivers such as the Amazon, Congo, and Negro. The largest rivers of the world in water discharge are anabranching, and the majority of the forty-five largest rivers (water discharges >5000m3s-1) are dominantly anabranching systems. Only a small number of rivers with meandering patterns, or sinuous with branches (meandering-tendency to anabranch) are part of the largest rivers group. The present large anabranching rivers flowing on lowlands and well developed floodplains have in common a characteristic very slow slopes, specific stream power of < 25 Wm-2 and sandy bed load with sand sizes dominantly ranging from 0.1 < D50 <0.5 mm. The diversity of planforms and island morphologies in large anabranching rivers result from autogenic adjustments to millennial scales in broad valleys and to century-decadal scale channel-floodplain processes. The variety of anabranching styles are not specifically related to a single explanatory "physically based theory" but to a variety of morphological processes, complex-channel floodplain interactions and the geologic characteristics of the valleys. Once considered a kind of oddity, anabranching rivers must be considered major and fundamental representatives of the fluvial world.

  10. The origin and geologic evolution of the East Continent Rift Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Drahovzal, J.A. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Kentucky Geological Survey)

    1992-01-01

    The East Continent Rift Basin (ECRB) is a newly recognized, dominantly sedimentary-volcanic Proterozoic rift basin that apparently represents the southern extension of the Keweenawan Midcontinent Rift. The ECRB extends from central Michigan at least as far south as south-central Kentucky. The inferred age of the rift fill is approximately 1,000 Ma. Evidence supporting a rift origin for the ECRB includes: interbedding of continental flood basalts and felsic volcanics with siliciclastics; sedimentary fill consisting of distal, arid-climate alluvial fan sediments that lack metamorphic lithologies; close proximity and similar lithologic succession to the Keweenawan rift-fill rocks of the Michigan Basin; and inferred marginal block faulting of Granite-Rhyolite Province rocks near the western edge of the ECRB. ECRB evolution is interpreted as follows: (1) formation of Granite-Rhyolite Province rocks (1,500--1,340 Ma); (2) Keweenawan crustal extension and rifting with development of central mafic complexes, emplacement of volcanic rocks, and deposition of siliciclastic fill from eroded marginal Granite-Rhyolite Province tilted fault blocks (ca 1,000 Ma); (3) overthrusting of the Grenville allochthon and associated foreland thrusting and folding of the rift sequence rocks together with deposition of foreland basin sediments (975---890 Ma); (4) Late Proterozoic erosional removal of the foreland basin sediments and interpreted wrench faulting along the Grenville Front (post-975 to pre-570 Ma); and (5) tectonic inversion, with the ECRB area remaining relatively high during major cambrian subsidence in central Kentucky (590--510 Ma).

  11. Geomorphological evolution of the Tilcara alluvial fan (Jujuy Province, NW Argentina): Tectonic implications and palaeoenvironmental considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Carlos; Peña, José Luis; Rivelli, Felipe; Rhodes, Ed; Muñoz, Arsenio

    2008-07-01

    The development and evolution of the Tilcara alluvial fan, in the Quebrada de Humahuaca (Andean Eastern Cordillera, NW Argentina), has been analysed by using geomorphological mapping techniques, sedimentological characterisation of the deposits and OSL chronological methods. It is a complex segmented alluvial fan made up of five evolutionary stages (units Qf1, Qf2, Qf3, Qf4 and Qf5) developed under arid climatic environments as well as compressive tectonic conditions. Segmentation processes, including aggradation/entrenchment cycles and changes in the location of the depositional lobe, are mainly controlled by climatic and/or tectonic changes as well as channel piracy processes in the drainage system. Alluvial fan deposits include debris flows, sheet flows and braided channel facies associated with high water discharge events in an arid environment. The best mean OSL age estimated for stage Qf2 is 84.5 ± 7 ka BP. In addition, a thrust fault affecting these deposits has been recognized and, as a consequence, the compressive tectonics must date from the Upper Pleistocene in this area of the Andean Eastern Cordillera.

  12. Groundwater research in the alluvial of river Sitnica, Kosova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdullahi, S.; Fejza, I.; Osmani, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the today's world, the problems of too much, too little or too polluted water are increasing at a rapid rate. Water resources in Kosova are relatively small, the average of annual runoff is 3.61miliard m3, relatively 113m3/s. Territory of Kosova is divided in four river basins: Drini i Bardhë, Ibri, Morava e Binqës and Lepenci. Sitnica River belongs to the river basin Ibri. The total surface of in this river is 2.861km2, the average of the annual rainfalls is 686mm, from which around 93mm (13.6%) flows on the surface and around 593mm (84.6%) infiltrates. In this case study are applied different methods for groundwater research and calculations of hydro-geological parameters in the alluvial of river Sitnica. Geophysics researches carried out with geo-electrical sounding and geo-electrical profile line. The goal of the geophysics researches is to identify hydrogeological collector and to determine the best position for placement of the piezometers. The geophysics research are done in aquifer area, in which 10 profiles line with different lengths and placed in distance from 30 m between each other are done. After finishing of the geophysics works, seven drilling wells with general length from 95.5 m are completed. Based to the testing results of two drilling wells we have concluded that the quantity of 27.4(l/sec) water can be exploited. The achieved results from application of those methods in this case study show that alluvial of river Sitnica are rich with groundwater. Based to the statistics the population is increasing in Kosova also water needs will be increasing too, so it is necessary to explore the existing groundwater for improving drinking water supply, industrial waters, agriculture etc. Key works: river, alluvial, geophysics researches, drilling wells, hydrogeological collector, water

  13. Geomorphic Processes and Remote Sensing Signatures of Alluvial Fans in the Kun Lun Mountains, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    1996-01-01

    The timing of alluvial deposition in arid and semiarid areas is tied to land-surface instability caused by regional climate changes. The distribution pattern of dated deposits provides maps of regional land-surface response to past climate change. Sensitivity to differences in surface roughness and composition makes remote sensing techniques useful for regional mapping of alluvial deposits. Radar images from the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory and visible wavelength images from the French SPOT satellite were used to determine remote sensing signatures of alluvial fan units for an area in the Kun Lun Mountains of northwestern China. These data were combined with field observations to compare surface processes and their effects on remote sensing signatures in northwestern China and the southwestern United States. Geomorphic processes affecting alluvial fans in the two areas include aeolian deposition, desert varnish, and fluvial dissection. However, salt weathering is a much more important process in the Kun Lun than in the southwestern United States. This slows the formation of desert varnish and prevents desert pavement from forming. Thus the Kun Lun signatures are characteristic of the dominance of salt weathering, while signatures from the southwestern United States are characteristic of the dominance of desert varnish and pavement processes. Remote sensing signatures are consistent enough in these two regions to be used for mapping fan units over large areas.

  14. Characterization of dust emission from alluvial sediments using aircraft observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, K.; Flamant, C.; Chaboureau, J.; Kocha, C.; Banks, J.; Brindley, H. E.; Lavaysse, C.; Marnas, F.; Pelon, J.; Tulet, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that numerous dust sources are located in the foothills of arid and semi-arid mountain regions such as over North Africa. Alluvial sediments deposited on the valley bottoms and flood plains are very prone to wind erosion and frequently serve as dust source. High surface wind speeds related to the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) during the morning hours are identified as a frequent driving mechanism for dust uplift. We investigate dust emission from alluvial dust sources located within the upland region in northern Mauritania and discuss the impact of valleys with regard to their role as dust source. Measures for local atmospheric dust burden were retrieved from airborne observations, MSG SEVIR dust AOD fields and MesoNH model simulations, and analyzed in order to provide complementary information on dust source activation and local dust transport at different horizontal scales. Vertical distribution of atmospheric mineral dust was obtained from the LNG backscatter lidar system flying aboard the French Falcon-20 aircraft. Lidar extinction coefficients were compared to topography, aerial photographs, and dust AOD fields to confirm the relevance of alluvial sediments at the valley bottoms as dust source. The observed dust emission event was further evaluated using the regional model MesoNH. A sensitivity study on the impact of the horizontal grid spacing highlights the importance of the spatial resolution on simulated dust loadings. The results further illustrate the importance of an explicit representation of alluvial dust sources in such models to better capture the spatial-temporal distribution of airborne dust concentrations.

  15. Preliminary Conceptual Model of Groundwater level Response to Evapotranspiration in the Whitewater Basin, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, J.; Rajaram, H.; Furey, P. R.; Milne, B. T.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrologic Studies are being proposed in the 1100 sq. km. Whitewater Basin in South-Central Kansas at scales ranging from that of a single link-hillslope system to the entire basin, as part of the Hydro-Kansas research program. This semi-arid 7th order basin is characterized by well-defined riparian zones along the banks of higher-order streams. A thick low-permeability geological unit extends to the ground surface in most of the basin, except adjacent to the stream network, where there are alluvial deposits. The groundwater flow system in these alluvial deposits is supplied by seepage losses from the stream and loses water to evapotranspiration by riparian vegetation. With the objective of estimating evapotranspiration rates as a closure term in the water balance at the scale of a single link-hillslope system, we are in the process of designing a piezometer network to estimate changes in groundwater storage and fluxes from the stream into the alluvium. The diurnal trends in evapotranspiration could potentially lead to diurnal fluctuations in groundwater levels, as has been observed at several other sites over the last 70 years. We present a simple conceptual model of stream-aquifer interaction and evapotranspiration that was developed to aid in the design of the piezometer network. The evapotranspiration rates in this model are specified using a recently developed biological allometric relationship, which provides bounds on areally integrated rates under conditions of no moisture deficit. After the piezometer network is installed in the field, the water balance estimates of evapotranspiration will be compared to ththose predicted by the allometric relationships, and to LIDAR and aircraft based measurements that are being developed in related projects. We also present a parametric analysis of the controls imposed by riparian zone width on stream-aquifer interactions to gain insights into the potential behavior across a range of stream orders

  16. Modern and ancient alluvial fan deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Understanding the structure and depositional processes of alluvial fans (river outwash deposits) has a special interest for those involved with the exploration of petroleum and many minerals. This collection of facsimile reprints of significant and classical research papers sheds new light on the subject. This reference covers the stratigraphy, sedimentology, and depositional processes of modern and ancient alluvial fans. Geographical areas considered include Arctic Canada, the American Southwest, Australia, Wyoming, Norway, and Spain. It includes a state-of-the-art introduction by the editor along with commentaries on all the papers included, a master author citation index and a subject index, and a chronological listing of early studies of alluvial fans.

  17. Geoenvironmental and structural studies for developing new water resources in arid and semi-arid regions using remote sensing and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    Water crises are rising with increasing world population and decreasing of freshwater resources. This problem is magnified in the arid and semi-arid regions because surface water resources are very limited and highly unreliable and therefore groundwater is the primary source of water supply in these regions. This study presents an integrated approach for the identification of groundwater occurrences using remote sensing, geological, and geophysical data, and establishing sustainable paths to groundwater management. The Central Eastern Desert (CED) of Egypt was selected as a test site for this study because its climate is arid and there is an urgent need to identify potential areas for groundwater accumulations. Field investigations indicated that the CED has three types of aquifers; shallow alluvial (SA), and fracture zone (FZ) aquifers in the valley depressions, and deep aquifers in the sedimentary succession that range in age from Late Cretaceous to Recent in the marginal extensional sub-basins (ESB) along the Red Sea coast. I developed three models: (1) a Geographic Information System (GIS) model for groundwater potential in the SA and FZ shallow aquifers; (2) a kinematic model for the development of the ESB; and (3) a groundwater budget model for the ESB aquifers. The GIS model is based on the analysis of remote sensing data of the Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar, the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus, and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer digital elevation model. The model was evaluated and proven successful against the existing shallow water wells, and by geophysical surveys using Ground Penetrating Radar and Geoelectric methods. The kinematic model indicated that the ESB were formed in the orthogonal rifting phase in the late Oligocene that is followed by oblique rifting phase during the early Miocene which resulted to the en-echelon pattern of the inland ESB and nucleation of the rift depression into segments separated by oblique-slip accommodation zones. The groundwater budget model shows that the ESB aquifers have considerable amounts of paleowater that can be purified and used for drinking. The renewable groundwater of SA and FZ aquifers can be used for herding, irrigation, and ore dressing in the mining zones.

  18. Changing Nitrate Concentrations in Arid Basin Aquifers- How Anthropogenic and Natural Processes Affect Water Quality and Availability in Trans-Pecos, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, W. M.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sharp, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    For the past six decades nitrate concentrations in groundwater of the West Texas Bolson Aquifers have been increasing. Long-term records (from 1950 to present) indicate an average increase of 3-5 mg/L (as nitrate) with some wells increasing by over 40 mg/L within 1-2 decades. While irrigated agriculture is the second largest land use in the region (range land being the largest), isotopic analyses indicate that direct leaching of synthetic fertilizers is not a primary source of nitrate to the groundwater; the isotopic composition of the nitrate in the groundwater (delta 18-O of +2 to +10 per mil and delta 15-N of +6 to +13 per mil) is more similar to that of natural soil-derived nitrate in the region, or possibly manure-derived nitrate. Various anion ratios (chloride/bromide, nitrate/chloride, and nitrate/bromide) provide additional insight into the likely sources of groundwater nitrate and the mechanisms by which it is transported through the unsaturated zone; compared to atmospheric deposition, groundwater N/Cl and N/Br ratios appear to be relatively low, consistent with net N loss accompanied by relatively high delta 15-N of residual N. The observed decadal scale changes in groundwater nitrate concentration and presence of young (<70 year old) recharge (as measured using CFCs) are coincident with the growth of irrigated agriculture and intensive grazing within the basins. We hypothesize that past and present land use practices have contributed to the increase in nitrate in the groundwater in three ways; 1) plowing and grazing of previously undisturbed grasslands led to mobilization of soil nitrogen, 2) irrigation of crops has increased recharge beneath agricultural fields and mobilized naturally occurring nitrate from the unsaturated zone, and 3) deposition of manure by grazing animals may have contributed to high delta 15-N values, and in the case of now disused CAFO operations (confined feed lots) may have contributed locally to the total mass of reactive nitrogen. These effects are likely temporally and spatially variable, but have a substantial impact on strategies for addressing water quality and sustainability concerns in these basins and similar environments elsewhere.

  19. Complex tectonic and tectonostratigraphic evolution of an Alpine foreland basin: The western Duero Basin and the related Tertiary depressions of the NW Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-González, F.; Heredia, N.

    2011-04-01

    The tectonic and tectonostratigaphic evolution of foreland basins and related Tertiary depressions are the key to investigate deformation history and the uplifting of the continental lithosphere of the Alpine-Pyrenean Orogeny. The northern part of the Duero basin is the foreland basin of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are, in turn, the western part of the Pyrenean Orogen. We have studied the western sharp end of the Duero foreland basin, and its relation to the Tertiary deposits of the NW Iberian Peninsula and the topography evolution. In order to propose a coherent tectonic and tectonosedimentary model that could explain all Tertiary deposits, we have analysed the depositional environment, stratigraphic sequences, paleocurrents and established a correlation of the main outcrops. Besides, a detailed structural mapping of the Alpine structures that limit and affect the main Tertiary outcrops has been carried out. The Tertiary deposits of the NW Iberian Peninsula depressions are affected and fragmented by Alpine structures that limit their extensions and locations. The stratigraphic succession is similar in the NW Tertiary outcrops; they are mainly terrigenous and carbonated continental deposits formed by assemblage of alluvial fans developed at the mountains front, in arid or semiarid conditions. Three formations can be identified in the main depressions: Toral Fm, Santalla Fm and Médulas Fm. The NW Tertiary outcrops were the western deposits of the Duero foreland basin that surrounded the lateral termination of the Pyrenean Orogen. These deposits were fragmented and eroded by the subsequent uplift of the Galaico-Leoneses Mountains and the NE-SW strike-slip faults activity (broken foreland basin). Only the latest stages of some of these outcrops can be considered as intramontane basins as traditionally have been interpreted. The sedimentation started in the northeast (Oviedo-Infiesto) during the Eocene and migrated to the west (As Pontes) during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene times. Meanwhile, southern areas were far away from the tectonic activity (El Bierzo, O Barco, Monforte, Sarria depressions).

  20. Occurrence of arsenic species in algae and freshwater plants of an extreme arid region in northern Chile, the Loa River Basin.

    PubMed

    Pell, Albert; Márquez, Anna; López-Sánchez, José Fermín; Rubio, Roser; Barbero, Mercedes; Stegen, Susana; Queirolo, Fabrizio; Díaz-Palma, Paula

    2013-01-01

    This study reports data on arsenic speciation in two green algae species (Cladophora sp. and Chara sp.) and in five aquatic plants (Azolla sp., Myriophyllum aquaticum, Phylloscirpus cf. desserticola, Potamogeton pectinatus, Ruppia filifolia and Zannichellia palustris) from the Loa River Basin in the Atacama Desert (northern Chile). Arsenic content was measured by Mass spectrometry coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), after acidic digestion. Liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS was used for arsenic speciation, using both anionic and cationic chromatographic exchange systems. Inorganic arsenic compounds were the main arsenic species measured in all samples. The main arsenic species in the extracts of freshwater algae and plants were arsenite and arsenate, whereas glycerol-arsenosugar (gly-sug), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and methylarsonic acid (MA) were present only as minor constituents. Of the samples studied, algae species accumulated more arsenic than aquatic plants. Total arsenic content ranged from 182 to 11100 and from 20 to 248 mg As kg(-1) (d.w.) in algae and freshwater plants, respectively. In comparison with As concentration in water samples, there was hyper-accumulation (>0.1% d.w.) in Cladophora sp. PMID:22981629

  1. Decreased streamflow in semi-arid basins following drought-induced tree die-off: A counter-intuitive and indirect climate impact on hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardiola-Claramonte, M.; Troch, Peter A.; Breshears, David D.; Huxman, Travis E.; Switanek, Matthew B.; Durcik, Matej; Cobb, Neil S.

    2011-09-01

    SummaryDrought- and infestation-related tree die-off is occurring at regional scales and is projected to increase with global climate change. These large-scale changes in vegetation are expected to influence hydrological responses, but the ecohydrological consequences of die-off have rarely been studied empirically and consequently remain uncertain. Here we evaluate observed hydrologic responses to recent regional-scale die-off of piñon pine ( Pinus edulis) in Southwestern USA. Basins with the most tree die-off showed a significant decrease in streamflow over several years following die-off, and this decrease was not attributable to climate variability alone. The results are counterintuitive compared to responses to reductions in tree cover by harvest that have shown an increase in streamflow, although such increases are more substantial for locations with higher precipitation than where the piñon pine die-off occurred. We are unable to isolate the cause of the increase, but note that it is consistent with a reported increase in understory herbaceous cover post-die-off and associated increase in solar radiation reaching near-ground (below the tree canopy overstory), which together would be expected to reduce overland flow. Our study highlights the need to more fully evaluate hydrological responses to drought-induced tree die-off empirically, in addition to modelling studies. More generally, the result illustrate potential indirect effects of climate on hydrological responses mediated through ecohydrological changes in vegetation, which will need to be considered in future water resources assessments.

  2. Morphometric Characterization and Classification of Alluvial Fans in Eastern Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, Annette; Mattern, Frank; van Gasselt, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Morphologic characteristics of alluvial fans are a product of fluvial erosion, transportation and deposition. Consequently, fans have been described and defined on the basis of their shape, their composition, conditions and processes under which they from, their so-called "controlling factors", and their geomorphic and tectonic settings. The aim of our study is to reconstruct the morphologic evolution and to relate it to past and present climate conditions. In order to achieve this, we first characterize alluvial fans based on their climatic settings and conditions and classify them accordingly using satellite image data and digital elevation models. For mapping of different alluvial fan bodies multispectral images of the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) with a scale of 15-30 m/px were utilized. For the detection of morphometric parameters as input data for subsequent hydrological studies digital terrain model data of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the ASTER GDEM with a scale of 90 m/px and 30m, respectively, were used. Using these datasets morphological characteristics, such as sizes of drainage basins, transport areas and areas of deposition derived from spatial semi-automatic analysis, have been computed. The area of Muscat at the Oman Mountains has been selected as a study area because of its size, accessibility and climate conditions and it is considered well-suited for studying the development of alluvial fans and their controlling factors. The Oman Mountains are well-known for the world's largest intact and best exposed obducted ophiolite complex, the Semail Ophiolite. They are today subjected to a mild desert climate (Bwh), in?uenced by the Indian Ocean but they have experienced extensive pluvial periods in the geologic past. Formation of alluvial fans was, therefore, likely triggered by the interplay of increased sediment production caused by high rainfalls with enhanced erosion of hillslopes and transport rates during pluvial periods. Typical morphometric parameters controlled by hydrological conditions are sizes of catchment areas, the morphometry of associated rivers and slope angles as well as sizes of alluvial fans. In order to distinguish the catchment areas, semi-automatized spatial analyses based on DEM data were carried out within a commercial GIS environment. Our analyses generally verify that there is a positive correlation between, e.g., fan areas and sizes of catchment areas as well as between fan areas and lengths of valley lines of associated rivers. Furthermore, our analyses show a negative correlation between average fan slopes and sizes of catchment areas. The observations are in good agreement with previous analyses from other areas we conducted. The applied methodology has shown to be adequate to be compared to and combined with future field investigations. Flow events are dominant in fan evolution, but the way in which alluvial fan systems responded to fluvial environmental conditions differs between systems under different climate conditions. We compared our results with data from other places located in different climate zones around the world. This allows us to constrain boundary conditions and their potential influence on shapes in a more efficient way.

  3. Aerial Transient Electromagnetic Surveys of Alluvial Aquifers in Rural Watersheds of Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pool, D. R.; Callegary, J. B.; Groom, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    Development in rural areas of Arizona has led the State of Arizona (Arizona Department of Water Resources), in cooperation with the Arizona Water Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey, to sponsor investigations of the hydrogeologic framework of several alluvial-basin aquifers. An efficient method for mapping the aquifer extent and lithology was needed due to sparse subsurface information. Aerial Transient Electro-Magnetic (ATEM) methods were selected because they can be used to quickly survey large areas and with a great depth of investigation. Both helicopter and fixed-wing ATEM methods are available. A fixed-wing method (GEOTEM) was selected because of the potential for a depth of investigation of 300 m or more and because previous surveys indicated the method is useful in alluvial basins in southeastern Arizona. About 2,900 km of data along flight lines were surveyed across five alluvial basins, including the Middle San Pedro and Willcox Basins in southeastern Arizona, and Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Basins in northwestern Arizona. Data initially were analyzed by the contractor (FUGRO Airborne Surveys) to produce conductivity-depth-transforms, which approximate the general subsurface electrical-property distribution along profiles. Physically based two-dimensional physical models of the profile data were then developed by PetRos- Eikon by using EMIGMA software. Hydrologically important lithologies can have different electrical properties. Several types of crystalline and sedimentary rocks generally are poor aquifers that have low porosity and high electrical resistivity. Good alluvial aquifers of sand and gravel generally have an intermediate electrical resistivity. Poor aquifer materials, such as silt and clay, and areas of poor quality water have low electrical resistivity values. Several types of control data were available to constrain the models including drill logs, electrical logs, water levels , and water quality information from wells; and gravity, seismic, direct-current resistivity, and transient-electromagnetic information from ground-based geophysical surveys. Results of the surveys will be used along with available subsurface information to describe the spatial extent of the alluvial aquifers and the general lithologic distribution within the alluvial aquifers.

  4. Dependable water supplies from valley alluvium in arid regions.

    PubMed

    Van Haveren, Bruce P

    2004-12-01

    Reliable sources of high-quality water for domestic use are much needed in arid regions. Valley alluvium, coarse sand and gravel deposited by streams and rivers, provides an ideal storage medium for water in many regions of the world. However, river sediments will not accumulate in a valley without a natural or artificial barrier to slow the water. Sediments will deposit upstream of a barrier dam and form an alluvial deposit of relatively well-sorted material. The alluvium then acts as both an underground water-supply reservoir and a water filter, yielding a constant flow of high-quality water. Trap dams that store water in alluvial sediments and slowly release the filtered water represent an appropriate and inexpensive technology for combating desertification and mitigating the effects of drought at the community level. Small trap dams may be built as a community project using local materials and local labor. PMID:15641388

  5. Lake Urmia (Iran): can future socio-ecologically motivated river basin management restore lake water levels in an arid region with extensive agricultural development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Bertacchi Uvo, Cintia; Klove, Bjorn; Madani, Kaveh

    2015-04-01

    Lake Urmia, one of the world's largest hyper saline lakes located in northwest of Iran, is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and Ramsar site, protected as a national park and, supports invaluable and unique biodiversity and related ecosystem services for the region's 6.5 million inhabitants. Due to increased development of the region's water resources for agriculture and industry and to a certain extent climate change, the lake has started to shrink dramatically since 1995 and now is holding less than 30 percent of its volume. Rapid development in agricultural sector and land-use changes has resulted in immense construction of dams and water diversions in almost all lake feeding rivers, intensifying lake shrinking, increasing salinity and degrading its ecosystem. Recently, lake's cultural and environmental importance and social pressure has raised concerns and brought government attention to the lake restoration plans. Along with poor management, low yield agriculture as the most water consuming activity in the region with, rapid, insufficient development is one of the most influential drivers in the lake desiccation. Part of the lake restoration plans in agricultural sector is to restrict the agricultural areas in the main feeding river basins flowing mostly in the southern part of the lake and decreasing the agricultural water use in this area. This study assess the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed plans and its influence on the lake level rise and its impacts on economy in the region using a system dynamics model developed for the Lake consist of hydrological and agro-economical sub-systems. The effect of decrease in agricultural area in the region on GDP and region economy was evaluated and compared with released water contribution in lake level rise for a five year simulation period.

  6. Ground-Water Recharge in the Arid and Semiarid Southwestern United States - Climatic and Geologic Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Harrill, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water recharge in the arid and semiarid southwestern United States results from the complex interplay of climate, geology, and vegetation across widely ranging spatial and temporal scales. Present-day recharge tends to be narrowly focused in time and space. Widespread water-table declines accompanied agricultural development during the twentieth century, demonstrating that sustainable ground-water supplies are not guaranteed when part of the extracted resource represents paleorecharge. Climatic controls on ground-water recharge range from seasonal cycles of summer monsoonal and winter frontal storms to multimillennial cycles of glacial and interglacial periods. Precipitation patterns reflect global-scale interactions among the oceans, atmosphere, and continents. Large-scale climatic influences associated with El Ni?o and Pacific Decadal Oscillations strongly but irregularly control weather in the study area, so that year-to-year variations in precipitation and ground-water recharge are large and difficult to predict. Proxy data indicate geologically recent periods of multidecadal droughts unlike any in the modern instrumental record. Anthropogenically induced climate change likely will reduce ground-water recharge through diminished snowpack at higher elevations, and perhaps through increased drought. Future changes in El Ni?o and monsoonal patterns, both crucial to precipitation in the study area, are highly uncertain in current models. Land-use modifications influence ground-water recharge directly through vegetation, irrigation, and impermeable area, and indirectly through climate change. High ranges bounding the study area?the San Bernadino Mountains and Sierra Nevada to the west, and the Wasatch and southern Colorado Rocky Mountains to the east?provide external geologic controls on ground-water recharge. Internal geologic controls stem from tectonic processes that led to numerous, variably connected alluvial-filled basins, exposure of extensive Paleozoic aquifers in mountainous recharge areas, and distinct modes of recharge in the Colorado Plateau and Basin and Range subregions.

  7. Exploration of an alluvial aquifer in Oman by time-domain electromagnetic sounding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Young; R. G. M. de Bruijn; A. Salim Al-Ismaily

    1998-01-01

    One-third of the population of Oman depends upon groundwater extracted from the alluvium of the Batinah Plain, on the coast\\u000a of the Gulf of Oman. Deep geophysical exploration techniques were used to determine the depth and nature of the alluvium and\\u000a the boundaries of the aquifer. The base and structural controls of the alluvial basin at its contact with Tertiary

  8. Geometry and evolution of a syntectonic alluvial fan, Southern Pyrenees

    SciTech Connect

    Arminio, J.F. (Maraven S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)); Nichols, G.J. (Univ. of London, Egham, Surrey (United Kingdom))

    1993-02-01

    Syntectonic alluvial fans formed on the northern margin of the Ebro Foreland Basin along the South Pyrenean thrust front during late orogenic thrust movements in the late Oligocene/early Miocene. The present-day geometry, structural relations and sedimentology of one of these fans, the Aguero fan in the province of Huesca, Spain, were studied. Field observations of the architecture of depositional facies and the geometries of syn-tectonic folds and unconformities indicate that the Aguero fan formed as the result of several phases of sedimentation which were primarily controlled by periods of tectonic activity and quiescence. The syntectonic unconformities and growth folds in the fan deposits provide a detailed record of the evolution of a fan adjacent to an active thrust front. Using a computer program to simulate sedimentation and deformation of an alluvial fan it is possible to constrain rates of both sedimentary and tectonic processes by modeling the evolution of the fan body. A facies model for the fan phases indicates that the facies change from proximal (coarse-grained, amalgamated) to distal (finger grained, stacked fining up cycles) in less than 1 km across a fan of radius estimated to be about 2 km.

  9. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of Cenozoic deposits in the Ka??zman-Tuzluca Basin, northeastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varol, Baki; ?en, ?evket; Ayy?ld?z, Turhan; Sözeri, Koray; Karaka?, Zehra; Métais, Grégoire

    2015-06-01

    The Ka??zman-Tuzluca Basin is located in the northeastern Anatolia, to the east of the intersection point (near Karl?ova) of the major North and East Anatolian Fault systems. This intermontane basin displays a thick sequence (over 2000 m) of mostly terrestrial deposits represented by repetitive alternations of the lake and fluvial environments ranging from ?Late Eocene/Oligocene to Middle/? Late Miocene. A marine incursion only mappable in the southeastern margin of the basin deposited limestones and sandy limestones rich in marine mollusks and nummulites, in particular N. fichteli that constrain an Early Oligocene age for this marine unit (Ka?an Fm). The terrestrial basin-fill deposits show different thicknesses throughout the basin due to irregular bottom topography and tectonic configuration of the basin margins. The thickest deposits were accumulated along the different margins of the basin, which received high quantities of siliciclastics from meandering river, alluvial and coastal fans, fan delta/Gilbert-type delta and wave-worked fluvial delta. Climate changes have also driven the development of lake environments during distinct depositional periods. Siliciclastic-dominated overfilled lakes (Hal?k??lak and K?z?lkaya formations) and chemical-dominated underfilled lakes (Turabi and Tuzluca formations) were formed. They have been also classified as "Newark-type" and "Fundy-type" lakes, respectively. Fluvial systems evolved from high-energy meandering rivers deposited under humid climate (Güngören Formation) to low-energy meandering rivers resulted from arid and semiarid climates (Çincavat Formation). The transitional intervals from ephemeral river-dry mudflat (Çincavat Formation) to saline pan/lake (Tuzluca Formation) indicate wadi-sand flat-playa fluvial systems. The chronostratigraphic constrains of the entire sequence remain poor and so far solely based on vertebrate fossil assemblages. The evaporitic Tuzluca Formation would be Middle Miocene in age due to its stratigraphic position over the Çincavat Formation.

  10. Geomorphological evidence of neotectonic deformation in the Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Beau B.; Hengesh, James V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines channel-scale morphodynamics of ephemeral streams in the onshore Carnarvon basin in arid west-central Western Australia. The rivers in this region have low gradients, the landscape has low relief, and the rates of climatically and tectonically driven geomorphic processes also are low. As a result, the rivers in the Carnarvon alluvial plain are highly sensitive to minor perturbations in base level, channel slope, and fluvial energy. We use channel planform adjustments, stream gradient changes, and floodplain profiles across multiple ephemeral streams within a variety of catchments and flow regimes to determine if tectonically driven land level changes are affecting channel form and fluvial processes. Growth of individual fold segments is shown to have altered stream and floodplain gradients and triggered repeated avulsions at structurally controlled nodes. Aligned perturbations in channel form across multiple channel-fold intersections provide systematic geomorphic evidence for the location and orientation of neotectonic structures in the region. These features occur as a belt of low relief anticlines in the Carnarvon alluvial plain.

  11. Erosion surfaces and Neogene landscape evolution in the NE Duero Basin (north-central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito-Calvo, Alfonso; Pérez-González, Alfredo

    2007-08-01

    We present a chronological model of erosion surface development in the Iberian and Cantabrian Ranges of north-central Spain. We map four erosion surfaces and interpret these to be related to Duero basin continental sediments and tectonic activity from Upper Oligocene to Plio-Pleistocene. The oldest erosion surface, SE1, formed across Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene synorogenic deposits; while surface SE2 was contemporaneous with the Middle Miocene alluvial systems, ending with an uplift stage in the Astaracian. The two most recent erosion surfaces, SE3 and SE4, developed during extensional tectonic episodes and are associated with the deposition of Upper Páramo sedimentary units at the end of the Miocene (Upper Turolian) and alluvial fan deposits, known as rañas (Plio-Pleistocene). With the exception of SE1, which seems to be associated with a relatively wet climate, the surfaces formed during periods of marked aridity and generally warm temperatures. Through geostatistical reconstruction of the best preserved surface (SE2), applying ordinary kriging method to the topography (DEM) of the erosion surface and its correlating sedimentary plains, we identify the deformation processes which occurred on this surface after its formation.

  12. Application of the groundwater-balance equation to indicate interbasin and vertical flow in two semi-arid drainage basins, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.

    2000-09-01

    An analysis of horizontal inflow and outflow in the groundwater-budget equation and the significance for interbasin flow are presented. Two field cases in Mexico, one in the Baja California peninsula and another in central Mexico, highlight the influence of interbasin flow. A significant proportion (approximately 70%) of the ed (thermal) groundwater probably originates outside the drainage basin. A conclusion is that a groundwater-balance study is an unsatisfactory method for determining some parameters, such as storativity (S). Specifically, the groundwater-balance approach provides unreliable results when vertical inflow is ignored or cannot be adequately defined. Vertical flow is indicated by the presence of groundwater temperatures as much as 23 °C higher than ambient temperature. Regional faults could be the pathways for upward flow. When vertical inflow is ignored, uncertainty in the estimation of the storativity through regional groundwater-balance calculation results. On the basis of the groundwater-balance equation, a value of S=0.19 appears to represent the confined condition of the developed part of the aquifer; this result is several orders of magnitude higher than would be reasonable according to the geological conditions. Findings are useful in evaluating whether a groundwater resource is being "overexploited". Conclusions are instructive in the application of transient-flow computer models, in which vertical flow of less dense water from beneath is not included. Résumé. L'article présente une analyse des entrées et des sorties horizontales dans l'équation du bilan d'une nappe et leur signification dans les écoulements entre bassins. Deux exemples provenant du Mexique, l'un dans la péninsule de Basse Californie, l'autre dans le centre du Mexique, mettent en lumière l'influence de l'écoulement entre bassins, où une proportion significative (environ 70%) de l'eau souterraine extraite, thermale, a probablement son origine hors du bassin. Une conclusion est qu'une étude par bilan de la nappe est une méthode qui n'est pas satisfaisante pour déterminer certains paramètres comme le coefficient d'emmagasinement. En particulier, l'approche par le bilan de la nappe donne des résultats qui ne sont pas fiables lorsque l'on ignore la drainance verticale ou que l'on ne peut pas la définir correctement. L'existence d'une drainance verticale est prouvée par des températures de l'eau souterraine pouvant être supérieures de 23 °C à la température ambiante. Des failles régionales peuvent permettre ces écoulements vers le haut. Lorsque l'on ignore la drainance verticale, on introduit une incertitude sur l'estimation de l'emmagasinement à partir des calculs du bilan régional de la nappe. Sur la base de l'équation du bilan de la nappe, une valeur de S=0,19 semble représenter les conditions captives de la partie développée de l'aquifère ce résultat est plus élevé, de plusieurs ordres de grandeur, que celui que l'on peut raisonnablement attendre des conditions géologiques. Ces résultats sont utiles pour évaluer si une ressource en eau souterraine est "surexploitée". Ces conclusions sont intéressantes lorsque l'on applique des modèles d'écoulement transitoire dans lesquels on ne prend pas en compte la drainance verticale d'une eau plus légère remontant. Resumen. En este trabajo, se investigan las entradas y salidas de flujo horizontal en la ecuación de balance de agua subterránea, así como el papel que desempeñan en el flujo entre cuencas. Se analizan dos ejemplos de México, uno en la Península de Baja California y otro en la parte central del país. En ambos, destaca la influencia del flujo entre cuencas, ya que se estima que una parte importante (aproximadamente el 70%) del agua termal extraída procede de una cuenca superficial externa. Se concluye que el método basado en cálculos de balance de agua subterránea no es satisfactorio para determinar algunos parámetros, como, por ejemplo, el coeficiente de almacenamiento (S). En particular, la ecuación de ba

  13. Strontium Isotope Ratios (87Sr\\/86Sr) as Tracers for Recharge Areas, Groundwater Movement and Mixing in an Arid Coastal Region of the Sultanate of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Weyhenmeyer; H. N. Waber; J. Kramers; S. J. Burns; A. Matter

    2001-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, conventional hydrological investigations often fail to adequately describe groundwater systems due to a large spatial and temporal variability of hydrological parameters. Alternatively, this study from northern Oman utilizes strontium isotope ratios (87Sr\\/86Sr) to describe the origin and evolution of groundwater in the Batinah coastal alluvial aquifer, which supplies water for the most densely populated, cultivated

  14. Detection and Mapping of Sedimentary Features on Alluvial Fans Using High-Resolution Overhead Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Moersch, J. E.; Whisner, S.

    2008-12-01

    In this study we evaluate the utility of thermal imagery for revealing geomorphic features and evidence of sedimentary processes on the surfaces of alluvial fans. Prior studies of alluvial fans have made extensive use of visible imagery and traditional field-based mapping techniques to identify surface geomorphic features and sedimentary processes. Here we present a comparison of features mapped using thermal images acquired from the ground, a light aircraft (altitude ~5000 ft, resolution ~2 m/pixel) and ASTER satellite imagery (resolution 90 m/pixel), to a preexisting ground-based map of features on an example alluvial fan in Owens Valley, California. Thermal images from a light aircraft were acquired at several times of day to determine how the surface temperatures of the alluvial fan rise and fall throughout a diurnal cycle. We have also acquired thermal images of the same fan from the ground at 5 minute intervals over the course of a full diurnal cycle. ASTER thermal data also covers the Owens Valley, and was used to determine if this technique can be used from orbit at significantly lower resolution (90 m/pixel). In an arid climate with low vegetation cover, the temperature of a surface at any given time of day is a complex function of many parameters, including slope, azimuth, composition, degree of induration, and grain size. By analyzing the temperatures on the surface of an alluvial fan with comparable slopes, azimuth, and composition, we make estimates of the relative particle size or degree of induration. We utilize the fact that several sedimentary processes acting on the surface of alluvial fans sort particles by size. For example, both debris flow and channelized flow processes can form linear features of large and small clasts. Therefore, thermal imagery could be expected to reveal evidence of these processes at the surfaces of alluvial fans in the form of spatial patterns of surface thermal properties. Process-related sedimentary features, such as clast-rich and clast-poor debris flows, debris-flow levees, and the change in particle size at the toe of the fan are all clearly revealed in the aerial thermal images of the Dolomite Fan in Owens Valley, California. The locations of these features in the thermal imagery match the locations of the features as mapped using traditional ground-based field sedimentology techniques by Blair and McPherson (1998). All debris flows that are exposed at the fan surface are evident in the aerial thermal imagery, including those that have been heavily weathered and are difficult to observe in visible aerial or orbital imagery. ASTER satellite thermal image data does not show the same sedimentary features as our aerial thermal images, presumably due to the significantly poorer spatial resolution of the satellite data. Our aerial thermal imagery suggests that higher resolution satellite data from a future satellite experiment could be used to detect sedimentary processes on alluvial fans anywhere on Earth. High resolution thermal imagery from above can be used to provide preliminary reconnaissance of an alluvial fan, suggest what processes have most recently acted on the surface of the fan, and to prioritize sites for detailed study on the ground. Future work will expand our database of alluvial fans and the list of process-related surface features that can be identified with thermal imagery.

  15. Sediments in Semi-arid Wetlands: US Southern High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Playas are ephemeral wetlands on the semi-arid U.S. Southern High Plains that serve as runoff catchment basins and are thought to be focal points of Ogallala aquifer recharge. Sediments in playas alter biodiversity and hydroperiods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of outerbas...

  16. Geospatial Data to Support Analysis of Water-Quality Conditions in Basin-Fill Aquifers in the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, Tim S.; Anning, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Southwest Principal Aquifers study area consists of most of California and Nevada and parts of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado; it is about 409,000 square miles. The Basin-fill aquifers extend through about 201,000 square miles of the study area and are the primary source of water for cities and agricultural communities in basins in the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Southwest). The demand on limited ground-water resources in areas in the southwestern United States has increased significantly. This increased demand underscores the importance of understanding factors that affect the water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the region, which are being studied through the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. As a part of this study, spatial datasets of natural and anthropogenic factors that may affect ground-water quality of the basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States were developed. These data include physical characteristics of the region, such as geology, elevation, and precipitation, as well as anthropogenic factors, including population, land use, and water use. Spatial statistics for the alluvial basins in the Southwest have been calculated using the datasets. This information provides a foundation for the development of conceptual and statistical models that relate natural and anthropogenic factors to ground-water quality across the Southwest. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to determine and illustrate the spatial distribution of these basin-fill variables across the region. One hundred-meter resolution raster data layers that represent the spatial characteristics of the basins' boundaries, drainage areas, population densities, land use, and water use were developed for the entire Southwest.

  17. Alluvial Fan, Rocky Mountain National Park

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Alluvial Fan is a fan-shaped area of disturbance in Rocky Mountain National Park. It was created on July 15, 1982, when the earthen Lawn Lake Dam above the area gave way, flooding the Park and nearby town of Estes Park with more than 200 million gallons of water. Enormous boulders were displaced...

  18. Arsenate adsorption by unsaturated alluvial sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenate adsorption as a function of solution arsenic concentration and solution pH was investigated on five alluvial sediments from the Antelope Valley, Western Mojave Desert, California. Arsenate adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, exhibited a maximum around pH 4 to 5, and then decr...

  19. Arsenic Levels in Groundwater from Quaternary Alluvium in the Ganga Plain and the Bengal Basin, Indian Subcontinent: Insights into Influence of Stratigraphy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Acharyya

    2005-01-01

    Late Quaternary stratigraphy and sedimentation in the Ganga Alluvial Plain and the Bengal Basin have influenced arsenic contamination of groundwater. Arsenic contaminated aquifers are pervasive within lowland organic rich, clayey deltaic sediments in the Bengal Basin and locally within similar facies in narrow, entrenched river valleys within the Ganga Alluvial Plain. These were mainly deposited during early-mid Holocene sea level

  20. Evidence of late early Miocene aridification intensification in the Xining Basin caused by the northeastern Tibetan Plateau uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Xiao, Guoqiao; Guo, Zhengtang; Wu, Haibin; Hao, Qingzhen

    2015-05-01

    Few early Miocene terrestrial climate records exist from the Asian interior and as a result the evolution of Central Asian aridification and the driving forces behind it remain unclear. Here we report sedimentary, mineralogy and geochemical proxies from an early Miocene sedimentary sequence (ca. 22.1 to 16.5 Ma) from Xining Basin on the northeastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Multiple proxies indicate a change of sedimentary facies of a distal alluvial fan from subfluvial to subatmospheric under a dominantly arid climate coupled with a clear two-stage climate change. During ~ 22.1-19.7 Ma (Unit I), the enrichment of I/S (irregular mixed-layers of illite and smectite) content, high values of a*/L* (redness/lightness), and stronger degree of chemical weathering suggest relatively warm and humid climate conditions during a generally arid climate. During 19.7-16.5 Ma (Unit II), the increase of chlorite and dolomite content, the upward decrease of a*/L*, and weaker degree of chemical weathering than Unit I suggest gradually increasing aridity since ca. 19.7 Ma. Comprehensive comparisons among records from central western China demonstrate that the aridification since ca. 19.7 Ma is widespread in northeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau. The climate changes in inner Asia are different to that of global-scale changes, which indicates that global climate changes and the retreat of the Para-Tethys Sea possibly had little influences on this region. The episodic, but persistent tectonic uplift of the north and northeastern Tibetan Plateau during the early Miocene likely played a key role in the aridification of the Xining Basin.

  1. Fire, Holocene Climate Change, and Geomorphic Response Recorded in Alluvial Fan Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. L.; Meyer, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Alluvial fan stratigraphic sequences record fire history in charcoal-rich deposits and buried burned soil surfaces. Deposit characteristics provide information about the magnitude of fire-related sedimentation events and severity of associated fires, and radiocarbon-dating of charcoal establishes the timing of fires. Unlike lakes, alluvial fans are ubiquitous in mountain environments. Although alluvial-fan fire records lack the annual resolution of tree-ring records, compilation of data from many alluvial fan sites provides a statistical sample of fire timing and approximate severity that can be related to climate variations over centennial to millennial timescales. We examine alluvial fan records from xeric Pinus ponderosa-dominated forests of central Idaho, and compare them with similar records from cooler, high-elevation Pinus contorta-dominated forests of Yellowstone National Park. Identification of charcoal macrofossils from Idaho fan deposits limits inbuilt age errors in radiocarbon dating, and shows that similar forest compositions have existed over the last ca. 4000 years in the fan drainage basins. Limited data from ca. 4000-7000 yr ago suggest that Pinus ponderosa was either sparse or absent in the 4 basins represented. Large fire-related debris flows in both Idaho and Yellowstone indicate severe fires during the ca. 1050-750 cal yr BP Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA), which included widespread and severe western US droughts. Another such episode 2700-1600 cal yr BP is less prominent in the Idaho record. Numerous small, fire-induced sedimentation events in Idaho ca. 350-500 (Little Ice Age), 1200-1400, and 2800-3000 cal yr BP likely indicate frequent low- to mixed-severity fires, and coincide with indicators of generally cool, moist conditions in the western USA and North Atlantic, and with minimal fire activity in Yellowstone. We infer that these effectively wetter periods allow greater grass growth, fueling frequent surface fires in ponderosa forests, but limiting fires in general in the effectively wetter forests of Yellowstone. Maxima in dated small events may relate to significant droughts within these intervals, e.g. in the late AD 1500s, but widespread severe fires are not indicated. Alluvial-fan records add to data from other charcoal-based proxy records of fire that indicate the importance of centennial- to millennial-scale climate change in modulating fire activity and geomorphic response in conifer forests over the Holocene.

  2. Metagenomic characterization of biodiversity in the extremely arid desert soils of Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutovaya, O. V.; Lebedeva, M. P.; Tkhakakhova, A. K.; Ivanova, E. A.; Andronov, E. E.

    2015-05-01

    For the first time, the composition of microbiomes in the biological crust (AKL) horizons of extremely arid desert soils (Aridic Calcisols) developed from saline and nonsaline alluvial deposits in the Ili Depression (eastern Kazakhstan) was analyzed. To describe the diversity of microorganisms in the soil samples, a novel method of pyrosequencing (Roche/454 Life Sciences) was applied. It was shown that bacteria from the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria, and Bacteroidetes phyla predominate in all the samples; these are typical representatives of the microbiome of soil crusts. A distinctive feature of the extremely arid soils is the high contribution of cyanobacteria (25-30%) to the total DNA. In the soils developed from saline sediments, representatives from the Rubrobacteraceae, Streptococcaceae, and Caulobacteraceae families and from the Firmicutes phylum predominated. In the soils developed from nonsaline gypsiferous deposits, bacteria from the class of Acidobacteria, subgroup Gp3, of the Methylobacteriaceae family and the class of Subdivision 3 from the Verrucomicrobia phylum predominated.

  3. UNESCO's G-WADI Program - Developing and Delivering Tools for Improved Water Management in Semi-arid and Arid Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, G. C.; Imam, B.; Sorooshian, S.

    2007-12-01

    UNESCO's Water and Development Information for Arid Lands - A Global Network (G-WADI) aims to strengthen the capacity to manage the water resources of arid and semi-arid areas around the globe through a network of international and regional cooperation. Six centers, including SAHRA headquartered at the University of Arizona and CHRS at UC-Irvine, are cooperating to improve water resource management by sharing knowledge and tools. Specific objectives include: improved understanding of the special characteristics of hydrological systems and water management needs in arid areas, through shared data and experiences; capacity building of individuals and institutions; raising awareness of advanced technologies for data provision, data assimilation, and system analysis; and promoting integrated basin management and the use of appropriate decision support tools. SAHRA coordinates G-WADI's information dissemination via G-WADI's web site and publications. Web-based resources include Global Water News Watch and the subscription service, Water News Tracker, plus access to remotely sensed precipitation data from HyDIS. Information on use of isotopes and chemical tracers is also featured. Materials and outcomes from various workshops and short courses on modeling, water harvesting, and impacts of climate change also are provided. While the intent is to benefit water resource managers in semi- arid and arid developing countries, the collaboration among international water centers, and perspectives and traditional knowledge gained from users, has benefitted U.S. researchers in many ways.

  4. Interaction of fine sediment with alluvial streambeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.; Carey, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    An alluvial streambed can have a large capacity to store fine sediments that are extracted from the flow when instream concentrations are high and it can gradually release fine sediment to the flow when the instream concentrations are low. Several types of storage mechanisms are available depending on the relative size distribution of the suspended load and bed material, as well as the flow hydraulics. -from Authors

  5. Estimating alluvial fan surface ages using Landsat 8 multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Mason, Philippa J.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Roda Boluda, Duna C.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate exposure age models are now essential for geomorphological and stratigraphic field research, and generally depend on laboratory analyses such as radiocarbon, cosmogenic nuclide or luminescence approaches. However, these techniques cannot be deployed in situ in the field, meaning other methods are needed to produce a preliminary age model, map depositional surfaces of different ages, and select sampling sites for the types of laboratory analyses outlined above. With the widespread availability of high-resolution multispectral imagery, a promising approach is to use remotely sensed data to discriminate depositional surfaces with different ages. Here, we use new Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) multispectral imagery to characterise the reflectance of 35 alluvial fan surfaces in the semi-arid Owens Valley, California. These surfaces have been mapped in detail in the field, have similar granitic compositions, and have well-constrained exposure ages ranging from modern to ~ 125 ka, measured using a high density of 10-Be cosmogenic nuclide samples. We identify a clear age signal recorded in the spectral properties of these surfaces. With increasing exposure age, there is a predictable redshift effect in the reflectance of the surfaces across the visible and short-wave infrared spectrum. Simple calculations, such as the brightness ratio of red/blue wavelengths, produce sensitive power law relationships with exposure age for at least 125 ka, meaning Landsat 8 imagery can be used to estimate surface exposure age remotely, at least in this calibrated dryland location. The ability to remotely sense exposure age has useful implications for field mapping, selecting suitable sampling sites for laboratory-based exposure age techniques, and correlating existing age constraints to previously un-sampled surfaces. We present the uncertainties associated with this spectral approach to exposure dating, evaluate its likely physical origins, and discuss its applicability in other locations and with other remotely sensed datasets.

  6. The application of remotely sensed data to pedologic and geomorphic mapping on alluvial fan and playa surfaces in Saline Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. A.; Petersen, G. W.; Kahle, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Arid and semiarid regions yield excellent opportunities for the study of pedologic and geomorphic processes. The dominance of rock and soil exposure over vegetation not only provides the ground observer with observational possibilities but also affords good opportunities for measurement by aircraft and satellite remote sensor devices. Previous studies conducted in the area of pedologic and geomorphic mapping in arid regions with remotely sensed data have utilized information obtained in the visible to near-infrared portion of the spectrum. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and Thematic Mapping (TM) data collected in 1984 are being used in comjunction with maps compiled during a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) soil survey to aid in a detailed mapping of alluvial fan and playa surfaces within the valley. The results from this study may yield valuable information concerning the application of thermal data and thermal/visible data combinations to the problem of dating pedologic and geomorphic features in arid regions.

  7. Climatic and tectonic controls on Quaternary eolian sedimentary sequences of the Chott Rharsa Basin, southern Tunisia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Stephen Swezey

    1997-01-01

    This dissertation presents an investigation of climatic and tectonic controls on Quaternary eolian sedimentary sequences of the Chott Rharsa Basin on the northern margin of the Sahara Desert, in southern Tunisia. This basin, which lies within the larger Atlas foreland basin of North Africa, is a structurally controlled depocenter created by Miocene-Pleistocene compression associated with the Atlas Orogeny. Alluvial fans

  8. Lagoa Feia Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Campos basin, offshore Brazil - Rift-Valley-Stage Lacustrine carbonate reservoirs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Bertani; T. Petrobras; A. V. Carozzi

    1985-01-01

    The Lagoa Feia Formation, buried in excess of 3000 m, is the exploration frontier of the prolific Campos basin. It contains the source beds of all the basin's oil in addition to having its own potential carbonate reservoirs. The faulted margins of the basin fed a system of alluvial fans, sand flats, and mud flats. Alternating dry and rainy period

  9. Hydrologic processes and geomorphic constraints on urbanization of alluvial fan slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, A. P.; Grodek, T.; Wolman, M. G.

    1999-12-01

    The natural array of processes conveying water and sediment from arid mountain catchments, through alluvial fans, into the base level below is affected by human intervention to an extent unknown until a few years ago. Previously permeable fan terrain has now been replaced by paved impermeable surfaces whose drainage becomes problematic. This problem is intensified with the growth of the town and its building density, particularly vis a vis the smaller catchments. The high sediment yields, with typically predominant bed material components that are supplied by steep catchments, create situations difficult to manage in terms of effective economical and environmentally sensitive criteria. Within the context of the general inadequacy of structural attempts to fully control the floods emanating onto an alluvial fan, a case can be made for exercising the option of local, low-key engineering intervention in protecting fan settlements. Several aspects of the considerations involved are illustrated by examples from the town of Eilat, Southern Negev Desert, Israel, a dynamically developing international tourist resort.

  10. Groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges Basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily from mixture of ambient sources, including direct percolation of precipitation and irrigation waters, infiltration of runoff from surrounding hills/areas, seepage from rivers and creeks, and subsurface inflow (from non-alluvial geologic units that bound the alluvial basins). The primary sources of discharge are evaporation, discharge to streams, and water pumped for municipal supply and irrigation.

  11. Movement of water infiltrated from a recharge basin to wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Leary, David R.; Izbicki, John A.; Moran, Jean E.; Meeth, Tanya; Nakagawa, Brandon; Metzger, Loren; Bonds, Chris; Singleton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Local surface water and stormflow were infiltrated intermittently from a 40-ha basin between September 2003 and September 2007 to determine the feasibility of recharging alluvial aquifers pumped for public supply, near Stockton, California. Infiltration of water produced a pressure response that propagated through unconsolidated alluvial-fan deposits to 125 m below land surface (bls) in 5 d and through deeper, more consolidated alluvial deposits to 194 m bls in 25 d, resulting in increased water levels in nearby monitoring wells. The top of the saturated zone near the basin fluctuates seasonally from depths of about 15 to 20 m. Since the start of recharge, water infiltrated from the basin has reached depths as great as 165 m bls. On the basis of sulfur hexafluoride tracer test data, basin water moved downward through the saturated alluvial deposits until reaching more permeable zones about 110 m bls. Once reaching these permeable zones, water moved rapidly to nearby pumping wells at rates as high as 13 m/d. Flow to wells through highly permeable material was confirmed on the basis of flowmeter logging, and simulated numerically using a two-dimensional radial groundwater flow model. Arsenic concentrations increased slightly as a result of recharge from 2 to 6 ?g/L immediately below the basin. Although few water-quality issues were identified during sample collection, high groundwater velocities and short travel times to nearby wells may have implications for groundwater management at this and at other sites in heterogeneous alluvial aquifers.

  12. A brief history of Great Basin pikas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald K. Grayson

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim Within the past few decades, seven of the 25 historically described populations of American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in the Great Basin of arid western North America appear to have become extinct. In this paper, the prehistoric record for pikas in the Great Basin is used to place these losses in deeper historical context.

  13. Cenozoic Climates of the Great basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernst Antevs

    1952-01-01

    The Great Basin in the western United States consists of almost level desert basins and alternating parallel mountain ranges. It has sparse, mostly interior, drainage and a few permanent lakes. The climate is arid and semiarid. Fairly large areas are true deserts. The main Cenozoic climatic changes have been: 1. a general cooling during the Tertiary and the early Pleistocene,

  14. Fire, climate, and alluvial system dynamics: A Holocene record from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.A. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology); Wells, S.G. (Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Jull, A.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF-Arizona Accelerator Facility For Isotope Dating)

    1992-01-01

    Many large debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and flood-streamflow sediment transport events have been produced in steep basins that were burned in the 1988 fires in northeaster Yellowstone National Park. The charcoal- and fines-rich character of fire-related debris-flow deposits and the abundance of similar facies in Holocene fan sections have allowed them to construct a [sup 14]C-dated chronology of fire-related sedimentation in the Soda Butte and Slough Creek drainages for the last 3500 years. Major periods of fire-related alluvial fan aggradation are interpreted as drought-dominated with the support of local paleoenvironmental data and statistical analyses of historical climate-fire relations; however, some fire-related events may occur due to high climatic variability and severe short-term drought within generally moist intervals. The last major episode of fire-related debris-flow activity encompasses the Medieval Warm Period of 900--1300 AD and peaks ca. 1150 AD; a prior episode culminates ca. 350--100 BC. Wetter periods contain minimal fire-related fan sedimentation; however, floodplain broadening and aggradation occurs along axial streams. Higher average snowmelt runoff discharges are probably involved, such that the dominant alluvial activity shifts to removal of sediment from alluvial fan storage and transport to downstream floodplains. The Little Ice Age (ca. 1300--1900 AD) contains minimal fire-related debris0flow activity and is associated with floodplain aggradation of the T4 terrace, and independent evidence suggests substantially wetter conditions during T3 aggradation ca. 350--650 AD. Thus, small-scale climate changes of the late Holocene effectively control the dominant mode of alluvial activity.

  15. Fluoride distribution in water and the governing factors of environment in arid north-west China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Genxu; Cheng Guodong

    2001-01-01

    In arid areas of north-west China, fluorides occur predominantly as NaF and KF. They are fairly ubiquitous in both natural surface waters such as rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and in ground-water. Abundant fluoride sources, a relatively closed hydrological network, and the dry climate of the arid inland basin provide favorable conditions to the dissolution, migration and enrichment of fluoride. The

  16. Hydrochemical and isotopic characteristics of groundwater in the Souss Upstream Basin, southwestern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindane, K.; Bouchaou, L.; Hsissou, Y.; Krimissa, M.

    2003-05-01

    Heterogeneous shallow Plio-Quaternary formations of the Souss Plain represent the most important aquifer in southern High Atlas Mountains in Morocco. The present work was conducted in the Souss Upstream Basin to identify the chemical characteristics and the origin of groundwater in an aquifer under semi-arid climate. Isotopic and hydrochemical compositions combined with geological and hydrogeological data were used for this purpose. The total dissolved solids vary from 239 to 997 mg l-1, and the following groundwater types are recognized: Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3-, Ca2+-Mg2+-SO42- and Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl-. The groundwater is saturated and slightly supersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals and undersaturated with respect to evaporite minerals, which means that the groundwater composition is largely controlled by the dissolution of carbonate rocks known in the basin. The isotopic contents of groundwaters ranged from -8‰ to -5.2‰ for ?18O, from -52‰ to -34‰ for ?D, and from 0 to 5.5 TU for tritium. The hydrogen (?D) and oxygen (?18O) isotope signatures reveal a significant infiltration before evaporation takes place, indicating a major recharge directly from fractures in the crystalline and limestone formations of Atlas Mountains (above 800 m a.s.l.) and infiltration of surface water in the alluvial cones at the border of the Atlas basins. The very low tritium values suggest that the groundwater recharge follows a long flow path and a mixing between old and modern water is shown. However, a slight evaporation effect is noted in the southern part of the basin close to the Anti-Atlas Mountains.

  17. CHANNEL EVOLUTION IN MODIFIED ALLUVIAL STREAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Andrew; Hupp, Cliff R.

    1987-01-01

    This study (a) assesses the channel changes and network trends of bed level response after modifications between 1959 and 1972 of alluvial channels in western Tennessee and (b) develops a conceptual model of bank slope development to qualitatively assess bank stability and potential channel widening. A six-step, semiquantitative model of channel evolution in disturbed channels was developed by quantifying bed level trends and recognizing qualitative stages of bank slope development. Development of the bank profile is defined in terms of three dynamic and observable surfaces: (a) vertical face (70 to 90 degrees), (b) upper bank (25 to 50 degrees), and (c) slough line (20 to 25 degrees).

  18. Controls on alluvial fan long-profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, J.D.; Schmidt, K.M.; Miller, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and debris flows exiting confined valleys have a tendency to deposit sediment on steep fans. On alluvial fans where water transport of gravel predominates, channel slopes tend to decrease downfan from ???0.10-0.04 to ???0.01 across wide ranges of climate and tectonism. Some have argued that this pattern reflects grain-size fining downfan such that higher threshold slopes are required just to entrain coarser particles in the waters of the upper fan, whereas lower slopes are required to entrain finer grains downfan (threshold hypothesis). An older hypothesis is that slope is adjusted to transport the supplied sediment load, which decreases downfan as deposition occurs (transport hypothesis). We have begun to test these hypotheses for alluvial fan long-profiles using detailed hydraulic and particle-size data in sediment transport models. On four alluvial fans in the western U.S., we find that channel hydraulic radiiare largely 0.5-0.9 m at fan heads, decreasing to 0.1-0.2 m at distal margins. We find that median gravel diameter does not change systematically along the upper 60%-80% of active fan channels as slope declines, so downstream gravel fining cannot explain most of the observed channel slope reduction. However, as slope declines, channel-bed sand cover increases systematically downfan from areal fractions of <20% above fan heads to distal fan values in excess of 70%. As a result, entrainment thresholds for bed material might decrease systematically downfan, leading to lower slopes. However, current models of this effect alone tend to underpredict downfan slope changes. This is likely due to off-channel gravel deposition. Calculations that match observed fan long-profiles require an exponential decline in gravel transport rate, so that on some fans approximately half of the load must be deposited off channel every -0.20-1.4 km downfan. This leads us to hypothesize that some alluvial fan long-proffies are statements about the rate of overbank deposition of coarse particles downfan, a process for which there is currently no mechanistic theory. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  19. ARTICLE A brief history of Great Basin pikas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald K. Grayson

    Aim Within the past few decades, seven of the 25 historically described populations of American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in the Great Basin of arid western North America appear to have become extinct. In this paper, the prehistoric record for pikas in the Great Basin is used to place these losses in deeper historical context. Location The Great Basin, or area

  20. Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program is "a multi-agency, multi-national global-change research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced changes in semi-arid environments." Current research efforts focus on the upper San Pedro River basin, encompassing southeastern Arizona and northeastern Sonora (Mexico). At the site, users will find summaries of current research in the Research section, including study area maps and project summaries for the Transborder Watershed Research Program, Ecosystem Fragmentation and Restoration Study, the 1998 Mexico Campaign (an intensive field campaign "to measure upland water and energy fluxes during August and September 1998"), and Riparian Ecophysiology (coming soon). Also available are numerous archived summaries from research conducted before 1998. An excellent collection of links on global change research and "other information sources related to the hydrology and ecology of the Upper San Pedro River Basin" rounds out the site.

  1. Rational regime model of alluvial channel morphology and response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brett C. Eaton; Michael Church; Robert G. Millar

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed for predicting equilibrium alluvial channel form. The concept of greatest relative stability, achieved by maximizing resistance to flow in the fluvial system, is presented as the basis for an optimization condition for alluvial systems. Discharge, sediment supply (quantity and calibre) and valley gradient are accepted as independent govern- ing variates. The model is used to

  2. Fertilizers mobilization in alluvial aquifer: laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrocicco, M.; Colombani, N.; Palpacelli, S.

    2009-02-01

    In alluvial plains, intensive farming with conspicuous use of agrochemicals, can cause land pollution and groundwater contamination. In central Po River plain, paleo-channels are important links between arable lands and the underlaying aquifer, since the latter is often confined by clay sediments that act as a barrier against contaminants migration. Therefore, paleo-channels are recharge zones of particular interest that have to be protected from pollution as they are commonly used for water supply. This paper focuses on fertilizer mobilization next to a sand pit excavated in a paleo-channel near Ferrara (Italy). The problem is approached via batch test leaking and columns elution of alluvial sediments. Results from batch experiments showed fast increase in all major cations and anions, suggesting equilibrium control of dissolution reactions, limited availability of solid phases and geochemical homogeneity of samples. In column experiments, early elution and tailing of all ions breakthrough was recorded due to preferential flow paths. For sediments investigated in this study, dispersion, dilution and chemical reactions can reduce fertilizers at concentration below drinking standards in a reasonable time frame, provided fertilizer loading is halted or, at least, reduced. Thus, the definition of a corridor along paleo-channels is recommended to preserve groundwater quality.

  3. Chloride mass-balance method for estimating ground water recharge in arid areas: Examples from western Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bazuhair, A.S.; Wood, W.W.

    1996-01-01

    The chloride mass-balance method, which integrates time and aerial distribution of ground water recharge, was applied to small alluvial aquifers in the wadi systems of the Asir and Hijaz mountains in western Saudi Arabia. This application is an extension of the method shown to be suitable for estimating recharge in regional aquifers in semi-arid areas. Because the method integrates recharge in time and space it appears to be, with certain assumptions, particularly well suited for and areas with large temporal and spatial variation in recharge. In general, recharge was found to be between 3 to 4% of precipitation - a range consistent with recharge rates found in other arid and semi-arid areas of the earth.

  4. From source to sink in the sediment cascade of the Hei-River Basin: Implications for late Quaternary landscape dynamics in the Gobi Desert, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, Stefan; Nottebaum, Veit; Diekmann, Bernhard; Hartmann, Kai; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Wünnemann, Bernd; Zhang, Chi

    2014-05-01

    The Hei River Basin with a catchment size of ~130,000 km² is host to one of the largest continental alluvial fans in the world. The basin comprises: (1) its high-elevated river sources in the glacier and the permafrost zone of the Qilian Mountains, (2) the semi-arid foreland of the Hexi Corridor in the middle reaches and (3) the endorheic Ejina Basin (Gaxun Nur Basin) as its recent sink. The river basin is characterized by small subcatchments of hyper-arid mountain ranges of the Gobi-Tienshan and Beishan as well as of smooth and fuzzy water divides of the Hexi-Corridor and the Badain Jaran Sand Sea. Up to 300 m of Quaternary sediments establish the large Ejina Basin, with a size of 28,000 km², as an excellent archive for environmental reconstructions located at the recent intersection of westerly and monsoonal air masses. Three sediment cores (up to 230 m long) provide evidence of sedimentation dynamics over the last 250,000 years, and cover at least two terminations since OIS 6. The sediments have to be regarded as a result of the interplay between tectonic activity and climate dynamics, accompanied by a related eolian and hydrological response of the catchment. Thus, it is crucial to understand and reconstruct the sedimentary processes along the huge sediment cascades, and to identify the most important sediment sources. Here we present a provenance analysis from mineralogical fingerprints of modern sediments that have been deposited along recent pathways from the sources to the Ejina Basin. The methodical approach combines the analysis of clay minerals, bulk mineralogy, and bulk geochemistry. Furthermore, we use heavy mineral data obtained from automated particle-analysis via a computer-controlled scanning electron microscope (CCSEM) and XRD measurements. We analyzed ~200 surface samples from the whole catchment as reference material, as well as the upper 19 m of cored sediments, to gain insight into temporal changes of depositional processes and provenance. Geostatistical analyses of the compositional data reveal a clear discrimination between sediments from the Qilian Shan in the south and from local basin sediments in the north. Moreover the mineralogical fingerprints allow the differentiation of sources from intrusive rocks that are dominant in the Bei Shan mountain sub-catchment, and from greenschist-bearing metamorphic rocks, that are widespread in the Qilian Mountain catchment. Finally, we draw conclusions about the main transport processes and pathways from assumed source regions to the sink (Ejina Basin). The provenance analysis of the sediment core reveals strong changes from local (Bei Shan) to long-distant (Qilian Shan) sources. The Late Pleistocene record reveals frequently changing sediment supply between periodic high mountain runoff and local episodic runoff. We assume that these variations are related to basin internal processes (e.g. fan dynamics, tectonics) and changing environmental conditions that are linked with variations in meltwater runoff and precipitation in the upper reaches of the southern catchment. These conclusions are supported by grain size characteristics that indicate phases of predominant alluvial activity and limnic deposition around the Late Glacial to Holocene transition and enhanced pre-Holocene eolian activity.

  5. Particle dynamics: The continuum of bedrock to alluvial river segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Particle dynamics refers to production, erosion, transport, and storage of particulate material including mineral sediment and organic matter. Particle dynamics differ significantly between the end members of bedrock and alluvial river segments and between alluvial river segments with different grain-size distributions. Bedrock segments are supply limited and resistant to change, with relatively slow, linear adjustments and predominantly erosion and transport. Particle dynamics in alluvial segments, in contrast, are transport limited and dominated by storage of mineral sediment and production of organic matter. Alluvial segments are resilient to change, with relatively rapid, multidirectional adjustments and stronger internal influences because of feedbacks between particles and biota. Bedrock segments are the governors of erosion within a river network, whereas alluvial segments are the biogeochemical reactors. Fundamental research questions for both types of river segments center on particle dynamics, which limit network-scale incision in response to base level fall (bedrock segments) and habitat, biogeochemical reactions, and biomass production (alluvial segments). These characterizations illuminate how the spatial arrangement of bedrock and alluvial segments within a river network influence network-scale resistance and resilience to external changes in relative base level, climate, and human activities.

  6. Long-term interactions between man and the fluvial environment - case of the Diyala alluvial fan, Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaert, Vanessa M. A.; Walstra, Jan; Mortier, Clément

    2014-05-01

    The Mesopotamian alluvial plain is dominated by large aggradading river systems (the Euphrates, Tigris and their tributaries), which are prone to avulsions. An avulsion can be defined as the diversion of flow from an existing channel onto the floodplain, eventually resulting in a new channel belt. Early civilizations depended on the position of rivers for their economic survival and hence the impact of channel shifts could be devastating (Wilkinson 2003; Morozova 2005; Heyvaert & Baeteman 2008). Research in the Iranian deltaic part of the Mesopotamian plain has demonstrated that deliberate human action (such as the construction of irrigation canals and dams) triggered or obstructed the alluvial processes leading to an avulsion on fluvial megafans (during preconditioning, triggering and post-triggering stages) (Walstra et al. 2010; Heyvaert et al. 2012, Heyvaert et al.2013). Thus, there is ample evidence that the present-day alluvial landscapes in the region are the result of complex interactions between natural and anthropogenic processes. Here we present a reconstruction of the Late Holocene evolution of the Diyala alluvial fan (one of the main tributaries of the Tigris in Iraq), with particular attention to the relations between alluvial fan development, changes in channel pattern, the construction of irrigation networks and the rise and collapse of societies through historic times. The work largely draws on the use of remote sensing and GIS techniques for geomorphological mapping, and previously published archaeological field data (Adams 1965). By linking archaeological sites of known age with traces of ancient irrigation networks we were able to establish a chronological framework of alluvial activity of the Diyala alluvial fan. Our results demonstrate that centralized and technologically advanced societies were able to maintain a rapidly aggradading distibutary channel system, supplying water and sediment across the entire alluvial fan. As a consequence, during these periods (Parthian, Sasanian and again in modern times), significant human modification of the landscape took place. Periods of societal decline are associated with reduced human impact and the development of a single-threaded incising river system. Adams, R.M. (1965). Land behind Baghdad: A history of settlement on the Diyala plains. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois. Heyvaert, V.M.A. & Baeteman, C. (2008). A Middle to Late Holocene avulsion history of the Euphrates river: a case study from Tell ed-D-er, Iraq, Lower Mesopotamia. Quaternary Science Reviews, 27, 2401-2410. Heyvaert, V. M. A., Walstra, J., Verkinderen, P., Weerts, H. J. T. & Ooghe, B. (2012). The role of human interference on the channel shifting of the river Karkheh in the Lower Khuzestan plain (Mesopotamia, SW Iran). Quaternary International, 251, 52-63. Heyvaert, V.M.A., Walstra, J., Weerts, H.J.T. (2013). Human impact on avulsion and fan development in a semi-arid region: examples from SW Iran. Abstractbook of the 10th International Fluvial Sedimentology Conference, July 2013,Leeds, United Kingdom. Morozova, G.S. (2005). A review of Holocene avulsions of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers and possible effects on the evolution of civilizations in lower Mesopotamia. Geoarchaeology, 20, 401-423. Walstra, J., Heyvaert, V. M. A. & Verkinderen, P. (2010). Assessing human impact on alluvial fan development: a multidisciplinary case-study from Lower Khuzestan (SW Iran). Geodinamica Acta, 23, 267-285. Wilkinson, T.J. (2003). Archaeological Landscapes of the Near East. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, Arizona.

  7. Modeling the Surface Water-Groundwater Interaction in Arid and Semi-Arid Regions Impacted by Agricultural Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Wu, B.; Zheng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In many semi-arid and arid regions, interaction between surface water and groundwater plays an important role in the eco-hydrological system. The interaction is often complicated by agricultural activities such as surface water diversion, groundwater pumping, and irrigation. In existing surface water-groundwater integrated models, simulation of the interaction is often simplified, which could introduce significant simulation uncertainty under certain circumstance. In this study, GSFLOW, a USGS model coupling PRMS and MODFLOW, was improved to better characterize the surface water-groundwater interaction. The practices of water diversion from rivers, groundwater pumping and irrigation are explicitly simulated. In addition, the original kinematic wave routing method was replaced by a dynamic wave routing method. The improved model was then applied in Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe River Baisn), China, where the famous 'Silk Road' came through. It is a typical semi-arid region of the western China, with extensive agriculture in its oasis. The model was established and calibrated using the data in 2000-2008. A series of numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of those improvements. It has been demonstrated that with the improvements, the observed streamflow and groundwater level were better reproduced by the model. The improvements have a significant impact on the simulation of multiple fluxes associated with the interaction, such as groundwater discharge, riverbed seepage, infiltration, etc. Human activities were proved to be key elements of the water cycle in the study area. The study results have important implications to the water resources modeling and management in semi-arid and arid basins.

  8. Volcaniclastic alluvial fan sedimentation, northern Rio Grande rift

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.G.; Waresback, D.B.; Self, S.

    1986-05-01

    The Pliocene Puye Formation is a well-exposed, volcanogenic, alluvial fan sequence 150+ m thick, representing a range of volcaniclastic deposits (proximal, medial, and distal) that may be generated in response to long-lived, multicompositional (basaltic to rhyolitic) volcanism in a rift setting. The deposits are a composite of eruptives (effusives and pyroclastics) and epiclastics (reworked primary volcanics). An almost complete record of source-area volcanics (style, intensity, and composition) is preserved in the volcaniclastic fan deposits, as sedimentation rates were high and basinal subsidence was continuous because of concomitant rift downfaulting. At least eight silicic, primary airfall beds are interstratified through the fan deposits and provide a reliable stratigraphic control for establishing vertical and lateral lithofacies correlations. Proximal (inner fan) lithofacies include voluminous block-and-ash deposits that have downfan facies equivalents as pyroclastic flows and mudflows. Other proximal facies include very coarse clast-bearing debris flows, boulder-rich stream-channel and hyperconcentrated flood-flow deposits, and minor sheet-flood sequences. Medial (midfan) deposits display the greatest variability in lithofacies and provide details of the rate and intensity of volcanism by means of a distinctive vertical lithofacies assemblage: a basal plinian layer, stacked debris flows, and stacked mudflows, capped by a fluvial reworking phase of interstratified stream-channel and sheetflood deposits. Debris flows (clast and matrix rich), mudflows, and hyperconcentrated flood-flow deposits are abundant; the latter show evidence of transformation to mudflows with increasing transport distance, as they incorporate added fines (ash). Sheetflood deposits increase in number and thickness at the expense of stream-channel deposits.

  9. Inference of lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer using airborne transient electromagnetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Jesse E.; Pool, D.R.; Groom, R.W.; Davis, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    An airborne transient electromagnetic (TEM) survey was completed in the Upper San Pedro Basin in southeastern Arizona to map resistivity distributions within the alluvial aquifer. This investigation evaluated the utility of 1D vertical resistivity models of the TEM data to infer lithologic distributions in an alluvial aquifer. Comparisons of the resistivity values and layers in the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data to 1D resistivity models of ground TEM data, borehole resistivity logs, and lithologic descriptions in drill logs indicated that the airborne TEM identified thick conductive fine-grained sediments that result in semiconfined groundwater conditions. One-dimensional models of ground-based TEM surveys and subsurface lithology at three sites were used to determine starting models and constraints to invert airborne TEM data using a constrained Marquardt-styleunderparameterized method. A maximum structural resolution of six layers underlain by a half-space was determined from the resistivity structure of the 1D models of the ground TEM data. The 1D resistivity models of the airborne TEM data compared well with the control data to depths of approximately 100 m in areas of thick conductive silt and clay and to depths of 200 m in areas of resistive sand and gravel. Comparison of a 3D interpolation of the 1D resistivity models to drill logs indicated resistive (mean of 65 ohm-m ) coarse-grained sediments along basin margins and conductive (mean of 8 ohm-m ) fine-grained sediments at the basin center. Extents of hydrologically significant thick silt and clay were well mapped by the 1D resistivity models of airborne TEM data. Areas of uncertain lithology remain below conductive fine-grained sediments where the 1D resistivity structure is not resolved: in areas where multiple lithologies have similar resistivity values and in areas of high salinity.

  10. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic setting of sedimentary basins in the Sevier thrust belt and hinterland, eastern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.G. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Vandervoort, D.S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Suydam, J.D. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The eastern Great Basin contains a sparse record of broadly distributed Cretaceous sedimentary rocks which record: evolution of intermontane basins during development of the Sevier (Sv)contractional orogen and incipient extensional collapse of the elevated Sv hinterland (east-central NV), and complex tectono-sedimentary interactions between frontal thrust belt structures and the western margin of the adjacent foreland basin. Palinspastic restoration of these strata and associated structures to pre-Tertiary extension positions reveals a clearer pictures of Cretaceous basin paleogeography and allows comparison with the Puna/Altiplano plateau and precordillera thrust belt of the Neogene Andean orogen. Two syntectonic stratal assemblages are present in east-central NV. Lower Cretaceous alluvial strata (Newark Canyon Fm) record basin development coeval with emergence of contractional structures in the Sv hinterland. Localized early Cretaceous basins were possibly piggyback immature; periods of open drainage to the to the east and south suggest connection with the nascent Sv foreland basin to the east (Cedar Mountain/Sanpete Fms) prior to major thrust loading in central Utah. Development of hinterland structures is almost recorded by Aptian-Albian foreland basin alluvial deposits in SW Utah (Dakota Fm) and southern Nevada (Willow Tank Fm). Upper Cretaceous to Eocene strata (Sheep Pass Fm) record inception of regionally abundant alluvial-lacustrine basins which developed in response to onset of latest Cretaceous extension and associated collapse of the Sv hinterland. Evolution of the structurally complex western margin of the Sv foreland basin is recorded in Cretaceous through Eocene strata deposited in: piggyback basins which were at times hydrologically connected to the adjacent foreland basins, and thrust-proximal portions of the foreland basin. These proximal areas are characterized by folding and faulting of basin fill and development of intrabasinal unconformities.

  11. Empirical assessment of theory for bankfull characteristics of alluvial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampush, S. M.; Huzurbazar, S.; McElroy, B.

    2014-12-01

    We compiled a data set of 541 bankfull measurements of alluvial rivers (see supporting information) and used Bayesian linear regression to examine empirical and theoretical support for the hypothesis that alluvial channels adjust to a predictable condition of basal shear stress as a function of sediment transport mode. An empirical closure based on channel slope, bankfull channel depth, and median grain size is proposed and results in the scaling of bankfull Shields stress with the inverse square root of particle Reynolds number. The empirical relationship is sufficient for purposes of quantifying paleohydraulic conditions in ancient alluvial channels. However, it is not currently appropriate for application to alluvial channels on extraterrestrial bodies because it depends on constant-valued, Earth-based coefficients.

  12. Kinematic wave model of bed profiles in alluvial channels 

    E-print Network

    Tayfur, Gokmen; Singh, Vijay P.

    2006-06-21

    A mathematical model, based on the kinematic wave (KW) theory, is developed for describing the evolution and movement of bed profiles in alluvial channels. The model employs a functional relation between sediment transport rate and concentration, a...

  13. INTRODUCTION Mesopotamia is the broad, flat alluvial plain

    E-print Network

    deMenocal, Peter B.

    INTRODUCTION Mesopotamia is the broad, flat alluvial plain between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers to the headwaters of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from ca. 4300 to 4200 B.P. Particularly important

  14. The Shape of Trail Canyon Alluvial Fan, Death Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.; Dohrenwend, John C.

    1993-01-01

    A modified conic equation has been fit to high-resolution digital topographic data for Trail Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California. Fits were accomplished for 3 individual fan units of different age.

  15. Water sources accessed by arid zone riparian trees in highly saline environments, Australia.

    PubMed

    Costelloe, Justin F; Payne, Emily; Woodrow, Ian E; Irvine, Elizabeth C; Western, Andrew W; Leaney, Fred W

    2008-05-01

    The flow regimes of arid zone rivers are often highly variable, and shallow groundwater in the alluvial aquifers can be very saline, thus constraining the availability and quality of the major water sources available to riparian trees-soil water, shallow groundwater and stream water. We have identified water sources and strategies used by riparian trees in more highly saline and arid conditions than previously studied for riparian trees of arid zone rivers. Our research focused on the riparian species Eucalyptus coolabah, one of the major riparian trees of ephemeral arid zone rivers in Australia. The water sources available to this riparian tree were examined using delta(18)O isotope data from xylem, soil water, groundwater and surface water. Additionally, soil chloride and matric potential data were used to infer zones of water availability for root uptake. Despite the saline conditions, the trees used a mixture of soil water and groundwater sources, but they did not use surface water directly. The study identified three strategies used to cope with typically high groundwater and soil water salinities. Firstly, the trees preferentially grow in zones of most frequent flushing by infiltrating streamflow, such as the bank-tops of channels. Secondly, the trees limit water use by having low transpiration rates. Thirdly, the trees are able to extract water at very low osmotic potentials, with water uptake continuing at chloride concentrations of at least 20,000-30,000 mg L(-1). PMID:18270743

  16. Geomorphologic flood-hazard assessment of alluvial fans and piedmonts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, J.J.; Pearthree, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Geomorphologic studies are an excellent means of flood-hazard assessment on alluvial fans and piedmonts in the southwestern United States. Inactive, flood-free, alluvial fans display well developed soils, desert pavement, rock varnish, and tributary drainage networks. These areas are easily distinguished from flood-prone active alluvial fans on aerial photographs and in the field. The distribution of flood-prone areas associated with alluvial fans is strongly controlled by fanhead trenches dissecting the surface. Where fanhead trenches are permanent features cut in response to long-term conditions such as tectonic quiescence, flood-prone surfaces are situated down-slope from the mountain front and their positions are stable for thousands of years. Since the length and permanency of fanhead trenches can vary greatly between adjacent drainages, it is not appropriate to use regional generalizations to evaluate the distribution and stability of flood-hazard zones. Site-specific geomorphologic studies must be carried out if piedmont areas with a high risk of flooding are to be correctly identified and losses due to alluvial-fan flooding minimized. To meet the growing demand for trained professionals to complete geomorphologic maps of desert piedmonts, undergraduate and graduate geomorphology courses should adopt an instructional unit on alluvial-fan flood hazards that includes: 1) a review of geomorphologic characteristics that vary with surface age; 2) a basic mapping exercise; and 3) a discussion of the causes of fanhead trenching.

  17. The “Alluvial Mesovoid Shallow Substratum”, a New Subterranean Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, Vicente M.; Gilgado, José D.; Jiménez-Valverde, Alberto; Sendra, Alberto; Pérez-Suárez, Gonzalo; Herrero-Borgoñón, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new type of subterranean habitat associated with dry watercourses in the Eastern Iberian Peninsula, the “Alluvial Mesovoid Shallow Substratum” (alluvial MSS). Historical observations and data from field sampling specially designed to study MSS fauna in the streambeds of temporary watercourses support the description of this new habitat. To conduct the sampling, 16 subterranean sampling devices were placed in a region of Eastern Spain. The traps were operated for 12 months and temperature and relative humidity data were recorded to characterise the habitat. A large number of species was captured, many of which belonged to the arthropod group, with marked hygrophilous, geophilic, lucifugous and mesothermal habits. In addition, there was also a substantial number of species showing markedly ripicolous traits. The results confirm that the network of spaces which forms in alluvial deposits of temporary watercourses merits the category of habitat, and here we propose the name of “alluvial MSS”. The “alluvial MSS” may be covered or not by a layer of soil, is extremely damp, provides a buffer against above ground temperatures and is aphotic. In addition, compared to other types of MSS, it is a very unstable habitat. It is possible that the “alluvial MSS” may be found in other areas of the world with strongly seasonal climatic regimes, and could play an important role as a biogeographic corridor and as a refuge from climatic changes. PMID:24124544

  18. Calculations of Surface Radiation in Arid Regions--A Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Dah Chou; Guoliang Ji; Kuo-Nan Liou; Szu-Cheng S. Ou

    1992-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in the derivation of surface radiation budget in arid regions are studied using the surface and satellite data measured during the preliminary field experiment for the Land-Atmosphere Interactions Experiment conducted at the Heihe River basin in western China. The surface radiation is derived by coupling theoretical radiative calculations with satellite cloud retrievals. Comparisons with the surface measurements

  19. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

  20. Loess is the accumulation of dust, not evidence for aridity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Loess-paleosol sequences (LPS) are valuable terrestrial archives for Quaternary climate and environmental changes. The famous sections on the Chinese Loess Plateau, for example, document the alternation of warm and humid interglacials (paleosols) and cold and more arid glacials (loess). This, at least partly, reflects the weakening of the monsoonal circulation during glacials and has led to the notion that loess in general documents more arid conditions. Paleosols, on the other hand, are often interpreted to document more humid conditions. We studied the LPS Crvenka in the Carpathian Basin, southeast Europe, which spans the full last glacial cycle, and obtained results that do not fit the above concept: (i) The analysis of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes indicates the presence of deciduous trees and shrubs during glacials, i.e. sufficient precipitation for tree growth, whereas tree-less grass steppes seem to have prevailed during the Eemian, the last interglacial. (ii) Compound-specific deuterium analyses on the alkanes show only little changes on glacial-interglacial timescale. When compared with the isotopic enrichment of the Mediterranean Sea during the last glacial, this likely documents a combination of increased rainfall, reduced evapo-transpiration and reduced temperatures. (iii) Novel lipid biomarkers derived from soil bacteria (GDGTs, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers) also indicate humid glacials (BIT index close to 1) and more arid interglacials (BIT<0.8). Our results are in good agreement with modelling studies suggesting a southward shift of the westerlies during glacials, and aridization in the Mediterranean area in response to man-made global warming. More importantly, they remind us of an important fact: Loess is the accumulation of dust, but not (necessarily) evidence for aridity. Pedogenesis may simply not have been able to keep pace with high glacial dust accumulation rates related to intense glacial, periglacial and fluvial activity. Proxies independent of accumulation rates should be further developed and applied in LPS.

  1. Geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits of the North Canadian River from Oklahoma City to Eufaula Lake, central Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Havens, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the alluvial and terrace deposits along the North Canadian River between Lake Overholser and Eufaula Lake, an area of about 1,835 square miles, and to determine the maximum annual yield of ground water. A 1982 water-level map of the alluvial and terrace aquifer was prepared using field data and published records. Data from test holes and other data from the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board were used to establish the approximate thickness of the alluvial and terrace deposits. The North Canadian River from Lake Overholser, near Oklahoma City, to Eufaula Lake is paralleled by a 2- to 3-mile wide band of alluvium. Scattered terrace deposits on either side of the alluvium reach an extreme width of 8 miles. Rocks of Permian age bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from the west to the midpoint of the study area; Pennsylvanian rocks bound the alluvial and terrace deposits from that point eastward. Three major aquifers are present in the study area: the alluvial and terrace aquifer, consisting of alluvium and terrace deposits of Quaternary age in a narrow band on either side of the North Canadian River; the Garber-Wellington aquifer of Permian age, consisting of an upper unconfined zone and a lower confined zone separated by relatively impermeable shales; and the Ada-Vamoosa aquifer of Pennsylvanian age. At locations were the alluvial and terrace aquifer overlies either of the other aquifers, there is hydraulic continuity between the alluvial and terrace aquifer and the other aquifers, and water levels are the same. Most large-scale municipal and industrial pumping from the Garber-Wellington aquifer is from the lower zone and has little discernible effect upon the alluvial and terrace aquifer. The total estimated base flow of the North Canadian River for the studied reach is 264 cubic feet per second. Evapotranspiration from the basin in August is about 60 cubic feet per second for the North Canadian River from Lake Overholser to a measuring station above Eufaula Lake. Estimated recharge rates to the alluvial and terrace aquifer in the basin range from 1.7 inches at the west edge of the study area to 7.0 inches at the east edge. Total permitted withdrawal from the aquifer, according to records of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, ranged from 2,107 acre-feet per year in 1942 to about 21,415 acre-feet per year in 1982. Simulations of the alluvial and terrace aquifer from Lake Overholser to Eufaula Lake were made using a finite-difference model developed by McDonald and Harbaugh (1984). The area of the aquifers was subdivided into a finite-difference grid having 30 rows and 57 columns with cells measuring 1 mile in the north-south direction and 2 miles in the east-west direction. The model was calibrated in two steps: A steady-state calibration simulated head distribution prior to extensive pumping of the aquifer in 1942, and a transient calibration simulated head distribution after extensive pumpage. The final horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the alluvial and terrace aquifer was 0.0036 feet per second (310 feet per day) at all locations. The recharge rate for the alluvial and terrace aquifer ranged from 1.7 inch per year in the west to 7.0 inches per year in the east, and averaged about 3.3 inches per year. A specific yield of 15 percent was used for the transient simulation. Permitted pumpage for 1942 through 1982 was used in the digital model to estimate the annual volume of water in storage in the alluvial and terrace aquifer for the years for this time period. The 1982 permitted pumpage rates were used for projections for 1983 to 2020. The estimated volume of water in storage was 1,940,000 acre-feet in 1982. Because the estimated recharge rate is equal to the allowed pumpage rate in 1982, the projected volume of water in storage in both 1993 and 2020 was 1,890,000 acre-feet.

  2. A discontinuity in the late Pleistocene alluvial deposits, Hwacheon-ri, Gyeongju, Korea: Occurrences and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, In Sung; Kyeong Seol, Weon; Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Ho Il; Kang, Hee Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary discontinuity surface occurs in the late Pleistocene alluvial deposits exposed along the cliff (about 10 m thick and over 140 m in length) in stream side, Gyeongju, Korea. The discontinuity surface is laterally extensive and marked by distinct carbonaceous dark horizon in the middle part of the deposits. The deposits are divided into lower and upper units by the discontinuity surface. The lower unit overlies unconformably the Cretaceous andesitic rock (basement), and consists of braided-river deposits. Lower part of the lower unit is mainly composed of lenticular-bedded and clast-supported conglomeratic deposits, whereas gray to dark gray sandy to muddy channel-plug deposits occur in the uppermost part of the lower unit. It is characteristic that iron-oxide crusts occur in the lower unit. They are cutting across the lower unit and truncated by the overlying upper unit. Rootlets mineralized by vivianite are present in the channel-plug deposits below the discontinuity surface. The upper unit overlying the lower unit with erosive contact (discontinuity surface) is mostly composed of matrix-supported conglomeratic alluvial fan deposits. Hornfelsic gravels are common in the lower unit, whereas andesitic gravels are predominant in the upper unit, suggesting the provenance change from the lower unit to the upper unit. OSL ages for the lower and the upper units are 125±9 ka and 94±9 ka, respectively, suggesting that the lower unit was deposited in MIS5e and the upper unit was formed in MIS5c to 5b. It is thus interpreted that the shift of depositional environment from a fluvial plain (lower unit) to an alluvial fan (upper unit) was an alluvial response to sea level change inducing fall of base level in an alluvial basin from the interglacial to the glacial stages. The development of iron-oxide crusts and diagenetic vivianite in the discontinuity surface suggest that humid condition persisted during the paleoclimatic shift from the last interglacial to the last glacial stages. Key words: Late Pleistocene, Alluvial deposits, Discontinuity, Iron-oxides, Vivianite

  3. BIOGEOCHEMICAL FLUXES ACROSS PIEDMONT SLOPES OF THE JORNADA BASIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is an overview of recent studies of the movement of water, sediment, and nutrients across a principle piedmont slope, or bajada, of the Jornada Basin. Bajadas are extensive, gently sloping surfaces formed by the coalescence of alluvial fans and are a major landscape component of the bas...

  4. Understanding Hydrologic Processes in Semi-Arid Cold Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, M. E.; Beutel, M.; Lamb, B.; Watts, R.

    2004-12-01

    Water shortages destabilize economies and ecosystems. These shortages are caused by complex interactions between climate variability, ecosystem processes, and increased demand from human activities. In the semi-arid region of the northwestern U.S., water availability during drought periods has already reached crisis levels and the problems are expected to intensify as the effects of global climate change and population growth continue to alter the supply and demand patterns. Many of the problems are critical to this region because hydropower, agriculture, navigation, fish and wildlife survival, water supply, tourism, environmental protection, and water-based recreation are vital to state economies and our way of life. In order to assess the spatial and temporal nature of hydrologic responses, consistent and comprehensive long-term data sets are needed. In response to these needs, we would like to propose the Spokane River drainage basin as a long-term hydrologic observatory. The Spokane River basin is located in eastern Washington and northern Idaho and is a tributary of the Columbia River. The watershed consists of several major surface water tributaries as well as natural and man-made lakes and reservoirs. With headwaters beginning in the Rocky Mountains, the drainage area is approximately 6,640 mi2. In addition to providing an excellent study area for examining many conventional water resource problems, the Spokane River watershed also presents a unique opportunity for investigating many of the hydrologic processes found in semi-arid cold climates. Snowfall in the watershed varies spatially between 35 inches near the mouth of the basin to over 112 inches at the headwaters. These varied hydrologic uses provide a unique opportunity to address many common challenges faced by water resource professionals. This broad array of issues encompasses science, engineering, agriculture, social sciences, economics, fisheries, and a host of other disciplines. In addition, because precipitation patterns in this semi-arid region tend to be temporally distributed, storage and global climate change issues are significant.

  5. Problems and Prospects of SWAT Model Application on an Arid/Semi-Arid Watershed in Arizona

    EPA Science Inventory

    In arid/semi-arid regions, precipitation mainly occurs during two periods: long-duration, low-intensity rainfall in winter; and short-duration, high-intensity rainfall in summer. Watersheds in arid/semi-arid regions often release water almost immediately after a storm due to spa...

  6. Tectonics of the Pliocene Loreto basin, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and evolution of the Gulf of California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Umhoefer; Rebecca J. Dorsey; Paul Renne

    1994-01-01

    The Pliocene Loreto basin is a transtensional basin, exposed just north of Loreto, Baja California Sur, that consists of nonmarine to marine sedimentary rocks and interbedded tuffs. On the basis of stratigraphic study and 40Ar\\/39Ar dating of tuffs, the southern Loreto basin began to form at ˜3.4 Ma as an alluvial basin with moderate rates of subsidence (<0.4 mm\\/yr). Between

  7. An Isotopic Investigation of Groundwater Recharge in the East Mesa Area of the Salton Sea Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Moran; A. F. Tompson; Z. Demir

    2008-01-01

    The Salton Sea Basin, a closed topographic basin located in arid southeastern California and a portion of Baja California, Mexico, is home to some of the most productive agricultural lands in the United States. In the Imperial Valley, in the southern portion of the basin, groundwater use is limited owing to the wide availability of imported water, low urban demand,

  8. Event scale variability of mixed alluvial-bedrock channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kristen; Turowski, Jens; Hovius, Niels

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between flood events and fluvial behavior is critical for understanding how rivers may respond to the changing hydrologic forcing that may accompany climate change. In mixed bedrock-alluvial rivers, the response of the system to a flood event can be affected by a large number of factors, including coarse sediment availability in the channel, sediment supply from the hillslopes, bedrock-controlled changes in channel width and planform, and the shape of the hydrograph. We use the Daan River Gorge in western Taiwan as a case study to directly observe the effect of individual flood events on channel evolution. The 1200 m long and up to 20 m deep bedrock gorge formed in response to uplift of the riverbed during the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake. The extremely rapid pace of change ensures that flood events have measurable and often dramatic effects on the channel. Taiwan is subject to both summer typhoons and a spring monsoon, resulting in numerous channel-altering floods with a range of magnitudes. Discharge is therefore highly variable, ranging from 5 to over 2000 m3/s, and changes in the channel are almost entirely driven by discrete flood events. Since early 2009 we have monitored changes in the gorge with repeated RTK GPS surveys, laser rangefinder measurements, and terrestrial LIDAR surveys. Six rainfall stations and five water level gauges provide hydrological data for the basin. We find a distinct relationship between flood magnitude and the magnitude of geomorphic change; however, we do not find a clear relationship between flood characteristics and the direction of change - whether the channel experienced aggradation or erosion in a particular flood. Upstream coarse sediment supply and the influence of abrupt changes in channel width on bedload flux through the gorge appear to have important influences on the channel response. The better understand these controls, we use the model sedFlow (Heimann et al., 2014) to explore the effects of interactions between sediment supply, channel width, and flood characteristics on aggradation and erosion of the channel bed. Heimann, F. U. M., Rickenmann, D., Turowski, J. M., and Kirchner, J. W.: sedFlow - an efficient tool for simulating bedload transport, bed roughness, and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams, Earth Surf. Dynam. Discuss., 2, 733-772, doi:10.5194/esurfd-2-733-2014, 2014.

  9. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell's interpretation. ?? 1989.

  10. A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1

    E-print Network

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 subsequent management for beneficial use. GIS-based modeling and evaluation is another tool to evaluate-basin of the Rio Puerco basin to the Rio Grande. Objective The objective of this work is to utilize a GIS platform

  11. A summary of methods for the collection and analysis of basic hydrologic data for arid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rantz, S.E.; Eakin, T.E.

    1971-01-01

    This report summarizes and discusses current methods of collecting and analyzing the data required for a study of the basic hydrology of arid regions. The fundamental principles behind these methods are no different than those that apply to studies of humid regions, but in arid regions the infrequent occurrence of precipitation, the great variability of the many hydrologic elements, and the inaccessibility of most basins usually make it economically infeasible to use conventional levels of instrumentation. Because of these economic considerations hydrologic studies in arid regions have been commonly of the reconnaissance type; the more costly detailed studies are generally restricted to experimental basins and to those basins that now have major economic significance. A thorough search of the literature and personal communication with workers in the field of arid-land hydrology provided the basis for this summary of methods used in both reconnaissance and detailed hydrologic studies. The conclusions reached from a consideration of previously reported methods are interspersed in this report where appropriate.

  12. ARID1B is a specific vulnerability in ARID1A-mutant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Helming, Katherine C.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wilson, Boris G.; Vazquez, Francisca; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Manchester, Haley E.; Kim, Youngha; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Aguirre, Andrew J.; Jagani, Zainab; Wang, Zhong; Garraway, Levi A.; Hahn, William C.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have revealed that ARID1A is frequently mutated across a wide variety of human cancers and also has bona fide tumor suppressor properties. Consequently, identification of vulnerabilities conferred by ARID1A mutation would have major relevance for human cancer. Here, using a broad screening approach, we identify ARID1B, a related but mutually exclusive homolog of ARID1A in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, as the number one gene preferentially required for the survival of ARID1A-mutant cancer cell lines. We show that loss of ARID1B in ARID1A-deficient backgrounds destabilizes SWI/SNF and impairs proliferation. Intriguingly, we also find that ARID1A and ARID1B are frequently co-mutated in cancer, but that ARID1A-deficient cancers retain at least one ARID1B allele. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A and ARID1B alleles cooperatively promotes cancer formation but also results in a unique functional dependence. The results further identify ARID1B as a potential therapeutic target for ARID1A-mutant cancers. PMID:24562383

  13. Spatial and temporal dynamics of vegetation in the San Pedro River basin area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Qi; R. C. Marsett; M. S. Moran; D. C. Goodrich; P. Heilman; Y. H. Kerr; G. Dedieu; A. Chehbouni; X. X. Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Changes in climate and land management practices in the San Pedro River basin have altered the vegetation patterns and dynamics. Therefore, there is a need to map the spatial and temporal distribution of the vegetation community in order to understand how climate and human activities affect the ecosystem in the arid and semi-arid region. Remote sensing provides a means to

  14. Structure of Alluvial Valleys from 3-D Gravity Inversion: The Low Andarax Valley (Almería, Spain) Test Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Antonio G.; Carmona, Enrique; García-Jerez, Antonio; Sánchez-Martos, Francisco; Prieto, Juan F.; Fernández, José; Luzón, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a gravimetric study (based on 382 gravimetric stations in an area about 32 km2) of a nearly flat basin: the Low Andarax valley. This alluvial basin, close to its river mouth, is located in the extreme south of the province of Almería and coincides with one of the existing depressions in the Betic Cordillera. The paper presents new methodological work to adapt a published inversion approach (GROWTH method) to the case of an alluvial valley (sedimentary stratification, with density increase downward). The adjusted 3D density model reveals several features in the topography of the discontinuity layers between the calcareous basement (2,700 kg/m3) and two sedimentary layers (2,400 and 2,250 kg/m3). We interpret several low density alignments as corresponding to SE faults striking about N140-145°E. Some detected basement elevations (such as the one, previously known by boreholes, in Viator village) are apparently connected with the fault pattern. The outcomes of this work are: (1) new gravimetric data, (2) new methodological options, and (3) the resulting structural conclusions.

  15. Modern alluvial fan and deltaic sedimentation in a foreland tectonic setting: the Lower Mesopotamian Plain and the Arabian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Frédéric; Purser, Bruce H.

    1990-05-01

    The Arabo-Persian Gulf, generally considered as a classical carbonate basin, in fact also includes important terrigenous systems whose nature and geometry are related closely to the tectonic framework. The Gulf is bordered along its northeastern periphery by an active alpine system which constitutes a major source of both siliceous and calcareous detritus. There are four types of terrigenous discharge which are classified according to their structural relationships. Numerous alluvial fans terminate ephemeral consequent streams draining the flanks of anticlines forming the external parts of the Zagros Mountain belt. Alluvial-fan deltas studied in detail in southeastern Iran terminate semi-permanent streams which flow along major synclinal axis. They are composed mainly of fine carbonate detritus, part of which accumulates as spectacular marine mud banks. Two major types of delta occur. Relatively small marine deltas, associated with permanent antecedent streams which cross the Zagros fold system, are scattered along the Persian shoreline. The other is the a major deltaic complex which is associated with the Tigris-Euphrates Rivers. This system has prograded along the main axis of the Gulf, the resulting Mesopotamian Plain filling at least half of the original basin which, in early Quaternary times, extended from Hormuz to Syria.

  16. A noncalibrated rainfall-runoff model for large, arid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J.; Leibundgut, C.; Greenbaum, N.; Schick, A. P.

    1999-07-01

    A distributed, field-based rainfall-runoff model was developed for the 1400-km2 arid catchment of Nahal Zin, Israel. No calibration with measured flow data was performed. The model used rainfall radar input applied over a catchment that was spatially disaggregated into different terrain types according to hydrologically relevant surface characteristics. Hortonian overland flow generation on each type was parameterized independently using values of initial loss and temporal decay of infiltration determined from existing field experiments. Delimited by topography, this catchment wide pattern of rainfall excess was distributed over 850 tributary catchments (model elements). Runoff delivery from the model elements to the adjoining channel segments was timed by applying a mean response function determined in an environmentally similar experimental catchment. Inside the channel network the MVPMC3 method of the Muskingum-Cunge technique was used for streamflow routing, accounting for channel dimensions and roughness. For each channel segment a constant infiltration rate was applied to account for transmission losses and discontinued when the wetting front reached the bottom of the available alluvial storage. Within two model tests, one separate for the routing component (October 1979) and one for the complete model (October 1991), observed hydrographs and reconstructed peak discharges were successfully simulated. The spatially distributed model output showed that during the October 1991 test, tributaries produced preceding peaks that wetted the channel alluvium before the main flood had arrived and transmission losses lost their significance downstream. Total maximum model uncertainty was estimated including the uncertainty ranges of each model parameter. In general, this study shows that field-based data on generation and losses of runoff may be incorporated into a distributed hydrologic model to overcome calibration with the poor data records of arid high-magnitude events.

  17. A review of the stratigraphy and sedimentary environments of the Karoo-aged basins of Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. M. H.; Eriksson, P. G.; Botha, W. J.

    1993-02-01

    The Karoo Basin of South Africa was one of several contemporaneous intracratonic basins in southwestern Gondwana that became active in the Permo-Carboniferous (280 Ma) and continued to accumulate sediments until the earliest Jurassic, 100 million years later. At their maximum areal extent, during the early Permian, these basins covered some 4.5 million km 2. The present outcrop area of Karoo rocks in southern Africa is about 300 000 km 2 with a maximum thickness of some 8000 m. The economic importance of these sediments lies in the vast reserves of coal within the Ecca Group rocks of northern and eastern Transvaal and Natal, South Africa. Large reserves of sandstone-hosted uranium and molybdenum have been proven within the Beaufort Group rocks of the southern Karoo trough, although they are not mineable in the present market conditions. Palaeoenvironmental analysis of the major stratigraphic units of the Karoo succession in South Africa demonstrates the changes in depositional style caused by regional and localized tectonism within the basin. These depocentres were influenced by a progressive aridification of climate which was primarily caused by the northward drift of southwestern Gondwana out of a polar climate and accentuated by the meteoric drying effect of the surrounding land masses. Changing palaeoenvironments clearly influenced the rate and direction of vertebrate evolution in southern Gondwana as evidenced by the numerous reptile fossils, including dinosaurs, which are found in the Karoo strata of South Africa, Lesotho, Namibia and Zimbabwe. During the Late Carboniferous the southern part of Gondwana migrated over the South Pole resulting in a major ice sheet over the early Karoo basin and surrounding highlands. Glacial sedimentation in upland valleys and on the lowland shelf resulted in the Dwyka Formation at the base of the Karoo Sequence. After glaciation, an extensive shallow sea covered the gently subsiding shelf, fed by large volumes of meltwater. Marine clays and muds accumulated under cool climatic conditions (Lower Ecca Group) including the distinctive Mesosaurus-bearing carbonaceous shales of the Whitehill Formation. Subduction of the palaeo-Pacific plate reslted in an extensive chain of mountains which deformed and later truncated the southern rim of the main Karoo Basin. Material derived from these "Gondwanide" mountains as well as from the granitic uplands to the north-east, accumulated in large deltas that prograded into the Ecca sea (Upper Ecca Group). The relatively cool and humid climate promoted thick accumulations of peat on the fluvial and delta plains which now constitute the major coal reserves of southern Africa. As the prograding deltas coalesced, fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the Beaufort Group were laid down on broad gently subsiding alluvial plains. The climate by this time (Late Permian) had warmed to become semi-arid with highly seasonal rainfall. Vegetation alongside the meander belts and semi-permanent lakes supported a diverse reptilian fauna dominated by therapsids or "mammal-like reptiles". Pulses of uplift in the southern source areas combined with possible orographic effects resulted in the progadation of two coarse-grained alluvial fans into the central parts of the basin (Katberg Sandstone Member and Molteno Formation). In the upper Karoo Sequence, progressive aridification and tectonic deformation of the basin through the late Triassic and early Jurassic led to the accumulation, in four separate depositories, of "redbeds" which are interpreted as fluvial and flood-fan, playa and dune complexes (Elliot Formation). This eventually gave way to westerly wind-dominated sedimentation that choked the remaining depositories with fine-grained dune sand. The interdune areas were damp and occasionally flooded and provided a habitat for small dinosaurs and the earliest mammals. During this time (Early Jurassic), basinwide volcanic activity began as a precursor to the break-up of Gondwana in the late Jurassic and continued until the early Cretaceous. This

  18. Water resources in basin-fill deposits in the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, B.R.; Myers, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Tularosa Basin, a faulted intermontane depression in south-central New Mexico, contains a thick sequence of alluvial and lacustrine deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age. Most of these sediments are saturated with very saline water. Freshwater supplies (dissolved solids concentration < 1000 mg/L) principally are found in alluvial fans located around the basin margin. On the eastern side of the Tularosa Basin, fresh groundwater supplies are limited to alluvial fan deposits from Grapevine Canyon to about 3 mi south of Alamogordo. Data from surface geophysical surveys indicate that about 1.4 to 2.1 million acre-ft of freshwater may be in storage in this area, not all of which is recoverable. An additional 3.6 to 5.4 million acre-ft of slightly saline water (dissolved solids concentration 1000 to 3000 mg/L) may be in storage in the same area, again not all of which is recoverable. On the western side of the Tularosa Basin, alluvial fans in the vicinity of Rhodes Canyon may contain freshwater. Geophysical data indicate the freshwater zone may be as thick as 1500 ft in places; however, the limited number of wells in this area precludes a precise definition of the volume of freshwater in storage. To the south, freshwater is present in alluvial fans associated with the Ash Canyon drainage system. Geophysical data indicate that perhaps as much as 450,000 acre-ft of freshwater, not all recoverable, may be in storage in this area. Fan deposits between Ash Canyon and Rhodes canyon may contain additional freshwater supplies. Possibly 10.7 million acre-ft of freshwater, not all of which is recoverable, may be in storage on the western side of the Tularosa Basin. Possibly 180 million acre-ft of brine (concentrations of dissolved solids exceeding 35,000 mg/L), not all of which is recoverable, may be in storage in the Tularosa Basin. Information is sparse concerning the capability of saline aquifers in the Tularosa Basin to store and transmit fluid. (Author 's abstract)

  19. Engineering Geology, 154, pp.80-86, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enggeo.2012.12.016 Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences M-francois.semblat@ifsttar.fr) 3 ENIT, Tunis, Tunisia ABSTRACT This paper aims at the analysis of seismic wave amplification in a deep alluvial basin in the city of Tunis in Tunisia. This sedimentary basin is 3000m wide and 350m deep

  20. Late Quaternary alluvial fans at the eastern end of the San Bernardino Mountains, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Lewis A.; Clemmens, Samuel J.; Finkel, Robert C.; Gray, Harrison

    2014-03-01

    Alluvial fans at the eastern end of the San Bernardino Mountains in Southern California provide a record of climate modulated sediment transfer and erosion, and are deformed and displaced in places by active faults. Alluvial fans within two study areas, the Mission Creek and the Whitewater River drainages, were examined using geomorphic, sedimentological, and 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) surface exposure methods to define the timing of alluvial fan formation and erosion, and to examine the role of climatic, tectonic and autocyclic processes. These alluvial fan complexes were studied because they are amongst the best-preserved successions of alluvial fans in southern California and they are located at the mouths of two of the largest drainages, Whitewater River and Mission Creek, in the San Bernardino Mountains and traverse major faults, the Mission Creek and Banning. The alluvial fans comprise bouldery debris deposits that represent deposition dominated by flash flood and debris flow events. TCN surface exposure dating indicates that abandonment/incision of alluvial fan surfaces date to early in the Last Glacial or more likely the penultimate glacial cycle, to marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, and to the Holocene. The lack of alluvial fan ages during the latter part of the Last Glacial (MIS 2 and 3) suggests that there has been little alluvial fan lobe deposition/incision during that time. This is similar to findings for many other alluvial fans throughout the American Southwest, and supports the view that there is a strong climatic control on alluvial fan formation throughout this region. Furthermore, the oldest alluvial fan surfaces in the Mission Creek region are beheaded by the Whitewater River drainage, showing that the oldest alluvial fans in the Mission Creek region underwent significant capture by the Whitewater River drainage. This shows the autocyclic controls are also important on alluvial fan evolution in this region; but the importance of these processes to alluvial fan development in other regions of the American Southwest needs to be more fully assessed. The alluvial fans in the Mission Creek area traverse the Mission Creek fault, but are not deformed by it, which suggests that there may have been little if any movement along this fault since at least MIS 4. In contrast, alluvial fans in the Whitewater River study are displaced by active faults highlighting the influence of tectonism on alluvial fan development in this region. In addition to illustrating the importance of climatic controls on the development of alluvial fans in the American Southwest, a classic region for alluvial fan studies, this study illustrates the complex mixture of autocyclic and allocyclic factors that force alluvial fan development in tectonically active settings.

  1. Seasonal Solute Cycling by Evapotranspiration and Flooding in a Semi-Arid Delta: The Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Molwalefhe, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Okavango River in semi-arid northwestern Botswana flows into an endorheic basin where its distributaries are developed on a large alluvial fan to form the dispersal system of the Okavango Delta. The river and its distributaries support a large pristine wetland complex which they inundate annually for 4 to 6 months. The semi-arid climate subjects the river and tributaries to high rates of evapotranspiration causing about 96% of the inflow into Botswana to be lost within the Delta. As an endorheic basin, it is one of the few river systems for which solutes are cycled entirely within the terrestrial system. We hypothesized that the seasonal flood pulse initiated by discharge from tropical Angola and the dense vegetation and hot climate cause variable response to influx, the temporal and spatial distribution and the recycling of solutes. Over a period of two years, we made hourly measurements of water levels, water temperature and electrical conductivity at four select locations distributed spatially across the Okavango Delta. We used SolonistTM level, temperature and conductivity loggers to record the readings. One of our objective was to document changes in water level that reflect flooding and non flooding conditions, water temperature which reflect seasonality and electrical conductivity which approximated the aqueous solute behavior. A second objective was to assess the timing and behavior of the aqueous solutes on a seasonal and short term (daily) basis in order to elucidate the effects of flooding and vegetation on the solute behavior. The flood pulse which enters the delta in February-March is highly attenuated by the redistribution in the distributaries and flooding of the wetlands. Discharge decreases from upstream to downstream due to this and the effects of evapotranspiration. The seasons are clearly observed in the water temperatures with higher water temperatures in the wet summer season and lower temperatures in the dry winter season. Overall, the aqueous solute concentration in the delta is generally higher in the wet summer season due to evapotranspiration and lower in the dry winter season due to dilution by flood waters. The solute concentration increase from upstream to downstream due to the longer residence time of water in the delta and greater exposure to evapotranspiration with distance downstream. During the winter when flooding occurs, the aqueous solute concentration increase initially during the rising limb of the flood pulse before decreasing as continued flooding of the delta continues. We suggest that the initial increase in the aqueous solute concentration is due to dissolution of solutes that accumulated in the floodplains and numerous islands from evapotranspiration in the summer and flushing of the solutes into the river and distributaries. The effect of vegetative evapo-concentration is observed on a diel basis with markedly higher solute concentrations during the day and lower concentrations at night. We conclude that evapotranspiration has a pronounced effect in controlling the aqueous solute concentration and its downriver concentration. In addition, previously precipitated solutes on land are cycled to river water by the initial phase of flooding.

  2. Aridity threshold in controlling ecosystem nitrogen cycling in arid and semi-arid grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Dongwei; Wu, Honghui; Lü, Xiaotao; Fang, Yunting; Cheng, Weixin; Luo, Wentao; Jiang, Ping; Shi, Jason; Yin, Huaqun; Zhou, Jizhong; Han, Xingguo; Bai, Edith

    2014-09-01

    Higher aridity and more extreme rainfall events in drylands are predicted due to climate change. Yet, it is unclear how changing precipitation regimes may affect nitrogen (N) cycling, especially in areas with extremely high aridity. Here we investigate soil N isotopic values (?15N) along a 3,200?km aridity gradient and reveal a hump-shaped relationship between soil ?15N and aridity index (AI) with a threshold at AI=0.32. Variations of foliar ?15N, the abundance of nitrification and denitrification genes, and metabolic quotient along the gradient provide further evidence for the existence of this threshold. Data support the hypothesis that the increase of gaseous N loss is higher than the increase of net plant N accumulation with increasing AI below AI=0.32, while the opposite is favoured above this threshold. Our results highlight the importance of N-cycling microbes in extremely dry areas and suggest different controlling factors of N-cycling on either side of the threshold.

  3. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapors In Unsaturated Alluvial Sand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Höhener; C. Duwig; G. Pasteris; N. Dakhel; K. Kaufmann; D. Werner

    2002-01-01

    Biodegradation rates are critical parameters in models aimed at predicting the nat- ural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone. In this study the kinetic rate laws for the aerobic biodegradation of selected petroleum hydrocarbons and MTBE were investigated in unsaturated alluvial sand exposed to the vapors from a fuel mixture. Laboratory column and batch experiments were

  4. HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF BASEFLOW AND BANK STORAGE IN ALLUVIAL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents analytical solutions, which describe the effect of time-variable net recharge (net accretion to water table) and bank storage in alluvial aquifers on the sustenance of stream flows during storm and inter-storm events. The solutions relate the stream discharge,...

  5. On Earthquake Ground Motion and Structural Response in Alluvial Valleys

    E-print Network

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    On Earthquake Ground Motion and Structural Response in Alluvial Valleys By Jacobo Bielak 1 , Member amplification and structural dam­ age due to local site conditions in sedimentary valleys during earthquakes the 1988 Armenia Earthquake. A more realistic two­dimensional finite element analysis is performed herein

  6. Intelligent mapping of alluvial aquifer characteristics in the Otago region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Michael; Rawlinson, Zara; Westerhoff, Rogier

    2015-04-01

    We adopt a hybrid approach to map the 3D hydrostratigraphy of an alluvial aquifer using big data collected in the Ettrick basin, Otago New Zealand. First, a subset (1%) of the 18 million regional helicopter frequency-domain electromagnetic (HEM) sounding measurements (300 Hz, Horizontal co-planar; 3300 Hz, vertical co-planar; 8200 Hz, horizontal co-planar; 40 kHz, horizontal co-planar; 137 kHz horizontal coplanar) and their numerically-inverted 1D resistivity (50¬-100 ?-m) profiles are randomly split. For example, 50% of these data are used for training an unsupervised machine-learning (ML) network, and 50% of these data are used for performance at independent locations. The remaining set of HEM measurements are then presented to the vetted ML network to estimate regional resistivity structure which is compared to previously inverted resistivity. Second, about 50 borehole autocorrelation functions are computed based on cross-component correlations of quantized borehole locations sampled for lithology and HEM sounding data. Third, an unsupervised ML network is trained and performance tested using sparse borehole lithology (fractions of sand, silt, clay, mudstone, schist) and hydraulic properties (storage, hydraulic conductivity), and those HEM sounding data occurring within a radius defined by the maximum borehole autocorrelation distances. Fourth, this ML network is then used together with independent HEM sounding measurements to map the spatial distribution of physical aquifer properties and hydraulic properties across the basin.

  7. Probable flood predictions in ungauged coastal basins of El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.; Smith, M.E.; Chica, A.M.E.; Litke, D.

    2008-01-01

    A regionalization procedure is presented and used to predict probable flooding in four ungauged coastal river basins of El Salvador: Paz, Jiboa, Grande de San Miguel, and Goascoran. The flood-prediction problem is sequentially solved for two regions: upstream mountains and downstream alluvial plains. In the upstream mountains, a set of rainfall-runoff parameter values and recurrent peak-flow discharge hydrographs are simultaneously estimated for 20 tributary-basin models. Application of dissimilarity equations among tributary basins (soft prior information) permitted development of a parsimonious parameter structure subject to information content in the recurrent peak-flow discharge values derived using regression equations based on measurements recorded outside the ungauged study basins. The estimated joint set of parameter values formed the basis from which probable minimum and maximum peak-flow discharge limits were then estimated revealing that prediction uncertainty increases with basin size. In the downstream alluvial plain, model application of the estimated minimum and maximum peak-flow hydrographs facilitated simulation of probable 100-year flood-flow depths in confined canyons and across unconfined coastal alluvial plains. The regionalization procedure provides a tool for hydrologic risk assessment and flood protection planning that is not restricted to the case presented herein. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  8. Do invasive riparian Tamarix alter hydrology of riparian areas of arid and semi-arid regions under climate change scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, M. P.; Acharya, K.; Chen, L.

    2012-12-01

    Competitiveness of riparian invasive species, Tamarix, in arid and semi-arid riparian areas of the southwestern United States under climate change scenario (SRES A2) was investigated. Tamarix has been replacing native vegetation along the riparian corridors of these areas for the past several decades and is thought to alter water balance. Changes in depth to groundwater, soil moisture distribution and flood frequency are critical in survival and growth of a facultative phreatophyte such as Tamarix. In this study, a fully coupled 2d surface flow and 3d subsurface flow hydrologic model, HydroGeoSphere, was used to simulate surface-subsurface hydrology of the lower Virgin River basin (4500 sq. km), located in Nevada, Utah and Arizona. The hydrologic model results, depth to groundwater and soil saturation, were then applied to the species distribution model, Maxent, along with other bioclimatic parameters to asses future Tamarix distribution probability. Simulations were made for the climate scenarios of the end of 21st centry conditions. Depth to groundwater is found to be the most important predictor variable to the Maxent model. Future Tamarix distribution range is not uniform across the basin. It is likely to decrease at lower elevations and increase in some higher elevation areas.

  9. Regional variation of As concentration in alluvial plain: An insight obtained from Mankyeong River plain, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Zhu, W.; Lee, E.; Ko, K.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    The arsenic (As) concentrations in the groundwater of alluvial plains generally show high spatial variability. We geochemically explored the regional variation of As concentration from Mankyeong River floodplain. Even though its watershed is very small, it shows a close similarity to the Ganger-Megna-Bramaputra Plain of Bengal Basin in the occurrence of As-rich groundwater. Therefore, a precise investigation of the study area can provide important clues for the mechanisms causing the spatial variation of As concentrations in Bangladesh. We collected 163 groundwater samples from 122 shallow wells placed into the alluvial aquifer and analyzed for pH, Eh, alkalinity, DOC, As, Fe, Mn, Cl, SO4, NO3, NH4, PO4-P. 42 wells out of the investigated wells show As concentrations exceeding the drinking water limit (10 ug/L) and they are mostly distributed as a zone apart from the coast likely to those in Bangladesh. The As-rich groundwaters show high alkalinity, Fe, Mn, PO4, NH4, and DOC levels and very low NO3 and SO4 levels, indicating that the reductive dissolution of iron oxide is the main mechanism mobilizing As. In contrast, groundwater generally shows very low As and Fe concentrations in the coastal zone even though the waters are under much stronger reducing condition. Our results show that the limited supply of SO4 caused the high As concentration in the inland. But As concentrations were low in the coastal zone due to SO4 supplied by seawater intrusion. Very high alkalinity was observed in the coastal zone due to sulfate reduction, and which also plays a role decreasing As concentration by precipitating carbonate minerals such as siderite and rhodocrosite.

  10. Geostatistical simulations of alluvial sandbodies in the Triassic series of the Chaunoy field, France

    SciTech Connect

    Eschard, R.; Desaubliaux, G.; Eemouzy, P. (Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)); Bacchiana, C.; Parpant, J.; Chautru, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    Chaunoy field, the largest oil field of the Paris basin, is exploiting heterogeneous reservoirs deposited during the Triassic in a large alluvial fan/lacustrine complex. The construction of a realistic reservoir model is difficult in such a setting because of the highly complex architecture of single reservoir units. Geostatistical simulations therefore have been performed to take into account the reservoir heterogeneities in the fluid flow modeling. A first layering has been determined from sedimentological and sequence stratigraphic analysis. The series was deposited in an alluvial outer fan environment. A lower siliciclastic member shows four heterogeneous sand sheets (7 m thick), which have been correlated across the field. Each of them is made up of stacked single channel sequences. The sand sheets are separated by extensive lacustrine and flood plain mudstone layers acting as permeability barriers. An upper siliciclastic/dolomitic member has been divided into two units with porous conglomeratic channels interfingered with cemented lagoonal dolomites. Proportional curves in lithofacies have confirmed this layering, showing the continuity of the permeability barriers, and the variogram analysis has shown that the well spacing is larger than the channel width. Simulations in lithofacies have been performed with the Heresim software using three different variogram ranges (small, medium, and large values). Because a good correlation exists between the lithofacies and the petrophysical attributes, a transcription of the lithofacies simulations into petrophysical attributes therefore was easy and realistic. Scaling-up techniques have given fluid-flow models corresponding to the three correlation ranges. Comparison of the global results of the fluid flow simulations with the observed production history enabled us to choose the more relevant case. The the model using the selected correlation range helped determine optimum well spacing.

  11. Experimental alluvial fan evolution: Channel dynamics, slope controls, and shoreline growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Meredith D.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2012-06-01

    River deltas and alluvial fans have channelization and deposition dynamics that are not entirely understood, but which dictate the evolution of landscapes of great social, economic, and ecologic value. Our lack of a process-based understanding of fan dynamics hampers our ability to construct accurate prediction and hazard models, leaving these regions vulnerable. Here we describe the growth of a series of experimental alluvial fans composed of a noncohesive grain mixture bimodal in size and density. We impose conditions that simulate a gravel/sand fan prograding into a static basin with constant water and sediment influx, and the resulting fans display realistic channelization and avulsion dynamics. We find that we can describe the dynamics of our fans in terms of a few processes: (1) an avulsion sequence with a timescale dictated by mass conservation between incoming flux and deposit volume; (2) a tendency for flow to reoccupy former channel paths; and (3) bistable slopes corresponding to separate entrainment and deposition conditions for grains. Several important observations related to these processes are: an avulsion timescale that increases with time and decreases with sediment feed rate; fan lobes that grow in a self-similar, quasi-radial pattern; and channel geometry that is adjusted to the threshold entrainment stress. We propose that the formation of well-defined channels in noncohesive fans is a transient phenomenon resulting from incision following avulsion, and can be directly described with dual transport thresholds. We present a fairly complete, process-based description of the mechanics of avulsion and its resulting timescale on our fans. Because the relevant dynamics depend only on threshold transport conditions and conservation of mass, we show how results may be directly applied to field-scale systems.

  12. Sediment-water interaction as a control on geochemical evolution of playa lake systems in the Australian arid interior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Arakel; G. Jacobson; W. B. Lyons

    1990-01-01

    Saline playa lakes represent major geomorphic and hydrologic components of internal drainage basins in the arid to semiarid interior of Australia. These lakes mark the outcrop areas of regional shallow groundwater; thus, they are effective hydro-chemical sinks for elemental concentration and authigenic formation of carbonate, evaporite, and silica\\/silicate minerals.

  13. The Correlation Analysis of Vegetation Variable Process and Climate Variables in Alpine-Cold Wetland in Arid Area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Dou; Xi Chen; Anming Bao; Geping Luo; Guli Japper; Junli Li

    2008-01-01

    Bayinbuluk alpine-cold wetland is an intermountain basin located in the middle of the Tienshan Mountains in Xinjiang, arid area. Some researches showed that there is a high correlation between the growth of vegetation and the meteorological factors (precipitation, temperature). In this paper, to quantify this correlation a study is carried out with MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) 16-day composites

  14. The role of hydraulic lift on seedling establishment under a nurse plant species in a semi-arid environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iván Prieto; Francisco M. Padilla; Cristina Armas; Francisco I. Pugnaire

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic lift (HL) has been shown to improve performance of species occurring next to a plant engaged in HL, but whether this process plays an important role in seedling survival and growth in arid environments remains largely unknown. Here, we tested the influence of HL on the interaction between Retama sphaerocarpa, a nurse lifter shrub from western Mediterranean basin, and

  15. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Young, R. R.; Huth, N.

    2012-04-01

    The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr-1 rainfall, potential evapotranspiration >2000 mm yr-1) such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB). In this rare study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8-1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0-2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91-229 t ha-1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ? 10 m depth that was not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m-1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5), whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m-1) with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3-9.5 mm yr-1 (0.7-2.1% rainfall) based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent soil water content, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total), and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge appears to be negligible due to low rainfall and large potential evapotranspiration, transient hydrological conditions after changes in land use and a thick clay dominated vadose zone. This is in contrast to regional groundwater modelling that assumes annual recharge of 0.5% of rainfall. Importantly, it was found that leaching from episodic deep drainage could not cause discharge of saline groundwater in the area, since the water table was several meters below the incised river bed.

  16. Implications of deep drainage through saline clay for groundwater recharge and sustainable cropping in a semi-arid catchment, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timms, W. A.; Young, R. R.; Huth, N.

    2011-11-01

    The magnitude and timing of deep drainage and salt leaching through clay soils is a critical issue for dryland agriculture in semi-arid regions (<500 mm yr-1 rainfall), such as parts of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB). In this unique study, hydrogeological measurements and estimations of the historic water balance of crops grown on overlying Grey Vertosols were combined to estimate the contribution of deep drainage below crop roots to recharge and salinization of shallow groundwater. Soil sampling at two sites on the alluvial flood plain of the Lower Namoi catchment revealed significant peaks in chloride concentrations at 0.8-1.2 m depth under perennial vegetation and at 2.0-2.5 m depth under continuous cropping indicating deep drainage and salt leaching since conversion to cropping. Total salt loads of 91-229 t ha-1 NaCl equivalent were measured for perennial vegetation and cropping, with salinity to ?10 m depth that is not detected by shallow soil surveys. Groundwater salinity varied spatially from 910 to 2430 mS m-1 at 21 to 37 m depth (N = 5), whereas deeper groundwater was less saline (290 mS m-1) with use restricted to livestock and rural domestic supplies in this area. The Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) software package predicted deep drainage of 3.3-9.5 mm yr-1 (0.7-2.1% rainfall) based on site records of grain yields, rainfall, salt leaching and soil properties. Predicted deep drainage was highly episodic, dependent on rainfall and antecedent, and over a 39 yr period was restricted mainly to the record wet winter of 1998. During the study period, groundwater levels were unresponsive to major rainfall events (70 and 190 mm total), and most piezometers at about 18 m depth remained dry. In this area, at this time, recharge negligible due to low rainfall and large potential evapotranspiration, transient hydrological conditionsafter changes in land use and a thick clay dominated vadose zone. This is in contrast to regional groundwater modelling that assumes annual recharge of 0.5% of rainfall. Importantly, it was found that leaching from episodic deep drainage could not cause discharge of saline groundwater in the area, since the water table was several meters below the incised river bed.

  17. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their 13C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2?kg C m?2, which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21–49?g C m?2 year?1) than SOC (10–39?g C m?2 year?1) over 0–20?cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China. PMID:26091554

  18. Carbon accumulation in arid croplands of northwest China: pedogenic carbonate exceeding organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Jiaping; Xu, Minggang; Zhang, Wenju; Fan, Tinglu; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbonate (SIC) exceeds organic carbon (SOC) greatly in arid lands, thus may be important for carbon sequestration. However, field data for quantifying carbonate accumulation have been lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of SIC dynamics and its role in carbon sequestration. We analyzed two datasets of SOC and SIC and their (13)C compositions , one with over 100 soil samples collected recently from various land uses in the Yanqi Basin, Xinjiang, and the other with 18 archived soil samples from a long-term experiment (LTE) in Pingliang, Gansu. The data from the Yanqi Basin showed that SOC had a significant relationship with SIC and pedogenic carbonate (PIC); converting shrub land to cropland increased PIC stock by 5.2?kg C m(-2), which was 3.6 times of that in SOC stock. The data from the LTE showed greater accumulation of PIC (21-49?g C m(-2) year(-1)) than SOC (10-39?g C m(-2) year(-1)) over 0-20?cm. Our study points out that intensive cropping in the arid and semi-arid regions leads to an increase in both SOC and PIC. Increasing SOC through straw organic amendments enhances PIC accumulation in the arid cropland of northwestern China. PMID:26091554

  19. Rainbow Basin, CA mapping project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joan Fryxell

    Rainbow Basin is just north of Barstow, CA, and is an excellent badlands-style exposure of the Barstow syncline in the Miocene Barstow Formation. In the first mapping class, their assignment is to map the basic geology of the basin, using a couple of distinctive marker beds within the Barstow Formation. Several faults postdate the fold, and three different ages of alluvial deposits occur within the basin. We camp in the nearby Owl Canyon campground, and spend three days in the field. More time could be spent with an introductory class, but three suffices to get most of the basin on the map. They are charged with writing up descriptions of the rock units they encounter. From the field map, students transfer information to an office copy, add a map explanation, and draw a cross-section through the map area. Mapping is done on a topographic map, specifically developed for the basin, with 10-foot contour intervals. This is a proprietary map, so permission is needed for its use.

  20. Progress and prospects of climate change impacts on hydrology in the arid region of northwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaning; Li, Zhi; Fan, Yuting; Wang, Huaijun; Deng, Haijun

    2015-05-01

    The arid region of Northwest China, located in the central Asia, responds sensitively to global climate change. Based on the newest research results, this paper analyzes the impacts of climate change on hydrology and the water cycle in the arid region of Northwest China. The analysis results show that: (1) In the northwest arid region, temperature and precipitation experienced "sharply" increasing in the past 50 years. The precipitation trend changed in 1987, and since then has been in a state of high volatility, during the 21st century, the increasing rate of precipitation was diminished. Temperature experienced a "sharply" increase in 1997; however, this sharp increasing trend has turned to an apparent hiatus since the 21st century. The dramatic rise in winter temperatures in the northwest arid region is an important reason for the rise in the average annual temperature, and substantial increases in extreme winter minimum temperature play an important role in the rising average winter temperature; (2) There was a significant turning point in the change of pan evaporation in the northwest arid area in 1993, i.e., in which a significant decline reversed to a significant upward trend. In the 21st century, the negative effects of global warming and increasing levels of evaporation on the ecology of the northwest arid region have been highlighted; (3) Glacier change has a significant impact on hydrology in the northwest arid area, and glacier inflection points have appeared in some rivers. The melting water supply of the Tarim River Basin possesses a large portion of water supplies (about 50%). In the future, the amount of surface water will probably remain at a high state of fluctuation. PMID:25682220

  1. Tracing the lateral movement of sediments through a shrubland environment using fallout radionuclides, Jornada Basin, Southern New Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Semi-arid grassland and savanna communities in many parts of the world have been displaced by woody shrubs. In the Jornada Basin of southern New Mexico, the displacement of perennial grasslands is well documented beginning in 1858. As shrubs invade semi-arid perennial grasslands, the length, number,...

  2. Trace Elements in Coalbed Methane Produced Water Interacting with Semi-Arid Ephemeral Stream Channels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Patz; K. J. Reddy; Q. D. Skinner

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the chemistry of trace elements in coalbed methane (CBM) discharge water reacting\\u000a with semi-arid ephemeral stream channels in Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The study area consisted of two ephemeral streams,\\u000a Burger Draw and Sue Draw. These streams are tributaries to the perennial Powder River, Wyoming. Samples were collected bimonthly\\u000a from three CBM

  3. A conjunctive use hydrologic model for a semi-arid region with irrigated agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. Ruud; T. Harter

    2003-01-01

    A GIS-based sub-basin scale conjunctive use (CU) model is developed for a semi-arid agricultural area in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The study area is 2230 square kilometers, and consists of 9114 individual landuse units and 26 water service districts. The CU model consists of three sub-models: 1) a surface water supply (SWS) model, 2) an unsaturated zone water

  4. The timing of alluvial activity in Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, John A.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Mangold, Nicolas; Calef, Fred; Grotzinger, John P.

    2014-02-01

    The Curiosity rover's discovery of rocks preserving evidence of past habitable conditions in Gale crater highlights the importance of constraining the timing of responsible depositional settings to understand the astrobiological implications for Mars. Crater statistics and mapping reveal the bulk of the alluvial deposits in Gale, including those interrogated by Curiosity, were likely emplaced during the Hesperian, thereby implying that habitable conditions persisted after the Noachian. Crater counting data sets and upper Peace Vallis fan morphology also suggest a possible younger period of fluvial activation that deposited ~10-20 m of sediments on the upper fan after emplacement of the main body of the fan. If validated, water associated with later alluvial activity may have contributed to secondary diagenetic features in Yellowknife Bay.

  5. Bahia Adair and vicinity, Sonora: modern siliciclastic-dominated arid macrotidal coastline

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, B.E.; Sinitiere, S.M.; Williams, L.J.

    1989-03-01

    The northwestern Sonoran coastline, in the vicinity of Bahia Adair, combines several important geologic features. The arid landward environments are dominated by the dunes of the Gran Desierto and the surrounding alluvial fans and ephemeral streams. The Colorado River, whose delta lies to the northwest, has been an important source of sediment until very recently. The high tidal energy of the region has profoundly influenced the distribution and geometries of coastal and shallow-marine sand bodies, and the active tectonic setting has also played a role. The Cerro Prieto splay of the San Andreas fault system has been responsible for local uplift and downwarp and resulting transgression and regression. The intertidal and supratidal zones are dominated by sand and constitute a sand-body type that has been seldom considered by petroleum explorationists or other students of ancient sand bodies, and the associated evaporites are rather different from those described from the superficially analogous Persian Gulf sabkhas.

  6. A successful borehole drilled by cryogenic drilling in an arid, unconsolidated soil with boulders

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnaro, P.; Simon, R.D.; Cooper, G.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-07-01

    An 80 foot deep borehole was drilled using a novel cryogenic drilling method. The freeze while drilling technique stabilizes the borehole wall while drilling by using conventional air rotary methods but with low temperature nitrogen gas (as cold as {minus}196 C) as the drilling fluid. The location of the field test was a semi-arid alluvial unconsolidated sedimentary formation at the Aerojet, Inc. site in Rancho Cordova, California. The geology was a sandy soil matrix containing cobbles and boulders. The test goal was to drill to 100 feet (30 m), but the test was terminated at 80 feet due to a failure of the swivel shaft and drill bit resulting from the very rough drilling conditions. No safety, technical, or operational problems were encountered that could prevent cryogenic drilling from becoming a standard technique for drilling in unstable near-surface formations.

  7. New constraints on the uplift history of the western Andes, north Chile, using cosmogenic He-3 in alluvial boulders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenstar, Laura; Stuart, Finlay; Hartley, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    To constrain mechanisms responsible for mountain belt growth independent methods for determining accurately the rate and timing of surface uplift are needed. Within the Central Andes paleoelevation proxies are afflicted by either large uncertainties or reliance on assumptions about past climate-elevation histories (Barnes and Ehmer. 2009). This leads to paleoelevation data being unable to distinguish between the two main uplift models of the Andes; gradual uplift of the Andes from the Late Eocene due to crustal shortening/thickening, and rapid uplift in the Late Miocene due to large-scale mantle delamination (Barnes and Ehmer. 2009). Here we present a new paleoelevation tool based on the varying production rate of in situ cosmogenic isotopes with elevation. It can constrain surface uplift histories independently of paleoclimatic fluctuations, making it potentially more accurate than previous methods. Within the Atacama Desert Northern Chile, a stable arid-hyperarid climate has persisted over the last 23 Ma (Dunai et al. 2005). This has lead to exceptionally low erosion rates and high cosmogenic nuclide concentrations within alluvial boulders overlying the Pacific Planation Surface (PPS). In the Aroma Quebrada region, the PPS can be constrained as forming post 13.4 Ma, using underlying volcanics (Evenstar 2007). Alluvial boulders that lie on this PPS have high concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 that suggest deposition soon after surface formation. Comparing concentrations of cosmogenic 3He in the boulders to those calculated for varying uplift histories the timing of the uplift of the western margin of the Andes can be constrained. The models require the Pacific Planation Surface to reach at least 2/3 of its current elevation by 13.4 Ma. These results are not consistent with rapid uplift of the Andes due to mantle delamination in the Late Miocene but support progressive shortening and thickening of continental crust initiating in the Early Miocene or earlier.

  8. Identification of Chromatin Remodeling Genes Arid4a and Arid4b as Leukemia Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Yi; Eldin, Karen W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Leukemia evolves through a multistep process from premalignancy to malignancy. Epigenetic alterations, including histone modifications, have been proposed to play an important role in tumorigenesis. The involvement of two chromatin remodeling genes, retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (Rbbp1/Arid4a) and Rbbp1-like 1 (Rbbp1l1/Arid4b), in leukemogenesis was not characterized. Methods The leukemic phenotype of mice deficient for Arid4a with or without haploinsufficiency for Arid4b was investigated by serially monitoring complete blood counts together with microscopic histologic analysis and flow cytometric analysis of bone marrow and spleen from the Arid4a?/? mice or Arid4a?/?Arid4b+/? mice. Regulation in bone marrow cells of downstream genes important for normal hematopoiesis was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Genotypic effects on histone modifications were examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Young (2–5 months old) Arid4a-deficient mice had ineffective blood cell production in all hematopoietic lineages. Beyond 5 months of age, the Arid4a?/? mice manifested monocytosis, accompanied by severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. These sick Arid4a?/? mice showed bone marrow failure with myelofibrosis associated with splenomegaly and hepatomegaly. Five of 42 Arid4a?/? mice and 10 of 12 Arid4a?/?Arid4b+/? mice progressed to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and had rapid further increases of leukocyte counts. Expression of Hox genes (Hoxb3, Hoxb5, Hoxb6, and Hoxb8) was decreased in Arid4a-deficient bone marrow cells with or without Arid4b haploinsufficiency, and FoxP3 expression was reduced in Arid4a?/?Arid4b+/? bone marrow. Increases of histone trimethylation of H3K4, H3K9, and H4K20 (fold increases in trimethylation = 32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 27 to 32; 45, 95% CI = 41 to 49; and 2.2, 95% CI = 1.7 to 2.7, respectively) were observed in the bone marrow of Arid4a-deficient mice. Conclusions Arid4a-deficient mice initially display ineffective hematopoiesis, followed by transition to chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)–like myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorder, and then transformation to AML. The disease processes in the Arid4a-deficient mice are very similar to the course of events in humans with CMML and AML. This mouse model has the potential to furnish additional insights into the role of epigenetic alterations in leukemogenesis, and it may be useful in developing novel pharmacological approaches to treatment of preleukemic and leukemic states. PMID:18728284

  9. Stratigraphy and stable isotope results from an Eocene-Miocene section of the western Qaidam Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Garzione, C. N.; Pullen, A.; Chang, H.; Molnar, P. H.

    2012-12-01

    The climate of central Asia has changed significantly throughout the Cenozoic, with surface uplift of the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau cited as the primary cause of the change. However, the timing and mechanisms of plateau uplift, especially the northern plateau, is still unclear. Sedimentary basin deposits and their stable isotopic composition record both paleo-environment and paleoclimate information and thus can be used to study the climate evolution and ultimately-the surface uplift history. The Qaidam Basin, in the northern part of the Tibetan Plateau, deposited thick fluviolacustrine sediments from Eocene to Pleistocene time. Here, we report a newly documented 4440 m long sedimentary section near Huatugou town in the western Qaidam Basin, and preliminary O and C stable isotope results from sedimentary carbonates. The section includes four formations. Xiaganchaigou Formation (XGCG Fm), with a late Eocene age, is dominated by alluvial to fluvial conglomerates, sandstones and sandy mudstones in the lower part, and siltstones, mudstones with gypsum of lacustrine origin in the upper part. The Oligocene Shangganchaigou Formation (SGCG Fm) and early to middle Miocene Xiayoushashan Formation (XYSS Fm) both consist mainly of lacustrine mudstones, siltstones, sandstones, intercalated with marls, limestones and minor conglomerates. The late Miocene Shangyoushashan Formation (SYSS Fm, the lower part) is dominated by alluvial to delta-front conglomerates, gravelly sandstones and siltstones; paleosols with root traces are also common in this formation. Between 232 and 1196 m (XGCG Fm), both the ?18O (VPDB) and ?13C (VPDB) values of marls show large variability between -3.3 and -8.9‰ and between 0.7 and -2.7‰, respectively. Between 1196 and 2524 m (SGCG Fm), the ?18O values of marls and limestones show a more narrow range of lower values between -7.0 and -8.6‰, and the ?13C values decrease to between -1.5 and -4.9‰. We speculate that the large variability in XGCG Fm resulted from late Eocene climate cyclicity, followed by decreasing ? values related to global cooling during the Eocene-Oligocene transitions and cooling associated with the horizontal translation of the Basin to higher latitudes. From 2500 to 3500 m (XYSS Fm), there is a more pronounced decrease in the ?18O values of paleosols and carbonate cements to between -8.2 and -10.0‰, but their ?13C values show large variations between -0.6 and -6.8‰. A plausible explanation for these changes is localized climate perturbations associated with the growth of surrounding mountain ranges. At the top of the section, between 3500 and 4400 m (XYSS and SYSS Fm), both the ?18O and ?13C values of paleosols and carbonate cements show a positive shift by 1 to 2‰. This positive shift is interpreted as the result of mid-Miocene aridification, a regional climatic change event that was also documented in Tarim Basin, eastern Qaidam Basin, and in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Extreme aridity that is comparable to present day is not recorded in the Huatuguo section, most likely because these deposits predate the Plio-Pleistocene time period when modern conditions were established.

  10. Lateral groundwater inflows into alluvial aquifers of main alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    In alpine regions the topography is mainly characterised by deep incised valleys, mountain slopes and ridges. Usually the main valleys contain aquifers in alluvial soft rock. Lateral these aquifers are confined by mountainous hard rock slopes covered by heterogeneous sediments with different thickness. The slopes can be incised by lateral valleys. Numerical models for the main alluvial aquifers ask for lateral hydrogeological boundaries. Usually no flow boundaries or Constant head Boundaries are used, even if the lateral inflows to the main aquifers are rarely known. In this example a data set for a detailed investigated and monitored area is studied to give an answer on the location and the quantification of these lateral subsurface inflows. The study area is a typical main alpine valley with a thick alluvial aquifer (appr. 120m thick), lateral confined by granite, covered at the base of the steep slopes by quaternary sediments (Burger at al. 2012). The study consists of several steps 1.) Analytical calculation of the inflows on the base of investigated and monitored 2d profiles along fault zones (Perello et al 2013) which pinch out in the main valley 2.) Analytical models along typical W-dipping slopes with monitored slope springs 3.) Evaluating temperature and electrical conductivity profiles measured in approx. 30 groundwater wells in the alluvial aquifers and along the slopes to locate main lateral subsurface inflows 4.) Output of a regional model used for the hydrogeological back analyses of the excavation of a tunnel (Baietto et al. 2014) 5.) Output of a local numerical model calibrated with a monitoring dataset and results of a pumping test of big scale (450l/s for 10days) Results of these analyses are shown to locate and quantify the lateral groundwater inflows in the main alluvial aquifer. References Baietto A., Burger U., Perello P. (2014): Hydrogeological modelling applications in tunnel excavations: examples from tunnel excavations in granitic rocks; congress of IAEG, Engineering Geology for Society and Territory, Torino Burger U., San Nicoló L. Bösel D. und Perello P. (2012): Hydrogeologische Modelle - Hilfsmittel für die Planung am Beispiel des Brenner Basistunnel, Beiträge zur Beiträge zur COGeo 2011, Salzburg COGEO Perello P., Baietto A., Burger U., Skuk S. (2013): Excavation of the Aica-Mules pilot tunnel for the Brenner base tunnel: information gained on water inflows in tunnels in granitic massifs, Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering, DOI 10.1007/s00603-013-0480-x

  11. Semi-Arid Landscapes: The Canary in the Climate-Change Coalmine (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. L.; Poulos, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The balance between precipitation as a driving force of sediment transport (via hillslope erosional processes) or a resisting force (via increases in vegetation cover) is reflected by the landforms and denudation rates in semi-arid landscapes. While exact values vary, studies examining the relationship between land surface lowering and mean annual precipitation show a ';sweet spot' of peak denudation rates for semi-arid landscapes receiving ~300-500 mm precipitation/year. Ongoing and future climate change necessitates the investigation of how landscapes may respond as they move towards or away from this erosional threshold; semi-arid landscapes on the edge of ecohydrologic thresholds (e.g. treelines) may experience dramatic environmental changes as ongoing and future climate change alters ecosystems. Semi-arid landscapes are the equivalent to canaries in a coal-mine, and studying them advances understanding of how other sensitive landscapes may respond to climate change. Landforms, however, are a product of thousands to millions of years of climatic forcing. Direct measurement of both short and long-term erosion rates is complicated, and observations of modern erosional processes may not reflect the past. Over 10 years of environmental data collected in the heavily instrumented Dry Creek Experimental Watershed (DCEW) outside Boise, Idaho facilitates 2nd order analysis of climate-driven environmental variability across a large area (27 km2). Multi-scaled analyses relate runoff production from pedons to catchments, and erosion rates and processes from hillslopes to landforms, while prior mapping results (Poulos et al, 2012) allow application of results to similar semi-arid montane landscapes. Preliminary data reveal intriguing, but counterintuitive, feedbacks among soil properties, hillslope hydrology, ecology, and drainage development. Despite steeper slope angles, north-facing slopes have thicker soils than south-facing slopes, suggesting slower erosion rates. This conflicts with theories of hillslope processes which predict that erosion rates increase and soil thicknesses decrease with increasing slope angles. Could future increases in temperatures and decreased vegetation push north-facing slopes beyond a geomorphic tipping point, where their soils and drainages erode like south-facing slopes? Also, shallower soils and reduced plant cover on south-facing slopes appear to limit soil water storage and evapotranspiration, culminating in increased runoff and streamflow from these relatively drier ecosystems. What impact do these pedon- and hillslope-scale differences in runoff have on catchment-scale drainage erosion, incision and expansion? Finally, while landforms and erosion rates reflect, to some degree, the annual to centennial-scale climate conditions and precipitation events, episodic events such as wildfires exert a major control on erosion rates. Alluvial fans act as natural (albeit a bit leaky) sediment traps for hillslope erosion from 1st order drainage systems, while charcoal fragments in alluvial fan stratigraphic sequences provide both evidence of fire, and (through 14C dating) a means to estimate erosion rates. Ongoing fire studies in the DCEW, combined with surveys of alluvial fan sediment volumes, will reveal 1) the contribution of fire events to overall erosion rates, 2) variability in erosion rates between north and south facing slopes and 3) changes in Holocene fire activity with changes in climate.

  12. Experimental Drainage Basins in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laronne, J. B.; Lekach, J.; Cohen, H.; Gray, J.

    2002-12-01

    Within the hyper-arid to semiarid areas of Israel are three experimental drainage basins. They are the Nahal (stream in Hebrew) Yael, subdivided into five sub-basins, Rahaf-Qanna'im (main and tributary, respectively) and Eshtemoa. These basins vary in drainage area and climate, and in monitoring duration and type. All are drained by gravel-bed channels. As the size of monitored drainage area is limited, 3-4 additional representative basins covering areas of 300, 1000, 2000 and 8000 square kilometers will likely be implemented in the next decade. The basins have precipitation, runoff, sediment and fluviomorphological records. Each was conceived for differing purposes, but all share the common two objectives for the continuous monitoring: 1. Many hydrological issues may be approached if, and only if, there are prototype databases on a wide spectrum of hydrological processes; and 2. There is a need for long-term records to assess large floods and subsequent hydrologic and geomorphic recovery. Lessons derived from a large number of research projects on these experimental basins focus on characteristics of runoff in arid climates. For example, the effect of the spatial distribution of rainfall on runoff generation becomes increasingly important with aridity. Rainfall angle on hillslopes and storm intensity and direction derived from rainfall recorders and radar backscatter are crucial for explanation of runoff response. Runoff hydrographs tend to have more bores, shorter-duration peaks, briefer recessions, longer dry periods, and are more variable in terms of flood volume and peaks with increased aridity. Suspended-sediment fluxes, yields and concentrations are relatively large in the semiarid realm, reaching maxima at the beginning of a flood season and after long dry spells. Bedload fluxes are exceptionally high from dryland basins in which hillslopes are minimally vegetated and where bedload transport takes place in channels lacking an armor layer. Bedload/suspended-sediment load ratios increase with aridity. Bedload yield may represent up to 70% of the total load. Hillslope to channel connectivity is high in drylands. In the hyperarid region suspended-sediment sources are hillslopes and the coarser, sandy fraction of the channel bedmaterial. The depth of channel bed activity is indicated by a fluvio-pedogenic unit beneath the channel surface. National and regional hydrological research needs will dictate future global monitoring in experimental basins. International collaboration may bring about considerable cost reduction by exclusion of monitoring aspects that can be evaluated based on the monitoring in other, similar conditions. Advanced international collaboration on validation and calibration of and consistency in monitoring means, as well as syntheses of lessons derived from international collaboration, such as from an International Watershed Research Network, are required for maximizing our understanding of water and sediment responses in varied global regions.

  13. Groundwater replenishment analysis by using natural isotopes in Ejina Basin, Northwestern China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yinghua Zhang; Y. Wu; J. Su; X. Wen; F. Liu

    2005-01-01

    The Ejina Basin underlying complex aquifers is located in the lower reaches of the Heihe River with an arid climate and 40 mm mean annual precipitation. As the balance of the natural ecosystem in the Ejina Basin is fragile and easily upset, it is very important to estimate and rationally use the limited groundwater resources to maintain the balance. Water samples

  14. Study on ecological environment evolution law in Junggar basin based on RS and GIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Zhang; Wen-ke Wang; Ze-yuan Yang; Hai-min Shang; Xue-jun Liu

    2011-01-01

    Junggar basin, located in the northwest arid areas of China, has vulnerable supeUgene ecological environment because of natural and anthropic factors. In this paper, based on the relationship between groundwater and ecological environment and combined with natural and geographical conditions, Junggar basin is divided into five ecosystem types: mountain, natural oasis, artificial oasis, natural water and desert. According to the

  15. Effects of basin edge on the distribution of damage in 1995 Dinar, Turkey earthquake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Bak?r; M. Y. Özkan; S. C?l?z

    2002-01-01

    An earthquake of magnitude ML=5.9 occurred in Dinar, a town located at the edge of an alluvial basin in Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. Inflicted structural damage throughout the town was highly concentrated in a region located on the alluvium and adjacent to the rock outcrop bounding the eastern side of the town. As an attempt to explain this discrepancy, possible effects

  16. Sedimentology and geochemistry of carbonates from lacustrine sequences in the Madrid Basin, central Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Calvo; B. F. Jones; M. Bustillo; R. Fort; A. M. Alonso Zarza; C. Kendall

    1995-01-01

    Lacustrine and alluvial carbonate facies have been investigated in Middle Miocene successions of the western side of the Madrid Basin in order to evaluate paleoenvironments in which carbonates formed. Carbonate facies are varied and include: (1) calcrete and dolocrete; (2) pond deposits; (3) lake margin dolostone; (4) mudflat carbonate; and (5) open-lake carbonate facies. The dominant mineralogy of these is

  17. The role of tropical cyclones on landscape dynamics in southern Baja California, Mexico based on Late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Eric; Antinao, Jose Luis; Rhodes, Edward J.; Brown, Nathan; Gosse, John

    2015-04-01

    Region-wide alluvial records provide evidence that time-transgressive changes in climate can be a major driver of landscape evolution. Historically, landfall of eastern Pacific tropical cyclones in southwestern North America during the late summer and early fall provide the strongest storms that have demonstrated geomorphic impact on the landscape. The alluvial fan record of the southern portion of Baja California (Mexico) was investigated to determine if linkages exist between region-wide fluvial deposits and tropical cyclones. The regional distribution and Pleistocene to Holocene morphostratigraphy of alluvial fans has been established for the southern portion of Baja California with primary focus on the La Paz and San José del Cabo basins. Six discrete morphopedosedimentary alluvial units (Qt1 through Qt6) were differentiated across the region using a combination of geomorphologic mapping, sedimentological analysis, and soil development further reinforced with geochronology using radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence and cosmogenic depth-profiles. A first phase of regional aggradation began before ~ 100 ka (Qt1) and culminated ~10 ka (Qt4). After deposition of Qt4, increasing regional incision of older units and the progressive development of a channelized alluvial landscape coincide with deposition of Qt5 and Qt6 units in a second, incisional phase. All units are conformed of multiple 1-3 m thick alluvial packages deposited in upper-flow regime and representing individual storms. Aggradational units (Qt1-Qt4) covered broad (>2 km) channels in the form of sheetflood deposition while incisional stage deposits are mostly confined to channels of ~0.5-2 km width. Continuous deposition of the thicker sequences is demonstrated by closely spaced luminescence dates in vertical profiles. In a few places disconformities between major units are evident and indicated by partly eroded buried soils. Analysis of historical terraces as part of the younger units incised into older fans show that deposition was accomplished by large tropical cyclone events. Older units feature the same sedimentological traits as these historical deposits. We interpret the whole sequence as indicating discrete periods during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene when climatic conditions allowed large tropical cyclone events that today are not expressed. These discrete periods can be associated with specific periods when (a) insolation at the Equator was at peaks determined by precessional cycles and (b) the Tropical Pacific might have shown a state similar to that currently displayed during El Niño events.

  18. Remote sensing classification of the arid watersheds of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaimani, Karim; Habibnejad-Roshan, Mahmud

    2002-01-01

    Iran's most obvious hydroclimatic problems are compounded of the disadvantages of scanty and highly seasonal precipitation and a surface configuration which tends to concentrate moisture on the periphery of the country, leaving its vast heart an area of irreconcilable sterility. Most of the central Iran has arid conditions with dry and hot summer months, when streams with and the land is parched. Nowhere in Iran is there an annual surplus of water, and significant seasonal surpluses occur in only the wishbone of high mountains that encloses the central plateau on the north and west. In most parts (about 80 percent of the total of country) the nature of human activity depends upon the availability of surface water that can be tapped by wells and qantas. Runoff is episodic and occurs only because the precipitation, meagre as it is momentarily exceeds the infiltration capability of the surface. Such precipitation is not of course capricious in terms of quantity, location and distribution in time. For more accurate investigation, remote sensing data was used to overcome the large area. Finally for arid basins, combined data from remote sensing (Cosmos and Aerial photographs) data and topography maps provided significant results.

  19. Controls of the water and sediment fluxes on alluvial fans morphology: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerit, Laure; Delorme, Pauline; Métivier, François; Lajeunesse, Eric; Devauchelle, Olivier; Barrier, Laurie

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fans are major sedimentary bodies that make the transition between the reliefs in erosion and the sedimentary basins, where deposition occurs. Understanding their dynamics of formation and evolution is a great problem of sediment transport, which leads to a better understanding of the control exerted by the water and sediment fluxes on the fan morphology. At the cost of several simplifications, we propose a totally predictive model for one-dimensional fans composed by one grain size and built under laminar flow. In this simplified context, it is possible to propose a unique relationship between the water flux, the sediment flux, the grain size and the slope of the fan. The theory is validated by one-dimension experiments, performed with glass beads and glycerine: the fan grows quasi-statically and maintains its slope just above the threshold for sediment transport. In addition, at leading order, the sediment discharge only controls the velocity at which the fan grows. These main predictions are then successfully tested in two-dimensional experiments.

  20. Mixed-Layer Illite\\/Smectite Minerals in Tertiary Sandstones and Shales, San Joaquin Basin, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl Ramseyer; J. R. BOLES

    1986-01-01

    The southern San Joaquin Valley contains more than 7 km of sedimentary fili, largely Miocene and younger in age. Ancient depositional environments ranged from alluvial fans at the basin margins to turbidite fans toward the basin center. Mixed-layer illite\\/smectite (I\\/S) dominates the < 2-gm fraction of Miocene Shales, and kaolinite is abundant in Miocene sandstones. I\\/S from carbonate-cemented sand- stones

  1. Salinization in semi-arid irrigated agricultural regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ale, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale introduction of canal irrigation systems across the semi-arid regions of the World has disturbed hydrologic equilibrium of many groundwater basins. This has resulted in rise of groundwater levels followed by degradation of soils through water logging and secondary saltbuild-up in many canal commands, and caused millions of hectares of irrigated agricultural land to go out of production. On the other hand, extensive pumping of groundwater for irrigation in some freshwater aquifers has lowered hydraulic heads and induced cross-formational flow from underlying highly mineralized older formations, which led to groundwater mixing between the formations and rise insalinity levels in the overlying fresh water aquifers over time. Some examples related to irrigation induced soil and groundwater salinization from India and the United States will be presented. Potential causes of salinization and possible solutions will be discussed.

  2. Hydrocarbon potential of early mesozoic basins of eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamel, S.

    1988-01-01

    The exposed Triassic-Liassic rift basins in the eastern United States are half-grabens filled with up to 7 km of continental sediments. The location and sense of asymmetry of the half-grabens are closely tied to the structural grain of the Appalachian crystalline terranes on which they have formed. In many instances, the faulted margins of the basins are older thrusts or terrane boundaries reactivated as listric normal faults. The sediment fill of the basins reflects their structural asymmetry. Coarse alluvial fan deposits along the main border faults pass basinward into a complex assemblage of fluvial, paludal, and lacustrine facies. The oldest sediment fill in the rift basins is dated palynologically as late Ladinian to late Carnian. Perhaps reflecting the northward opening of the central Atlantic, the youngest rift-fill sediments are older in the southern basins than in the northern-Carnian in the Righmond basin vs. Toarcian in the Hartford-Deerfield basin. Floral evidence points to a tropical to near-tropical environment, with severe oscillations between xerophytic (dry) and hydrophytic (wet) conditions. The degree of thermal maturation, as estimated from vitrinite reflectance and clay mineralogy, varies widely from basin to basin; however, most of the basins are within the oil to dry gas generative window. The basins with highest thermal maturities are those having large volumes of diabase intrusives and presumed higher paleogeothermal gradients. The peak of thermal maturation/migration may have occurred as early as the Jurassic.

  3. Dynamics of Floodwater Infiltration and Groundwater Recharge Under Ephemeral Channels in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarsky, B.; Dahan, O.; Enzel, Y.

    2007-05-01

    Shallow alluvial aquifers underneath ephemeral streams are often the only reliable source of water that can sustain human habitation in arid environments (e.g. Arava Valley, Israel; Rio Andarax, Spain; Kuiseb River, Namibia). The main source of replenishment of these alluvial aquifers is recharge from floodwater infiltration. Accordingly, effective management of surface water and groundwater in arid regions requires a better understanding of the processes controlling floodwater infiltration and recharge of alluvial aquifers. This study focuses on understanding the dynamic process of floodwater infiltration from ephemeral channels while implementing innovative methods specifically designed to quantify the recharge fluxes. The monitoring system provides real-time continuous measurements of the hydraulic conditions in all three domains involved in the recharge process: (a) the flood, (b) water-content variations along the unsaturated profile, (c) the groundwater response to the recharge event. Water-content variations along the unsaturated profile were monitored using flexible TDR (FTDR) probes installed along slanted boreholes underneath the stream channel. Water levels and salinity of both the flood and the groundwater were measured simultaneously. Two study sites were selected for this work: the Buffels River, South Africa and the Kuiseb River, Namibia. The monitoring stations installed at those sites recorded several flood events during 2005/2006. Data collected during this period revealed the dynamic process in which floodwater percolates through the vadose zone and recharges the groundwater. Each flood initiated an infiltration event expressed by wetting of the vadose zone and a rise in the water table. The sequential wetting of the vadose zone allowed direct calculations of the wetting-front propagation velocities and percolation fluxes from land surface down to the groundwater. With the arrival of the wetting front to the water table, groundwater began to rise, indicating an increase in groundwater storage in response to the recharge event. Water fluxes were calculated using several independent methods: (a) combining the calculated wetting-front propagation velocity with the change in moisture profile, (b) the rate at which the water table rises as an indication of the percolation rate, and (c) the final increase in groundwater storage through the measured change in groundwater levels. Interestingly, the calculations performed for all of the floods yielded corresponding flux values of approximately 1 cm/h. Aquifer dimensions, as well as total recharge estimations, were also derived from the data. Salt-transport dynamics at each site and the positive influence of the flood events on groundwater quality were revealed from the EC measurements.

  4. Desert Pavement Process and Form: Modes and Scales of Landscape Stability and Instability in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen G.; McFadden, Leslie D.; McDonald, Eric V.; Eppes, Martha C.; Young, Michael H.; Wood, Yvonne A.

    2014-05-01

    Desert pavements are recognized in arid landscapes around the world, developing via diminution of constructional/depositional landform relief and creating a 1-2 stone thick armor over a "stone free" layer. Surface exposure dating demonstrates that clasts forming the desert pavements are maintained at the land surface over hundreds of thousands of years, as aeolian fines are deposited on the land surface, transported into the underlying parent material and incorporated into accretionary soil horizons (e.g., the stone free or vesicular [Av] horizon). This surface armor provides long-term stability over extensive regions of the landscape. Over shorter time periods and at the landform-element scale, dynamic surficial processes (i.e., weathering, runoff) continue to modify the pavement form. Clast size reduction in comparison to underlying parent material, along with armoring and packing of clasts in pavements contribute to their persistence, and studies of crack orientations in pavement clasts indicate physical weathering and diminution of particle size are driven by diurnal solar insolation. Over geologic time, cracks form and propagate from tensile stresses related to temporal and spatial gradients in temperature that evolve and rotate in alignment with the sun's rays. Observed multimodal nature of crack orientations appear related to seasonally varying, latitude-dependent temperature fields resulting from solar angle and weather conditions. Surface properties and their underlying soil profiles vary across pavement surfaces, forming a landscape mosaic and controlling surface hydrology, ecosystem function and the ultimate life-cycle of arid landscapes. In areas of well-developed pavements, surface infiltration and soluble salt concentrations indicate that saturated hydraulic conductivity of Av horizons decline on progressively older alluvial fan surfaces. Field observations and measurements from well-developed desert pavement surfaces landforms also yield significantly lower infiltration rates, enhanced rates of overland flow characterized by high water:sediment ratios and reduced production of desert ecosystems. Consequently, regionally extensive pavement and significantly decreased infiltration over geologic time have resulted in widespread overland flow, elaborate drainage networks on alluvial and eolian-mantled bedrock landscapes, and channel incision and regional dissection of the pavement-mantled landforms. However, these once stable landscapes become progressively unstable with time, serving as sediment source areas for younger alluvial deposits (i.e., geologic life-cycle). Thus, regional dissection (instability) of these desert landscapes can be influenced by the intrinsic properties of pavement-mantled landscapes and not necessarily to external forces of climate change and tectonics.

  5. Depositional character of a dry-climate alluvial fan system from Palaeoproterozoic rift setting using facies architecture and palaeohydraulics: Example from the Par Formation, Gwalior Group, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Paul, Pritam

    2014-09-01

    The ?20 m thick coarse-grained clastic succession in the basal part of Palaeoproterozoic Par Formation, Gwalior Group has been investigated using process-based sedimentology and deductive palaeohydraulics. Bounded between granitic basement at its base and shallow marine succession at the top, the studied stratigraphic interval represents products of an alluvial fan and its strike-wise co-existent braided river system that possibly acted as a tributary for the fan. Detailed facies, facies association analysis allowed identification of two anatomical parts for the fan system viz. proximal and mid fan. While thin proximal fan is represented by products of rock avalanche and hyperconcentrated flows with widely varying rheology, the mid fan is represented by products of sheet floods and flows within streamlets. The interpretation found support from palaeoslope estimation carried out on the fluvial part of the mid fan that plot dominantly within the alluvial fan field demarcated by Blair and McPherson (1994). Dry climatic condition suggested from dominance of stream flow over mass flow deposition within the Par alluvial fan. Strike-wise, the fan is discontinuous and juxtaposed with a braid plain system. In contrast to the fluvial part of fan system, the palaeoslope data from the braid plain system dominantly plot within the ‘natural depositional gap' defined by Blair and McPherson. A raised palaeoslope for the river systems, as suggested from Proterozoic braid plain deposits around the Globe, is found valid for the Par braid plain system as well. From preponderance of granular and sandy sediments within the alluvial fan and braid plain systems and a pervasive north-westward palaeocurrent pattern within the fluvial systems the present study infers a gently sloping bevelled source area in the south-southeast of the basin with occurrence of steep cliffs only locally.

  6. Tectonics and Quaternary sequence development of basins along the active Vienna Basin strike-slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, B.; Lomax, J.; Meurers, B.; Smit, J.; Preusser, F.; Decker, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Vienna Basin strike-slip fault is a continent scale active fault extending over a distance of some 300 km from the Eastern Alps through the Vienna Basin into the Western Carpathians. Sinistral movement causes the formation of several tight Pleistocene strike-slip basins within the older Miocene Vienna Basin. These sub-basins not only have a high relevance for groundwater exploitation but their fault activities depict serious seismic hazards. Basins are filled with fluvial sediments from the Danube and, closer to the Alpine front, with thick alluvial fan deposits. However, knowledge on the stratigraphy and tectonics is sparse and rather limited to the Miocene part of the Vienna Basin as it hosts giant hydrocarbon fields. This study tackles two major questions: (i) What is the effect of Quaternary climatic oscillations and subsidence on the sequence development of the alluvial fans and (ii) what is the deformation style of these basins? To answer (i) we present a series of new OSL ages and biotic data from both, surface and cores, to better constrain the timing of fan activity, fan abandonment but also to constrain the onset of Pleistocene basin formation. For (ii) we utilize information from unparalleled geophysical and geological data. Specifically we utilize industrial Bouguer gravity's derivatives to highlight shallow structures and to compensate for the lag of fault trace information. The integration of geological and geophysical data highlights textbook-like models of strike-slip basins, with typical features like Riedel shears with intervening relay ramps, en-echelon sidewall faults and a cross-basin fault zone delimiting opposite depocenters. The infill reflects a distinct cyclicity with thick sequences of coarse sediments deposited during colder periods and thin sequences of paleosol and flood sediments deposited during warmer periods. Ages indicate main activity around the short peak glacial periods and basin formation starting c. 300 ka ago. The distinct sequence development and the strong contrast to the underlying marine deposits is a very suitable setting to apply geophysical methods constraining basins' deformation style.

  7. Combined velocity and depth mapping on developing laboratory alluvial fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, P.; Strom, K. B.; Hoyal, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a nonintrusive method for measuring free-surface velocities using tracer patterns in a sequence of images. This method has been applied in both natural rivers and large-scale hydraulic models (Muste et al., 2008). Here the method is used to map channel and sheet flow velocity during the development of laboratory-scale alluvial fans. Measuring the time and space varying hydraulics on laboratory fans by traditional methods is not practical since flows are quite shallow (~1 cm). Additionally, the highly dynamic environment makes positioning of traditional probe-type instruments difficult and their physical presence could alter autogenic fan evolution. These difficulties can be overcome by using particle image velocimetry techniques. Furthermore, images collected in the LSPIV method can be used to extract flow depth using a calibrated dye-intensity method (Gran and Paola, 2001). This allows for simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and depth everywhere over the fan at any point in time. To validate the method, a set of controlled small-scale experiments were run for depths ranging from 0.2-1.5 cm and velocities from 10-100 cm/sec. Comparison of the LSPIV and dye-intensity method measurements to the known values indicated that the methodology was able to accurately capture simultaneous flow velocity and depth in this range of conditions, i.e., those encountered during the development of laboratory-scale alluvial fans and streams. The method is then used to map the hydraulics associated with various fan processes during development as demonstrated in figure 1. The ability to measure hydraulic properties during fan development is important since physical models provide an arena for observing the time evolution and morphodynamic feedback in depositional systems such as alluvial fans.

  8. Alluvial Diamond Resource Potential and Production Capacity Assessment of Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Anum, Solomon; Phillips, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by both diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in 'conflict' diamonds while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was to assess the alluvial diamond resource endowment and current production capacity of the alluvial diamond-mining sector in Ghana. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields. The production capacity of the sector was estimated using a formulaic expression of the number of workers reported in the sector, their productivity, and the average grade of deposits mined. This study estimates that there are approximately 91,600,000 carats of alluvial diamonds remaining in both the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields: 89,000,000 carats in the Birim and 2,600,000 carats in the Bonsa. Production capacity is calculated to be 765,000 carats per year, based on the formula used and available data on the number of workers and worker productivity. Annual production is highly dependent on the international diamond market and prices, the numbers of seasonal workers actively mining in the sector, and environmental conditions, which influence seasonal farming.

  9. Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R{sub o} ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin.

  10. Estimation of the aerodynamic roughness length in arid and semi-arid regions over the globe with the ERS scatterometer

    E-print Network

    Aires, Filipe

    Estimation of the aerodynamic roughness length in arid and semi-arid regions over the globe 2005. [1] Estimates of the aerodynamic roughness lengths z0 in arid and semi-arid regions: Prigent, C., I. Tegen, F. Aires, B. Marticorena, and M. Zribi (2005), Estimation of the aerodynamic

  11. BARRIERS TO WATER CONSERVATION IN THE RIO GRANDE BASIN1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank A. Ward; Ari M. Michelsen; Leeann DeMouche

    2007-01-01

    The Rio Grande basin shares problems faced by many arid regions of the world: growing and com- peting demands for water and river flows and uses that are vulnerable to drought and climate change. In recent years legislation, administrative action, and other measures have emerged to encourage private investment in efficient agricultural water use. Nevertheless, several institutional barriers discourage irrigators

  12. Hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater in the Zhangye Basin, Northwestern China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. H. Wen; Y. Q. Wu; J. Wu

    2008-01-01

    The Zhangye Basin, located in arid northwest China, is an important agricultural and industrial center. In recent years rapid development has created an increased demand for water, which is increasingly being fulfilled by groundwater abstraction. Detailed knowledge of the geochemical evolution of groundwater and water quality can enhance understanding of the hydrochemical system, promoting sustainable development and effective management of

  13. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Measured Shallow Soil Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, B. A.; Louie, J.; Beeston, H. E.; Skidmore, V.; Concha, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Las Vegas valley in Nevada is a deep (up to 5 km) alluvial basin filled with interlayered gravels, sands, and clays. The climate is arid. The water table ranges from a few meters to many tens of meters deep. Laterally extensive thin carbonate-cemented lenses are commonly found across parts of the valley. Lenses range beyond 2 m in thickness, and occur at depths exceeding 200 m. Shallow seismic datasets have been collected at approximately ten sites around the Las Vegas valley, to characterize shear and compression wave velocities in the near surface. Purposes for the surveys include modeling of ground response to dynamic loads, both natural and manmade, quantification of soil stiffness to aid structural foundation design, and non-intrusive materials identification. Borehole-based measurement techniques used include downhole and crosshole, to depths exceeding 100 m. Surface-based techniques used include refraction and three different methods involving inversion of surface-wave dispersion datasets. This latter group includes two active-source techniques, the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method and the Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method; and a new passive-source technique, the Refraction Mictrotremor (ReMi) method. Depths to halfspace for the active-source measurements ranged beyond 50 m. The passive-source method constrains shear wave velocities to 100 m depths. As expected, the stiff cemented layers profoundly affect local velocity gradients. Scale effects are evident in comparisons of (1) very local measurements typified by borehole methods, to (2) the broader coverage of the SASW and MASW measurements, to (3) the still broader and deeper resolution made possible by the ReMi measurements. The cemented layers appear as sharp spikes in the downhole datasets and are problematic in crosshole measurements due to refraction. The refraction method is useful only to locate the depth to the uppermost cemented layer. The surface-wave methods, on the other hand, can process velocity inversions. With the broader coverage of the active-source surface wave measurements, through careful inversion that takes advantage of prior information to the greatest extent possible, multiple, shallow, stiff layers can be resolved. Data from such broader-coverage methods also provide confidence regarding continuity of the cemented layers. For the ReMi measurements, which provide the broadest coverage of all methods used, the more generalized shallow profile is sometimes characterized by a strong stiffness inversion at a depth of approximately 10 m. We anticipate that this impedance contrast represents the vertical extent of the multiple layered deposits of cemented media.

  14. Global and continental changes of arid areas using the FAO Aridity Index over the periods 1951-1980 and 1981-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoni, Jonathan; Micale, Fabio; Carrao, Hugo; Naumann, Gustavo; Barbosa, Paulo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    An increase in arid areas and progressing land degradation are two of the main consequences of global climate change. In the 2nd edition of the World Atlas of Desertification (WAD), published by the United Nation Environment Program (UNEP) in 1997, a global aridity map was presented. This map was based on the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Aridity Index (AI) that takes into account the annual ratio between precipitation (RR) and Potential Evapo-Transpiration (PET). According to the long-term mean value of this ratio, climate is therefore classified in hyper-arid (<0.05), arid (0.05-0.2), semi-arid (0.2-0.5), dry sub-humid (0.5-0.65), and humid (>0.65); a special case are cold climates, which occur if the mean annual PET is below 400 mm. In the framework of the 3rd edition of the WAD, we computed new global aridity maps to improve and update the old version that was based on a single dataset (CRU dataset, Climate Research Unit of University of East Anglia) related to the 1951-80 period only. We computed the AI on two different time intervals (1951-80 and 1981-2010) in order to account for shifts in classes between the two periods and we used two different datasets: PET from CRU (version 3.2), and precipitation from the global 0.5?x0.5? gridded monthly precipitation of the Global Precipitation Climatology Center (GPCC) of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD). We used the GPCC Full Data Reanalysis Version 6.0, which showed a high reliability during many quality checks and is based on more stations than the CRU's precipitation counterpart. The results show that the "arid areas" (i.e. AI <0.5) globally increased from 28.4% to 29.6% and in Northern Hemisphere the cold climate areas decreased from 26.6% to 25.4%. Comparing the aridity maps of the two periods, the areas which most remarkably moved to lower AI values ("more arid" conditions) are: Canada, Brazil, the Mediterranean Region, Eastern Europe, almost all of Africa, the Middle East, Eastern China, Borneo, and Australia. At regional or country level, a shift of one class towards a "more arid" class can be found in Alaska (U.S.), Alberta (Canada), Patagonia (Argentina), Pernambuco (Brazil), Western Peru, Spain, the Southern Sahara and North-Eastern Kalahari deserts, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh (India), Mongolia, the Yang-Tze Basin (China), and the North-Eastern and South-Western Australian coasts. On the other hand, Central U.S., Paraguay and Northern Argentina, Scandinavia, Northern Australia, and Western China moved to a wetter climate in the last period. Due to the low data availability, we assumed that no changes took place in Antarctica, which is meant to be under a permanent ice cap, excluding the northernmost Graham Land.

  15. Preface paper to the Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere (SALSA) Program special issue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodrich, D.C.; Chehbouni, A.; Goff, B.; MacNish, B.; Maddock, T.; Moran, S.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Williams, D.G.; Watts, C.; Hipps, L.H.; Cooper, D.I.; Schieldge, J.; Kerr, Y.H.; Arias, H.; Kirkland, M.; Carlos, R.; Cayrol, P.; Kepner, W.; Jones, B.; Avissar, R.; Begue, A.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Boulet, G.; Branan, B.; Brunel, J.P.; Chen, L.C.; Clarke, T.; Davis, M.R.; DeBruin, H.; Dedieu, G.; Elguero, E.; Eichinger, W.E.; Everitt, J.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Gempko, V.L.; Gupta, H.; Harlow, C.; Hartogensis, O.; Helfert, M.; Holifield, C.; Hymer, D.; Kahle, A.; Keefer, T.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Lhomme, J.-P.; Lagouarde, J.-P.; Lo, Seen D.; Luquet, D.; Marsett, R.; Monteny, B.; Ni, W.; Nouvellon, Y.; Pinker, R.; Peters, C.; Pool, D.; Qi, J.; Rambal, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Santiago, F.; Sano, E.; Schaeffer, S.M.; Schulte, M.; Scott, R.; Shao, X.; Snyder, K.A.; Sorooshian, S.; Unkrich, C.L.; Whitaker, M.; Yucel, I.

    2000-01-01

    The Semi-Arid Land-Surface-Atmosphere Program (SALSA) is a multi-agency, multi-national research effort that seeks to evaluate the consequences of natural and human-induced environmental change in semi-arid regions. The ultimate goal of SALSA is to advance scientific understanding of the semi-arid portion of the hydrosphere-biosphere interface in order to provide reliable information for environmental decision making. SALSA approaches this goal through a program of long-term, integrated observations, process research, modeling, assessment, and information management that is sustained by cooperation among scientists and information users. In this preface to the SALSA special issue, general program background information and the critical nature of semi-arid regions is presented. A brief description of the Upper San Pedro River Basin, the initial location for focused SALSA research follows. Several overarching research objectives under which much of the interdisciplinary research contained in the special issue was undertaken are discussed. Principal methods, primary research sites and data collection used by numerous investigators during 1997-1999 are then presented. Scientists from about 20 US, five European (four French and one Dutch), and three Mexican agencies and institutions have collaborated closely to make the research leading to this special issue a reality. The SALSA Program has served as a model of interagency cooperation by breaking new ground in the approach to large scale interdisciplinary science with relatively limited resources.

  16. A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER

    E-print Network

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO GRANDE, NEW MEXICO Gigi RICHARD1 and Pierre JULIEN2 ABSTRACT The impact of construction of dams and reservoirs on alluvial rivers extends both upstream and downstream of the dam. Downstream of dams, both

  17. Quaternary alluvial fans in the Gobi of southern Mongolia: evidence for neotectonics and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Owen; B. F. Windley; W. D. Cunningham; J. Badamgarav; D. Dorjnamjaa

    1997-01-01

    Alluvial fans in southern Monglia occur along a group of narrow discontinuous mountain ranges which formed as transpressional uplifts along a series of strike-slip faults. They provide information on the nature of neotectonic activity in the eastern Gobi Altai range and on palaeoclimate change. Alluvial fan formation was dominated by various geomorphological processes largely controlled by climatic changes related to

  18. Changes of chromium concentration in alluvial sediments of the Obra river valley

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Z. Mlynarczyk; T. Sobczynski; M. Slowik

    2006-01-01

    In this research work, changes in concentration of the chosen chemical element in alluvial sediments have been used to estimate the relative age of floodplain deposits. The research concerning changes of chromium concentration in alluvial deposits was done in the Obra river valley near Mi?dzyrzecz (Western Poland). Chromium was chosen because of its low ability to migrate in groundwater environment.

  19. Metamodel-based design of alluvial channels at incipient motion subjected to seepage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bimlesh Kumar; Gopu Sreenivasulu; Achanta Ramakrishna Rao

    2010-01-01

    The design of an alluvial channel affected by seepage requires information about five basic parameters: particle size, water depth, energy slope, seepage velocity, and average velocity. The conventional approach to predicting the incipient motion in an alluvial channel cannot be applied in the case of a channel affected by seepage. Metamodelling techniques are nowadays widely used in engineering design to

  20. Physicochemical characteristics of the soils developed from alluvial deposits on Chongming Island in Shanghai, China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming He; Katsutoshi Sakurai; Guoqing Wang; Zonghui Chen; Yi Shu; Jinjin Xu

    2003-01-01

    Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of the soils collected from Chongming Island in Shanghai, China, which is the largest alluvial island with a total area of about 1,070 km in the world, has been conducted in order to investigate the current status of agricultural soils, with special reference to the effect of alluvial deposits on the development and utilization of

  1. A semi-distributed, physics-based hydrologic model using remotely sensed and Digital Terrain Elevation Data for semi-arid catchments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Getu Fana Biftu

    2004-01-01

    A practical, hydrologic model (DPHM-RS) is developed for the semi-arid climate of the Canadian Prairies that could adequately account for a river basin's terrain features by sub-dividing it to sub-basins of uneven shapes and sizes (semi-distributed) based on topographic information derived from the digital terrain elevation (DTED) data. Even though computationally modest, DPHM-RS is scientifically vigorous, can effectively assimilate remotely

  2. Sedimentology and climatic environment of alluvial fans in the martian Saheki crater and a comparison with terrestrial fans in the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. M.; Howard, A. D.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Moore, J. M.; Dietrich, W. E.; Williams, R. M. E.; Burr, D. M.; Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Matsubara, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The deflated surfaces of the alluvial fans in Saheki crater reveal the most detailed record of fan stratigraphy and evolution found, to date, on Mars. During deposition of at least the uppermost 100 m of fan deposits, discharges from the source basin consisted of channelized flows transporting sediment (which we infer to be primarily sand- and gravel-sized) as bedload coupled with extensive overbank mud-rich flows depositing planar beds of sand-sized or finer sediment. Flow events are inferred to have been of modest magnitude (probably less than ?60 m3/s), of short duration, and probably occupied only a few distributaries during any individual flow event. Occasional channel avulsions resulted in the distribution of sediment across the entire fan. A comparison with fine-grained alluvial fans in Chile’s Atacama Desert provides insights into the processes responsible for constructing the Saheki crater fans: sediment is deposited by channelized flows (transporting sand through boulder-sized material) and overbank mudflows (sand size and finer) and wind erosion leaves channels expressed in inverted topographic relief. The most likely source of water was snowmelt released after annual or epochal accumulation of snow in the headwater source basin on the interior crater rim during the Hesperian to Amazonian periods. We infer the Saheki fans to have been constructed by many hundreds of separate flow events, and accumulation of the necessary snow and release of meltwater may have required favorable orbital configurations or transient global warming.

  3. Water harvesting techniques for small communities in arid areas.

    PubMed

    Yuen, E; Anda, M; Mathew, K; Ho, G

    2001-01-01

    Limited water resources exist in numerous remote indigenous settlements around Australia. Indigenous people in these communities are still living in rudimentary conditions while their urban counterparts have full amenities, large scale water supplies and behavioral practices which may not be appropriate for an arid continent but are supported by extensive infrastructure in higher rainfall coastal areas. As remote indigenous communities continue to develop, their water use will increase, and in some cases, costly solutions may have to be implemented to augment supplies. Water harvesting techniques have been applied in settlements on a small scale for domestic and municipal purposes, and in the large, broadacre farm setting for productive use of the water. The techniques discussed include swales, infiltration basins, infiltration trenches and "sand dam" basins. This paper reviews the applications of water harvesting relevant to small communities for land rehabilitation, landscaping and flood control. Landscaping is important in these communities as it provides shelter from the sun and wind, reduces soil erosion and hence reduced airborne dust, and in some cases provides food and nutrition. Case studies of water harvesting systems applied in the Pilbara Region, Western Australia for landscaping around single dwellings in Jigalong and Cheeditha, in a permaculture garden in Wittenoon and at a college and carpark in Karratha are described. PMID:11700659

  4. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds.

    PubMed

    Hale, Rebecca L; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy; Riha, Krystin; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen A; Childers, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3-) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3- (?15N, ?18O, and ?17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3- during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover--retention basins, pipes, and grass cover--dictated the sourcing of NO3- in runoff. Urban watersheds were strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on runoff, which in turn was inversely related to retention basin density and positively related to imperviousness and precipitation. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the time scale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms. PMID:24803360

  5. Sedimentation of the Triassic–Jurassic Adigrat Sandstone Formation, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Wolela

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Adigrat Sandstone Formation as a reservoir objective. Conglomerates, gravely sandstones, coarse to medium-grained sandstones, very fine-grained cross-bedded sandstones, siltstones and mudstones of the Adigrat Sandstone Formation were deposited in semi-arid to arid climates. The North-western highlands are the main source for the sedimentation. The poorly-sorted, crudely-bedded conglomerates

  6. Sustainable Water Use System of Artesian Water in Alluvial Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, K.; Tsujimura, M.; Tase, N.

    2013-12-01

    The traditional water use system, developed with the intelligence of the local residents, usually takes advantage of local natural resources and is considered as a sustainable system, because of its energy saving(only forces of nature). For this reason, such kind of water use system is also recommended in some strategic policies for the purpose of a symbiosis between nature and human society. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship between human activities and water use systems. This study aims to clarify the mechanism of traditional water use processes in alluvial fan, and in addition, to investigate the important factors which help forming a sustainable water use system from the aspects of natural conditions and human activities. The study area, an alluvial fan region named Adogawa, is located in Shiga Prefecture, Japan and is in the west of Biwa Lake which is the largest lake in Japan. In this alluvial region where the land use is mainly occupied by settlements and paddy fields, a groundwater flowing well system is called "kabata" according to local tradition. During field survey, we took samples of groundwater, river water and lake water as well as measured the potential head of groundwater. The results showed that the upper boundary of flowing water was approximately 88m amsl, which is basically the same as the results reported by Kishi and Kanno (1966). In study area, a rapid increase of water pumping for domestic water use and melting snow during last 50 years, even if the irrigation area has decreased about 30% since 1970, and this fact may cause a decrease in recharge rate to groundwater. However, the groundwater level didn't decline based on the observed results, which is probably contributed by some water conservancy projects on Biwa Lake which maintained the water level of the lake. All the water samples are characterized by Ca-HCO3 type and similar stable isotopic value of ?D and ?18O. Groundwater level in irrigation season is higher than that in non-irrigation season, which indicates that groundwater level is apparently influenced by surface water. Some communities and NPOs working in this area maintain the "kabata" and canal for environment conservation. There are many rules for the local residents when using the water resources. For example, the use of detergents is prohibited for "kabata" users. The residents living upstream also should think of other groundwater users downstream. For this reason, it can be considered that the "kabata" water use method contributed to a symbiosis between ecosystem and human activity The study area case showed that the traditional water use system is useful for forming a sustainable groundwater flowing well use system.

  7. Facies architecture and paleohydrology of a synrift succession in the Early Cretaceous Choyr Basin, southeastern Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ito, M.; Matsukawa, M.; Saito, T.; Nichols, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    The Choyr Basin is one of several Early Cretaceous rift basins in southwestern Mongolia that developed in specific regions between north-south trending fold-and-thrust belts. The eastern margin of the basin is defined by high-angle normal and/or strike-slip faults that trend north-to-south and northeast-to-southwest and by the overall geometry of the basin, which is interpreted to be a half graben. The sedimentary succession of the Choyr Basin documents one of the various types of tectono-sedimentary processes that were active in the rift basins of East Asia during Early Cretaceous time. The sedimentary infill of the Choyr Basin is newly defined as the Khalzan Uul and Khuren Dukh formations based on detailed mapping of lateral and vertical variations in component lithofacies assemblages. These two formations are heterotopic deposits and constitute a third-order fluvio-lacustrine sequence that can be divided into transgressive and highstand systems tracts. The lower part of the transgressive systems tract (TST) is characterized by sandy alluvial-fan and braided-river systems on the hanging wall along the western basin margin, and by a gravelly alluvial-fan system on the footwall along the eastern basin margin. The alluvial-fan and braided-river deposits along the western basin margin are fossiliferous and are interpreted to have developed in association with a perennial fluvial system. In contrast, alluvial-fan deposits along the eastern basin margin do not contain any distinct faunas or floras and are interpreted to have been influenced by a high-discharge ephemeral fluvial system associated with fluctuations in wetting and drying paleohydrologic processes. The lower part of the TST deposit fines upward to siltstone-dominated flood-plain and ephemeral-lake deposits that constitute the upper part of the TST and the lower part of the highstand systems tract (HST). These mudstone deposits eventually reduced the topographic irregularities typical of the early stage of synrift basin development, with an associated decrease in topographic-slope gradients. Finally, a high-sinuosity meandering river system drained to the south during the late highstand stage in response to the northward migration of the depocenter. The upper HST deposits are also fossiliferous and are interpreted to have been influenced by a perennial fluvial system, although the average annual discharge of this system was probably less than 5 percent of that involved in the formation of the lower TST deposits along the western basin margin. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Review of Fire Effects on Vegetation and Soils in the Great Basin Region: Response and Ecological Site Characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review summarizes the state of our knowledge on fire effects on plants and soils in semi-arid ecosystems in the Great Basin Region, including the Columbia River and Snake River basins. It identifies what we know and don’t know and the key components that influence how plants, communities, and ...

  9. Sedimentation and depositional environments of the Barremian-Cenomanian Debre Libanose Sandstone, Blue Nile (Abay) Basin, Ethiopia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Wolela

    2009-01-01

    Exploration of oil and gas deposits in the Blue Nile Basin targeted the Debre Libanose Sandstone as a reservoir objective. The unit was deposited in broad alluvial plains, and shows some elements of the Platte type braided river sedimentation in the lower and middle succession. The braided river sedimentation is dominated by single storey and multistorey amalgamated sandstone bodies, and

  10. Characteristics of chemistry and stable isotopes in groundwater of Chaobai and Yongding River basin, North China Plain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Aji; C. Tang; X. Song; A. Kondoh; Y. Sakura; J. Yu; S. Kaneko

    2008-01-01

    To identify the groundwater flow system in the North China Plain, the chemical and stable isotopes of the groundwater and surface water were analysed along the Chaobai River and Yongding River basin. According to the field survey, the study area in the North China Plain was classified hydrogeologically into three parts: mountain, piedmont alluvial fan and lowland areas. The change

  11. Band reporting rates of mallards in the Mississippi alluvial valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinecke, K.J.; Shaiffer, C.W.; Delnicki, D.

    1992-01-01

    We captured 2,182 mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in eastcentral Arkansas and marked 730 with standard bands, 728 with 10 reward bands, and 724 with 'dummy' radio transmitters during November 1986-89 to estimate band reporting rates in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV). Assuming all transmitters were reported, reporting rates were 0.16 (SE=0.049) for standard bands and 0.34 (SE=0.081) for 10 reward bands. Interviews with hunters indicated that flock size distributions differed (P=0.03) between mallards wearing transmitters and those wearing bands (standard or reward). Mallards wearing transmitters were more likely to be alone and less likely to be in large flocks when recovered than were mallards wearing bands. These results suggest that either band reporting rates of mallards in the MAV are substantially less than those of midcontinent mallards (P=0.03), or marking mallards with external transmitters increases susceptibility to hunting mortality.

  12. Seismic Response of Alluvial Valleys to SH Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ausilio, Ernesto; Conte, Enrico; Dente, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Difesa del Suolo, Universit della Calabria (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the seismic response of alluvial valleys. The considered model consists of a two-dimensional elastic inclusion of arbitrary shape embedded in a stiffer half-plane excited by vertically or obliquely incident SH waves. Computations are conducted using a procedure based on the boundary element method. As known, this numerical technique is well suited to deal with wave propagation in infinite media as it avoids the introduction of fictitious boundaries and reduces by one the dimensions of the problem. This provides significant advantages from a computational point of view. A one-dimensional closed form solution is also used for comparison, and the most significant differences between the results obtained using the two methods are highlighted.

  13. Methodologies for hydraulic hazard mapping in alluvial fan areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesi, L.; Pilotti, M.; Ranzi, R.; Valerio, G.

    2014-09-01

    Hydraulic hazards in alluvial fan areas are mainly related to torrential floods and debris flows. These processes are characterized by their fast time evolution and relevant sediment load. Rational approaches for the estimation of hazard levels in flood-prone areas make use of the maps of depth and velocity, which are provided by numerical simulations of the event. This paper focuses on national regulations regarding quantitative debris-flow hazard mapping and compares them to a simple conceptual model for the quantification of the hazard levels on the basis of human stability in a flood. In particular, the proposed method takes into account, in a conceptual fashion, both the local slope and the density of the fluid, that are crucial aspects affecting stability for processes in mountain environments. Physically-based hazard criteria provide more comprehensible and objective maps, increasing awareness among stakeholders and providing more acceptable constraints for land planning.

  14. The measurement of total sediment load in alluvial streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, P.C.; Matejka, D.Q.

    1953-01-01

    The measurement of the total sediment load transported by streams that flow in alluvial channels has been a perplexing problem to engineers and geologists for over a century. Until the last decade the development of equipment to measure bed load and suspended load was carried on almost independently, and without primary consideration of the fundamental laws governing the transportation of fluvial sediments. French investigators during the nineteenth century described methods of measurement and a mathematical approach for computing the rate of bed-load movement. The comprehensive laboratory investigations by Gilbert early in this century provided data that are still being used for studies of sediment transport. Detailed laboratory investigations of bed-load movement conducted during the last two decades by a number of investigators have resulted in the development of additional mathematical formulas for computing rates of bed-load movement. Likewise, studies of turbulent flow have provided the turbulence suspension theory for suspended sediment as it is known today.

  15. Water Through Life, A New Technique for Mapping Shallow Water Tables in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates using Color Infrared Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, G.

    2003-04-01

    Two of the fundamental issues in water resources in arid regions are (1) the ability to accurately predict the presence of groundwater shallow enough to support riparian ecosystems and (2) the ability to assess the vulnerability of those ecosystems to withdrawals by an ever-increasing human population. A new technique for finding areas of shallow groundwater in arid and semi-arid environments has been developed that addresses both of these concerns by using the relative health of natural vegetation as an indicator of perennial shallow groundwater in environments where water is the main biolimiting factor to growth. The technique revolves around the differences in the spectral response between: actively transpiring vegetation; dormant vegetation; and dry, bare soil in the 400-900nm range as recorded by color infrared film in the dry pre-monsoon months. Distilling out only the active vegetation from aerial photographs was achieved through the creation of an index-based filter using readily available, inexpensive photo processing software. The output of the filter was carefully designed to maximize the qualitative interpretability by an analyst through the careful selection of display colors that are tuned to the maximum sensitivity range of the human vision system. When the analyst combines the qualitative interpretation of the spatial distribution of active vegetation with an understanding of the rooting depth of the native species it becomes possible to extrapolate a quantitative, basin-scale reconnaissance level map which defines the lateral extent of areas of shallow <20m(+/-5m) groundwater with a spatial accuracy of just a few meters. The research plan for the development of this technique also explored the potential for conducting the entire analysis procedure in three dimensions by projecting the filtered aerial photographs onto 10m resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). When this is done and the geomorphology of the region is carefully considered the usefulness of the technique becomes greatly enhanced. By extending the analysis from 2D to 3D, the technique evolves from being a powerful descriptive tool for mapping the lateral extent of shallow groundwater into a very powerful predictive tool that can aid in unlocking the dynamics of shallow aquifers and groundwater flow regimes within basins in arid and semi-arid climates.

  16. Alluvial diamond resource potential and production capacity assessment of Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Van Bockstael, Mark; Diaby, Mamadou; Cissé, Kabinet; Diallo, Thierno Amadou; Sano, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that export shipments of rough diamonds were free of conflict concerns. Outcomes of the meeting were formally supported later in December of 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. The goal of this study was to estimate the alluvial diamond resource endowment and the current production capacity of the alluvial diamond mining sector of Guinea. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within Guinea's diamondiferous regions, while the diamond-production capacity of these zones was estimated by inputting the number of artisanal miners, the number of days artisans work per year, and the average grade of the deposits into a formulaic expression. Guinea's resource potential was estimated to be approximately 40 million carats, while the production capacity was estimated to lie within a range of 480,000 to 720,000 carats per year. While preliminary results have been produced by integrating historical documents, five fieldwork campaigns, and remote sensing and GIS analysis, significant data gaps remain. The artisanal mining sector is dynamic and is affected by a variety of internal and external factors. Estimates of the number of artisans and deposit variables, such as grade, vary from site to site and from zone to zone. This report has been developed on the basis of the most detailed information available at this time. However, continued fieldwork and evaluation of artisanally mined deposits would increase the accuracy of the results.

  17. Nitrogen Transport in Thick, Unsaturated, Spatially Variable Alluvial Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. A.; Harter, T.; Hopmans, J. W.; Horwath, W. R.

    2001-12-01

    We are investigating the spatial variability of unsaturated hydraulic properties as part of an effort to improve our understanding of nitrogen transport through thick, unsaturated alluvial sediments that underlie many of the agricultural regions in the southwestern United States. Prior studies of soil nitrogen concentrations have focused on nitrogen cycling in the relatively shallow root zone and have generally not considered field-scale spatial variability of hydraulic properties. This study will survey nitrogen levels in a thick, layered, vadose zone at a well-controlled, long-term research nectarine orchard. The site is located in the Kings River alluvial fan on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley, approximately 30 miles southeast of Fresno, California, at the University of California Kearney Research Center. A controlled fertilizer experiment was conducted at the orchard over a 12-year period (1983-1994) during which three subplots were subjected to three different rates of fertilization: 0, 100, and 325 lbs/acre. During 1997-1998, we drilled and characterized approximately 3000 ft. of geologic material from 60 cores drilled to groundwater at a depth of 52 feet. Horizontal spacing of the borehole locations varied from 1.2 to 3 meters in a transect that is approximately 100 m long and 2.4 m wide. Nine major hydrofacies have been identified within the transect based on textural, morphological, and mineralogical interpretation of the continuous cores. Hydraulic properties of each of these hydrofacies are determined using the multi-step outflow method. Unsaturated hydraulic parameters for the van Genuchten and lognormal models are determined by inverse modeling of the multi-step outflow experiments. Armed with the hydraulic parameters the USGS numerical model VS2DT, modified to allow for the lognormal retention model, is used to model the fertilizer experiments. The results are compared to measured nitrate distributions in the subplots. This is the first step in developing a tool to assess the fate of nitrogen in deep, heterogeneous vadose zones.

  18. Basin analysis of tertiary strata in the Pattani Basin, Gulf of Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Chonchawalit, A. (PTT Exploration and Production Public Co., Ltd., Bangkok (Thailand)); Bustin, R.M. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada))

    1994-07-01

    The stratigraphic and structural evolution of the Pattani basin, the most prolific petroleum basin in Thailand, reflects the extensional tectonics of continental southeast Asia. East-west extension, a product of the northward collision of India with Eurasia since the early Tertiary resulted in the formation of a series of north-south-trending sedimentary basins including the Pattani basin. Subsidence and thermal histories of the basin can generally be accounted for by nonuniform lithospheric stretching. The validity of nonuniform lithospheric stretching as a mechanic for the formation of the Pattani basin is confirmed by a reasonably good agreement between modeled and observed vitrinite reflectance at various depths and locations. The amount of stretching and surface heat flow generally increases from the basin margin to the basin center. Crustal stretching factor ([beta]) ranges from 1.3 at the basin margin to 2.8 in the center. Subcrustal stretching factor ([sigma]) ranges from 1.3 at the margin to more than 3.0 in the center. The stretching of the lithosphere may have extended basement rocks as much as 45 to 90 km and may have caused the upwelling of asthenosphere, resulting in high heat flow. The sedimentary succession in the Pattani basin is divisible into synrift and postrift sequences. The synrift sequences comprise (1) late Eocene ( ) to early Oligocene alluvial fan, braided river, and flood-plain deposits; (2) late Oligocene to early Miocene floodplain and channel deposits; and (3) an early Miocene regressive package of marine to nonmarine sediments. Deposition of synrift sequences corresponded to rifting and extension, which included episodic block faulting and rapid subsidence. Postrift succession comprises (1) an early to middle Miocene regressive package of shallow marine to nonmarine sediments, (2) a late early Miocene transgressive package; and (3) a late Miocene to Pleistocene transgression succession.

  19. A new estimate for the composition of weathered young upper continental crust from alluvial sediments, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamber, Balz S.; Greig, Alan; Collerson, Kenneth D.

    2005-02-01

    We present new major element, trace element and Nd-isotope data for 30 alluvial sediments collected from 25 rivers in Queensland, E Australia. Samples were chosen to represent drainage from the region's most important lithologies, including Tertiary intraplate volcanic rocks, a Cretaceous igneous province (and sedimentary rocks derived thereof) as well as Proterozoic blocks. In most chemical and isotopic aspects, the alluvial sediments represent binary or ternary mixing relationships, with absolute abundances implied to reflect the proportion of lithologies in the catchments. When averaged, the studied sediments differ from other proxies of upper continental crust (UCC) mainly in their relative middle rare earth element enrichment (including an elevated Sm/Nd ratio), higher relative Eu abundance and higher Nb/Ta ratio. These features are inherited from eroded Tertiary intraplate basalts, which commonly form topographic highs in the studied region. Despite the high degree of weathering strong to excellent coherence between similarly incompatible elements is found for all samples. From this coherence, we suggest revisions of the following upper crustal element ratios: Y/Ho = 26.2, Yb/Tm = 6.37, Th/W = 7.14, Th/Tl = 24 and Zr/Hf = 36.9. Lithium, Rb, Cs and Be contents do not seem depleted relative to UCC, which may reflect paucity of K-feldspar in the eroded catchments. Nickel, Cr, Pb, Cu and Zn concentrations are elevated in polluted rivers surrounding the state capital. River sediments in the Proterozoic Georgetown Inlier are elevated in Pb, Cu and Zn but this could be a natural phenomenon reflecting abundant sulphide mineralisation in the area. Except for relative Sr concentrations, which broadly anticorrelate with mean annual rainfall in catchments, there is no obvious relationship between the extent of weathering and climate types, which range from arid to tropical. The most likely explanation for this observation is that the weathering profiles in many catchments are several Myr old, established during the much wetter Miocene period. The studied sediment compositions (excluding those from the Proterozoic catchments) are used to propose a new trace element normalisation termed MUQ (MUd from Queensland), which serves as an alternative to UCC proxies derived from sedimentary rocks.

  20. Strategies for cooler cities? Ecophysiological responses of semi-arid street trees to storm water harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C. M.; Pavao-zuckerman, M.; Barron-Gafford, G.

    2013-12-01

    As the southwestern U.S. moves into an uncertain future in terms of water supply and climate, communities are seeking creative ways to harvest urban runoff. One such solution is to implement water-sensitive urban design features such as rain basins, which are designed to capture and facilitate infiltration of precipitation and storm water as it runs off impermeable surfaces like streets and sidewalks. Rain basins essentially act as temporary cisterns, allowing a given rain event to have a much larger impact in recharging soil water profiles. In this sense, even a 'small' rain may yield a more saturated soil profile and stimulate plant physiological activity well beyond plants that lack this additional moisture input. However, the impacts of rain basins on plant function remain unquantified. Therefore, the purpose of our research is to characterize the performance of native mesquite trees in basins relative to non-basin native mesquites. To answer our question, we randomly sampled basin and non-basin native mesquites in two different neighborhoods in Tucson, AZ, and characterized their response to precipitation events. We measured stomatal conductance, a proxy for transpiration, on the first and third days following rain events in 2013. Numerous environmental factors, such as photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), temperature, relative humidity, and soil moisture, were also measured in order to explore relationships with conductance. These measurements were conducted before and during monsoon season in order to determine the significance of water in basin performance, enabling us to better characterize plant response to medium (6 to 12 mm) rain events. Findings from this study indicate that basin and non-basin mesquites have similar pre-monsoon conductance rates, with a mean basin value of 70 +/-10 mmol/(m2*s) and a mean non-basin value of 57 +/-6 mmol/(m2*s) at peak conductance. In contrast, during the monsoon, basin mesquites showed significantly higher peak conductance rates (179 +/-22 mmol/(m2*s)) than non-basin trees (126 +/-9 mmol/(m2*s)). Perhaps more importantly, basin mesquite conductance remained elevated for an extended period of time into the afternoon as compared to non-basin mesquites. While this difference was negligible before the monsoon, it was significant during the monsoon. The day immediately after a medium rainfall event, non-basin mesquites shut down around 13:00, while basin mesquites never shut down completely before the end of the measurement period around 17:30. Soil moisture levels were elevated in the rain basins relative to the non-basin soils, suggesting that basins impact plant functioning through enhanced soil water availability. These preliminary results demonstrate that basins are an effective means of capturing water and irrigating plants. Here we have demonstrated how an appreciation of wildland plant ecophysiology can be applied to an urban setting in support of a suite of ecosystem services. Notably, there is a potential for enhanced urban heat island mitigation in semi-arid cities through the application of water-sensitive urban design features such as rain basins, due to their supporting a longer duration of latent heat flux cooling (i.e., transpiration) into the afternoon.

  1. Optimizing conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater for irrigation in arid and semi-arid areas: an integrated modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Wu, Bin; Zheng, Yi; Tian, Yong; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid agricultural areas, groundwater (GW) is an important water source of irrigation, in addition to surface water (SW). Groundwater pumping would significantly alter the regional hydrological regime, and therefore complicate the water resources management process. This study explored how to optimize the conjunctive use of SW and GW for agricultural irrigation at a basin scale, based on integrated SW-GW modeling and global optimization methods. The improved GSFLOW model was applied to the Heihe River Basin, the second largest inland river basin in China. Two surrogate-based global optimization approaches were implemented and compared, including the well-established DYCORS algorithm and a new approach we proposed named as SOIM, which takes radial basis function (RBF) and support vector machine (SVM) as the surrogate model, respectively. Both temporal and spatial optimizations were performed, aiming at maximizing saturated storage change of midstream part conditioned on non-reduction of irrigation demand, constrained by certain annual discharge for the downstream part. Several scenarios for different irrigation demand and discharge flow are designed. The main study results include the following. First, the integrated modeling not only provides sufficient flexibility to formulation of optimization problems, but also makes the optimization results more physically interpretable and managerially meaningful. Second, the surrogate-based optimization approach was proved to be effective and efficient for the complex, time-consuming modeling, and is quite promising for decision-making. Third, the strong and complicated SW-GW interactions in the study area allow significant water resources conservation, even if neither irrigation demand nor discharge for the downstream part decreases. Under the optimal strategy, considerable part of surface water division is replaced by 'Stream leakage-Pump' process to avoid non-beneficial evaporation via canals. Spatially, the optimization suggests increase of pumping percentage in areas with significant GW recharge and shallow water table and adjacent to the main river channel. Temporally, the optimization suggests increase of pumping percentage during dry seasons, and decrease during flooding seasons. The groundwater storage zone could work as inartificial reservoirs because of the fierce interactions between SW and GW to help achieve spatial and temporal reallocation without loss from evaporation. Moreover, the results of different scenarios reveal that, sustainability of saturated zone for the midstream part could be promoted dramatically by cutting down irrigation demand. The study results are of significant importance to the water resources management in arid and semi-arid agricultural areas.

  2. Distinctive channel geometry and riparian vegetation: A geomorphic classification for arid ephemeral streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, N.; Shaw, J. R.; Wohl, E. E.; Cooper, D.

    2012-12-01

    Interactions between hydrology, channel form, and riparian vegetation along arid ephemeral streams are not thoroughly understood and current stream classifications do not adequately represent variability in channel geometry and associated riparian communities. Relatively infrequent hydrologic disturbances in dryland environments are responsible for creation and maintenance of channel form that supports riparian communities. To investigate the influence of channel characteristics on riparian vegetation in the arid southwestern United States, we develop a geomorphic classification for arid ephemeral streams based on the degree of confinement and the composition of confining material that provide constraints on available moisture. Our conceptual model includes five stream types: 1) bedrock channels entirely confined by exposed bedrock and devoid of persistent alluvium; 2) bedrock with alluvium channels at least partially confined by bedrock but containing enough alluvium to create bedforms that persist through time; 3) incised alluvium channels bound only by unconsolidated alluvial material into which they are incised; 4) braided washes that exhibit multi-thread, braided characteristics regardless of the composition of confining material; and 5) piedmont headwater 0-2nd order streams (Strahler) confined only by unconsolidated alluvium and which initiate as secondary channels on piedmont surfaces. Eighty-six study reaches representing the five stream types were surveyed on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in the Sonoran Desert of southwestern Arizona. Non-parametric multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) indicates significant differences between the five stream types with regards to channel geometry (i.e., stream gradient, width-to-depth ratio, the ratio between valley width and channel width (Wv/Wc), shear stress, and unit stream power) and riparian vegetation (i.e., presence and canopy coverage by species, canopy stratum, and life form). Discriminant analysis of the physical driving variables is being conducted to produce a model that predicts stream type and resulting riparian vegetation communities based on channel geometry. This model will be tested on a separate set of 15 study reaches surveyed on the Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range in southern Arizona. The resulting classification will provide a basis for examining relationships between hydrology, channel and watershed characteristics, riparian vegetation and ecosystem sensitivity of ephemeral streams in arid regions of the American Southwest.

  3. Texture and depositional history of near-surface alluvial deposits in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laudon, Julie; Belitz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    Saline conditions and associated high levels of selenium and other soluble trace elements in soil, shallow ground water, and agricultural drain water of the western San Joaquin Valley, California, have prompted a study of the texture of near-surface alluvial deposits in the central part of the western valley. Texture is characterized by the percentage of coarse-grained sediment present within a specified subsurface depth interval and is used as a basis for mapping the upper 50 feet of deposits. Resulting quantitative descriptions of the deposits are used to interpret the late Quaternary history of the area. Three hydrogeologic units--Coast Range alluvium, flood-basin deposits, and Sierran sand--can be recognized in the upper 50 feet of deposits in the central part of the western San Joaquin Valley. The upper 30 feet of Coast Range alluvium and the adjacent 5 to 35 feet of flood-basin deposits are predominantly fine grained. These fine-grained Coast Range deposits are underlain by coarse-grained channel deposits. The fine-grained flood basin deposits are underlain by coarse-grained Sierran sand. The extent and orientation of channel deposits below 20 feet in the Coast Range alluvium indicate that streams draining the Coast Range may have been tributary to the axial stream that deposited the Sierran sand and that streamflow may have been to the southeast. The fining-upward stratigraphic sequence in the upper 50 feet of deposits and the headward retreat of tributary stream channels from the valley trough with time support a recent hypothesis of climatic control of alluviation in the western San Joaquin Valley.

  4. Arid site characterization and technology assessment: Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) program was initiated in March 1991 to evaluate technologies for all phases of remediation of VOCs in soils and groundwater at DOE arid/semiarid sites. The primary site for field demonstrations under the VOC-Arid ID program is the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to describe (1) the bases for technologies currently under evaluation in the VOC-Arid ID program; (2) the types of subsurface contamination at DOE arid/semiarid sites; and (3) the areas of potential common technology interests based on perceived technology needs at other DOE sites. This report was compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in response to DOE`s Office of Technology Development`s mission to carry out an aggressive program to accelerate the development and implementation of new and existing technologies to meet a 30-year goal set by DOE in June 1989 to clean up all of its sites and to bring all sites into compliance with current and future environmental regulations. A key component of this program is the development of technologies that are better, faster, safer, and cheaper than those technologies currently available. Included in this report are an evaluation of technologies currently (fiscal year 1993) being pursued at the Hanford Site under the auspices of the VOC-Arid ID program, an assessment of subsurface contaminants at arid/semiarid sites, a summarization of technologies under consideration at other DOE sites, a discussion of areas of potential common technology interests, and the conclusions. Also included are a summary of the extent of contamination at the DOE arid/semiarid sites under consideration and a bibliography of source documents from which this report was prepared.

  5. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  6. Deducing Weathering Processes Using Silicon Isotopes in the Ganges Alluvial Plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Fontorbe, G.; Chakrapani, G.; Clymans, W.; Conley, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Ganges Alluvial Plain ('GAP') is the sedimentary infill of the foreland basin created during Himalayan orogeny. Freshly eroded material from the Himalaya and southern cratonic tributaries is deposited into a system with long water-sediment interaction times, creating potential for further generation of river weathering fluxes. To quantify weathering processes in the GAP, 51 sites including all major tributaries were sampled in a September 2013 campaign and analysed for major and minor ions, Ge/Si ratios and ?30Si, ?13C and ?18O. Net dissolved Si (DSi) and major cation yields are 2 to 5 times lower in the GAP than the Himalaya, and at a whole basin scale approximate the global average, indicating that the plain apparently moderates the efficiency of Himalayan weathering rates. Mainstem ?30Si spans 0.81 to 1.93‰ (see figure) and gives the impression of a system buffered to moderate DSi and ?30Si. Ge/Si ratios (µmol/mol) are higher than expected in the Himalaya (>3), reflecting input of Ge-enriched water from hot springs, and decline to ~1.4 in the GAP. For the Himalayan sourced rivers, ?30Si increases with distance from the Himalayan front, and can not be explained entirely by conservative mixing with higher ?30Si peninsular and GAP streams. To a first degree, the ?30Si data suggest incorporation of Si into secondary minerals as the key fractionating process, and that this occurs both in situ during initial weathering and progressively in the GAP. Partitioning of solutes between sources is complicated in the GAP. Consistent with previous work, carbonate weathering dominates the ion fluxes, but with substantial contributions from saline/alkaline soil salts, the chlorination of wastewater and highly variable rainfall chemistry. Due to these contributions, precisely inferring the input from silicate weathering is difficult. We introduce a novel method to infer silicate-weathering rates that exploits the fractionation of Si during clay formation to account for the loss of DSi from solution.

  7. Evolution of a rift basin dominated by subaerial deposits: The Guaritas Rift, Early Cambrian, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, Renato P.; Janikian, Liliane; Fragoso-Cesar, Antonio Romalino S.; Marconato, André

    2009-05-01

    Most existing models for the evolution of rift basins predict the development of deep-water depositional systems during the stage of greatest tectonic subsidence, when accommodation generation potentially outpaces sedimentation. Despite this, some rift basins do not present deep-water systems, instead being dominated by subaerial deposits. This paper focuses on one of these particular rift basins, the Cambrian Guaritas Rift, Southern Brazil, characterized by more than 1500 m of alluvial and aeolian strata deposited in a 50-km-wide basin. The deposits of the Guaritas Rift can be ascribed to four depositional systems: basin-border alluvial fans, bed-load-dominated ephemeral rivers, mixed-load ephemeral rivers and aeolian dune fields. These four systems are in part coeval and in part succeed each other, forming three stages of basin evolution: (i) Rift Initiation to Early Rift Climax stage, (ii) Mid to Late Rift Climax stage, and (iii) Early Post-Rift stage. The first stage comprises most of the Guaritas Group and is characterized by homogeneous bed-load-dominated river deposits, which do not clearly record the evolution of subsidence rates. The onset of sedimentation of finer-grained deposits occurred as a consequence of a reactivation event that changed the outline of the basin and the distribution of the nearby highlands. This strongly suggests that the capture of the main river system to another depression decreased the sediment supply to the basin. The study of the Guaritas Rift indicates that rift basins in which the sediment supply exceeds the accommodation generation occur as a consequence of moderate subsidence combined with the capture of a major river system to the basin during the initial stages of basin evolution. In these basins, changes in the average discharge of the river system or tectonic modification of the drainage network may be the major control on the stratigraphic architecture.

  8. Structural and sedimentary evolution of the Malay Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.T.; Rudolph, K.W. (Esso Production Malaysia Inc., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)); Abdullah, S.A. (Petronas Carigali, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia))

    1994-07-01

    The Malay Basin is a back-arc basin that formed via Eocene ( ) through Oligocene extension. This early extensional episode is characterized by large east-west and northwest-southeast-trending normal fault systems with associated block rotation. Extensional subbasins are filled with a thick succession of alluvial and fluvial sediments that show increasing lacustrine influence toward the central basin dep. In the early Miocene, the basin entered a passive sag phase in which depositional relief decreased, and there is the first evidence of widespread marine influence. Lower Miocene sediments consist of cyclic offshore marine, tidal-estuarine, and coastal plain fluvial sediments with very wide facies tracts. The middle Miocene is dominated by increasing compressional inversion, in which preexisting extensional lows were folded into east-west anticlines. This compression continues well into the Pliocene-Pleistocene, especially in the northwest portion of the basin and is accompanied by an increase in basin-wide subsidence. There is significant thinning over the crest of the growing anticlines and an angular unconformity near the top of the middle Miocene in the southeast portion of the basin. Middle Miocene sedimentary facies are similar to those seen in the lower Miocene, but are influenced by the contemporaneous compressional folding and normal faulting. Based on this study, there is no evidence of through-going wrench-fault deformation in the Malay Basin. Instead, localized strike-slip faulting is a subsidiary phenomenon associated with the extensional and compressional tectonic episodes.

  9. Engineering geologic feasibility of lignite mining in alluvial valleys by hydraulic dredging methods

    E-print Network

    Cason, Cynthia Lynn

    1982-01-01

    , or approximately a year's total production volume required for a single power plant boiler unit. This represents a considerable volume of potentially recoverable lignite. To the present, alluvial valleys have not been considered for mining purposes because...ENGINEERING GEOLOGIC FEASIBILITY OF LIGNITE MINING IN ALLUVIAL VALLEYS BY HYDRAULIC DREDGING METHODS A Thesis by CYNTHIA LYNN CASON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  10. Thermophysical Characterization of Terrestrial Alluvial Fans, With Applications to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moersch, J. E.; Whisner, S. C.; Hardgrove, C.

    2005-12-01

    Visible and infrared spectral remote sensing are currently being used to map lithologic variation on Mars, but these techniques are only sensitive to a depth equivalent to a few times the wavelength of observation (several 10's of microns at most). Thus, a fine regolith can make it difficult to characterize the geology of a surface based on spectral properties. This problem can be partially ameliorated by using thermal infrared temperature images. The temperature of the surface is controlled by material within approximately one diurnal thermal skin depth (typically a few cm) of the surface. Thermal images "see below" thin, spectrally obscuring surface layers, and enable the mapping of some underlying geologic heterogeneities (but not mineral compositions). Temperature variation is related, in part, to differences in thermal inertia, which in turn are related to lithology, particle size, degree of induration, and (for Earth) moisture content. THEMIS (and other) images of the Martian surface reveal a variety of features that may be the result of sedimentary processes. Earth analogs have been proposed for many of these features, but very little terrestrial analog work has been done to establish whether particular classes of sedimentary features have distinctive spatial-thermophysical signatures. Sedimentary processes often lead to sorting of grain sizes and/or varying degrees of cementation, so it is reasonable to expect that such signatures might exist. Here we present the results of a preliminary study of alluvial fans in Death Valley. As seen from above in ASTER nighttime thermal infrared images, these fans display distinct "thermophysical facies." Each fan apex has a relatively high thermal inertia, mid-fan areas have intermediate thermal inertias, and distal terminus areas have relatively low thermal inertias. This pattern of thermal inertias is consistent with field-based grain size studies that have been conducted on other debris flow-dominated fans in the area. We have also collected ground-based thermal images of one fan over a 24-hour insolation cycle in order to construct a "hypertemporal image cube" in which each spatial pixel contains a complete diurnal temperature curve. Principle component transformation of this unique data product allows us to separate the effects of surface geometry, shadows, and thermal inertia on surface temperatures. Our intent is to collect more such observations of alluvial fans and other sedimentary structures and compare them with nighttime THEMIS images of proposed analog structures on Mars.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Sediment Plug Formation in Alluvial Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A. J.; Duan, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    A sediment plug is the aggregation of sediment in a river reach that completely blocks the original channel resulting in plug growth upstream by accretion and flooding in surrounding areas. Sediment plugs historically form over relatively short periods, in many cases a matter of weeks. Although sediment plugs are much more common in reach constrictions associated with large woody debris, the mouths of tributaries, and along coastal regions, this investigation focuses on sediment plug formation in an alluvial river. During high flows in the years 1991, 1995, 2005, and 2008, a sediment plug formed in the San Marcial reach of the Middle Rio Grande. The Bureau of Reclamation has had to spend millions of dollars dredging the channel to restore flows to Elephant Butte Reservoir. The hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes, associated with plug formation, occurring in this reach are driven by 1) a flow constriction associated with a rock outcrop, 2) a railroad bridge, and 3) the water level of the downstream reservoir. The three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, Delft3D, was implemented to determine the hydrodynamic and sediment transport parameters and variables required to simulate plug formation in an effort to identify hydro- and morphodynamic thresholds. Several variables were identified by previous studies as metrics for plug formation. These variables were used in our investigation to detect the relative magnitude of each process. Both duration and degree of high flow events were simulated, along with extent of cohesive sediment deposits, reservoir level, and percent of fines in suspended sediment distribution. Results of this analysis illustrate that this model is able to reproduce the sediment plug formation. Model calibration was based on measured water levels and changes in bathymetry using both sediment transport and morphologic change parameters. Changes to hydraulic and sediment parameters are not proportional to morphologic changes and are asymptotic in their response. These results suggest that there are thresholds to predict plug formation and that the contribution of specific variables to plug formation is not uniform. Sediment plug formation is a costly and dangerous phenomenon, especially in large alluvial rivers. This investigation yielded specific insights into the hydrodynamic and morphologic processes occurring during sediment plug formation. These insights can be used to reduce the risk of plug formation and predict the locations and times of other sediment plugs.

  12. Are the topsoil structures relevant indicators of alluvial soil evolution ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Clémence; Le Bayon, Renée.-Claire; Guenat, Claire; Hallaire, Vincent; Bullinger Weber, Géraldine; Verrecchia, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Floodplains contain a wide range of all steps of soil evolution, which are relevant in order to study the initial steps of soil structuring. Alluvial soils exhibit characteristics of both sediment and / or inherited soil deposition, and in situ soil formation resulting in different types of soil structure, especially in the topsoil layers. In calcareous alluvium deposits, the structuration processes of the topsoil are fast resulting in different structures. In this context, our aim is to verify if these topsoil structures, at macroscopic and microscopic scales, are relevant indicators of in situ soil evolution in a carbonate-rich and calcium saturated environment. We hypothesise that along a soil-vegetation stabilisation gradient both macroscopic and microscopic structures of topsoil reflect this in situ soil evolution. Along this evolutionary gradient the type of structure changes and becomes more stable and widespread within the topsoil. We characterize the topsoil structure in three different vegetation types from the pioneer stage (willow vegetation) on new sediment deposits (carbonate-rich FLUVIOSOLS BRUTS according to the Sound Reference base for soils, 1998) to mature forests (beech, ash, spruce) on stable soils (carbonate-rich FLUVIOSOLS TYPIQUES) at three different altitudes (subalpine to hill levels). In order to evaluate the heterogeneity within each site and between them three replicates are made resulting in a total of 27 soil samples. At the macroscopic scale, topsoil structure is described based on morphological and macroscopic descriptions (humus form, type and size of structure) as well as structure stability (Mean Weight Diameter, MWD) and water stable macro aggregates (WSA%) according to Kemper and Rossenau (1986). At the microscopic scale, polished slabs (dimension of 7cm X 10 cm and 0.5 cm in thickness) are used to quantify pore space using a morphological approach and 2D image analysis. After binarization of the image, leading to the detection and quantification of the soil porosity, a multi fractal algorithm is applied in order to characterize the pores by the slope value of the regression line between the frequencies and their associated amplitudes. In addition, the pore size distribution is described using moments of the third and the fourth orders applied on the pore cumulative curve (pore size vs frequency). These holistic parameters of the structure can be compared with other evolution indicators (e.g. vegetation stage, soil type, structural stability) and are pertinent to evaluate the stage of the humiferous topsoil evolution. They can be considered as relevant indicators of in situ alluvial soil evolution.

  13. Magnetic properties of alluvial soils polluted with heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlouha, S.; Petrovsky, E.; Boruvka, L.; Kapicka, A.; Grison, H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic properties of soils, reflecting mineralogy, concentration and grain-size distribution of Fe-oxides, proved to be useful tool in assessing the soil properties in terms of various environmental conditions. Measurement of soil magnetic properties presents a convenient method to investigate the natural environmental changes in soils as well as the anthropogenic pollution of soils with several risk elements. The effect of fluvial pollution with Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn on magnetic soil properties was studied on highly contaminated alluvial soils from the mining/smelting district (P?íbram; CZ) using a combination of magnetic and geochemical methods. The basic soil characteristics, the content of heavy metals, oxalate, and dithionite extractable iron were determined in selected soil samples. Soil profiles were sampled using HUMAX soil corer and the magnetic susceptibility was measured in situ, further detailed magnetic analyses of selected distinct layers were carried out. Two types of variations of magnetic properties in soil profiles were observed corresponding to indentified soil types (Fluvisols, and Gleyic Fluvisols). Significantly higher values of topsoil magnetic susceptibility compared to underlying soil are accompanied with high concentration of heavy metals. Sequential extraction analysis proved the binding of Pb, Zn and Cd in Fe and Mn oxides. Concentration and size-dependent parameters (anhysteretic and isothermal magnetization) were measured on bulk samples in terms of assessing the origin of magnetic components. The results enabled to distinguish clearly topsoil layers enhanced with heavy metals from subsoil samples. The dominance of particles with pseudo-single domain behavior in topsoil and paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic contribution in subsoil were observed. These measurements were verified with room temperature hysteresis measurement carried out on bulk samples and magnetic extracts. Thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility measured on magnetic extracts indicated the presence of magnetite/maghemite in the uppermost layers, and strong mineralogical transformation of iron oxyhydroxides during heating. Magnetic techniques give valuable information about the soil Fe oxides, which are useful for investigation of the environmental effects in soil. Key words: magnetic methods, Fe oxides, pollution, alluvial soils.

  14. Constraining aggradation and degradation phases of alluvial fans in the sedimentary record: a case study from the Namib Desert, NW Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hagke, Christoph; Stollhofen, Harald; Malatesta, Luca C.; Stanistreet, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Controversy exists over when alluvial fans propagate, when they incise and how this is expressed in the sedimentary record. The Horingbaai Fan-delta at the Skeleton coast provides an end member due to its location in a hyper-arid area and a tectonically quiescent, although continuously uplifting setting. Accordingly, the influence of climate changes on alluvial fan sedimentation is directly assessable. There is pronounced interaction with the marine system during fan evolution, which provides the opportunity to constrain phases of fan progradation based on marine terrace stratigraphy. In this contribution, we will (1) present a detailed stratigraphic framework of the Horingbaai Fan-delta and associated marine terraces, and (2) analyze this framework in order to identify the imprint of past climatic changes on the sedimentary record. The of the Horingbaai Fan-delta sediments have been laid down between 2.6 and 2.4 Ma, based on age constraints from under- and overlying marine terraces. After 2.4 Ma, fan sedimentation was generally reduced and much more irregular due to intervening erosion phases. We propose a new model for late stage sedimentation and erosion phases, using offshore bathymetric and onshore sedimentological data, and conclude that generally decreasing sea-surface temperatures and glacial cycles largely govern the mode of sedimentation since the Early Pleistocene. We compare these findings to other fans at the Skeleton Coast, as well as other systems worldwide. Our study shows that climatic variations may leave distinct imprints in the sedimentological record. Recognizing these in depositional systems worldwide will improve understanding how fan sediments are preserved through time, and whether the reported worldwide increase in sedimentation rates since the Late Cenozoic is real or apparent.

  15. US Army Corps of Engineers Arid West Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM Arid West Region

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    US Army Corps of Engineers Arid West ­ Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM ­ Arid West of Biotic Crust Hydrophytic Vegetation Present? Yes No Remarks: #12;US Army Corps of Engineers Arid West Invertebrates (B13) Drift Deposits (B3) (Riverine) Water Marks (B1) (Nonriverine) Hydrogen Sulfide Odor (C1

  16. Asymmetric alluvial fans along strike-slip faults: A potential slip-rate record?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of asymmetric alluvial fan morphology along strike-slip faults. From analysis of high-resolution topographic data, we find that asymmetric alluvial fans are common along several strike-slip faults in the western United States. Affected fans are steeper in the direction of translation of the sediment source, often resulting in stream deflections counter to that expected from the sense of fault slip (e.g. left deflected streams along dextral faults). We hypothesize that fan asymmetry results from lateral translation of the sediment source relative to the depocenter. This relative motion changes the accommodation space in such a way that one side of the alluvial fan continuously progrades while the other is gradually abandoned. Therefore, lateral translation results in radial asymmetry of slopes about the fan apex. As a first approximation, we model this asymmetry as a result of diffusive sediment transport down fan. From this analysis, we predict that the degree of asymmetry of the alluvial fan is controlled by the ratio of sediment flux to fault slip rate. Qualitatively, more rapidly slipping faults should host more highly asymmetric fans; conversely, high sediment flux will obscure asymmetry. By measuring the sediment flux, through catchment-average concentration of cosmogenic isotopes or other means, we show that it is theoretically possible to quantify strike-slip fault slip-rates and alluvial-fan sediment transport rates using alluvial fan morphometry.

  17. Elementary and Secondary Education in Arid Lands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Herbert B.

    The basic point to be considered in establishing a curriculum for elementary and secondary schools in the arid areas of the world is relevancy. Usually, the educational system of an area reflects the dominant culture of the political power in control. However, the educational system of the dominant culture might not be relevant to the people of…

  18. Evaporation Modeling in Lakes in Arid and Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, A.; Giesen, N.

    2012-04-01

    Evaporation is the main loss from the system but, in contrast to losses to the groundwater, the evaporative loss does not have any direct benefits in the immediate environment of the reservoir. Evaporative losses make small reservoirs less efficient than large reservoirs. Significance of its accurate estimation increases when the problems are associated with the water resources accounting of arid and semi-arid regions. Direct measurement of evaporation from water surface is very difficult. The process of evaporation is a complex phenomenon, which is a function of solar radiation, temperature, wind speed, vapour pressure deficit, atmospheric pressure and the surrounding environment. Accurate estimation of evaporation is important for designing and planning projects in which a water balance is key factor as well as for conservation of water. In other words, accurate estimation of free water surface evaporation in arid and semi-arid regions, what criterion can be followed for selection of reliable evaporation method, is an important area of research. The precise estimation of evaporation from a water body requires extensive databases, which are often missing and/or expensive to generate on routine basis. In this paper, different methods for evaporation from small lakes in arid and semi-arid regions(According to the available data) is considered and different parameters affected this phenomenon are discussed(i.e. wind speed above the water surface, heat storage of lake, roughness length of water surface, etc.).

  19. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally decreased with increasing aridity with k going from 0.0025 day-1 on equatorial (dry) facing slopes to 0.0040 day-1 on polar (wet) facing slopes. However, differences in temperature as a result of morning vs afternoon sun on east and west aspects, respectively, (not captured in the aridity metric) resulted in poor prediction of decomposition for the sites located in the intermediate aridity range. Overall the results highlight that relatively small differences in microclimate due to slope orientation can have large effects on decomposition. Future research will aim to refine the aridity metric to better resolve small scale variation in surface temperature which is important when up-scaling decomposition processes to landscapes.

  20. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapors In Unsaturated Alluvial Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhener, P.; Duwig, C.; Pasteris, G.; Dakhel, N.; Kaufmann, K.; Werner, D.

    Biodegradation rates are critical parameters in models aimed at predicting the nat- ural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone. In this study the kinetic rate laws for the aerobic biodegradation of selected petroleum hydrocarbons and MTBE were investigated in unsaturated alluvial sand exposed to the vapors from a fuel mixture. Laboratory column and batch experiments were per- formed at room temperature under aerobic conditions. An analytical reactive transport model for VOC vapors in soil based on Monod kinetics is used for data interpretation. In the column experiment, steady-state diffusive vapor transport was reached after 23 days. Monod kinetic parameters were derived from the column profiles for toluene, m-xylene, octane and hexane. The degradation of cyclic alkanes, isooctane, and 1,2,4- trimethylbenzene was best described by first-order kinetics. MTBE, pentane and chlo- rofluorocarbons were recalcitrant. Batch experiments suggested first-order disappear- ance rate laws for all VOCs except octane, which followed zero-order kinetics. For some compounds including MTBE, disappearance rates in abiotic batch experiments were as high as in live batches. Abiotic disappearance is explained by slow intraparti- cle diffusion and sorption. It is concluded that the column approach is preferable for determining biodegradation rate parameters to be used in risk assessment models.

  1. Floodplain biogeochemical mosaics: A multidimensional view of alluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appling, Alison P.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Stanford, Jack A.

    2014-08-01

    The alluvial floodplains of large rivers are exceptionally productive and dynamic ecosystems, characterized by a complex mosaic of vegetation at different successional stages overlying soils sorted by historic floods. Natural floodplains are widely credited with efficiently removing nitrogen from surface waters and accumulating carbon in biomass, yet very little floodplain research has examined carbon and nitrogen cycling below surficial soils. We evaluated the extent to which vegetation cover could be used to predict subsurface carbon and nitrogen dynamics and to estimate whole-floodplain carbon storage and denitrification rates. We dug soil pits under three dominant vegetation communities on a gravel-bedded floodplain in northwest Montana to the depth of the permanent water table (1-3 m). We compared depth profiles of total and dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), denitrification potentials (DEAs), organic particulates, moisture, and pH across vegetation types. Near-surface soils (0-10 cm) of forests had larger C and N pools and DEAs than grasslands or gravel bars, but such vegetation effects dissipated within the upper ~50 cm of soil. At depth, spatial heterogeneity in carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes depended instead on soil texture, and relatively high rates of DEA and carbon storage were measured in zones of buried organic debris. Although C storage and denitrification potential are generally low in subsurface soils, these deep soils might nonetheless contribute substantially to whole-floodplain C storage and denitrification because of their large volume, high hydrologic connectivity, and heterogeneous biogeochemistry.

  2. Comparing Reactive Surface Area of Sediments in Hot and Cold Arid Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburg, R.; Elwood Madden, M.; Joo, Y. J.; Marra, K. R.; Soreghan, G. S.; Hall, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The reactive surface area of primary silicate phases in sediment is an important determinant in weathering rates and fluxes in the critical zone. Weathering rates in warm climates are presumed to be faster than rates in cold climates, but glacial stream systems have chemical fluxes similar to temperate climates due to the production of highly reactive fresh mineral surfaces. To assess climate as a controller on weathering rates by comparing reactive surface area in cold arid and hot arid systems, samples were collected at the base of Denton Glacier, Wright Valley, Antarctica, and in the Anza Borrego Desert, California. Sediments were wet sieved and treated to remove carbonates and organics. Mud and very fine fractions were freeze dried. Surface areas of each size fraction were determined using the BET method. Sediment reactivity was measured through batch dissolution experiments in water buffered to pH 8.4. Samples were removed and filtered at predetermined time intervals, then refrigerated prior to ICP-OES analysis. Antarctic glacial sediment released an order of magnitude or more cations to solution compared to alluvial sediments from the Anza Borrego Desert. The Anza Borrego sand fraction was more reactive than the mud for Ca, P, Mn, and Si, while the Antarctic mud was more reactive than the sand for all cations. The high reactivity of the glacial mud can be attributed to the high reactive surface area (10.42 m2/g) created by physical crushing. In addition, the cation exchange capacity of the mud fraction was reached more quickly in the Antarctica samples, while Anza Borrego muds produced more complicated weathering fluxes, likely due to their higher clay mineral component. These results emphasize a strong climate control and the importance of physical weathering mechanisms on the chemical weathering fluxes over geologic time scales.

  3. Global semi-arid climate change over last 60 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Ji, Mingxia; Xie, Yongkun; Wang, Shanshan; He, Yongli; Ran, Jinjiang

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzes areal changes and regional climate variations in global semi-arid regions over 61 years (1948-2008) and investigates the dynamics of global semi-arid climate change. The results reveal that the largest expansion of drylands has occurred in semi-arid regions since the early 1960s. This expansion of semi-arid regions accounts for more than half of the total dryland expansion. The area of semi-arid regions in the most recent 15 years studied (1990-2004) is 7 % larger than that during the first 15 years (1948-1962) of the study period; this expansion totaled 0.4 × 106 and 1.2 × 106 km2 within the American continents and in the Eastern Hemisphere, respectively. Although semi-arid expansion occurred in both regions, the shifting patterns of the expansion are different. Across the American continents, the newly formed semi-arid regions developed from arid regions, in which the climate became wetter. Conversely, in the continental Eastern Hemisphere, semi-arid regions replaced sub-humid/humid regions, in which the climate became drier. The climate change in drying semi-arid regions over East Asia is primarily dominated by a weakened East Asian summer monsoon, while the wetting of semi-arid regions over North America is primarily controlled by enhanced westerlies.

  4. Mineral Occurrence, Translocation, and Weathering in Soils Developed on Four Types of Carbonate and Non-carbonate Alluvial Fan Deposits in Mojave Desert, Southeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Soil geomorphology and mineralogy can reveal important clues about Quaternary climate change and geochemical process occurring in desert soils. We investigated (1) the mineral transformation in desert soils developed on four types of alluvial fans (carbonate and non-carbonate) under the same conditions of climate and landscape evolution; and (2) the effects of age, parent materials, and eolian processes on the transformation and translocation of the minerals. Four types of alluvial-fan deposits along the Providence Mountains piedmonts, Mojave Desert, southeastern California, USA were studied: (1) carbonate rocks, primarily limestone and marble (LS), (2) fine-grained rhyodacite and rhyolitic tuff mixed with plutonic and carbonate rocks (VX), (3) fine- to coarse- grained mixed plutonic (PM) rocks, and (4) coarse-grained quartz monzonite (QM). These juxtaposed fan deposits are physically correlated in a small area (about 20 km by 15 km) and experienced the same climatic changes in the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The soils show characteristic mineral compositions of arid/semiarid soils: calcite is present in nearly all of the samples, and a few of the oldest soils contain gypsum and soluble salts. Parent material has profound influence on clay mineral composition of the soils: (1) talc were observed only in soils developed on the volcanic mixture fan deposits, and talc occurs in all horizons; (2) palygorskite occur mainly in the petrocalcic (Bkm) of old soils developed on the LS and VX fan deposits, indicating pedogenic origin; (3) chlorite was observed mainly in soils developed on VX fan deposits (all ages) and on some LS deposits, but it is absent in soils developed on PM and QM fan deposits; and (4) vermiculite was common throughout soils developed on plutonic rock fan deposits. These mineralogical differences suggest that minerals in the soils are primarily inherited from their parent materials and that mineral weathering in this area was weak. Except the abundance of palygorskite, soils developed on alluvial fans with different ages (4,000 to 200,000 yrs old) did not show other distinct mineralogy difference as a function of age or soil development, which supports the weak weathering of the soils. The results suggest that the clays in the argillic horizons are primarily derived from the accumulation of desert dust, and with time, are translocated into subsoil horizons. The pedogenic accumulation of dust is a soil-geomorphic process common to the Mojave Desert, as well as other deserts in the world.

  5. Geomorphic changes upstream of beaver dams in Bridge Creek, an incised stream channel in the interior Columbia River basin, eastern Oregon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M. Pollock; Timothy J. Beechie; Chris E. Jordan

    2007-01-01

    Channel incision is a widespread phenomenon throughout the dry interior Columbia River basin and other semi-arid regions of the world, which degrades stream habitat by funda- mentally altering natural ecological, geomorphological and hydrological processes. We examined the extent of localized aggradation behind beaver dams on an incised stream in the interior Columbia River basin to assess the potential for using

  6. Patterns of human occupation during the early Holocene in the Central Ebro Basin (NE Spain) in response to the 8.2 ka climatic event

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. González-Sampériz; P. Utrilla; C. Mazo; B. Valero-Garcés; Mc. Sopena; M. Morellón; M. Sebastián; A. Moreno; M. Martínez-Bea

    2009-01-01

    The Central Ebro River Basin (NE Spain) is the most northern area of truly semi-arid Mediterranean climate in Europe and prehistoric human occupation there has been strongly influenced by this extreme environmental condition. Modern climate conditions single out this region due to the harsh environment, characterised by the highest absolute summer temperatures of the Ebro River Basin. The Bajo Aragón

  7. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (?15N, ?18O, and ?17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  8. Modeling Episodic Surface Runoff in an Arid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichler, S. R.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methods were developed for estimating episodic surface runoff in arid eastern Washington, USA. Small (1--10 km2) catchments in this region with mean annual precipitation around 180 mm produce runoff in about half the years, and such events usually occur during winter when a widespread cold snap and possible snow accumulation is followed by warmer temperatures and rainfall. Existence of frozen soil appears to be a key factor, and a moving average of air temperature is an effective predictor of soil temperature. The watershed model DHSVM simulates snow accumulation and ablation reasonably well at a monitoring location, but the same model applied in distributed mode across a 850 km2 basin overpredicts runoff. Inadequate definition of local meteorology appears to limit the accuracy of runoff predictions. However, runoff estimates of sufficient quality to support modeling of long-term groundwater recharge and sediment transport may be found in focusing on recurrence intervals and volumes rather than hydrographs. Usefulness of upland watershed modeling to environmental management of the Hanford Site and an adjacent military reservation will likely improve through sensitivity analysis of basic assumptions about upland water balance.

  9. Calculations of surface radiation in arid regions - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Ji, Guoliang; Liuo, Kuo-Nan; Ou, Szu-Cheng S.

    1992-01-01

    The surface and satellite data measured during the preliminary field experiment for the Land-Atmosphere Interactions Experiment conducted at the Heihe River basin in western China are used to investigate the difficulties encountered in the derivation of the surface radiation budget in arid regions. The surface radiation is derived by coupling theoretical radiative transfer calculations with satellite cloud retrievals. For cloud-free cases, the modeled downward solar fluxes are systematically larger than the measured fluxes. It is found that the error can be reduced and that good agreement between the computed and measured surface solar fluxes can be obtained by using an aerosol single-scattering albedo of 0.5 and an optical thickness of about 0.2 in the afternoon hours. For all the cases studied when both surface and satellite data are available, the mean errors are 4.3 and -4.7 W/sq m for the net downward surface solar flux and the downward surface IR flux, respectively. The rms errors are 17.4 and 22.1 W/sq m for the respective surface fluxes. The importance of aerosols in surface radiation calculations is underscored.

  10. Ground-water hydrology and simulated effects of development in Smith Creek valley, a hydrologically closed basin in Lander County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Carlton, S.M.; Hines, L.B.

    1989-01-01

    Smith Creek valley is a hydrologically closed, single-valley ground-water flow system in the Great Basin. The basin-fill aquifer consists of unconsolidated alluvial and lacustrine deposits as thick as 5,500 ft. Simulations based on a ground-water flow model indicate that potential natural discharge can be efficiently captured by pumping strategically located wells at a rate equal to the sustained yield with small declines of ground-water levels.

  11. Climate change scenarios of herbaceous production along an aridity gradient: vulnerability increases with aridity.

    PubMed

    Golodets, Carly; Sternberg, Marcelo; Kigel, Jaime; Boeken, Bertrand; Henkin, Zalmen; Seligman, No'am G; Ungar, Eugene D

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is expected to reduce annual precipitation by 20% and increase its standard deviation by 20% in the eastern Mediterranean. We have examined how these changes may affect herbaceous aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and its inter-annual coefficient of variation (CV) in natural rangelands along a desert-Mediterranean precipitation gradient, at five sites representing arid, semi-arid, and Mediterranean-type ecosystems, respectively, all showing positive linear relationships between herbaceous ANPP and annual precipitation. Scenarios of reduced annual precipitation and increased inter-annual precipitation variability were defined by manipulating mean annual precipitation (MAP) and its standard deviation. We simulated precipitation and calculated ANPP using current ANPP-precipitation relationships. Our model predicts that reduced precipitation will strongly reduce ANPP in arid and semi-arid sites. Moreover, the effect of reduced precipitation on the CV of ANPP along the entire gradient may be modified by changes in inter-annual variability in MAP. Reduced precipitation combined with increased precipitation variability was the scenario most relevant to the wet end of the gradient, due to the increased likelihood for both dry and rainy years. In contrast, the scenario most relevant to the arid end of the gradient combined reduced precipitation with decreased precipitation variability, due to the strong effect on mean ANPP. All scenarios increased variability of ANPP along the entire gradient. However, the higher sensitivity of vegetation at arid and semi-arid sites (i.e., lower forage production) to future changes in the precipitation regime emphasizes the need to adapt grazing management in these ecosystems to secure their long-term viability as sustainable rangelands. PMID:25663330

  12. Geologic evolution of Uinta-Piceance basin province, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.Y.; Tuttle, M.L.; Bryant, B.H.; Dubiel, R.F.; Fouch, T.D.; Franczyk, K.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Grout, M.A.; Johnson, R.C.; Molenaar, C.M.; Nichols, D.J.; Nichols, K.M.; Nuccio, V.F.; Peterson, F.; Pitman, J.K.; Perry, W.J. Jr.; Potter, C.J.; Sawatzky, D.L.; Scott, R.W. Jr.; Verbeek, E.R.; Wanty, R.B. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The Uinta-Piceance basin province (UPBP) has a complex Phanerozoic history characterized by five distinct phases of basin development (1) The UPBP formed part of a continental platform shelf on the northwestern flank of North America during the early and middle Paleozoic. Cambrian through Mississippian strata consist mainly of carbonate rocks, shale, and quartzite; contain major unconformities; and thicken westward. (2) Pennsylvanian-Permian uplifts of the ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny segmented this continental platform shelf into the Eagle, Paradox, and Oquirrh basins. Basin-margin tectonics and cyclic eustatic-climatic fluctuations strongly controlled deposition of the clastic, carbonate, and evaporitic fill of these basins. (3) During the early Mesozoic, the UPBP formed part of a slowly subsiding continental platform. Triassic-Jurassic rocks include eolian, alluvial, and lacustrine deposits that thicken and grade westward into marine facies. (4) Paleozoic and early Mesozoic strata in the westernmost part of the UPBP were thrust eastward during the late Mesozoic Sevier orogeny, causing subsidence in the adjacent foreland basin. The history of the UPBP part of this foreland basin is recorded by thick nonmarine deposits within and adjacent to the thrust belt that grade eastward into thinner accumulations of marine rocks. (5) The geometry and style of regional compressional deformation changed markedly with onset of the latest Cretaceous-Paleogene Laramide orogeny. Laramide uplifts segmented the UPBP foreland basin into the Uinta and Piceance intermontane lacustrine basins. The geometry of these lacustrine basins is notably different from that of the late Paleozoic segment basins.

  13. GLDAS Land Surface Models based Aridity Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Ghazanfari, S.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of dryland areas is crucial to guide policy aimed at intervening in water stressed areas and addressing its perennial livelihood or food insecurity. Aridity indices based on spatially relative soil moisture conditions such as NCEP aridity index allow cross comparison of dry conditions between sites. NCEP aridity index is based on the ratio of annual precipitation (supply) to annual potential evaporation (demand). Such an index ignores subannual scale competition between evaporation and drainage functions well as rainfall and temperature regimes. This determines partitioning of annual supply of precipitation into two competing (but met) evaporation and runoff demands. We here introduce aridity indices based on these additional considerations by using soil moisture time series for the past 3 decades from three Land Surface Models (LSM) models and compare it with NCEP index. We analyze global monthly soil moisture time series (385 months) at 1 x 1 degree spatial resolution as modeled by three GLDAS LSMs - VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH. The first eigen vector from Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis, as it is the most dominant spatial template of global soil moisture conditions, is extracted. Frequency of nonexceedences of this dominant soil moisture mode for a location by other locations is calculated and is used as our proposed aridity index. An area is indexed drier (relative to other areas in the world) if its frequency of nonexceedence is lower. The EOF analysis reveals that their first eigen vector explains approximately 32%, 43% and 47% of variance explained by first 385 eigen vectors for VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH respectively. The temporal coefficients associated with it for all three LSMS show seasonality with a jump in trend around the year 1999 for NOAH and MOSAIC. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of NCEP though all LSM based indices isolate dominant dryland areas. However, all three LSMs identify some parts of south central Africa, southeast United States and eastern India as drier than NCEP classification. NOAH and MOSAIC indentify parts of Western Africa drier than the other two classifications, while NOAH and VIC indentify parts of central India as wetter than the other two classifications.

  14. Lower Mississippi River: A Mixed Bedrock-alluvial Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D.; Allison, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetric and CHIRP sub-bottom seismic data from the lower most 110 km of the Mississippi River offer a detailed depiction of the bed surface, revealing portions of the channel covered by sediment and areas of exposed substrate. A single line data swath running from Head of Passes to the English Turn bend was collected during low water discharge conditions. The swath zigzags up the river channel, intersecting each bank at an oblique angle of roughly 45 degrees, thereby ensuring that the entire channel bottom is adequately represented by the survey. Local composition of the channel bed is determined based on distinctive bathymetric characteristics, and is corroborated by grab samples collected along the survey path. Dune fields, composed of active and inactive dunes, cover 77% of the channel bottom and are most abundant in straight reach segments. Stagnant dunes, mantled by high-porosity ephemeral mud, cover 7% of the channel bed and tend to be located in shallower water near the river banks (10-15 m depth). Active bedforms cover 70% of the bed and are centered on the channel thalweg at water depths of 15-25 m. The remainder of the river bed is devoid of dunes, and consists of highly-consolidated and stratified sedimentary deposits that are part of the Pleistocene and Holocene substrata that lies beneath the modern Mississippi River (23% coverage). Steeply dipping channel sidewalls (30-80 degrees) are composed of the relict sediments and make up 10% of the bed area. Erosion-resistant substrate covers 13% of the channel bottom, and is frequently exposed in the deepest portions of the thalweg (25-60 m depth). Grooves and flutes are cut into this exposed substrate implying active river incision. Based on the proportion of modern sediment cover versus exposed erosion-resistant substrate on the channel bed, we propose that the lower Mississippi River is best classified as a mixed bedrock-alluvial channel.

  15. Alluvial Soil Chronosequence in the Inner Coastal Plain, Central Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Jeffrey L.; Amos, Dan F.; Daniels, W. Lee

    1993-03-01

    A chronological sequence of soils formed on a series of alluvial depositional surfaces ranging in age from late-middle Miocene to late Pleistocene was characterized to clarify soil-geomorphic relations and provide a basis for allostratigraphic subdivision of the inner Coastal Plain. On Quaternary river terraces, Ultic Hapludalfs containing abundant weatherable mineral species and clast types are estimated to have formed in 60,000-120,000 yr, whereas Typic Hapludults greatly depleted in weatherable minerals and showing strong weathering of clast types are estimated to be 700,000-1,600,000 yr old. Typic Paleudults with incipient plinthite, duripan, and ferricrete development characterize interfluves that have been little eroded since early Pliocene time (3.4-5.3 myr ago). Typic-Plinthic Paleudults with intense weathering of siliceous clasts and moderate to strong duripan and ferricrete development are found on surfaces that formed near the beginning of late Miocene time (10.8-13.0 myr ago). Chemical weathering in the chronosequence may be classified into three progressive stages: (1) decomposition of unstable sand- and silt-sized minerals into a mixed (stable + unstable) clay-mineral suite (stable Fe + Al/Si bulk chemical composition, < 10 6 yr); (2) transformation of mixed clay-mineral suite into a stable suite (increasing Fe + Al/Si bulk chemical composition, 10 6 - 10 7 yr); and (3) transformation of stable suite into ultrastable clay-mineral suite (increasing Fe/Si bulk composition, > 10 7 yr). Not all soil properties show unidirectional development, nor is a steady state of pedon development observed even after approximately 10 7 yr of chemical weathering. Soil development in the chronosequence is episodic. The transition from one phase to the next is marked by a change in rate, and sometimes a reversal in the direction, of development of one or more soil properties.

  16. Comparison of different investigation methods to characterise alluvial gravel aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reist, Fabian; Brauchler, Ralf; Jiménez, Santos; Bühler, Lukas; Hu, Linwei; Leuenberger-West, Fanny; Bayer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    For reliable groundwater transport modelling of unconsolidated porous aquifers, high resolution characterisation of spatially heterogeneous hydraulic and transport properties is of great importance. Predictions of first-arrival times and long term behaviour depend strongly on the quality of estimated hydraulic and transport parameters. By neglecting small-scale structures such as sand lenses and sediment intra-channel deposits, predictions are hardly accurate. This paper deals with the comparison of methods to characterize hydraulic parameters governing solute transport in unconsolidated porous aquifer materials. A large number of single-well slug tests, cross-well slug tests, a pumping test and a multi-level tracer test were conducted in a shallow alluvial gravel aquifer. This facilitated describing the spatial variation of hydraulic and transport parameters with high resolution. Multi-level slug tests results show distinct positive correlation with porosity-logs and drill cores and are thus an effective means to identify and characterize subsurface structures at high resolution. Values for hydraulic conductivity gained from pumping tests and cross-well slug tests revealed good accordance but were around one order of magnitude higher than the values derived from multi-level slug tests. This might be due to the fact that the three methods are involving different test-volumes. Hence, the determination of hydraulic conductivity underlies a scale dependency: larger test volumes tend to be characterized by larger K-values. Furthermore, our pumping test results show the importance of a high sampling rate, in our case 50 Hz, in order to determine reliably the hydraulic properties storage and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivity. Although pumping tests typically estimate hydraulic parameters on large-scale, small-scale heterogeneity could also be identified and characterized. This was again possible through the high resolution records of the early time drawdown. Finally, results of multi-level tracer testing supported observations from slug tests and porosity logs.

  17. Waste rice for waterfowl in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, J.D.; Kaminski, R.M.; Reinecke, K.J.; Manley, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are important foraging habitats for waterfowl in the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV). Waste rice previously was abundant in late autumn (140?492 kg/ha), but early planting and harvest dates in recent years may have increased losses of waste rice during autumn before waterfowl arrive. Research in Mississippi rice fields revealed waste-rice abundance decreased 79?99% during autumns 1995?1996. To determine if this trend existed throughout the MAV, we used multistage sampling (MSS) to estimate waste-rice abundance during September?December 2000?2002. Averaged over years, mean abundance of waste rice decreased 71% between harvest ((x) over bar = 271.0 kg/ha, CV = 13% n = 3 years) and late autumn ( (x) over bar = 78.4 kg/ha, CV = 15% n = 3). Among 15 models formulated to explain variation in rice abundance among fields and across years, the best model indicated abundance of waste rice in late autumn differed between harvester types (i.e., conventional > stripper header) and was positively related to initial waste-rice abundance after harvest. Because abundance of waste rice in late autumn was less than previous estimates in all 3 years, we concluded that waterfowl conservationists have overestimated carrying capacity of rice fields for wintering waterfowl by 52?83% and recommend 325 duck-use days/ha (DUDs) as a revised estimate. We suggest monitoring advances in rice harvest dates to determine when new surveys are warranted and recommend increased management of moist-soil wetlands to compensate for decreased rice abundance.

  18. Evaluation of reforestation in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, S.L.; Keeland, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    Only about 2.8 million ha of an estimated original 10 million ha of bottomland hardwood forests still exist in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (LMAV) of the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and state agencies initiated reforestation efforts in the late 1980s to improve wildlife habitat. We surveyed restorationists responsible for reforestation in the LMAV to determine the magnitude of past and future efforts and to identify major limiting factors. Over the past 10 years, 77,698 ha have been reforested by the agencies represented in our survey and an additional 89,009 ha are targeted in the next 5 years. Oaks are the most commonly planted species and bare-root seedlings are the most commonly used planting stock. Problems with seedling availability may increase the diversity of plantings in the future. Reforestation in the LMAV is based upon principles of landscape ecology; however, local problems such as herbivory, drought, and flooding often limit success. Broad-scale hydrologic restoration is needed to fully restore the structural and functional attributes of these systems, but because of drastic and widespread hydrologic alterations and socioeconomic constraints, this goal is generally not realistic. Local hydrologic restoration and creation of specific habitat features needed by some wildlife and fish species warrant attention. More extensive analyses of plantings are needed to evaluate functional success. The Wetland Reserve Program is a positive development, but policies that provide additional financial incentives to landowners for reforestation efforts should be seriously considered.

  19. Movement of agricultural chemicals between surface water and ground water, lower Cedar River basin, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Caldwell, J.P.; Schulmeyer, P.M.; Harvey, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Movement of alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and metolachlor between surface water and ground water in documented data collected from May 1989 through July 1991 at a study site in the lower Cedar River basin, Iowa. The principal source of atrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and metolachlor in the Cedar River during two periods of base flow in 1989 and 1990 was ground water discharged from the alluvial aquifer adjacent to the river.

  20. Anthropic Modification of The Alluvial Plain and Flood Control In Some Marchean Rivers (central Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farabollini, P.; Materazzi, M.

    The fluvial axis of the marchean rivers display an essentially sinuate character, whereas in its terminal portion, where it runs through a wide valley, it assumes an anastomosed form. In the initial portion, where it runs inside the Umbro-Marchean calcareous ridge, the regime is prevalently stream like, while in the arenaceous and clayey hilly belt, it follows a more regular trend. In the middle-lower portion, and especially in summer, the hydrological regime is significantly influenced by the water drawn off for hydroelectric and irrigation purposes. The particular hydrographic and orographic setting of the study territory and the considerable amount of anthropic activity, both in the past and present, are responsible for the frequent and disastrous flooding and flash flooding phenomena that, during intense rainfall, affected vast areas of the middle-terminal portion of the alluvial plain. An analysis of the flooding events of the last years has in fact led to the observation that flooding and flash flooding phenomena, and the damage deriving from them, are connected especially with mistaken management of the territory and subordinately with abundant rainfalls in a short span of time. This includes the following factors: insufficient, or complete absence of works for maintaining natural levees and river beds; the obstruction of watercourses due to building with no respect for adequate hydraulic criteria; an excessive narrowing or straightening of the main river axis, above all in those portions near the mouth; runoff difficulties in the works connecting the main hydrographic network with the secondary one; insufficient disposal capacity or efficiency of the rain water outlet network; insufficient measures, or a lack of planning of measures and/or works for emergency protection systems; widespread situations of hydrogeological accident and slope instability, accentuated by the progressive abandoning of agriculture and repeated occurrence of forest fires. In particular, after the atmospheric events of the April, 1992, November 1998 and September 2000, which caused vast damages, it could be shown that the causes determining the flash flooding, as well as the occurrence of floods with return times of less than 20 years (flow rate of the order of 120 m3/sec) and which are increasing in the last decade, were attributable to four main causes: · deviations and artificial banks along the lower valley, dating from 1400 to 1500, for land reclamation and agriculture; · 15th century alterations and destruction due to anthropic settlements and more extensive agricultural cultivation; · beginning from the year 1900, the building of transversal works to deviate the water for hydroelectric and agricultural purposes with a hydraulic profile rate incompatible with that of the existent hydraulic defenses such as to cause flash floods due to breaking of the banks; · underestimation in measuring the fluvial discharge due to indiscriminate and strong exploitations of the aquifers for agriculture during arid periods.

  1. Significance of paleosols in alluvial architecture: Example from Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Mantzios, C. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Paleosols are rapidly becoming an important and essential aspect of alluvial architecture. Their diversity can be used extensively in detailing important subenvironments of major alluvial systems. The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau exhibits some of the best examples of alluvial paleosols yet known. Three-dimensional exposures are used to illustrate the relationships between the various alluvial subenvironments. Paleosols are better developed on meandering-channel systems where the overbank areas are much broader compared to braided-channel systems where paleosol profiles are thin and less well developed. A great variation also exists between paleosols which were developed on different subenvironments. This variability ranges from degree of development (maturity) of the soil profile to the presence or absence of certain pedogenic features. Three processes are responsible for the development of the soil profiles: sedimentation, pedogenesis, and diagenesis. All three processes must be differentiated and considered separately. Sedimentation rates the paleosols to the channels, distinguishes soil profiles, and helps explain compound pedogenesis. Diagenesis reflects mineralogical alterations which may be related to climatic conditions, soil horizon coloration which does not necessarily reflect horizon boundaries, and processes such as silicification, calcification, and concretion development. Pedogenesis acts in various degrees reflecting climate, topography, vegetation, parent material, and time. All these aspects of paleosols can be used effectively to reconstruct ancient alluvial architecture. The Morrison Formation is a prime example because of its great regional extent and excellent outcrops.

  2. Hydrochemical characteristics of groundwater in the Zhangye Basin, Northwestern China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. H. Wen; Y. Q. Wu; J. Wu

    2008-01-01

    The Zhangye Basin, located in arid northwest China, is an important agricultural and industrial center. In recent years rapid\\u000a development has created an increased demand for water, which is increasingly being fulfilled by groundwater abstraction. Detailed\\u000a knowledge of the geochemical evolution of groundwater and water quality can enhance understanding of the hydrochemical system,\\u000a promoting sustainable development and effective management of

  3. VOCs in Arid soils: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds In Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) focuses on technologies to clean up volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants in soil and groundwater at arid sites. The initial host site is the 200 West Area at DOE`s Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. The primary VOC contaminant is carbon tetrachloride, in association with heavy metals and radionuclides. An estimated 580--920 metric tons of carbon tetrachloride were disposed of between 1955 and 1973, resulting in extensive soil and groundwater contamination. The VOC-Arid ID schedule has been divided into three phases of implementation. The phased approach provides for: rapid transfer of technologies to the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) programs once demonstrated; logical progression in the complexity of demonstrations based on improved understanding of the VOC problem; and leveraging of the host site EM-40 activities to reduce the overall cost of the demonstrations. During FY92 and FY93, the primary technology demonstrations within the ID were leveraged with an ongoing expedited response action at the Hanford 200 West Area, which is directed at vapor extraction of VOCs from the vadose (unsaturated) zone. Demonstration efforts are underway in the areas of subsurface characterization including: drilling and access improvements, off-gas and borehole monitoring of vadose zone VOC concentrations to aid in soil vapor extraction performance evaluation, and treatment of VOC-contaminated off-gas. These current demonstration efforts constitute Phase 1 of the ID and, because of the ongoing vadose zone ERA, can result in immediate transfer of successful technologies to EM-40.

  4. Peruvian Arid Coast and Agriculture, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The coast of Peru, between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes Mountains is very arid (16.5S, 72.5W). For several thousand years, water from numerous small streams has been used for traditional flood and canal irrigation agriculture. However, during the past decade innovative techniques have tapped new water sources for increased agricultural production. Ground water in the porous sedimentary rock formations has been tapped for well irrigation agriculture.

  5. Evolution of local facilitation in arid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kéfi, Sonia; van Baalen, Minus; Rietkerk, Max; Loreau, Michel

    2008-07-01

    In harsh environments, sessile organisms can make their habitat more hospitable by buffering environmental stress or increasing resource availability. Although the ecological significance of such local facilitation is widely established, the evolutionary aspects have been seldom investigated. Yet addressing the evolutionary aspects of local facilitation is important because theoretical studies show that systems with such positive interactions can exhibit alternative stable states and that such systems may suddenly become extinct when they evolve (evolutionary suicide). Arid ecosystems currently experience strong changes in climate and human pressures, but little is known about the effects of these changes on the selective pressures exerted on the vegetation. Here, we focus on the evolution of local facilitation in arid ecosystems, using a lattice-structured model explicitly considering local interactions among plants. We found that the evolution of local facilitation depends on the seed dispersal strategy. In systems characterized by short-distance seed dispersal, adaptation to a more stressful environment leads to high local facilitation, allowing the population to escape extinction. In contrast, systems characterized by long-distance seed dispersal become extinct under increased stress even when allowed to adapt. In this case, adaptation in response to climate change and human pressures could give the final push to the desertification of arid ecosystems. PMID:18554137

  6. Eustatic and tectonic control on localization of porosity and permeability, Mid-Permian, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Simmons; P. A. Scholle

    1990-01-01

    The Goose Egg Formation of the northeastern Bighorn basin was deposited in an arid shoreline (sabkha) environment during a time of global cyclic sea level variations and local tectonic uplift Eustatic sea level lows are represented by terrestrial red beds (seals), whereas highs resulted in the deposition of supratidal to shallow subtidal carbonates (reservoirs). Pennsylvanian and Permian differential uplift along

  7. A Conceptual Framework for SAHRA Integrated Multi-resolution Modeling in the Rio Grande Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Liu; H. Gupta; E. Springer; T. Wagener; D. Brookshire; C. Duffy

    2004-01-01

    The sustainable management of water resources in a river basin requires an integrated analysis of the social, economic, environmental and institutional dimensions of the problem. Numerical models are commonly used for integration of these dimensions and for communication of the analysis results to stakeholders and policy makers. The National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology

  8. Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel

    E-print Network

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel MORDECKAIMAGARr / Evidence of climatic changes is recorded in the salt content of the surface sediments in arid zones, In wetter periods airborne salts are removed downward by leaching to the groundwater, whereas in drier

  9. pecos river basin wpp implementation The Pecos River winds more than 900 miles through semi-

    E-print Network

    pecos river basin wpp implementation The Pecos River winds more than 900 miles through semi- arid with abundant water to irrigate crops and water livestock. Today, the river's flow has dwindled to a trickle in many instances, and dissolved oxy- gen (DO) levels in portions of the river do not meet Texas' water

  10. Adaptation Challenges in Complex River Basins: Lessons Learned and Unlearned for the Colorado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Pulwarty

    2008-01-01

    Climate variations affect the function and operation of existing water infrastructure - including hydropower, structural flood defenses, drainage and irrigation systems - as well as water management practices in support of efficiency and environmental needs. Selected basins around the world, including the Colorado, show agreements in model projections of increasing aridity. Adverse effects of climate change on freshwater systems aggravate

  11. GEOMORPHIC AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL CONTROLS ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF WET MEADOWS IN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great Basin is an arid landscape dominated by dryland vegetation such as big sage and xeric grasses. Meadow complexes occur in mountain drainages and consist of discrete parcels of land up to several hectares in area that are characterized by high water tables and that primar...

  12. Hydrochemical and isotopic characteristics of groundwater in the Souss Upstream Basin, southwestern Morocco

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Dindane; L. Bouchaou; Y. Hsissou; M. Krimissa

    2003-01-01

    Heterogeneous shallow Plio-Quaternary formations of the Souss Plain represent the most important aquifer in southern High Atlas Mountains in Morocco. The present work was conducted in the Souss Upstream Basin to identify the chemical characteristics and the origin of groundwater in an aquifer under semi-arid climate. Isotopic and hydrochemical compositions combined with geological and hydrogeological data were used for this

  13. Stunting of onion caused by Rhizoctonia spp. isolated from the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2009 and 2010, 45 isolates of Rhizoctonia spp. were recovered from onion bulb crops in the semi-arid Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington, in which patches of severely stunted onion plants developed following rotation with winter cereal cover crops. Characterization of isolates recovered f...

  14. Introduction to the Special Section on Alternative Futures for Great Basin Ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erica Fleishman; Jeanne C. Chambers; Michael J. Wisdom

    2009-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic processes are causing exten- sive and rapid ecological, social, and economic changes in arid and semiarid ecosystems worldwide. Nowhere are these changes more evident than in the Great Basin of the western United States, a region of 400,000 km2 that largely is managed by federal agencies. Major drivers of ecosys- tems and human demographics of the Great

  15. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  16. Some Cenozoic hydrocarbon basins on the continental shelf of Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dien, P.T.

    1994-07-01

    The formation of the East Vietnam Sea basins was related to different geodynamic processes. The pre-Oligocene basement consists of igneous, metamorphic, and metasediment complexes. The Cretaceous-Eocene basement formations are formed by convergence of continents after destruction of the Tethys Ocean. Many Jurassic-Eocene fractured magmatic highs of the Cuulong basin basement constitute important reservoirs that are producing good crude oil. The Paleocene-Eocene formations are characterized by intramountain metamolasses, sometimes interbedded volcanic rocks. Interior structures of the Tertiary basins connect with rifted branches of the widened East Vietnam Sea. Bacbo (Song Hong) basin is predominated by alluvial-rhythmic clastics in high-constructive deltas, which developed on the rifting and sagging structures of the continental branch. Petroleum plays are constituted from Type III source rocks, clastic reservoirs, and local caprocks. Cuulong basin represents sagging structures and is predominated by fine clastics, with tidal-lagoonal fine sandstone and shalestone in high-destructive deltas that are rich in Type II source rocks. The association of the pre-Cenozoic fractured basement reservoirs and the Oligocene-Miocene clastic reservoir sequences with the Oligocene source rocks and the good caprocks is frequently met in petroleum plays of this basin. Nan Conson basin was formed from complicated structures that are related to spreading of the oceanic branch. This basin is characterized by Oligocene epicontinental fine clastics and Miocene marine carbonates that are rich in Types I, II, and III organic matter. There are both pre-Cenozoic fractured basement reservoirs, Miocene buildup carbonate reservoir rocks and Oligocene-Miocene clastic reservoir sequences, in this basin. Pliocene-Quaternary sediments are sand and mud carbonates in the shelf facies of the East Vietnam Sea back-arc basin. Their great thickness provides good conditions for maturation and trapping.

  17. Hydrology and Biogeochemistry of Semiarid and Arid Regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiao-Yan Li

    \\u000a Arid and semi-arid areas with more than 30% of the world’s land surface are characterized by low and sporadic moisture availability\\u000a and sparse or discontinuous vegetation, both spatially and temporally. Vegetation, water, and nutrients are intimately coupled\\u000a in the arid environments with strong feedbacks and interactions occurring across fine to coarse scales. This chapter reviews\\u000a and synthesizes recent advances in

  18. Interbasin underflow between closed Altiplano basins in Chile.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Errol L; Rosko, Michael J; Castro, Santiago O; Keller, Barry R; Bevacqua, Paolo S

    2003-01-01

    Interbasin ground water movement of 200 to 240 L/sec occurs as underflow beneath a mountainous surface water divide separating the topographically higher Salar de Michincha from the topographically lower Salar de Coposa internally drained basins in the Altiplano of northern Chile. Salt-encrusted flats (salars) and saline lakes occur on the lowest parts of the basin floors and comprise the principal evaporative discharge areas for the basins. Because a surface water divide separates the basins, surface water drainage boundaries do not coincide with ground water drainage boundaries. In the region, interbasin ground water movement is usually not recognized, but occurs for selected basins, and at places is an important component of ground water budgets. With increasing development of water for mining industry and potential exportation of ground water from the Altiplano for use at coastal cities, demonstration and quantification of interbasin movement is important for assessment of sustainable ground water development in a region of extreme aridity. Recognition and quantification of interbasin ground water underflow will assist in management of ground water resources in the arid Chilean Altiplano environment. PMID:12873015

  19. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  20. Reconstructing Holocene fluvial activity in Ireland using alluvial radiocarbon dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jonathan; Macklin, Mark; Jones, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Advances in fluvial geochronologies and multi-proxy environmental correlatives are providing increasingly robust models of river response to Holocene environmental change. At the forefront of recent scientific progress is the development and analysis of databases of fluvial radiocarbon dates, where particular emphasis is given to terminus post quem (‘change after') radiocarbon dates that mark the onset of alluviation linked to episodes of enhanced flooding. Here we report on the first attempt to apply these meta-analysis techniques to dated fluvial deposits in Ireland, which offer tremendous potential for recording climate changes associated with shifts in meridional atmospheric circulation, largely free from the effects of continentality in the east. The resulting Irish fluvial radiocarbon database is considerably smaller than examples from other European countries, such as Germany, Poland, Spain and the UK, and a patchy geographical distribution of dated sites across Ireland highlights the relative dearth of Irish fluvial research up to now. Despite a comparatively small number of significant ‘change after' radiocarbon dates, however, the application of generic meta-analysis techniques reveals a pattern of Holocene flooding that is consistent with widely cited palaeoclimate proxies for regional temperature and precipitation. The Irish flood record also closely matches that derived from an established and much larger UK radiocarbon database, thereby corroborating the growing body of evidence that supports an underlying climate forcing of fluvial activity during much of the Holocene. Fluvial systems in Ireland are shown to be sensitive to climate, but the majority of major radiocarbon-dated flooding episodes appear to lag the UK by ca. 100 years. Although this may be the result of database precision, we suggest that the hydrological buffering and sponge effects of widespread peatland cover across Ireland may have impeded hydrological connectivity during Holocene flooding episodes. In addition, this investigation reveals systematically lower sedimentation rates across Ireland compared to the UK, which may have reduced the geomorphic effectiveness of fluvial sediment archives to record major flood events. These considerations, together with an increasing focus on regional variations in fluvial activity across the Holocene, can only be properly addressed with a more concerted and expanded programme of Holocene fluvial research in Ireland.

  1. Estimates of mountain-front streamflow available for potential recharge to the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waltemeyer, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Streamflow in the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico, infiltrates into alluvial-basin aquifers at or near mountain fronts. Streamflow at or near mountain fronts is a substantial component of potential recharge to these aquifers. Streamflow response from precipitation differs substantially between the streams draining the Sacramento Mountains on the eastern side of the basin and those draining the San Andres Mountains on the western side. Mean annual streamflow at mountain fronts that is available for potential recharge to the Tularosa Basin was estimated using two regional regression methods. The method for estimating mean annual streamflow using basin-climatic characteristics was applied to 46 subbasins in the Tularosa Basin. Drainage areas for the subbasins ranged from 0.87 to 157 square miles, and mean annual precipitation ranged from 11.80 to 24.89 inches. Mean annual streamflow to the basin is estimated to be about 95 cubic feet per second or 68,800 acre-feet using the basin-climatic characteristics method. The method for estimating mean annual streamflow using channel-geometry characteristics was applied to 12 subbasins in the Tularosa Basin. Of the 46 basins, 31 had drainage areas less than 20.7 square miles and 3 had active-channel widths less than 15 feet, which were outside the ranges used to develop the regression equations.

  2. Nucleation of Waterfalls at Fault Scarps Temporarily Shielded By Alluvial Fan Aggradation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, L. C.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Waterfalls are important components of mountain river systems and they can serve as an agent to transfer tectonic, climatic, or authigenic signals upstream through a catchment. Retreating waterfalls lower the local base level of the adjacent hillslopes, and temporarily increase sediment delivery to the fluvial system. Their creation is often attributed to seismic ruptures, lithological boundaries, or the coalescence of multiple smaller steps. We explore here a mechanism for the nucleation of waterfalls that does not rely on sudden seismic slip but on the build-up of accumulated slip during periods of fault burial by fluvial aggradation. Alluvial fans are common features at the front of mountain ranges bound by normal or thrust faults. Climate change or internal forcing in the mountain catchment modifies the equilibrium slope of alluvial fans. When alluvial fans aggrade, they shield the active fault scarp from fluvial erosion allowing the scarp to grow undisturbed. The scarp may then be exposed when the channel incises into the fan exposing a new bedrock waterfall. We explore this mechanism analytically and using a numerical model for bedrock river incision and sediment deposition. We find that the creation of waterfalls by scarp burial is limited by three distinct timescales: 1) the critical timescale for the scarp to grow to the burial height, 2) the timescale of alluvial re-grading of the fan, and 3) the timescale of the external or internal forcing, such as climate change. The height of the waterfall is controlled by i) the difference in equilibrium alluvial-fan slopes, ii) the ratio of the respective fan and catchment sizes, iii) the catchment wide denudation rate, and iv) the fault slip rate. We test whether an individual waterfall could be produced by alluvial shielding of a scarp, and identify the tectonic, climatic, or authigenic nature of waterfalls using example field sites in the southwest United States.

  3. Thermal influence on the groundwater fluid dynamics of the shallow Santiago forearc basin: 2D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramusset, Anneli; Herrera, Paulo; Parada, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal processes that occur in aquifers is essential to assess local and regional low enthalpy geothermal resources. The relationship between heat convection and heat conduction has been widely studied in basins around the world at a regional scale. However, few studies have focused on smaller, shallower basins containing free aquifers hosted in unconsolidated fluvial-alluvial sediments, like Santiago Basin. We use numerical modeling to simulate the fluid dynamics of the Santiago basin groundwater system under different thermal conditions. Despite the current computational advances, modeling such a complex system with a full 3D approach is still numerically time demanding and unstable. Besides, the basin has irregular geometry and variable hydraulic and thermal features. Thus, we performed a 2D model comprising a thin water saturated slice of sediments beneath the central part of the city, where the basin morphology is well constrained. We simulate coupled groundwater and heat flow throughout this vertical slice and we compare results for different scenarios that comprise different hydraulic, thermal and geometric parameters. Results obtained with certain hydraulic conductivities show that instabilities appear giving rise to free thermal convection in the deepest parts of the basin. If the system is split into several hydrogeological units, the onset of these instabilities is inhibited. Consequently, we suggest that the stratigraphic complexities of a fluvial-alluvial deposit should be considered to better understanding the thermal-driven groundwater fluid dynamics.

  4. Dynamics of Groundwater Flow at an Alluvial Fan\\/Playa Margin Interface Based on Inorganic and Isotope Hydrochemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Vargas; B. J. Hibbs

    2009-01-01

    Mojave Chub (MC) Spring is located at an alluvial fan\\/playa margin interface between Soda Lake and the Soda Mountains, Mojave Desert. Identifying the source flows at MC Spring provides an opportunity to help managers protect the spring and the Mojave tui chub, a listed endangered species that survives in MC Spring. An alluvial fan formed on the flanks of the

  5. Autogenic attainment of large-scale alluvial grade with steady sea-level fall: An analog tank-flume experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuji Muto; John B. Swenson

    2006-01-01

    A graded river conveys its sediment load without net deposition or erosion. The graded state is thought to represent the long-term response of alluvial rivers to steady external forcing. We show here that alluvial rivers building deltas can be in grade as an autogenic response to steady sea-level fall. Consider an antecedent graded river profile, the upstream end of which

  6. Seismic mapping of alluvial fans and sub-fan bedrock in Big Bend National Park, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Monti, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    SEISMIC MAPPING OF ALLUVIAL FANS AND SUB-FAN BEDROCK IN BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis JOSEPH MONTI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May, 1984 Major Subject: Geology SEISMIC MAPPING OF ALLUVIAL FANS AND SUB-FAN BEDROCK IN BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOSEPH MONTI Approved as to style and content by: M. C. Schroeder (Chairman of committee) icky M. P. Wilson...

  7. UNESCO's G-WADI Program - Developing and Delivering Tools for Improved Water Management in Semi-arid and Arid Lands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Woodard; B. Imam; S. Sorooshian

    2007-01-01

    UNESCO's Water and Development Information for Arid Lands - A Global Network (G-WADI) aims to strengthen the capacity to manage the water resources of arid and semi-arid areas around the globe through a network of international and regional cooperation. Six centers, including SAHRA headquartered at the University of Arizona and CHRS at UC-Irvine, are cooperating to improve water resource management

  8. Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A description of the geology of the Permian Basin of the West Texas And Southeastern New Mexico was presented. Also, a brief history of the petroleum and natural gas drilling in the region was given. It was concluded that the New Mexico portion of the Permian Basin has the greatest potential for future fuel production. During 1980, there were 646 oil well completions, and 168 dry holes were recorded in southeast New Mexico. The average total depths of new wells completed was 4,901 feet for oil wells, 8,987 feet for gas wells, and 6,250 feet for dry holes.

  9. Late Tertiary and Quaternary geology of the Tecopa basin, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-12-31

    Stratigraphic units in the Tecopa basin, located in southeastern California, provide a framework for interpreting Quaternary climatic change and tectonism along the present Amargosa River. During the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, a climate that was appreciably wetter than today`s sustained a moderately deep lake in the Tecopa basin. Deposits associated with Lake Tecopa consists of lacustrine mudstone, conglomerate, volcanic ash, and shoreline accumulations of tufa. Age control within the lake deposits is provided by air-fall tephra that are correlated with two ash falls from the Yellowstone caldera and one from the Long Valley caldera. Lake Tecopa occupied a closed basin during the latter part, if not all, of its 2.5-million-year history. Sometime after 0.5 m.y. ago, the lake developed an outlet across Tertiary fanglomerates of the China Ranch Beds leading to the development of a deep canyon at the south end of the basin and establishing a hydrologic link between the northern Amargosa basins and Death Valley. After a period of rapid erosion, the remaining lake beds were covered by alluvial fans that coalesced to form a pediment in the central part of the basin. Holocene deposits consist of unconsolidated sand and gravel in the Amargosa River bed and its deeply incised tributaries, a small playa near Tecopa, alluvial fans without pavements, and small sand dunes. The pavement-capped fan remnants and the Holocene deposits are not faulted or tilted significantly, although basins to the west, such as Death Valley, were tectonically active during the Quaternary. Subsidence of the western basins strongly influenced late Quaternary rates of deposition and erosion in the Tecopa basin.

  10. A refined characterization of the alluvial geology of yucca flat and its effect on bulk hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.A.; Halford, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    In Yucca Flat, on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada, the migration of radionuclides from tests located in the alluvial deposits into the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through a thick, heterogeneous section of late Tertiary and Quaternary alluvial sediments. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of the alluvial sediments will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating groundwater flow in the Yucca Flat area. Previously published geologic models for the alluvial sediments within Yucca Flat are based on extensive examination and categorization of drill-hole data, combined with a simple, data-driven interpolation scheme. The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with Stanford University, is researching improvements to the modeling of the alluvial section, incorporating prior knowledge of geologic structure into the interpolation method and estimating the uncertainty of the modeled hydrogeologic units.

  11. Quantities and associations of lead, zinc, cadmium, manganese, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and copper in fresh Mississippi delta alluvium and New Orleans alluvial soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. W. Mielke; C. R. Gonzales; M. K. Smith; P. W. Mielke

    2000-01-01

    The topic of this study is the effect of anthropogenic metals on the geochemical quality of urban soils. This is accomplished by comparing the metal contents and associations between two alluvial soils of the lower Mississippi River Delta, freshly deposited alluvial parent materials and alluvial soils collected from a nearby urban environment. Fresh alluvium samples (n=97) were collected from the

  12. Water Conservation and Management in Semi-Arid and Arid Lands for Sustainable Agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Ethan; A. Umar

    2001-01-01

    With the population explosion in Nigeria, water requirements have been expanded resulting in competition between agricultural municipal and industrial users for a finite water supply. Water is the major limiting factor in arid land agriculture. Crop yields in the regions are low due to the temporal and spatial variations in rainfall and the lack of appropriate soil, water and crop

  13. Abstract Rivers provide important resources for rip-arian consumers, especially in arid or seasonally arid

    E-print Network

    Power, Mary Eleanor

    or seasonally arid biomes. Pygmy grasshoppers (Paratettix aztecus and P. mexicanus; Tetrigidae) graze river plants (­28.2), and higher than those of acridid grasshoppers (­27.9) from the same habitats. Mixing models suggest that 88­100% of the C in tetrigid grasshoppers at our study site is derived from riverine

  14. Remote sensing parameterization of land surface heat fluxes over arid and semi-arid areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yaoming; Wang, Jiemin; Huang, Ronghui; Wei, Guoan; Menenti, Massimo; Su, Zhongbo; Hu, Zeyong; Gao, Feng; Wen, Jun

    2003-07-01

    Dealing with the regional land surfaces heat fluxes over inhomogeneous land surfaces in arid and semi-arid areas is an important but not an easy issue. In this study, one parameterization method based on satellite remote sensing and field observations is proposed and tested for deriving the regional land surface heat fluxes over inhomogeneous landscapes. As a case study, the method is applied to the Dunhuang experimental area and the HEIFE (Heihe River Field Experiment, 1988 1994) area. The Dunhuang area is selected as a basic experimental area for the Chinese National Key Programme for Developing Basic Sciences: Research on the Formation Mechanism and Prediction Theory of Severe Climate Disaster in China (G1998040900, 1999 2003). The four scenes of Landsat TM data used in this study are 3 June 2000, 22 August 2000, and 29 January 2001 for the Dunhuang area and 9 July 1991 for the HEIFE area. The regional distributions of land surface variables, vegetation variables, and heat fluxes over inhomogeneous landscapes in arid and semi-arid areas are obtained in this study.

  15. Problems and Prospects of Swat Model Application on an Arid/Semi-Arid Watershed in Arizona

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological characteristics in the semi-arid southwest create unique challenges to watershed modellers. Streamflow in these regions is largely dependent on seasonal, short term, and high intensity rainfall events. The objectives of this study are: 1) to analyze the unique hydrol...

  16. Responses of terrestrial aridity to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Feng, Song

    2014-07-01

    The dryness of terrestrial climate can be measured by the ratio of annual precipitation (P) to potential evapotranspiration (PET), where the latter represents the evaporative demand of the atmosphere, which depends on the surface air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and available energy. This study examines how the terrestrial mean aridity responds to global warming in terms of P/PET using the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 transient CO2 increase to 2 × CO2 simulations. We show that the (percentage) increase (rate) in P averaged over land is ~1.7%/°C ocean mean surface air temperature increase, while the increase in PET is 5.3%/°C, leading to a decrease in P/PET (i.e., a drier terrestrial climate) by ~3.4%/°C. Noting a similar rate of percentage increase in P over land to that in evaporation (E) over ocean, we propose a framework for examining the change in P/PET, in which we compare the change in PET over land and E over ocean, both expressed using the Penman-Monteith formula. We show that a drier terrestrial climate is caused by (i) enhanced land warming relative to the ocean, (ii) a decrease in relative humidity over land but an increase over ocean, (iii) part of increase in net downward surface radiation going into the deep ocean, and (iv) different responses of PET over land and E over ocean for given changes in atmospheric conditions (largely associated with changes in temperatures). The relative contributions to the change in terrestrial mean aridity from these four factors are about 35%, 35%, 15%, and 15%, respectively. The slight slowdown of the surface wind over both land and ocean has little impact on the terrestrial mean aridity.

  17. Nest survival of forest birds in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Hamilton, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    In the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, flood control has led to a drastic reduction in the area of forest habitat and altered the patchwork of forest cover types. Silvicultural management of the remaining fragmented forests has changed to reflect the altered hydrology of the forests, current economic conditions of the area, and demand for forest products. Because forest type and silvicultural management impact forest birds, differences in avian productivity within these forests directly impact bird conservation. To assist in conservation planning, we evaluated daily nest survival, nest predation rates, and brood parasitism rates of forest birds in relation to different forest cover types and silvicultural management strategies within this floodplain. Within bottomland hardwood forests, nest success of blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea, 13%), eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus, 28%), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea, 18%), northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis, 22%), and yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus, 18%) did not differ from that within intensively managed cottonwood plantations. However, average daily survival of 542 open-cup nests of 19 bird species in bottomland hardwoods (0.9516 + 0.0028, -27% nest success) was greater than that of 543 nests of 18 species in cotlonwood plantations (0.9298 + 0.0035, -15% nest success). Differences in daily nest survival rates likely resulted from a combination of differences in the predator community--particularly fire ants (Solenopsis invicta)--and a marked difference in species composition of birds breeding within these 2 forest types. At least 39% of nests in bottomland hardwood forests and 65% of nests in cottonwood plantations were depredated. Rates of parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) were greater in managed cottonwoods (24%) than in bottomland hardwoods (9%). Nest success in planted cottonwood plantations for 18 species combined (-14%), and for yellow-breasted chat (Icteria vimns, 7%), eastern towhee (14%), indigo bunting (14%), and northern cardinal (17%) did not differ from nest success in cottonwood plantations that were coppiced from root sprouts following pulpwood harvest. Within bottomland hardwood forests, uneven-aged group-selection timber harvest reduced the combined daily nest survival of all species from 0.958 to 0.938, which reduced nest success by about 14%. Specifically, timber harvest reduced nest success of species that nest in the forest midstory and canopy, such as Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens)--from 32% before harvest to 14% after harvest. Conversely, those species that nest primarily in the shrubby understory--such as northern cardinal--were not affected by timber harvest and maintained an overall nest success of about 33%. Thus, birds nesting in the understory of bottomland hardwood forests are not adversely impacted by selective timber harvest, but there is a short-term reduction in nest success for birds that nest in the canopy and midstory.

  18. Alluvial deposits and plant distribution in an Amazonian lowland megafan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zani, H.; Rossetti, D.; Cremon; Cohen, M.; Pessenda, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    A large volume of sandy alluvial deposits (> 1000 km2) characterizes a flat wetland in northern Amazonia. These have been recently described as the sedimentary record of a megafan system, which have a distinct triangular shape produced by highly migratory distributary rivers. The vegetation map suggests that this megafan is dominated by open vegetation in sharp contact with the surround rainforest. Understanding the relationship between geomorphological processes and vegetation distribution is crucial to decipher and conserve the biodiversity in this Amazonian ecosystem. In this study we interpret plant dynamics over time, and investigate its potential control by sedimentary processes during landscape evolution. The study area is located in the Viruá National Park. Two field campaigns were undertaken in the dry seasons of 2010 and 2011 and the sampling sites were selected by combining accessibility and representativeness. Vegetation contrasts were recorded along a transect in the medial section of the Viruá megafan. Due to the absence of outcrops, samples were extracted using a core device, which allowed sampling up to a depth of 7.5 m. All cores were opened and described in the field, with 5 cm3 samples collected at 20 cm intervals. The ?13C of organic matter was used as a proxy to distinguish between C3 and C4 plant communities. The chronology was established based on radiocarbon dating. The results suggest that the cores from forested areas show the most depleted values of ?13C, ranging from -32.16 to -27.28‰. The ?13C curve in these areas displays typical C3 land plant values for the entire record, which covers most of the Holocene. This finding indicates that either the vegetation remained stable over time or the sites were dominated by aquatic environments with freshwater plants before forest establishment. The cores from the open vegetation areas show a progressive upward enrichment in ?13C values, which range from -28.50 to -19.59‰. This trend is more pronounced after de mid-Holocene, suggesting that the open vegetation, represented mostly by C4 land plants, evolved only more recently. Based on our isotope data, a model is proposed taking into account the influence of sedimentary dynamics on the modern pattern of plan distribution. The establishment of open vegetation occurred at different times depending on location over the megafan area, varying from around 3,000 to 6,400 cal yrs BP. As sedimentation took place, areas located far from the surrounding rainforest were prone to inputs of organic matter derived from open vegetation, whereas the contribution of organic matter derived from arboreous vegetation increases toward the areas located closer to the rainforest. In general, open vegetation is constrained to depositional sites that remained active until relatively recent Holocene times, while surrounding areas with a relatively older geological history are covered by dense forest. The results presented here consist in a striking example of the influence of sedimentary processes during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene on the development of modern plants of this Amazonian lowland.

  19. Incipient basin inversion of the Middle Archean Moodies Basin, Barberton Supergroup, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, Jens; Heubeck, Christoph; Lippold, Wigbert

    2010-05-01

    The Moodies Group of the Barberton Greenstone Belt is one of the oldest and best-preserved quartz-rich sedimentary sequences on Earth. Its strata, approx. 3 km thick, record an initial extensional setting, followed by a strong shortening pulse which resulted in the dominant large-scale final deformation of the greenstone belt. We investigated the apparently rapid transition from Moodies extensional to compressive setting through detailed mapping, correlation of measured sections and the analysis of a prominent basaltic lava which extends for approx. 60 km along strike, in order to constrain the tectonic and depositional setting of some of the earliest stable life-providing habitats on Earth. In the middle Moodies Group, large-scale cross-bedded coarse-grained sandstones, interpreted as an offshore dune field, are abruptly overlain by a discontinuous cobble and boulder conglomerate of up to 4 m thickness, possibly representing local small alluvial fans above a cryptic disconformity. A basaltic lava, reaching approx. 50 m thick, regionally exists above this unit and forms the most prominent marker unit in the Moodies Group. In most places, the lava is metasomatically altered to a fine-grained mesh of illite, sericite, chlorite and very fine-grained quartz. In its upper third, it contains abundant amygdules approx. 0.5 - 1 cm in diameter. We did not record significant thickness changes hinting at eruption centers, feeder channels, flow markers nor pillows. Two thin but regionally continuous dacitic tuffs overlying the lava yielded concordant single-zircon ages of 3229+-6 Ma (Heubeck et al., in prep.) which are statistically indistinguishable from underlying Fig Tree Group volcanics and suggest high depositional and subsidence rates (mm/yr or higher) of intervening Moodies Group strata. Overlying clastic sediments up to 1 km thick show a very high lateral and vertical variability in grain size and petrography. Their facies ranges from alluvial conglomeratic wedges, fluvial gravelly sandstones, nearshore cross-bedded sandstones, tuffaceous shales to thin BIFs; sandstones show isolated occurrences of laminated curly biomats. The rapid facies changes attest to the termination of a uniform sedimentation regime and suggest the incipient breakup of the basin in numerous subbasins. The boulder conglomerate below the base of the basaltic lava likely represents the tectonic turning point in the evolution of the Moodies Basin by marking a pronounced increase in local depositional slope, the subsequent initiation of horizontal shortening, basin margin uplift and erosion, and final tight greenstone belt shortening. The eruption of the basaltic lava may be related to brittle segmentation of the basement, causing small-scale faulting, alluvial fan development on a former shelf, and allowing magma ascent.

  20. Influence of groundwater on the degradation of irrigated soils in a semi-arid region, the inner delta of the Niger River, Mali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, A.; Grillot, J. C.; Dazy, J.

    2000-08-01

    The problem of soil degradation through alkalinization/salinization in an irrigated area with a semi-arid climate was examined in the inner delta of the Niger River, Mali, by the study of groundwater hydraulics and hydrochemistry in an area recharged by irrigation water. On the basis of data analysis on various scales, it is concluded that the current extent of the surface saline soils is due to a combination of three factors: (1) the existence of ancient saline soils (solonchaks) resulting from the creation of a broad sabkha west of the former course of the Niger River, now called the Fala of Molodo. These saline crusts were gradually deposited during the eastward tilting of the tectonic block that supports the Niger River; (2) the irrigation processes during the recent reflooding of the Fala of Molodo (river diversion in 1950). These used very poorly mineralized surface water but reintroduced into the alluvial groundwater system - generally of a low permeability (K=10-6 m s-1) - salts derived from the ancient solonchaks; and (3) the redeposition of the dissolved salts on the surface due to the intense evapotranspiration linked to the present Sahelian climate. In this context, only efficient artificial draining of subsurface alluvial groundwater can eliminate most of the highly mineralized flow and thus reduce the current saline deposits.

  1. Sundaland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Morley, Christopher K.

    The continental core of Sundaland, comprising Sumatra, Java, Borneo, the Thai-Malay Peninsula and Indochina, was assembled during the Triassic Indosinian orogeny, and formed an exposed landmass during Pleistocene lowstands. Because the region includes extensive shallow seas, and is not significantly elevated, it is often assumed to have been stable for a long period. This stability is a myth. The region is today surrounded by subduction and collision zones, and merges with the India-Asia collision zone. Cenozoic deformation of Sundaland is recorded in the numerous deep sedimentary basins alongside elevated highlands. Some sediment may have been supplied from Asia following Indian collision but most was locally derived. Modern and Late Cenozoic sediment yields are exceptionally high despite a relatively small land area. India-Asia collision, Australia-SE Asia collision, backarc extension, subduction rollback, strike-slip faulting, mantle plume activity, and differential crust-lithosphere stretching have been proposed as possible basin-forming mechanisms. In scale, crustal character, heat flow and mantle character the region resembles the Basin and Range province or the East African Rift, but is quite unlike them in tectonic setting. Conventional basin modeling fails to predict heat flow, elevation, basin depths and subsidence history of Sundaland and overestimates stretching factors. These can be explained by interaction of a hot upper mantle, a weak lower crust, and lower crustal flow in response to changing forces at the plate edges. Deformation produced by this dynamic model explains the maintenance of relief and hence sediment supply over long time periods.

  2. Sediment source determination using fallout Cesium-137 in arid rangelands.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sediment source identification in arid rangelands is necessary to understanding rangeland conditions and developing management practices to improve rangeland health and reduce sediment load to streams. The purpose of this research was to use Cesium-137 to identify sources of sediments in an arid ran...

  3. Demographic processes limiting seedling recruitment in arid grassland restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeding is commonly used in plant community restoration to overcome recruitment limitations. In arid systems, seeding is a particularly important management tool because plant community recovery following disturbance is slow and often inhibited by invasive species. While important in arid systems,...

  4. Watershed Management in Arid Zones: A Prototype Short Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thames, John L., Ed.; Fischer, John N., Ed.

    Presented is information recommended for inclusion in a short course to help extend knowledge of water resource development and research techniques in arid and semi-arid regions. Information is particularly intended for applicability in developing nations. Included are considerations of livestock grazing, use of hydrologic data, vegetation…

  5. Arid landscapes and environmental transformations in ancient Southwestern Ecuador

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter W. Stahl

    1991-01-01

    The Valdivia valley of southwestern Ecuador is currently an ecotonal area between both northerly and interior humid environments, and southerly and coastal arid environments. Inferences drawn from a sample of archaeologically recovered vertebrate taxa in Early Formative context (3000 BC to 2400 BC) at the site of Loma Alta (OGSEMa?182), suggest the availability of widely variable habitats, ranging from arid

  6. Local facilitation, bistability and transitions in arid ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonia Kéfi; Max Rietkerk; Minus van Baalen; Michel Loreau

    2007-01-01

    Arid ecosystems are liable to undergo sudden discontinuous transitions from a vegetated to a desert state as a result of human pressure and climate change. A predictive framework about the conditions under which such transitions occur is lacking. Here, we derive and analyze a general model describing the spatial dynamics of vegetation in arid ecosystems considering local facilitation as an

  7. The stewardship of arid Australia: Ecology and landscape management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Morton; D. M. Stafford Smith; M. H. Friedel; G. F. Griffin; G. Pickup

    1995-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid lands cover 70% of Australia, and bear a legacy of degradation and species loss from past policies and management. Pastoralism, the most extensive industry, as well as other land users and the community at large, are seeking sustainable use of these lands in the future. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of integrating conservation

  8. Food Production in Arid Regions as Related to Salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi arid regions of the world are generally associated with high population density and lower than average per capita incomes and living standards. These regions are vulnerable to food shortages due to current, unsustainable use of fresh water for irrigation and soil salinization. This pa...

  9. Microclimates of the arid lands ecology reserve, 1968--1975

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Thorp; W. T. Hinds

    1977-01-01

    The climatology of the Hanford Reservation Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve does not end, of course, with this report. As this goes to press the arid lands of eastern Washington are experiencing the driest winter in 65 years of record. Even without including this winter's (1976-77) data in our summaries here, we have been fortunate to have had a very

  10. S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin, Taiwan, using microtremor array measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huey-Chu; Wu, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Feng-Mei; Hwang, Ruey-Der

    2015-04-01

    The S-wave velocity structures of the Taipei Basin in Taiwan are investigated using the array records of microtremors at 15 sites. Dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the frequency-wavenumber (F-K) spectrum method. The S-wave velocity structures in the Taipei Basin are then estimated by employing surface wave inversion technique. Harder strata sites have higher phase velocities than softer sites. If the S-wave velocity of the Tertiary Basement is assumed to be 1000 m/s, then the Quaternary alluvial thicknesses in the Taipei Basin are between about 100 m and 650 m. The thickness of the alluvium gradually increases from the southeast to the northwest. The inversion results are also in good agreement with well-logging data and seismic reflection studies of the Taipei Basin. The study concludes that microtremor array measurement is a useful tool for estimating S-wave velocity structure.

  11. Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of a middle Miocene alluvial fan to cyclic shallow lacustrine depositional system

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    margin facies, which show two distinct lithofacies associations depending on their distribution relative to the alluvial fan system, i.e. front (lithofacies A), comprising massive siliciclastic mudstone and tabular carbonates, or lateral (lithofacies B) showing laminated and/or massive siliciclastic mudstone alternating

  12. An evaluation strategy for conservation goals of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Hamel, P.B.; Cooper, R.J.; Woodrey, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    The population goals and habitat objectives established by the Mississippi Alluvial Valley Migratory Bird Initiative are based on several unverified assumptions. We have developed an evaluation strategy that identifies research needed to verify these assumptions. We also have outlined a monitoring strategy designed to track progress toward achieving habitat objectives and population goals.

  13. Reference Conditions for Old-Growth Redwood Restoration on Alluvial Flats

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -growth coast redwood stands. Tree size parameters and occurrences of distinctive features (e.g., burls, goose251 Reference Conditions for Old-Growth Redwood Restoration on Alluvial Flats Christa M. Dagley1 sizes was similar between study sites. Redwood density ranged from 118 to 148 trees ha-1 and upper

  14. Natural arsenic contamination of Holocene alluvial aquifers by linked tectonic, weathering, and microbial processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Saunders; M.-K. Lee; A. Uddin; S. Mohammad; Richard T. Wilkin; Mostafa Fayek; Nic E. Korte

    2005-01-01

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of arsenic, where chemical weathering of As-bearing minerals occurs. We propose a “GBH-As” model that ties together all of the

  15. HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF BASE-FLOW AND BANK STORAGE IN ALLUVIAL STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents analytical solutions, which describe the effect of time-variable net recharge (net accretion to water table) and bank storage in alluvial aquifers on the sustenance of stream flows during storm and inter-storm events. The solutions relate the stream discharge,...

  16. Occurrence of Arsenic in Ground Water in the Choushui River Alluvial Fan, Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen-Wuing Liu; Sheng-Wei Wang; Cheng-Shin Jang; Kao-Hong Lin

    2006-01-01

    An investigation of shallow ground water quality revealed that high arsenic (As) concentrations were found in both aquifers and aquitards in the southern Choushui River alluvial fan of Taiwan. A total of 655 geological core samples from 13 drilling wells were col- lected and analyzed. High As contents were found primarily in aqui- tards, to a maximum of 590 mg\\/kg.

  17. Mobility of lead, zinc and cadmium in alluvial soils heavily polluted by smelting industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Van?k; L. Bor?vka; O. Drábek; M. Mihaljevi?; M. Komárek

    In order to determine the mobility of Pb, Zn and Cd in soils from the P?íbram region (Czech Republic) heavily conta- minated by metallurgy, two profiles of alluvial soils were closely studied. Total contents of heavy metals were deter - mined aer digestion with a mixture of HF and HClO 4 . Heavy metal mobility was assessed using the mobility

  18. Modeling of Reactive Transport of Nitrate in a Heterogeneous Alluvial Fan Aquifer, San Joaquin Valley, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Green; S. P. Phillips

    2005-01-01

    Fate of nitrate in an alluvial fan aquifer in the San Joaquin Valley, California, was investigated with combined laboratory analyses, field measurements, geostatistics, and flow and reactive transport modeling. In the summer of 2003, groundwater wells and lysimeters were installed along a 1-km transect extending upgradient from the Merced River through an unfarmed riparian zone, a corn field, and an

  19. Arsenic enrichment in groundwater of the alluvial aquifers in Bangladesh: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Matin Ahmed; Prosun Bhattacharya; M. Aziz Hasan; S. Humayun Akhter; S. M. Mahbub Alam; M. A. Hossain Bhuyian; M. Badrul Imam; Aftab A Khan; Ondra Sracek

    2004-01-01

    Arsenic in the groundwater of Bangladesh is a serious natural calamity and a public health hazard. Most groundwater from the shallow alluvial aquifers (<150 m), particularly in the Holocene plain lands, are vulnerable to As-enrichment. Delta plains and flood plains of the Ganges–Brahmaputra river system are moderately to severely enriched and more than 60% of the tube wells are affected.

  20. Hydrologic interactions of stream channels with their alluvial system in northeastern Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. R. Hasfurther; R. C. Miller; L. B. Wesche

    1980-01-01

    Perennial and ephemeral stream channels were investigated among three study sites in northeastern Wyoming to determine the interaction of the stream with the alluvial system and its surroundings. Hydrographs of the surface stream and ground water wells in the valley fill material (alluvium) are correlated with the geology, water quality and vegetation. A water budget analysis and soil moisture measurements

  1. Comparison of subsurface and surface runoff phosphorus transport rates in alluvial floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) loading to streams can occur by both surface runoff and subsurface transport. Although surface runoff is often considered the dominant pathway, groundwater P concentrations in alluvial aquifers can be significant, especially in preferential flow paths (PFPs). The objectives of this re...

  2. Determinism in Fish Assemblages of Floodplain Lakes of the Vastly Disturbed Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. Miranda; G. M. Lucas

    2004-01-01

    The Mississippi Alluvial Valley between southern Illinois and southern Louisiana contains hundreds of floodplain lakes, most of which have been adversely affected by landscape modifications used to control flooding and support agriculture. We examined fish assemblages in lakes of this region to determine whether deterministic patterns developed in relation to prominent abiotic lake characteristics and to explore whether relevant abiotic

  3. Spatial patterns of ecohydrologic properties on a hillslope and alluvial fan transect, Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Reserve, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, D. R.; Small, E. E.

    2005-12-01

    Spatial patterns of ecohydrologic properties allow researchers to examine spatial interactions between hydrologic, ecologic, soil, and climate parameters. Arid ecosystems are generally water limited, therefore the distribution of available moisture is extremely important. We use the spatial patterns of ecohydrologic properties to understand plant strategies to increase their water supply. In particular, we are interested in the degree of spatial self-organization of vegetation and its effects to maximize plant water availability. Small-scale measurements of surface microtopography (n~8,000 total), infiltration rate (n~400), soil texture (n~800), and vegetation have been made on six 100 m2 plots along a transect within the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Reserve. The transect is located in the shrubland ecotone and spans a hillslope and alluvial fan landform. These data have been collected to investigate how spatial patterns change along the transect to understand the relationships between hydrology, vegetation, soils, and geomorphology. We use statistical and geostatistical techniques to analyze the data. Preliminary results show that relationships between ecohydrologic properties are strongly dependant on vegetation and landscape position. In general, vegetation cover decreases while the number of species increases with higher slope and drainage area. Microtopography and infiltration rates are higher under vegetation and decrease away from plant centers. Microtopographic relief tends to increase as landscape slope and drainage area increase. Significant differences in soil texture (amounts of sand, silt, clay, organic matter, bulk density) exist under vegetation compared to vegetation interspaces. Microtopography, infiltration rate, and texture are all spatially correlated with vegetation pattern (quantified as the distance from nearest shrub). The magnitude of geostatistic correlations and correlation distances both tend to decrease with increasing landform slope and drainage area. All variables analyzed showed significant anisotropy, with the direction of maximum continuity in the general direction of maximum slope of the plot. Our data suggests that vegetation is responsible for much of the spatial variability in ecohydrologic properties. Ecohydrologic properties are also anisotropic in the direction of slope, suggesting that slope-driven processes are also driving variation. The relative effects of vegetation tend to decrease with slope and drainage area. This suggests that effects of vegetation are moderated by other processes such as overland flow and erosion.

  4. Tectonic setting of Cretaceous basins on the NE Tibetan Plateau: Insights from the Jungong basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craddock, W.H.; Kirby, E.; Dewen, Z.; Jianhui, L.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the Cenozoic growth of high topography in the Indo-Asian collision zone remains challenging, due in part to significant shortening that occurred within Eurasia before collision. A growing body of evidence suggests that regions far removed from the suture zone experienced deformation before and during the early phases of Himalayan orogenesis. In the present-day north-eastern Tibetan Plateau, widespread deposits of Cretaceous sediment attest to significant basin formation; however, the tectonic setting of these basins remains enigmatic. We present a study of a regionally extensive network of sedimentary basins that are spatially associated with a system of SE-vergent thrust faults and are now exposed in the high ranges of the north-eastern corner of the Tibetan Plateau. We focus on a particularly well-exposed basin, located ~20km north of the Kunlun fault in the Anyemaqen Shan. The basin is filled by ~900m of alluvial sediments that become finer-grained away from the basin-bounding fault. Additionally, beds in the proximal footwall of the basin-bounding fault exhibit progressive, up-section shallowing and several intraformational unconformities which can be traced into correlative conformities in the distal part of the basin. The observations show sediment accumulated in the basin during fault motion. Regional constraints on the timing of sediment deposition are provided by both fossil assemblages from the Early Cretaceous, and by K-Ar dating of volcanic rocks that floor and cross-cut sedimentary fill. We argue that during the Cretaceous, the interior NE Tibetan Plateau experienced NW-SE contractional deformation similar to that documented throughout the Qinling-Dabie orogen to the east. The Songpan-Ganzi terrane apparently marked the southern limit of this deformation, such that it may have been a relatively rigid block in the Tibetan lithosphere, separating regions experiencing deformation north of the convergent Tethyan margin from regions deforming inboard of the east Asian margin. ?? 2011 The Authors. Basin Research ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers and International Association of Sedimentologists.

  5. A database on flood and debris-flow processes in alluvial fans: a preliminary analysis aimed at evaluation of the damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Carmela; Santangelo, Nicoletta; Santo, Antonio; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Debris-flow and flood events cause yearly wide damages to buildings and infrastructures, and produce many casualties and fatalities. These processes are very common in Italy, affecting mainly torrential stream basins with different geological and morphological settings: in the Alpine mountain areas they are quite well analysed, whilst much less attention is generally paid in contexts such as those of the Apennines mostly due to the minor frequency of the events. Nevertheless, debris-flows and flood processes occur along many alluvial fans, have greatly contributed to their building up, and are therefore worth to be studied. Along many areas of the Southern Apennines, coalescent alluvial fans are a widespread geomorphic unit, typically located at the foot of steep slopes. In most cases these areas correspond to the more highly urbanised sectors, generally considered to be safer than the bottom valley, as concerns the direct effects from flooding. During intense storms, villages and towns built on alluvial fans may be affected by flooding and/or debris flow processes originated in the above catchment, and rapidly transferred downslope due to the steep slopes and the torrential character of the streams. This creates a very high hazard to the population and is at the origin of the severe and recurrent damage to urban settlements. Starting from the above considerations, we compiled a catalogue of flood and debris-flow events occurred in Campania Region, southern Italy, by consulting very different information sources: national and local newspapers and journals, regional historical archives, scientific literature, internet blogs. More than 350 events, occurred in Campania from 1700 to present, were collected. Information on time of occurrence and location are available for each event, with different level of accuracy, that is typically lower going back to the oldest events for which only the year or the month of occurrence of the event was identified; nevertheless, for more than 75 % of the collected data, the complete date of occurrence is known. All the provinces of Campania are affected by debris-flow and flood processes, but the most interested appear to be Naples and Salerno. Debris flows and flood produced in the Region more than 2400 fatalities, about 200 injured people, and about 100 missing people, with more than 6000 homeless. Very harmful were the events occurred in 1581, 1841, 1910,1924, 1954, 1998; each of these caused more than 100 fatalities. With regard to homeless, the most damaging event took place in the area of Salerno, causing more than 5000 homeless. Buildings and infrastructures were also involved by the events dealt with here. A third of the processes included in the catalogue caused the total destruction of private buildings, and serious damage to communication routes (roads and railways), pipelines, factories and architectonical structures. The most disastrous season, as concerns the damage to infrastructures and humans, is the autumn. The catalogue is still in progress, being continually updated for new events, but, at the same time, continuing to perform archive and literature scrutiny as regards the past events. Further, another important part of the research is the investigation of the link with the triggering events (rainfall): at this aim, daily (or hourly, when available) pluviometric data are being analysed. Our final goal is to provide a method to estimate hazard assessment in alluvial basins torrents, that might be exportable in similar geological-geomorphological contexts. In such an effort, the first and mandatory step is the collection of historical data.

  6. Exploring the use of weathering indexes in an alluvial fan chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardenbicker, Ulrike; Watanabe, Makiko; Kotowich, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    Alluvial fan sediments can act as an archive of local environmental history. Two borehole cores (FN 350 cm and AG 850cm) from Holocene alluvial fans located in the Qu'Appelle Valley in southern Saskatchewan were analyzed in order to identify how changes in land use of upland catchment plateaus modified the pattern and rate of sediment delivery to the fan. Due to the lack of material for radiometric dating a chronology of depositional events within the alluvial fans was established by using lithostratigraphy data of soils and sediments. In order to establish a more detailed relative chronology we evaluated if weathering indexes (the Parker Index, the CaO/ZrO2 molar ratio, the Product Index) originally developed for studies of in situ weathering of bedrock, are suitable to assess sediment weathering within alluvial fan sediments. To quantify the degree of weathering within the sediment samples the three indexes of weathering were calculated using the proportions of elements measure by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and there is an inverse relationship between weathering index and sample age. For further statistical analyses the fan sediments were classified into three groups: a sheet flow facies of well sorted silt loam and sandy loam textures, bed load facies characterized by high sand and gravel content and layers with high organic matter in combination with higher clay content indicative of in situ weathering and soil development. First results show that the Product Index may be the most suitable weathering index to indicate weathering or input of less weathered sediment within the sheet flow and bed load facies. In general, the weathering indexes do not take into account complexities of the weathering processes nor the overall environmental conditions in an alluvial fan. But chemical weathering indexes accompanied by geophysical and geo-chemical information have value, especially when the amount of sample material is limited.

  7. Infiltration of atrazine and metabolites from a stream to an alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.J.; Burkart, M.R.; Simpkins, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The infiltration of atrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrozine from Walnut Creek, a tributary stream, to the alluvial valley aquifer along the South Skunk River in central Iowa occurred where the stream transects the river's flood plain. A preliminary estimate indicated that the infiltration was significant and warrants further investigation. Infiltration was estimated by measuring the loss of stream discharge in Walnut Creek and the concentrations of atrazine and its metabolites deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, in ground water 1 m beneath the streambed. Infiltration was estimated before application of agrichemicals to the fields during a dry period on April 7, 1994, and after application of agrichemicals during a period of small runoff on June 8, 1994. On April 7, the flux of atrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine from Walnut Creek into the alluvial valley aquifer ranged from less than 10 to 60 (??g/d)/m2, whereas on June 8 an increased flux ranged from 270 to 3060 (??g/d)/m2. By way of comparison, the calculated fluxes of atrazine beneath Walnut Creek, for these two dates, were two to five orders of magnitude greater than an estimated flux of atrazine to ground water caused by leaching from a field on a per-unit-area basis. Furthermore, the unit-area flux rates of water from Walnut Creek to the alluvial valley aquifer were about three orders of magnitude greater than estimated recharge to the alluvial aquifer from precipitation. The large flux of chemicals from Walnut Creek to the alluvial valley aquifer was due in part to the conductive streambed and rather fast ground water velocities; average vertical hydraulic conductivity through the streambed was calculated as 35 and 90 m/d for the two sampling dates, and estimated ground water velocities ranged from 1 to 5 m/d.

  8. An integrated modelling and remote sensing approach for hydrological study in arid and semi-arid regions: the SUDMED Programme

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Chehbouni; R. Escadafal; B. Duchemin; G. Boulet; V. Simonneaux; G. Dedieu; B. Mougenot; S. Khabba; H. Kharrou; P. Maisongrande; O. Merlin; A. Chaponniere; J. Ezzahar; S. Er-Raki; J. Hoedjes; R. Hadria; A. Abourida; A. Cheggour; F. Raibi; A. Boudhar; I. Benhadj; L. Hanich; A. Benkaddour; N. Guemouria; A. Lahrouni; A. Olioso; F. Jacob; D. G. Williams; J. A. Sobrino

    2008-01-01

    Recent efforts have been concentrated in the development of models to understand and predict the impact of environmental changes on hydrological cycle and water resources in arid and semi?arid regions. In this context, remote sensing data have been widely used to initialize, to force, or to control the simulations of these models. However, for several reasons, including the difficulty in

  9. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2012-09-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of southeastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within both wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from the basin was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during low- to moderate flood events. The construction of a drainage ditch through a previously unchanneled wetland altered the hydrologic connectivity of the catchment, allowing sediment to be transported from the headwaters to the lower basin where much of it was deposited within the riparian wetlands. The axial drainage system is now geomorphically and hydrologically connected during most events throughout the study basin. The study indicates that increased valley connectivity partly negated the positive benefits of controlling sediment/nutrient exports from the catchment by means of upland based, best management practices.

  10. Water relations of coast redwood planted in the semi-arid climate of southern California.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Elizaveta; McCarthy, Heather R; Pataki, Diane E

    2011-08-01

    Trees planted in urban landscapes in southern California are often exposed to an unusual combination of high atmospheric evaporative demand and moist soil conditions caused by irrigation. The water relations of species transplanted into these conditions are uncertain. We investigated the water relations of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) planted in the urbanized semi-arid Los Angeles Basin, where it often experiences leaf chlorosis and senescence. We measured the sap flux (J(O)) and hydraulic properties of irrigated trees at three sites in the Los Angeles region. We observed relatively strong stomatal regulation in response to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (D; J(O) saturated at D < 1 kPa), and a linear response of J(O) to photosynthetically active radiation. Total tree water use by coast redwood was relatively low, with plot-level transpiration rates below 1 mm d(-1) . There was some evidence of xylem cavitation during the summer, which appeared to be reversed in fall and early winter. We conclude that water stress was not a direct factor in causing leaf chlorosis and senescence as has been proposed. Instead, the relatively strong stomatal control that is adaptive in the native habitat of coast redwood may lead to carbon limitation and other stresses in semi-arid, irrigated habitats. PMID:21486308

  11. A study on the role and importance of irrigation management in integrated river basin management.

    PubMed

    Koç, Cengiz

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the role and the importance of irrigation management in integrated river basin management during arid and semi-arid conditions. The study has been conducted at Büyük Menderes Basin which is located in southwest of Turkey and where different sectors (irrigation, drinking and using, industry, tourism, ecology) related to the use and distribution of water sources compete with each other and also where the water demands for important ecological considerations is evaluated and where the river pollution has reached important magnitudes. Since, approximately 73 % of the water resources of the basin are utilized for irrigation; as a result, irrigation management becomes important for basin management. Irrigation operations have an effect on basin soil resources, water users, and environmental and ecological conditions. Thus, the determination of the role and importance of irrigation management require an integrated and interdisciplinary approach. In the studies conducted in Turkey, usually the environmental reactions have been analyzed in the basin studies and so the other topics related to integrated river basin management have not been taken into account. Therefore, this study also is to address these existing gaps in the literature and practice. PMID:26148688

  12. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of the East Georges Bank Basin, offshore Nova Scotia, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Carswell, A.B. (Esso Canada Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Koning, T. (Texaco Canada Petroleum, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Hibbs, D.C. (Conoco Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The East Georges Bank Basin is located offshore Nova Scotia on the southeastern Canadian continental shelf. The basin covers 2.5 million ac and is one of the last undrilled basins in North America. The geological interpretation is almost entirely based on 16,000 km of seismic data over the basin. Pertinent well control is limited to 10 wells on the US portion of the Georges Bank (West Georges Bank Basin) and two wells on the Scotian shelf. Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of this data has led to a structural and stratigraphic model for the basin. The basin formed during the Triassic when the landmass of Pange began separating along rift zones. A prominent Paleozoic basement high, the Yarmouth Arch separated the East Georges Bank Basin from the West Georges Bank Basin and had a dominant influence on sedimentation until the Middle Jurassic. Early synrift sequences consist of lacustrine clastics and shales. Marine incursions began in the late Triassic resulting in massive salt deposits that reflect the restricted extent of the basin and the arid Triassic and Early Jurassic climate. Further continental separation during the Early Jurassic resulted in deposition of carbonates and evaporites followed by Middle Jurassic continental shelf carbonates and deltaic sands. During the Middle Jurassic, major growth faulting and halokinesis was initiated by progradation of the deltaic sands. Post Middle Jurassic continental spreading in combination with changing climatic conditions resulted in a steady decline of carbonate sedimentation and dominance of clastic deposition throughout the remaining history of the basin.

  13. Sedimentary development of the Oligocene Karsant? Basin, southern Turkey, in its regional tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlügenç, Ulvi Can; Ak?nc?, Ahmet Can

    2015-06-01

    Following Late Cretaceous ophiolite and melange emplacement within the Tauride belt several Neogene sedimentary basins of variable size were formed along the southern flank of the Taurus continent in southern Turkey. These include the Pozant? and Karsant? Basins and the regional scale Çukurova Basin Complex, extending southwestwards into the Cilicia-Kyrenia Basin. The Karsant? Basin is bounded by the regional scale sinistral Ecemi? Fault Zone to the west, the East Anatolian Fault Zone to the southeast and the Negoene Adana Basin to the south. Deformed Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rock units that display an irregular palaeotopography form the basement of the Karsant? Basin. These units are overlain by an allochthonous K?z?lda? melange and by thrust slices of basic/ultrabasic ophiolitic rocks (Fara?a ophiolites) that were emplaced in this region during the Late Maastrichtian. The Karsant? Basin was formed during the Oligocene above the thrust sheets. The Karsant? Basin disconformably overlies the ophiolitic nappes and is interpreted as a N-S trending half graben which was probably most active following the deposition of lacustrine sediments during the late Oligocene. The main Karsant? Basin infill is represented by four lithological units: 1. Alluvial fan deposits (A1), 2. shallow-marine deposits (A2), 3. lacustrine deposits (A3), and 4. fluvial deposits (A4). These sediments were deposited during the Oligocene, prior to the initiation of the main Adana Basin, which formed in a separate intermontane setting. The Karsant? Basin fill is unconformably overlain by early Miocene sediments of the Neogene Adana basin.

  14. Strontium Isotope Ratios (87Sr/86Sr) as Tracers for Recharge Areas, Groundwater Movement and Mixing in an Arid Coastal Region of the Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyhenmeyer, C. E.; Waber, H. N.; Kramers, J.; Burns, S. J.; Matter, A.

    2001-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, conventional hydrological investigations often fail to adequately describe groundwater systems due to a large spatial and temporal variability of hydrological parameters. Alternatively, this study from northern Oman utilizes strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) to describe the origin and evolution of groundwater in the Batinah coastal alluvial aquifer, which supplies water for the most densely populated, cultivated and industrialized area in the Sultanate. Sr-isotope ratios in groundwater samples from over 100 wells distributed over the 10,000 km2 study area show that the Jabal Akhdar mountains are the most significant recharge area for the adjacent coastal alluvial plain. Sr-isotope ratios in samples taken along the foothills of the mountains are as high as 0.7120, indicating that this water has interacted with the pre-Permian silt- and sandstone formations exposed in the anticline of the Jabal Akhdar. Sr-isotope ratios of these pre-Permian sediments exceed 0.7200 and are thus significantly higher than isotope ratios of the Permian to Mesozoic limestones and dolomites (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7067 to 0.7080) that form the limbs of the anticline. Groundwater that infiltrates in the mountains follows two major groundwater flowpaths across the alluvial plain towards the coast. Along these two preferential pathways, the Sr-isotope signal changes from 0.7110-0.7120 at the foothills to 0.7095-0.7100 a few kilometers further onto the coastal plain, indicating the addition of a second, locally infiltrated, groundwater component. Mixing calculations based on Sr- and Cl-concentrations together with Sr-isotopes indicate that recharge on the coastal plain only accounts for approximately 10% of the total groundwater recharge, the remaining 90% originating in the Jabal Akhdar mountains. Surprisingly, very little influence of oceanic basement rocks, the Samail ophiolite, is detectable in the Sr-isotope ratios of groundwater samples. Even in catchments composed entirely of ophiolite, the groundwater Sr-isotope ratios are consistently above 0.7080, indicating little rock-water interaction with the ophiolite matrix (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7030 to 0.7065). Instead, groundwater samples closely resemble the Sr-isotope signature of magnesite and calcite lined fractures in the ophiolitic host rocks (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7078 to 0.7087), suggesting that groundwater flow occurs predominantly through hydraulically connected fracture systems, which is consistent with modern-day tritium activities detected in all bedrock wells.

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of Precipitation on Ground-Water Levels from Wells in Selected Alluvial Aquifers in Utah and Arizona, 1936-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, Philip M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased withdrawals from alluvial aquifers of the southwestern United States during the last half-century have intensified the effects of drought on ground-water levels in valleys where withdrawal for irrigation is greatest. Furthermore, during wet periods, reduced withdrawals coupled with increased natural recharge cause rising ground-water levels. In order to manage water resources more effectively, analysis of ground-water levels under the influence of natural and anthropogenic stresses is useful. This report evaluates the effects of precipitation patterns on ground-water levels in areas of Utah and Arizona that have experienced different amounts of ground-water withdrawal. This includes a comparison of water-level records from basins that are hydrogeologically and climatologically similar but have contrasting levels of ground-water development. Hydrologic data, including records of ground-water levels, basin-wide annual ground-water withdrawals, and precipitation were examined from two basins in Utah (Milford and central Sevier) and three in Arizona (Aravaipa Canyon, Willcox, and Douglas). Most water-level records examined in this study from basins experiencing substantial ground-water development (Milford, Douglas, and Willcox) showed strong trends of declining water levels. Other water-level records, generally from the less-developed basins (central Sevier and Aravaipa Canyon) exhibited trends of increasing water levels. These trends are likely the result of accumulating infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water. Water-level records that had significant trends were detrended by subtraction of a low-order polynomial in an attempt to eliminate the variation in the water-level records that resulted from ground-water withdrawal or the application of water for irrigation. After detrending, water-level residuals were correlated with 2- to 10-year moving averages of annual precipitation from representative stations for the individual basins. The water-level residual time series for each well was matched with the 2- to 10-year moving average of annual precipitation with which it was best correlated and the results were compared across basins and hydrologic settings. Analysis of water-level residuals and moving averages of annual precipitation indicate that ground-water levels in the Utah basins respond more slowly to precipitation patterns than those from the Arizona basins. This is attributed to the dominant mechanism of recharge that most directly influences the respective valley aquifers. Substantial recharge in the Utah basins likely originates as infiltrating snowmelt in the mountain block far from the valley aquifer, whereas mountain-front recharge and streambed infiltration of runoff are the dominant recharge mechanisms operating in the Arizona basins. It was determined that the fraction of water-level variation caused by local precipitation patterns becomes more difficult to resolve with increasing effects of ground-water pumping, especially from incomplete records. As the demand for ground water increases in the southwestern United States, long-term records of ground-water levels have the potential to provide valuable information about the precipitation-driven variation in water levels, which has implications to water management related to water availability.

  16. Reviewing SEBAL input parameters for assessing evapotranspiration and water productivity for the Low-Middle São Francisco River basin, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. de C. Teixeira; W. G. M. Bastiaanssen; M. D. Ahmad; M. G. Bos

    2009-01-01

    The intensification of irrigated agriculture in the semi-arid region of Brazilian North-east results in a change of natural vegetation by irrigated fruit crops. New applications of remote sensing technologies are presented in this paper to estimate the impact of this land use change on regional water consumption – and ultimately the water balance – in Low-Middle São Francisco River basin.

  17. Vegetation changes and hydrological fluctuations in the Central Ebro Basin (NE Spain) since the Late Glacial period: Saline lake records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Penélope González-Sampériz; Blas L. Valero-Garcés; Ana Moreno; Mario Morellón; Ana Navas; Javier Machín; Antonio Delgado-Huertas

    2008-01-01

    Although the Central Ebro Basin (northeastern Iberian Peninsula) is both the northernmost semi-arid area in Europe and one of the regions with the largest biodiversity, it has been insufficiently studied in terms of past climate variability due to the scarcity of suitable sites for palaeoenvironmental analyses. Previous studies from ephemeral saline lakes in the area, mainly based on palynological data,

  18. Extent, Impact, and Response to Soil and Water Salinity in Arid and Semiarid Regions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karuppan Sakadevan; Minh-Long Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable management of land and water resources in arid and semi-arid regions is of concern as a result of increased population pressure and the need for more food and fiber. Soil and water salinity is widespread across the arid and semi-arid regions of South Asia, Central Asia, Arabian Peninsula, and North Africa and affected agricultural productivity and livelihood of rural

  19. Fault-controlled sedimentation in a progressively opening extensional basin: the Palaeoproterozoic Vargfors basin, Skellefte mining district, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Tobias E.; Skyttä, Pietari; Allen, Rodney L.; Weihed, Pär

    2013-03-01

    The Vargfors basin in the central part of the Skellefte mining district is an inverted sedimentary basin within a Palaeoproterozoic (1.89 Ga) marine volcanic arc. The fault-segmented basin formed from upper-crustal extension and subsequent compression, following a period of intense sub-marine volcanism and VMS ore formation. New detailed mapping reveals variations in stratigraphy attributed to syn-extensional sedimentation, as well as provenance of conglomerate clasts associated with tectonic activity at the transition from extension to compression. The onset of fan delta to alluvial fan sedimentation associated with basin subsidence indicates that significant dip-slip displacement accommodating rapid uplift of the intrusive complex and/or subsidence of the adjacent volcano-sedimentary domain took place along a major fault zone at the southern margin of the intrusive complex. Subsidence of the Jörn intrusive complex and/or its burial by sedimentary units caused a break in erosion of the intrusion and favoured the deposition of a tonalite clast-barren conglomerate. Clast compositions of conglomerates show that the syn-extensional deposits become younger in the south-eastern parts of the basin, indicating that opening of the basin progressed from north-west to south-east. Subsequent basin inversion, associated with the accretion to the Karelian margin, involved reverse activation of the normal faults and development of related upright synclines. Progressive crustal shortening caused the formation of break-back faults accompanied by mafic volcanic activity that particularly affected the southern contact of the Jörn intrusive complex and the northern contact of the Vargfors basin.

  20. Determine the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio in arid and semi-arid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadaei, Hadi; Suzuki, Rikie

    2012-11-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera. L (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. In this study, we estimated the optimum spectral reflectance of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. In this research spectral reflectance are able to specify of multispectral from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) that provided by JAXA. These data included PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 ?m and AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 ?m), green (0.52-0.60 ?m), red (0.61-0.69 ?m), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 ?m). Total ratio vegetation index (TRVI) of optimum spectral reflectance of juniper and pistachio have been evaluated. The result of TRVI for Pistachio and juniper were (R2= 0.71 and 0.55). I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  1. The geochronological timing and alluvium of the tablelands in the Puli Basin, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chia-Han; Lüthgens, Christopher; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Reimann, Tony; Frechen, Manfred; Böse, Margot

    2015-04-01

    Tablelands are prominent geomorphic features in the Puli Basin in central Taiwan. Being composed of sediments, they provide clues to understand links between past climatic evolution and tectonic events resulting in the formation of the present-day landforms. To establish a geochronological framework of the tablelands, optically stimulated luminescence dating was applied to obtain burial ages of the tableland deposits. The numerical dating indicate an accumulation phase in the Late Pleistocene to Early Holocene transition. By integrating data from previous studies on topography, sediment characteristics in the study and adjacent areas, huge amounts of alluvium were deposited as alluvial fans in 5?6 thousand years into the Puli Basin based on the results of the luminescence dating. The study area in the Taomi River catchment, an obviously longer precursor of the Taomi River, originating from west of the Yuchih Basin, transported the sediments forming the present-day southern tablelands. During the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, the climate changed to more wet and warmer conditions, so that slope processes might have changed and an increasing transport in the fluvial system was stimulated. Fluvial and fan terraces in other river catchments in Taiwan also indicate a period of increased erosion and fluvial transport at that time. After the deposition of the alluvial fan, an estimated mean incision rate of at least 15 mm/a of the Taomi River reflects local tectonic activities. Fluvial processes controlled by climatic change and accompanied by tectonic activities have created the diverse topography in the Puli Basin.

  2. Capturing and modelling high-complex alluvial topography with UAS-borne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfennigbauer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Due to fluvial activity alluvial forests are zones of highest complexity and relief energy. Alluvial forests are dominated by new and pristine channels in consequence of current and historic flood events. Apart from topographic features, the vegetation structure is typically very complex featuring, both, dense under story as well as high trees. Furthermore, deadwood and debris carried from upstream during periods of high discharge within the river channel are deposited in these areas. Therefore, precise modelling of the micro relief of alluvial forests using standard tools like Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is hardly feasible. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), in turn, is very time consuming for capturing larger areas as many scan positions are necessary for obtaining complete coverage due to view occlusions in the forest. In the recent past, the technological development of Unmanned Arial Systems (UAS) has reached a level that light-weight survey-grade laser scanners can be operated from these platforms. For capturing alluvial topography this could bridge the gap between ALS and TLS in terms of providing a very detailed description of the topography and the vegetation structure due to the achievable very high point density of >100 points per m2. In our contribution we demonstrate the feasibility to apply UAS-borne laser scanning for capturing and modelling the complex topography of the study area Neubacher Au, an alluvial forest at the pre-alpine River Pielach (Lower Austria). The area was captured with Riegl's VUX-1 compact time-of-flight laser scanner mounted on a RiCopter (X-8 array octocopter). The scanner features an effective scan rate of 500 kHz and was flown in 50-100 m above ground. At this flying height the laser footprint is 25-50 mm allowing mapping of very small surface details. Furthermore, online waveform processing of the backscattered laser energy enables the retrieval of multiple targets for single laser shots resulting in a dense point cloud of, both, the ground surface and the alluvial vegetation. From the acquired point cloud the following products could be derived: (i) a very high resolution Digital Terrain Model (10 cm raster), (ii) a high resolution model of the water surface of the River Pielach (especially useful for validation of topo-bathymetry LiDAR data) and (iii) a detailed description of the complex vegetation structure.

  3. Surface water?groundwater interactions in an alluvial plain: Chemical and isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Négrel, Ph.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Barbier, J.; Gautier, E.

    2003-06-01

    Our work on the Loire River forms part of a French National Research Program dedicated to wetlands and aims to better understand the global functioning of the system from the hydrological, geochemical, ecological and sociological aspects. The present study, using a coupled hydrological and geochemical (stable and Sr isotopes) approach, focuses on the 'Soulangy' site with its secondary anastomosing channels just below the confluence of the Loire and Allier rivers, and also on the 'Dorna``nt' site with two unconnected oxbow lakes 50 km upstream of the confluence. The stable isotopes of water ( ?18O, ?2H) show that the alluvial (or riverbank) aquifer feeds the Loire River during the summer, but is not recharged by the river during flood periods in the winter; the alluvial groundwater thus has a purely local origin from precipitation. The major elements reveal an anthropogenic input of Cl and more importantly of NO 3, especially near farms. The 87Sr/ 86Sr isotopes identify different groundwater layers in the alluvium, i.e. an upper and a lower alluvial aquifer, and a perched aquifer at Dornant, that have relatively complex relationships with the surface water. The two main rivers (Loire and Allier) present distinct geochemical characteristics reflecting the different lithologies that they drain upstream. In addition, the secondary channels, lying parallel to the Loire main stream at the Soulangy site, give different geochemical signatures, which shows that they are not fed by the same overflows of the Loire; they are more-or-less well connected to the upper level of the alluvial plain, and a longitudinal study of one of these channels has revealed a Loire River influence progressively replaced by a water contribution from the upper alluvial aquifer. Similarly, the two oxbow lakes at the Dornant site are not supplied by the same water during the summer months. A conceptual scheme of the Loire hydrosystem based on ?18O and 87Sr/ 86Sr suggests that the isotopic variations of the Loire River can be related to a Massif Central surface-water supply for the Loire and Allier main streams and to a groundwater supply from the alluvial plains.

  4. Development of an arid site closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Barnes, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes the development of a prototype plan for the effective closure and stabilization of an arid low-level waste disposal site. This plan will provide demonstrated closure techniques for a trench in a disposal site at Los Alamos. The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed. A specific example is presented showing how the field-validated hydrologic models can be used to develop a final prototype closure plan. 15 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Neuquén basin (Argentina) between 39°S and 41°S during the Neogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyghe, D.; Bonnel, C.; Nivière, B.; Messager, G.; Dhont, D.; Fasentieux, B.; Hervouët, Y.; Xavier, J.-P.

    2012-04-01

    Sedimentary rocks deposited in foreland basins are of primary interest, because they record the interactions between the growth of the orogenic wedge, the isostatic readjustment of the lithosphere, the variations of base-level and earth surface process. The Neuquén basin (32°S - 41°S) is a triangular shape foreland basin located on the eastern flank of the Andes. Its filling began during the late Triassic, first as back arc basin context and as compressive foreland basin since the upper Cretaceous. The structural inheritance is thus important and old basement structures, like the Huincul Ridge, generate significant variations of both deformation and shortening. Its Mesozoic history is well constrained due to its hydrocarbon potential. In comparison, its Cenozoic history remains poorly documented. The modern configuration of this basin results from several successive compressive tectonic phases. The last one is dated from the Miocene (Quechua phase) and has conditioned the segmentation of the foreland basin in several intra-mountainous sub-basins, whose sedimentary filling could reach several hundred meters. In this work, we document the relative chronology of the geological events and the sedimentary processes that have governed the Cenozoic history of the southern part of the Neuquen basin, to discriminate the relative rules of climatic and structural controlling factors on the evolution of the depocentres. Several NNW-SSE oriented intra-mountainous basins exist in this part of the Andes (Collon Cura basin and Catan Lil basin). On the contrary the associated foreland basin (Picun Leufu basin) is relatively underformed and is bounded to the North by the Huincul ridge and the North Patagonian massif to the South. Fifteen sedimentary sections have been studied along the Rio Limay River in the southern border of the basin, from the range to the external part of the foreland. The sedimentation is discontinuous in time and important retrogradations of the depocentres are observed from the outer part of the foreland to the intra-mountainous basins. Tertiary sedimentation begins at the end of the Oligocene until the end of the middle Miocene in the Picun Leufu basin. During the paroxysm of the Quechua tectonic phase, (middle Miocene to Pliocene) the Picun Leufu basin is characterised by a sedimentary hiatus of ~10 Ma that illustrates the closure of the Collon Cura basin and a migration to the internal zone of the range of the depocentres. The filling of the Collon Cura basin is characterised by a continental fining upward sequence of a thickness of several hundred meters. This sedimentation begins with lacustrine and alluvial plain paleoenvironments with some syn-eruptive events (ignimbrites) and ends with continental conglomerates and paleosoils. A first reconnexion with the foreland basin occurs at the beginning of the Pliocene, with the deposition of an alluvial fan. Since the end of the Pliocene another anticline grew in the Picun Leufu basin and controlled the deposition of more recent alluvial fans with the arrival of coarse conglomerates (Pampa Curaco and Bayo Messa Formations). The modern drainage network is established during the Pleistocene in the Collon Cura and Picun Leufu basins, which are since only characterised by the construction of erosional surfaces (terraces) and the apparition of the Rio Limay system on the Miocene and Cretaceous deposits.

  6. Response of Terrestrial Vegetation to Variations in Temperature and Aridity Since the Last Glacial Maximum in Lake Chalco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werne, J. P.; Halbur, J.; Rubesch, M.; Brown, E. T.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Lozano, S.

    2013-05-01

    The water balance of the Southwestern United States and most of Mexico is dependent on regional climate systems, including the Mexican (or North American) Monsoon. The Mexican Monsoon leads to significant summer rainfall across a broad swath of the continent, which constitutes the major source of annual precipitation over much of this region. The position of the ITCZ and the strength of the accompanying monsoon are affected by variability in insolation. Stronger northern hemisphere summer insolation shifts the ITCZ northward, bringing about a more intense monsoon. Here we discuss a new geochemical climate record from Lake Chalco, Mexico, which couples inorganic (X-ray fluorescence) and organic (biomarkers and stable isotopes) geochemical proxies to reconstruct temperature and aridity over the past 45,000 years, as well as the response of terrestrial vegetation to such climate changes. The Basin of Mexico is a high altitude closed lacustrine basin (20°N, 99°W; 2240 m.a.s.l.) in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. The plain of Lake Chalco, located near Mexico City in the southern sub-basin, has an area of 120 km2 and a catchment of 1100 km2. Though the present-day lake has been reduced to a small marsh due to historic diversion of its waters, over longer timescales the lake has been a sensitive recorder of hydroclimatic variations. Low Ca concentrations indicate more arid periods during the late glacial (34 - 15 kybp) compared to the last interstadial or early Holocene. This observation is supported by the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic lipid biomarkers (long vs. short chain n-alkanes), which indicate greater relative inputs of aquatic biomarkers during wetter periods. The changes in aridity as shown in these geochemical proxies are compared with temperature as reflected in glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) based paleotemperature proxies to assess the extent to which insolation may have driven aridity variations, and with terrestrial and aquatic biomarker ?13C values to assess the impact of these observed climate changes on regional vegetation.

  7. Response of Terrestrial Vegetation to Variations in Temperature and Aridity Since the Last Glacial Maximum in Lake Chalco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werne, J. P.; Rubesch, M.; Brown, E. T.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Lozano-Garcia, S.

    2011-12-01

    The water balance of the Southwestern United States and most of Mexico is dependent on regional climate systems, including the Mexican (or North American) Monsoon. The Mexican Monsoon leads to significant summer rainfall across a broad swath of the continent, which constitutes the major source of annual precipitation over much of this region. The position of the ITCZ and the strength of the accompanying monsoon are affected by variability in insolation. Stronger northern hemisphere summer insolation shifts the ITCZ northward, bringing about a more intense monsoon. Here we discuss a new geochemical climate record from Lake Chalco, Mexico, which couples inorganic (X-ray fluorescence) and organic (biomarkers and stable isotopes) geochemical proxies to reconstruct temperature and aridity over the past 45,000 years, as well as the response of terrestrial vegetation to such climate changes. The Basin of Mexico is a high altitude closed lacustrine basin (20°N, 99°W; 2240 m.a.s.l.) in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. The plain of Lake Chalco, located near Mexico City in the southern sub-basin, has an area of 120 km2 and a catchment of 1100 km2. Though the present-day lake has been reduced to a small marsh due to historic diversion of its waters, over longer timescales the lake has been a sensitive recorder of hydroclimatic variations. Low Ca concentrations indicate more arid periods during the late glacial (34 - 15 kybp) compared to the last interstadial or early Holocene. This observation is supported by the ratio of terrestrial to aquatic lipid biomarkers (long vs. short chain n-alkanes), which indicate greater relative inputs of aquatic biomarkers during wetter periods. The changes in aridity as shown in these geochemical proxies are compared with temperature as reflected in glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) based paleotemperature proxies to assess the extent to which insolation may have driven aridity variations, and with terrestrial and aquatic biomarker ?13C values to assess the impact of these observed climate changes on regional vegetation.

  8. Observed variability of drought and aridity and its impact on the hydrological regime in the Barlad catchment (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcan, Mihaela; Cheval, Sorin; Chendes, Viorel

    2015-04-01

    The drought is a complex phenomenon with slow manifestation which engages, depending on its duration and intensity, a number of different components of the climatic, hydrologic, pedologic systems. This paper investigates the relationships between drought and aridity on one hand and hydrological regime, on the other hand, in Bârlad river basin, in the eastern part of Romania. Recent studies have revealed that both meteorological and hydrological drought events have a significant frequency and magnitude in the area, so that an important impact on the hydrological regime is likely to occur. For the next decades, climate change scenarios estimate increasing temperatures and relatively low decreasing of precipitation. Therefore, eventual changes in the aridity characteristics can be expected, and they might have a considerable impact on the water supply or agriculture in the Bârlad catchment. The analysis covers the period 1961-2013 and it is based on monthly data from meteorological and hydrological stations. Seasonal indices were calculated for characterising the drought (SPI, SFI, PDSI, PHDI) and aridity (UNEP, de Martonne, Pinna), while their temporal variability was further investigated in relations with specific hydrological parameters (monthly discharge time series). The spatial distribution of the selected indices was analysed in the same context using co-variables integrated in a GIS framework. The results show that the hydrological drought is influenced and determined mostly by the meteorological drought. The highest variability between the aridity indices has been identified for the summer season, where the time lag between the hydrological response to the meteorological impulse is up to 2 months. The work has been financed by the research project Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania (CLIMHYDEX), Cod PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, sponsored by the National Authority for Scientific Research.

  9. Modeling scenarios for water resources management in a semi-arid catchment "Merguellil - Tunisia"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouabdillah, A.; Lo Porto, A.; de Girolamo, A. M.; Sakka, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the Mediterranean climatic zone, also labeled as semi-arid area, hydrological processes are largely variable both in time and space due to the high variability of rainfall regime, the influence of topography and the spatial distribution of geology, soil and land use. These processes may also have changed due to a range of human activities such as land use changes, dams building, soil and water conservations works. Besides, there is a general agreement that global climate change is taking place in the Mediterranean basin. The Merguellil catchment (Central Tunisia), as a typical Mediterranean semi-arid basin, suffers regular water shortage aggravated by current drought with different degrees of frequency, intensity and severity. In addition, the hydrological regime has been changed over the last decade in this catchment. The construction of the large El Haouareb dam (1989) increases the surface storage and evaporations losses. Soil and water Conservation Works (SWCW) (ie. benches terraces) and others small and large dams have altered the hydrological regime. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT-2000) model was used in order to simulate the water and nutrient balance at the catchment scale. The simulation results revealed that evapotranspiration is the major component (91%) of the hydrological balance. Hydrological Calibration (1992-1994) and validation (1996-1998) have been carried out referring to a daily flow data at the Hafouz flowgage. The model performance was satisfactory and the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient ranges between 0.3 to 0.5. The water quality simulation shows that Phosphorus simulated concentrations better matched existing measurements. In order to improve the availability of high quality water, three scenarios were generated. Firstly, the total or partial removal of SWCWs from the upstream area has shown an increase of the surface runoff and sediment loading at the outlet. Secondly, by reducing 20% in the applied fertilizers, no change was detected in the crop yield, whereas on a yearly scale, it has been noted a reduction in sediment and nutrient loads. Finally to assess the potential impact of climate change, the predicted precipitations and temperatures (for 2020, 2050 and 2080) from the general circulation model HadCm3 developed by UK Hadley Center for climatic prediction and research, were used. All the components of the water and nutrient balance are foreseen to decrease. A longer arid period in summer is also predicted leading to a decrease of the sediment and nutrient load in that period.

  10. Evaluation of an extreme-condition-inverse calibration remote sensing model for mapping energy balance fluxes in arid riparian areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.-H.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.; Kleissl, J.; Allen, R. G.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Scott, R. L.; Steinwand, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate information on the distribution of the surface energy balance components in arid riparian areas is needed for sustainable management of water resources as well as for a better understanding of water and heat exchange processes between the land surface and the atmosphere. Since the spatial and temporal distributions of these fluxes over large areas are difficult to determine from ground measurements alone, their prediction from remote sensing data is very attractive as it enables large area coverage and a high repetition rate. In this study the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) was used to estimate all the energy balance components in the arid riparian areas of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (New Mexico), San Pedro Basin (Arizona), and Owens Valley (California). We compare instantaneous and daily SEBAL fluxes derived from Landsat TM images to surface-based measurements with eddy covariance flux towers. This study presents evidence that SEBAL yields reliable estimates for actual evapotranspiration rates in riparian areas of the southwestern United States. The great strength of the SEBAL method is its internal calibration procedure that eliminates most of the bias in latent heat flux at the expense of increased bias in sensible heat flux.

  11. Fluvial sedimentology and basin analyses of the Permian Fairchild and Buckley formations, Beardmore Glacier region, and the Weller Coal Measures, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Isbell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Beardmore Glacier region contains a 1-km-thick Permian fluvial sequence that was deposited in an elongate basin along the margin of the East Antarctica craton. Fluvial architecture, sandstone composition and paleocurrents within the basin record a change from an early Permian cratonic to a late Permian foreland basin. The Lower Permian Fairchild Formation consists entirely of overlapping channel-form sandstone bodies deposited by braided streams. Arkosic sandstone was deposited by SE flowing streams. Fairchild strata record slow subsidence within a broad cratonic basin. The Lower to Upper Permian Buckley Formation consists of an arkosic lower member and a volcaniclastic upper member. Paleocurrents which consist of transverse and longitudinal paleocurrents, suggest a cratonward migration of the basin axis through time. The Buckley Formation was deposited within a braided stream setting and is an important unit because it contains interstratified channel-sandstone sheets, shale and coal, along with evidence of channel-belt avulsions. Sandstone sheets predominate at the base of the formation, while flood-plain deposits thicken and increase in abundance upward. The interaction between fluvial processes and subsidence rates produced this alluvial stratigraphy. The Lower Permian Weller Coal Measures in southern Victoria Land were deposited within a narrow basin located cratonward of the foreland basin. Basin geometry and depositional patterns are similar to those of fault-bounded basins. Although basin formation is not constrained, deposition of the Weller was contemporaneous with the development of the foreland basin. This suggests a relationship between subsidence within the two basins.

  12. Fly Ash as a Time Marker for Anthropocene Alluvial Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettis, E. A., III; Grimley, D. A.; Anders, A. M.; Bates, B.; Hannan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Human land use has transformed the landscapes, ecosystems and hydrology of the North American Midcontinent. One widespread impact of this transformation is increased runoff and accelerated soil erosion, which, along with direct human channel modifications and artificial drainage, have dramatically altered hydrologic and ecological conditions in streams and rivers with far-reaching results. A legacy of this change in streams and rivers is preserved on floodplains throughout the region in sediment known as post-settlement alluvium (PSA). Documenting the spatial and temporal pattern of historic floodplain sedimentation in the drainage network is part of a larger effort to understand decadal and century-scale sediment routing through the drainage system and the role of floodplain sedimentation in carbon sequestration. Fly ash, a product of high-temperature coal combustion, began to accumulate on the landscape in the early historic period (c.a.1840-1850 in Iowa and Illinois) as coal-burning technology such as steam engines came into use after 1850; prior to which no source of fly ash was present. Release of fly ash from coal burning in power plants and steam locomotives likely peaked in the early-mid 20th century. Fly ash particles (~ 1 to 10 % magnetic) are identified by their spheroidal shape and range in size from coarse clay to silt (~1-63µ). By identifying the percentage of fly ash spheroids in the magnetic separate (10 - 60µ size range) of a soil or sediment profile, the pre-fly ash Historic surface could be discerned. Application of this technique in selected localities in eastern Iowa (Clear Creek drainage) and central Illinois (Sangamon River drainage) resulted in successful demarcation of the PSA contact in areas where the boundary was physically evident. Bolstered by this success we were able to confidently demark the PSA contact in other settings where the boundary was not as physically evident. This relatively easy to implement, inexpensive tool will provide us with critical ground truth data for understanding long-term sediment movement through drainage basins and for modelling landscape evolution during the Anthropocene.

  13. a Proposed New Vegetation Index, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (trvi), for Arid and Semi-Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadaei, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T.; Torii, K.

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 ?m (JAXA EORC). AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 ?m), green (0.52-0.60 ?m), red (0.61-0.69 ?m), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 ?m) (JAXA EORC). In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5) and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI), and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by analysing data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) using 5×5 maximum filtering algorithms. The results for pistachio forest showed the coefficient regression of NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, OSAVI, and TRVI were (R2= 0.68, 0.67, 0.68, 0.68, and 0.71) respectively. The results for juniper forest showed the coefficient regression of NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, OSAVI, and TRVI were (R2= 0.51, 0.52, 0.51, 0.52, and 0.56) respectively. I hope this research can provide decision of managers to helping sustainable management for arid and semi-arid regions in Iran.

  14. Sedimentation in pull-apart basins: modern examples from eastern Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Hempton, M.R.; Dunne, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    Well-exposed ancient pull-apart basin deposits have the following characteristics in common: (1) great stratigraphic thickness relative to basin size, (2) high rate of sedimentation, (3) asymmetry of sediment thickness and facies pattern, (4) organization of the facies into marginal fault-bounded fanglomerates and central flood-basin and lacustrine deposits, and (5) textural cycles that reflect tectonic activity and evolution. The Erzincan pull-apart basin overlies the North Anatolian fault, a right-lateral, 1200-km (745 mi) long intracontinental transform fault. Sedimentation within the basin is controlled by: (1) an axial fluvial system (the upper Euphrates River) associated with a broad flood plain/salt marsh, and (2) alluvial fans that prograde transversely from the boundary mountain fronts. The features suggest that the northern fault margin has probably been more recently active than the southern fault margin. The Lake Hazar pull-apart basin overlies the East Anatolian fault, a left-lateral, 450-km (280 mi) long intracontinental transform fault. Sedimentation within the basin is controlled by: (1) an axial fluvial system which enters the basin longitudinally and forms a large (5.1 km/sup 2/ (2 mi/sup 2/)), low-gradient (1.1/sup 0/) fan delta which is composed of interbedded fluvial and lacustrine facies, and (2) lateral fluvial systems that enter the basin transversely and form small (0.03 to 0.23 km/sup 2/ (0.01 to 0.09 mi/sup 2/)), steep (2.5/sup 0/ to 8.5/sup 0/) fan deltas composed of interbedded fluvial and debris flow facies. The Erzincan and Lake Hazar pull-apart basins present an instantaneous structural and depositional picture of pull-apart basin evolution and provide a basis of comparison with ancient pull-apart basin deposits.

  15. Early Cretaceous coniferous woods from a paleoerg (Paraná Basin, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Etiene Fabbrin; Guerra-Sommer, Margot; Scherer, Claiton Marlon dos Santos; Santos, Adriano Rodrigues dos; Cardoso, Edivane

    2011-07-01

    We report here the occurrence of an assemblage of silicified coniferous wood within aeolian sandstones of the Early Cretaceous Botucatu Formation, a paleoerg along the margins of the Paraná Basin (Brazil). The characteristics of this monotypic wood assemblage indicate the occurrence of some more humid periods during the prevailing arid climate of a semi-desert biome. The growing conditions were seasonal and stressed during the life cycle of the trees. Quantitative parameters controlling growth ring development might be closely related to local environmental conditions and not just only a single consequence of climate. The conifer assemblage, developed in an arid desert biome during the climax of a greenhouse phase with increasing atmospheric CO 2 does not have modern analogues in present icehouse world.

  16. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  17. Impact of forest type and management strategy on avian densities in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Twedt; R. Randy Wilson; Jackie L. Henne-Kerr; Robert B. Hamilton

    1999-01-01

    Avian territory densities were determined from 20 Breeding Bird Censuses in mature (>30 years) bottomland hardwood stands and 18 Breeding Bird Censuses in young (6–9 years old) cottonwood (Populus deltoides) plantations in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Avian species richness, diversity, and territory density were greater (p<0.01) in bottomland hardwood stands than in intensively-managed cottonwood stands but these parameters were not

  18. SURFACE MOTION OF A SEMICYLINDRICAL ALLUVIAL VALLEY FOR INCIDENT PLANE SH WAVES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. TRIFUNAC

    1971-01-01

    The nature of surface motion in and around a semi-cylindrical alluvial valley is investigated for the case of incident plane SH waves. The closed-form analytical solution of this two-dimensional wave-propagation problem displays complicated wave-interference phenomena characterized by nearly-standing wave patterns, rapid changes in the ground-motion amplification along the free surface of the valley, and significant dependence of motion on the

  19. The utility of gravity and water-level monitoring at alluvial aquifer wells in southern Arizona

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Pool

    2008-01-01

    Coincident monitoring of gravity and water levels at 39 wells insouthernArizonaindicatethatwater-levelchangemightnotbe a reliable indicator of aquifer-storage change for alluvial aquifer systems.Onereasonisthatwaterlevelsinwellsthatarescreened acrosssingleormultipleaquifersmightnotrepresentthehydrau- licheadandstoragechangeinalocalunconfinedaquifer.Gravity estimates of aquifer-storage change can be approximated as a one-dimensional feature except near some withdrawal wells and recharge sources. The aquifer storage coefficient is estimated by the linear regression slope of storage change estimated using gravity methods

  20. Gypsum karstification induced subsidence: effects on alluvial systems and derived geohazards (Calatayud Graben, Iberian Range, Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco Gutiérrez

    1996-01-01

    The karstification of the tertiary gypsum formations in the Calatayud Graben has given rise to synsedimentary and postsedimentary subsidence phenomena in both the Neogene sediments of the endorheic graben fill and in the Quaternary alluvial sediments deposited under exorheic conditions. In the so-called Maluenda and Perejiles areas, covering 4.4 and 12 km2 respectively, the Neogene sedimentary units stratigraphically above the

  1. An engineering geologic impact analysis of hydraulic dredging for lignite in Texas alluvial valleys 

    E-print Network

    Nolan, Erich Donald Luis

    1985-01-01

    Hypothetical cross-section of reclaimed and revegetated dredge mine. . . . . . . . . . . . 85 INTRODUCTION Background Texas possesses a major lignite resource. Kaiser and others (1980) estimate that Texas' near surface lignite (from depths of 20 ft to 200... lignite in alluvial valleys is feasible Table 1. Stratigraphic occurrence of Texas lignites (IUodified fram Cason, 1982) . North of the Colorado River OLIGOCENE CATAMOULA FORMATION South of the Colorado River Whitsett Formation Manning Formations...

  2. Aspects of alluvial river bank recession: some examples from the Niger delta

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. S. Abam

    1997-01-01

    The recession of alluvial channel banks occurs as a sequence of mass movements or by gradual dissolution of bank materials.\\u000a Criteria for recognizing and interpreting bank recessions due to mass movement and\\/or erosion are presented. Using back analysis\\u000a technique, slope development processes are reconstructed as a sequence of bank failure episodes and erosional events. Various\\u000a mechanisms of mass bank failure

  3. Fractionation and potential mobility of trace metals in Danube alluvial aquifer within an industrialized zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dubravka Reli?; Dragana ?or?evi?; Aleksandar Popovi?; Milka Jadranin; Predrag Poli?

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-five alluvial sediments of the River Danube and 12 groundwater samples were taken within the Pan?evo Oil Refinery (Serbia).\\u000a The results for groundwater samples exceed European primary drinking water standards for Fe (obtained results, >200 ?g\\/l)\\u000a and Mn (obtained results, >50 ?g\\/l), while the levels of the trace metals are below the thresholds for drinking water quality.\\u000a Sediments were treated by sequential

  4. High-resolution characterization of chemical heterogeneity in an alluvial aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulmeister, M.K.; Healey, J.M.; Butler, J.J.; McCall, G.W.; Birk, S.

    2002-01-01

    The high-resolution capabilities of direct push technology were exploited to develop new insights into the hydrochemistry at the margin of an alluvial aquifer. Hydrostratigraphic controls on groundwater flow and contaminant loading were revealed through the combined use of direct push electrical conductivity (EC) logging and geochemical profiling. Vertical and lateral variations in groundwater chemistry were consistent with sedimentary features indicated by EC logs, and were supported by a conceptual model of recharge along the flood plain margin.

  5. Entrainment of riparian gravel and cobbles in an alluvial reach of a regulated canyon river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliotp, J.G.; Hammack, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many canyon rivers have channels and riparian zones composed of alluvial materials and these reaches, dominated by fluvial processes, are sensitive to alterations in streamflow regime. Prior to reservoir construction in the mid-1960s, banks and bars in alluvial reaches of the Gunnison River in the Black Canyon National Monument, Colorado, USA, periodically were reworked and cleared of riparian vegetation by mainstem floods. Recent interest in maintaining near-natural conditions in the Black Canyon using reservoir releases has created a need to estimate sediment-entraining discharges for a variety of geomorphic surfaces composed of sediment ranging in size from gravel to small boulders. Sediment entrainment potential was studied at eight cross-sections in an alluvial reach of the Gunnison River in the Black Canyon in 1994 and 1995. A one-dimensional water-surface profile model was used to estimate water-surface elevations, flow depths, and hydraulic conditions on selected alluvial surfaces for discharges ranging from 57 to 570 m3/s. Onsite observations before and after a flood of 270 m3/s confirmed sediment entrainment on several surfaces inundated by the flood. Selective entrainment of all but the largest particle sizes on the surface occurred at some locations. Physical evidence of sediment entrainment, or absence of sediment entrainment, on inundated surfaces generally was consistent with critical shear stresses estimated with a dimensionless critical shear stress of 0.030. Sediment-entrainment potential over a range of discharges was summarized by the ratio of the local boundary shear stress to the critical shear stress for d50, given hydraulic geometry and sediment-size characteristics. Differing entrainment potential for similar geomorphic surfaces indicates that estimation of minimum streamflow requirements based on sediment mobility is site-specific and that there is no unique streamflow that will initiate movement of d50 at every geomorphically similar location in the Black Canyon. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Arid Lands--A Study in Ecological Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckholm, Erik

    1977-01-01

    Reports that over-grazing and unsound agricultural practices are increasing the world-wide amount of uninhabitable land. Cites some practices which have been used to successfully reclaim arid land areas. (CP)

  7. Particle transport in unsaturated fractured chalk under arid conditions

    E-print Network

    Weisbrod, Noam

    Particle transport in unsaturated fractured chalk under arid conditions Noam Weisbrod a,b,*, Ofer the mechanisms of particle detachment and transport from fractures in vadose chalk. Experiments of intermittent

  8. Local facilitation, bistability and transitions in arid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kéfi, Sonia; Rietkerk, Max; van Baalen, Minus; Loreau, Michel

    2007-05-01

    Arid ecosystems are liable to undergo sudden discontinuous transitions from a vegetated to a desert state as a result of human pressure and climate change. A predictive framework about the conditions under which such transitions occur is lacking. Here, we derive and analyze a general model describing the spatial dynamics of vegetation in arid ecosystems considering local facilitation as an essential process. We investigate the conditions under which continuous or discontinuous transitions from a vegetated to a desert state are likely to occur. We focus on arid ecosystems but our approach is sufficiently general to be applied to other ecosystems with severe environmental conditions. The model exhibits bistability and vegetation patchiness. High local facilitation decreases the risk of discontinuous transitions. Moreover, for arid ecosystems where local facilitation is a driving process, vegetation patchiness indicates proximity to a transition point, but does not allow distinguishing between continuous and discontinuous transitions. PMID:17097700

  9. Water Tables, Evapotranspiration, and Climate Variability: A Decade of Observations From a Semi-Arid Riparian Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, J. R.; Cleverly, J. R.; Dahm, C.

    2009-12-01

    Native (Rio Grande cottonwood) riparian ecosystems in the semi-arid Rio Grande floodplain of central New Mexico are threatened by hydrologic alterations and highly competitive invasive vegetation (saltcedar, Russian olive). Climate change is expected to alter surface runoff in the southwestern United States and exacerbate water scarcity. Depletions are likely to increase in this agricultural riverine corridor downstream of the rapidly growing Albuquerque metropolitan area. Long-term monitoring of shallow alluvial water tables (WTs) and evapotranspiration (ET) in native, non-native, and mixed communities along the river has provided critical information to help understand how water availability affects these ecosystems during a decade of extreme climate variability. Here, we present several observations, with implications for restoration. WTs ranged from several meters depth to flood stage and from relatively stable to highly dynamic, which can influence recruitment of native vegetation and ecosystem functioning. Annual ET declined with deeper WTs across sites, with robust correlations where WTs were dynamic. Riparian communities responded differently to drought cycles and to restorative flooding during peak runoff at the onset of the growing season. Annual ET in a native-dominated system was reduced following removal of non-native understory vegetation, but returned to previous levels when regrowth was left unmanaged. Long-term data are valuable assets that can help optimize efforts to sustain and restore native ecosystems amid the challenges of a changing climate.

  10. Developing a coupled analytical model for analyzing salt intrusion in alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.; CAI, H.; Gisen, J.

    2013-12-01

    A predictive assessment technique to estimate the salt intrusion length and longitudinal salinity distribution in estuaries is important for policy makers and managers to maintain a healthy estuarine environment. In this study, the salt intrusion model of Savenije (2005, 2012) is applied and coupled to an explicit solution for tidal dynamics developed by Cai and Savenije (2013). The objective of the coupling is to reduce the number of calibration parameters, which subsequently strengthens the reliability of the salt intrusion model. Moreover, the fully analytical treatment allows assessing the effect of model forcing (i.e., tide and river discharge) and geometry adjustments (e.g., by dredging) on system performance. The coupled model has been applied to a wide range of estuaries, and the result shows that the correspondence between analytical estimations and observations is very good. As a result, the coupled model is a useful tool for decision makers to obtain first order estimates of salt intrusion in estuaries based on a minimum of information required. References Savenije, H.H.G. (2005), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, Elsevier. Savenije, H.H.G. (2012), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, completely revised 2nd edition, www.salinityandtides.com. Cai, H., and H. H. G. Savenije (2013), Asymptotic behavior of tidal damping in alluvial estuaries, Journal of Geophysical Research, submitted.

  11. Soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Gröndalselva River valley in West Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, V. N.; Litvinova, T. I.

    2012-05-01

    The genetic characterization of soils developed from alluvial and proluvial deposits in the Gröndalselva River valley (West Spitsbergen) is presented. These soils are compared with analogous soils formed on marine terraces along the coasts of Isfjord and Grönfjord. Gray-humus (soddy) soils with an O-AY-C profile have been described on parent materials of different origins, including alluvial and proluvial sediments. The texture of the soils in the Gröndalselva River valley varies from medium to heavy loam and differs from the texture of the soils on other geomorphic positions in the higher content of fine particles. The soils developed from the alluvial deposits are characterized by their richer mineralogical and chemical composition in comparison with the soils developed from proluvial deposits, marine deposits, and bedrocks. All the deposits are impoverished in CaO. No differentiation of the chemical composition of the soils along the soil profiles has been found in the soils of the coastal areas and the river valley. Some accumulation of oxalate-soluble Al and Fe compounds takes place in the uppermost mineral horizon. The soils of all the geomorphic positions have a high humus content and a high exchange capacity.

  12. Where river and tide meet: The morphodynamic equilibrium of alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolla Pittaluga, Michele; Tambroni, Nicoletta; Canestrelli, Alberto; Slingerland, Rudy; Lanzoni, Stefano; Seminara, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphodynamic equilibrium of tidally dominated alluvial estuaries, extending previous works concerning the purely tidal case and the combined tidal-fluvial case with a small tidal forcing. We relax the latter assumption and seek the equilibrium bed profile of the estuary, for a given planform configuration with various degrees of funneling, solving numerically the 1-D governing equation. The results show that with steady fluvial and tidal forcings, an equilibrium bed profile of estuaries exists. In the case of constant width estuaries, a concave down equilibrium profile develops through most of the estuary. Increasing the amplitude of the tidal oscillation, progressively higher bed slopes are experienced at the mouth while the river-dominated portion of the estuary experiences an increasing bed degradation. The fluvial-marine transition is identified by a "tidal length" that increases monotonically as the river discharge and the corresponding sediment supply are increased while the river attains a new morphological equilibrium configuration. Tidal length also increases if, for a fixed river discharge and tidal amplitude, the sediment flux is progressively reduced with respect to the transport capacity. In the case of funnel-shaped estuaries the tidal length strongly decreases, aggradation is triggered by channel widening, and tidal effects are such to enhance the slope at the inlet and the net degradation of the river bed. Finally, results suggest that alluvial estuaries in morphological equilibrium cannot experience any amplification of the tidal wave propagating landward. Hence, hypersynchronous alluvial estuaries cannot be in equilibrium.

  13. Large Well-exposed Alluvial Fans in Deep Late-Noachian Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    Large, fresh-appearing alluvial fans (typically greater than 10 km long) have been identified during a systematic search of 100 m/pixel low-sun daylight THEMIS IR imaging in deep late-Noachian or early- Hesperian craters. Our study of these fans was augmented with MOLA-derived topography and high-resolution MOC and THEMIS VIS images where available. The influence of alluvial fan deposition on the topography of crater floors has been recognized in previous topographic studies. Recent Mars Odyssey-era studies have also identified and described in detail a fluvial delta or fan of approximately the same age as the alluvial fans of this study. Our results, at the time of this writing, indicate that these fans are only found in less than 5% of all craters = 70 km in diameter within a large study region. In every case the fan-containing craters were restricted to a latitude belt between 20 deg S and 30 deg S. All of which had significant topographic relief and appeared morphologically younger than typical mid-Noachian craters in the size range. However, large fans were not found in the most pristine (and presumably youngest) craters in this size range. Most Martian fans have morphologies consistent with terrestrial debris-flow-dominated fans.

  14. Large Well-Exposed Alluvial Fans in Deep Late-Noachian Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    Large, fresh-appearing alluvial fans (typically greater than 10 km long) have been identified during a systematic search of 100 m/pixel low-sun daylight THEMIS IR imaging in deep late-Noachian or early-Hesperian craters. Our study of these fans was augmented with MOLA-derived topography and high-resolution MOC and THEMIS VIS images where available. The influence of alluvial fan deposition on the topography of crater floors has been recognized in previous topographic studies. Recent Mars Odyssey-era studies have also identified and described in detail a fluvial delta or fan of approximately the same age as the alluvial fans of this study. Our results, at the time of this writing, indicate that these fans are only found in less than 5% of all craters greater than or equal to 70 kilometers in diameter within a large study region. In every case the fan-containing craters were restricted to a latitude belt between 20 degrees S and 30 degrees S. All of which had significant topographic relief and appeared morphologically younger than typical mid-Noachian craters in the size range. However, large fans were not found in the most pristine (and presumably youngest) craters in this size range. Most Martian fans have morphologies consistent with terrestrial debris-flow-dominated fans.

  15. Review: Environmental tracers in arid-zone hydrology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew L. Herczeg; F. W. Leaney

    2011-01-01

    Application of environmental tracers to arid-zone hydrology over the past several decades is reviewed, with particular reference to the Australian continent. Some notable successes in the application of stable and radio-isotopes include identifying arid-zone groundwater as palaeowaters, understanding the importance of episodicity and of large flood events to recharge, and delineating sources of water to vegetation. Estimating the rates of

  16. Review: Environmental tracers in arid-zone hydrology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew L. Herczeg; F. W. Leaney

    2011-01-01

    Application of environmental tracers to arid-zone hydrology over the past several decades is reviewed, with particular reference\\u000a to the Australian continent. Some notable successes in the application of stable and radio-isotopes include identifying arid-zone\\u000a groundwater as palaeowaters, understanding the importance of episodicity and of large flood events to recharge, and delineating\\u000a sources of water to vegetation. Estimating the rates of

  17. Age calibration of weathering fractures in desert clasts: A new approach to dating geomorphic surfaces in arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2014-05-01

    Advances in geomorphological and sedimentological research depend on the availability of reliable exposure age constraints. Establishing robust age models at a high spatial and temporal resolution is crucial for measuring rates of geomorphological change and decoding complex landscapes shaped by time-dependent forces, e.g. climate fluctuations. A number of isotopic and luminescence techniques are now available for dating geomorphic surfaces, however they remain expensive and time-consuming to deploy with detailed coverage over space and time in many study areas. For this reason, quick and accessible methods for correlating and extrapolating these chronologies are needed. In arid landscapes, among others, a variety of weathering-induced changes occur to geomorphic and sedimentary surfaces, and many of these processes occur at predictable rates and can be quantified using objective, field based measurements. One example is the gradual widening of fractures that exist within boulders on desert surfaces, by a combination of processes including salt weathering and freeze-thaw cycles. The recent emergence of very detailed exposure age models in a number of locations means it is now possible to measure the rates of desert weathering processes, and use them as fully calibrated age indicators themselves. With the potential to significantly extend the coverage of existing age constraints, this kind of quantitative age correlation would enable a broad range of geomorphological and sedimentological research that depends on detailed absolute age models. We have measured the mean widths of hundreds of vertical fractures that dissect granitic boulders, on a variety of alluvial surfaces in Owens Valley, California, which have themselves been independently dated in detail using cosmogenic nuclides. Our data demonstrates for the first time that these fractures widen at a predictable, steady rate of approximately 1 mm ka-1 for at least the last 150 ka, in this arid study area in the south-western United States. This finding, which is repeatable at a number of test sites, allows clast fracture widths to be exploited as a simple and powerful technique for the inexpensive dating of geomorphic surfaces in the field. We introduce a robust statistical method for this new approach to exposure dating, perform a full uncertainty analysis on its results, and discuss the potential usefulness of this technique in other arid landscapes.

  18. Keeping Sediment and Nutrients out of Streams in Arid/Semi-Arid Regions: Application of Low Impact Development/Green Infrastructure Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongping, Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Climatic and hydrological characteristics in the arid/semi-arid areas create unique challenges to soil, water and biodiversity conservation. These areas are environmentally sensitive, but very valuable for the ecosystems services they provide to society. Some of these areas are experiencing the fastest urbanization and now face multiple water resource challenges. Low Impact Development (LID)/Green Infrastructure (GI) practices are increasingly popular for reducing stormwater and nonpoint source pollution in many regions around the world. However, streamflow in the arid/semi-arid regions is largely dependent on seasonal, short term, and high intensity rainfall events. LID has not been very common in the arid/semi-arid regions due to a lack of performance evaluation, as well as the perception that LID may not be very useful for regions with little annual precipitation. This study focused on investigating the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of LID/GI systems in arid/semi-arid climates. Ten types of practices were found in use in the Western/Southwestern U.S.: rainwater harvest systems, detention ponds, retention ponds, bioretention, media filters, porous pavements, vegetated swales/buffer/strips, green roofs, infiltration trenches, and integrated LIDs. This study compared the performance of these practices in terms of their effectiveness at pollutant removal and cost-effectiveness. This analysis provides insight into the future implementation of LID/GI in the arid/semi-arid areas. Key words: LID/GI, arid/semi-arid, effectiveness of pollutant removal, cost-effectiveness analysis

  19. Artificial recharge experiments on the Ship Creek alluvial fan, Anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Gary S.

    1977-01-01

    During the summers of 1973 and 174, water from Ship Creek, Alaska, was diverted at an average rate of approximately 6 cfs (cubic feet per second) to an 11-acre recharge basin. Maximum sustained unit recharge for the basin was approximately 1.4 feet per day. During 1975 a second basin of 8 acres was also used for recharge, and the total diversion rate was increased to as much as 30 cfs. The second basin was never completely filled, but the unit recharge rate was at least four times as great as that in the first basin. During 1973 and 1974, when only one recharge basin was in operation, a maximum rise of 18 feet was observed in the ground-water table near the basin. In 1975, when both basins were being used, the maximum rise was 30 feet in the same area. During 1973 and 1974, the water-level rise was 12 and 8 feet in the unconfined and confined systems, respectively, at a point 4,400 feet downgradient from the basins; in 1975 the rise at the same point was 31 and 16 feet, respectively. The potentiometric rise that was achieved in the confined aquifer during summer operation of the recharge basins was quickly dissipated when diversion stopped and the basins drained. Thus the benefits of recharge would not persist into late winter, the critical period for water availability in Anchorage, unless diversion to the basins could be continued until January or February. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. New Mexico EPSCoR: a Statewide Ecohydrology and Flux Network Within a Semi-arid Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleverly, J. R.; Bowman, R.; Dahm, C. N.; Allred Coonrod, J. E.; Samani, Z.; Thibault, J. R.; Gosz, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    Semi-arid regions are often comprised of numerous biomes, from highly productive gallery forests along riparian corridors, to desert shrub or grassland steppes, and high-elevation mixed conifer forests. Each of these vegetation assemblages across the landscape regulates hydrologic and atmospheric fluxes both locally and within basins. We are introducing a recently initiated NSF-EPSCoR project in ecohydrology to integrate measurements within the Rio Grande basin at these appropriate scales. Eddy covariance flux towers are being upgraded or established in four nodes within the state of New Mexico: (1) at five riparian locations along the Middle Rio Grande, (2) four agricultural and open water locations in the Lower Rio Grande, (3) two middle-elevation sites on the Sevilleta NWR, and (4) four upper elevation sites in the Upper Rio Grande. These local measurements are to be scaled throughout the basin using a combination of integrated remote sensing and hydrologic modeling. Each site is additionally instrumented with groundwater wells, where appropriate. Previous results from existing towers illustrate species-specific variation in water and energy fluxes due to the response of vegetation to changes in groundwater depth, groundwater chemistry (e.g., nitrate and chloride), flooding, drought, micrometeorological conditions, and topographical constraints. Constructing the infrastructure for within-basin networking of evapotranspiration and fluxes of water, energy, and carbon will lead to a better understanding of the coupled responses and feedbacks between vegetation, hydrology, and the atmosphere across multiple teleconnected biomes.

  1. Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Rhizosphere of Jatropha curcas L. in Arid and Semi Arid Regions of India.

    PubMed

    Kamalvanshi, Madhvi; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Anuradha; Dhyani, Shiv Kumar

    2012-09-01

    A study was conducted to identify common arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi present in rhizosphere of Jatropha curcas L., an important bio-diesel crop, from different arid and semi arid regions of India viz., Jodhpur (Rajasthan), Hissar (Haryana), Jhansi and Lalitpur (Uttar Pradesh) and Hyderabad (Andhra Pradesh). A total of 20 AM species were recorded, which consisted of two species of Acaulospora and 18 species of Glomus. The highest frequency of occurrence was recorded for Glomus intraradix (100%), followed by Acaulospora scrobiculata (83%), G. etunicatum (50%) and Glomus 1 (50%). Maximum species richness was recorded at Jodhpur, followed by Jhansi, Hissar, Hyderabad and Lalitpur. The results seem to suggest that species richness was more in arid regions as compared to semi arid areas. PMID:23997345

  2. Model a Catchment Basin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this resource is to introduce what a catchment basin is and how it works. Students will make a 3-dimensional model of a catchment basin to understand how water moves through the basin and explore how water is affected when there are changes in the basin.

  3. Development of a stream-aquifer numerical flow model to assess river water management under water scarcity in a Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Mas-Pla, Josep; Font, Eva; Astui, Oihane; Menció, Anna; Rodríguez-Florit, Agustí; Folch, Albert; Brusi, David; Pérez-Paricio, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Stream flow, as a part of a basin hydrological cycle, will be sensible to water scarcity as a result of climate change. Stream vulnerability should then be evaluated as a key component of the basin water budget. Numerical flow modeling has been applied to an alluvial formation in a small mountain basin to evaluate the stream-aquifer relationship under these future scenarios. The Arbúcies River basin (116 km(2)) is located in the Catalan Inner Basins (NE Spain) and its lower reach, which is related to an alluvial aquifer, usually becomes dry during the summer period. This study seeks to determine the origin of such discharge losses whether from natural stream leakage and/or induced capture due to groundwater withdrawal. Our goal is also investigating how discharge variations from the basin headwaters, representing potential effects of climate change, may affect stream flow, aquifer recharge, and finally environmental preservation and human supply. A numerical flow model of the alluvial aquifer, based on MODFLOW and especially in the STREAM routine, reproduced the flow system after the usual calibration. Results indicate that, in the average, stream flow provides more than 50% of the water inputs to the alluvial aquifer, being responsible for the amount of stored water resources and for satisfying groundwater exploitation for human needs. Detailed simulations using daily time-steps permit setting threshold values for the stream flow entering at the beginning of the studied area so surface discharge is maintained along the whole watercourse and ecological flow requirements are satisfied as well. The effects of predicted rainfall and temperature variations on the Arbúcies River alluvial aquifer water balance are also discussed from the outcomes of the simulations. Finally, model results indicate the relevance of headwater discharge management under future climate scenarios to preserve downstream hydrological processes. They also point out that small mountain basins could be self-sufficient units so long as the response of the main hydrological components to external forces that produce water scarcity, as climate change or human pressures, is appropriately considered in water resource planning. PMID:22840637

  4. Onshore-offshore coastal lithofacies of Polis basin, NW Cyprus

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, L.C. (Univ. of Edinburgh (Scotland))

    1988-08-01

    The Polis basin, northwest Cyprus, is located between the Akamas Peninsula and the main Troodos ophiolite massif. The basin contains sediments of Miocene-Holocene age and allows detailed study of a range of onshore-offshore coastal lithofacies which represent potential reservoirs. Coastal sediments of Messinian age characterized by algal mats and fluvial channel fill are found in the basin. Following very late Miocene rifting and Pliocene transgression, steep, narrow, faulted coastlines were produced, and several coastal facies were generated. These include coastal alluvial fans, offshore reefs, and tectonically generated cliff deposits as olistolith blocks. The steep, faulted coastline generated fan-delta deposits in early Pliocene time, superseded during late Pliocene regression by carbonate fan deltas. Offshore coastal lithofacies include storm-generated deposits, consisting of rip-up clasts and hummocky cross-stratification in sand-silt sequences, and mass-flow and channelized conglomerates and debris flows in this tectonically active basin. Shoreline sands are dominated by long-shore drift which generated longitudinal sandbars and offshore gravel bars. Pleistocene-age deposits show several suites of coastal deposits, formed in response to oscillations in Pleistocene sea level. These include beach deposits demonstrating beach-crest and planar bimodal back-beach deposits, together with coastal lagoons transected by cross-bedded fluvial conglomerate deposits. In addition, lowstands produced large channelized braided fluvial deposits which formed part of a broad coastal plain. Certain Pleistocene channels are deformed by continuing synsedimentary tectonic activity.

  5. Age and origin of the Gezira alluvial fan between the Blue and White Nile rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, martin

    2014-05-01

    The Gezira is a low-angle alluvial fan bounded by the Blue Nile to the east and the White Nile to the west. It is the main agricultural region of Sudan and produces high quality long-staple cotton for export. Dark cracking clays (vertisols) cover much of the Gezira and range in age from 50 kyr to Holocene. The Gezira is traversed by a series of defunct sandy channels that originate between Sennar and Wad Medani on the present-day Blue Nile. With a radius of 300 km and an area of 40,000 km2 the Gezira is a mega-fan. The younger channels range in age from early Holocene to 100 kyr, while near surface channels filled with rolled quartz and carbonate gravels have ages back to >250 kyr. Boreholes in the Gezira reveal coarse alluvial sands and gravels in now buried channels overlain by alluvial clays, forming a repetitive sequence of fining-upwards alluvial units. that probably extend back to Pliocene times. The fan is up to 180 m thick with a volume of ~1,800 km3. The sandy or gravelly bed-load channels coincide with colder drier climates and sparse vegetation in the Ethiopian headwaters of the Blue Nile and the alluvial clays denote widespread flooding during times of stronger summer monsoon. The early stages of such flood events were often accompanied by mass burial of Nile oyster (Etheria elliptica) beds, such as the 45-50 kyr floods that deposited up to 5 m of clay in the northern Gezira. A unique feature of the eastern Gezira is a former Blue Nile channel at least 80 km long running parallel to the present river and entirely filled with volcanic ash. The channel was only 3-4 m deep and 20-30 m wide. Very fine laminations and cross-beds, together with locally abundant phytoliths and sponge spicules, suggest slow-moving water, with flow dispersed across many distributary channels. The ash geochemistry is similar to that in the lower part of the Kibish Formation in the lower Omo valley of southern Ethiopia and points to a minimum age of 100 kyr and a maximum age of 190 kyr. The Ethiopian volcano that provided the ash was located on the interfluve between the upper Omo and the upper Blue Nile. Although the Blue Nile has frequently changed course in the last 250 kyr, it has flowed close to its present channel at least three times in that time.

  6. Potential impacts of damming the Juba Valley, western Somalia: Insights from geomorphology and alluvial history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In 1988 plans were well advanced to dam the Juba River in western Somalia. The aims of the Baardheere Dam Project were to generate hydroelectric power for the capital Mogadishu, and to provide water for irrigation in the Juba Valley. A reconnaissance survey on foot along 500 km of the river upstream of the proposed dam site at Baardheere and detailed geomorphic mapping from air photos provided a basis for reconstructing the late Quaternary alluvial history of the river and for assessing the potential impact of the proposed dam. The Juba River rises in the Ethiopian Highlands and is the only river in Somalia that flows to the sea. Its history reflects climatic events in Ethiopia, where the Rift Valley lakes were very low during the LGM (21±2 ka), and high for about 5, 000 years before and after then. Cave deposits in Somalia indicate wetter conditions at 13, 10, 7.5 and 1.5 ka. Alluvial terraces in the Juba Valley range in age from late Pleistocene to late Holocene but only attain a few metres above the present floodplain. This is because the dry tributary valleys contain limestone caves and fissures that divert any high flows from the parent river underground, a process not known when the project was first approved. The oldest preserved terrace was cemented by calcrete by 40 ka. Alluvial gravels were deposited at the outlet of dry tributary valleys during times of episodic high-energy flow between 26 ka and 28 ka. Finely laminated shelly sands accumulated at 10 ka to form the 5 m terrace. The 2 m terrace was laid down 3.2 ka ago as a slackwater deposit. The lack of high-level alluvial terraces raises doubts over plans to dam the river, since rapid leakage would occur from side valleys and the reservoir would not attain the height needed to generate hydroelectric power. It would submerge all existing arable land along the river. Finally, the presence in the late Holocene alluvium of the sub-fossil gastropods Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria pfeifferi, which are the two main vectors of schistosomiasis in northeast Africa, suggests that this parasitic disease could become endemic across the valley. Any future plans to manage the Juba River need to take proper account of alluvial history and geomorphic processes.

  7. Water resources of the Lower Rio Grande de Arecibo alluvial valley, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of the surface and groundwater resources of the lower Rio Grande de Arecibo alluvial valley was made between 1981 and 1983. Rio Grande de Arecibo is the major source of water in the valley with a mean-annual discharge of 527 cu ft/sec (382,000 acre-ft/yr). Its lowest mean-daily flow (low flow) during 12 yr of record is 50 cu ft/sec. Withdrawals of water from Rio Grande de Arecibo exceeding 15 cu ft/sec during periods of extreme low flows could cause reduction of recharge to the aquifer. However, withdrawals of as much as 35 cu ft/sec are possible when base flow ranges from 90 to 200 cu ft/sec without causing a reduction of aquifer recharge. An unconfined aquifer within the alluvial valley is hydraulically continuous with bordering limestone formations. A clay layer divides the alluvial aquifer into two separate hydraulic systems. Groundwater from the alluvial aquifer above the clay layer has not been widely developed. However, high yielding wells presently yield as much as 9.6 mil gal/day (10,800 acre-ft/yr) from the aquifers occurring below the clay layer within the alluvium and underlaying limestones. Transmissivity ranges from 3,000 sq ft/day in the alluvial area to 42,000 sq ft/day in the adjacent limestone areas. Total groundwater flow through aquifers within the study area (excluding water withdrawn by wells) is about 20.6 mil gal/day (23,100 acre-ft/yr). 50% of this amount is estimated to flow to the eastern area of Cano Tiburones and discharges as springs and seeps. An estimated 9.4 mil gal/day (10,500 acre-ft/yr) of additional groundwater can be withdrawn from the aquifers below the clay layer without reversing the northward hydraulic gradient. Seepage from Rio Grande de Arecibo to the groundwater system at the east side of the valley is probably the key to the development of groundwater resources in the Arecibo area. San Pedro spring, with an average discharge of 8.6 mil gal/day (9,600 acre-ft/yr), is undeveloped and represents a potential alternate source of water. (Author 's abstract)

  8. MICROPROPAGATION OF CACTUS (Opuntia ficus-indica) AS STRATEGIC TOOL TO COMBAT DESERTIFICATION IN ARID AND SEMI ARID REGIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. KHALAFALLA; E. ABDELLATEF; M. M. MOHAMEED AHMED; M. G. OSMAN

    Khalafalla, M. M., Abdellatef, E., Mohameed Ahmed, M. M. and Osman, M. G. 2007. Micropropagation of Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) as Strategic Tool to Combat Desertification in Arid and Semi Arid Regions. Int. J. Sustain. Crop Prod. 2(4):1-8 With aim of large production of plant material, a protocol for micropropagation of Opuntia ficus-indica was developed at the laboratory of plant tissue

  9. Psematismenos-Maroni Basin in Cyprus: geomorphology and biostratigraphic contributions to its Tertiary geodynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpied, Christian; Mocochain, Ludovic; Müller, Carla

    2015-04-01

    The Tertiary regressive sedimentary succession which forms the sedimentary cover of the Troodos Ophiolic Massif has been studied in the Psematismenos-Maroni Basin (PMB) located in southern Cyprus. Identification of key surfaces, morphologies, and sedimentary facies permit to propose a new interpretation of the geologic history of this basin. The series of unconformity surfaces are conforted by numerous new datings, and they are related to tectonic, eustatic, and biostratigraphic hiatuses. This eventually leads to a new geologic vision of the Psematismenos-Maroni Basin from the Neogene Pakhna formation up to the first alluvial deposits of the Quaternary. In the meantime, and for what concerns the Messinian salinity crisis; similarities and differences from the 2008 Messinian consensus (Lofi et al. 2008) are highlighted.

  10. Amplification of seismic ground motion in the Tunis basin: Numerical BEM simulations vs experimental evidences

    E-print Network

    Kham, Marc; Bouden-Romdhane, Nejla

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at the analysis of seismic wave amplification in a deep alluvial basin in the city of Tunis in Tunisia. This sedimentary basin is 3000m wide and 350m deep. Since the seismic hazard is significant in this area, the depth of the basin and the strong impedance ratio raise the need for an accurate estimation of seismic motion amplification. Various experimental investigations were performed in previous studies to characterize site effects. The Boundary Element Method is considered herein to assess the parameter sensitivity of the amplification process and analyse the prevailing phenomena. The various frequencies of maximum amplification are correctly estimated by the BEM simulations. The maximum amplification level observed in the field is also well retrieved by the numerical simulations but, due to the sensitivity of the location of maximum amplification in space, the overall maximum amplification has to be considered. The influence of the wave-field incidence and material damping is also discuss...

  11. Great basin paleoenvironmental studies project; Technical progress report first quarter (year 2), June--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal Progress reports are presented for: Paleobotenical studies in the Great Basin; Paleofaunas studies in the Great Basin; Geomorphology studies in the Great Basin; and Transportation. The goal of the transportation project is to compare the results from three models (FESWMS-2DH, DAMBRK, and FLO-2D) that have been suggested as appropriate for evaluating flood flows on alluvial fans with the results obtained from the traditional one-dimensional, stochastic model used in previous research performed by DRI for the Yucca Mountain Project.

  12. Recharge source and hydrogeochemical evolution of shallow groundwater in a complex alluvial fan system, southwest of North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fadong; Pan, Guoying; Tang, Changyuan; Zhang, Qiuying; Yu, Jingjie

    2008-09-01

    Many cities around the world are developed at alluvial fans. With economic and industrial development and increase in population, quality and quantity of groundwater are often damaged by over-exploitation in these areas. In order to realistically assess these groundwater resources and their sustainability, it is vital to understand the recharge sources and hydrogeochemical evolution of groundwater in alluvial fans. In March 2006, groundwater and surface water were sampled for major element analysis and stable isotope (oxygen-18 and deuterium) compositions in Xinxiang, which is located at a complex alluvial fan system composed of a mountainous area, Taihang Mt. alluvial fan and Yellow River alluvial fan. In the Taihang mountainous area, the groundwater was recharged by precipitation and was characterized by Ca-HCO3 type water with depleted ?18O and ?D (mean value of -8.8‰ ?18O). Along the flow path from the mountainous area to Taihang Mt. alluvial fan, the groundwater became geochemically complex (Ca-Na-Mg-HCO3-Cl-SO4 type), and heavier ?18O and ?D were observed (around -8‰ ?18O). Before the surface water with mean ?18O of -8.7‰ recharged to groundwater, it underwent isotopic enrichment in Taihang Mt. alluvial fan. Chemical mixture and ion exchange are expected to be responsible for the chemical evolution of groundwater in Yellow River alluvial fan. Transferred water from the Yellow River is the main source of the groundwater in the Yellow River alluvial fan in the south of the study area, and stable isotopic compositions of the groundwater (mean value of -8.8‰ ?18O) were similar to those of transferred water (-8.9‰), increasing from the southern boundary of the study area to the distal end of the fan. The groundwater underwent chemical evolution from Ca-HCO3, Na-HCO3, to Na-SO4. A conceptual model, integrating stiff diagrams, is used to describe the spatial variation of recharge sources, chemical evolution, and groundwater flow paths in the complex alluvial fan aquifer system.

  13. Irrigation Development and Its Environmental Consequences in Arid Regions of India

    PubMed

    Jaglan; Qureshi

    1996-05-01

    The present paper examines the nature and dimensions of environmental transformation induced by canal irrigation in the arid region of India. The case study pertains to the Indira Gandhi Canal comand area in Rajasthan where the density and area of vegetation cover have increased due to afforestation, and the cultivated area has expanded due to irrigation. Consequently, there has been a perceptible improvement in the structure and fertility of sandy soils, but it would require a herculean effort on the part of the canal authority and local people to reduce soil erosion and siltation in the lower parts of stage I and the entire command area of stage II. Moreover, the water table has been rising rapidly throughout the command area of stage I. About half of the command area and adjoining Ghaggar basin in Ganganagar District will be facing the danger of waterlogging by the turn of the century. The incidence of irrigation-induced alkalization is higher in the lower parts of stage I. Soil alkalinity has appeared within five years of the introduction of irrigation in the interdunal basins and is manifested as a strong salt regime or calcareous pans near surface. This calls for immediate reclamation of the affected area and prevention of its expansion by altering the strategy of irrigation development, by changing cropping patterns, and by providing soil drainage. PMID:8661604

  14. Diagnosis of GLDAS LSM based aridity index and dryland identification.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Sadegh; Pande, Saket; Hashemy, Mehdy; Sonneveld, Ben

    2013-04-15

    The identification of dryland areas is crucial for guiding policy aimed at intervening in water-stressed areas and addressing the perennial livelihood or food insecurity of these areas. However, the prevailing aridity indices (such as UNEP aridity index) have methodological limitations that restrict their use in delineating drylands and may be insufficient for decision-making frameworks. In this study, we propose a new aridity index based on based on 3 decades of soil moisture time series by accounting for site-specific soil and vegetation that partitions precipitation into the competing demands of evaporation and runoff. Our proposed aridity index is the frequency at which the dominant soil moisture value at a location is not exceeded by the dominant soil moisture values in all of the other locations. To represent the dominant spatial template of the soil moisture conditions, we extract the first eigenfunction from the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis from 3 GLDAS land surface models (LSMs): VIC, MOSAIC and NOAH at 1 × 1 degree spatial resolution. The EOF analysis reveals that the first eigenfunction explains 33%, 43% and 47% of the VIC, NOAH and MOSAIC models, respectively. We compare each LSM aridity indices with the UNEP aridity index, which is created based on LSM data forcings. The VIC aridity index displays a pattern most closely resembling that of UNEP, although all of the LSM-based indices accurately isolate the dominant dryland areas. The UNEP classification identifies portions of south-central Africa, southeastern United States and eastern India as drier than predicted by all of the LSMs. The NOAH and MOSAIC LSMs categorize portions of southwestern Africa as drier than the other two classifications, while all of the LSMs classify portions of central India as wetter than the UNEP classification. We compare all aridity maps with the long-term average NDVI values. Results show that vegetation cover in areas that the UNEP index classifies as drier than the other three LSMs (NDVI values are mostly greater than 0). Finally, the unsupervised clustering of global land surface based on long-term mean temperature and precipitation