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Sample records for army ammunitions plant

  1. Solar energy applications at Army ammunition plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, A. P.; Moy, S. M.

    1982-06-01

    The Army Ammunition Plants use significant quantities of fossil fuels. To reduce dependence on these scarce, costly, and non-renewable fuels, a study was conducted to investigate potential solar energy applications at the AAPs. Solar energy is a low-level energy source which is best applied to low temperature applications. It can be used at the AAPs to preheat boiler feedwater, provide hot air for dry-houses, provide domestic hot water and heat for administration buildings, and provide hot water for manufacturing processes such as metal cleaning, phosphating, and X-ray film processing. Use of the flat plate collectors, evacuated tube collectors, or solar ponds with the possible addition of a heat pump, offers reasonably economical means of applying solar technology to AAP needs.

  2. Remedial action suitability for the Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Nonavinakere, S.; Rappa, P. III

    1995-12-31

    Numerous Department of Defense (DOD) sites across the nation are contaminated with explosive wastes due to munitions production during World War II, Korean Conflict and Vietnam Conflict. Production activities included explosives manufacturing, loading, packing, assembling, machining, casting and curing. Contaminants often present at these sites include TNT, RDX, HMX, Tetryl 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, 1,3-DNB, 1,3,5-TNB and nitrobenzene. The Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant (CAAP) is one such DOD site that has been determined to be contaminated with explosives. The CAAP is located approximately 2 miles west of the City of Grand Island in Hall County, Nebraska. The plant produced artillery, bombs, boosters, supplementary charges and various other experimental explosives. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the site background, review of the remedial alternatives evaluation process and rationale behind the selection of present remedial action.

  3. Solar energy applications at Army Ammunition Plants. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, A.P.; Moy, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    The Army Ammunition Plants (AAPs) use significant quantities of fossil fuels. To reduce dependence on these scarce, costly, and non-renewable fuels, a study was conducted to investigate potential solar energy applications at the AAPs. Solar energy is a low-level energy source which is best applied to low temperature applications. It can be used at the AAPs to preheat boiler feedwater, provide hot air for dry-houses, provide domestic hot water and heat for administration buildings, and provide hot water for manufacturing processes such as metal cleaning, phosphating, and x-ray film processing. Use of flat plate collectors, evacuated tube collectors, or solar ponds with the possible addition of a heat pump, offers reasonably economical means of applying solar technology to AAP needs.

  4. Badger Army Ammunition Plant groundwater data management system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    At the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (Badger), there are currently over 200 wells that are monitored on a quarterly basis. Badger has had three active production periods since its construction in 1942. During these periods, various nitrocellulose based propellants were produced including single base artillery propellants were produced including single base artillery propellant, double base rocket propellant and BALL POWDER{reg_sign} propellant. Intermediate materials used in the manufacture of these propellants were also produced, including nitroglycerine, and sulfuric and nitric acids. To meet the challenge of managing the data in-house, a groundwater data management system (GDMS) was developed. Although such systems are commercially available, they were not able to provide the specific capabilities necessary for data management and reporting at Badger. The GDMS not only provides the routine database capabilities of data sorts and queries, but has provided an automated data reporting system as well. The reporting function alone has significantly reduced the time and efforts that would normally be associated with this task. Since the GDMS was developed at Badger, the program can be continually adapted to site specific needs. Future planned modifications include automated reconciliation, improved transfer of data to graphics software, and statistical analysis and interpretation of the data.

  5. Environmental readiness pilot study at the Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, D.; Bhinge, D.; Patel, J.; Jones-Bateman, L.; Resnick, E.

    1994-12-31

    The Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) has been on standby status since the mid-1970s, prior to the enactment of the majority of Federal environmental regulations. As a result, BAAP is unprepared to begin production without the implementation of pollution prevention and treatment measures. The Army contracted SAIC to conduct a pilot study to develop an environmental readiness plan for BAAP in the event that the plant is reactivated to produce explosives and propellants for ammunition requirements during mobilization. This paper describes the process developed by SAIC to conduct this pilot study at BAAP and the relationship between this effort and the Army`s overall environmental mission.

  6. Evaluation of soil toxicity at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Simini, M.; Amos, J.C.; Wentsel, R.S.; Checkai, R.T.; Phillips, C.T.; Chester, N.A.; Major, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental toxicity testing and chemical analyses of soil were performed as part of an ecological risk assessment at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), Joliet, Illinois. Soils were collected from an area where munitions were loaded, assembled, and packed (area L7, group 1), and from an area where waste explosives were burned on unprotected soil (area L2). Control samples were collected from an adjacent field. Soil toxicity was determined using early seedling growth and vigor tests, earthworm survival and growth tests, and Microtox{reg_sign} assays. Relative toxicity of soils was determined within each area based on statistical significant (p = 0.05) of plant and earthworm growth and survival, and the effective concentration at which luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was reduced by 50% (EC50) in the Microtox assay. Samples were designated as having high, moderate, or no significant toxicity. Soil that had significant toxicity according to at least one test, and representative samples showing no toxicity, were analyzed for munitions via HPLC. Chemical residues found in soils were 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT); 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB); 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT); 2,6-dinitrotoluene; 2-amino-4,6-DNT; 4-amino-2,6-DNT; 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX); and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). All soils with no significant toxicity were void of these chemicals. However, some soils void of munitions still showed toxicity that may have been caused by elevated levels of heavy metals. Linear regressions of toxicity test results vs. chemical concentrations showed that TNT and TNB accounted for most off the soil toxicity. Lowest-observable-effect concentrations (LOEC) of TNT were determined from these data. This study presents a simple, relatively inexpensive methodology for assessing toxicity of soils containing TNT, RDX, and other contaminants related to munitions production.

  7. Energy engineering analysis study report, Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee: Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-09-01

    This report is a summary of the Energy Engineering Analysis for the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP) in Milan, Tennessee. It includes the recommendations for the development of a Basewide Energy Plan consisting of energy conservation projects and other recommendations for reduction of the installation`s 1985 source energy consumption. Milan Army Ammunition Plant, containing 22,541 acres, is situated in both Gibson and Carroll Counties, Tennessee, and is approximately equally divided longitudinally into the two counties. The Milan area experiences typically short mild winters and long warm summers. With the exception of a few modernized facilities, the overwhelming majority of buildings at MAAP were constructed for World War II ammunition production.

  8. Steam/power plant modernization program, Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, New Brighton, Minnesota. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-20

    This study is to develop a cost-effective and technically practical modernization program for the steam/power plants at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) while meeting the intent of the Army energy goals of reduced dependence on oil and natural gas. The recommended modernization approach is to provide new coal-fired boilers complete with required auxiliary equipment in an addition to Building 515. One existing oil-fired boiler in Building 515 will be converted to burn coal. This approach will satisfy facility steam requirements from peacetime through mobilization demands. Upon completion of construction the remaining boilers in Building 115 and 515 will be abandoned in-place. Total expenditures required to complete this modernization program are $59 million in FY 1982 dollars or $69 million in actual dollars. Funding allocations are anticipated for FY 1985 through FY 1989.

  9. THE USE OF CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS TO PHYTOREMEDIATE EXPLOSIVES-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE MILAN ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT, MILAN, TENNESSEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The groundwaters beneath many Army ammunition plants in the United States are contaminated with explosives. To help address this problem, the USAEC and TVA initiated a field demonstration program to evaluate the technical feasibility of using constructed wetlands for remediating ...

  10. Process energy inventory at Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Lines 1, 2, and 3A. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.W.; Hadenfeldt, G.L.; McKay, R.E.; Krajkowski, E.A.

    1983-04-01

    A process energy audit was conducted at Iowa Army Ammunition Plant. Lines 1, 2, and 3A were surveyed. Energy consumption baselines were established for eight production items: the Hawk, Stinger, Chaparral, Dragon, Copperhead and Improved TOW Warheads, the M549A1 RA Projectile, and the M718/M741 AT Projectile. A number of potential energy conservation projects were defined to reduce present energy use.

  11. Demolition Range Noise Abatement Technique Demonstration and Evaluation for the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    CALDERONE,JAMES J.; GARBIN,H. DOUGLAS

    2001-08-01

    Public concern regarding the effects of noise generated by the detonation of excess and obsolete explosive munitions at U.S. Army demolition ranges is a continuing issue for the Army's demilitarization and disposal groups. Recent concerns of citizens living near the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant (MCAAP) in Oklahoma have lead the U.S. Army Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) to conduct a demonstration and evaluation of noise abatement techniques that could be applied to the MCAAP demolition range. With the support of the DAC, MCAAP, and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), three types of noise abatement techniques were applied: aqueous foams, overburden (using combinations of sand beds and dirt coverings), and rubber or steel blast mats. Eight test configurations were studied and twenty-four experiments were conducted on the MCAAP demolition range in July of 2000. Instrumentation and data acquisition systems were fielded for the collection of near-field blast pressures, far-field acoustic pressures, plant boundary seismic signals, and demolition range meteorological conditions. The resulting data has been analyzed and reported, and a ranking of each technique's effects has been provided to the DAC.

  12. Plant uptake of explosives from contaminated soil at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D.; Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Banwart, W.L.; Chen, D.

    1995-04-01

    Explosives and their degradation products may enter the animal and human food chains through plants grown on soils contaminated with explosives. Soil and plant samples were collected from the Group 61 area at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant and analyzed to determine the extent to which 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its degradation products are taken up by existing vegetation and crops growing on contaminated soils. Neither TNT nor its degradation products was detected in any of the aboveground plant organs of existing vegetation. Oat (Avena sativa L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) were planted on TNT-contaminated soils amended with three levels of chopped grass hay. Extractable TNT concentrations in hay-amended soils were monitored for almost 1 year. Crop establishment and growth improved with increased levels of hay amendment, but TNT uptake was not affected or detected in any aboveground crop organs. Evidence was found to indicate that soil manipulation and hay addition may reduce extractable TNT concentration in soils, but the wide variations in TNT concentrations in these soils prevented development of conclusive evidence regarding reduction of extractable TNT concentrations. Results from this study suggest that vegetation grown on TNT-contaminated soils is not a major health concern because TNT and its degradation products were not detected in aboveground plant organs. However, low concentrations of TNT, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene were detected in or on some existing vegetation and crop roots. 21 refs., 10 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Zellmer, S.D.; Banwart, W.L.; Houser, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by vegetation growing on soils contaminated by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). Plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled and analyzed to determine TNT uptake under natural field conditions. Standard USATHAMA methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. No- explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, results indicate that TNT, 2-aminodinitrotoluene (2-ADNT), and/or 4-ADNT were present in some root samples. The presence of 2-ADNT and 4-ADNT increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, as opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.

  14. Executive summary of Energy Saving Opportunity Survey (ESOS) for Indiana Army Ammunition Plant, Charlestown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-31

    The Indiana Army Ammunition Plant in Charlestown, Indiana completed FY1985 with an energy use reduction of 8.5% from FY1984, surpassing the 8.1% goal. The 10-Year Energy Use Reduction Coal (Base Year FYl975) of 32.3% was achieved and surpassed in FY1985 with a 10-year reduction of 32.5%. This reduction occurred while increasing the plant`s staff by 15% and production by 28%. The energy conservation efforts at INAAP during FY1985 resulted in cost avoidances of $917,685 for base year FYl985 and $175,879 from FY1984. The achievement of these energy reductions had occurred by implementing a high priority action-oriented task plan utilizing short term and long term facility retrofit projects as well as people oriented programs and incentives.

  15. Residential structural response to airblast from munitions disposal at the McAlester Army Ammunitions Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cumerlato, C.L.; Siskind, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The Bureau of Mines has monitored structural responses to airblast overpressure produced by munitions disposal at the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant. The purpose of this study was to determine if the blasting caused vibrations, airblasts or structural responses that could possibly be responsible for cracking or other damage observed in nearby residences. Monitoring took place during a 3-month period at 10 selected residences surrounding the plant. By the end of the monitoring period, nearly 2,300 blast-related events had been recorded. The results of this study have been compared to the results of previous studies and established safe level criteria. The study concludes that none of the residences monitored had been subjected to unsafe levels of vibration or airblast overpressure, and structural responses did not exceed threshold damage levels.

  16. Results of the Radiological Survey of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Middletown, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.

    2001-07-17

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an indoor radiological survey of property at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAAP), Middletown, Iowa in June 2000. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive residuals resulting from previous Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) activities were present inside selected Line 1 buildings at the IAAAP and conduct sampling in those areas of previous AEC operations that utilized radioactive components at some point during the manufacturing process, in order to evaluate any possible immediate health hazards and to collect sufficient information to determine the next type of survey. The AEC occupied portions of IAAAP from 1947 to 1975 to assemble nuclear weapons. The surveyed areas were identified through interviews with current and former IAAAP employees who had worked at the plant during AEC's tenure, and from AEC records.

  17. Adaptive Sampling approach to environmental site characterization at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant: Phase 2 demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Bujewski, G.E.; Johnson, R.L.

    1996-04-01

    Adaptive sampling programs provide real opportunities to save considerable time and money when characterizing hazardous waste sites. This Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project demonstrated two decision-support technologies, SitePlanner{trademark} and Plume{trademark}, that can facilitate the design and deployment of an adaptive sampling program. A demonstration took place at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), and was unique in that it was tightly coupled with ongoing Army characterization work at the facility, with close scrutiny by both state and federal regulators. The demonstration was conducted in partnership with the Army Environmental Center`s (AEC) Installation Restoration Program and AEC`s Technology Development Program. AEC supported researchers from Tufts University who demonstrated innovative field analytical techniques for the analysis of TNT and DNT. SitePlanner{trademark} is an object-oriented database specifically designed for site characterization that provides an effective way to compile, integrate, manage and display site characterization data as it is being generated. Plume{trademark} uses a combination of Bayesian analysis and geostatistics to provide technical staff with the ability to quantitatively merge soft and hard information for an estimate of the extent of contamination. Plume{trademark} provides an estimate of contamination extent, measures the uncertainty associated with the estimate, determines the value of additional sampling, and locates additional samples so that their value is maximized.

  18. Geophysical investigation at Hazardous Waste Management Site 16, Radford Army Ammunition Plant Radford, Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Sjostrom, K.J.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes procedural details and test results of a geophysical investigation conducted at Hazardous Waste Management Site-16 (HWMS-16), Radford Army Ammunition Plant, Va. The geophysical investigation, part of a comprehensive ground-water assessment program, was conducted to obtain subsurface information regarding HWMS-16, thus aiding in determining the most optimal locations for future monitoring wells. The two geophysical methods used in this investigation were electromagnetic (EM) induction and seismic refraction. A number of anomalous areas including a suspected sinkhole were discerned at HWMS-16. Also, the EM method proved to be effective in delineating the boundaries of covered and leveled-off landfill cells and distinguishing landfill cells used for the disposal of household waste from those used for the disposal of hazardous waste.

  19. Process energy inventory at Radford Army Ammunition Plant. Final report, November 1975-March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.H.; Ogle, E.E.; Hedrick, R.E.; Krajkowski, E.A.

    1983-05-01

    Process operations at Radford Army Ammunition Plant were audited to measure energy consumption, identify areas of inefficiency, and identify changes which would reduce process energy requirements. The audited operations included nitrocellulose manufacture, propellant drying and solvent recovery. The study identified process changes available for immediate implementation which will result in annual energy savings of 1,435,000 MBTU under mobilization production rates. Further studies were proposed with an additional annual potential savings of 1,557,000 MBTU. This totals to an equivalent saving of approximately 460,000 barrels of oil or 107,000 tons of coal per year. Recommendations include automatic control of boiling tub steam, insulation of boiling tubs, heat recovery from wastewater, demand cycle control of the activated carbon solvent recovery operation, elimination of preheating of solvent laden air, and electric power generation using waste heat from hot condensate and exhaust gases via Organic Rankine Cycle Engines.

  20. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Zellmer, S.D.; Banwart, W.L. |

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in TNT-contaminated soils on Group 61 at the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP). The soils in this group were contaminated more than 40 years ago. In this study, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled from 15 locations and analyzed to determine TNT uptake by plants under natural field conditions. Plant materials were separated by species if more than one species was present at a sampling location. Standard methods were used to determine concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. No. explosives were detected in the aboveground portion of any plant sample. However, the results indicate that TNT, 2-amino DNT, and/or 4-amino DNT were found in some root samples of false boneset (Kuhnia eupatorioides), teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris), and bromegrass (Bromus inermis). It is possible that slight soil contamination remained on the roots, especially in the case of the very fine roots for species like bromegrass, where washing was difficult. The presence of 2-amino DNT and 4-amino DNT, which could be plant metabolites of TNT, increases the likelihood that explosives were taken up by plant roots, as opposed to their presence resulting from external soil contamination.

  1. Uptake of explosives from contaminated soil by existing vegetation at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.F.; Zellmer, S.D.; Tomczyk, N.A.; Rastorier, J.R.; Chen, D.; Banwart, W.L.

    1995-02-01

    This study examines the uptake of explosives by existing vegetation growing in soils contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitro-3,5-triazine (RDX) in three areas at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP). To determine explosives uptake under natural environmental conditions, existing plant materials and soil from the root zone were sampled at different locations in each area, and plant materials were separated by species. Standard methods were used to determine the concentrations of explosives, their derivatives, and metabolites in the soil samples. Plant materials were also analyzed. The compound TNT was not detected in the aboveground portion of plants, and vegetation growing on TNT-contaminated soils is not considered a health hazard. However, soil and plant roots may contain TNT degradation products that may be toxic; hence, their consumption is not advised. The compound RDX was found in the tops and roots of plants growing on RDX-contaminated soils at all surveyed sites. Although RDX is not a listed carcinogen, several of its potentially present degradation products are carcinogens. Therefore, the consumption of any plant tissues growing on RDX-contaminated sites should be considered a potential health hazard.

  2. Energy engineering analysis, Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Burlington, Iowa. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Jonik, D.M.

    1982-06-22

    This Energy Engineering Analysis consists of the main report, three appendices, and a summary of annual energy consumption on a per-building basis. The main report identifies the purpose of the study, describes the existing and anticipated energy use trends, and defines and summarizes specific energy conservation projects recommended to achieve the goals stated in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. Appendices I, II and III, and the Annual Energy Consumption Summary include building information, weather data, cost data, and detailed computer-generated and manual calculations for each individual project. The analysis will enable ammunition plant personnel to identify energy conservation measures and meet Army energy reduction goals. The report includes: Energy consumption by fuel type Energy consumption trends ECAM projects Other potential projects Quick-fix management form Description of analyzed buildings In addition, the Analysis is a detailed data base consisting of: An analysis of building energy use Energy Conservation Measures applied to each analyzed building to be improved A set of marked-up prints from the survey indicating the conditions when surveyed.

  3. Energy engineering analysis Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Burlington, Iowa. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-05-10

    This Energy Engineering Analysis consists of the main report, three appendices, and a summary of annual energy consumption on a `per building` basis. The main report identifies the purpose of the study, describes the existing and anticipated energy use trends, and defines and summarizes specific energy conservation projects recommended to achieve the goals stated in the Army Facilities Energy Plan. Appendices I, II and III, and the Annual Energy Consumption Summary include building information, weather data, cost data, and detailed computer-generated and manual calculations for each individual project. The analysis will enable ammunition plant personnel to identify energy conservation measures and meet Army energy reduction goals. The report includes: Energy consumption by fuel type Energy consumption trends ECAM projects other potential projects Quick-fix management form Description of analyzed buildings. In addition-, the Analysis is a detailed data base consisting of: An analysis of building energy use Energy Conservation Measures applied to each analyzed building to be improved A set of marked-up prints from the survey indicating the conditions when surveyed.

  4. Elements of a CERCLA action at a former Army ammunition plant

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, D.F.; Marotz, G.A.; Frazier, G.F.

    1999-07-01

    The Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant covers 44 km{sup 2} and is located near several large population centers. Leased sites within the plant are now being used for various activities including recreation and manufacturing. Plans are in place for conversion of an additional 3,000 ha to a commercial amusement park. Some 400 structures from the plant remain and most must be removed if further ventures are to take place. Many of the buildings are structurally unsound or contain potentially hazardous materials, such as explosive residues, lead sheathing or asbestos shingles, that were stored or used in the construction of the structures. State and federal agencies agreed that the buildings should be destroyed, but the method to do so was unclear. Analysis on building by building basis revealed that in many cases explosive residue made it unsafe to remove the buildings by any other method rather than combustion. Completion of a comprehensive destruction plan that included ground-level monitoring of combustion plumes, and burn scheduling under tightly prescribed micro and mesoscale meteorological conditions was approved by the EPA as a non-time critical removal action under CERCLA in 1996; the US Army was designated as the lead agency. Personnel at the University of Kansas assisted in developing the destruction plan and helped conduct two test burns using the comprehensive plan protocols. Results of one test burn scenario on June 26, 1997, intended as a test of probable dispersion safety margin and covered extensively by print and television media, the EPA and State agencies, are described in this paper. The selected building was smaller than typical of the buildings on the plant site. The events leading to a burn decision on the test day are used to illustrate the decision-making process.

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 2. Feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 1. Feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  7. Supplementary documentation for an environmental impact statement regarding the Pantex Plant: hydrologic study for the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.

    1982-12-01

    This report documents work performed in support of preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. A study of flooding was made for the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant near Burlington, Iowa, one of the alternative sites. A partial series-flood frequency analysis of the Skunk River, which flows along the plant's southern boundary, was examined as well as the effects of rise in river level of the Skunk River on the plant and its operations. A flood frequency analysis on Long Lake, a manmade reservoir within the plant grounds, was made. Maximum spillway capacity was computed and compared to the magnitude of floods of particular recurrence intervals.

  8. Environmental geophysics and sequential air photo study at Sunfish Lake Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Padar, C.A.; McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Anderson, A.W.

    1996-11-01

    Geophysical and air photo studies at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP), Minnesota, were conducted to establish a chronology of dumping and waste disposal. This study was undertaken to aid in the assessment of the amount of remediation needed to reclaim a wetland area. An integrated analysis of electromagnetic, magnetic and ground-penetrating RADAR (GPR) measurements over a 25-acre site, provided the information necessary to define waste disposal events. These events are observed on a sequence of aerial photos taken between 1940 and 1993. The former southwestern embayment of the lake, filled in during the original construction of the base, has been clearly defined. Two burn cages and their surrounding debris have been delineated. The areal extent of another waste site has been defined along the northern shoreline. Depth estimates determined from EM-61 analysis, and depths to original lake bottom, derived from GPR, have yielded volumetric estimates of the amount of material that would need removal if excavation is required. Magnetic and electromagnetic data have pinpointed the locations of mounds, observed from historical air photos. Except for these areas along the Northwestern shore, there is no evidence of waste disposal along the shoreline or within the present-day lake margins. The ability to date the anomalous regions is significant, in that different production demands upon TCAAP, during the time periods of WWII, The Korean War, and The Vietnam Conflict, have resulted in different types of waste. The ability to categorize areas with distinct time periods of operation and waste disposal can greatly aid the environmental cleanup effort with regard to the type of contaminants that might be expected at these poorly documented disposal sites.

  9. Aquatic macroinvertebrates collected at Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant, Portage and Trumbull Counties, Ohio, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tertuliani, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a survey of macroinvertebrate communities in the Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant, were used as an indicator of disturbance in streams flowing through or near the training areas at the Plant. The data were interpreted using the Invertebrate Community Index (ICI), a multiple-metric index developed by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and based on the structural and functional characteristics of the macroinvertebrate community. Quantitative samples of the macroinvertebrate were collected for ICI determination from three streams South Fork Eagle Creek, Sand Creek, and Hinkley Creek flowing through the study area. These samples were collected using Hester-Dendy type artificial substrate samplers, which were placed in the streams during a 6-week sampling period, June 2 through July 15, 1998. A qualitative- dipnet sample from the natural substrates also was collected at each station on July 15, 1998, the last day of the sampling period. The macroinvertebrate communities at all three stations met the criterion designated for warmwater habitat aquatic life use, and communities at two of the three stations exceeded the criterion. The ICI scores were 42 at South Fork Eagle Creek, 50 at Sand Creek, and 48 at Hinkley Creek. The density of macroinvertebrates at South Fork Eagle Creek was 1,245 per square foot and represented 38 distinct taxa. The density at Sand Creek was 246 per square foot and represented 29 distinct taxa. The density at Hinkley Creek was 864 per square foot and represented 36 distinct taxa. Qualitative samples were also collected at 21 other sites using a D-framed dipnet. The qualitative sites encompassed three main environments: stream, pond, and swamp-wetland. All available habitat types in each environment were sampled until no new taxa were evident during coarse examination. The highest number of taxa were collected from the streams. The total number of taxa collected in streams ranged from 25 to 76; the mean was 60 and median 64. The

  10. Process energy inventory at Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Load Line 3. Final report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.W.; Hadenfield, G.L.; Lowry, A.P.

    1981-09-01

    A comprehensive process energy audit was conducted at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Load Line 3. The energy consumption baseline was determined for four production items: cartridges M106, M650E5, M17A1, and M337A1E1. This report includes a brief description of the production process for each item, corresponding process flow charts, and estimates of potential savings. The potential savings for production of all four items total $22,244 or 6680 M Btu of energy per year, a reduction over current consumption of 28%.

  11. FY95 limited energy study for the area `a` package boiler. Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-03

    Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HSAAP) in Holston, Tennessee, manufactures explosives from raw materials. The facility comprises two separate areas designated Area `A11 and Area 11B`. Each area is served by a steam plant which produces steam for production processes, equipment operation, space heating, domestic water heating, steam tracing, and product storage heating requirements. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of alternative methods of meeting the steam requirements of the Area 11A11 industrial complex. The following items were specifically requested to be evaluated. Evaluate the use of two new gas-fired packaged boilers sized to meet the requirements of the industrial complex. The new boilers would be installed adjacent to the existing steam plant and would utilize the existing smokestacks and steam distribution system. Evaluate using the existing steam distribution system rather than locating multiple boilers at various sites. Existing steam driven chillers will be replaced with electric driven equipment. Evaluate this impact on the steam system requirements. Field survey and test two existing gas-fired packaged boilers located at the Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The two boilers were last used about 1980 and are presently laid away. The boilers are approximately the same capacity and operating characteristics as the ones at HSAAP. Relocation of the existing boilers and ancillary equipment (feedwater pumps, generators, fans, etc.) would be required as well as repairs or modifications necessary to meet current operating conditions and standards.

  12. FY95 limited energy study. Area B nitric acid production facilities, Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-02

    In June 1995, Affiliated Engineers SE, Inc. (AESE) was retained by the Mobile District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform a Limited Energy Study for Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. The field survey of existing conditions was completed in July 1995. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line process flow diagrams on Autocad. A subsequent one day field survey was conducted in August 1995. This report summarizes the results obtained from field investigation and the analysis of various alternative Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s). ECO`s were analyzed for suitability for the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) using the government`s software package called Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID).

  13. Basewide energy studies in support of Energy Engineering Analysis Program for Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, Parsons, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-07-01

    The Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, a Government-owned Contractor-Operated military industrial installation under jurisdiction of Headquarters, U.S. Army Armament Material Readiness Command, is assigned responsibility to manufacture explosives (Lead Azide) and related products; and load, assemble, and pack ammunition items as directed; operation and maintenance of active facilities, and maintenance and/or layaway of standby facilities in such condition to permit rehabilitation and resumption of production within time limitations prescribed; procurement, receipt, storage, and issue of necessary supplies, equipment, components, and materials; receipt, surveillance, maintenance, renovation, demilitarization, salvage, storage, inventory, and issue of Field Service Stocks as directed; Industrial Preparedness Planning and Emergency Mobilization Planning. The present population at Kansas AAP consists of 830 Contractor personnel and 30 Government personnel. Under full mobilization the population would increase to 4,477 Contractor personnel and 115 Government personnel. The basic survey data for this energy engineering analysis was gathered during November, 1981, and furnished as an appendix to the preliminary submittal. An executive summary is included as a part of this report. It summarizes and explains the conclusions reached on energy conservation measures that were analyzed under Phase II of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program.

  14. SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS FOR THE PILOT IN-SITU CHROMIUM REDUCTION TEST AT RIVERBANK ARMY AMMUNITIONS PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, M

    2007-04-25

    A treatability study was conducted at Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant's (RBAAP) Site 17, to evaluate the effectiveness of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}). The chromium contamination at Site 17 is hydrologically isolated and unsuitable for standard extraction and treatment (pump and treat). The majority of the chromium contamination at Site 17 is trapped within the fine grain sediments of a clay/slit zone (45 to 63). The PRB was established above and adjacent to the contaminated zone at Site 17 to reduce the hexavalent chromium as it leaches out of the contaminated clay/silt zone separating the A zone from the A zone. Site 17 and the monitoring network are described in the In-Situ Chromium Reduction Treatability Study Work Plan (CH2MHILL, January 2004). The PRB was created by reducing naturally occurring Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} with the injection of a buffered sodium dithionite solution into subsurface chromium source area. The Cr{sup 6+} leaching out of the contaminated clay/silt zone and migrating through the PRB is reduced by Fe{sup 2+} to Cr{sup 3+} and immobilized (Amonette, et al., 1994). The sodium dithionite will also reduce accessible Cr{sup 6+}, however the long-term reductant is the Fe{sup 2+}. Bench scale tests (Appendix A) were conducted to assess the quantity and availability of the naturally occurring iron at Site 17, the ability of the sodium dithionite to reduce the hexavalent chromium and Fe within the sediments, and the by-products produced during the treatment. Appendix A, provides a detailed description of the laboratory treatability tests, and provides background information on the technologies considered as possible treatment options for Site 17. Following the sodium dithionite treatment, groundwater/treatment solution was extracted to remove treatment by-products (sulfate, manganese, and iron). The following sections briefly discuss the current treatment status, future recommendations

  15. Health assessment for Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Grand Island, Nebraska, Region 7. CERCLIS No. NE2213820234. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-31

    The Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant is listed on the National Priorities List. The government-owned plant is located 2 miles west of Grand Island, Nebraska, and occupies 18.7 square miles. During World War II and the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, the plant was operated by contractors for the production of conventional munitions. The primary contaminants that have been identified are cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its impurities/degradation products: 2,4-dinitrotoluene (24DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (135TNB). The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by possible exposure to hazardous substances via contact with on-site contaminated soils and the use of contaminated ground water for the irrigation of consumable crops and livestock watering.

  16. Superfund record of decision (EPA region 6): Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, (No Further Action at LHAAP 13 and 14), Karnack, TX, February 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected no Further Action alternative for LHAAP 13 and 14, Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), in Karnack, Texas. There are no actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances as a result of suspected previous activities from these sites that may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment.

  17. A laboratory treatability study on RDX-contaminated soil from the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Burlington, Iowa.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J. F.; Environmental Research

    2000-03-01

    Soil in certain areas of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Burlington, Iowa, was contaminated with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). A laboratory treatability study was conducted to examine the ability of native soil bacteria present in the contaminated site to degrade RDX. The results indicated that RDX can be removed effectively from the soil by native soil bacteria through a co-metabolic process. Molasses, identified as an effective cosubstrate, is inexpensive, and this factor makes the treatment system cost effective. The successful operation of aerobic-anoxic soil-slurry reactors in batch mode with RDX-contaminated soil showed that the technology can be scaled up for field demonstration. The RDX concentration in the contaminated soil was decreased by 98% after 4 months of reactor operation. The advantage of the slurry reactor is the simplicity of its operation. The method needs only mixing and the addition of molasses as cosubstrate.

  18. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 3. Feasibility study report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  19. Screening submersed plant species for phytoremediation of explosives-contaminated groundwater from the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Best, E.P.; Sprecher, S.L.; Fredrickson, H.L.; Zappi, M.E.; Larson, S.L.

    1997-11-01

    As an alternative to other groundwater extraction and surface treatment techniques, phytoremediation systems are currently being evaluated by civilian and military administrators for their ability to enhance removal of potentially toxic or mutagenic munitions materiel such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5- trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and their degradation products. To guide selection of aquatic plants for use in demonstration phytoremediation lagoons at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP), Milan, TN, this study evaluated the relative ability of ten species to decrease levels of TNT and RDX explosives and related nitrobodies in contaminated MAAP groundwater.

  20. Identification of potential wetlands in training areas on Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant, Ohio, and guidelines for their management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Tertuliani, J.S.; Darner, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Potential wetlands in training areas on Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant, Ohio, were mapped by use of geographic information system (GIS) data layers and field inspection. The GIS data layers were compiled from existing sources and interpretation of aerial photography. Data layers used in the GIS analysis were wetland-plant communities, hydric soils, National Wetlands Inventory designated areas, and wet areas based on photogrammetry. According to review of these data layers, potential wetlands constitute almost one-third of the land in the training areas. A composite map of these four data layers was compiled for use during inspection of the training areas. Field inspection focused on the presence of hydrophytic vegetation and macroscopic evidences of wetland hydrology. Results of the field inspection were in general agreement with those predicted by the GIS analysis, except that some wet areas were more extensive than predicted because of high amounts of precipitation during critical periods of 1995 and 1996. Guidelines for managing wetlands in the training areas are presented.

  1. Evaluation of state-of-the-art high speed deluge systems presently in service at various US Army ammunition plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedeke, A. D.; Fadorsen, G. A.

    1993-09-01

    A brief study was made of ultra high speed deluge systems used in Army ammunition plants for fire protection against pyrotechnic and propellant material-type fires/explosions. The evaluation included both fire detectors and fire suppressant devices and technologies. It was found that the technologies being utilized today have not been optimized for the specific fire application. In general, it was found that there is a lack of information on the properties of the fire events themselves that detectors are supposedly designed to respond to. No data exists on spectral irradiances in the IR or UV spectral bands where the current detectors operate. A need exists to determine the sources that may be responsible for detector false alarms. Tests should be conducted on the performance of current systems and on other detection and suppression techniques, notably, machine vision fire detection. It is recommended that field testing of old and new hardware systems be conducted; modifications be made to optimize currently installed systems; a new system capability be developed which better meets the overall threat, performance, and reliability requirements; and a thorough purchase description/performance specification be developed.

  2. Environmental geophysics and sequential aerial photo study at Sunfish and Marsden Lakes, Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Padar, C.A.; McGinnis, L.D.; Thompson, M.D.; Anderson, A.W.; Benson, M.A.; Stevanov, J.E.; Daudt, C.R.; Miller, S.F.; Knight, D.E. |

    1995-08-01

    Geophysical studies at Site H of Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant have delineated specific areas of dumping and waste disposal. Anomalous areas noted in the geophysical data sets have been correlated with features visible in a chronological sequence of aerial photos. The photos aid in dating the anthropogenic changes and in interpreting the geophysical anomalies observed at Site H and across Sunfish Lake. Specifically, two burn cages and what has been interpreted as their surrounding debris have been delineated. The areal extent of another waste site has been defined in the southwest corner of Area H-1. Depth estimates to the top of the Area H-1 anomalies show that the anomalies lie below lake level, indicative of dumping directly into Sunfish Lake. Except for these areas along the northwestern shore, there is no evidence of waste disposal along the shoreline or within the present-day lake margins. Magnetic, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating-radar data have pinpointed the locations of mounds, observable in aerial photos, around the first burn cage. The second burn cage and its surrounding area have also been clearly defined from aerial photos, with support from further geophysical data. Additional analysis of the data has yielded volumetric estimates of the amount of material that would need removal in the event of excavation of the anomalous areas. Magnetic and electromagnetic profiles were also run across Marsden Lake. On the basis of these data, it has been concluded that no large-scale dumping has occurred in or around Marsden Lake.

  3. Energy conservation investment program, FY95 limited energy study area B nitric acid production facilities Holston Army Ammunition Plant Kingsport, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    In June 1995, Affiliated Engineers SE, Inc. (AESE) was retained by the Mobile District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform a Limited Energy Study for Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. The field survey of existing conditions was completed in July 1995. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line process flow diagrams on Autocad. A subsequent one day field survey was conducted in August 1995. This report summarizes the results obtained from field investigation and the analysis of various alternative Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s).

  4. Results of a greenhouse study investigating the phytoextraction of lead from contaminated soils obtained from the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant, Desoto, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, D.F.; Behel, A.D.; Almond, R.A.; Kelly, D.A.; Pier, P.A.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the results of greenhouse studies conducted to determine if phytoextraction methods could be enhanced by increasing ionic lead`s solubility in water. Soil acidifiers and chelating agents were used to increase lead`s solubility in water. The study was conducted using lead contaminated soil from the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant near Desoto, Kansas. These soils were shipped to the Tennessee Valley Authority`s Environmental Research Facility in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, where the study was conducted. The report concludes that phytoextraction methods may be enhanced by these techniques and that the risk of leaching lead out of the soil`s root zone is minimal.

  5. Forest tree growth as a bioindicator of pollution abatement systems at the Radford Army Ammunition Plant. Final report 1 Jul 76-30 Jun 78

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.M.; Kress, L.W.

    1982-01-14

    The study objectives of this research were: (1) to determine if the pollution levels alone were responsible for the observed growth suppressions in trees growing at Radford Army Ammunition Plant (RAAP); (2) to screen several full-sib families of loblolly pine and half-sib families of American sycamore for tolerance or sensitivity to O3, SO2, and NO2; (3) to identify and quantify the effects to loblolly pine and sycamore of long-term low-level exposures to O3, SO2, and NO2 in combination; (4) to demonstrate the success or failure of the abatement programs now being initiated at the RAAP, with loblolly pine and/or American sycamore as bioindicators; and (5) to contribute to the field of air pollution effects on plants an understanding of the growth impact of pollutant interactions.

  6. Task Order 7. Use of activated carbon for treatment of explosives-contaminated groundwater at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP). Final report, Apr 89-May 90

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.M.; Wujcik, W.J.; Lowe, W.L.; Marks, P.J.

    1990-05-01

    The primary objective of this task was to determine the feasibility of using GAC to treat ground water contaminated by explosives at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP) in Milan, Tennessee. Laboratory GAC isotherm studies were conducted and two carbons, Atochem, Inc. GAC 830 and Calgon Filtrasorb 300, were selected for further testing in continuous flow GAC columns. Three pilot scale continuous flow GAC column tests were performed at MAAP using the two carbons selected from the laboratory GAC isotherm studies. The results from the laboratory and pilot studies are presented in this report. They show that concurrent removal of explosives such as TNT, RDX, HMX, Tetryl, and nitrobenzenes from ground water using continuous flow granular activated carbon is feasible.

  7. Health assessment for Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Carrol and Gibson Counties, Tennessee, Region 4. CERCLIS No. TND210020582. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Milan Army Ammunition Plant Site (MAAP) is located in Milan (Carrol and Gibson Counties), Tennessee. MAAP produces munitions for the U.S. Army. From 1942 to 1978 wastewater from a munition demilitarization process line was discharged into 11 unlined settling ponds. These ponds were dredged in 1971 with the soils placed near the side of the ponds. A multilayer cap was placed on top of the ponds and the dredged soils (1984). Access to the site is restricted. Removal actions have not occurred. Preliminary on-site groundwater sampling results have identified cyclonite (RDX), homocyclonite (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene. In addition, cadmium, chromium, and lead were detected in on-site groundwater. Off-site surface water sampling results identified RDX and HMX. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Direct contact and ingestion with groundwater from on-site wells, off-site soils and bioaccumulation of site-related contaminants in fish, waterfowl, and crops with uptake from irrigation, and subsequent ingestion by area residents are possible human exposure pathways.

  8. Screening of aquatic and wetland plant species for phytoremediation of explosives-contaminated groundwater from the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant.

    PubMed

    Best, E P; Zappi, M E; Fredrickson, H L; Sprecher, S L; Larson, S L; Ochman, M

    1997-11-21

    The results of this study indicate that the presence of plants did enhance TNT and TNB removal from IAAP groundwater. Most effective at 25 degrees C were reed canary grass, coontail and pondweed. Groundwater and plant tissue analyses indicate that in presence of the plants tested TNT is degraded to reduced by-products and to other metabolites that were not analyzed. TNT removal was best modeled using first order kinetics, with rate constants at 25 degrees C incubations ranging from 0.038 microgram L-1 h-1 for reed canary grass to 0.012 microgram L-1 h-1 for parrot-feather. These kinetics predict hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 4.9 days to 19.8 days to reach a TNT concentration of 2 micrograms L-1. Decreasing incubation temperature to 10 degrees C affected reed canary grass more than parrot-feather, increasing estimated HRTs by factors of four and two, respectively. The plant species tested showed a far lower potential for RDX removal from the IAAP groundwater. Most effective at 25 degrees C were reed canary grass and fox sedge. Analyses of plant material indicated the presence of RDX in under-water plant portions and in aerial plant portions, and RDX accumulation in the latter. RDX removal was best modeled using zero order kinetics, with rate constants for the 25 degrees C incubation ranging from 13.45 micrograms L-1 h-1 for reed canary grass to no removal in four species. Based on these kinetics, estimated HRTs to reach 2 micrograms L-1 RDX increased from 39 days. Decreasing the temperature to 10 degrees C increased HRT 24-fold for reed canary grass. By using the biomass-normalized K value, submersed plants are identified as having the highest explosives-removing activity (microgram explosive L-1 h-1 g DW-1). However, biomass production of submersed plants is normally five to ten times less than that of emergent plants per unit area, and, thus, in plant selection for wetland construction, both, explosives removal potential and biomass production are

  9. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (Operable Unit 1), AL. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 2,200-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) site was located in Talledega County, Alabama, near the junction of Talledega Creek and the Coosa River. AAAP was built in 1941 as a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that produced nitrocellulose, nitroaromatic explosives, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl methyl nitramine. Operations at AAAP were terminated in August 1945, and in 1973 several parcels of the original 13,233-acre property were sold. In 1978, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), managing the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP), identified soil, sediment, and ground water potentially contaminated by explosives, asbestos, and lead as a result of past site operations. During the RI/FS, the facility was divided into two general areas: the eastern area (Area A) and the western area (Area B). In 1985, investigations identified soil contamination by explosives, asbestos, and lead in Area A, and ground water contamination by these materials in Area B. Soil excavated from Area A was stockpiled in Area B in two covered buildings and on a concrete slab, which was subsequently covered with a membrane liner. A 1991 characterization study of Area B concluded that explosives, lead, and asbestos contamination were present above regulatory limits. The ROD addressed a final action for the contaminated soil in the Stockpile Soils Area (Area B). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris were explosives, including 2,4,6-TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and tetryl; metals, including lead; and asbestos, an inorganic.

  10. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. Screening of aquatic and wetland plant species for phytoremediation of explosives-contaminated groundwater from the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Best, E.P.; Zappi, M.E.; Fredrickson, H.L.; Sprecher, S.L.; Larson, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Munitions material such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5- trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion and decomposition products can enter the environment from production activities and field usage and disposal. The purposeful use of plants for cleanup of the environment has received relatively little attention despite the fact that plants, like microorganisms, play an important role in nature in sustaining and restoring environments. The capabilities of plants to absorb, accumulate, and metabolize, directly or indirectly, various organic substances suggest their use in the remediation of contaminated environments (phytoremediation).

  12. Evaluation of various organic fertilizer substrates and hydraulic retention times for enhancing anaerobic degradation of explosives-contaminated groundwater while using constructed wetlands at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, L.L.; Almond, R.A.; Kelly, D.A.; Phillips, W.D.; Rogers, W.J.

    1998-05-01

    This document describes studies conducted at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant (MAAP) to improve the design, operation, and cost of gravel-based anaerobic cells when phytoremediating explosives-contaminated groundwater. To conduct this study, small-scale anaerobic test cells were used to determine: (1) If the hydraulic retention time of a large demonstration-scale anaerobic cell at MAAP could be reduced, and (2) if other carbon sources could be used as an anaerobic feedstock. The study results indicated that: (1) The existing anaerobic cell`s 7.5-day retention time should not be reduced since residual explosive by-products were present in the effluent of treatments with a 3.5-day retention time. (2) Daily application of a relatively soluble substrate, such as molasses syrup, will provide better explosives removal than periodic application of less soluble substrates like milk replacement starter and sewage sludge. (3) Molasses syrup could be, and should be, used as a substitute for milk replacement power. The recommendation to use molasses syrup was based on: (1) The lower cost of molasses syrup as compared to milk replacement starter, (2) molasses syrup`s higher solubility (which makes it easier to apply), and (3) molasses syrup`s ability to provide enhanced explosives removal.

  13. 12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. November 1, 1940 - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 227, South side of Hagner Road between Ripley & Mellon Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 129. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING FREESTANDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. DETAIL OF NORTH PLANT AMMUNITION DEMOLITION FACILITY, SHOWING FREE-STANDING SMOKESTACK (BUILDING 1504). VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. Final expanded site inspection, ammunition storage area, Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama. Final report, September 1992-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Suomela, K.D.; Highsmith, R.L.; Rapuano, K.F.; Kirchner, B.

    1994-11-15

    An Expanded Site Inspection (ESI) was conducted at the Anniston Army Depot (ANAD) Ammunition Storage Area (ASA). The objective of this ESI was to gather the information and data necessary to determine whether there is sufficient evidence of any release of contamination that would require additional investigation. The ASA contains 1,300 ammunition storage magazines and an ammunition maintenance workshop complex which includes buildings for maintenance, demilitarization, and inspection of all types of ammunition and their components. Fifteen Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) were the focus of the ESI, of which 11 were recommend for further investigation. The work included a review of historical records, field investigations, laboratory analyses, data interpretation, and report preparation. Contamination from volatile organic compounds and semi volatile organic compounds is not a major problem at the ASA. Arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, vanadium, zinc, explosives, and total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected above control screening values levels in one or more of the media sampled. Nitrate/nitrite and total organic carbon were also detected above control screening values in samples of groundwater, soil, and sediment from a number of SWMUs.

  16. Levelized cost-benefit analysis of proposed diagnostics for the Ammunition Transfer Arm of the US Army`s Future Armored Resupply Vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, V.K.; Young, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The US Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (PM-AFAS/FARV) is sponsoring the development of technologies that can be applied to the resupply vehicle for the Advanced Field Artillery System. The Engineering Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has proposed adding diagnostics/prognostics systems to four components of the Ammunition Transfer Arm of this vehicle, and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on the diagnostics/prognostics to show the potential savings that may be gained by incorporating these systems onto the vehicle. Possible savings could be in the form of reduced downtime, less unexpected or unnecessary maintenance, fewer regular maintenance checks. and/or tower collateral damage or loss. The diagnostics/prognostics systems are used to (1) help determine component problems, (2) determine the condition of the components, and (3) estimate the remaining life of the monitored components. The four components on the arm that are targeted for diagnostics/prognostics are (1) the electromechanical brakes, (2) the linear actuators, (3) the wheel/roller bearings, and (4) the conveyor drive system. These would be monitored using electrical signature analysis, vibration analysis, or a combination of both. Annual failure rates for the four components were obtained along with specifications for vehicle costs, crews, number of missions, etc. Accident scenarios based on component failures were postulated, and event trees for these scenarios were constructed to estimate the annual loss of the resupply vehicle, crew, arm. or mission aborts. A levelized cost-benefit analysis was then performed to examine the costs of such failures, both with and without some level of failure reduction due to the diagnostics/prognostics systems. Any savings resulting from using diagnostics/prognostics were calculated.

  17. Anaerobic treatment of army ammunition production wastewater containing perchlorate and RDX.

    PubMed

    Atikovic, Emina; Suidan, Makram T; Maloney, Stephen W

    2008-08-01

    Perchlorate is an oxidizer that has been routinely used in solid rocket motors by the Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX) is a major component of military high explosives and is used in a wide variety of munitions. Perchlorate bearing wastewater typically results from production of solid rocket motors, while RDX is transferred to Army industrial wastewaters during load, assemble and pack operations for new munitions, and hot water or steam washout for disposal and deactivation of old munitions (commonly referred to as demilitarization, or simply demil). Biological degradation in Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors (AFBR), has been shown to be an effective method for the removal of both perchlorate and RDX in contaminated wastewater. The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate and RDX, individually and when co-mingled, using ethanol as an electron donor under steady state conditions. Three AFBRs were used to assess the effectiveness of this process in treating the wastewater. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored relative to perchlorate, RDX, and chemical oxygen demand removal effectiveness. The experimental results demonstrated that the biodegradation of perchlorate and RDX was more effective in bioreactors receiving the single contaminant than in the bioreactor where both contaminants were fed. PMID:18586300

  18. Remediation of dinitrotoluene contaminated soils from former ammunition plants: soil washing efficiency and effective process monitoring in bioslurry reactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Daprato, R C; Nishino, S F; Spain, J C; Hughes, J B

    2001-10-12

    A pilot-scale bioslurry system was used to test the treatment of soils highly contaminated with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). The treatment scheme involved a soil-washing process followed by two sequential aerobic slurry reactors augmented with 2,4-DNT- and 2,6-DNT-mineralizing bacteria. Test soils were obtained from two former army ammunition plants, the Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (VAAP, Chattanooga, TN) and the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP, Baraboo, WI). Soil washing was used to minimize operational problems in slurry reactors associated with large particulates. The Eimco slurry reactors were operated in a draw-and-fill mode for 3 months and were monitored for the biodegradation of 2,4-DNT and 2,6-DNT, nitrite production, NaOH consumption, and oxygen uptake rate. Results show that soil washing was very effective for the removal of sands and the recovery of soil fines containing 2,4-DNT and 2,6-DNT. Bioslurry reactors offered rapid and nearly complete degradation of both DNT isomers, but require real time monitoring to avoid long lag periods upon refeeding. Results found a significant discrepancy between the measured DNT concentrations and calculated DNT concentrations in the slurry reactors because of solids profiles in the slurry reactors and the presence of floating crystal of DNTs. Based on the actual amount of dinitrotoluene degradation, nitrite release, NaOH consumption, and oxygen uptake were close to the theoretical stoichiometric coefficients of complete DNT mineralization. Such stoichiometric relationships were not achieved if the calculation was based on the measured DNT concentrations due to the heterogeneity of DNT in the reactor. Results indicate that nitrite release, NaOH consumption, and oxygen uptake rates provide a fast assessment of 2,4-DNT degradation and microbial activity in a slurry reactor, but could not be extended to a second reactor in series where the degradation of a much lower concentration

  19. Analysis of organic compounds in aqueous samples of former ammunition plants

    SciTech Connect

    Levsen, K.; Preiss, A.; Berger-Preiss, E.

    1995-12-31

    In Germany, a large number of sites exist where ammunition was produced before and in particular during World War II. These former production sites represent a particular threat to the environment because these plants were constructed and operated under war conditions, where production was far more important than protection of the health of the (in general forced) workers and the environment. New approaches are presented for the extraction and analysis of explosives and related compounds in aqueous samples from former ammunition production sites. Quantitative extraction of nitro aromatics but also of the polar nitroamines such as RDX and HMX is achieved by solid phase extraction with styrene-divinylbenzene polymers (Lichrolut EN). Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) has been used to identify and quantify unknowns in ammunition waste water. Finally, automated multiple development (AMD) high performance thin layer chromatography was applied for the first time to the analysis of this compound class.

  20. Users guide: simulation model for ammunition plants; prediction of wastewater characteristics and impact of reuse/recycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, S.; Messenger, M.; Webster, R.D.; Bandy, J.T.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the algorithm and details the operating instructions required for an ammunition plant process model developed for DARCOM environmental personnel. The model was created to define the impact of increased ammunition production on the quantity and quality of the effluents discharged from the plants. It also allows assessment of the impact of recycle/reuse of wastewaters on final effluent quality. This model may be accessed through the Environmental Technical Information System.

  1. Beryllium surface levels in a military ammunition plant.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Wayne T; Leonard, Stephanie; Ott, Darrin; Fuortes, Laurence; Field, William

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the presence of beryllium surface contamination in a U.S. conventional munitions plant as an indicator of possible past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and used these measurements to classify job categories by potential level of exposure. Surface samples were collected from production and nonproduction areas of the plant and at regional industrial reference sites with no known history of beryllium use. Surface samples of premoistened wiping material were analyzed for beryllium mass content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and results expressed as micrograms of beryllium per 100 square centimeters (micro g/100 cm(2)). Beryllium was detected in 87% of samples collected at the munitions plant and in 72% of the samples collected at regional reference sites. Two munitions plant samples from areas near sanders and grinders were above 3.0 micro g/100 cm(2) (U.S. Department of Energy surface contamination limit). The highest surface level found at the reference sites was 0.44 micro g/100 cm(2). Workers in areas where beryllium-containing alloy tools were sanded or ground, but not other work areas, may have been exposed to airborne beryllium concentrations above levels encountered in other industries where metal work is conducted. Surface sampling provided information useful for categorizing munitions plant jobs by level of past beryllium airborne and skin exposure and, subsequently, for identifying employees within exposure strata to be screened for beryllium sensitization. PMID:18569510

  2. An integrated information support system for the factory floor of an ammunition manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.O.; Badalamente, R.V.; Crow, V.L.

    1988-11-01

    An integrated information support system provides information processing and management on the factory floor of an ammunition manufacturing plant. The system is designed as a distributed network of minicomputers, process control computers and personal computer workstations that interactively update a complex relational database. The system controls and analyzes production,quality, and maintenance functions. Attention to human factors engineering during design has resulted in minimum training time and high user acceptance. The paper presents the system's life-cycle history and a critique of the implementation approach and system design. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: ENGINEERING AND DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT OF GENERAL DECON TECHNOLOGY FOR THE U.S. ARMY'S INSTALLATION/RESTORATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document reports on the results of bench-scale tests of treatment technologies for explosive-containing sediment located in lagoons at Army ammunition plants. A companion literature search identified the appropriate explosives remediation technologies to be evaluated. ...

  4. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: COGNIS TERRAMET LEAD EXTRACTION PROCESS - TWIN CITIES ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT - COGNIS, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The TERRAMET® soil remediation system leaches and recovers lead (including metallic lead, and lead salts and oxides), and other metals from contaminated soil, sludge, or sediment. The system uses a proprietary aqueous leachant that is optimized through treatability tests for the ...

  5. Automatic Ammunition Identification Technology Project. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, B.

    1993-03-01

    The Automatic Ammunition Identification Technology (AAIT) Project is an activity of the Robotics & Process Systems Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Army`s Project Manager-Ammunition Logistics (PM-AMMOLOG) at the Picatinny Arsenal in Picatinny, New Jersey. The project objective is to evaluate new two-dimensional bar code symbologies for potential use in ammunition logistics systems and automated reloading equipment. These new symbologies are a significant improvement over typical linear bar codes since machine-readable alphanumeric messages up to 2000 characters long are achievable. These compressed data symbologies are expected to significantly improve logistics and inventory management tasks and permit automated feeding and handling of ammunition to weapon systems. The results will be increased throughout capability, better inventory control, reduction of human error, lower operation and support costs, and a more timely re-supply of various weapon systems. This paper will describe the capabilities of existing compressed data symbologies and the symbol testing activities being conducted at ORNL for the AAIT Project.

  6. Automated ammunition logistics for the Crusader program

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D.M.; Kring, C.T.; Lloyd, P.D.; Ray, T.L.; Jatko, W.B.

    1997-03-01

    The US Army`s next generation artillery system is called the Crusader. A self-propelled howitzer and a resupply vehicle constitute the Crusader system, which will be designed for improved mobility, increased firepower, and greater survivability than current generation vehicles. The Army`s Project Manager, Crusader, gave Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the task of developing and demonstrating a concept for the resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to sustain the howitzer with ammunition and fuel and will significantly increase capabilities over those of current resupply vehicles. Ammunition is currently processed and transferred almost entirely by hand. ORNL identified and evaluated various concepts for automated upload, processing, storage, docking and delivery. Each of the critical technologies was then developed separately and demonstrated on discrete test platforms. An integrated technology demonstrator, incorporating each of the individual technology components to realistically simulate performance of the selected vehicle concept, was developed and successfully demonstrated for the Army.

  7. 48 CFR 908.7111 - Arms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Arms and ammunition. 908... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7111 Arms and ammunition. Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 4655, the Secretary of the Army is authorized to furnish arms,...

  8. 48 CFR 908.7111 - Arms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arms and ammunition. 908... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7111 Arms and ammunition. Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 4655, the Secretary of the Army is authorized to furnish arms,...

  9. 48 CFR 908.7111 - Arms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Arms and ammunition. 908... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7111 Arms and ammunition. Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 4655, the Secretary of the Army is authorized to furnish arms,...

  10. 48 CFR 908.7111 - Arms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Arms and ammunition. 908... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7111 Arms and ammunition. Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 4655, the Secretary of the Army is authorized to furnish arms,...

  11. 48 CFR 908.7111 - Arms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Arms and ammunition. 908... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Special Items 908.7111 Arms and ammunition. Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 4655, the Secretary of the Army is authorized to furnish arms,...

  12. Automatic Ammunition Identification Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Automatic Ammunition Identification Technology (AAIT) Project is an activity of the Robotics Process Systems Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Army's Project Manager-Ammunition Logistics (PM-AMMOLOG) at the Picatinny Arsenal in Picatinny, New Jersey. The project objective is to evaluate new two-dimensional bar code symbologies for potential use in ammunition logistics systems and automated reloading equipment. These new symbologies are a significant improvement over typical linear bar codes since machine-readable alphanumeric messages up to 2000 characters long are achievable. These compressed data symbologies are expected to significantly improve logistics and inventory management tasks and permit automated feeding and handling of ammunition to weapon systems. The results will be increased throughout capability, better inventory control, reduction of human error, lower operation and support costs, and a more timely re-supply of various weapon systems. This paper will describe the capabilities of existing compressed data symbologies and the symbol testing activities being conducted at ORNL for the AAIT Project.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE PROTOCOL FOR THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: CASE STUDY AT THE TWIN CITIES ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the request of staff in the EPA Regions, EPA?s Office of Research and Development carried out an independent evaluation of the Technical Protocol for Evaluating Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water (EPA/600/R-98/128). The Protocol was developed around c...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE PROTOCOL FOR NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: CASE STUDY AT THE TWIN CITIES ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the request of staff in the EPA Regions, EPA's Office of Research and Development
    carried out an independent evaluation of the Technical Protocol for Evaluating Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water (EPA/600/R-98/128). The Protocol was developed around...

  15. FY95 limited energy study area B nitric acid production facilities, Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-02

    The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of process or equipment modifications pursuant to conservation of energy and reduction of water consumption at the Ammonia Oxidation Process Facilities in Building 302, Area B. An adjunct requirement is to avoid proposed modifications which would impose additional maintenance and operation requirements. The following ECO`s specifically identified by scope documents, were investigated: 1. Convert air compressor drive turbine from tailgas to steam or to steam augmentation. 2. Recover heat from product gas leaving the air preheater to produce steam. 3. Water conservation. Additional ECOs selected by the A/E to be studied include the following: 1. Insulate heat exchangers and tailgas piping. 2. Install preformed plate heat exchangers inside insulation on air preheater and tailgas heater vessels for heat recovery to a 30 psig steam system. 3. Inject air compressor intercooler and aftercooler condensate and steam condensate from the ammonia vaporizer into tailgas entering compressor drive turbine for increased power.

  16. Densified biomass as an alternative Army heating and power plant fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, S.A.; Magrino, T.; Lin, J.S.; Duster, K.; Mahon, D.

    1980-03-01

    This investigation evaluated the technical and economic potential of using densified biomass (principally wood pellets) as a coal substitute in Army heating and power plants. The report reviews Department of Defense (DOD) experience with and tests of wood pellets; production of wood pellets (excluding silvicultural aspects); handling, storing, and feeding; combustion; major environental considerations; and economics of use.

  17. Application of on-line HPLC-1H NMR to environmental samples: analysis of groundwater near former ammunition plants.

    PubMed

    Godejohann, M; Preiss, A; Mügge, C; Wünsch, G

    1997-09-15

    Coupling of HPLC to NMR was applied for the first time to the analysis of environmental samples, i.e., water samples from an ammunition hazardous waste site. Using the continuous flow mode at very low flow rates (< or = 0.017 mL/min) and large volume injection (400 microL), the confirmation of many nitroaromatic compounds could be achieved down to the microgram-per-liter level after solid phase extraction of a groundwater sample from a former ammunition production site. At a flow rate of 0.006 mL/min, it is possible to detect less than 29 nmol (5 micrograms) of 1,3-dinitrobenzene injected on a 75 mm x 4 mm reversed phase C-18 column (particle size, 5 microns). The results obtained by HPLC-NMR are compared to those obtained by HPLC-PDA (photodiode array) of the same sample, demonstrating that many more compounds can be identified by the former compared to the latter method as a result of coelution of major and minor components in the HPLC chromatogram. PMID:9302876

  18. Robotic conveyance of artillery projectiles for remote ammunition resupply operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.L.; Glassell, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    The U.S. Army`s Project Manager, Advanced Field Artillery System/Future Armored Resupply Vehicle has given Oak Ridge National Laboratory the task of developing a robotic conveyance system which will provide automated artillery ammunition transfer. This technology is currently being developed and will be demonstrated in the summer of 1995. This paper describes the development of an ammunition transfer arm to date. The arm consists of three sections and 6 D.F. which will allow the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle to dock and mate with the Advanced Field Artillery System on terrain varying from {+-}10{degrees} in pitch, yaw, and roll and will allow for alignment of the fuel and propellant transfer ports. This arm will deliver the ammunition to the AFAS, where it will be received by an automatic handling and storage system inside the AFAS.

  19. Modified blank ammunition injuries.

    PubMed

    Ogunc, Gokhan I; Ozer, M Tahir; Coskun, Kagan; Uzar, Ali Ihsan

    2009-12-15

    Blank firing weapons are designed only for discharging blank ammunition cartridges. Because they are cost-effective, are easily accessible and can be modified to live firearms plus their unclear legal situation in Turkish Law makes them very popular in Turkey. 2004 through 2008, a total of 1115 modified blank weapons were seized in Turkey. Blank firing weapons are easily modified by owners, making them suitable for discharging live firearm ammunition or modified blank ammunitions. Two common methods are used for modification of blank weapons. After the modification, these weapons can discharge the live ammunition. However, due to compositional durability problems with these types of weapons; the main trend is to use the modified blank ammunitions rather than live firearm ammunition fired from modified blank firing weapons. In this study, two types of modified blank weapons and two types of modified blank cartridges were tested on three different target models. Each of the models' shooting side was coated with 1.3+/-2 mm thickness chrome tanned cowhide as a skin simulant. The first model was only coated with skin simulant. The second model was coated with skin simulant and 100% cotton police shirt. The third model was coated with skin simulant and jean denim. After the literature evaluation four high risky anatomic locations (the neck area; the eyes; the thorax area and inguinal area) were pointed out for the steel and lead projectiles are discharged from the modified blank weapons especially in close range (0-50 cm). The target models were designed for these anatomic locations. For the target models six Transparent Ballistic Candle blocks (TCB) were prepared and divided into two test groups. The first group tests were performed with lead projectiles and second group with steel projectile. The shortest penetration depth (lead projectile: 4.358 cm; steel projectile 8.032 cm) was recorded in the skin simulant and jean denim coated block for both groups. In both groups

  20. Smart crane ammunition transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Killough, S.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of the Smart Crane Ammunition Transfer System (SCATS) project is to demonstrate robotic/telerobotic controls technology for a mobile articulated crane for missile/ munitions handling, delivery, and reload. Missile resupply and reload have been manually intensive operations up to this time. Currently, reload missiles are delivered by truck to the site of the launcher. A crew of four to five personnel reloads the missiles from the truck to the launcher using a hydraulic-powered crane. The missiles are handled carefully for the safety of the missiles and personnel. Numerous steps are required in the reload process and the entire reload operation can take over 1 h for some missile systems. Recent U.S. Army directives require the entire operation to be accomplished in a fraction of that time. Current requirements for the development of SCATS are being based primarily on reloading Patriot missiles. The planned development approach will integrate robotic control and sensor technology with a commercially available hydraulic articulated crane. SCATS is being developed with commercially available hardware as much as possible. Development plans include adding a 3-D.F. end effector with a grapple to the articulating crane; closed-loop position control for the crane and end effector; digital microprocessor control of crane functions; simplified operator interface; and operating modes which include rectilinear movement, obstacle avoidance, and partial automated operation. The planned development will include progressive technology demonstrations. Ultimate plans are for this technology to be transferred and utilized in the military fielding process.

  1. Development of an automated ammunition processing system for battlefield use

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D.M.; Chesser, J.B.; Lloyd, P.D.; Miller, E.D.; Ray, T.L.; Weil, B.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV) will be the companion ammunition resupply vehicle to the Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS). These systems are currently being investigated by the US Army for future acquisition. The FARV will sustain the AFAS with ammunition and fuel and will significantly increase capabilities over current resupply vehicles. Currently ammunition is transferred to field artillery almost entirely by hand. The level of automation to be included into the FARV is still under consideration. At the request of the US Army`s Project Manager, AFAS/FARV, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and evaluated various concepts for the automated upload, processing, storage, and delivery equipment for the FARV. ORNL, working with the sponsor, established basic requirements and assumptions for concept development and the methodology for concept selection. A preliminary concept has been selected, and the associated critical technologies have been identified. ORNL has provided technology demonstrations of many of these critical technologies. A technology demonstrator which incorporates all individual components into a total process demonstration is planned for late FY 1995.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE PROTOCOL FOR THE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: CASE STUDY AT THE TWIN CITIES ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT (EPA/600/R-01/025)

    EPA Science Inventory

    At the request of staff in the EPA Regions, EPAs Office of Research and Development carried out an independent evaluation of the Technical Protocol for Evaluating Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents in Ground Water (EPA/600/R-98/128). The Protocol was developed around cas...

  3. Ecotoxicity of nitroaromatics to aquatic and terrestrial species at Army Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatter, P.S.; Talmage, S.S.; Opresko, D.M.; Ross, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, RDX, HMX, tetryl, and associated degradation products, are released into the environment during the manufacturing, loading, packing, and assembling of munitions at US Army Ammunition Plants. With the exception of 2A46DNT, nitroaromatic compounds are more toxic to freshwater fishes than to freshwater invertebrates. Rainbow trout are the most sensitive test species with LC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.43 to 6.4 mg/L for TNT, RDX, and HMX. These compounds produce negative effects on reproductive endpoints in terrestrial mammals at doses >1 mg/kg/day. Limited data indicate that nitroaromatics are not toxic to terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates. Additional studies need to be undertaken to completely characterize the toxicity of these compounds; however, the criteria and screening benchmarks presented in this paper can be used to assess the risks to indigenous flora and fauna at Army Superfund sites.

  4. The criminal purchase of firearm ammunition

    PubMed Central

    Tita, G E; Braga, A A; Ridgeway, G; Pierce, G L

    2006-01-01

    Objective Laws that prohibit certain individuals from owning firearms also pertain to ammunition. Whereas retail sales of firearms to criminals are regularly disrupted by instant background checks, sales of ammunition are essentially unchecked and the rate at which criminals acquire ammunition is unknown. This research describes the ammunition market and estimates the rate at which criminals are acquiring ammunition. Design Criminal background checks conducted on individuals purchasing ammunition in the City of Los Angeles in April and May 2004. Setting Los Angeles, CA, USA. Subjects Ammunition purchasers. Main outcome measures Criminal activity that prohibits one from owning, purchasing, or possessing ammunition. Results 2.6% (95% CI 1.9% to 3.2%) of ammunition purchasers had a prior felony conviction or another condition that prohibited them from possessing ammunition. During the study period prohibited possessors purchased 10 050 rounds of ammunition in Los Angeles. Conclusions These estimates suggest that monitoring ammunition transactions may help reduce the supply of ammunition to criminals and the frequency of injuries from felonious gun assaults. Such a record can also provide information for generating leads on illegal firearm possession. PMID:17018671

  5. 27 CFR 478.119 - Importation of ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... feeding devices. 478.119 Section 478.119 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL... AMMUNITION Importation § 478.119 Importation of ammunition feeding devices. (a) No ammunition feeding device... of such device. (b) For purposes of this section, an “ammunition feeding device” is a magazine,...

  6. 6. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1955 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1955 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). AERIAL VIEW OF BUILDING 1611. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. 'THIS IS THE HONEST JOHN WARHEAD DEMILITARIZATION PLANT. THE DEMILITARIZATION PROCESS CONSISTS OF STRIPPING AND OPENING THE WARHEAD MANUALLY AND DOWNLOADING THE M139 BOMBLETS ONTO A CONVEYOR WHICH CARRIES THEM THROUGH A PUNCH, DRAIN AND RINSE MACHINE INTO A ROTARY RETORT DEACTIVATION FURNACE WHERE THE BURSTER IS BURNED. THE BOMBLET SHELLS, WHICH ARE ALUMINUM, ARE THEN CONVEYED TO A DECONTAMINATION FURNACE WHERE THEY ARE MELTED AND CAST INTO INGOTS. THE GB, WHICH IS COLLECTED IN THE PUNCH, DRAIN AND RINSE MACHINE, IS CONDUCTED TO A STORAGE TANK AND, ULTIMATELY, IS NEUTRALIZED ... - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Ammunition Demolition Building-Tail Fin Storage & Assembly, 2750 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 3480 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Kneessy, A.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned and operated industrial plants, arsenals and depots, and privately owned and operated ordnance explosive establishments. The end of World War II was the beginning of the nuclear age and attendant Medical Department responsibilities for radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection. The US Army has undertaken the demilitarization of obsolete and excess chemical munitions. The Medical Systems Safety and Health Branch is tasked to survey Army hospitals within the United States, to identify and recommend corrective action for safety and health hazards. At present, a continuing study is underway to evaluate the waste anesthetic gases to operating room personnel in Army hospitals. Noise-induced hearing loss is considered the most widespread occupational injury incurred by DA personnel.

  8. High power microwave hazard facing smart ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohl, J.

    1995-03-01

    The battle field of the present and even more the one in future will be characterized by the use of weapon systems with a high degree of electronics, computers, and sensors, designed and built to keep not only the man out of the loop. But the higher the technology used for smart weapon systems, the more these systems are endangered by numerous sources of hazard. One of those sources is the threat caused by induced or natural electromagnetic fields. These threat factors can be generated by natural, civil and military environment. In principle there are two main applications which must be considered in military applications: Firstly, weapon systems, that is, high power microwave sources as well as intelligent electromagnetic radiation systems to defeat ammunition on the battle field and secondly, the hardening of the own smart ammunition systems and missiles against the interference sources created by the different types of electromagnetic fields. This report will discuss the possible electromagnetic coupling effects on smart ammunition and missiles and their typical interference caused on the electronics and sensor level. Real time 6-DOF simulations show the flight mission which may be compromised depending on the coupled electromagnetic fields. The German MOD has established a research program where smart ammunitions with different seeker systems are investigated in respect of the coupling effects on smart ammunition caused by high power microwaves. This program considers all available resources and know how in Germany. The systems are investigated by analytical, numerical, and experimental methods with passive and activated missiles.

  9. 33 CFR 165.1703 - Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ammunition Island, Port Valdez... Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska. (a) Location. The waters within the following boundaries is a safety zone—the area within a radius of 1330 yards of Ammunition Island, centered on latitude 61°07′28″...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1703 - Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ammunition Island, Port Valdez... Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska. (a) Location. The waters within the following boundaries is a safety zone—the area within a radius of 1330 yards of Ammunition Island, centered on latitude 61°07′28″...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1703 - Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ammunition Island, Port Valdez... Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska. (a) Location. The waters within the following boundaries is a safety zone—the area within a radius of 1330 yards of Ammunition Island, centered on latitude 61°07′28″...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1703 - Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ammunition Island, Port Valdez... Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska. (a) Location. The waters within the following boundaries is a safety zone—the area within a radius of 1330 yards of Ammunition Island, centered on latitude 61°07′28″...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1703 - Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ammunition Island, Port Valdez... Ammunition Island, Port Valdez, Alaska. (a) Location. The waters within the following boundaries is a safety zone—the area within a radius of 1330 yards of Ammunition Island, centered on latitude 61°07′28″...

  14. 22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ammunition therefor as the foreign person brought into the United States under the provisions of 27 CFR 478... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exports of firearms and ammunition. 123.17... FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.17 Exports of firearms and ammunition. (a) Except as...

  15. 22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ammunition therefor as the foreign person brought into the United States under the provisions of 27 CFR 478... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exports of firearms and ammunition. 123.17... FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.17 Exports of firearms and ammunition. (a) Except as...

  16. 22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ammunition therefor as the foreign person brought into the United States under the provisions of 27 CFR 478... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exports of firearms and ammunition. 123.17... FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.17 Exports of firearms and ammunition. (a) Except as...

  17. 27 CFR 478.119 - Importation of ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the release from Customs custody of such a device authorized by this section to be imported through.... (f) Within 15 days of the date of release from Customs custody, the person importing such a device... AMMUNITION Importation § 478.119 Importation of ammunition feeding devices. (a) No ammunition feeding...

  18. 27 CFR 478.119 - Importation of ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the release from Customs custody of such a device authorized by this section to be imported through.... (f) Within 15 days of the date of release from Customs custody, the person importing such a device... AMMUNITION Importation § 478.119 Importation of ammunition feeding devices. (a) No ammunition feeding...

  19. 27 CFR 478.119 - Importation of ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the release from Customs custody of such a device authorized by this section to be imported through.... (f) Within 15 days of the date of release from Customs custody, the person importing such a device... AMMUNITION Importation § 478.119 Importation of ammunition feeding devices. (a) No ammunition feeding...

  20. 27 CFR 478.119 - Importation of ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the release from Customs custody of such a device authorized by this section to be imported through.... (f) Within 15 days of the date of release from Customs custody, the person importing such a device... AMMUNITION Importation § 478.119 Importation of ammunition feeding devices. (a) No ammunition feeding...

  1. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  2. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  3. Identification of propellants of small arms ammunition.

    PubMed

    Nag, N K; Sengupta, D

    1987-02-01

    Existing methods seem inadequate to identify propellants of small arms ammunition. The present article describes that viscosity may be effectively used to differentiate and identify those. The temperature dependence, intra- and inter-batch variation and storage effect of propellants were studied. PMID:3557244

  4. Demonstration of the smart crane ammunition transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.C.; Killough, S.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of the Smart Crane Ammunition Transfer System (SCATS) project is to demonstrate robotic/telerobotic controls technology for a mobile articulated crane for missile/munitions handling, delivery, and reload. Missile resupply and reload have been manually intensive operations up to this time. Currently, reload missiles are delivered by truck to the site of the launcher. A crew of four to five personnel reloads the missiles from the truck to the launcher using a hydraulic-powered crane. The missiles are handled carefully for the safety of the missiles and personnel. Numerous steps are required in the reload process and the entire reload operation can take over an hour for some missile systems. Recent US Army directives require the entire operation to be accomplished in a fraction of that time. Current development of SCATS is being based primarily on reloading Patriot missiles. This paper summarizes the current status of the SCATS project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additional information on project background and requirements has been described previously (Bradley, et al., 1995).

  5. Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: radiation monitoring and radiological assessment of routine releases

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, T.; Dewart, J.; Gunderson, T.; Talley, D.; Wenzel, J.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.; Van Etten, D.

    1982-12-01

    This report documents work perfomed in support of the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. Results of environmental measurements performed for the EIS are described. Descriptions are presented are presented of existing radiological conditions at the Pantex Plant and the two alternate sites, the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant near Burlington, Iowa, and the Hanford Site in Washington. Radiological impacts on these three sites by the proposed options and alternatives considered in the EIS are evaluated. Only impacts from routine operations are considered; impacts from accidents are treated in other reports.

  6. 27 CFR 478.33 - Stolen firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stolen firearms and ammunition. 478.33 Section 478.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  7. 27 CFR 478.33 - Stolen firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stolen firearms and ammunition. 478.33 Section 478.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  8. 27 CFR 478.33 - Stolen firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen firearms and ammunition. 478.33 Section 478.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  9. 27 CFR 478.33 - Stolen firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Stolen firearms and ammunition. 478.33 Section 478.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  10. 27 CFR 478.33 - Stolen firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stolen firearms and ammunition. 478.33 Section 478.33 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  11. 46. Photograph of a published page. 'OPERATIONS IN INCORPORATION BUILDINGS: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photograph of a published page. 'OPERATIONS IN INCORPORATION BUILDINGS: HOLSTON DEFENSE CORPORATION. 'HOLSTON ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT.' Page 17. (no date). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  12. 45. Photograph of a published page. OPERATIONS IN 'H' OR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photograph of a published page. OPERATIONS IN 'H' OR DEWATERING BUILDING: HOLSTON DEFENSE CORPORATION. 'HOLSTON ARMY AMMUNITION PLANT.' Page 16. (no date). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  13. A database system for characterization of munitions items in conventional ammunition demilitarization stockpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, K.C.; Chiu, S.Y.; Ditmars, J.D.; Huber, C.C.; Nortunen, L.; Sabb, R.

    1994-05-01

    The MIDAS (Munition Items Disposition Action System) database system is an electronic data management system capable of storage and retrieval of information on the detailed structures and material compositions of munitions items designated for demilitarization. The types of such munitions range from bulk propellants and small arms to projectiles and cluster bombs. The database system is also capable of processing data on the quantities of inert, PEP (propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics) and packaging materials associated with munitions, components, or parts, and the quantities of chemical compounds associated with parts made of PEP materials. Development of the MIDAS database system has been undertaken by the US Army to support disposition of unwanted ammunition stockpiles. The inventory of such stockpiles currently includes several thousand items, which total tens of thousands of tons, and is still growing. Providing systematic procedures for disposing of all unwanted conventional munitions is the mission of the MIDAS Demilitarization Program. To carry out this mission, all munitions listed in the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition inventory must be characterized, and alternatives for resource recovery and recycling and/or disposal of munitions in the demilitarization inventory must be identified.

  14. 7. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1955 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1955 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). INTERIOR OF BUILDING 1611. 'THE M139 BOMBLETS ARE MANUALLY DOWNLOADED FROM THE WARHEAD SECTION ONTO THE CONVEYORS, EQUIPPED WITH FIXTURES TO POSITION THE BOMBLETS FOR THE SUBSEQUENT PUNCH, DRAIN AND RINSE OPERATIONS.' - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Ammunition Demolition Building-Tail Fin Storage & Assembly, 2750 feet South of Ninth Avenue; 3480 feet East of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. Radiological assessment of cartridge 120-mm, APFSDS-T, XM829 ammunition

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, C.D.; Hadlock, D.E.; Soldat, K.L.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The components of the XM829 round effectively shield out nonpenetrating beta radiation emitted by the depleted uranium; however, photons cna penetrate the components of the round and are therefore the predominant emission. The radiation levels associated with the XM829 ammunition are low. The maximum emissions measured from a cartridge are not likely to result in exposure to military personnel above the maximum permissible nonoccupational dose limits listed in Army Regulation (AR) 40-14. Based upon the specifications contained in 49 CFR 173.424 and the radiation measurement data, the XM829 shipping package may be excepted from the specification packaging, marking and labeling requirements of subpart 49 CFR 173 as long as the outer surface of the uranium is enclosed in an inactive sheath and the conditions specified in 49 CFR 421 (b), (c), and (d) are met.

  16. A new type of shotgun ammunition produces unique wound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Craig L; Winston, David C

    2007-01-01

    The Tucson Police Department, Tucson, AZ, has begun using the Polyshok Impact Reactive Projectile (IRP), a new type of shotgun ammunition that includes a lead bead core that travels within single, plastic-encased projectile. On impact, the core is released to distribute over a small area, thereby disintegrating on impact to reduce the likelihood of exit or collateral damage on missed shots. After a brief review of shotgun slug ballistics and wound characteristics and a discussion of the mechanism of the Polyshok IRP, we report the first death in the United States from this ammunition. Findings included a single entrance wound with plastic ammunition components and small lead particles recovered from the body, the combination of which normally would suggest a close-range shooting with birdshot. However, the characteristics of this ammunition create different patterns than are found with slugs or shot, so that a medical examiner unfamiliar with the Polyshok IRP could draw inaccurate conclusions about ammunition and range of fire. Because the single projectile fired from this ammunition is composed of both plastic and lead, plastic components are likely to be found within the wound at any range of fire, unlike traditional shot or slug ammunition. Also, the small size of lead particles found spread through the wound cavity would ordinarily suggest a small-size shot, whereas the external appearance of the wound (a single entrance with no dispersion of shot) and the pattern of tissue destruction are more consistent with the patterns of injury associated with shotgun slugs. PMID:17209937

  17. Contextual view looking past ammunition depot buildings to main entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view looking past ammunition depot buildings to main entrance of A1 in background; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Magazine No. 1, Railroad Avenue, west side near Maseda Road, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  18. 31. View captioned General view of Shipbuilding Dock with Ammunition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View captioned General view of Shipbuilding Dock with Ammunition Ships in process of construction. Aug. 13, 1919. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Drydock No. 3, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  19. VIEW OF TWO READY AMMUNITION BOXES WITH TWO UNATTACHED STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF TWO READY AMMUNITION BOXES WITH TWO UNATTACHED STEEL DOORS - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. DETAIL OF THREE DOORS FOR READY AMMUNITION BOXES (IN FOREGROUND). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THREE DOORS FOR READY AMMUNITION BOXES (IN FOREGROUND). NOTE THE STEEL PLATES IN THE BACKGROUND - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. DETAIL OF A READY AMMUNITION BOX SHOWING THE INTERNAL SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF A READY AMMUNITION BOX SHOWING THE INTERNAL SUPPORT BRACKETS - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478...

  3. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478...

  4. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478...

  5. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478...

  6. 27 CFR 479.192 - Commerce in firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES..., machine guns, short-barreled shotguns, or short-barreled rifles, see 18 U.S.C. Chapter 44, and Part 478...

  7. Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) concept evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Babcock, S.M.; Watkin, D.C.; Oliver, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    The Field Artillery Ammunition Processing System (FAAPS) is an initiative to introduce a palletized load system (PLS) that is transportable with an automated ammunition processing and storage system for use on the battlefield. System proponents have targeted a 20% increase in the ammunition processing rate over the current operation while simultaneously reducing the total number of assigned field artillery battalion personnel by 30. The overall objective of the FAAPS Project is the development and demonstration of an improved process to accomplish these goals. The initial phase of the FAAPS Project and the subject of this study is the FAAPS concept evaluation. The concept evaluation consists of (1) identifying assumptions and requirements, (2) documenting the process flow, (3) identifying and evaluating technologies available to accomplish the necessary ammunition processing and storage operations, and (4) presenting alternative concepts with associated costs, processing rates, and manpower requirements for accomplishing the operation. This study provides insight into the achievability of the desired objectives.

  8. 5. Photocopy titled 'Map of Naval Ammunition Depot, Bremerton (Puget ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy titled 'Map of Naval Ammunition Depot, Bremerton (Puget Sound), Wash.' dated June 30, 1947. Buildings 103 and 104 are shaded and located left of center near top of map. HABS film is an 8x10' high-contrast negative made from original map in the collection of the Department of Public Works, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Munitions Storage Bunker, Naval Ammunitions Depot, North of Campbell Trail, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  9. Reducing impacts from ammunitions: A comparative life-cycle assessment of four types of 9mm ammunitions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos; Ribeiro, José; Almada, Sara; Rotariu, Traian; Freire, Fausto

    2016-10-01

    Increase of environmental awareness of the population has pressured research activities in the defence area to cover environment and toxicity issues, where have been considered appropriate manners to reduce the environmental and toxicological impacts of ammunition. One of the adopted approaches to achieve such goal involves the replacement of lead and other heavy metals by alternative materials. However, the consequences of using alternative materials in ammunitions manufacturing are uncertain for the other life-cycle phases and trade-offs can occur. The present paper describes the potential benefits from the replacement of lead in the primer and in the projectile of a 9mm calibre ammunition. For that purpose, it is assessed and compared the environmental and toxicological impacts associated with the life-cycle of four ammunitions: combination of two types of projectiles (steel jacket and lead core; copper and nylon composite) with two types of primers (lead primer; non-lead primer). In addition, some potential improvements for the environmental performance of small calibre ammunition are also presented. To assess the impacts two Life-Cycle Impact Assessment methods are applied: CML for six environmental categories and USEtox to three toxicity categories. Results showed that the conclusion drawn for environmental and toxicological impact categories are distinct. In fact, ammunition production phase presents higher impacts for the environmental categories, whilst the operation phase has a higher impact to the toxicity categories. The substitution of lead in the primer and in the projectile provides a suitable alternative from a toxicology perspective; however, the composite projectile still presents some environmental concerns. The conclusions drawn are important for the procurement (and design) of environmental responsible ammunitions, in order to avoid (or decrease) the impacts for their manufacture and the effects on human health (e.g. shooters) and ecosystems

  10. Symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders among ammunition factory workers in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Pinar, Tevfik; Cakmak, Z Aytul; Saygun, Meral; Akdur, Recep; Ulu, Nuriye; Keles, Isik; Saylam, Hamdi Saim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and to determine the risk factors among ammunition factory workers in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was performed on 955 ammunition factory workers. Potential risk factors were investigated with a questionnaire and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. During the previous year, 39.3% of ammunition workers experienced symptoms of work-related MSDs. Logistic regression analysis showed smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 1.372), chronic diseases (OR = 1.795), body mass index (BMI; overweight) (OR = 1.631), working year (OR = 1.509), cold temperature (OR = 1.838), and work load (OR = 2.210) were significant independent risk factors for the development of symptoms of MSDs. It was found that both work-related conditions and personal and environmental factors are important for the development of occupational MSDs. PMID:23298420

  11. Thermal indicating paints for ammunition health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, James L., III; Iqbal, Zafar

    2010-04-01

    Thermochromic semiconductive polymers that change color in response to external stimuli, such as heat and radiation, can be utilized to monitor the temperature range and elapsed time profiles of stored and prepositioned munitions. These polymers are being tailored to create paints and coatings that will alert Army logistic staff of dangerous temperature exposures. Irreversible indication via color change in multiple thermal bands, 145 F - 164 F (63o-73°C), 165 F - 184 F (74° - 84° C) and over 185 F (>85°C) are possible with these thermochromic polymers. The resulting active coating can be visually inspected to determine if safe temperatures were exceeded. More detailed information, including cumulative time of exposure in certain temperature bands through changes in optical chromaticity describing the vividness or dullness of a color, can be assessed using a hand-held optical densitometer.

  12. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for...

  13. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for...

  14. [Traumatic potential of colour marking cartridges (FX ammunition)].

    PubMed

    Peschel, Oliver; Manthei, Axel; Kühl, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Colour marking cartridges as the FX ammunition (Simunition Europe, Brussels) are increasingly used by the police for realistic close range combat training. Conversion kits for service weapons of different manufacturers are available. The ballistic data of this ammunition is reported and experimentally verified. The risk of injury seems to be very low, if the recommended protective equipment is used. Small hematomas up to superficial lacerations are to be expected only in areas over a bony support. Shots to the unprotected eye will result in severe injuries. PMID:15384458

  15. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. 27 CFR 478.40a - Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transfer and possession of... AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.40a Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices. (a) Prohibition. No person shall...

  17. 27 CFR 478.40a - Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transfer and possession of... AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.40a Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices. (a) Prohibition. No person shall...

  18. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  19. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  20. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  1. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  2. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  3. 48 CFR 252.223-7007 - Safeguarding sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. 252.223-7007 Section 252.223-7007 Federal Acquisition... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. As prescribed in 223.7203, use the following clause: Safeguarding Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (SEP 1999) (a) Definition....

  4. 48 CFR 252.223-7007 - Safeguarding sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. 252.223-7007 Section 252.223-7007 Federal Acquisition... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. As prescribed in 223.7203, use the following clause: Safeguarding Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (SEP 1999) (a) Definition....

  5. 48 CFR 252.223-7007 - Safeguarding sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. 252.223-7007 Section 252.223-7007 Federal Acquisition... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. As prescribed in 223.7203, use the following clause: Safeguarding Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (SEP 1999) (a) Definition....

  6. 48 CFR 252.223-7007 - Safeguarding sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. 252.223-7007 Section 252.223-7007 Federal Acquisition... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. As prescribed in 223.7203, use the following clause: Safeguarding Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (SEP 1999) (a) Definition....

  7. 48 CFR 252.223-7007 - Safeguarding sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. 252.223-7007 Section 252.223-7007 Federal Acquisition... conventional arms, ammunition, and explosives. As prescribed in 223.7203, use the following clause: Safeguarding Sensitive Conventional Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives (SEP 1999) (a) Definition....

  8. 27 CFR 70.443 - Firearms and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Firearms and ammunition. 70.443 Section 70.443 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Procedural Rules Relating to Alcohol, Tobacco,...

  9. Associating gunpowder and residues from commercial ammunition using compositional analysis.

    PubMed

    MacCrehan, William A; Reardon, Michelle R; Duewer, David L

    2002-03-01

    Qualitatively identifying and quantitatively determining the additives in smokeless gunpowder to calculate a numerical propellant to stabilizer (P/S) ratio is a new approach to associate handgun-fired organic gunshot residues (OGSR) with unfired powder. In past work, the P/S values of handgun OGSR and cartridges loaded with known gunpowders were evaluated. In this study, gunpowder and residue samples were obtained from seven boxes of commercial 38 caliber ammunition with the goals of associating cartridges within a box and matching residues to unfired powders, based on the P/S value and the qualitative identity of the additives. Gunpowder samples from four of the seven boxes of ammunition could be easily differentiated. When visual comparisons of the cartridge powders were considered in addition to composition, powder samples from all seven boxes of ammunition could be reliably differentiated. Handgun OGSR was also collected and evaluated in bulk as well as for individual particles. In some cases, residues could be reliably differentiated based on P/S and additive identity. It was instructive to evaluate the composition of individual unfired gunpowder and OGSR particles. We determined that both the numerical centroid and dispersity of the P/S measurements provide information for associations and exclusions. Associating measurements from residue particles with those of residue samples collected from a test firing of the same weapon and ammunition appears to be a useful approach to account for any changes in composition that occur during the firing process. PMID:11908593

  10. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  11. Crusader Automated Docking System: Technology support for the Crusader Resupply Team. Interim report, Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Varma, V.K.; Jatko, W.B.

    1995-11-01

    The US Army and Team Crusader (United Defense, Lockheed Martin Armament Systems, etc.) are developing the next generation howitzer, the Crusader. The development program includes an advanced, self-propelled liquid propellant howitzer and a companion resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to rendezvous with the howitzer near the battlefront and replenish ammunition, fuel, and other material. The Army has recommended that Crusader incorporate new and innovative technologies to improve performance and safety. One conceptual design proposes a robotic resupply boom on the resupply vehicle to upload supplies to the howitzer. The resupply boom would normally be retracted inside the resupply vehicle during transit. When the two vehicles are within range of the resupply boom, the boom would be extended to a receiving port on the howitzer. In order to reduce exposure to small arms fire or nuclear, biological, and chemical hazards, the crew would remain inside the resupply vehicle during the resupply operation. The process of extending the boom and linking with the receiving port is called docking. A boom operator would be designated to maneuver the boom into contact with the receiving port using a mechanical joystick. The docking operation depends greatly upon the skill of the boom operator to manipulate the boom into docking position. Computer simulations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have shown that computer-assisted or autonomous docking can improve the ability of the operator to dock safely and quickly. This document describes the present status of the Crusader Autonomous Docking System (CADS) implemented at Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the CADS project is to determine the feasibility and performance limitations of vision systems to satisfy the autonomous docking requirements for Crusader and conduct a demonstration under controlled conditions.

  12. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  13. Recent advances in high speed detection systems for ammunition plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapmeier, K. M.

    1984-08-01

    The application of UV detection systems in radioactive environments and the application considerations of infrared, and combinations of ultraviolet and infrared are discussed. Recent developments in high speed single frequency infrared detection systems and their applications to munitions processes are also reviewed.

  14. Yield, biomass, and uptake of crop plants irrigated with TNT and RDX contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Simini, M.; Checkai, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Crops grown in site-collected soil were irrigated with water containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) to simulate field conditions at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska. Pots were watered in an environment-controlled greenhouse to field capacity throughout the life-cycle of the crop with 2, 20, and 100 ppb RDX; 2,100, and 800ppb TNT; 100ppb RDX + 800ppb TNT; or uncontaminated water. Yield and biomass of tomato fruit, bush bean fruit, corn stover, and soybean seeds were significantly (p = 0.05) less when irrigated with the RDX + TNT treatment compared to controls. Lettuce leaves and radish root yield and biomass were unaffected by treatment level. Soil loading of RDX and TNT in response to evapotranspiration was greatest for tomato, corn, soybean, bush bean, and least for radish and lettuce. Plant tissue contaminant concentrations will be presented and discussed.

  15. Application of powder metallurgy techniques for the development of non-toxic ammunition. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, R.; Kelly, R.

    1997-05-30

    The purpose of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., and Delta Frangible Ammunition (DFA), was to identify and evaluate composite materials for the development of small arms ammunition. Currently available small arms ammunition utilizes lead as the major component of the projectile. The introduction of lead into the environment by these projectiles when they are expended is a rapidly increasing environmental problem. At certain levels, lead is a toxic metal to the environment and a continual health and safety concern for firearm users as well as those who must conduct lead recovery operations from the environment. DFA is a leading supplier of high-density mixtures, which will be used to replace lead-based ammunition in specific applications. Current non-lead ammunition has several limitations that prevent it from replacing lead-based ammunition in many applications (such as applications that require ballistics, weapon recoil, and weapon function identical to that of lead-based ammunition). The purpose of the CRADA was to perform the research and development to identify cost-effective materials to be used in small arms ammunition that eventually will be used in commercially viable, environmentally conscious, non-lead, frangible and/or non-frangible, ammunition.

  16. 48 CFR 223.370 - Safety precautions for ammunition and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Hazardous Material Identification and Material Safety Data 223.370 Safety precautions for ammunition and explosives....

  17. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-23

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  18. Automated SEM-EDS GSR Analysis for Turkish Ammunitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ismail; Uner, H. Bulent

    2007-04-01

    In this work, Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (SEM-EDS) was used to characterize 7.65 and 9mm cartridges Turkish ammunition. All samples were analyzed in a SEM Jeol JSM-5600LV equipped BSE detector and a Link ISIS 300 (EDS). A working distance of 20mm, an accelerating voltage of 20 keV and gunshot residue software was used in all analysis. Automated search resulted in a high number of particles analyzed containing gunshot residues (GSR) unique elements (PbBaSb). The obtained data about the definition of characteristic GSR particles was concordant with other studies on this topic.

  19. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  20. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  1. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  2. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  3. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  4. 32 CFR 552.124 - Transportation of privately owned weapons and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation of privately owned weapons and... owned weapons and ammunition. (a) Privately owned firearms and ammunition will be transported in the following manner: (1) Weapons, other than weapons being transported into Fort Lewis for the first time,...

  5. 32 CFR 552.124 - Transportation of privately owned weapons and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation of privately owned weapons and... owned weapons and ammunition. (a) Privately owned firearms and ammunition will be transported in the following manner: (1) Weapons, other than weapons being transported into Fort Lewis for the first time,...

  6. 32 CFR 552.124 - Transportation of privately owned weapons and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Transportation of privately owned weapons and... owned weapons and ammunition. (a) Privately owned firearms and ammunition will be transported in the following manner: (1) Weapons, other than weapons being transported into Fort Lewis for the first time,...

  7. 32 CFR 552.124 - Transportation of privately owned weapons and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transportation of privately owned weapons and... owned weapons and ammunition. (a) Privately owned firearms and ammunition will be transported in the following manner: (1) Weapons, other than weapons being transported into Fort Lewis for the first time,...

  8. 32 CFR 552.124 - Transportation of privately owned weapons and ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Transportation of privately owned weapons and... owned weapons and ammunition. (a) Privately owned firearms and ammunition will be transported in the following manner: (1) Weapons, other than weapons being transported into Fort Lewis for the first time,...

  9. 22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms, ammunition, and personal protective gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the foreign person brought into the United States under the provisions of 27 CFR 478.115(d). (The... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exports of firearms, ammunition, and personal... REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.17 Exports of firearms, ammunition, and...

  10. Lead-free hunting rifle ammunition: product availability, price, effectiveness, and role in global wildlife conservation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Vernon George

    2013-10-01

    Proposals to end the use of lead hunting ammunition because of the established risks of lead exposure to wildlife and humans are impeded by concerns about the availability, price, and effectiveness of substitutes. The product availability and retail prices of different calibers of lead-free bullets and center-fire rifle ammunition were assessed for ammunition sold in the USA and Europe. Lead-free bullets are made in 35 calibers and 51 rifle cartridge designations. Thirty-seven companies distribute internationally ammunition made with lead-free bullets. There is no major difference in the retail price of equivalent lead-free and lead-core ammunition for most popular calibers. Lead-free ammunition has set bench-mark standards for accuracy, lethality, and safety. Given the demonstrated wide product availability, comparable prices, and the effectiveness of high-quality lead-free ammunition, it is possible to phase out the use of lead hunting ammunition world-wide, based on progressive policy and enforceable legislation. PMID:23288616

  11. The enhancement of friction ridge detail on brass ammunition casings using cold patination fluid.

    PubMed

    James, Richard Michael; Altamimi, Mohamad Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Brass ammunition is commonly found at firearms related crime scenes. For this reason, many studies have focused on evidence that can be obtained from brass ammunition such as DNA, gunshot residue and fingerprints. Latent fingerprints on ammunition can provide good forensic evidence, however; fingerprint development on ammunition casings has proven to be difficult. A method using cold patination fluid is described as a potential tool to enhance friction ridge detail on brass ammunition casings. Current latent fingerprint development methods for brass ammunition have either failed to provide the necessary quality of friction ridge detail or can be very time consuming and require expensive equipment. In this study, the enhancement of fingerprints on live ammunition has been achieved with a good level of detail whilst the development on spent casings has to an extent also been possible. Development with cold patination fluid has proven to be a quick, simple and cost-effective method for fingerprint development on brass ammunition that can be easily implemented for routine police work. PMID:26544632

  12. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no...

  13. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no...

  14. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no...

  15. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no...

  16. 27 CFR 478.37 - Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manufacture, importation... COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.37 Manufacture, importation and sale of armor piercing ammunition. No person shall manufacture or import, and no...

  17. 27 CFR 478.40a - Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices. 478.40a Section 478.40a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  18. 27 CFR 478.40a - Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfer and possession of large capacity ammunition feeding devices. 478.40a Section 478.40a Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION COMMERCE IN FIREARMS AND...

  19. Chimpanzees prey on army ants at Seringbara, Nimba Mountains, Guinea: predation patterns and tool use characteristics.

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Schöning, Caspar; McGrew, William C; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-03-01

    Chimpanzees are renowned for their use of foraging tools in harvesting social insects and some populations use tools to prey on aggressive army ants (Dorylus spp.). Tool use in army ant predation varies across chimpanzee study sites with differences in tool length, harvesting technique, and army ant species targeted. However, surprisingly little is known about the detailed ecology of army ant predation. We studied army ant predation by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at the Seringbara study site in the Nimba Mountains, Guinea (West Africa), over 10 years (2003-2013). We investigated chimpanzee selectivity with regards to army ant prey species. We assessed the temporal variation in army ant-feeding and examined whether army ant predation was related to rainfall or ripe fruit availability. Moreover, we examined whether chimpanzees showed selectivity regarding plant species used for tool manufacture, as well as the relationship between tool species preference and tool collection distance. Lastly, we measured tool properties and investigated the use of tool sets and composite tools in army ant predation. Seringbara chimpanzees preyed on one army ant species (D. nigricans) more often than expected based on encounter rates, which may be explained by the overlap in altitudinal distribution between chimpanzees and D. nigricans. Army ant predation was not related to rainfall or fruit availability. Chimpanzees were selective in their choice of tool materials and collected their preferred tool species (Alchornea hirtella) from greater distances than they did other species. Lastly, Seringbara chimpanzees used both tool sets and composite tools (tree perch) in army ant predation. Tool types (dig vs. dip) differed in width and strength, but not length. Tool composites were found at 40% of ant-feeding sites. Our study sheds new light on the ecology of army ant predation and provides novel insights into chimpanzee selection of army ant prey and tool species. PMID:25315798

  20. Short-range ammunition--a possible anti-hijacking device.

    PubMed

    Smialek, J E; Spitz, W U

    1976-10-01

    Short-range ammunition was developed for use by law enforcement personnel in congested, enclosed areas and primarily as a hijacking deterrent in commercial airliners. This ammunition was expected to reduce the risk of injury to innocent bystanders and prevent damage to the aircraft walls. Experimentally, short-range ammunition is effective in its wounding capacity at close ranges, and it does not exit from the body. Due to the particular structure of the projectile, injuries due to ricochet are averted. At ranges of 6 ft (1.8 m), the risk of damage to the full thickness of an aircraft wall does exist. Short-range ammunition deserves serious consideration as an alternative to regular ammunition for use in specialized, close-quartered situations, such as hijacking. PMID:972314

  1. IR-Detector-Types For Short Distance Seeker Ammunition Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleikies, Reinharol; Wittmer, D.; Lindner, Friedrick W.

    1990-01-01

    A significant improvement in performance of classical ammunition has become possible by using intelligent fuzes. For short target distance applications the use of Single or Dual Mode IR-Sensors has become state of the art. Excessive requirements to both axial and radial g-load arise from the fact that the sensor, normally positioned excentrically relative to shells rotating axis, has to withstand the cannon launch. High requirements on temperature stability, microphonic noise insensitivity and cross talk are essential for high sensor performance. The response has to be stable over an extended temperature range from -46 degrees C to +63 degrees C. Insensitivity against microphony prevents mechanical vibration induced reduction of sensor signal noise ratio, and low detector element cross talk guarantees high spatial resolution and therefore target classification. In addition, by means of a 20-year wooden round concept, there is a strong requirement for long-term stability. The choice of detector material and operation temperature is essentially determined by cost effectivness. All the requirements mentioned above can be met with different results depending on different detector materials. The usability of some detector materials for intelligent ammunition application has been investigated comparatively by theory and experiments. In a feasibility study different pyroelectrics, thermic detectors, as well as the photonic detectors (thermoelectrically cooled photo conductors), lead sulfide (PbSe) and mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), have been compared.

  2. Handguns and ammunitions indicators extracted from the GSR analysis.

    PubMed

    Jozef, Lebiedzik; Johnson, David L

    2002-05-01

    The computer automated scanning electron microscope. X-ray microanalysis of Firearms Discharge Residue (FDR) can reveal substantial information about the circumstances of their generation beyond the presence of characteristic gunshot residue (GSR). Indicators of the type of weapon and ammunition used can he obtained from the distribution of GSR particle shapes and from the multi-element analysis of the FDR sample. This is demonstrated for a large database of GSR samples from nine different handguns and over 60 different ammunitions. An example classification scheme is presented for the supporting particles generally found present in FDR. When particle type area concentration ratios are normalized to the iron (Fe) particle type, results show it is possible to distinguish much about the metal used in the weapon manufacture, whether it was of large or small caliber, whether the bullets were jacketed or plated, and whether the cartridge cases were of aluminum, brass, or nickel-plated brass. Standardization of such analytical schemes would be advantageous. PMID:12051326

  3. Suicide in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Timothy W; O'Connor, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  4. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  5. Reducing Lead on the Landscape: Anticipating Hunter Behavior in Absence of a Free Nonlead Ammunition Program

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Loren; Rabe, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Lead is a neurotoxin that has been documented to affect many forms of wildlife, and has been identified as a limiting factor in a population of California Condors in Northern Arizona. The Arizona Game and Fish Department provides vouchers for free nonlead ammunition to hunters selected to hunt within the distribution of California Condors, with the intention of having fewer lead-laden offal piles available to California Condors. Although wildlife agencies may reasonably assume voucher programs motivate hunters into choosing nonlead ammunition, the lead reduction efforts attributable to the voucher program has not been empirically quantified. Our intention was to compare a control group of hunters to a treatment group of hunters within California Condor occupied areas. Both groups received educational materials regarding the deleterious effects of lead, but the treatment group also received a voucher for a free initial box of ammunition. About half of the control group used nonlead ammunition, compared to about three-fourths of the treatment group. Prominent barriers to adoption of nonlead ammunition included a general difficulty of obtaining it, obtaining it in the desired caliber, and its costliness. Frequently mentioned motivations for using nonlead was the exhortation to use it by the Department, and the desire to aid California Condor recovery by hunters. The disparate compliance rates found herein confirm and quantify the success of nonlead ammunition voucher programs, but underscore the importance of working to increase the supply of nonlead ammunition with the end of facilitating its procurement and reducing its cost. PMID:26114878

  6. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  7. Health effects after firing small arms comparing leaded and unleaded ammunition.

    PubMed

    Voie, Øyvind; Borander, Anne-Katrine; Sikkeland, Liv Ingunn Bjoner; Grahnstedt, Svein; Johnsen, Arnt; Danielsen, Tor Erik; Longva, Kjetil; Kongerud, Johny

    2014-12-01

    A number of Norwegian soldiers have reported health problems after live-fire training using the HK416 rifle. The objective of this study was to characterize gaseous and particulate emissions from three different types of ammunition, and record the health effects after exposure to emissions from live-firing. Fifty-five healthy, non-smoking men (mean age 40 years) were recruited and divided randomly into three groups, one for each type of ammunition. All subjects fired the HK416 rifle in a semi-airtight tent for 60 min using leaded ammunition, unleaded ammunition and modified unleaded ammunition. Gaseous and particulate emissions were monitored within the tent. The symptoms experienced by the subjects were recorded immediately after and the day after firing using a standardized questionnaire. The concentrations of particulate matter and copper exceeded their respective occupational exposure limits (eight hours per day, five days a week) by a factor of 3 and 27, respectively. Of the 55 subjects, 54 reported general and respiratory symptoms. The total number of symptoms reported was significantly higher among shooters using unleaded ammunition as compared with the use of leaded and modified unleaded ammunition. Copper was the substance that had the highest concentration relative to its toxicity. Although the general symptoms were found to be consistent with the development of metal fume fever, the respiratory symptoms indicated an irritant effect of the airways different from that seen in metal fume fever. More symptoms were reported when unleaded ammunition was used compared with leaded and modified unleaded ammunition. PMID:25373830

  8. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  9. Battles: Intelligent Army versus Insurgency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2009-03-01

    A ``simple'' battle can be thought of as a conflict between two parties, each with finite reserves, and typically fought on one side’s territory. Modern battles are often strategic, based largely on the speed of information processing and decision making and are mission oriented rather than to annex new territory. Here, we analyze such battles using a simple model in which the ``blue'' army fights a strategic battle against a ``red'' army that is well matched in combat power and in red’s territory. We assume that the blue army attacks strategically while the red army attempts to neutralize the enemy when in close enough proximity, implemented here as ``on- site,'' with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. We show that minimizing risk exposure and making strategic moves based on local intelligence are often the deciding factors that determine the outcome of battles among well matched adversaries.

  10. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  11. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  12. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  13. U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Ammunition Depot West Loch, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Ammunition Depot West Loch, Oahu, Dispensary, Near Avenue A between First & Second Streets, Lualualei, West Loch Branch Naval Magazine, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. 44. Storehouse of Philadelphia Signal Depot, U.S. Army Corps of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Storehouse of Philadelphia Signal Depot, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, War Department (1942) - Atwater Kent Manufacturing Company, North Plant, 5000 Wissahickon Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes...

  16. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle... continued growth and development of the United States Army War College. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  17. Hydroacoustic detection of dumped ammunition in the Ocean with multibeam snippet backscatter analyses. A case study from the 'Kolberger Heide' ammunition dump site (Baltic Sea, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunde, Tina; Schneider von Deimling, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Dumped ammunition in the sea is a matter of great concern in terms of safe navigation and environmental threads. Because corrosion of the dumped ammunition's hull is ongoing, future contamination of the ambient water by their toxic interior is likely to occur. The location of such dump sites is approximately known from historical research and ship log book analyses. Subsequent remote sensing of ammunition dumping sites (e.g. mines) on the seafloor is preferentially performed with hydro-acoustic methods such as high resolution towed side scan or by the sophisticated synthetic aperture sonar approach with autonomous underwater vehicles. However, these are time consuming and expensive procedures, while determining the precise position of individual mines remains a challenging task. To mitigate these shortcomings we suggest using ship-born high-frequency multibeam sonar in shallow water to address the task of mine detection and precise localization on the seabed. Multibeam sonar systems have improved their potential in regard to backscatter analyses significantly over the past years and nowadays present fast and accurate tools for shallow water surveying to (1) detect mines in multibeam snippet backscatter data (2) determine their precise location with high accuracy intertial navigation systems. A case study was performed at the prominent ammunition dumping site 'Kolberger Heide' (Baltic Sea, Germany) in the year 2014 using a modern hydro-acoustic multibeam echosounder system with 200-400 kHz (KONGSBERG EM2040c). With an average water depth of not even 20 m and the proximity to the shore line and dense waterways, this investigated area requires permanent navigational care. Previously, the study area was surveyed by the Navy with the very sophisticated HUGIN AUV equipped with a synthetic aperture sonar with best resolution by current technology. Following an evaluation of the collected data, various ammunition bodies on the sea floor could be clearly detected. Analyses

  18. 10. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PROCESS FLOW SCHEMATIC, GAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PROCESS FLOW SCHEMATIC, GAS PRODUCER PROCESS, BUILDING 10A.' Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Holston Defense Corporation. August 29, 1974. Delineator: G. A. Horne. Drawing # SK-1942. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  19. 13. Photograph of a line drawing. 'BUILDING LOCATION PLAN, AREAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photograph of a line drawing. 'BUILDING LOCATION PLAN, AREAS A & B.' Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Holston Defense Corporation. September 8, 1970. Delineator: R. C. G. Drawing # 7651-212/1226.03. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  20. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Shoemaker, Chuck M.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army is undergoing a transformation from Cold War era "heavy" forward-deployed forces arrayed against a monolithic known enemy to lighter, more flexible, U.S.-based forces able to rapidly engage in a full spectrum of military operations. Unmanned systems can potentially contribute towards achieving this goal of a highly capable and flexible ground force. To support this effort, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has undertaken a long-term research program to support technology development for unmanned ground vehicle systems. Over the course of the past year, this multifaceted effort has made significant technical strides, demonstrating sufficient technological maturity to potentially enable incorporation of semi-autonomous unmanned vehicles into the initial fielding of Future Combat Systems (FCS), while successfully conducting additional research directed toward improved capabilities for later increments of FCS and Land Warrior systems.

  1. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  2. Measurement of exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklifts during operations in ammunition-storage magazines. Final report, 23 July 1984-15 March 1985 on Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ungers, L.J.

    1985-02-01

    Indoor air quality and worker exposures were monitored in Stradley and Igloo-type ammunition magazines during the use of diesel-powered forklifts. Test results indicate that the impact of diesel exhaust on breathing zone exposures and magazine air quality depends largely on the type of operation being performed and the type of magazine being used. Of the two operating scenarios investigated (i.e., loading/unloading and warehousing), warehousing presents the greater potential risk to the health and safety of Army personnel. Of the two magazines investigated, Igloo-type structures of the size encountered in this study are likely to contribute to a hazardous situation. Breathing zone exposures and magazine air quality data were compared with the OSHA permissible exposure levels and ACGIH (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) threshold limit values. Under the operating conditions, ventilation, and temperatures experienced during the test, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide may pose a health risk to Army personnel in small structures similar in size and design to the Igloo-type magazines. A performance hierarchy can be suggested from the results of the air monitoring data. The Still-Deutz and Hyster-Isuzu vehicles appear to have out performed the Hyster-Perkins and Baker-Deutz forklifts. Under the conditions tested the Still-Deutz and Hyster-Isuzu did not exceed any of the OSHA permissible exposure limits for the exhaust components measured.

  3. Modeling, simulation, and evaluation of HE ammunition for counter-RAM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graswald, Markus; Rothe, Hendrik

    2008-04-01

    Military camps in out-of-area missions are permanently threatened by rockets, artillery projectiles, and mortar grenades (RAM) launched by terrorists. A good portion of these attacks are undertaken by mortars due to their specific advantages for the warfare of irregular forces and their worldwide distribution. The military installations can be protected by counter-RAM systems consisting of several artillery weapons, radar and electro-optical sensors, C2 and fire control computers. A system analysis has shown that the precision of the sensors is vital for defending the camp with low ammunition consumptions. Furthermore, the type of ammunition is also of great impact: 35 mm Ahead ammunition is hardly suited for this application due to its small hit density and low kinetic energy of the sub-projectiles, especially in the case of mortar grenades. Therefore, 155 mm high-explosive (HE) ammunition is investigated using experimentally determined fragment data. Russian mortar projectiles are considered as worst-case RAM targets and their ballistics are mathematically modeled by an air drag function that is also used for computing firing tables. Due to uncertainties of the target positions that are given by an elliptic cylinder for specific sensor parameters, simulations are conducted in order to determine the ammunition consumption. Penetration and detonation criteria for the terminal impact are also considered and the resulting thresholds are displayed in a 3D fragment map. The results show that HE ammunition is superior to low-caliber ammunition because of their high numbers of effective fragments reducing the number of rounds significantly from hundreds to less than ten.

  4. Hydraulic systems performance of Army engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, H.W.; Lestz, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A technical evaluation of qualified military specification lubricants was started by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research and Development Center and was performed at the U.S. Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory (AFLRL) located at Southwest Research Institute. This work was conducted to determine if such lubricants can be used as hydraulic fluids in Army Commercial Construction Equipment (CCE) and Selected Material Handling Equipment (SMHE). Sixteen military specification lubricants were extensively evaluated using twelve selected tests required by equipment manufacturers and one test developed by AFLRL in conjunction with John Deere. From the data developed, lubricants meeting Army specifications passed 88 percent of all the tests. It appears that the Army engine oils are good potential candidates for use as hydraulic and power transmission lubricants within the Army CCE/SMHE systems. Areas of concern include copper corrosion, wet brake/clutch frictional performance, and final drive gear wear.

  5. Ammunition identification by means of the organic analysis of gunshot residues using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    López-López, María; Delgado, Juan José; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2012-04-17

    The ability to unequivocally identify a gunshot residue (GSR) when a firearm is discharged is a very important and crucial part of crime scene investigation. To date, the great majority of the analyses have focused on the inorganic components of GSR, but the introduction of "lead-free" or "nontoxic" ammunitions makes it difficult to prevent false negatives. This study introduces a fast methodology for the organic analysis of GSR using Raman spectroscopy. Six different types of ammunition were fired at short distances into cloth targets, and the Raman spectra produced by the GSR were measured and compared with the spectra from the unfired gunpowder ammunition. The GSR spectrum shows high similarity to the spectrum of the unfired ammunition, allowing the GSR to be traced to the ammunition used. Additionally, other substances that might be found on the victim's, shooter's, or suspect's clothes and might be confused with GSR, such as sand, dried blood, or black ink from a common ballpoint pen, were analyzed to test the screening capability of the Raman technique. The results obtained evidenced that Raman spectroscopy is a useful screening tool when fast analysis is desired and that little sample preparation is required for the analysis of GSR evidence. PMID:22424274

  6. 50. Photograph of a line drawing. 'AREA B, GENERAL ASSEMBLY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photograph of a line drawing. 'AREA B, GENERAL ASSEMBLY, BUILDINGS I, J, L, & M - LINES 9 & 10.' Holston Army Ammunition Plant. March 13, 1967; revised November 15, 1967, January 3, 1968. Delineator: Unknown. Drawing # 7651-1009.454. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  7. 51. Photograph of a line drawing. 'AREA B, ARRANGEMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photograph of a line drawing. 'AREA B, ARRANGEMENT OF KETTLES AND DRIVE PLAN, BUILDINGS I, J, L, & M - LINES 9 & 10.' Holston Army Ammunition Plant. March 14, 1967; revised November 14, 1967, January 3, 1968. Delineator: Unknown. Drawing # 7651-1009.456. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  8. 40. Photograph of a line drawing. 'FLOW DIAGRAM FOR BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Photograph of a line drawing. 'FLOW DIAGRAM FOR BUILDING G-1.' Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Holston Defense Corporation. December 1, 1965. Delineator: V. N.J. Drawing # 7651-1007-528. - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  9. Analysis of primer residue from lead free ammunition by X-ray microfluorescence.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, B; Desrochers, C

    2000-03-01

    In forensic science, the analysis of gunshot residues was traditionally done by the detection of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba) usually found in a primer. However, the recent development of lead-free ammunition represents a new challenge for ballistic specialists. This analysis study gunshot residues from primers and ammunitions in the area surrounding bullet holes, a very important tool to determine the shooting distance. The ammunitions used were 9 mm Luger and .38 spl + p calibers, where lead in the primer was replaced with strontium (Sr) and where the lead bullet was plated with copper (Total Metal Jacket). Gunshot analysis results were obtained using an energy dispersive X-ray microfluorescence spectrometer. The method allows the detection and quantification of strontium residues on the target up to a distance of 45 cm. PMID:10782972

  10. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January 15.... Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for the Army Science Board to review the results of...

  11. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, Attn: ATTG-OPS-EI...

  12. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, ATTN: ATTG-OPS-EO...

  13. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting: Thursday... standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant training and education for its force...

  14. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date: Wednesday, July 17..., Colorado 80903-1685. 5. Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for Army Science Board members...

  15. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26, 2012...: Adopt the findings and recommendations for the following studies: Strategic Direction for Army...

  16. Numerical prediction of rock mass damage due to accidental explosions in an underground ammunition storage chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengqing; Hao, Hong

    2006-03-01

    Accidental detonations in an underground ammunition storage chamber inside a rock mass may cause severe damage to the rock mass around the chamber, adjacent tunnels and chambers, ground surface, and in the worst case cause sympathetic detonation of explosives in adjacent storage chambers. To prevent such damage, underground ammunition storage chambers are often situated at minimum depth below the ground surface, and spaced at minimum distance from each other, so that damage, should it occur, is limited to the accidental chamber. Different codes and regulations for ammunition storage chambers specify minimum embedment depth and separation distance for underground ammunition storage chambers. They are usually given in terms of the rock mass properties and the weight of explosive stored in chambers. Some empirical formulae, usually based on the peak particle velocity of the stress wave or the maximum strain of the rock mass, are also available to estimate the damage zones in the rock mass from an explosion. All these empirical methods do not include the effects of explosion details, such as the loading density, chamber geometry and explosive distribution. In this paper, a previously calibrated numerical model is used to estimate the damage zones in a granite mass resulting from an accidental explosion in an underground ammunition storage chamber. Effects of various explosion conditions on rock mass damage are investigated. On the basis of the numerical results, some empirical formulae are derived to predict damage zones around the explosion chamber, as well as safe embedment depth of the storage chamber and safe separation distance between adjacent chambers. The numerical results are also compared with available empirical formulae and code specifications. It should be noted that the characteristics of stress wave propagation around an ammunition storage chamber has been published in a preceding paper (Int. J. Blast. Fragm. 5:57 90, 2001.

  17. 27 CFR 478.132 - Dispositions of semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for... assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for official use... licensed dealers in semiautomatic assault weapons, as well as persons who manufacture, import, or deal...

  18. 27 CFR 478.132 - Dispositions of semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for... assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for official use... licensed dealers in semiautomatic assault weapons, as well as persons who manufacture, import, or deal...

  19. 27 CFR 478.132 - Dispositions of semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for... assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for official use... licensed dealers in semiautomatic assault weapons, as well as persons who manufacture, import, or deal...

  20. 27 CFR 478.132 - Dispositions of semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for... assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for official use... licensed dealers in semiautomatic assault weapons, as well as persons who manufacture, import, or deal...

  1. 27 CFR 478.132 - Dispositions of semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for... assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices to law enforcement officers for official use... licensed dealers in semiautomatic assault weapons, as well as persons who manufacture, import, or deal...

  2. Comparison of particulate lead levels for different ammunition types used with the M16 rifle. Final report, July 1987-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, S.H.; Beard, A.S.; Brueggemann, E.E.; Rosencrance, A.B.

    1988-07-01

    Airborne lead generated during firing of conventional ammunition has lead to health concerns at indoor firing ranges. This study compares the relative amounts of airborne lead produced by the M16 rifle firing the M193 standard M16 5.56-mm conventional ammunition, the M862 5.56-mm plastic training ammunition, and the conventional caliber .22 rifle cartridge. Both breech and breech-plus-muzzle lead emissions were determined for each type of ammunition.

  3. Gunshot residue particles formed by using ammunitions that have mercury fulminate based primers.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, A; Levin, N; Dvorachek, M

    1992-11-01

    Ammunition having mercury fulminate-based primers are commonly manufactured by Eastern Bloc countries and used extensively in the Middle East. Gunshot residue (GSR) particles formed by firing these types of ammunition were examined. It was observed that much lower percentage of mercury-containing GSR particles were found in samples taken from a shooter as compared to the percentage of such particles in samples from cartridge cases. This fact must therefore be taken into account when interpreting case results. A plausible explanation for the results described is proposed. PMID:1453170

  4. The Baltimore Youth Ammunition Initiative: A Model Application of Local Public Health Authority in Preventing Gun Violence

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Nancy L.; Vernick, Jon S.; Beilenson, Peter L.; Mair, Julie S.; Lindamood, Melisa M.; Teret, Stephen P.; Webster, Daniel W.

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, the Baltimore City Health Department, in collaboration with the Baltimore Police Department and the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, launched the Youth Ammunition Initiative. The initiative addressed Baltimore’s problem of youth gun violence by targeting illegal firearm ammunition sales to the city’s young people. The initiative included undercover “sting” investigations of local businesses and issuance of health department violation and abatement notices. Intermediate results included the passage of 2 Baltimore city council ordinances regulating ammunition sales and reducing the number of outlets eligible to sell ammunition. Although it is too early to assess effects on violent crime, the intervention could theoretically reduce youth violence by interrupting one source of ammunition to youths. More important, the initiative can serve as a policy model for health commissioners seeking to become more active in gun violence prevention efforts. PMID:15855448

  5. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... policies are violated should be identified to ASA (I&E) for resolution. (e) Army leadership and...

  6. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Register (71 FR 46052), the Department of the Army issued a final rule. This final rule corrects the... Litigation Division when complaints citing the Privacy Act are filed in order to correct the mailing address in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  7. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  8. Army Space Systems For Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerman, Ronald L.; Gomez, Richard B.

    1988-04-01

    Army combat forces involved in global military operations require knowledge of the terrain and accurate positioning and navigation capability to effectively perform their missions. Combat critical data from satellite-based systems to augment ground and airborne data collection, processing, and dissemination systems are crucial for the delivery and use of the needed information and intelligence in near-real time. The Army is developing ground-based testbed systems to utilize terrain and weather data collected from space-based platforms to enhance Army commanders' battlefield capabilities, and is researching new applications for the NAVSAT Global Positioning System and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-sponsored (DARPA) LIGHTSAT program that are unique to the Army. In addition, the Army is designing experiments to be conducted on the Space Shuttle.

  9. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. PMID:27001366

  10. 7. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 325 - POWER PLANT 1st FL. LOOKING EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Electric Power Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 280 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  11. 6. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 325 - POWER PLANT LOOKING N.W. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Electric Power Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 280 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  12. 8. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 325 - POWER PLANT 2nd FL. LOOKING N.E. GENERATING RM. 2nd FL. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Electric Power Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 280 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  13. 10. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 - BOILER HOUSE 1st FL. - LOOKING EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. 9. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 - BOILER HOUSE LOOKING N.WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. 13. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 - BOILER HOUSE 3rd FL. LOOKING WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  16. 8. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 & 325 - BOILER & POWER HOUSE LOOKING SO. WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  17. 11. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 - BOILER HOUSE 2nd FL. LOOKING WEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  18. 12. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph, U.S. Army, ca. 1943 (original print located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, Colorado). R.M.A. - 321 - BOILER HOUSE 2nd FL. LOOKING EAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Boiler Plant-Central Gas Heat Plant, 1022 feet South of December Seventh Avenue; 525 feet West of D Street, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  19. 75 FR 58377 - Lead in Ammunition and Fishing Sinkers; Disposition of TSCA Section 21 Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... AGENCY Lead in Ammunition and Fishing Sinkers; Disposition of TSCA Section 21 Petition AGENCY... section 6(a) the manufacture, processing, and distribution in commerce of (1) lead bullets and shot; and (2) lead fishing sinkers. On August 27, 2010, EPA denied the first request due to a lack of...

  20. 27 CFR 70.444 - Importation of arms, ammunition, and implements of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... implements of war. Part 47 of title 27 CFR implements Executive Order 11958 and supplements the import provisions contained in parts 178 and 179 of title 27 CFR. Part 47 establishes the U.S. Munitions Import List..., ammunition, and implements of war. 70.444 Section 70.444 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL...

  1. 22 CFR 123.17 - Exports of firearms, ammunition, and personal protective gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... person brought into the United States under the provisions of 27 CFR 478.115(d). (The latter provision... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exports of firearms, ammunition, and personal... REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT AND TEMPORARY IMPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123.17 Exports of...

  2. 27 CFR 478.120 - Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien. 478.120 Section 478.120 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  3. 27 CFR 478.120 - Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien. 478.120 Section 478.120 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  4. 27 CFR 478.120 - Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien. 478.120 Section 478.120 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  5. 27 CFR 478.120 - Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien. 478.120 Section 478.120 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  6. 48 CFR 223.370 - Safety precautions for ammunition and explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety precautions for ammunition and explosives. 223.370 Section 223.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY...

  7. 27 CFR 478.120 - Firearms or ammunition imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... imported by or for a nonimmigrant alien. 478.120 Section 478.120 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms... nonimmigrant alien. (a) Any nonimmigrant alien who completes an ATF Form 6 to import firearms or ammunition... for a nonimmigrant alien, must attach applicable documentation to the Form 6 (e.g., a hunting...

  8. 9 mm ammunition used in a 40 caliber glock pistol: an atypical gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Thogmartin, J R; Start, D A

    1998-05-01

    Atypical gunshot wounds due to ricochet and intermediate targets have been well described in the literature. We represent a case of suicide with an atypical entrance wound and bullet without rifling marks due to 9 mm ammunition being loaded and fired from a 40 caliber semiautomatic pistol. PMID:9608712

  9. Stabilization of soils contaminated with explosives and metals from the ammunition demolition activity area and miscellaneous sites at the Umatilla Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, P.R.; Gemarr, D.

    1997-12-31

    The US Army Umatilla Depot (UMD) was established as an ordnance depot in 1941 to store, preserve, and perform minor maintenance on conventional and chemical munitions. From the 1940`s until the present, UMD operated periodically at the 32 miscellaneous sites identified as OU-5. OU-4 consists of twenty sites within the Ammunition Demolition Activity Area. Typical activities conducted at these sites consisted of operations to burn, detonate, and otherwise dispose of ordnance, munitions casings, and other solids wastes. Five sites were selected for remedial action. The remediation contaminants of concern for the sites encompassed both metallic and non-metallic elements and both inorganic and organic compounds. The remedial action selected for the contaminated soil at these sites was stabilization/solidification (S/S). The site remediation activities for the five sites were performed by OHM Remediation Services Corp. (OHM) under the supervision of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Seattle District. The remedial action included treatability mix design testing, mobilization and field setup, soil excavation and processing, and S/S treatment. Stabilized soil samples were collected as grab samples from the pugmill discharge conveyor at a rate of every 75 tons of soil feed, corresponding to an individual production lot. None of the 437 production lots failed to meet the UCS requirement of 50 psi, however, 31 (7%) of the 437 lots failed for either TCLP-leachable metals or explosives. With one exception, all production lots which failed were due to exceedances of the TCLP-leachable explosives requirements. Of these 30 lots, 22 lots were from the OU-5 metals sites and were not expected to contain significant amounts of explosives. The areas in the landfill corresponding to these lots were excavated and the material reprocessed.

  10. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.