Science.gov

Sample records for army cold regions

  1. Cold Dust in Hot Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Dunlop, James S.; Gibb, Andy; Greaves, Jane S.; Halpern, Mark; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Jenness, Tim; Robson, Ian; Scott, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 1023 cm-2, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ~10 to 103 M ⊙. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r -2.36 ± 0.35 density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 104 AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  2. Cold dust in hot regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel; Ade, Peter; Bintley, Dan; Chapin, Ed; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jenness, Tim; Dunlop, James S.; Holland, Wayne S.; Ivison, Rob; Gibb, Andy; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Greaves, Jane S.; Robson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    We mapped five massive star-forming regions with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Temperature and column density maps are obtained from the SCUBA-2 450 and 850 μm images. Most of the dense clumps we find have central temperatures below 20 K, with some as cold as 8 K, suggesting that they have no internal heating due to the presence of embedded protostars. This is surprising, because at the high densities inferred from these images and at these low temperatures such clumps should be unstable, collapsing to form stars and generating internal heating. The column densities at the clump centers exceed 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}, and the derived peak visual extinction values are from 25 to 500 mag for β = 1.5-2.5, indicating highly opaque centers. The observed cloud gas masses range from ∼10 to 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The outer regions of the clumps follow an r {sup –2.36±0.35} density distribution, and this power-law structure is observed outside of typically 10{sup 4} AU. All these findings suggest that these clumps are high-mass starless clumps and most likely contain high-mass starless cores.

  3. Acoustic-to-seismic coupling variations in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.

    2002-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the variations that may occur in acoustic-to-seismic coupling arising from changes in local near-surface conditions. The emphasis of the investigations was on cold regions, where many different surface conditions exist and where conditions may change over a short time period from wind, precipitation, freezing, or thawing. The measurements were conducted by recording blank pistol shots with surface geophones and microphones. Results are presented for grassland, thin and thick seasonal snow covers, polar firn, thin grounded ice, thick glacier ice, and floating river ice. The ratio of induced ground motion to acoustic pressure ranged from 0.5 to 20 micro-meters per second per Pascal. Often two arrivals were detected on the geophones, a high-speed seismic compressional wave followed by the air wave. [Work funded by the U.S. Army.

  4. Application of Heat Pipes in Cold Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Masataka

    Recently, there has been put into practical use of heat pipes as space application, electronics cooling, and waste heat recovery. Especially, the low temperature heat pipe which can be used in below atmospheric temperature are also actively developed and applied in terrestrial field. These are based on utilization of natural energy in cold region. This paper is described about application of snow melting and deicing system on a road and roof, snow damage prevention system for electric pole branch wire, artificial permafrost storage system as a reverse utilization of cold atmosphere, and cryo-anchor applied in Alaska and northern Canada.

  5. On the variability of cold region flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matti, Bettina; Dahlke, Helen E.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-03-01

    Cold region hydrological systems exhibit complex interactions with both climate and the cryosphere. Improving knowledge on that complexity is essential to determine drivers of extreme events and to predict changes under altered climate conditions. This is particularly true for cold region flooding where independent shifts in both precipitation and temperature can have significant influence on high flows. This study explores changes in the magnitude and the timing of streamflow in 18 Swedish Sub-Arctic catchments over their full record periods available and a common period (1990-2013). The Mann-Kendall trend test was used to estimate changes in several hydrological signatures (e.g. annual maximum daily flow, mean summer flow, snowmelt onset). Further, trends in the flood frequency were determined by fitting an extreme value type I (Gumbel) distribution to test selected flood percentiles for stationarity using a generalized least squares regression approach. Results highlight shifts from snowmelt-dominated to rainfall-dominated flow regimes with all significant trends (at the 5% significance level) pointing toward (1) lower magnitudes in the spring flood; (2) earlier flood occurrence; (3) earlier snowmelt onset; and (4) decreasing mean summer flows. Decreasing trends in flood magnitude and mean summer flows suggest widespread permafrost thawing and are supported by increasing trends in annual minimum daily flows. Trends in selected flood percentiles showed an increase in extreme events over the full periods of record (significant for only four catchments), while trends were variable over the common period of data among the catchments. An uncertainty analysis emphasizes that the observed trends are highly sensitive to the period of record considered. As such, no clear overall regional hydrological response pattern could be determined suggesting that catchment response to regionally consistent changes in climatic drivers is strongly influenced by their physical

  6. COLD REGIONS AIR POLLUTION: BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Through a series of workshops on cold climate environmental research priorities, conducted in 1982 by Battelle for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy, air pollution was identified as the topic of highest priority. The current state of knowledge on ai...

  7. Early winter cold spells over the Euro-Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreti, Andrea; Xoplaki, Elena; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2016-04-01

    In a changing climate context, temperature extremes are expected to heavily impact societies and economies. Projected changes in warm extremes have been extensively investigated, while less efforts are devoted to cold extremes. Despite the projected warming of the climate system, cold extremes could still occur and have an impact on several sectors, such as human health and agriculture. Here, we focus on cold spells that have a potential high impact, i.e. early winter cold spells occurring after a mild-to-warm autumn. Projected changes of these events over the Euro-Mediterranean region are analysed by using the latest Euro-Cordex simulations under the scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. In terms of spatial extension of cold spells, a significant reduction can be seen only at the end of the 21st century and under the RCP8.5 scenario. As for the changes in intensity in the mid-century, no consistency is found among models over large areas. At the end of the century, the north-eastern part of the domain and northern Africa are projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP4.5 scenario, while, almost the entire domain is projected to be early-cold-spell free under the RCP8.5 scenario.

  8. What caused the 2009 cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Kristin; Brandt, Peter; Lübbecke, Joke F.

    2016-04-01

    The tropical Atlantic (TA) exhibits sea surface temperature (SST) variability on seasonal to inter-annual time scales. This variability is associated with changes of atmospheric dynamics, linking it to severe flooding or droughts in South America and West Africa. This study investigates processes in the TA that might have caused the extreme cold event in the Atlantic cold tongue (ACT) region in 2009. During boreal spring, a strong negative Atlantic meridional mode event developed in the TA associated with northwesterly wind anomalies along the equator. Contrary to what would be expected from ENSO-like dynamics, these wind anomalies did not lead to a warming in the eastern equatorial Atlantic in boreal summer. Instead, from May to August 2009, an abrupt cooling took place in the ACT region resulting in the coldest August ACT SST on record. In the literature, two processes - equatorial wave reflection and meridional advection of subsurface temperatures - are discussed as potential causes of such an event. Whereas previous studies are mainly based on satellite data, reanalysis products and model output, we here use in situ measurements (data from Argo floats, PIRATA buoys, and TACE moorings, as well as CTD data of various ship cruises) in addition to satellite and reanalysis products to investigate the contribution of both processes to the strong surface cooling in the ACT region in 2009. Results based on the Argo float data confirm previous findings that equatorial wave reflection contributed to the cold event in the ACT region in 2009. They further indicate that higher baroclinic mode waves played an important role. The analysis of in situ and reanalysis temperature and velocity data does not suggest a significant contribution of meridional advection of subsurface temperatures for the onset of the 2009 cold event. The results indicate an asymmetry in the importance of meridional advection for non-ENSO-like cold and warm events with warm events more strongly affected

  9. HOT AND COLD DUST NEAR H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel

    2011-07-15

    We estimate the mass, temperature, and luminosity of the hot ({>=}100 K), cool (20-40 K), and cold ({<=}20 K) dust in the environs of Galactic H II regions using Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Submillimeter Common User Bolometric Array (SCUBA) data. A total of 83 clouds have been examined using IRAS data. A two-component model spectral energy distribution (SED) of hot and cool dust is used to fit the IRAS data. All of the SEDs use a graphite/silicate mix of grains in an MRN distribution. A three-component model SED is fitted to combined SCUBA and IRAS data for 15 clouds near H II regions to measure the cold dust component. Surprisingly, the ratio of the bolometric luminosity of the cool dust to the hot dust appears to be the same (2.8) in virtually all objects. The cool dust has typically four-five orders of magnitude greater mass than the hot dust. However, the mass in cold dust is much greater than the mass in cool and hot dust. We also find some evidence for a relationship between the cool and cold dust masses. These results may prove useful for using IR observations for estimating gas masses in extragalactic systems with active high-mass star formation.

  10. Health assessment for Umatilla Army Depot, Hermiston, Oregon, Region 10. CERCLIS No. OR6213820917. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Umatilla Army Depot Site (UAS) is listed on the National Priorities List. The site covers 23 square miles and is located in Hermiston (Umatilla and Morrow Counties), Oregon. UAS is a storage depot for chemical warfare agents. Parts of the depot were contaminated with explosives as a result of past demilitarization and disposal operations. Preliminary on-site lagoon sampling results have identified 2,4,6-TNT (2,800 ppm in surface soil, 180 ppm in subsurface soil), RDX (350 ppm in surface soil, 260 ppm subsurface soil), dinitrotoluene (DNT) (10 ppm in surface soil) and tetryl (12 ppm in surface soil). Preliminary off-site ground water sampling results identified 2,4-DNT (trace to 400 ppb), 2,6-DNT (trace to 5 ppb), and 2,5,6-TNT (trace to 4,350 ppb). In addition, HMX (trace to 2,530 ppb) and RDX (trace to 7,480 ppb) were also identified in off-site ground water samples. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because on-site employees may be exposed by direct contact to site-related contaminants in soil and possible ingestion of site-related contaminants that bioaccumulate through the food chain. It may be prudent to restrict areas of known contamination to post personnel.

  11. A new water level gauge for cold region application

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.H.; Moss, M.K.; Dixon, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The traditional gas purging (bubbler) water level gauge has been widely sued because of its simplicity, ruggedness and ability to operate in areas of ice cover. However, its mechanically-based sensing and recording system and the need for density information to compute water level have caused inconveniences in field operations. This paper describes a new design that records and telemeters digital data and allows computation of water density directly from the pressure measurements. Major measurement error sources are also identified and quantified. The performance in water level measurement is comparable to the National Ocean Service`s standard air acoustic tide gauge. Deriving density from pressure measurements obviates the need for use of a separate conductivity/temperature/depth instrument, which can be prone to fouling. The uncertainty in density determination is less than 0.0005 g/cc in laboratory tests; in the field, it varies from 0.0015 g/cc under low wave conditions to 0.003 g/cc for high wave conditions. The instrument has been successfully deployed at several cold region sites including the Arctic and Antarctic regions.

  12. Fuel cell power source for a cold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, B. K.; Velayutham, G.; Goud, A. Prasad

    operation. Based on the results of these experiments, the design of the fuel cell power source for cold region application has been finalised. The paper deals with the design criteria and design factors to be considered for the fuel cell power source for cold region application and details of tests and test results that led to the final design concept for such an application. The paper also deals with a proposed hybrid power plant taking into account the exploitation of wind energy with a fuel cell and generation of hydrogen by an electrolyser and provision of hydrogen storage.

  13. Regional collaborative research on cold tolerance of exotic biofuel grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold tolerance is a selectable trait for many exotic grasses, even those of tropical or subtropical origin. We are conducting cold tolerance assessments on an array of perennial biofuel grasses at Booneville, AR. In study one (published), we reported that two sugarcane clones (US84-1028 and US84-1...

  14. [An apothecary from the Cévennes region on the rolls of Oriental Pyrenees Army in 1793].

    PubMed

    Guibert, Marie-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In 1793 during the french Revolution, the decret of February 23rd orders a big recruitment of 300 000 people. The city of Alès (Cevennes) has to supply ninety-seven soldiers to establish the battalion of the Gard. They will be allocated to the "Armée des Pyrénées-Orientales" (Army of the Eastern Pyrenees) which is going to defend the border with Spain. These armies have to face the influx of wounded persons but especially the devastation of the epidemics. Besides the soldiers, are enlisted the officers of health, the doctors, the surgeons and the pharmacists. So the city of Alès indicates to be of use to this army the youngest of the doctors, freshly honed of the university of Montpellier and two old pharmacists (51 y. and 61 y. old). They were allocated to the hospital of Narbonne where they worked to fight against the epidemics, in particular by the disinfection of rooms. The oldest of them succumbed to the disease. Two others, safe and sound income in their home town, played a notables' role. PMID:25807665

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Sacramento Army Depot, Operable Unit 3, Sacramento, CA. (Second remedial action), December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    The 485-acre Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) is a U.S. Army support, service, and storage facility located approximately 7 miles southeast of the City of Sacramento, California. Land use in the area is predominantly commercial and light industrial, with residential areas located mainly to the west. An estimated 56,000 people obtain water from a deep aquifer that is not considered to be contaminated by the facility. However, some wells in the surrounding area draw water from the upper aquifers. Past and present activities conducted at SAAD include electro-optics equipment repair, the emergency manufacture of parts, shelter repair, and metal treating. The primary waste-generating activities included metal-plating and painting. The selected remedial action for this site includes constructing and installing an onsite soil vapor extraction system to remove VOCs from contaminated soil; dehumidifying the air stream and treating the collected water vapor using UV/hydrogen peroxide; treating air emissions using granular activated carbon and transporting the residual carbon offsite for recycling and treatment; monitoring air emissions during the treatment process; and sampling media after 6 months to determine compliance with clean-up standards. The estimated present worth cost for the selected remedial action is $614,414. No O M costs are associated with the selected remedial action.

  16. Health assessment for Savanna Army Depot, Savanna, Carroll County, Illinois, Region 5. CERCLIS No. IL0213820376. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Savanna Army Depot Activity (SADA) is on the National Priorities List. The 13,000-acre facility is an Army munitions plant engaged in munitions renovation and loading, and demolition and burning. About 20 areas within the facility have been identified as potential sources of hazardous waste. The environmental contamination on-site (maximum concentrations reported) consists of chloroform (20 ppb), trinitrotoluene or TNT (29 percent), trinitrobenzene or TNB (2,770 ppb), 2,6-dinitrotoluene or 2,6-DNT (1,400 ppb), 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (300,000 ppb), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (94,200 ppb) in sediment; TNB (1,400 ppb), TNT (314 ppb), 2,4-DNT (113 ppb), trichloroethylene or TCE (20 ppb), chloroform (20 ppb), and nickel (185 ppb) in ground water; TNT (50 percent), 2,4-DNT (673 ppb), and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine or RDX (12,300 ppb), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs (greater than 59,000,000 ppb) in soil; and RDX (36,900 ppb) and TNT (16,600 ppb) in surface water. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ground water, surface water, soil, sediment, and air.

  17. Health assessment for Sharpe Army Depot, Lathrop, San Joaquin County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CA8210020832. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-14

    The Sharpe Army Depot (SHAD), consisting of 720 acres located in San Joaquin County, California, is on the National Priorities List. The site has served as a storage, receiving, packaging, and shipping facility since 1941. In the late 1940s the Depot also served as a maintenance facility for heavy equipment. Available data indicate that the primary contaminant sources are associated with past heavy equipment and aircraft-maintenance operations. Contaminants associated with SHAD include trichloroethene, arsenic, selenium, and bromacil (a herbicide). The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion, dermal contact, or inhalation of contaminants in ground water, subsurface soil, soil-gas, and food-chain entities.

  18. Health assessment for Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Grand Island, Nebraska, Region 7. CERCLIS No. NE2213820234. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-31

    The Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant is listed on the National Priorities List. The government-owned plant is located 2 miles west of Grand Island, Nebraska, and occupies 18.7 square miles. During World War II and the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, the plant was operated by contractors for the production of conventional munitions. The primary contaminants that have been identified are cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its impurities/degradation products: 2,4-dinitrotoluene (24DNT), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (135TNB). The site is considered to be of potential health concern because of the risk to human health caused by possible exposure to hazardous substances via contact with on-site contaminated soils and the use of contaminated ground water for the irrigation of consumable crops and livestock watering.

  19. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2012-09-10

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

  20. Challenges in precipitation observation and analysis over the cold/mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important variables for climate, hydrology, glacier, and ecosystem research at local, regional, and global scales. It is a great challenge to compile regional precipitation datasets and to develop reliable products for various research activities over the cold regions, i.e. the high altitudes and high latitudes. The TPE program has recognized the urgent need and critical importance for accurate regional precipitation datasets and products. This presentation will show new results from regional analyses of surface and remote sensing precipitation datasets for the TPE. It will also discuss key issues in cold region precipitation research, such as compatibility of data/observations over the national borders, bias-correction methods and results, and common challenges and linkages between high-latitude and high-altitude regions.

  1. Martian (and Cold Region Lunar) Soil Mechanics Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Koon Meng; Johnson, Stewart W.

    1998-01-01

    The exploration of Mars has generated a lot of interest in recent years. With the completion of the Pathfinder Mission and the commencement of detailed mapping by Mars Global Surveyor, the possibility of an inhabited outpost on the planet is becoming more realistic. In spite of the upbeat mood, human exploration of Mars is still many years in the future. Additionally, the earliest return of any martian soil samples will probably not be until 2008. So why the discussion about martian soil mechanics when there are no returned soil samples on hand to examine? In view of the lack of samples, the basis of this or any discussion at this time must necessarily be one that involves conjecture, but not without the advantage of our knowledge of regolith mechanics of the Moon and soil mechanics on Earth. The objective of this presentation/discussion is fourfold: (1) Review some basic engineering-related information about Mars that may be of interest to engineers, and scientists - including characteristics of water and C02 at low temperature; (2) review and bring together principles of soil mechanics pertinent to studying and predicting how martian soil may behave, including the morphology and physical characteristics of coarse-grained and fine-grained soils (including clays), the characteristics of collapsing soils, potentials and factors that affect migration of water in unfrozen and freezing/frozen soils, and the strength and stiffness characteristics of soils at cold temperatures; (3) discuss some preliminary results of engineering experiments performed with frozen lunar soil simulants, JSC-1, in the laboratory that show the response to temperature change with and without water, effects of water on the strength and stiffness at ambient and at below freezing temperatures; and (4) discuss engineering studies that could be performed prior to human exploration and engineering research to be performed alongside future scientific missions to that planet.

  2. Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations of cold traps in the Moon's south polar region.

    PubMed

    Paige, David A; Siegler, Matthew A; Zhang, Jo Ann; Hayne, Paul O; Foote, Emily J; Bennett, Kristen A; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Schofield, John T; McCleese, Daniel J; Foote, Marc C; DeJong, Eric; Bills, Bruce G; Hartford, Wayne; Murray, Bruce C; Allen, Carlton C; Snook, Kelly; Soderblom, Laurence A; Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric W; Bowles, Neil E; Bandfield, Joshua L; Elphic, Richard; Ghent, Rebecca; Glotch, Timothy D; Wyatt, Michael B; Lucey, Paul G

    2010-10-22

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies. PMID:20966246

  3. Diviner lunar radiometer observations of cold traps in the moon's south polar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paige, D.A.; Siegler, M.A.; Zhang, J.A.; Hayne, P.O.; Foote, E.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Vasavada, A.R.; Greenhagen, B.T.; Schofield, J.T.; McCleese, D.J.; Foote, M.C.; DeJong, E.; Bills, B.G.; Hartford, W.; Murray, B.C.; Allen, C.C.; Snook, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Calcutt, S.; Taylor, F.W.; Bowles, N.E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Elphic, R.; Ghent, R.; Glotch, T.D.; Wyatt, M.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  4. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Sacramento Army Depot, Operable Unit 4, Sacramento, CA. (Third remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    The 485-acre Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) site is a military facility in Sacramento County, California. Land use in the area is predominantly commercial and light industrial, with wetlands in the vicinity of several oxidation lagoons. The estimated 56,398 people who live within 2 to 3 miles of the site use municipal water as their drinking water supply. From 1950 to 1972, the lagoons received mostly industrial waste water from metal plating processes and domestic wastewater. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavating and treating approximately 15,500 cubic yards of contaminated soil onsite using soil washing; dewatering and then backfilling the treated soil onsite in the excavation areas, and storing the rinsate temporarily in onsite holding tanks for recycling; treating rinsate from the treatment process using chemical precipitation, clarification/flocculation, and chemical coagulation to remove metals, prior to discharge into the sanitary sewer; dewatering the sludge containing the precipitated metals, and stabilizing this if necessary, followed by disposal in an RCRA landfill or recovery at an offsite reclamation unit. The estimated present worth cost for this remedial action is $5,020,000. There are no O M costs associated with the remedial action.

  6. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Shoemaker, Chuck M.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army is undergoing a transformation from Cold War era "heavy" forward-deployed forces arrayed against a monolithic known enemy to lighter, more flexible, U.S.-based forces able to rapidly engage in a full spectrum of military operations. Unmanned systems can potentially contribute towards achieving this goal of a highly capable and flexible ground force. To support this effort, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has undertaken a long-term research program to support technology development for unmanned ground vehicle systems. Over the course of the past year, this multifaceted effort has made significant technical strides, demonstrating sufficient technological maturity to potentially enable incorporation of semi-autonomous unmanned vehicles into the initial fielding of Future Combat Systems (FCS), while successfully conducting additional research directed toward improved capabilities for later increments of FCS and Land Warrior systems.

  7. Optimization of Domestic-Size Renewable Energy System Designs Suitable for Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    Five different kinds of domestic-size renewable energy system configurations for very cold climate regions were investigated. From detailed numerical modeling and system simulations, it was found that the consumption of fuel oil for the auxiliary boiler in residential-type households can almost be eliminated with a renewable energy system that incorporates photovoltaic panel arrays for electricity generation and two storage tanks: a well-insulated electric water storage tank that services the hot water loads, and a compact boiler/geothermal heat pump tank for room heating during very cold seasons. A reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) of about 28% was achieved for this system compared to an equivalent conventional system. The near elimination of the use of fuel oil in this system makes it very promising for very cold climate regions in terms of energy savings because the running cost is not so dependent on the unstable nature of global oil prices.

  8. Complex regional pain syndrome: evidence for warm and cold subtypes in a large prospective clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen; Maihöfner, Christian; Stanton-Hicks, Michael; Perez, Roberto S G M; Vatine, Jean-Jacques; Brunner, Florian; Birklein, Frank; Schlereth, Tanja; Mackey, Sean; Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Livshitz, Anatoly; Harden, R Norman

    2016-08-01

    Limited research suggests that there may be Warm complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and Cold CRPS subtypes, with inflammatory mechanisms contributing most strongly to the former. This study for the first time used an unbiased statistical pattern recognition technique to evaluate whether distinct Warm vs Cold CRPS subtypes can be discerned in the clinical population. An international, multisite study was conducted using standardized procedures to evaluate signs and symptoms in 152 patients with clinical CRPS at baseline, with 3-month follow-up evaluations in 112 of these patients. Two-step cluster analysis using automated cluster selection identified a 2-cluster solution as optimal. Results revealed a Warm CRPS patient cluster characterized by a warm, red, edematous, and sweaty extremity and a Cold CRPS patient cluster characterized by a cold, blue, and less edematous extremity. Median pain duration was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the Warm CRPS (4.7 months) than in the Cold CRPS subtype (20 months), with pain intensity comparable. A derived total inflammatory score was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in the Warm CRPS group (compared with Cold CRPS) at baseline but diminished significantly (P < 0.001) over the follow-up period, whereas this score did not diminish in the Cold CRPS group (time × subtype interaction: P < 0.001). Results support the existence of a Warm CRPS subtype common in patients with acute (<6 months) CRPS and a relatively distinct Cold CRPS subtype most common in chronic CRPS. The pattern of clinical features suggests that inflammatory mechanisms contribute most prominently to the Warm CRPS subtype but that these mechanisms diminish substantially during the first year postinjury. PMID:27023422

  9. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment - a hot topic in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Pippa

    2016-04-01

    Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelling tackles the classic geodynamical problem of determining the solid Earth response to surface load changes by ice and ocean water whilst at the same time solving for the gravitationally-consistent redistribution of ice sheet meltwater across the global ocean. Understanding this process is important for quantifying both present-day ice mass balance and the response of ice sheets to past and future climatic change. The two fundamental unknowns in this problem are (i) the rheology of the solid Earth, and (ii) the history of global ice sheet change. In this talk I will discuss the myriad of approaches that are used to constrain these two components. In particular, I will focus on Antarctica, where the presence of a continuously-evolving ice sheet, situated on top of one of the most rheologically-diverse regions of the planet, provides us with a challenge that can only be resolved by drawing on knowledge from across the fields of geodynamics, glaciology, geology, geodesy and seismology.

  10. Cold Plasma Research and Development at the USDA Eastern Regional Research Center

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a promising new technology that has been the subject of research effort at the Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC) since 2004. As a commodity group, the quality and sensory requirements of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables limit the antimicrobial technologies which can be...

  11. Proceedings: International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, V. J.; Bowen, S. L.

    This document contains a collection of papers from the Fourth International Symposium on Thermal Engineering and Science for Cold Regions. Topics covered include: some topics on melting heat transfer problems; osmotic model of ice segregation; thermosyphon applications in cold regions; an analytic study of liquid solidification in low Peclet number forced flows inside a parallel plate channel concerning axial heat conduction; freezing within laminar fast-growing thermally developing region of a uniform heat flux cooled parallel plate duct; the morphology of ice layers in curved rectangular channels; effect of heat conductor plates on ice formation near a wall; freezing characteristics of water flow in a horizontal cooled tube with the separated region; stability of thick ice formation in pipes; experiments and analysis of pipe freezing; experimental study of freezing of water in a closed circular tube with pressure increasing; and effects of a porous medium in a flow passage with miter bend.

  12. Isolated cold plasma regions: Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 orbit on the equatorial plane, are reported using the sheath induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasmatails that are predicted from enhancements of large scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  13. The Net Energy Budget at the Surface Interface of the "Cold Tongue" Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentamy, Abderrahim; Pinker, Rachel; Zhang, Banglin; Ma, Yingtao

    2016-04-01

    The southern tropical Pacific region also known as the "cold tongue" region is of great interest in terms of understanding the atmosphere-ocean coupling, and the observed strong seasonal cycle in sea surface temperature. The primary goal of our study is to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of air-sea interaction through the analysis of the net heat budget over the "cold tongue" region. Such analysis requires high quality heat budget estimates which are impacted by the complex and extensive low-level stratocumulus clouds in this region. The accuracy at which current satellite and numerical model methods can estimate this net heat budget is of interest. In this paper, the heat budget at the ocean-atmosphere interface in a region bound by 0o S - 30o S, 110o W - 70o W has been derived using satellite observations and compared to in situ measurements and to predictions from numerical models. The approach is based on multi-satellite sensors, buoy observations and numerical analyses. The fluxes are generated at daily and monthly time scales for a 10 year period (2002-2012) at a nominal 10 resolution (some parameters are available at higher resolution). Once the metrics on the accuracy of the satellite estimates are known, they can serve as "ground truth" for evaluating numerical models.

  14. Superfund record of decision (EPA region 6): Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, (No Further Action at LHAAP 13 and 14), Karnack, TX, February 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected no Further Action alternative for LHAAP 13 and 14, Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), in Karnack, Texas. There are no actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances as a result of suspected previous activities from these sites that may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment.

  15. Improved management of winter operations to limit subsurface contamination with degradable deicing chemicals in cold regions.

    PubMed

    French, Helen K; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of management considerations required for better control of deicing chemicals in the unsaturated zone at sites with winter maintenance operations in cold regions. Degradable organic deicing chemicals are the main focus. The importance of the heterogeneity of both the infiltration process, due to frozen ground and snow melt including the contact between the melting snow cover and the soil, and unsaturated flow is emphasised. In this paper, the applicability of geophysical methods for characterising soil heterogeneity is considered, aimed at modelling and monitoring changes in contamination. To deal with heterogeneity, a stochastic modelling framework may be appropriate, emphasizing the more robust spatial and temporal moments. Examples of a combination of different field techniques for measuring subsoil properties and monitoring contaminants and integration through transport modelling are provided by the SoilCAM project and previous work. Commonly, the results of flow and contaminant fate modelling are quite detailed and complex and require post-processing before communication and advising stakeholders. The managers' perspectives with respect to monitoring strategies and challenges still unresolved have been analysed with basis in experience with research collaboration with one of the case study sites, Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway. Both scientific challenges of monitoring subsoil contaminants in cold regions and the effective interaction between investigators and management are illustrated. PMID:24281673

  16. Trends of Future Heavy Snowfall and Accumulated Freezing Indexes in Japanese Snowy Cold Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Matsuzawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    To achieve sufficient, effective winter road maintenance, it is important that long-term snow and ice hazard mitigation plans be examined and formulated by taking into consideration the influence of climate change. In this study, we have developed a method of predicting more accurately the indexes of heavy snowfall events that occur over short periods of time and future projections of winter temperatures based on the relationship of observed data to the climate model predicted values. The indexes for heavy snowfall were the maximum 24-hour snowfall and the frequency of 10-cm or more snowfall within a maximum 6-hour period. Indexes for cold weather were the accumulated freezing index in winter and the number of days of freeze-thaw days. Subsequently, we have applied this methodology for Japanese snowy cold regions, in order to clarify the trends for near future and century-end future period changes. The results indicate that current measures to mitigate the effects of extremely heavy snowfall in inland areas of Hokkaido may require enhancement of operational procedures. In addition, the possibility of pavement and concrete damage in the colder regions is expected to increase due to the increment in the number of freeze-thaw days. Based upon the results of this study, we will identify the road management issues associated with climate change using the recent trends and predictions for the near future and century-end future climate periods.

  17. INTERFROST: a benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, C. F.; Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Pessel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Large focus was put recently on the impact of climate changes in boreal regions due to the large temperature amplitudes expected. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) with very specific evolution and water budget. These water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent studies and modeling exercises showed that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is a minimal requirement to model and understand the evolution of the river and lake - soil continuum in a changing climate (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007; Bense et al 2009, Rowland et al 2011; Painter 2011; Grenier et al 2012; Painter et al 2012 and others from the 2012 special issue Hydrogeology Journal: 'Hydrogeology of cold regions'). However, 3D studies are still scarce while numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for the purely thermal equation with conduction and phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare different codes on provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. We propose here to initiate a benchmark exercise, detail some of its planned test cases (phase I) and invite other research groups to join. This initial phase of the benchmark will consist of some test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. Some experimental cases in cold room will complement the validation approach. In view of a Phase II, the project is open as well to other test cases reflecting a numerical or a process oriented interest or answering a more general concern among the cold region community. A further purpose of the benchmark exercise is to propel discussions for the optimization of codes and numerical approaches in order to develop validated and

  18. INTERFROST: a benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Costard, François; Pessel, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Large focus was put recently on the impact of climate changes in boreal regions due to the large temperature amplitudes expected. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) with very specific evolution and water budget. These water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent studies and modeling exercises showed that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is a minimal requirement to model and understand the evolution of the river and lake - soil continuum in a changing climate (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007; Bense et al 2009, Rowland et al 2011; Painter 2011; Grenier et al 2012; Painter et al 2012 and others from the 2012 special issue Hydrogeology Journal: "Hydrogeology of cold regions"). However, 3D studies are still scarce while numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for the purely thermal equation with conduction and phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare different codes on provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. We propose here to join the INTERFROST benchmark exercise addressing these issues. We give an overview of some of its test cases (phase I) as well as provide the present stand of the exercise and invite other research groups to join. This initial phase of the benchmark consists of some test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. Mc Kenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. Some experimental cases in cold room complement the validation approach. In view of a Phase II, the project is open as well to other test cases reflecting a numerical or a process oriented interest or answering a more general concern among the cold region community. A further purpose of the benchmark exercise is to propel discussions for the

  19. Effects of ice and floods on vegetation in streams in cold regions: implications for climate change

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Weber, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Riparian zones support some of the most dynamic and species-rich plant communities in cold regions. A common conception among plant ecologists is that flooding during the season when plants are dormant generally has little effect on the survival and production of riparian vegetation. We show that winter floods may also be of fundamental importance for the composition of riverine vegetation. We investigated the effects of ice formation on riparian and in-stream vegetation in northern Sweden using a combination of experiments and observations in 25 reaches, spanning a gradient from ice-free to ice-rich reaches. The ice-rich reaches were characterized by high production of frazil and anchor ice. In a couple of experiments, we exposed riparian vegetation to experimentally induced winter flooding, which reduced the dominant dwarf-shrub cover and led to colonization of a species-rich forb-dominated vegetation. In another experiment, natural winter floods caused by anchor-ice formation removed plant mimics both in the in-stream and in the riparian zone, further supporting the result that anchor ice maintains dynamic plant communities. With a warmer winter climate, ice-induced winter floods may first increase in frequency because of more frequent shifts between freezing and thawing during winter, but further warming and shortening of the winter might make them less common than today. If ice-induced winter floods become reduced in number because of a warming climate, an important disturbance agent for riparian and in-stream vegetation will be removed, leading to reduced species richness in streams and rivers in cold regions. Given that such regions are expected to have more plant species in the future because of immigration from the south, the distribution of species richness among habitats can be expected to show novel patterns. PMID:25505542

  20. Effects of ice and floods on vegetation in streams in cold regions: implications for climate change.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lovisa; Nilsson, Christer; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Riparian zones support some of the most dynamic and species-rich plant communities in cold regions. A common conception among plant ecologists is that flooding during the season when plants are dormant generally has little effect on the survival and production of riparian vegetation. We show that winter floods may also be of fundamental importance for the composition of riverine vegetation. We investigated the effects of ice formation on riparian and in-stream vegetation in northern Sweden using a combination of experiments and observations in 25 reaches, spanning a gradient from ice-free to ice-rich reaches. The ice-rich reaches were characterized by high production of frazil and anchor ice. In a couple of experiments, we exposed riparian vegetation to experimentally induced winter flooding, which reduced the dominant dwarf-shrub cover and led to colonization of a species-rich forb-dominated vegetation. In another experiment, natural winter floods caused by anchor-ice formation removed plant mimics both in the in-stream and in the riparian zone, further supporting the result that anchor ice maintains dynamic plant communities. With a warmer winter climate, ice-induced winter floods may first increase in frequency because of more frequent shifts between freezing and thawing during winter, but further warming and shortening of the winter might make them less common than today. If ice-induced winter floods become reduced in number because of a warming climate, an important disturbance agent for riparian and in-stream vegetation will be removed, leading to reduced species richness in streams and rivers in cold regions. Given that such regions are expected to have more plant species in the future because of immigration from the south, the distribution of species richness among habitats can be expected to show novel patterns. PMID:25505542

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 10): Umatilla Army Depot (lagoons), soils operable Unit 2, Hermiston, OR. (First remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-25

    The Umatilla Army Depot lagoons site is located in the center of the 19,700-acre U.S. Army Depot Activity, Umatilla (UMDA), 5 miles west of Hermiston, in Morrow and Umatilla Counties, Oregon. From the 1950's through 1965, UMDA operated an onsite explosives washout plant, which processed munitions to remove and recover explosives using a pressurized hot water system. An estimated 85,000,000 gallons of effluent were discharged to the lagoons during plant operations. The ROD provides a final remedy for the soil present at the lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are inorganics and explosives, including DNB, 2, 4-DNT, HMX, NB, TNB, TNT, and RDX.

  2. Improving Snow Measurement Technology to Better Parameterise Cold Regions Hydrometeorology Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J.; Debeer, C.; Ellis, C.; Essery, R.; Helgason, W.; Kinar, N.; Link, T.; MacDonald, J.

    2008-12-01

    Marmot Creek Research Basin, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada constitutes a long term cold regions hydrometeorological observatory with over 45 years of intensive observations in alpine and forested zones. Recently, novel combinations of measurement technology to snow have been deployed in Marmot Creek to advance the understanding of snow processes and to improve hydrometeorological models of streamflow and atmospheric variables. One advance has been the development and application of portable acoustic reflectometry to measure the density and structure of seasonal snowpacks using an audible sound wave. This has permitted the non-invasive measurement of snow water equivalent for both stationary and snow survey applications. Another advance has been the use of oblique time-lapse digital photography which is corrected for elevation and view angle from a LiDAR DEM to produce daily orthogonal snow covered area images of the alpine zone. These images are used to calculate snowcovered area and to develop and test improved snowcover melt and depletion algorithms. Deployment of 3-axis ultrasonic anemometers and fast hygrometers with collection of 10 Hz data and full correction for non-stationarity, axis rotation and other effects has shown that horizontal turbulence is often advected into mountain clearings and causes failure of traditional bulk transfer calculations of latent and sensible heat. For forest snow a hanging, weighed spruce tree and hanging, weighed sub-canopy troughs are used to capture intercepted snow load and unloaded snow fluxes respectively. These quantities provide the information needed to test detailed models of the snow interception and unloading processes. To quantify variations in sub-canopy energy for snowmelt, infrared imaging radiometers and narrow beam radiometers are used to measure thermal radiation exitance from needles, stems and trunks in forests of varying structure. These measurements are being used to develop improved models of

  3. Low modulus polymer packaged optical fiber sensor for macrocrack monitoring in ice structures of cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-09-01

    Ice structures provide load-bearing capability for energy exploitation and transportation in cold regions. Meanwhile, staff and facilities take a risk due to large amounts of distributed macrocracks in ice roads, ice bridges, and ice platforms. It is critical to monitor macrocracks for detecting and understanding the fracture process under such a harsh environment. Aiming to obtain real-time, long-term, and quantitative crack opening information for ice structures, this paper presents a feasibility study on monitoring macrocracks with a low modulus polymer packaged optical fiber sensor. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis-based sensing technology is utilized for the distributed strain measurement. According to in situ monitoring requirements, a type of silicone rubber material with appropriate mechanical properties is selected to fabricate the sensor. On this basis, a strain transfer analysis on the packaged and embedded sensor is carried out to derive the relation between the optical measurement and the increment of the crack width. The prototypes have been evaluated by demonstration tests on a tensile device and an ice road model. The experimental results show the sensor can survive in a cold environment and under the large strain resulting from the macrocrack opening. These measured data agree well with the linear calibration. The macrocracks opening in large-scale ice structures can be characterized based on the optical sensor.

  4. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (Operable Unit 1), AL. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The 2,200-acre Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP) site was located in Talledega County, Alabama, near the junction of Talledega Creek and the Coosa River. AAAP was built in 1941 as a government-owned/contractor-operated facility that produced nitrocellulose, nitroaromatic explosives, and 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl methyl nitramine. Operations at AAAP were terminated in August 1945, and in 1973 several parcels of the original 13,233-acre property were sold. In 1978, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA), managing the Army's Installation Restoration Program (IRP), identified soil, sediment, and ground water potentially contaminated by explosives, asbestos, and lead as a result of past site operations. During the RI/FS, the facility was divided into two general areas: the eastern area (Area A) and the western area (Area B). In 1985, investigations identified soil contamination by explosives, asbestos, and lead in Area A, and ground water contamination by these materials in Area B. Soil excavated from Area A was stockpiled in Area B in two covered buildings and on a concrete slab, which was subsequently covered with a membrane liner. A 1991 characterization study of Area B concluded that explosives, lead, and asbestos contamination were present above regulatory limits. The ROD addressed a final action for the contaminated soil in the Stockpile Soils Area (Area B). The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris were explosives, including 2,4,6-TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and tetryl; metals, including lead; and asbestos, an inorganic.

  5. [Spatial and temporal variations of hydrological characteristic on the landscape zone scale in alpine cold region].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Gang; Hu, Jin-Fei; Xiao, Hong-Lang; Zou, Song-Bing; Yin, Zhen-Liang

    2013-10-01

    There are few studies on the hydrological characteristics on the landscape zone scale in alpine cold region at present. This paper aimed to identify the spatial and temporal variations in the origin and composition of the runoff, and to reveal the hydrological characteristics in each zone, based on the isotopic analysis of glacier, snow, frozen soil, groundwater, etc. The results showed that during the wet season, heavy precipitation and high temperature in the Mafengou River basin caused secondary evaporation which led to isotope fractionation effects. Therefore, the isotope values remained high. Temperature effects were significant. During the dry season, the temperature was low. Precipitation was in the solid state during the cold season and the evaporation was weak. Water vapor came from the evaporation of local water bodies. Therefore, less secondary evaporation and water vapor exchange occurred, leading to negative values of delta18O and deltaD. delta18O and deltaD values of precipitation and various water bodies exhibited strong seasonal variations. Precipitation exhibited altitude effects, delta18O = -0. 005 2H - 8. 951, deltaD = -0.018 5H - 34. 873. Other water bodies did not show altitude effects in the wet season and dry season, because the runoff was not only recharged by precipitation, but also influenced by the freezing and thawing process of the glacier, snow and frozen soil. The mutual transformation of precipitation, melt water, surface water and groundwater led to variations in isotopic composition. Therefore, homogenization and evaporation effect are the main control factors of isotope variations. PMID:24364295

  6. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  7. Health assessment for Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Carrol and Gibson Counties, Tennessee, Region 4. CERCLIS No. TND210020582. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-10

    The Milan Army Ammunition Plant Site (MAAP) is located in Milan (Carrol and Gibson Counties), Tennessee. MAAP produces munitions for the U.S. Army. From 1942 to 1978 wastewater from a munition demilitarization process line was discharged into 11 unlined settling ponds. These ponds were dredged in 1971 with the soils placed near the side of the ponds. A multilayer cap was placed on top of the ponds and the dredged soils (1984). Access to the site is restricted. Removal actions have not occurred. Preliminary on-site groundwater sampling results have identified cyclonite (RDX), homocyclonite (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene. In addition, cadmium, chromium, and lead were detected in on-site groundwater. Off-site surface water sampling results identified RDX and HMX. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances. Direct contact and ingestion with groundwater from on-site wells, off-site soils and bioaccumulation of site-related contaminants in fish, waterfowl, and crops with uptake from irrigation, and subsequent ingestion by area residents are possible human exposure pathways.

  8. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  9. Integrated research and observation experiment of hydrological process in small watershed in cold regions of Qilian Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Liu, J.

    2012-04-01

    Heihe Qilian Mountain station is located at QingHai Province, northeast of Tibetan Plateau, belongs to the Source Region of Heihe River Basin at latitude 38° 15¢542 N and longitude 99° 52¢ 532 E. The research objective of this station is to find the mutual mechanisms of eco-hydrological processes and to predict the runoff with high precision in cold watershed in China under global warming. Hulugou watershed, with a total area of 23.1 km2 and elevation fluctuating from 2960m to 4820m, has obvious vertical landscape and all types of typical underlying surface of cold regions. Thus, it was chosen as the researched watershed for integrated research and observation experiment of hydrological process in cold regions. In 2008, four ENVIS (Environmental Information System) were built along different altitude gradient in Hulugou experiment watershed to measure heat and water flux of the frozen soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer systems. Besides, many apparatus measuring snow, frozen soil, glacier, evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff were built on various typical underlying surfaces. Through the observation net in Hulugou experiment watershed, various hydrological and meteorological data was obtained for hydrological processes research in cold regions.

  10. Effects of Land Management Practices on Cold Region Hydrological Processes in an Agricultural Prairie Basin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, T. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Baulch, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Conservation tillage including zero and reduced tillage, crop rotation and upstream reservoirs are commonly implemented as beneficial management practices (BMPs) in the Canadian Prairies. However, their effects are strongly dependent on interactions with cold region hydrological processes, such as wind redistribution of snow, snowmelt, infiltration to frozen soils and evaporation, due to strong coupling between land surface characteristics and hydrology. These interactions are poorly understood and few studies have investigated them using a physically-based modeling framework. In this study, we deploy a physically-based, semi-distributed cold regions hydrological model (CRHM) to investigate the impacts of land management practices in the South Tobacco Creek Basin (STC) which forms part of the Red River Basin in southern Manitoba, Canada. The STC (~73 km2) is set in a gently rolling landscape of low relief (~200 m). Detailed field data such as crop type, tillage practices, crop residue and planting and harvesting dates are available from 1995 and are used to parameterize the model. While the majority of parameters are specified a priori, we have manually calibrated roughness and initial soil water storage parameters to compare the simulations with runoff observations at multiple scales (upstream catchment, mid-basin gauge and outlet gauge) and snow observations during 2000-2001 water year. The calibrated model based on the 2000-2001 period is further evaluated over the 2001-2011 period, which includes high inter-annual variability. The results suggest good agreement between observations and simulations and provide insight into hydrological controls. Snowmelt runoff is a major contributor to streamflow while the contribution of summer rainfall runoff is highly variable. The evaporative fraction is high during dry years (2002-2004) indicating a vertical flux controlled mass balance while the runoff fraction dominates during wet years (2005-2011), suggesting overland

  11. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  12. Assessing the performance of a cold region evapotranspiration landfill cover using lysimetry and electrical resistivity tomography.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William E; Munk, Jens; Abichou, Tarek; Barnes, David; Lee, William; Pape, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the efficacy ofa cold-region evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover against a conventional compacted clay (CCL) landfill cover, two pilot scale covers were constructed in side-by-side basin lysimeters (20m x 10m x 2m) at a site in Anchorage, Alaska. The primary basis of comparison between the two lysimeters was the percolation of moisture from the bottom of each lysimeter. Between 30 April 2005 and 16 May 2006, 51.5 mm of water percolated from the ET lysimeter, compared to 50.6 mm for the the CCL lysimeter. This difference was not found to be significant at the 95% confidence level. As part of the project, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to measure and map soil moisture in ET lysimeter cross sections. The ERT-generated cross sections were found to accurately predict the onset and duration of lysimeter percolation. Moreover, ERT-generated soil moisture values demonstrated a strong linear relationship to lysimeter percolation rates (R-Squared = 0.92). Consequently, ERT is proposed as a reliable tool for assessing the function of field scale ET covers in the absence of drainage measurement devices. PMID:22574381

  13. Processing of analogues of plume fallout in cold regions of Enceladus by energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergantini, A.; Pilling, S.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Enceladus, a small icy moon of Saturn, is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. This moon is a geologically active object, and despite the lower temperatures on most of its surface, the geothermally heated south polar region presents geysers that spouts a plume made of water (~90%), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and methanol, among other molecules. Most of the upward-moving particles do not have the velocity to escape from the gravitational influence of the moon and fall back to the surface. The molecules in the ice are continuously exposed to ionizing radiation, such as UV and X-rays photons, cosmic rays, and electrons. Over time, the ionizing radiation promotes molecular bond rupture, destroying and also forming molecules, radicals, and fragments. Aims: We analyse the processing of an ice mixture analogue to the Enceladus fallout ice in cold resurfaced areas (north pole) by 1 keV electrons. The main goal is to search for complex species that have not yet been detected in this moon, and to determine relevant physico-chemical parameters, such as destruction and formation cross-sections and the half-life of the studied molecules in the ice. Methods: The experiment consisted of the electron irradiation of an Enceladus-like ice mixture (H2O:CO2:CH4:NH3:CH3OH) in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at 20 K. The analysis was made by infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-800 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 μm). Results: The absolute dissociation cross-sections of the parent molecules, the formation cross-section of daughter species, and the half-life of the parental species in a simulated Enceladus irradiation scenario were determined. Among the produced species, CO (carbon monoxide), OCN- (cyanate anion), HCONH2 (formamide), and H2CO (formaldehyde) were tentatively detected.

  14. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  15. 32 CFR 536.12 - Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Commanding General, U.S. Army Medical Command.... Army Medical Command. (a) After consulting with the Commander USARCS on the selection of medical claims attorneys, the Commander of the U.S. Army MEDCOM, the European Medical Command, or other regional...

  16. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Army and Navy. 223.238 Section 223.238 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and...

  17. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Army and Navy. 223.238 Section 223.238 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and...

  18. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Army and Navy. 223.238 Section 223.238 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and...

  19. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Army and Navy. 223.238 Section 223.238 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy. Subject to delegations of authority by the Chief, Regional Foresters may approve the harvest of special forest products by the U.S. Army and...

  20. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  1. Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Kneessy, A.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned and operated industrial plants, arsenals and depots, and privately owned and operated ordnance explosive establishments. The end of World War II was the beginning of the nuclear age and attendant Medical Department responsibilities for radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection. The US Army has undertaken the demilitarization of obsolete and excess chemical munitions. The Medical Systems Safety and Health Branch is tasked to survey Army hospitals within the United States, to identify and recommend corrective action for safety and health hazards. At present, a continuing study is underway to evaluate the waste anesthetic gases to operating room personnel in Army hospitals. Noise-induced hearing loss is considered the most widespread occupational injury incurred by DA personnel.

  2. Characterization of cold hardiness in quince: potential pear rootstock candidates for northern pear production regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US pear industry lacks a size-controlling, precocious rootstock for pear production. Commercially available selections of quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) have been reported to possess insufficient cold tolerance for northern latitude sites. Fifty in-situ clonal quince accessions with diverse orig...

  3. European cold wave during February 2012 and impacts in wine growing regions of Moldavia (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planchon, Olivier; Quénol, Hervé; Irimia, Liviu; Patriche, Cristi

    2015-05-01

    A severe cold wave hits a large part of Europe between late January and mid-February 2012 and caused damages in the vineyard of Moldavia in Northeastern Romania. During the cold wave, the daily minimum temperature fell near -30 °C at some weather stations in Moldavia, but the hilly terrain caused strong temperature differences at small scales: up to 10 °C in a few kilometres. Three main cold spells with very low minimum temperatures were identified in association with the succession of three circulation types (according to the Hess-Brezowsky classification): Fennoscandian high anticyclonic (HFA, January 29-February 4), Central European ridge (BM, February 5-7) and northeast anticyclonic NEA (NEA, February 8-11). A multi-scale agroclimatic analysis in the vineyard of Cotnari (Moldavia, Romania) was carried out in the particular meteorological context of the early 2012 European cold wave. The results especially pointed out the local-scale (topoclimatic) effects on the high spatial variability of temperature and consequently a contrasting spatial distribution of damage on grape vine. The analysis of data recorded from temperature loggers installed in several test sites in the vineyard of Cotnari, depending on its topographical features, and of the observations of frost damage on grape vines (on vine buds, vine canes and even vine arms and trunks) pointed out a significant correlation between the topographic position and the grape vine variety.

  4. Storms or cold fronts: what is really responsible for the extreme waves regime in the Colombian Caribbean coastal region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, L. J.; Ortiz-Royero, J. C.; Ruiz-Merchan, J. K.; Higgins, A. E.; Henriquez, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the contribution and importance of cold fronts and storms to extreme waves in different areas of the Colombian Caribbean in an attempt to determine the extent of the threat posed by the flood processes to which these coastal populations are exposed. Furthermore, the study wishes to establish the actions to which coastal engineering constructions should be subject. In the calculation of maritime constructions, the most important parameter is the height of the wave. For this reason, it is necessary to establish the design wave height to which a coastal engineering structure should be resistant. This wave height varies according to the return period considered. The significant height values for the areas focused on in the study were calculated in accordance with Gumbel's extreme value methodology. The methodology was evaluated using data from the reanalysis of the spectral National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WAVEWATCH III® (WW3) model for 15 points along the 1600 km of the Colombian Caribbean coastline (continental and insular) between the years 1979 and 2009. The results demonstrated that the extreme waves caused by tropical cyclones and those caused by cold fronts have different effects along the Colombian Caribbean coast. Storms and hurricanes are of greater importance in the Guajira Peninsula (Alta Guajira). In the central area (consisting of Baja Guajira, and the cities of Santa Marta, Barranquilla, and Cartagena), the strong impact of cold fronts on extreme waves is evident. However, in the southern region of the Colombian Caribbean coast (ranging from the Gulf of Morrosquillo to the Gulf of Urabá), the extreme values of wave heights are lower than in the previously mentioned regions, despite being dominated mainly by the passage of cold fronts. Extreme waves in the San Andrés and Providencia insular region present a different dynamic from

  5. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gula; Zhu, Yunqiang; Wu, Guozheng; Li, Jing; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Jiulin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of COD(Cr) and NH₃N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well. PMID:27070631

  6. Modelling and Analysis of Hydrodynamics and Water Quality for Rivers in the Northern Cold Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Gula; Zhu, Yunqiang; Wu, Guozheng; Li, Jing; Li, Zhao-Liang; Sun, Jiulin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Mudan River, which is the most typical river in the northern cold region of China was selected as the research object; Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was adopted to construct a new two-dimensional water quality model for the urban sections of the Mudan River, and concentrations of CODCr and NH3N during ice-covered and open-water periods were simulated and analyzed. Results indicated that roughness coefficient and comprehensive pollutant decay rate were significantly different in those periods. To be specific, the roughness coefficient in the ice-covered period was larger than that of the open-water period, while the decay rate within the former period was smaller than that in the latter. In addition, according to the analysis of the simulated results, the main reasons for the decay rate reduction during the ice-covered period are temperature drop, upstream inflow decrease and ice layer cover; among them, ice sheet is the major contributor of roughness increase. These aspects were discussed in more detail in this work. The model could be generalized to hydrodynamic water quality process simulation researches on rivers in other cold regions as well. PMID:27070631

  7. An integrated numerical framework for water quality modelling in cold-region rivers: A case of the lower Athabasca River.

    PubMed

    Shakibaeinia, Ahmad; Kashyap, Shalini; Dibike, Yonas B; Prowse, Terry D

    2016-11-01

    There is a great deal of interest to determine the state and variations of water quality parameters in the lower Athabasca River (LAR) ecosystem, northern Alberta, Canada, due to industrial developments in the region. As a cold region river, the annual cycle of ice cover formation and breakup play a key role in water quality transformation and transportation processes. An integrated deterministic numerical modelling framework is developed and applied for long-term and detailed simulation of the state and variation (spatial and temporal) of major water quality constituents both in open-water and ice covered conditions in the lower Athabasca River (LAR). The framework is based on the a 1D and a 2D hydrodynamic and water quality models externally coupled with the 1D river ice process models to account for the cold season effects. The models are calibrated/validated using available measured data and applied for simulation of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus). The results show the effect of winter ice cover on reducing the DO concentration, and a fluctuating temporal trend for DO and nutrients during summer periods with substantial differences in concentration between the main channel and flood plains. This numerical frame work can be the basis for future water quality scenario-based studies in the LAR. PMID:27376919

  8. Optical and microphysical properties of a cold cirrus cloud - Evidence for regions of small ice particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Hart, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An airborne lidar and a scanning radiometer aboard an ER-2 aircraft were used to observe a cold cirrus cloud, and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) was used to obtain simultaneous in situ microphysical observations at two altitudes within the cloud. Lidar depolarization ratio data show that the clouds were composed predominantly of ice crystals. At an altitude where the temperature was -62.7 C, the lidar and radiometer analysis gave a visible extinction to infrared absorption ratio (alpha) of 2.3, while the cloud microphysics data provided an alpha value of 3.77. The discrepancy is attributed to undersizing of particles by the FSSP. Direct and remote measurements showed better agreement for a lower layer where the temperature was -47.3 C.

  9. A comprehensive evaluation of high friction overlay systems on bridge decks in cold climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostick, Robert D.

    In recent history the Minnesota Department of Transportation has looked to improve the safety of bridge decks by installing high friction overlays (HFO). A comprehensive study researched four different proprietary HFO systems placed on fourteen bridge decks throughout Minnesota. Research was split into three separate tasks: (1) laboratory testing of aggregate properties, (2) field observations and testing, and (3) a comprehensive analysis of crash data investigated crash rates on bridges with HFO systems. Field observations and testing revealed that the use of snowplows quickly abrades HFO systems. Abrasion, among other factors, causes a reduction in surface friction values, and reduces the life of HFO systems. Furthermore, improving crash rate trends cannot be directly correlated to the installation of HFO systems. Research concludes that HFO systems should not be used in Minnesota. Other cold climate transportation agencies should conduct research emulated after this study to assess HFO systems in their jurisdiction.

  10. Changing Cold Regions: Addressing Atmospheric, Cryospheric, Ecological and Hydrological Change in the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. W.; Wheater, H. S.; Quinton, W. L.; Stewart, R. E.

    2013-05-01

    The cold interior region of Western Canada east of the Continental Divide from the US border to the Arctic Ocean has one of the world's most extreme and variable climates and is experiencing rapid environmental change. Climate warming and precipitation change have resulted in altered patterns of snowfall and snowmelt, conversion of snowfall to rainfall, loss of glaciated area and thawing of permafrost. Effects of these changes on terrestrial ecosystems include changing alpine and arctic treelines, extreme variability in Prairie wetland extent and storage of subsurface water in soil and groundwater, "browning" of the boreal forest and prairie aspen woodlands, forest conversion to wetlands in areas of permafrost loss, increased tundra shrub height and coverage, with associated impacts on snow accumulation and melt and ground thaw regimes. These atmospheric, cryospheric and ecological changes have produced changes to water storage and cycling with lower, earlier and more variable streamflow from the Western Cordillera, earlier and more variable Prairie streamflow, more variable agricultural soil moisture, substantially earlier and sometimes higher streamflows with greater winter baseflows in the North, and indications of changes in extreme precipitation events and resulting flooding and drought. The recently formed Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) will investigate the integrated response of mountain, boreal forest, prairie and sub-arctic biomes to climate change at the scales of the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins and the regional climate system. The multi-prong approach will first inventory and evaluate observable recent change in the Earth system state, fluxes and variability, and then explore the complex interrelationships of changing Earth system processes through the development of improved models and their application in diagnosis and prediction at multiple scales, from small headwater basins to large river basins, major biomes and the regional

  11. The Changing Cold Regions Network: Atmospheric, Cryospheric, Ecological and Hydrological Change in the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins, Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheater, H. S.; DeBeer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The cold interior of Northwestern Canada has one of the world's most extreme and varied climates and, as with other regions across the Arctic, is experiencing rapid environmental change. The Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) is a new Canadian research network devoted to addressing key challenges and globally-important issues facing the Arctic by improving the understanding of past and ongoing changes in climate, land, vegetation, and water, and predicting their future integrated responses, with a geographic focus on the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Basins. The network is funded for 5 years (2013-18) by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and combines the unique expertise of 36 Canadian scientists representing 8 universities and 4 Federal government agencies, as well as 15 international researchers from the United States, China, Australia, the UK, France, and Germany. The network will also involve the World Climate Research Programme, NASA, the Canadian Space Agency, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. CCRN will integrate existing and new experimental data with modelling and remote sensing products to understand, diagnose and predict changing land, water and climate, and their interactions and feedbacks, for Northwestern Canada's cold interior. It will use a network of world class observatories to study the detailed connections among changing climate, ecosystems and water in the permafrost regions of the Sub-arctic, the Boreal Forest, the Western Cordillera, and the Prairies. Specifically, the network will: 1. Document and evaluate observed Earth system change, including hydrological, ecological, cryospheric and atmospheric components over a range of scales from local observatories to biome and regional scales; 2. Improve understanding and diagnosis of local-scale change by developing new and integrative knowledge of Earth system processes, incorporating these processes into a suite of process-based integrative

  12. Intercomparison of Global Reanalyses and Regional Simulations of Cold Season Water Budgets in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun; Han, Jongil; Roads, John O.

    2003-12-01

    Estimating water budgets of river basins in the western U.S. is a challenge because of the effects of complex terrain and lack of comprehensive observational datasets. This study aims at understanding the uncertainty in estimating water budgets of the Columbia River (CRB) and Sacramento-San Joaquin (SSJ) River basins. An intercomparison was performed based on the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis I (NRA1), NCEP/DOE Reanalysis II (NRA2), ECMWF reanalyses (ERA), regional climate simulations produced by the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) and NCEP Regional Spectral Model (RSM), and two precipitation datasets gridded at 2.5 and 1/8 degree for seven years between 1986 and 1993 to study the effects of spatial resolutions, model configurations and parameterizations, and large-scale conditions on basin-scale water budgets. Results showed that overall, the regional simulations were superior in terms of simulating the spatial distributions of mean precipitation and precipitation anomalies compared to the global reanalyses. However, cold season precipitation was generally amplified through downscaling using the regional models such that basin mean precipitations were typically higher than the observed, while the opposite was true for the reanalyses. The amplification was the largest in the RSM simulation driven by NRA2, which showed the biggest difference between the large-scale and regional-scale basin mean precipitations. ERA and the MM5 simulation driven by ERA provided the best basin mean precipitation estimates when compared to the 1/8o observational dataset.

  13. Sulfur biogeochemistry of cold seeps in the Green Canyon region of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formolo, Michael J.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-10-01

    Cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico provide a natural laboratory to study biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen at hydrate- and hydrocarbon-rich deep marine settings with obvious additional relevance to studies of diverse modern and ancient seeps. Of particular interest are the sulfur isotope signatures of microbial sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane and other non-methane liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Whereas most of the published sulfur isotope data from cold seep systems pertain to pore-water species, our study integrates both solid and dissolved sulfur: acid-volatile sulfides (SAVS), pyrite (Spy), elemental sulfur (S°), dissolved sulfate and ΣH2S. Modeled and 35SO42- reduction rates and δ13C and δ18O data for authigenic carbonates are integrated within this sulfur framework. Our results indicate extreme variability over narrow spatial and temporal scales within short distances (meters) from active seeps. High rates of microbial sulfate reduction can lead to complete consumption of the sulfate within the upper few centimeters of burial, while meters away the sulfate profile shows little depletion. Such small-scale variability must reflect the structure and temporal dynamics of hydrocarbon migration in the presence of low amounts of background organic matter. Our past work demonstrated that electron donors other than methane drive significant levels of microbial activity at these seeps, and very recent work has demonstrated that oxidation of higher chain volatile hydrocarbons can contribute to the high levels of microbial activity. These findings are consistent with our new results. Elevated concentrations of pyrite and diagenetic carbonate relative to background sediments are diagnostic of active seepage, yet the S isotopes tell more complex stories. Low levels of the transient, 'instantaneous' products of S cycling-AVS and S°-show high δ34S values that increase with depth. Most of the pyrite formation, however, seems

  14. Restriction to large-scale gene flow vs. regional panmixia among cold seep Escarpia spp. (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae).

    PubMed

    Cowart, Dominique A; Huang, Chunya; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Carney, Susan L; Fisher, Charles R; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The history of colonization and dispersal in fauna distributed among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems remains enigmatic and poorly understood because of an inability to mark and track individuals. A combination of molecular, morphological and environmental data improves understanding of spatial and temporal scales at which panmixia, disruption of gene flow or even speciation may occur. Vestimentiferan tubeworms of the genus Escarpia are important components of deep -sea cold seep ecosystems, as they provide long-term habitat for many other taxa. Three species of Escarpia, Escarpia spicata [Gulf of California (GoC)], Escarpia laminata [Gulf of Mexico (GoM)] and Escarpia southwardae (West African Cold Seeps), have been described based on morphology, but are not discriminated through the use of mitochondrial markers (cytochrome oxidase subunit 1; large ribosomal subunit rDNA, 16S; cytochrome b). Here, we also sequenced the exon-primed intron-crossing Haemoglobin subunit B2 intron and genotyped 28 microsatellites to (i) determine the level of genetic differentiation, if any, among the three geographically separated entities and (ii) identify possible population structure at the regional scale within the GoM and West Africa. Results at the global scale support the occurrence of three genetically distinct groups. At the regional scale among eight sampling sites of E. laminata (n = 129) and among three sampling sites of E. southwardae (n = 80), no population structure was detected. These findings suggest that despite the patchiness and isolation of seep habitats, connectivity is high on regional scales. PMID:23879204

  15. Tree-Ring Proxies of Hydroclimate Variability in the Great Lakes Region during Cold Excursions Back to 15ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panyushkina, I. P.; Leavitt, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A decade-long investigation of subfossil wood buried in glacio-fluvial, fluvial and lacustrine deposits from the U.S. Great Lakes region has resulted in a Great Lakes tree-ring network (GLTRN) comprising 47 sites dated from ca. 15 ka to 3ka. The GLTRN provides high-resolution proxies for exploration of local and regional responses to hydroclimate change at inter-annual scales during the transition from the Late Pleistocene to the Holocene. Classification of radiometric ages of GLTRN wood with relative cumulative-probability function delineates intervals and importance of hydrological changes in time and space. The overwhelming majority of wood burial events correlate with generally cold climate excursions. Forest-stand deterioration and tree mortality events at the studied sites are demonstrated to result from flooding, via river aggradation (identifying occurrence of extreme hydrologic events), rise of water table, or lake inundation. To better evaluate the special patterns of hydrological change back to 15ka, we developed four floating d13C chronologies from spruce tree rings. The length of these tree-ring proxy series that capture high-frequency moisture variability of the Great Lakes area ranges from 120 to 250 years. Our data indicate progressive wet intervals during the cold excursions precisely dated with 14C tree-ring wiggles at 13.7ka, 12.1ka, and 11.3ka that fall in the Bølling-Allerød and Pre-Boreal Interstadials, and Younger Dryas Stadial. The inter-annual and decadal variability of tree-ring moisture proxies are similar across the studied locations and time intervals. Such coherence of respective proxies may result from both local ecological stability of spruce communities or regional response to a common source of moisture at the studied time intervals and locations. This study demonstrates a potential of GLTRN proxies for modeling hydroclimatic changes at the North American continent back 15 ka.

  16. Suicide in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Timothy W; O'Connor, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  17. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  18. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  19. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  20. Simplifications of Simulation on Energy Balances and Estimations of a Hybrid Renewable Energy System for Use in Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    A simplified double grade meteorological data model for the simulation of the annual performance of a domestic-size renewable energy system is proposed. With the model, only two representative days (clearest and cloudiest) during each season of the year are necessary to estimate annual energy balances, carbon emissions and the running costs. The model was chosen in preference to other simplified models based on the error distributions from the results of the continuous simulations in a test period. Detailed numerical simulation studies show that the carbon emissions from the renewable energy system are about 16%of a comparable conventional system. The thermal energy produced by a solar collector during the winter season, however, is insufficient to meet all the loads so that frequent heat pump operations and the auxiliary boiler are necessary in cold climate regions.

  1. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  2. Battles: Intelligent Army versus Insurgency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2009-03-01

    A ``simple'' battle can be thought of as a conflict between two parties, each with finite reserves, and typically fought on one side’s territory. Modern battles are often strategic, based largely on the speed of information processing and decision making and are mission oriented rather than to annex new territory. Here, we analyze such battles using a simple model in which the ``blue'' army fights a strategic battle against a ``red'' army that is well matched in combat power and in red’s territory. We assume that the blue army attacks strategically while the red army attempts to neutralize the enemy when in close enough proximity, implemented here as ``on- site,'' with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. We show that minimizing risk exposure and making strategic moves based on local intelligence are often the deciding factors that determine the outcome of battles among well matched adversaries.

  3. On improving cold region hydrological processes in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Arman; Sushama, Laxmi; Verseghy, Diana; Harvey, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the treatment of frozen water in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-Interim) for the 1990-2001 period over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration and therefore soil moisture during the snowmelt season for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation are also in better agreement to those observed. This study thus demonstrates the importance of treatment of frozen water for realistic simulation of streamflows.

  4. EXPERIENCE IN REDUCING ELECTRON CLOUD AND DYNAMIC PRESSURE RISE IN WARM AND COLD REGIONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS,L.; ALLESI, J.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; DREES, A.; FISCHER, W.; GULLOTTA, J.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; HUANG, H.; LEE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MACKAY, W.W.; MONTAG, C.; NICOLETTI, A.; OERTER, B.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; SMART, L.; SYNDSTRUP, L.; TEPIKIAN, S.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.

    2006-06-23

    The large scale application of non-evaporable getter coating in RHIC has been effective in reducing the electron cloud. Since beams with higher intensity and smaller bunch spacing became possible in operation, the emittance growth is of concern. Study results are reported together with experiences of machine improvements: saturated NEG coatings, anti-grazing ridges in warm sections, and the pre-pumping in cryogenic regions.

  5. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  6. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  7. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  8. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes...

  9. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle... continued growth and development of the United States Army War College. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  10. On the orbital motion of cold clouds in broad-line regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen

    2015-08-01

    We study the orbit of a pressure-confined cloud in the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei when the combined effects of the central gravity and anisotropic radiation pressure and the drag force are considered. The physical properties of the intercloud gas, such as its pressure and dynamic viscosity, are defined as power-law functions of the radial distance. For a drag force proportional to the relative velocity of a cloud and the background gas, a detailed analysis of the orbits is performed for different values of the input parameters. We also present analytical solutions for when the intercloud pressure is uniform and the viscosity is proportional to the inverse square of the radial distance. Our analytical and numerical solutions demonstrate decay of the orbits due to the drag force, so that a cloud will eventually fall on to the central region after the so-called time-of-flight. We found that the time-of-flight of a BLR cloud is proportional to the inverse of the dimensionless drag coefficient. If the time-of-flight becomes shorter than the lifetime of the whole system, then mechanisms for continually forming BLR clouds are needed.

  11. Lidar Temperature Measurements During the SOLVE Campaign and the Absence of PSCs from Regions of Very Cold Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walt; Newman, Paul; Lait, Leslie; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Heaps, William; Hostetler, Chris; Neuber, Roland; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol Lidar (AROTEL) measured extremely cold temperatures during all three deployments (December 1-16, 1999, January 14-29, 2000 and February 27-March 15, 2000) of the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). Temperatures were significantly below values observed in previous years with large regions regularly below 191 K and frequent temperature retrievals yielding values at or below 187 K. Temperatures well below the saturation point of type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were regularly encountered but their presence was not well correlated with PSCs observed by the NASA Langley Research Center's Aerosol Lidar co-located with AROTEL. Temperature measurements by meteorological sondes launched within areas traversed by the DC-8 showed minimum temperatures consistent in time and vertical extent with those derived from AROTEL data. Calculations to establish whether PSCs could exist at measured AROTEL temperatures and observed mixing ratios of nitric acid and water vapor showed large regions favorable to PSC formation. On several occasions measured AROTEL temperatures up to 10 K below the NAT saturation temperature were insufficient to produce PSCs even though measured values of nitric acid and water were sufficient for their formation.

  12. The Impact of the Atlantic Cold Tongue on West African Monsoon Onset in Regional Model Simulations for 1998-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic cold tongue (ACT) develops during spring and early summer near the Equator in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Guinea. The hypothesis that the ACT accelerates the timing of West African monsoon (WAM) onset is tested by comparing two regional climate model (RM3) simulation ensembles. Observed sea surface temperatures (SST) that include the ACT are used to force a control ensemble. An idealized, warm SST perturbation is designed to represent lower boundary forcing without the ACT for the experiment ensemble. Summer simulations forced by observed SST and reanalysis boundary conditions for each of five consecutive years are compared to five parallel runs forced by SST with the warm perturbation. The article summarizes the sequence of events leading to the onset of the WAM in the Sahel region. The representation of WAM onset in RM3 simulations is examined and compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and reanalysis data. The study evaluates the sensitivity of WAM onset indicators to the presence of the ACT by analysing the differences between the two simulation ensembles. Results show that the timing of major rainfall events and therefore theWAM onset in the Sahel are not sensitive to the presence of the ACT. However, the warm SST perturbation does increase downstream rainfall rates over West Africa as a consequence of enhanced specific humidity and enhanced northward moisture flux in the lower troposphere.

  13. Characteristics of organic soil in black spruce forests: Implications for the application of land surface and ecosystem models in cold regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, S.; Manies, K.; Harden, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Soil organic layers (OL) play an important role in landatmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon in cold environments. The proper implementation of OL in land surface and ecosystem models is important for predicting dynamic responses to climate warming. Based on the analysis of OL samples of black spruce (Picea mariana), we recommend that implementation of OL for cold regions modeling: (1) use three general organic horizon types (live, fibrous, and amorphous) to represent vertical soil heterogeneity; (2) implement dynamics of OL over the course of disturbance, as there are significant differences of OL thickness between young and mature stands; and (3) use two broad drainage classes to characterize spatial heterogeneity, as there are significant differences in OL thickness between dry and wet sites. Implementation of these suggestions into models has the potential to substantially improve how OL dynamics influence variability in surface temperature and soil moisture in cold regions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophys.ical Union.

  14. Army Reserve Expands Net Zero Energy, Water, Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.

    2015-04-14

    In 2012, the Army initiated a Net Zero (NZ) program to establish NZ energy, water, and/or waste goals at installations across the U.S. In 2013, the U.S. Army Reserve expanded this program to cover all three categories at different types of Reserve Centers (RCs) across 5 regions. Projects identified at 10 pilot sites resulted in an average savings potential from recommended measures of 90% for energy, 60% for water, and 83% for waste. This article provides results of these efforts.

  15. Coupling of the simultaneous heat and water model with a distributed hydrological model and evaluation of the combined model in a cold region watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To represent the effects of frozen soil on hydrology in cold regions, a new physically based distributed hydrological model has been developed by coupling the simultaneous heat and water model (SHAW) with the geomorphology based distributed hydrological model (GBHM), under the framework of the water...

  16. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  17. Development of An Enthalpy-based Frozen Soil Model and Its Validation in A Cold Region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, H.

    2015-12-01

    A physically-based frozen soil model was developed based on the Water and Energy Budget-based Distributed Hydrological model (WEB-DHM) for the simulation of water and energy transfer in cold regions. In order to simulate the soil freezing/thawing processes stably and efficiently, a two-step algorithm is applied to solve the non-linear energy governing equations: 1) the thermal diffusion equation is used to simulate the heat fluxes between soil layers without considering liquid-ice phase change; 2) a freezing/thawing scheme is used to derive soil temperature, liquid water content and ice content from enthalpy conservation, mass conservation, and freezing point depression equations. In the algorithm, a parameterization set is adopted to update hydraulic and thermal properties by considering the presence of ice and low soil temperatures. The performance of the frozen soil model was validated at point scale in a typical mountainous permafrost region of Binggou Watershed, Heihe Basin, Northwest China. Results show that the model can achieve a convergent solution at a typical time step (hourly) and layer sizes (centimeters) of current land process models. It is able to reproduce the observed soil freezing/thawing processes and hydrological processes. The simulated profiles of soil temperature, liquid water content, ice content and thawing front depth are in good agreement with the observations and the characteristics of permafrost. The freeze-thaw cycle in frozen soil evolution was continuously represented by the contour map of soil temperature and ice content of all soil layers. Therefore, this model can be coupled with hydrological, ecological and climate models to deepen our physical understanding in permafrost regions.

  18. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  19. Differential Acetylation of Histone H3 at the Regulatory Region of OsDREB1b Promoter Facilitates Chromatin Remodelling and Transcription Activation during Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dipan; Paul, Amit; Roy, Adrita; Ghosh, Ritesh; Ganguly, Payel; Chaudhuri, Shubho

    2014-01-01

    The rice ortholog of DREB1, OsDREB1b, is transcriptionally induced by cold stress and over-expression of OsDREB1b results in increase tolerance towards high salt and freezing stress. This spatio-temporal expression of OsDREB1b is preceded by the change in chromatin structure at the promoter and the upstream region for gene activation. The promoter and the upstream region of OsDREB1b genes appear to be arranged into a nucleosome array. Nucleosome mapping of ∼700bp upstream region of OsDREB1b shows two positioned nucleosomes between −610 to −258 and a weakly positioned nucleosome at the core promoter and the TSS. Upon cold stress, there is a significant change in the nucleosome arrangement at the upstream region with increase in DNaseI hypersensitivity or MNase digestion in the vicinity of cis elements and TATA box at the core promoter. ChIP assays shows hyper-acetylation of histone H3K9 throughout the locus whereas region specific increase was observed in H3K14ac and H3K27ac. Moreover, there is an enrichment of RNA PolII occupancy at the promoter region during transcription activation. There is no significant change in the H3 occupancy in OsDREB1b locus negating the possibility of nucleosome loss during cold stress. Interestingly, cold induced enhanced transcript level of OsDREB1b as well as histone H3 acetylation at the upstream region was found to diminish when stressed plants were returned to normal temperature. The result indicates absolute necessity of changes in chromatin conformation for the transcription up-regulation of OsDREB1b gene in response to cold stress. The combined results show the existence of closed chromatin conformation at the upstream and promoter region of OsDREB1b in the transcription “off” state. During cold stress, changes in region specific histone modification marks promote the alteration of chromatin structure to facilitate the binding of transcription machinery for proper gene expression. PMID:24940877

  20. Hydrochemical evolution of Na-SO4-Cl groundwaters in a cold, semi-arid region of southern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnachev, V. P.; Banks, D.; Berezovsky, A. Y.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.

    1999-12-01

    The Shira region of Khakassia in southern Siberia exhibits many features governing the evolution of groundwater and surface-water chemistry that are common to other cold, semi-arid areas of the world: (1) a continental climate, (2) location in a rain shadow, (3) low density of surface-water drainage, (4) occurrence of saline lakes, and (5) occurrence of palaeo- and modern evaporite mineralisation. In lowland areas of Shira, the more saline groundwaters and lake waters have a sodium-sulphate (-chloride) composition. Results of thermodynamic modelling suggest that these evolve by a combination of silicate weathering and gypsum and halite dissolution, coupled with carbonate precipitation to remove calcium and bicarbonate ions. An approximately 1:1 sodium:sulphate ratio occurs even in groundwaters from non-evaporite-bearing aquifers. This may indicate the formation of secondary sodium sulphate evaporites (in or near saline lakes or in soil profiles where the water table is shallow), which are subsequently distributed throughout the study area by atmospheric transport. Several urban groundwaters are characterised by very high nitrate concentrations, conceivably derived from sewage/latrine leakage.

  1. Development of an enthalpy-based frozen soil model and its validation in a cold region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiyi; Koike, Toshio; Yang, Kun; Wang, Lei; Shrestha, Maheswor; Lawford, Peter

    2016-05-01

    An enthalpy-based frozen soil model was developed for the simulation of water and energy transfer in cold regions. To simulate the soil freezing/thawing processes stably and efficiently, a three-step algorithm was applied to solve the nonlinear governing equations: (1) a thermal diffusion equation was implemented to simulate the heat conduction between soil layers; (2) a freezing/thawing scheme used a critical temperature criterion to judge the phase status and introduced enthalpy and total water mass into freezing depression equation to represent ice formation/melt and corresponding latent heat release/absorption; and (3) a water flow scheme was employed to describe the liquid movement within frozen soil. In addition, a parameterization set of hydraulic and thermal properties was updated by considering the frozen soil effect. The performance of the frozen soil model was validated at point scale in a typical mountainous permafrost basin of China. An ice profile initialization method is proposed for permafrost modeling. Results show that the model can achieve a convergent solution at a time step of hourly and a surface layer thickness of centimeters that are typically used in current land surface models. The simulated profiles of soil temperature, liquid water content, ice content and thawing front depth are in good agreement with the observations and the characteristics of permafrost. The model is capable of continuously reproducing the diurnal and seasonal freeze-thaw cycle and simulating frozen soil hydrological processes.

  2. Modeling and predicting the shape of the far-infrared to submillimeter emission in ultra-compact HII regions and cold clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Mény, C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bot, C.; Cambrésy, L.; Demyk, K.; Gromov, V.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Veneziani, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Dust properties are very likely affected by the environment in which dust grains evolve. For instance, some analyses of cold clumps (7-17 K) indicate that the aggregation process is favored in dense environments. However, studying warm (30-40 K) dust emission at long wavelength (λ> 300 μm) has been limited because it is difficult to combine far infrared-to-millimeter (FIR-to-mm) spectral coverage and high angular resolution for observations of warm dust grains. Aims: Using Herschel data from 70 to 500 μm, which are part of the Herschel infrared Galactic (Hi-GAL) survey combined with 1.1 mm data from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), we compared emission in two types of environments: ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions, and cold molecular clumps (denoted as cold clumps). With this comparison we tested dust emission models in the FIR-to-mm domain that reproduce emission in the diffuse medium, in these two environments (UCHII regions and cold clumps). We also investigated their ability to predict the dust emission in our Galaxy. Methods: We determined the emission spectra in twelve UCHII regions and twelve cold clumps, and derived the dust temperature (T) using the recent two-level system (TLS) model with three sets of parameters and the so-called T-β (temperature-dust emissivity index) phenomenological models, with β set to 1.5, 2 and 2.5. Results: We tested the applicability of the TLS model in warm regions for the first time. This analysis indicates distinct trends in the dust emission between cold and warm environments that are visible through changes in the dust emissivity index. However, with the use of standard parameters, the TLS model is able to reproduce the spectral behavior observed in cold and warm regions, from the change of the dust temperature alone, whereas a T-β model requires β to be known. Tables 2, 4, 7 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Vernalization Requirement and the Chromosomal VRN1-Region can Affect Freezing Tolerance and Expression of Cold-Regulated Genes in Festuca pratensis

    PubMed Central

    Ergon, Åshild; Melby, Tone I.; Höglind, Mats; Rognli, Odd A.

    2016-01-01

    Plants adapted to cold winters go through annual cycles of gain followed by loss of freezing tolerance (cold acclimation and deacclimation). Warm spells during winter and early spring can cause deacclimation, and if temperatures drop, freezing damage may occur. Many plants are vernalized during winter, a process making them competent to flower in the following summer. In winter cereals, a coincidence in the timing of vernalization saturation, deacclimation, downregulation of cold-induced genes, and reduced ability to reacclimate, occurs under long photoperiods and is under control of the main regulator of vernalization requirement in cereals, VRN1, and/or closely linked gene(s). Thus, the probability of freezing damage after a warm spell may depend on both vernalization saturation and photoperiod. We investigated the role of vernalization and the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.), a perennial grass species. Two F2 populations, divergently selected for high and low vernalization requirement, were studied. Each genotype was characterized for the copy number of one of the four parental haplotypes of the VRN1-region. Clonal plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks or vernalized/cold acclimated for a total of 9 weeks, after which the F2 populations reached different levels of vernalization saturation. Vernalized and cold acclimated plants were deacclimated for 1 week and then reacclimated for 2 weeks. All treatments were given at 8 h photoperiod. Flowering response, freezing tolerance and expression of the cold-induced genes VRN1, MADS3, CBF6, COR14B, CR7 (BLT14), LOS2, and IRI1 was measured. We found that some genotypes can lose some freezing tolerance after vernalization and a deacclimation–reacclimation cycle. The relationship between vernalization and freezing tolerance was complex. We found effects of the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance in plants cold acclimated for 2 weeks, timing of heading after 9 weeks of

  4. Vernalization Requirement and the Chromosomal VRN1-Region can Affect Freezing Tolerance and Expression of Cold-Regulated Genes in Festuca pratensis.

    PubMed

    Ergon, Åshild; Melby, Tone I; Höglind, Mats; Rognli, Odd A

    2016-01-01

    Plants adapted to cold winters go through annual cycles of gain followed by loss of freezing tolerance (cold acclimation and deacclimation). Warm spells during winter and early spring can cause deacclimation, and if temperatures drop, freezing damage may occur. Many plants are vernalized during winter, a process making them competent to flower in the following summer. In winter cereals, a coincidence in the timing of vernalization saturation, deacclimation, downregulation of cold-induced genes, and reduced ability to reacclimate, occurs under long photoperiods and is under control of the main regulator of vernalization requirement in cereals, VRN1, and/or closely linked gene(s). Thus, the probability of freezing damage after a warm spell may depend on both vernalization saturation and photoperiod. We investigated the role of vernalization and the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance of meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds.), a perennial grass species. Two F2 populations, divergently selected for high and low vernalization requirement, were studied. Each genotype was characterized for the copy number of one of the four parental haplotypes of the VRN1-region. Clonal plants were cold acclimated for 2 weeks or vernalized/cold acclimated for a total of 9 weeks, after which the F2 populations reached different levels of vernalization saturation. Vernalized and cold acclimated plants were deacclimated for 1 week and then reacclimated for 2 weeks. All treatments were given at 8 h photoperiod. Flowering response, freezing tolerance and expression of the cold-induced genes VRN1, MADS3, CBF6, COR14B, CR7 (BLT14), LOS2, and IRI1 was measured. We found that some genotypes can lose some freezing tolerance after vernalization and a deacclimation-reacclimation cycle. The relationship between vernalization and freezing tolerance was complex. We found effects of the VRN1-region on freezing tolerance in plants cold acclimated for 2 weeks, timing of heading after 9 weeks of

  5. Preliminary thoughts concerning potential US Army threats/roles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.; Solomon, K.A.; Miles, J.T.

    1991-06-01

    The rate at which the current world military/political perspective is changing demands consideration of a broader spectrum of potential threats then has been the case for the past few decades--during which the Soviet Union was the preeminent threat. Seemingly overnight, the cold war ceased, the requirement for massive U.S. military counters to the Soviet Union forces faded, and an era of constant (obvious) military threat disappeared. This situation has in turn been revolutionized by the Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the U.S. response. The paper addresses part of the problem facing military planners by defining a spectrum of threats that typify those the U.S. Army might face over the next decade or two. The purpose of the threat set is to support the evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness, to the U.S. Army, of advanced technologies. The set of threats is intended to provide a complete set of characteristics rather then to be a complete list of the possibilities; it is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Although largely completed before the war with Iraq started, its content is still valid in that its purpose is to provide a framework for thinking about future U.S. Army technology needs.

  6. Hydraulic systems performance of Army engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, H.W.; Lestz, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A technical evaluation of qualified military specification lubricants was started by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research and Development Center and was performed at the U.S. Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory (AFLRL) located at Southwest Research Institute. This work was conducted to determine if such lubricants can be used as hydraulic fluids in Army Commercial Construction Equipment (CCE) and Selected Material Handling Equipment (SMHE). Sixteen military specification lubricants were extensively evaluated using twelve selected tests required by equipment manufacturers and one test developed by AFLRL in conjunction with John Deere. From the data developed, lubricants meeting Army specifications passed 88 percent of all the tests. It appears that the Army engine oils are good potential candidates for use as hydraulic and power transmission lubricants within the Army CCE/SMHE systems. Areas of concern include copper corrosion, wet brake/clutch frictional performance, and final drive gear wear.

  7. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command. PMID:25830799

  8. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance is an abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and ...

  9. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  10. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  11. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January 15.... Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for the Army Science Board to review the results of...

  12. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date: Wednesday, July 17..., Colorado 80903-1685. 5. Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for Army Science Board members...

  13. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26, 2012...: Adopt the findings and recommendations for the following studies: Strategic Direction for Army...

  14. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, Attn: ATTG-OPS-EI...

  15. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, ATTN: ATTG-OPS-EO...

  16. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting: Thursday... standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant training and education for its force...

  17. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Register (71 FR 46052), the Department of the Army issued a final rule. This final rule corrects the... Litigation Division when complaints citing the Privacy Act are filed in order to correct the mailing address in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  18. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  19. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... policies are violated should be identified to ASA (I&E) for resolution. (e) Army leadership and...

  20. Army Space Systems For Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerman, Ronald L.; Gomez, Richard B.

    1988-04-01

    Army combat forces involved in global military operations require knowledge of the terrain and accurate positioning and navigation capability to effectively perform their missions. Combat critical data from satellite-based systems to augment ground and airborne data collection, processing, and dissemination systems are crucial for the delivery and use of the needed information and intelligence in near-real time. The Army is developing ground-based testbed systems to utilize terrain and weather data collected from space-based platforms to enhance Army commanders' battlefield capabilities, and is researching new applications for the NAVSAT Global Positioning System and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-sponsored (DARPA) LIGHTSAT program that are unique to the Army. In addition, the Army is designing experiments to be conducted on the Space Shuttle.

  1. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. PMID:27001366

  2. Variable regions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum strains identified by comparative genomics: application to selective breeding for cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease is one of the most frequent causes of elevated loss in juvenile salmonids, and the development of effective control strategies is a high priority to aquaculturists, management agencies, and conservationists. Since 2005, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) have been bred ...

  3. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Anbergen, Hauke; Collier, Nathaniel; Costard, Francois; Ferrry, Michel; Frampton, Andrew; Frederick, Jennifer; Holmen, Johan; Jost, Anne; Kokh, Samuel; Kurylyk, Barret; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Molson, John; Orgogozo, Laurent; Rivière, Agnès; Rühaak, Wolfram; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Therrien, René; Vidstrand, Patrik

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change in boreal regions has received considerable attention recently due to the warming trends that have been experienced in recent decades and are expected to intensify in the future. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost. For example, the thermal state of the surrounding soil influences the energy and water budget of the surface water bodies. Also, these water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that disturb the thermal regimes of permafrost and may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model the past and future evolution of landscapes, rivers, lakes and associated groundwater systems in a changing climate. However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, and the lack of study can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. Numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for a purely thermic 1D equation with phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare the results from different codes to provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. Such inter-code comparisons can propel discussions to try to improve code performances. A benchmark exercise was initialized in 2014 with a kick-off meeting in Paris in November. Participants from USA, Canada, Germany, Sweden and France convened, representing altogether 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. They

  4. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison phase results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Christophe; Rühaak, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impacts in permafrost regions have received considerable attention recently due to the pronounced warming trends experienced in recent decades and which have been projected into the future. Large portions of these permafrost regions are characterized by surface water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost often generating taliks (unfrozen zones) within the permafrost that allow for hydrologic interactions between the surface water bodies and underlying aquifers and thus influence the hydrologic response of a landscape to climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model past and future evolution such units (Kurylyk et al. 2014). However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, which can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. A benchmark exercise was initialized at the end of 2014. Participants convened from USA, Canada, Europe, representing 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones (Kurylyk et al. 2014; Grenier et al. in prep.; Rühaak et al. 2015). They range from simpler, purely thermal 1D cases to more complex, coupled 2D TH cases (benchmarks TH1, TH2, and TH3). Some experimental cases conducted in a cold room complement the validation approach. A web site hosted by LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement) is an interaction platform for the participants and hosts the test case databases at the following address: https://wiki.lsce.ipsl.fr/interfrost. The results of the first stage of the benchmark exercise will be presented. We will mainly focus on the inter-comparison of participant results for the coupled cases TH2 & TH3. Both cases

  5. U.S. Army's Center of Excellence for Spectral Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Mark K.; Roper, William E.

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in the field of spectral sensing technology have elucidated the benefits of multi-spectral and hyperspectral sensing to the Army's user community. These advancements, when properly exploited can provide the Army with additional and improved automated terrain analysis, image understanding, object detection, and material characterization capabilities. The U.S. Army, led by the Topographic Engineering Center, has established a Center of Excellence for Spectral Sensing Technology. This Center conducts Army wide collaborative research on, and development and demonstration of spectral sensing, processing and exploitation technologies. The Center's collaborative efforts integrate Army programs across multiple disciplines and form a baseline program consisting of coordinated technology thrusts. The program's applied research and demonstration components will in turn support an Army spectral Strategic Technology Objective (STO) that will ultimately support and leverage joint service efforts starting in FY00. Existing efforts span the domains of sensor hardware, data processing architectures, algorithms, and, signal processing and exploitation technologies across wide spectral regions. These thrusts in turn enable progress and performance improvement in the automated analysis, understanding, classification, discrimination, and identification of terrestrial objects, and materials. The participants draw upon common scientific processes and disciplines to attack similar problems related to different categories and domains of phenomenology. This paper describes the Center's program and objectives along with an explanation of the Army's strategy and approach in support of its program objectives.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Marathon Battery, Cold Spring, NY. (Third remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-29

    The Marathon Battery site is a former battery-manufacturing plant in Cold Spring, Putnam County, New York. The site is composed of three study areas: Area I, which consists of East Foundry Cove Marsh and Constitution Marsh; Area II, which encompasses the former plant, presently a book-storage warehouse, the surrounding grounds, and a vault with cadmium contaminated sediment dredged from East Foundry Cove; and Area III, which includes East Foundry Cove (48 acres), West Foundry Cove and the Hudson River in the vicinity of Cold Spring pier and a sewer outfall. Contamination in Area III emanates from plant waste water that was discharged via the city sewer system into the Hudson River at Cold Spring Pier or, in some instances, through a storm sewer into East Foundry Cove. A Record of Decision (ROD) was signed for Area I in September 1986 with cleanup activities to include dredging the East Foundry Cove Marsh. The second ROD for the site was signed in September 1988 and included decontamination of the battery plant and soil excavation in Area II. The 1989 ROD represents the third and final operable unit for the site and addresses sediment contamination in Area III. The primary contaminants of concern affecting sediment at the site are metals, including cadmium and nickel.

  7. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  8. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...: Attn: Designated Federal Officer, Dept. of Academic Affairs, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA 17013....

  9. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  10. The Changing Cold Regions Network: Improving the Understanding and Prediction of Changing Land, Water, and Climate in the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.; Chun, K. P.; Shook, K.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Within the cold interior of western and northern Canada, rapid and widespread environmental changes are taking place, which are of serious concern for society and have a range of implications from local to regional and global scales. From a scientific standpoint there is an urgent need to understand the changes and develop improved diagnostic and predictive modelling tools to deal with the uncertainty faced in the future. The Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) is a research consortium of over 50 Canadian university and government scientists and international researchers aimed at addressing these issues within the geographic domain of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins. CCRN's primary focus is to integrate existing and new experimental data with modelling and remote sensing products to understand, diagnose and predict changing land, water and climate, and their interactions and feedbacks. To support these activities, the network utilizes a suite of 14 world-class water, ecosystem, cryosphere and climate (WECC) observatories across this region that provide exceptional opportunities to observe change, investigate processes and their dynamics, and develop and test environmental models. This talk will briefly describe the CCRN thematic components and WECC observatories, and will then describe some of the observed environmental changes and their linkages across the northern and mountainous parts of the network study domain. In particular, this will include changes in permafrost, terrestrial vegetation, snowcover, glaciers, and river discharge in relation to observed climatic changes across the region. The observations draw on a wide range of literature sources and statistical analyses of federal and provincial regional monitoring network data, while more detailed observations at some of the WECC observatories help to show how these regional changes are manifested at local scales and vice versa. A coordinated special observation and analysis period across all

  11. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  12. Diving of Great Shearwaters (Puffinus gravis) in Cold and Warm Water Regions of the South Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Ronconi, Robert A.; Ryan, Peter G.; Ropert-Coudert, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Background Among the most widespread seabirds in the world, shearwaters of the genus Puffinus are also some of the deepest diving members of the Procellariiformes. Maximum diving depths are known for several Puffinus species, but dive depths or diving behaviour have never been recorded for great shearwaters (P. gravis), the largest member of this genus. This study reports the first high sampling rate (2 s) of depth and diving behaviour for Puffinus shearwaters. Methodology/Principal Findings Time-depth recorders (TDRs) were deployed on two female great shearwaters nesting on Inaccessible Island in the South Atlantic Ocean, recording 10 consecutive days of diving activity. Remote sensing imagery and movement patterns of 8 males tracked by satellite telemetry over the same period were used to identify probable foraging areas used by TDR-equipped females. The deepest and longest dive was to 18.9 m and lasted 40 s, but most (>50%) dives were <2 m deep. Diving was most frequent near dawn and dusk, with <0.5% of dives occurring at night. The two individuals foraged in contrasting oceanographic conditions, one in cold (8 to 10°C) water of the Sub-Antarctic Front, likely 1000 km south of the breeding colony, and the other in warmer (10 to 16°C) water of the Sub-tropical Frontal Zone, at the same latitude as the colony, possibly on the Patagonian Shelf, 4000 km away. The cold water bird spent fewer days commuting, conducted four times as many dives as the warm water bird, dived deeper on average, and had a greater proportion of bottom time during dives. Conclusions/Significance General patterns of diving activity were consistent with those of other shearwaters foraging in cold and warm water habitats. Great shearwaters are likely adapted to forage in a wide range of oceanographic conditions, foraging mostly with shallow dives but capable of deep diving. PMID:21152089

  13. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  14. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    .... Background In the April 14, 2010, issue of the Federal Register (75 FR 19302), the Army issued a proposed..., 2007 (72 FR 55864) that became effective on November 30, 2007. The Army received no comments on its... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of...

  15. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  16. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption. FOR FURTHER...

  17. Quality in Government: The Army Intern Intake Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungvarsky, Diane M.; Lilienthal, Richard A.

    The development of the Army Intern Intake Survey (AIIS) is described. The AIIS focuses on the Army civilian intern program, a vehicle for entry-level employees to progress in Army civilian jobs, which produces a profile of past and current interns. The AIIS will identify changes in intern quality over time and will make comparisons of Army interns…

  18. 75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 21, 2010....

  19. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  20. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  1. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting...

  2. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  3. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  4. Army (MANTECH) Thrust Area Concept: Optics Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-01-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  5. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  6. Hyperspectral imager development at Army Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam

    2008-04-01

    Development of robust compact optical imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents as well as targets and backgrounds. Spectral features arise due to the material properties of objects as a result of the emission, reflection, and absorption of light. Using hyperspectral imaging one can acquire images with narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene in detection of objects. Traditional hyperspectral imaging systems use gratings and prisms that acquire one-dimensional spectral images and require relative motion of sensor and scene in addition to data processing to form a two-dimensional image cube. There is much interest in developing hyperspectral imagers using tunable filters that acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up an image cube as a function of time. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers using a number of novel tunable filter technologies. These include acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the UV to the long wave infrared, diffractive optics technology that can provide image cubes either in a single spectral region or simultaneously in different spectral regions using a single moving lens or by using a lenslet array, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Fabry-Perot (FP) tunable etalons to develop miniature sensors that take advantage of the advances in microfabrication and packaging technologies. New materials are being developed to design AOTFs and a full Stokes polarization imager has been developed, diffractive optics lenslet arrays are being explored, and novel FP tunable filters are under fabrication for the development of novel miniature hyperspectral imagers. Here we will brief on all the technologies being developed and present

  7. Health assessment for Marathon Battery, Cold Springs, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD001959757. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-16

    The 11-acre Marathon Battery Site (MBS) Plant is located in Putnam County, Cold Springs, New York. The site is bordered to the east by a wooded area and to the south by a junkyard and Foundary Cove. Foundary Cove is a wetland marsh connected by several channels to the Hudson River. Various heavy metals have been identified on-site. They include arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, lead, nickel, and zinc. In addition, a previous ATSDR memorandum reports the results of a ground-water sample containing high concentrations of trichloroethylene. Based on the preliminary information reviewed concerning on-site and off-site contamination, MBS represents a potential public health threat to area residents.

  8. Army Distance Learning: Potential for Reducing Shortages in Army Enlisted Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Michael G.; Leonard, Henry A.; Winkler, John D.

    The potential of distance learning (DL) to expedite the U.S. Army's efforts to redress personnel shortages in Army enlisted occupations was studied by evaluating how DL-based training strategies might affect skill shortages in the following occupations: helicopter repairer; electronic switching system operator; microwave systems…

  9. Typology of Army Families: Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Russell C.

    The active duty Army has approximately 400,000 families who on a daily basis interact with the largest military system in the world. An all-pervasive culture unto itself, the Army affects the lives of each one of these people. This research was begun in order to look at the effects which this lifestyle has and how individuals and families…

  10. Bot armies as threats to network security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  11. [Effect of tillage patterns on the structure of weed communities in oat fields in the cold and arid region of North China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Li; Wu, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Jun

    2014-06-01

    In order to clarify the effects of tillage patterns on farmland weed community structure and crop production characteristics, based on 10 years location experiment with no-tillage, subsoiling and conventional tillage in the cold and arid region of North China, and supplementary experiment of plowing after 10 years no-tillage and subsoiling, oat was planted in 2 soils under different tillage patterns, and field weed total density, dominant weed types, weed diversity index, field weed biomass and oats yield were measured. The results showed that the regional weed community was dominated by foxtail weed (Setaira viridis); the weed density under long-term no-tillage was 2.20-5.14 times of tillage at different growing stages of oat, but there were no significant differences between conditional tillage and plowing after long-term no-tillage and subsoiling. Field weed Shannon diversity indices were 0.429 and 0.531, respectively, for sandy chestnut soil and loamy meadow soil under no-tillage conditions, and field weed biomass values were 1.35 and 2.26 times of plowing treatment, while the oat biomass values were only 2807.4 kg x hm(-2) and 4053.9 kg x hm(-2), decreased by 22.3% and 46.2%, respectively. The results showed that the weed community characteristics were affected by both tillage patterns and soil types. Long-term no-tillage farmland in the cold and arid region of North China could promote the natural evolution of plant communities by keeping more perennial weeds, and the plowing pattern lowered the annual weed density, eliminated perennial weeds with shallow roots, and stimulated perennial weeds with deep roots. PMID:25223030

  12. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  13. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  14. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  15. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  16. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  17. Comparison of effects of cold-region soil/snow processes and the uncertainties from model forcing data on permafrost physical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Rahul; Jain, Atul K.

    2016-03-01

    We used a land surface model to (1) evaluate the influence of recent improvements in modeling cold-region soil/snow physics on near-surface permafrost physical characteristics (within 0-3 m soil column) in the northern high latitudes (NHL) and (2) compare them with uncertainties from climate and land-cover data sets. Specifically, four soil/snow processes are investigated: deep soil energetics, soil organic carbon (SOC) effects on soil properties, wind compaction of snow, and depth hoar formation. In the model, together they increased the contemporary NHL permafrost area by 9.2 × 106 km2 (from 2.9 to 12.3—without and with these processes, respectively) and reduced historical degradation rates. In comparison, permafrost area using different climate data sets (with annual air temperature difference of ˜0.5°C) differed by up to 2.3 × 106 km2, with minimal contribution of up to 0.7 × 106 km2 from substantial land-cover differences. Individually, the strongest role in permafrost increase was from deep soil energetics, followed by contributions from SOC and wind compaction, while depth hoar decreased permafrost. The respective contribution on 0-3 m permafrost stability also followed a similar pattern. However, soil temperature and moisture within vegetation root zone (˜0-1 m), which strongly influence soil biogeochemistry, were only affected by the latter three processes. The ecosystem energy and water fluxes were impacted the least due to these soil/snow processes. While it is evident that simulated permafrost physical characteristics benefit from detailed treatment of cold-region biogeophysical processes, we argue that these should also lead to integrated improvements in modeling of biogeochemistry.

  18. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  19. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  20. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  1. Global characteristics of the cold plasma in the equatorial plasmapause region as deduced from the geos 1 mutual impedance probe

    SciTech Connect

    Decreu, P.M.E.; Beghin, C.; Parrot, M.

    1982-02-01

    Thermal plasma parameters derived by the muntal impedance experiment on GEOS are described. The experiment is well suited to the measurement of the electron density and temperature of the outer plasmasphere (when kT/sub e//N/sub e/<1.6 eV/cm/sup 3/). This investigation of the whole set of data supplied by GEOS 1 (4regions: the plasmasphere, an intermediate region of ionospheric refilling, and the plasma trough. In the plasmasphere, we observe profiles with N/sub e/proportionalL/sup -4/, while T/sub e/ stands around 10,000 /sup 0/K or less. The intermediate region, situated next to the plasmasphere and above it, is always present in the day sector, where the ionospheric source plays a leading part. In that zone, the plasma parameters, poorly known up to now, exhibit N/sub e/ values approx.2 to 20 cm/sup -3/, together with T/sub e/ values of 20,000 /sup 0/K on the average, dispersed over a 5,000 to 100,000 /sup 0/K range during disturbances. In the night sector, the intermediate region is seen only during the recovery phase. The region of depleted density is observed at the higher L values in the night and morning MTL sectors. There, plasmas out of Maxwellian equilibrium are seen under disturbed conditions. The dynamic response of the thermal plasma parameters to temporal variations of the a/sub m/ index of magnetic activity follows a known scenario as concerns N/sub e/, making apparent a night-to-day, MTL dependent time delay. As concerns T/sub e/, the dynamical study reveals striking features, such as the persistance of the T/sub e/ modifications into the dusk sector, the interpretation of which remains to be clarified.

  2. Investigating the performance and energy saving potential of Chinese commercial building benchmark models for the hot humid and severe cold climate regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Lesley Anne

    2011-12-01

    The demand for energy in China is growing at an alarming rate. Buildings have become a significant component of the energy-demand mix accounting for nearly one-quarter of the country's total primary energy consumption. This study compares the building code standards for office and hotel buildings in the hot humid and severe cold climate regions of China and the United States. Benchmark office and hotel building models have been developed for Guangzhou and Harbin, China that meets China's minimum national and regional building energy codes with the integration of common design and construction practices for each region. These models are compared to the ASHRAE standard based US reference building models for Houston, Texas and Duluth, Minnesota which have similar climate conditions. The research further uses a building energy optimization tool to optimize the Chinese benchmarks using existing US products to identify the primary areas for potential energy savings. In the case of the Harbin models, an economic analysis has also been performed to determine the economic feasibility of alternative building designs. The most significant energy-saving options are then presented as recommendations for potential improvements to current China building energy codes.

  3. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  4. U.S. Army Signal School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Signal Center and School, Fort Monmouth, NJ.

    The U. S. Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, provides military education and appropriate practical training for Armed Forces men and women to prepare them for positions in communications-electronics activities and familiarize them with the application of doctrine, tactics, logistics, and electronic techniques pertinent to the…

  5. Improving the Classroom Performance of Army Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melching, William H.; Larson, Susan M.

    Using "A Model of the Functions of Master Instructor" (HumRRO-TR-73-23) as a guide, procedures and materials for training Army instructors to improve their classroom effectiveness were developed. In constructing the model, various materials on instructor characteristics and responsibilities in four main areas (training programs, classroom…

  6. Army health care operations in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard S K; Gillan, Eileen; Dingmann, Philip; Casinelli, Paul; Taylor, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Four years of warfare in the urban environment of Iraq have produced fundamental changes in the Army's health-care system. First, improved communications and air evacuation have streamlined the transport of the wounded soldierfrom the battlefield to stateside medical centers. Second, individual ballistic armor has decreased the number of U.S. troops killed while the number of wounded soldiers has increased. Third, battling an unseen enemy has produced a marked increase in acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Deployment of soldiers with chronic mental health disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit disorder, and depression is problematic. The stress of long combat tours has doubled the incidence of abuse and neglect in children of deployed service members. Comparedto active-componentsoldiers, the prevalence ofmental health disorders is twice as great in soldiers of the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. Finally, the difficulty in determining friend vs. foe in Iraq results in the incarceration of thousands of Iraqis creating both medical and ethical challenges for Army physicians. PMID:18286877

  7. Handbook on Volunteers in Army Community Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This handbook has been prepared for the purpose of offering guidance and assistance in the development and administration of a volunteer program within Army Community Service. It contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 is the Introduction. Chapter 2, Volunteers Are Partners and Team Members, considers the importance of attitudes, agreement on volunteer…

  8. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... and/or DAC police accompanying civilian law enforcement officers remain directly responsible to,...

  9. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S... issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study techniques, assemble a working ] group for the concentrated review of institutional policies and a working group to address...

  10. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S... issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study techniques, assemble a working group for the concentrated review of institutional policies and a working group to address...

  11. Artic and subarctic environmental analyses utilizing ERTS-1 imagery. Cold regions environmental analysis based on ERTS-1 imagery (preprint)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M. (Principal Investigator); Haugen, R. K.; Gatto, L. W.; Slaughter, C. W.; Marlar, T. L.; Mckim, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. An overriding problem in arctic and subarctic environmental research has been the absence of long-term observational data and the sparseness of geographical coverage of existing data. A first look report is presented on the use of ERTS-1 imagery as a major tool in two large area environmental studies: (1) investigation of sedimentation and other nearshore marine processes in Cook Inlet, Alaska; and (2) a regional study of permafrost regimes in the discontinuous permafrost zone of Alaska. These studies incorporate ground truth acquisition techniques that are probably similar to most ERTS investigations. Studies of oceanographic processes in Cook Inlet will be focused on seasonal changes in nearshore bathymetry, tidal and major current circulation patterns, and coastal sedimentation processes, applicable to navigation, construction, and maintenance of harbors. Analyses will be made of the regional permafrost distribution and regimes in the Upper Koyukuk-Kobuk River area located in NW Alaska.

  12. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors. PMID:15646182

  13. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  14. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  15. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  16. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Steven G.; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  17. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six component Army STARRS studies. These include: an integrated study of historical administrative data systems (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e., those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQ] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. DoD/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

  18. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  19. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  20. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  1. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  2. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  3. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  4. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  5. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  6. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  7. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581... REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section)...

  8. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  9. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581... REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section)...

  10. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  11. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  12. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. You may also have a sore throat, cough, ... symptoms are: Nasal congestion Runny nose Scratchy throat Sneezing Adults and older children with colds generally have ...

  13. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Cold Intolerance Many polio ... index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Back to top Contact ...

  14. 75 FR 52733 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Fort Bliss Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... Mr. John F. Barrera, IMWE-BLS-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail... site ( http://www.bliss.army.mil ) or at the following locations: El Paso, TX: Richard Burges Regional..., IMWE-BLS-PA; Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; telephone: (915) 568- 4505; fax: (915) 568-2995; e-mail:...

  15. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: bliss.eis@conus.army.mil . FOR... libraries: In El Paso (TX), the Richard Burges Regional Library, 9600 Dyer; the Irving Schwartz Branch... stationing package. Alternative 5 land use changes allow fixed sites (e.g., military bivouac),...

  16. Poor Design and Management Hamper Army's Basic Skills Education Program. Report to the Secretary of the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) was studied to consider whether it was properly designed to determine the basic skills needed in Army jobs and to be effectively implemented. Information and reports on BSEP were reviewed, and three major commands were selected for evaluation. In designing the program, the Army did not identify the…

  17. Measurements and modeling of cold 13CH4 spectra in the 3750-4700 cm-1 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. R.; Nikitin, A. V.; Sung, K.; Rey, M.; Tashkun, S. A.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Crawford, T. J.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    A new study of 13CH4 line intensities and positions was performed in the Octad region between 3750 and 4700 cm-1. Using 13C-enriched samples, spectra were recorded with both the McMath-Pierce FTS at Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona and the Bruker IFS-125HR at JPL. Sample temperatures ranged between 80 and 296 K. Line positions and intensities of ~15,000 features were retrieved at different temperatures by non-linear least squares curve-fitting procedures. Intensities were used to estimate the lower state energies for 60% of the features in order to determine quantum assignments up to J=10. A preliminary analysis was performed using the effective Hamiltonian and the effective dipole transition moment expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators adapted to spherical top molecules. Selected assignments were made up to J=10 for all 24 sub-vibrational states of the Octad; these were modeled for 4752 experimental line positions and 3301 selected line intensities fitted with RMS standard deviations of 0.004 cm-1 and 6.9%, respectively. Integrated intensities of the eight Octad bands are compared to ab initio variational calculations. A prediction of the 13CH4 is given, but further analysis to improve the calculation will be reported in the future.

  18. Grizzly bear use of army cutworm moths in the Yellowstone Ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, Steven P.; French, Marilynn G.; Knight, Richard R.

    1994-01-01

    The ecology of alpine aggregations of army cutworm moths (Euxoa auxiliaris) and the feeding behavior of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) at these areas were studied in the Yellowstone ecosystem from 1988 to 1991. Army cutworm moths migrate to mountain regions each summer to feed at night on the nectar of alpine and subalpine flowers, and during the day they seek shelter under various rock formations. Grizzly bears were observed feeding almost exclusively on moths up to 3 months each summer at the 10 moth-aggregation areas we identified. Fifty-one different grizzly bears were observed feeding at 4 of these areas during a single day in August 1991. Army cutworm moths are a preferred source of nutrition for many grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem and represent a high quality food that is available during hyperphagia.

  19. [The technique of army nursing in the Meiji period].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y

    1994-06-01

    It was in the nineteenth year of Meiji that Japan introduced the modern nursing system from Europe on the nation-wide level. But the Japanese army introduced the new nursing system from the sixth year of Meiji. For that reason, I studied whether the technique of the army nursing system was modern or not. Since the technical level of the nursing system is represented by the teaching methods and text books, I studied these aspects of the Japanese army nursing system. As the result, I confirmed that the army nursing system was modern. The Japanese army was the first to introduce the modern nursing system from Europe in Japan. PMID:11639784

  20. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  1. Predictors of Suicide and Accident Death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Cox, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. OBJECTIVES To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. RESULTS The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view

  2. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  3. [Effects of different organic matter mulching on water content, temperature, and available nutrients of apple orchard soil in a cold region].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiang-Tao; Lü, De-Guo; Qin, Si-Jun

    2014-09-01

    The effects of different organic matter covers on soil physical-chemical properties were investigated in a 'Hanfu' apple orchard located in a cold region. Four treatments were applied (weed mulching, rice straw mulching, corn straw mulching, and crushed branches mulching), and physical-chemical properties, including orchard soil moisture and nutrient contents, were compared among treatment groups and between organic matter-treated and untreated plots. The results showed that soil water content increased in the plots treated with organic matter mulching, especially in the arid season. Cover with organic matter mulch slowed the rate of soil temperature increase in spring, which was harmful to the early growth of fruit trees. Organic matter mulching treatments decreased the peak temperature of orchard soil in the summer and increased the minimum soil temperature in the fall. pH was increased in soils treated with organic matter mulching, especially in the corn straw mulching treatment, which occurred as a response to alleviating soil acidification to achieve near-neutral soil conditions. The soil organic matter increased to varying extents among treatment groups, with the highest increase observed in the weed mulching treatment. Overall, mulching increased alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, available phosphorus, and available potassium in the soil, but the alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen content in the rice straw mulching treatment was lower than that of the control. PMID:25757304

  4. Involvement of the 5'-untranslated region in cold-regulated expression of the rbpA1 gene in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis M3.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, N; Nakamura, A

    1998-01-01

    Transcript of the rbpA1 gene in Anabaena variabilis accumulates significantly at low growth temperatures below 28 degreesC. This accumulation was maximal at 16 degreesC. Accumulation of the rbpA1 transcript was completely abolished by rifampicin, but not by chloramphenicol. Photosynthesis was not required for this cold-induced accumulation. This accumulation of transcript was partly accounted for by increased stability of the rbpA1 transcript at low temperature. Expression of chimeric genes containing 3'-deleted rbpA1 sequences fused to the lacZ gene was regulated by low temperature when almost the entire 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) remained undeleted. Further deletion resulted in constitutive expression of the chimeric gene. The 5'-UTR sequence formed two types of complexes in vitro with protein extract from cells grown at 38 degreesC, but not with extract from the 22 degreesC grown cells. Affinity purification identified polypeptides of 75 and 32 kDa in Complex 1 and a 72 kDa polypeptide in Complex 2. These results are compatible with a model in which expression of the rbpA1 gene is regulated by transcriptional derepression at low temperature, although additional mechanisms, such as regulation of mRNA stability, might also contribute to temperature-dependent regulation. PMID:9547280

  5. Battles between an insurgent army and an advanced army - focus on strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Surajit; Shanahan, Linda

    2008-03-01

    Detailed and aggregate analyses of the outcome of past battles focusing on rates of troop losses or on the ratios of forces on each side is at the heart of present knowledge about battles. Here we present non-equilibrium statistical mechanics based studies of possible outcomes of well matched strategic battles by a ``blue'' army against insurgency based attacks by well matched opponents in a ``red'' army in red territory. We assume that the red army attacks with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. Our results reveal that while unpredictable events play a major role in battles, a balance between risk of exposure in a battlefield and the use of short range intelligence is needed in determining whether one side can decimate the other, and hence force a battle to end.

  6. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  7. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), U.S. Engineer Office, New York District, Harbor Defenses of New York Mine Boathouse, location plan and elevations, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, July 1943 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  8. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) Gillespie, G.L., map of a portion of Sandy Hook, NJ showing condition of beach in vicinity of dynamite gun emplacements, 1894 Engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  9. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  10. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ursano, Robert J.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    Importance/Objective Although the suicide rate in the U.S. Army has traditionally been below age-gender matched civilian rates, it has climbed steadily since the beginning of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts and since 2008 has exceeded the demographically matched civilian rate. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge about risk and resilience factors for suicidality and its psychopathological correlates. This paper presents an overview of the Army STARRS component study designs and of recent findings. Design/Setting/Participants/Intervention Army STARRS includes six main component studies: (1) the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) of Army and Department of Defense (DoD) administrative data systems (including records of suicidal behaviors) for all soldiers on active duty 2004–2009 aimed at finding administrative record predictors of suicides; (2) retrospective case-control studies of fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors (each planned to have n = 150 cases and n = 300 controls); (3) a study of new soldiers (n = 50,765 completed surveys) assessed just before beginning basic combat training (BCT) with self-administered questionnaires (SAQ), neurocognitive tests, and blood samples; (4) a cross-sectional study of approximately 35,000 (completed SAQs) soldiers representative of all other (i.e., exclusive of BCT) active duty soldiers; (5) a pre-post deployment study (with blood samples) of soldiers in brigade combat teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (n = 9,421 completed baseline surveys), with sub-samples assessed again one, three, and nine months after returning from deployment; and (6) a pilot study to follow-up SAQ respondents transitioning to civilian life. Army/DoD administrative data are being linked prospectively to the large-scale survey

  11. [Health situation of the armies in the Crimean war and a document related to this].

    PubMed

    Dağlar, Oya

    2004-01-01

    Although the Crimean War seems to be a war between the Ottoman and Russian with the support of England an France, in reality, it was a power struggle between the biggest European countries. The cooperation between England - Ottoman Empire and France in the Crimean War meanly determined the result of the war. The Crimean War should not only be evaluated in militarian and political aspect, but also from other perspectives. One of the most important problems for the allied armies in Istanbul and Crimea was related to the health concepts. During the two years long war, problems were the freezing cold and contagious diseases before the Russian soldiers. And thypus, scorbut, cholera and malaria prepears the dead of a large number of soldiers. Although the allied armies won the battle but all the sides fighting in the was lost many people due to contagious diseases. According to the resources, the contagious diseases such as, thypus, cholera and malaria led to the deads of more than ten times of the people who were in the battle field. Thats why, The European armies understood the importance of the treatment diseases in the war and gave importance to the development of military medical services and form this point, the Crimean War became the begining of an important development in military health concept. PMID:15487045

  12. Results of NASA/Army transmission research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coe, Harold H.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1970 the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command have shared an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components are outlined. The major goals of the program were (and continue to be) to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability, reduce the weight, noise, and vibration, and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. Major historical milestones are reviewed, significant advances in technology for bearings, gears, and transmissions are discussed, and the outlook for the future is presented. The reference list is comprehensive.

  13. Tune v. Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia directed the removal of life support from a 71-year-old terminally ill cancer patient at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The court held that competent adult patients who are in federal medical facilities and who are afflicted with terminal illnesses have a right to decide for themselves whether to allow their lives to be prolonged by artificial means, including the right to demand the withdrawal of life support already begun. Societal concern for the prevention of suicide was not involved because permission was being sought merely to allow nature to take its course. PMID:11648165

  14. The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.

  15. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  16. Review of ground water modeling needs for the US Army

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The report was prepared to assist the U.S. Army in remediation of ground water contamination from hazardous, toxic, and radioactive wastes at Army installations. The Waterways Experiment Station of the Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Water Science and Technology Board evaluate the state of the art in mathematical models of ground water flow and contaminant transport, and then advise the Corps of Engineers on how it might support and use such models to meet Army's ground water remediation needs over the next ten years. The study recommends that the Army develop in-house expertise in ground water modeling, expand partnership programs between the Army and academic researchers, and develop a ground water modeling support center to help focus research, technology transfer and training activities.

  17. Ocean-Atmosphere Environments of Antarctic-Region Cold-Air Mesocyclones: Evaluation of Reanalyses for Contrasting Adjacent 10-Day Periods ("Macro-Weather") in Winter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleton, A. M.; Auger, J.; Birkel, S. D.; Maasch, K. A.; Mayewski, P. A.; Claud, C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale cyclones in cold-air outbreaks (mesocyclones) feature in the weather and climate of the Antarctic (e.g., Ross Sea) and sub-antarctic (Drake Passage). They adversely impact field operations, and influence snowfall, the ice-sheet mass balance, and sea-air energy fluxes. Although individual mesocyclones are poorly represented on reanalyses, these datasets robustly depict the upper-ocean and troposphere environments in which multiple mesocyclones typically form. A spatial metric of mesocyclone activity—the Meso-Cyclogenesis Potential (MCP)—used ERA-40 anomaly fields of: sea surface temperature (SST) minus marine air temperature (MAT), near-surface winds, 500 hPa air temperature, and the sea-ice edge location. MCP maps composited by teleconnection phases for 1979-2001, broadly correspond to short-period satellite "climatologies" of mesocyclones. Here, we assess 3 reanalysis datasets (CFSR, ERA-I and MERRA) for their reliably to depict MCP patterns on weekly to sub-monthly periods marked by strong regional shifts in mesocyclone activity (frequencies, track densities) occurring during a La Niña winter: June 21-30, 1999 (SE Indian Ocean) and September 1-10, 1999 (Ross Sea sector). All reanalyses depict the marked variations in upper ocean and atmosphere variables between adjacent 10-day periods. Slight differences may owe to model resolution or internal components (land surface, coupled ocean models), and/or how the observations are assimilated. For June 21-30, positive SST-MAT, southerly winds, proximity to the ice edge, and negative T500, accompany increased meso-cyclogenesis. However, for September 1-10, surface forcing does not explain frequent comma cloud "polar lows" north-east of the Ross Sea. Inclusion of the upper-level diffluence (e.g., from Z300 field) in the MCP metric, better depicts the observed mesocyclone activity. MCP patterns on these "macro-weather" time scales appear relatively insensitive to the choice of reanalysis.

  18. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  19. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    PubMed

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas. PMID:19539373

  20. The automated Army ROTC Questionnaire (ARQ)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadet Command (ROTCCC) takes applications for its officer training program from college students and Army enlisted personnel worldwide. Each applicant is required to complete a set of application forms prior to acceptance into the ROTC program. These forms are covered by several regulations that govern the eligibility of potential applicants and guide the applicant through the application process. Eligibility criteria changes as Army regulations are periodically revised. Outdated information results in a loss of applications attributable to frustration and error. ROTCCC asked for an inexpensive and reliable way of automating their application process. After reviewing the process, it was determined that an expert system with good end user interface capabilities could be used to solve a large part of the problem. The system captures the knowledge contained within the regulations, enables the quick distribution and implementation of eligibility criteria changes, and distributes the expertise of the admissions personnel to the education centers and colleges. The expert system uses a modified version of CLIPS that was streamlined to make the most efficient use of its capabilities. A user interface with windowing capabilities provides the applicant with a simple and effective way to input his/her personal data.

  1. Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors in U.S. Army Administrative Records, 2004–2009: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Naifeh, James A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Vegella, Patti; Mash, Holly Herberman; Buckley, Christina; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the U.S. Army suicide rate is known to have risen sharply over the past decade, information about medically documented, nonfatal suicidal behaviors is far more limited. Here we examine trends and sociodemographic correlates of suicide attempts, suspicious injuries, and suicide ideation among regular Army soldiers. Methods Data come from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS), which integrates administrative records for all soldiers on active duty during the years 2004 through 2009 (n = 1.66 million). Results We identified 21,740 unique regular Army soldiers with a nonfatal suicidal event documented at some point during the HADS study period. There were substantial increases in the annual incidence rates of suicide attempts (179–400/100,000 person-years) and suicide ideation (557–830/100,000 person-years), but not suspicious injuries. Using hierarchical classification rules to identify the first instance of each soldier's most severe behavior, we found increased risk of all outcomes among those who were female, non-Hispanic White, never married, lower-ranking enlisted, less educated, and of younger age when entering Army service. These sociodemographic associations significantly differed across outcomes, despite some patterns that appear similar. Conclusion Results provide a broad overview of nonfatal suicidal trends in the U.S. Army during 2004 through 2009 and demonstrate that integration of multiple administrative data systems enriches analysis of the predictors of such events. PMID:26168022

  2. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter research focusing on the past 25 years.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, Kent B; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W; Young, Andrew J; Zambraski, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of pocket guides providing guidance for sustaining Warfighter health and performance in Southwest Asia, Somalia, the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Haiti. Issues identified during Operation Desert Storm elicited research that improved nutritional guidelines for protracted desert operations; safer use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective clothing; equipment, development, and fielding of efficient microclimate cooling systems; and effective evaluation of pharmaceuticals to protect soldiers from chemical and biological threats. During the first decade of the 21st century, USARIEM and the Department of the Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism focused research to improve doctrines for hot, cold, and high-altitude operations, reduce musculoskeletal training injuries, provide improved field nutrition, more efficient planning for operational water requirements, and improve both military clothing and materiel. This article also describes the critically important interactions and communications between USARIEM and deployed units and the benefits to Warfighters from this association. This report presents USARIEM's unique and world-class facilities, organizational changes, scientific and support personnel, and major research accomplishments, including the publication of 2,200 scientific papers over the past 25 yr. PMID:22139770

  3. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  4. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  5. 75 FR 34714 - Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure Realignment Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Department of the Army Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure... Department of the Army announces the availability of an updated ROD for Army Growth and Force Structure... Army growth and force structure realignment. The Army's decision at the time grew the Army by...

  6. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  7. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Request for information regarding support to Army Core Competencies...) research, operational concepts, and mission support innovations to support Army core competencies. No...

  8. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  9. Filmless radiology at Brooke Army Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    The hospital at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas has an essentially filmless radiology department. Mammography is one of the few services still using film. The radiology department at Brooke takes advantage of a very capable Lockheed Martin PACS to achieve the filmless operation. The old hospital has been replaced by a new hospital, the new Brooke Army Medical Center. As a basis for predictions of activity at new Brooke, the activities at the old Brooke Army Medical Center were examined. The heart of the PACS at Brooke is the image server with an associated database. The image server has the performance required to keep the radiologist from returning to film for diagnosis. A directly connected workstation can present a full screen of images in less than two seconds, even during the busiest hour of the day for this large hospital. In addition the database is used to organize the workflow for the radiology examinations through the hospital. Information about the activity at the new Brooke hospital is used to predict the utilization of the short term storage and the long term storage. In particular, the time that an examination will be retained on the new Brooke short term storage is measured. The Brooke medical complex generates 384.8 exams per day on a typical weekday. The number of exams on a weekend is 40 percent of the exams on the weekday. The storage required is 18.3 gigabytes per day in the short term storage of the Image Storage Unit (ISU) and 9.7 gigabytes per day in the archive. The 256 gigabytes of the ISU will hold 11.7 weeks or about 2.5 months of exams. The archive will hold four years of exams in tow jukeboxes. A working year will have an effective 300 days of equivalent weekday radiology load. By ten years from now the hospital complex can be expected to handle to load that is estimated to be about 160 percent of the current load. With the changes in the storage of disks and archive media that will have occurred by that time, the

  10. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  11. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a) General... Secretary of Defense. The authority to determine whether the use of an Army band at a public gathering is... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to...

  12. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... final rule which establishes requirements for the expanded definition of byproduct material. 72 FR 55864... was made in a separate rulemaking for 10 CFR Part 110 (April 20, 2006; 71 FR 20336). The Department of... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of...

  13. The Army Collegiate Commissioning Program--A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, P. E.

    This study examined the feasibility of a U.S. Army collegiate commissioning program (CCP) as a supplemental method of officer procurement. Investigated were the U.S. undergraduate population, Army procurement goals, program production capabilities, costs, and retention rates projected through fiscal year 1982. A sufficient college population will…

  14. Explaining Recent Army and Navy Minority Recruiting Trends. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2007, the representation of blacks among high-quality Army recruits declined, while in the Navy, black representation remained stable; the representation of Hispanics among high-quality recruits in both the Army and Navy grew during this period. RAND researchers identified factors that explain these recruiting trends and found…

  15. Cultural Assimilator for Training Army Personnel in Racial Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Roland J.; And Others

    A cultural assimilator was developed to teach white junior officers about black culture in the army. Scenarios involving misunderstandings between blacks and whites in the army were presented, and respondents were asked to identify "correct" reasons for the misunderstandings. In the first of three field tests respondents showed evidence of…

  16. New Tools and Metrics for Evaluating Army Distributed Learning. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Susan G.; Shanley, Michael G.; Yeung, Douglas; Rothenberg, Jeff; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Leuschner, Kristin J.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed learning (DL) is a key element of the Army's training strategy, and the Army has ambitious goals for expanding the future use of DL and for changing how it is developed and delivered. Program-level evaluation of DL can play an essential role in accomplishing those goals and in identifying strategic directions for the overall program.…

  17. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a) Fee-owned land and easements. (1) Action by Division/District...

  18. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a) Fee-owned land and easements. (1) Action by Division/District...

  19. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a) General... Secretary of Defense. The authority to determine whether the use of an Army band at a public gathering is... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to...

  20. Correlates of Military Satisfaction and Attrition Among Army Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John P.; Bell, D. Bruce

    A study determined relationships between Army organizational variables and levels of soldier satisfaction and assessed correlates of attrition and battalion effectiveness ratings. It was based on a secondary analysis of data collected in the Army Life-78 Study, which considered relationships of organizational climate and unit effectiveness.…

  1. Achieving Competence: Army-VOTEC School Partnership Pilot Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Mary W.

    To reduce Army training costs, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) investigated use of training at civilian secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical (VOTEC) institutions as an alternative to initial job training in Army service schools. Three models were used in the pilot study: the preservice training model in which…

  2. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  3. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  4. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  5. 20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, Corps of Engineers, 1964 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) REPAIRS OF SPALLED CONCRETE-PIERS 2,3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  6. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  7. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  8. Solar energy applications at Army ammunition plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, A. P.; Moy, S. M.

    1982-06-01

    The Army Ammunition Plants use significant quantities of fossil fuels. To reduce dependence on these scarce, costly, and non-renewable fuels, a study was conducted to investigate potential solar energy applications at the AAPs. Solar energy is a low-level energy source which is best applied to low temperature applications. It can be used at the AAPs to preheat boiler feedwater, provide hot air for dry-houses, provide domestic hot water and heat for administration buildings, and provide hot water for manufacturing processes such as metal cleaning, phosphating, and X-ray film processing. Use of the flat plate collectors, evacuated tube collectors, or solar ponds with the possible addition of a heat pump, offers reasonably economical means of applying solar technology to AAP needs.

  9. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  10. Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Polypharmacy Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ridderhoff, Kevin J; Hull, Jessica R; Sandberg, Sheila K

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of central nervous system depressants (CNSD) and psychotropics are one of the many factors that contribute to suicidal behavior in soldiers. U.S. Army policy requires medication screening for any soldier prescribed 4 or more medications when at least 1 of the medications is a CNSD or psychotropic. Constant deployments challenged health care provider ability to comply with required screenings, and senior leaders sought proactive intervention to reduce medication risks upon return of the 101 st Airborne Division (Air Assault) from deployment in 2011. A pharmacy-led team established the Polypharmacy Clinic (PC) at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital. Of the 3,999 soldiers assigned, 540 (13.5%) met the initial screening criteria. Success of the pilot program led to the mandatory screening of all other Fort Campbell, Kentucky, brigades. During the first 12 months, 895 soldiers were seen by a clinical pharmacist, and 1,574 interventions were documented. Significant interventions included medication added (121), medication changed (258), medication stopped (164), lab monitoring recommended (172), adverse reaction mitigated (41), therapeutic duplication prevented (61), and drug-drug interaction identified (93). Additionally, 55 soldiers were recommended for temporary duty profiles based on their adverse drug effects. Ten soldiers were recommended for enhanced controlled substance monitoring. Placing soldiers on clinically appropriate medications and removing potentially harmful medications from their possession are examples of how the PC positively impacted the Commanding General's ability to deploy a fully medically ready force. Soldiers consistently remarked favorably on the thorough medication counseling provided at their PC appointments. Innovative notes within the electronic health record summarized relevant findings regarding soldiers' medications, which allowed providers to quickly pinpoint and adjust medication regimens. With each identified high

  11. Heritage of army audiology and the road ahead: the Army Hearing Program.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, D Scott; Gates, Kathy; Ciliax, Donald

    2008-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been documented as early as the 16th century, when a French surgeon, Ambroise Paré, wrote of the treatment of injuries sustained by firearms and described acoustic trauma in great detail. Even so, the protection of hearing would not be addressed for three more centuries, when the jet engine was invented and resulted in a long overdue whirlwind of policy development addressing the prevention of hearing loss. We present a synopsis of hearing loss prevention in the US Army and describe the current Army Hearing Program, which aims to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in soldiers and to ensure their maximum combat effectiveness. PMID:18923117

  12. TMAP [Teleoperated Mobile Antiarmor Platform]: The Army`s near term entree to battlefield robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.K.

    1988-05-01

    TMAP is a remotely operated battlefield system consisting of a 750-pound all terrain vehicle, remotely operated by a solider over a fiber optic communication link 4 km long. Using state-of-the-art automation and robotic technology, Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems is developing a modular prototype system under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The Army Material developer is the Missile Command (MICOM) at Huntsville, Alabama; the Combat Developer is the Infantry School (USAIS) at Ft. Benning, Georgia. With the weapons removed by Congress in December 1987, the O & O is being rewritten for a ``Tactical Multipurpose Automated Platform`` (TMAP) instead of the original Teleoperated Mobile Antiarmor Platform. With minimal modification the modular TMAP system can be used in many applications (eg., antiarmor or antiair weapons, mine detection, medical support). System acceptance and Army evaluation testing is scheduled for summer and fall of 1988. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Heritage of Army Audiology and the Road Ahead: The Army Hearing Program

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Kathy; Ciliax, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been documented as early as the 16th century, when a French surgeon, Ambroise Paré, wrote of the treatment of injuries sustained by firearms and described acoustic trauma in great detail. Even so, the protection of hearing would not be addressed for three more centuries, when the jet engine was invented and resulted in a long overdue whirlwind of policy development addressing the prevention of hearing loss. We present a synopsis of hearing loss prevention in the US Army and describe the current Army Hearing Program, which aims to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in soldiers and to ensure their maximum combat effectiveness. PMID:18923117

  14. Suicide prevention program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Gordana; Gordana, Dedic J; Panic, Milivoje; Milivoje, Panic

    2007-05-01

    Suicide, as one of the greatest problems of maladjustment to the military environment, has been a subject of investigation in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro (former Yugoslav Army) for more than six decades. The Suicide Prevention Program was implemented in December 2003. The aim of the study was to follow-up the application of the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro and its effect on the suicide rate and to compare its incidence in civilians. Results of the program application showed that the number of suicides in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro was constantly reducing over the period 2004 to 2005. For soldiers, it was even four times less than in the civilian male population, particularly in the period of adaptation to the military environment. Since the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro proved to be successful in decreasing the suicide number, it should be further improved and routinely applied. PMID:17521110

  15. Army Reserve 63d RSC Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Army Reserve 63d Regional Support Command (RSC) achieved 85% energy savings and $4,000 per year in cost savings by replacing 12 old light fixtures with light-emitting diode fixtures in the military equipment parking area. This project was part of a camp-wide parking lighting retrofit which, on average, delivered 78% energy savings and a simple payback of 4.4 years.

  16. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-03-09

    This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  17. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal... renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee... include the U.S. Army's joint professional military education programs, educational policies,...

  18. Potential psychological problems of Army Medical Services personnel in combat with particular reference to the Territorial Army.

    PubMed

    Brooking, J I

    1983-10-01

    In the event of a major European war the Army Medical Services (AMS), of whom the majority would be drawn from the Territorial Army (TA), would be exposed to a unique combination of stresses. Ways of reducing the effects of these are discussed. PMID:6663577

  19. Cold as a therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Olivero, W; Wang, D; Lanzino, G

    2006-05-01

    The use of cold as a therapeutic agent has a long and colorful history. The Edwin Smith Papyrus, the most ancient medical text known, dated 3500 B.C., made numerous references to the use of cold as therapy. Baron de Larrey, a French army surgeon during Napoleon's Russian campaign, packed the limbs in ice prior to amputations to render the procedures painless. In the early twentieth century, a neurosurgeon, Temple Fay, pioneered "human refrigeration" as a treatment for malignancies and head injuries. In 1961, Irving Cooper developed the first closed cryoprobe system and ushered in the modern era of cryogenic surgery with his imperturbable convictions. Fay's early work fell victim to the disruptive sequel of the World War II. The Nazis confiscated his data (presented before the Third International Cancer Congress in 1939) forwarded to Belgium for publication and brutally applied his refrigeration techniques experimentally without any benefit of anesthesia in the concentration camps, especially Dachau. Hypothermia became associated in the public mind with the atrocities exposed at the war trials in Nürnberg. After lying dormant for decades, the interest was rekindled in the late 80s when mild hypothermia was shown to confer dramatic neuroprotection in a number of experimental models of brain injury. With several large multi-center clinical studies currently under way, hypothermia is receiving unprecedented attention from the medical and scientific communities. PMID:16489500

  20. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    PubMed

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences. PMID:22124867

  1. Renewable Energy Opportunities for the Army

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Chvala, William D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-08-13

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has a goal of obtaining 25% of its domestic electricity from renewable sources by 2025, and also must meet federal renewable energy mandates and schedules. This report describes the analyses undertaken to study the renewable resource potential at 15 Army sites, focusing on grid-connected generation of electricity. The resources analyzed at each site include solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste-to-energy, and ground source heat pumps (GSHPs). For each renewable generation resource, an assessment was completed to determine the level of resource availability, and the price at which that resource would be available for electricity generation. Various design alternatives and available technologies were considered in order to determine the best way to utilize each resource and maximize cost-effective electricity generation. Economic analysis used multiple funding options, including investment by an independent power producer (IPP), Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC), and Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP), and considered tax incentives, renewable energy credits, and other economic factors to reveal the most realistic costs possible. Where resource options proved to be economically viable, implementation approaches were recommended. The intention was to focus each installation’s efforts on realistic projects, moving them from initial assessment through the design and financing to implementation. Many Army sites enjoy very low costs of electricity, limiting the number of cost-effective renewable energy options where resources are available. Waste-to-energy was often a viable option due to the additional revenue gathered from transferred tipping fees. GSHPs were also commonly cost-effective options for replacement in inefficient buildings. Geothermal, wind, and solar resources are found to be more available in certain parts of the country over others, reducing overall potential for use. Wind is variable and often most

  2. Multimedia architecture for teleradiology in the U.S. Army virtual radiology environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jay F.; Chimiak, William J.

    1998-07-01

    The U.S. Army Medical Command, lead by the Brooke Army Medical Center, has embarked on a futuristic project which will revolutionize the practice of radiology in the DoD. The U.S. Army Virtual Radiology Environment (USAVRE) is a CONUS-based network that connects all the Army's major medical centers and Regional Medical Commands (RMC). The purpose of the USAVRE is to improve the quality, access, and cost of radiology services in the Army via the use of state-of-the-art medical imaging, computer, and networking technologies. The USAVRE contains multimedia-viewing workstations for static and dynamic modality cases. The storage and archiving systems are based on a distributed computing environment using Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) middleware protocols. Collaboration between archive centers and viewing workstations are managed by CORBA functions and multimedia object streams. The underlying Telecommunications network is an ATM based backbone network that connects to the RMC regional networks and PACS local networks at medical centers and RMC clinics. The U.S. Army Information Systems Engineering Command (USAISEC) at Ft. Huachuca, AZ is responsible for the ATM backbone network to the RMC sites. The virtual Radiology services in a USAVRE must be applied to several radiology modalities in a virtual network environment. In this discussion, we assume the existence of several PACS networks within a USAVRE environment that have a need to exchange multimedia images and patient information. We define a multimedia collaborative distributed computing environment (DCE) in medical imaging and radiology as a collection of collaborating PACS networks with workstations and image archive systems for the purposes of acquiring and exchanging patient static and video sequence images; storage, retrieval, and archival of those images; performing image analysis and multimedia consultation on patient cases; operation and management of the network to optimize its resources

  3. COLD-PCR amplification of bisulfite-converted DNA allows the enrichment and sequencing of rare un-methylated genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Milbury, Coren A; Karatza, Elli; Chen, Clark C; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Merewood, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant hypo-methylation of DNA is evident in a range of human diseases including cancer and diabetes. Development of sensitive assays capable of detecting traces of un-methylated DNA within methylated samples can be useful in several situations. Here we describe a new approach, fast-COLD-MS-PCR, which amplifies preferentially un-methylated DNA sequences. By employing an appropriate denaturation temperature during PCR of bi-sulfite converted DNA, fast-COLD-MS-PCR enriches un-methylated DNA and enables differential melting analysis or bisulfite sequencing. Using methylation on the MGMT gene promoter as a model, it is shown that serial dilutions of controlled methylation samples lead to the reliable sequencing of un-methylated sequences down to 0.05% un-methylated-to-methylated DNA. Screening of clinical glioma tumor and infant blood samples demonstrated that the degree of enrichment of un-methylated over methylated DNA can be modulated by the choice of denaturation temperature, providing a convenient method for analysis of partially methylated DNA or for revealing and sequencing traces of un-methylated DNA. Fast-COLD-MS-PCR can be useful for the detection of loss of methylation/imprinting in cancer, diabetes or diet-related methylation changes. PMID:24728321

  4. Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI): a successful start to a national program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Jung, R.E.; Bailey, L.L.; Adams, M.J.; Corn, P.S.; Dodd, C.K., Jr.; Fellers, G.M.; Sandinski, W.J.; Schwalbe, C.R.; Walls, S.C.; Fisher, R.N.; Gallant, A.L.; Battaglin, W.A.; Green, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Most research to assess amphibian declines has focused on local-scale projects on one or a few species. The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) is a national program in the United States mandated by congressional directive and implemented by the U.S. Department of the Interior (specifically the U.S. Geological Survey, USGS). Program goals are to monitor changes in populations of amphibians across U.S. Department of the Interior lands and to address research questions related to amphibian declines using a hierarchical framework of base-, mid- and apex-level monitoring sites. ARMI is currently monitoring 83 amphibian species (29% of species in the U.S.) at mid- and apex-level areas. We chart the progress of this 5-year-old program and provide an example of mid-level monitoring from 1 of the 7 ARMI regions.

  5. Filmless Radiographic System For Army Field Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedband, Melvin P.; Grenzow, Frank C.; Gray, James; Heilman, Craig A.; Zhang, Hui L.

    1989-05-01

    Small computers incorporating hard disc memory, multiple high resolution monitors and the small computer systems interface (SCSI) can be used for low-cost filmless radiography. A system has been constructed which can perform all of the functions required of a small clinic or field hospital including scheduling, reporting, image acquisition and display, image annotation, image storage and transmission, and control of peripheral devices. The peripheral devices include an optical card reader/writer, an optical disc reader/writer, a SCSI to DIN/PACS port, an Ethernet port and a SCSI to a long distance telephone/computer port, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) port. Individual patient optical data cards may be prepared, all images and reports may be archived in a small optical disc in the computer, other image sources may be coupled to the system via the DIN/PACS port, data may be exchanged with the local DIN via the Ethernet port and with distant sites via the ISDN port. The small optical data cards, about the size of a credit card, are used for individual patient images and reports. An independent viewer may be used to display the contents of the cards. The result is a complete "filmless and paperless" medical imaging system. The system was developed on Contract DAMD17-88C-8058 with the US Army Medical Research and Development Command.

  6. Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

    1996-10-01

    This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

  7. Self-organized lane formation and optimized traffic flow in army ants.

    PubMed

    Couzin, I D; Franks, N R

    2003-01-22

    We show how the movement rules of individual ants on trails can lead to a collective choice of direction and the formation of distinct traffic lanes that minimize congestion. We develop and evaluate the results of a new model with a quantitative study of the behaviour of the army ant Eciton burchelli. Colonies of this species have up to 200 000 foragers and transport more than 3000 prey items per hour over raiding columns that exceed 100 m. It is an ideal species in which to test the predictions of our model because it forms pheromone trails that are densely populated with very swift ants. The model explores the influences of turning rates and local perception on traffic flow. The behaviour of real army ants is such that they occupy the specific region of parameter space in which lanes form and traffic flow is maximized. PMID:12590751

  8. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  9. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  10. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics - colds and flu ... treat infections that are caused by a virus. Colds and flu are caused by viruses. If you ... Hamilton A. Treatments for symptoms of the common cold. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(12):Online. PMID: ...

  11. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... belief that vitamin C can cure the common cold , research about this claim is conflicting. Large doses ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts, but they do not appear to protect ...

  12. Cold weather injuries, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2008-June 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    From July 2012 through June 2013, the number of active and reserve component service members treated for cold injuries (n=479) was the lowest of the last five cold seasons (2008-2013). Over the last five years hypothermia was the most common cold injury among service members in the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, while frostbite was the most common type of cold injury in the other three Services. Consistent with trends from previous cold seasons, service members who were female, less than 20 years old, or of black, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity tended to have higher cold injury rates than their respective counterparts. Among service members overall, Army personnel accounted for the majority (62%) of cold injuries. PMID:24191768

  13. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  14. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  15. U.S. Army High Energy Laser (HEL) technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavan, Michael J.; Wachs, John J.

    2011-11-01

    The US Army is investing in Solid State Laser (SSL) technology to assess counter rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) and counter unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) capabilities of solid state based HEL systems, as well as other potential applications for HELs of interest to the Army. The Army HEL program thrust areas are systematically moving the technology forward toward weaponization, including solid state laser technologies, advances in beam control technology, and conducting major demonstrations. The High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) will be a major step toward demonstrating HEL weapon capability to the soldier. The US Army will continue to pursue technologies that enable more compact systems compatible with, for example, a Stryker tactical vehicle as a crucial part of our strategy to provide a capability to the warfighter that can maneuver with the force.

  16. Development of aeronautical engines by the Army and Navy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Different aircraft engines are categorized as being of interest to only the Army or Navy or to both armed services. A listing of the different engines is presented along with some statistics, namely, horsepower.

  17. 78 FR 60864 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...: Wednesday, October 16, 2013. Time: 1530--Until completion (UTC). Location: Hyatt Regency Crystal City, 2799... Crystal Drive, Suite 7098. Arlington, VA 22202. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison...

  18. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W.; Schexanayder, S.M.

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase ``unit supportability`` was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents` ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  20. Successful Army National Guard units: A guard perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, A.K.; Saulsbury, J.W. ); Schexanayder, S.M. )

    1991-10-01

    This project sought to identify factors contributing to a healthy Army National Guard (ARNG) unit. Its results were intended to contribute to a computerized forecasting model under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model, the ARNG Regional Recruiting Potential Model (RRPM), forecasts locations of successful new or modified Guard units. The study was expected to enhance the understanding of what constituents a healthy Guard unit. A Delphi approach was used to define criteria for healthy Guard units and to elicit rankings of those criteria. Two sets of telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of 102 individuals-two battalion-level administrative officers, or their equivalents, in each state in Washington, DC. During these telephone calls, the phrase unit supportability'' was used to express the notion of a healthy unit. The first set of interviews obtained background information and respondents' ideas of the criteria that lead to unit supportability and to a lack of supportability. The data were analyzed to develop a list of ten criteria for unit supportability. In the second interview, the same respondents were asked to rank those criteria in order of importance.

  1. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor and flood control projects for privately-owned lands required for such purposes (33 U.S.C. 558b and 558b-1)....

  2. US Army remotely piloted vehicle supporting technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gossett, T. D.

    1981-01-01

    Essential technology programs that lead to the full scale engineering development of the Aquila Remotely Piloted Vehicle system for U.S. Army are described. The Aquila system uses a small recoverable and reusable RPV to provide target acquisition, designation, and aerial reconnaissance mission support for artillery and smart munitions. Developments that will provide growth capabilities to the Aquila RPV system, as well as future RPV mission concepts being considered by the U.S. Army are presented.

  3. Crater degradation in the Noachian highlands of Mars: Assessing the hypothesis of regional snow and ice deposits on a cold and icy early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, David K.; Head, James W.

    2015-11-01

    The presence of valley networks and the highly degraded state of Noachian highland craters has led to the interpretation that Mars was once warmer and wetter. Recent climate models have suggested, however, that the extremely cold climate in the Noachian would be unlikely to support liquid water precipitation. The presence of a thicker atmosphere thermally coupled to the surface is predicted instead to concentrate surface snow and ice deposits in the higher-altitude southern highlands, producing a Late Noachian Icy Highlands (LNIH) characterized by hundreds of meters of relatively continuous ice cover. In this study we test this hypothesis by reevaluating the degradation state of Noachian highland craters to assess whether their degradation state might be attained in such a cold and icy climate. We review the characteristics of Amazonian-aged impact craters hypothesized to form in surface snow and ice layers (excess ejecta, EE; double-layered ejecta, DLE; and pedestal, Pd, craters) to provide the potential initial conditions of craters forming in Late Noachian surface snow and ice layers. We then examine modification processes active in the Amazonian that may have played a role in crater degradation in the Late Noachian. In addition, we examine the potential morphometric effects of impacting into a thick surface ice deposit, and the potential erosive effects of backwasting, top-down melting, basal ice melting, and atmospheric warming pulses on the morphology of Noachian highland craters. We find that several aspects of the highly degraded state of Noachian craters could be accounted for in the context of a cold and icy climate, and we outline further tests of the hypothesis.

  4. MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... MISR Browse Images: Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) These MISR Browse images provide a ... over the region observed during the NASA Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX). CLPX involved ground, airborne, and satellite measurements ...

  5. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants. PMID:25988694

  6. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    PubMed

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:27035922

  7. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  8. The Professional Environment in Army Laboratories and Its Effect on Scientific and Engineering Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Army Science and Technology.

    In response to a 1982 request by the U.S. Department of the Army, the National Research Council's Board on Army Science and Technology established the Committee on Army Manpower to investigate the professional environments and use of civilian and military scientists/engineers in Army laboratories. The committee's primary objective was to identify…

  9. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery....

  10. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  13. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

  14. An Examination of Current and Future Directions in the U.S. Army's Mentoring Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlechter, Theodore M.

    This study included a literature review of mentoring practices in Army and civilian organizations and an exploratory research effort concerning mentoring practices in the U.S. Army. The research effort consisted of 11 people (9 Army personnel and 2 civilians) were associated with training programs at an Army post. Participants completed a…

  15. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  16. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  17. Low-temperature pumpability of US Army diesel engine oils. Interim report, July 1982-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, E.A.; Montemayor, A.F.; Owens, E.C.

    1987-12-01

    Borderline oil-pumpability temperatures (BPT's) were determined for U.S. Army diesel engines by cranking experiments conducted in a cold box. The variables investigated included: four different diesel-engine types; four different oil-viscosity grades; and three different viscosity index improver chemical types. In general, for a given oil, the decreasing order of engine severity (i.e., highest BPT) was: the Continental LDT-465-1C and the Cummins VTA-903T were the most severe, and were approximately equivalent. The GM 6.2L engine was the next least severe with the DDC 6V-53T engine being the overall least severe. The different viscosity index improver chemistries of specially blended test oils included: olefin copolymer (OCP), styrene-isoprene polymer (SI), and polymethacrylate (PMA). The PMA-containing 15W-40 oils had superior low-temperature oil-pumpability performance in each engine in which they were evaluated.

  18. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  19. Ambulatory physical activity in Swiss Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Wyss, T; Scheffler, J; Mäder, U

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess and compare the type, duration and intensity of physical activity during the basic training provided by each of 5 selected Swiss Army occupational specialties. The first objective was to develop and validate a method to assess distance covered on foot. The second objective was to describe and compare physical activity levels among occupational specialties. In the first part of the study, 30 male volunteers completed 6 laps of 290 m at different gait velocities. Data from 15 volunteers were used to develop linear regression equations for the relationship between step frequency and gait velocity, and data from the other 15 volunteers were used to verify the accuracy of these equations. In the second part of the study, 250 volunteers from 5 military schools (each training school for a different occupational specialty) wore heart-rate, acceleration and step-count monitors during workdays of weeks 2, 4, 8 and 10 of their basic training. Sensor data were used to identify physically demanding activities, estimate energy expenditure (based on already published algorithms) and estimate distance covered on foot (based on the algorithm developed in the first part of this study). A branched model using 2 regression equations (gait velocity=0.705∙step frequency for walking speeds below 1 m/s and gait velocity=1.675∙step frequency - 1.464 for faster gait velocities) was shown to be accurate for estimating distance covered on foot. In the training schools investigated, average physical activity energy expenditure was 10.5 ± 2.4 MJ per day, and trainees covered 12.9 ± 3.3 km per day on foot. Recruits spent 61.0 ± 23.3 min per day marching and 33.1 ± 19.5 min per day performing physically demanding materials-handling activities. Average physical activity energy expenditure decreased significantly from week 2 to week 8. The measurement system utilised in the present study yielded data comparable to those of prior studies that

  20. IRTM brightness temperature maps of the Martian south polar region during the polar night: The cold spots don't move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Crisp, D.; Santee, M. L.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    A series of infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) south polar brightness temperature maps obtained by Viking Orbiter 2 during a 35-day period during the southern fall season in 1978 was examined. The maps show a number of phenomena that have been identified in previous studies, including day to day brightness temperature variations in individual low temperature regions and the tendency for IRTM 11-micron channel brightness temperatures to also decrease in regions where low 20-micron channel brightness temperatures are observed. The maps also show new phenomena, the most striking of which is a clear tendency for the low brightness temperature regions to occur at fixed geographic regions. During this season, the coldest low brightness temperatures appear to be concentrated in distinct regions, with spatial scales ranging from 50 to 300 km. There are approximately a dozen of these concentrations, with the largest centered near the location of the south residual polar cap. Other concentrations are located at Cavi Angusti and close to the craters Main, South, Lau, and Dana. Broader, less intense regions appear to be well correlated with the boundaries of the south polar layered deposits and the Mountains of Mitchell. No evidence for horizontal motion of any of these regions has been detected.

  1. Army Medical Department Lessons Learned Program marks 25th anniversary.

    PubMed

    Cannon, David W; McCollum, Jeffery

    2011-11-01

    The year 2010 marked the 25th anniversary of the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL) as well as the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Center and School's Lessons Learned Division. In the aftermath of Operation Urgent Fury in 1983, the Army recognized the need to create an organization whose sole purpose was to collect, review, and analyze lessons learned and created the CALL in 1985 at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The AMEDD followed suit and established the Medical Information System/AMEDD Lessons Learned office under the Directorate of Evaluation and Standardization to research and compile lessons learned as the AMEDD's point of contact for the CALL program. Over these past 25 years the AMEDD Center and School Lessons Learned program evolved and underwent organizational realignments, but the overall mission continues to promote changes either directly or indirectly in the AMEDD's Doctrine, Organizations, Training, Leader Development, Materiel, Personnel and Facilities domains and capabilities to provide combat health service support on the battlefield. PMID:22165647

  2. Building adaptive nurse leaders for future Army full spectrum operations.

    PubMed

    Funari, Tamara S; Gentzler, Kevin; Wyssling, Philip W; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2011-02-01

    The Army Nurse Corps (ANC) life cycle model outlines major milestones that are required, expected, or recommended to be achieved to prepare Army Nurses to become senior leaders. Army nurses must be prepared to function in uncertain future full spectrum operational environment. The purpose of this study was to determine specific education and developmental experiences that will assist in developing ANC officers to become adaptive leaders through a review of literature and qualitative study. Fifteen interviews were conducted with senior ANC officers. Purposive sampling was used, yielding a sample population with a variety of experiences, to include deployments, recruiting, command, and joint operational assignments. Results indicated that the major themes for senior leader preparation are military education, field experience, and the need to add a new career pathway to ensure equal opportunity of advancement for both clinicians and administrators. PMID:21366082

  3. Is the British Army medical grading functional assessment tool effective?

    PubMed

    Mackie, Isobel

    2015-12-01

    Decision Support Aids (DSAs) have been widely used throughout industry and one (known as Table 7) is available to support British Army Medical Officers (MOs) grade soldiers against the Joint Medical Employment Standards. It is unknown how useful this DSA is in practice. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to British Army MOs working within Defence Primary Care facilities enquiring about MOs views on the usefulness of the DSA. Although the response rate was low, informative data were obtained. Between a half and a third of respondents felt that their judgement was affected in the application of the grading system when there were career implications to the grading MOs felt that the DSA allowed subjectivity in the grading. The results of this research suggest that although minor changes to Table 7 may improve service provision, an improvement in training in the application of Table 7 would be of greater benefit to the quality of occupational health service provision in the British Army. PMID:26621810

  4. Response bias, weighting adjustments, and design effects in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Hwang, Irving; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase knowledge about determinants of suicidality. Three Army STARRS component studies are large-scale surveys: one of new soldiers prior to beginning Basic Combat Training (BCT; n=50,765 completed self-administered questionnaires); another of other soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (n=35,372); and a third of three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan who are being followed multiple times after returning from deployment (n= 9,421). Although the response rates in these surveys are quite good (72.0-90.8%), questions can be raised about sample biases in estimating prevalence of mental disorders and suicidality, the main outcomes of the surveys based on evidence that people in the general population with mental disorders are under-represented in community surveys. This paper presents the results of analyses designed to determine whether such bias exists in the Army STARRS surveys and, if so, to develop weights to correct for these biases. Data are also presented on sample inefficiencies introduced by weighting and sample clustering and on analyses of the trade-off between bias and efficiency in weight trimming. PMID:24318218

  5. ERTS program of the US Army Corps of Engineers. [water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarman, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Army Corps of Engineers research and development efforts associated with the ERTS Program are confined to applications of investigation, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of water resource projects. Problems investigated covered: (1) resource inventory; (2) environmental impact; (3) pollution monitoring; (4) water circulation; (5) sediment transport; (6) data collection systems; (7) engineering; and (8) model verification. These problem areas were investigated in relation to bays, reservoirs, lakes, rivers, coasts, and regions. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely valuable in developing techniques and is now being used in everyday applications.

  6. The chemistry of cold, dark interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years the nearby cold, dark clouds have been shown to possess a rich chemistry, with interesting differences with respect to warmer massive-star-forming regions and also among the cold clouds themselves. Thirty-nine molecular species are now known in these regions. Recent molecular detections and upper limits in dark clouds are discussed, with particular emphasis on the tricarbon species C3O, C3H, and C3H2.

  7. Conceptual Design for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglin, W. A.; Langtimm, C. A.; Adams, M. J.; Gallant, A. L.; James, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    In 2000, the President of the United States (US) and Congress directed Department of Interior (DOI) agencies to develop a program for monitoring trends in amphibian populations on DOI lands and to conduct research into causes of declines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was given lead responsibility for planning and implementing the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management. The program objectives are to (1) establish a network for monitoring the status and distribution of amphibian species on DOI lands; (2) identify and monitor environmental conditions known to affect amphibian populations; (3) conduct research on causes of amphibian population change and malformations; and (4) provide information to resource managers, policy makers, and the public in support of amphibian conservation. The ARMI program will integrate research efforts of USGS, other Federal, and non-federal herpetologists, hydrologists, and geographers across the Nation. ARMI will conduct a small number (~20) of intensive research efforts (for example, studies linking amphibian population changes to hydrologic conditions) and a larger number (~50) of more generalized inventory and monitoring studies encompassing broader areas such as NPS units. ARMI will coordinate with and try to augment other amphibian inventory studies such as the National Amphibian Atlas and the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program. ARMI will develop and test protocols for the standardized collection of amphibian data and provide a centrally managed database designed to simplify data entry, retrieval, and analysis. ARMI pilot projects are underway at locations across the US.

  8. Preferred emission factor techniques for army emission inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, L.M.; Robinson, D.L.; Alden, S.A.; Hopp, P.L.; Ruff, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA-90) present an unprecedented regulatory challenge to the Department of the Army and the entire US business community. Unlike previous legislation, which focused heavily on the substantive or emission control aspects of air quality management, this round of Amendments focused equal attention on the administrative aspects of air pollution control. Specifically, each new Title of the CAAA-90 is underpinned, either explicitly or implicitly, with the need to perform an emission inventory. The emission inventory is an implied prerequisite for determining the applicability of any of the emission control requirements of the 1990 Amendments, and it is the explicit center piece of the Title 5 operating permit program. Although the emission inventory is little more than a formal accounting of the number and type of emission sources and their associated air emissions, the resource requirements for preparing and maintaining the inventory can be substantial. The average contractor cost for preparing an initial emission inventory at an Army installation was over $100,000. Record keeping to support the inventory, and the annual inventory updates required for the Title 5 permit program will only expand these costs. In an effort to assist the Army community with the ongoing obligation to prepare these emission inventories, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has compiled a list of preferred emission inventory techniques for the various emission sources found at Army installations. The USACHPPM guidance identifies emission sources most likely to be found at an Army installation, as well as the most effective and preferred emission factors associated with these sources. This guidance is designed to be widely disseminated, and may have relevant applications in the non-military community.

  9. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  10. The US Army Medical Department Email Teleconsultation Program.

    PubMed

    Lappan, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    The US Army Surgeon General authorized the formation of an email based teleconsultation program in 2004 to support deployed healthcare providers in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program, which began its 12th year of operation in April 2015, was originally viewed as a temporary solution until a robust system was fielded. Although future of the program as a going concern has not been determined, there is the possibility it could be incorprated into the critical care consultation program managed at an Army Medical Center. PMID:27215882

  11. Behavioral Health Competence: An Exploration of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Paul B.; DeCleene, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The behavioral health competence of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists (OT) was examined by electronic survey to determine current levels of competence and highlight pre-deployment training needs. Results indicated that while Army Reserve OTs report high levels of behavioral health competence, many questions regarding diagnosis, assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, and progress arose throughout deployment. OT’s often relied on skills from Level II fieldwork education and entry-level didactic education for competency. Perceived competencies may be compromised by curriculum changes in entry-level education, available fieldwork settings, and a lack of adequate training currently available prior to deployment. PMID:25368437

  12. A Surgical Business Composite Score for Army Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Douglas R; Robinson, Andrew B; Comer, Tracy A; Meno, Jenifer A; Welder, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Measuring surgical business performance for Army military treatment facilities is currently done through 6 business metrics developed by the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Surgical Services Service Line (3SL). Development of a composite score for business performance has the potential to simplify and synthesize measurement, improving focus for strategic goal setting and implementation. However, several considerations, ranging from data availability to submetric selection, must be addressed to ensure the score is accurate and representative. This article presents the methodology used in the composite score's creation and presents a metric based on return on investment and a measure of cases recaptured from private networks. PMID:27244067

  13. Dr. von Braun and Army Ballistics Missile Agency (ABMA) Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    This photograph of Dr. von Braun, shown here to the left of General Bruce Medaris, was taken in the fall of 1959, immediately prior to Medaris' retirement from the Army. At the time, von Braun and his associates worked for the Army Ballistics Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama. Those in the photograph have been identified as Ernst Stuhlinger, Frederick von Saurma, Fritz Mueller, Hermarn Weidner, E.W. Neubert (partially hidden), W.A. Mrazek, Karl Heimburg, Arthur Rudolph, Otto Hoberg, von Braun, Oswald Lange, Medaris, Helmut Hoelzer, Hans Maus, E.D. Geissler, Hans Heuter, and George Constan.

  14. Balancing act: The Salvation Army in the United States.

    PubMed

    Temme, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The Salvation Army in the United States addresses its mission of serving suffering humanity in Christ's name through a structure that is classically hierarchical while emphasizing local control and autonomy. Programming, community alliances, staffing, and fundraising are local rather than national functions. An example is discussed--the National Branding Promise--where the national office has taken a lead. This has been in response to rapid changes in the media, especially electronic communication. The Salvation Army views its components as its customers and works continuously to adjust the balance between national and local operations. PMID:18551843

  15. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  16. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  17. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  18. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  19. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  20. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking plenty of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  1. Boreal spring precipitation variability in the cold arid western Himalaya during the last millennium, regional linkages, and socio-economic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Akhilesh K.; Bräuning, Achim; Singh, Jayendra; Yadav, Ram R.

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation in the monsoon shadow zone of the western Himalayan region, largely under the influence of mid-latitude westerlies, is the dominant regional socioeconomic driver. Current knowledge of long-term regional precipitation variability is scarce due to spatially and temporally limited weather and high-resolution proxy climate records. We developed the first boreal spring precipitation reconstruction for the western Himalaya covering the last millennium (1030-2011 C.E.). The annually resolved reconstruction is based on a large tree-ring data set of Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara) and neoza pine (Pinus gerardiana) from 16 ecologically homogeneous moisture stressed settings in Kinnaur, western Indian Himalaya. The precipitation reconstruction revealed persistent long-term spring droughts from the 12th to early 16th century C.E. and pluvial from the late 16th century C.E. to recent decades. The late 15th and early 16th centuries (1490-1514 C.E.) displayed the driest episode, with precipitation being ∼15% lower than the long-term mean. The early 19th century (1820-1844 C.E.) was the wettest period of the past millennium, with mean precipitation ∼13% above the long-term mean. The reconstructed boreal spring precipitation from the western Himalaya revealed large-scale consistency with hydrological records from westerly dominated regions in Central Asia, indicating synoptic-scale changes in atmospheric circulation during the major part of the Medieval and Little Ice Age periods. Protracted droughts in Central Asia could have caused severe contraction of the regional economy, as indicated by striking coherence of reconstructed drought periods and historic social upheavals and invasions of India from Central and Western Asian invaders. Vulnerability to climatic extremes underpins the need to develop a better understanding of the temporal and spatial variability in regional hydroclimate in order to devise viable water resource management plans.

  2. Algeria: Revolution, Army and Political Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeraoui, Zidane

    2012-01-01

    Despite the numerous similarities among the Arab countries that explain the rapid popular movements since the end of 2010, the case of Algeria presents particular features. It shares the same inequalities and social challenges as the rest of the countries in the region. However, the revolutionary process in Algeria between 1954 and 1962 and the…

  3. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  4. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  5. 42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. US Army Chemical Corps Vietnam veterans health study: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kang, H K; Dalager, N A; Needham, L L; Patterson, D G; Matanoski, G M; Kanchanaraksa, S; Lees, P S

    2001-01-01

    The long-term health consequences of exposure to phenoxyherbicides used in Vietnam has been a great concern to the veterans. In addition to the Air Force Ranch Hand personnel, Army Chemical Corps personnel who served in Vietnam are thought to have had some of the highest herbicide exposures. The Department of Veterans Affairs commenced a study of veterans who served in Vietnam as members of the Army Chemical Corps and a comparison cohort of Army Chemical Corps personnel who served elsewhere. A total of 2872 Vietnam veterans and 2737 non-Vietnam veterans who served in the Army Chemical Corps were identified for inclusion in a telephone health interview survey with a random 20% sample of veterans receiving serum dioxin and other congeners assessments. In a feasibility study which included 284 Vietnam veterans and 281 non-Vietnam veterans, 100 serum assessments were conducted of which 95 were included in the analysis. Vietnam veterans with a history of spraying herbicides were found to have a statistically significant elevation in their current serum 2,3,7,8-TCDD concentrations compared to non-Vietnam veterans without a spray history (P = 0.05). Other 2,3,7,8-substituted dioxins levels were comparable to the levels found in the non-Vietnam veterans. This feasibility study demonstrated that serum dioxin concentrations from a sample of the study participants can be used to identify exposure variables in the health survey that can serve as a surrogate measure of phenoxyherbicide exposure. PMID:11372888

  7. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section..., such as telephone, telegraph, electric transmission, oil, gas, and water lines. (vi) Purchase price of... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329...

  8. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section..., such as telephone, telegraph, electric transmission, oil, gas, and water lines. (vi) Purchase price of... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329...

  9. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section..., such as telephone, telegraph, electric transmission, oil, gas, and water lines. (vi) Purchase price of... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329...

  10. The Army Marches forward with CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozo, Leo; O'Connor, Mary Ann

    1992-01-01

    Describes three applications of CD-ROM technology for publishing and distribution of U.S. Army forms and automation of the AD PAM 25-30, a microfiche index to the publications and forms. The production, field test, and evaluation phases of the project are discussed. Several lessons learned are summarized. (MES)

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 255 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hopital, Building 255, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of postcard from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center public affairs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of postcard from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center public affairs office, building 120, showing building 215 in the 1940's before the top of the smokestack blew off. Photograph shows north side and corner of west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Specifications for Version 1. 0 of the Army Data Encyclopedia

    SciTech Connect

    Gey, F.; Holmes, H.

    1988-09-30

    This document provides a more detailed description of the Army Data Encyclopedia (ADE) Version 1.0, in accordance with the Data Encyclopedia Architecture for Army Information Management. The software and contents of the ADE are key mechanisms that are necessary to achieve interoperability, integration and synchronization of Army information systems. The ADE architecture is intended to provide a global view, long-term direction, and the conceptual foundation for further development. In accord with the architecture, the ADE will develop through a sequence of increasingly powerful versions, supporting a series of Army-wide Information Mission Area (IMA) efforts, such as data element standardization. The major components of the ADE Version 1.0 are an ANSI-FIPS Standard Information Resource Dictionary System (IRDS) framework, which is implemented using a relational DBMS, a user interface for schema and data maintenance, a user interface for the Data Element search/retrieval/approval process, and the loading of the actual data of the ADE. This paper assumes the reader is familiar with the Data Encyclopedia Architecture document. It provides background for ADE Version 1.0 and a brief status report of ADE related activities in progress. It outlines a software structure for the ADE, functionality to be implemented within the ADE 1.0, structure of the data element approval process and user interface, initial data content of the ADE, documentation needs of the ADE, and remote user access strategies for the ADE. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. 2007 NCTE Presidential Address: Where Ignorant Armies Clash by Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yatvin, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the text of Joanne Yatvin's presidential address, delivered at the NCTE Annual Convention in New York City in November 2007. The title of her presidential address, "Where Ignorant Armies Clash by Night," was taken from Matthew Arnold's (1867) poem "Dover Beach." Yatvin states that the federal government has usurped the right…

  4. 32 CFR 651.14 - Integration with Army planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... environmental management; responding to inaccuracies or uncertainties in the Army's ability to accurately... with other environmental reviews, laws, and Executive Orders (40 CFR 1502.25). Incorporation of these... Rivers (Executive Order 13061, 3 CFR, 1997 Comp., p. 221). (17) Floodplain Management (Executive...

  5. Dr. von Braun Surrenders to U.S. Army

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun surrenders to U.S. Army Counterintelligence persornel of the 44th Infantry Division in Ruette, Bavaria on May 2, 1945. Left to right are Charles Stewart, CIC agent; Dr. Herbert Axster; Dieter Huzel; Dr. von Braun (arm in cast); Magnus von Braun (brother); and Hans Lindenberg.

  6. Reinforcement Management; An Approach to Motivating Army Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie

    To study the effectiveness of reinforcement management (contigency management) as applied to a military program of instruction already in operation, 335 students in an Army clerk-typist course in which self-paced instruction is used were given points for successive approximations to desired learning behavior. The points were exchangeable later for…

  7. Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries. Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DAMANS and Associates, Rockville, MD.

    Eight appendices provide information related to a study which was conducted to determine the feasibility of introducing new automatic techniques to Army library technical processing activities; to examine and recommend appropriate systems and configurations for library automation; and to determine costs of implementing the recommendations. The…

  8. Net Zero Ft. Carson: making a greener Army base

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army Net Zero program seeks to reduce the energy, water, and waste footprint of bases. Seventeen pilot bases aim to achieve 100% renewable energy, zero depletion of water resources, and/or zero waste to landfill by 2020. Some bases are pursuing Net Zero in a single secto...

  9. 21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital. EKG Cardiology Clinic, Building 1049. December 1955. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. The United States School Garden Army. Bulletin, 1919, No. 26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, J. H.

    1919-01-01

    The name of the United States School Garden Army was adopted in March, 1918. The work of the organization is an expansion of work undertaken by the Bureau of Education in 1914. The scale upon which it was done was limited by the finances that could be secured for it. The acute demand for food production growing out of the war conditions made…

  12. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  14. Effectiveness of Interactive Videodisc in Army Communications Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, John D.; Polich, J. Michael

    This report presents the results of RAND research conducted at the U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive videodisc (IVD) system used to facilitate training in a variety of military occupational specialities. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a methodology for assessing the…

  15. New Directions in the Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgrim, Mark T.

    The Army has given to the Training and Doctrine Command the task of developing four Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) curricula to provide functional, job-related basic skills training. These would be Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Baseline Skills, English-as-a-Second Language (ESL), Military Life Coping Skills, and Learning Strategies.…

  16. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Master Resilience Training in the U.S. Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; McBride, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Army Master Resilience Trainer (MRT) course, which provides face-to-face resilience training, is one of the foundational pillars of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program. The 10-day MRT course is the foundation for training resilience skills to sergeants and for teaching sergeants how to teach these skills to their soldiers. The…

  18. Learning Organization Dimensions of the Sri Lanka Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahanayake, Nishada Dhananjaya; Gamlath, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study intends to investigate the extent to which the Sri Lanka Army can be described as a learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: The main tool of analysis used was the Dimensions of the Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) developed by Marsick and Watkins, with the exclusion of the sections on financial and…

  19. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration

  20. BENCHMARKING FAST-TO-ALFVEN MODE CONVERSION IN A COLD MHD PLASMA. II. HOW TO GET ALFVEN WAVES THROUGH THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Shelley C.; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2012-05-20

    Alfven waves may be difficult to excite at the photosphere due to low-ionization fraction and suffer near-total reflection at the transition region (TR). Yet they are ubiquitous in the corona and heliosphere. To overcome these difficulties, we show that they may instead be generated high in the chromosphere by conversion from reflecting fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, and that Alfvenic TR reflection is greatly reduced if the fast reflection point is within a few scale heights of the TR. The influence of mode conversion on the phase of the reflected fast wave is also explored. This phase can potentially be misinterpreted as a travel speed perturbation with implications for the practical seismic probing of active regions.

  1. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  2. 75 FR 22756 - Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal AGENCY... the charter for the United States Army Science Board (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER... disciplines: Science, technology, manufacturing, acquisition, logistics, business management functions,...

  3. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  4. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  5. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... These cells produce essential immune system proteins called interferons that respond to a cold virus. The cells ... several degrees below core body temperature, virus-fighting interferons were less able to do their job. The ...

  6. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: A Vision for Psychological Resilience in the U.S. Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, George W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The stress and strain on the U.S. Army's community due to nearly a decade of protracted war is well documented in the press and in scientific literature. In response, the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program is a preventive program that seeks to enhance psychological resilience among all members of the Army community, which includes…

  7. A Theory-Based Approach to Reading Assessment in the Army. Technical Report 625.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford-Carpenter, Rebecca L.; Schultz-Shiner, Linda J.

    Noting that the United States Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI) has been involved in research on reading assessment in the Army from both practical and theoretical perspectives, this paper addresses practical Army problems in reading assessment from a theory base that reflects the most recent and most sound…

  8. 46 CFR 4.11-1 - Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as... vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses. No officer, seaman, or other employee of any public vessel controlled by the Army or Navy (not including the Coast Guard) of the United States, shall...

  9. 46 CFR 4.11-1 - Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as... vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses. No officer, seaman, or other employee of any public vessel controlled by the Army or Navy (not including the Coast Guard) of the United States, shall...

  10. 46 CFR 4.11-1 - Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as... vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses. No officer, seaman, or other employee of any public vessel controlled by the Army or Navy (not including the Coast Guard) of the United States, shall...

  11. 36 CFR 223.238 - Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Army and Navy. 223.238 Section 223.238 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Contracts, Permits, Or Other Authorizing Instruments § 223.238 Free use authorization to U.S. Army and Navy... forest products by the U.S. Army and Navy for the purposes identified at 16 U.S.C. 492....

  12. 46 CFR 4.11-1 - Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as... vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses. No officer, seaman, or other employee of any public vessel controlled by the Army or Navy (not including the Coast Guard) of the United States, shall...

  13. 46 CFR 4.11-1 - Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employees of vessels controlled by Army or Navy as... vessels controlled by Army or Navy as witnesses. No officer, seaman, or other employee of any public vessel controlled by the Army or Navy (not including the Coast Guard) of the United States, shall...

  14. The Concepts of Performance-Oriented Instruction Used in Developing the Experimental Volunteer Army Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John E.; And Others

    This report describes the planning and implementing of the Experimental Volunteer Army Training Program (EVATP) at Fort Ord early in 1971. This was the Army's first effort to effect major training innovations in the conversion toward an all-volunteer Army. By the fall of 1971, this program was being used as a model for implementing the EVATP at…

  15. Health Hazard Assessment and Toxicity Clearances in the Army Acquisition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macko, Joseph A., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Army Materiel Command, Army Acquisition Pollution Prevention Support Office (AAPPSO) is responsible for creating and managing the U.S. Army Wide Acquisition Pollution Prevention Program. They have established Integrated Process Teams (IPTs) within each of the Major Subordinate Commands of the Army Materiel Command. AAPPSO provides centralized integration, coordination, and oversight of the Army Acquisition Pollution Prevention Program (AAPPP) , and the IPTs provide the decentralized execution of the AAPPSO program. AAPPSO issues policy and guidance, provides resources and prioritizes P2 efforts. It is the policy of the (AAPPP) to require United States Army Surgeon General approval of all materials or substances that will be used as an alternative to existing hazardous materials, toxic materials and substances, and ozone-depleting substances. The Army has a formal process established to address this effort. Army Regulation 40-10 requires a Health Hazard Assessment (HHA) during the Acquisition milestones of a new Army system. Army Regulation 40-5 addresses the Toxicity Clearance (TC) process to evaluate new chemicals and materials prior to acceptance as an alternative. U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine is the Army's matrixed medical health organization that performs the HHA and TC mission.

  16. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  17. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  18. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  19. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  20. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  1. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  2. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  3. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  4. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  5. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  6. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for...

  7. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite layout plans for...

  8. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 636.5 Section 636.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. For...

  9. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 636.5 Section 636.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. For...

  10. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drivers. 634.12 Section 634.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... § 634.12 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. Army commanders will take appropriate action against intoxicated drivers. These actions may include the following: (a) A written...

  11. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. 636.5 Section 636.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. For...

  12. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drivers. 634.12 Section 634.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... § 634.12 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. Army commanders will take appropriate action against intoxicated drivers. These actions may include the following: (a) A written...

  13. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drivers. 634.12 Section 634.12 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... § 634.12 Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers. Army commanders will take appropriate action against intoxicated drivers. These actions may include the following: (a) A written...

  14. Male and Female Soldiers' Beliefs about the "Appropriateness" of Various Jobs for Women in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savell, Joel M.; And Others

    A study was conducted to (1) document the expanding role of women in the U.S. Army and (2) determine whether soldiers in 1974 believed that certain military jobs were appropriate for women and whether those beliefs were related to respondent sex, rank, and expectation of leaving the army before retirement. An examination of army records revealed…

  15. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  16. A comparison among root soil-conservation effects for nine herbs at the cold region highway in north-eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Wang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High soil-conservation herbs are very important for slope vegetation restoration of a highway in serious sandstorm regions. In this study, nine common herbs in northeast China were selected and compared to study soil-conservation effects by using an undisturbed-soil trough scouring method for soil anti-scourability enhancement and hydrostatic collapse method for soil anti-erodibility. Further, principal components analysis was used to identify significant root features that affected soil erosion resistance. Results indicated that different herbs had distinct enhancement effects on soil erosion resistance. Soil anti-scourability enhancement index decreased with increases of soil depth, slope gradient and rainfall amount. Relationship between soil anti-erodibility enhancement index ( S) and immersion time ( t) is a cubic spline in each different herb type ( R 2 ≥ 0.88). Herb root features such as micro-aggregates, organic matter, net leaf weight, thick root length, fine root length and biomass contributed a leading role in soil erosion resistance enhancement effect, and all their common factor variances were more than 0.81. Descending order of soil erosion resistance enhancement effect in soil anti-scourability for nine herbs is Poa pratensis, Medicago sativa, Viola philippica, Rudbeckia hirta, Clematis heracleifolia, Kalimeris indica, Cosmos bipinnata, Hemerocallis fulva and Sedum elatinoides, while the sequence of soil anti-erodibility is M. sativa, S. elatinoides, P. pratensis, R. hirta, H. fulva, V. philippica, C. heracleifolia, C. bipinnata and K. indica. Therefore, we concluded that P. pratensis and M. sativa were the most suitable herbs for resisting soil erosion and recommended to be widely planted for road vegetation recovery in this region.

  17. Human responses to cold.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    The thermoneutral ambient temperature for naked and resting humans is ca. 27 degrees C. Exposure to cold stimulates cold receptors of the skin which causes cold thermal sensations and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction in skin, arms and legs. Diminished skin and extremity blood flow increases the thermal insulation of superficial tissues more than 300% corresponding to 0.9 clo (0.13 degrees C x m(-2) x W(-1)). With thermoregulatory vasoconstriction/ vasodilatation the body heat balance can be maintained within a range of ca. 4 degrees C, the middle of the range being at ca. 21 degrees C when light clothing is used. Below the thermoneutral zone metabolic heat production (shivering) is stimulated and above the zone starts heat loss by evaporation (sweating). Cold induced vasoconstriction increases blood pressure and viscosity and decreases plasma volume consequently increasing cardiac work. Cold induced hypertensive response can be counteracted by light exercise, while starting heavy work in cold markedly increases blood pressure. Under very cold conditions the sympathetic stimulation opens the anastomoses between arterioles and venules which increases skin temperatures markedly but temporarily, especially in finger tips. Adaptation to cold takes ca. 2 weeks, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful. PMID:17929604

  18. Assessment of cold-climate environmental research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    States, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has consistently recognized that cold regions pose unique environmental problems. This report sets forth the conceptual framework and research plans for several high priority research areas. It provides the fundamental basis for implementation of the EPA Cold-Climate Environmental Research Program. This three- to five-year program encompasses both short- and long-term research of high relevance to the EPA and to the cold regions that it serves.

  19. Distributions of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in surface soils of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: implications of GDGT-based proxies in cold and dry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; He, Y.; Hou, J.; Chen, L.; He, J.-S.

    2015-01-01

    The methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) based on the distribution of bacteria-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs) are useful proxies for the reconstruction of continental paleotemperature and soil pH. Several calibrations of the MBT-CBT index have been proposed based on global and regional soils and lake sediments. However, little is known about the distribution and applicability of GDGTs proxies in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP), a critical region of the global climate system. Here, we investigated 33 surface soils covering a large area of the QTP. Redundancy analysis showed that soil pH was the most important factor affecting GDGT distributions, followed by mean annual precipitation (MAP) and mean annual air temperature (MAT). The branched-isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) index, an indicator for estimation of soil organic matter in aquatic environments, varied from 0.48 to 1 and negatively correlated with soil pH (r2 = 0.38), suggesting that the BIT index should be used with caution in the QTP. A transfer function of the CBT index-soil pH was established to estimate paleo-soil pH in the QTP: pH = 8.33-1.43 × CBT (r2 = 0.80, RMSE = 0.27 pH unit). The local calibration of MBT-CBT index presented a weak, still significant correlation with MAT (r2 = 0.36) mainly owing to the additional influence of MAP (r2 = 0.50). Combining our data with previously reported GDGTs for Chinese soils resulted in a new calibration of MBT/CBT-MAT: MAT = 2.68+26.14 × MBT-3.37 × CBT (r2 = 0.73; RMSE = 4.2 °C, n = 164). The correlation coefficient and residual error of this new transfer function is comparable with global calibrations, suggesting that MBT-CBT paleotemperature proxy is still valid in the QTP.

  20. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  1. US Army Research Office research in progress, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The US Army Research Office, under the US Army Materiel Command (AMC), is responsible for coordinating and supporting research in the physical and engineering sciences, in materials science, geosciences, biology, and mathematics. This report describes research directly supported by the Army Research Projects Agency, and several AMC and other Army commands. A separate section is devoted to the research program at the US Army Research, Development and Standardization Group - United Kingdom. The present volume includes the research program in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, engineering sciences, metallurgy and materials science, geosciences, electronics, and the European Research Program. It covers the 12-month period from 1 July 1991 through 30 June 1992.

  2. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  3. EO-based lake-ice cover and surface temperature products: Advancing process understanding and modeling capabilities of lake-atmosphere interactions in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, C. R.; Kheyrollah Pour, H.; Ochilov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to determine the energy and water budgets of lakes is critical to modeling high latitude weather and climate. In recent years, the proper representation of lake processes in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and regional climate (RCM) models has become a topic of much interest by the scientific community. With the increased resolution of the NWP models and RCMs, it has now become possible and necessary to improve the representation of lake-atmosphere interactions to better describe the energy exchange between the atmosphere and the lake surface. Among other lake properties, knowledge about lake surface temperature and ice-coverage is critical. These two parameters can either be obtained from observations or through simulations. Although much progress is being made with lake models, as implemented in NWP/RCM models, the assimilation of data on lake temperature and fractional ice coverage has been identified as highly desirable. Spatially and temporally consistent lake ice and lake surface temperature (LST) products are invaluable in this respect. These can be derived from Earth Observation (EO) systems. However, satellite-based products must be compared with existing lake models, as well as validated and further improved as needed, to generate lake ice and LST products for operational use by the modeling community. The European Space Agency (ESA) is supporting the international efforts coordinated by the Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to exploit the use of EO technology, models and in situ data to improve the characterization of river and lake ice processes and their contribution to the Northern Hydrology system. The ESA-sponsored North Hydrology project aims to develop a portfolio of novel multi-mission geo-information products, maximizing the use of ESA satellite data, to respond to the scientific requirements of the CliC community and the operational requirements of the weather and climate

  4. Distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers in surface soils of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: implications of brGDGTs-based proxies in cold and dry regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, S.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; He, Y.; Hou, J.; Chen, L.; He, J.-S.

    2015-06-01

    The methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) and cyclization ratio of branched tetraethers (CBT) based on the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGT) are useful proxies for the reconstruction of mean annual air temperature (MAT) and soil pH. Recently, a series of 6-methyl brGDGTs were identified which were previously co-eluted with 5-methyl brGDGTs. However, little is known about 6-methyl brGDGTs in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), a critical region of the global climate system. Here, we analyze 30 surface soils covering a large area of the QTP, among which 6-methyl brGDGTs were the most abundant components (average 53 ± 17% of total brGDGT). The fractional abundance of 6-methyl brGDGTs showed a good correlation with soil pH, while the global MBT'5ME calibration overestimates MAT in the QTP. We therefore proposed a MBT5/6 index including both 5- and 6-methyl brGDGTs, presenting a strong correlation with MAT in QTP: MAT = -20.14 + 39.51 × MBT5/6 (n = 27, r2 = 0.82; RMSE = 1.3 °C). Another index, namely IBT (isomerization of branched tetraether), based on carbon skeleton isomerization of the 5-methyl to 6-methyl brGDGTs, is dependent on soil pH: pH = 6.77 - 1.56 × IBT (n = 27; r2 = 0.74, RMSE = 0.32). Our study suggests that changing the position of methyl group of brGDGTs may be another mechanism for some soil bacteria to adapt to the ambient pH change in addition to the well-known cyclization.

  5. Groundwater modeling in the Army environmental restoration programs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, G.; Campbell, C.C.; Green, K.; Sculley, J.; Piegari, G.

    1994-05-01

    This is the report of the findings and recommendations of a ground water study panel convened by the Army Science Board's Infrastructure Environment (IE) Issue Group to evaluate the role and practice of ground water modeling (GWM) in the Army's environmental restoration programs and to assess future research program needs. Cleaning up contaminated ground water and soils is an exceptionally difficult problem. Contaminants offer exist in complex hydrogeologic conditions in which a variety of different physical, chemical, and biological processes are occuring. Complexities in subsurface characteristics make characterizing contaminant transport challenging. Ground water models mathematically approximate contaminant fate and transport processes in certain subsurface water conditions, providing a tool for site characterization that can help clarify the trade-offs associated with alternative clean-up remedies.

  6. Role of Gymnastics in the Army School of Physical Training

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, DE; Hargrove, R; Clasper, J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a result of a single spinal injury seen at Frimley Park Hospital, we reviewed the injuries recorded at the Army School of Physical Training since December 1996. PATIENTS AND METHODS This was a retrospective review of all acute accidents and injuries recorded in the Accident Book since its inception. RESULTS Over 75% of the injuries that were serious enough to result in soldiers having their training terminated were as a direct result of gymnastic events such as vaulting, trampolining and somersaults. These events were also responsible for most of the small number of career-threatening injuries. CONCLUSIONS This raises questions about the inclusion of gymnastic events in course training programmes, especially when considering its relevance to army training in general. PMID:17002850

  7. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  8. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. High-performance IR detector modules for Army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Rutzinger, S.; Schallenberg, T.; Wendler, J.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Since many years AIM delivers IR-modules for army applications like pilotage, weapon sights, UAVs or vehicle platforms. State-of-the-art 640x512, 15μm pitch detector modules are in production in manifold configurations optimized for specific key requirements on system level. This is possible due to a modular design, which is best suited to meet the diversity of system needs in army applications. Examples are optimization of detector-dewar length for gimbal applications, size weight and power reduction for UAVs or lifetime enhancement for vehicle platforms. In 2012 AIM presented first prototypes of megapixel detectors (1280x1024, 15μm pitch) for both spectral bands MWIR and LWIR. These large format detector arrays fulfill the demand for higher spatial resolution, which is requested for applications like rotorcraft pilotage, persistent surveillance or tasks like determination of threat level in personnel targets. Recently, a new tactical dewar has been developed for the 1280x1024 detector arrays. It is designed to withstand environmental stresses and, at the same time, to quest for a compact overall package. Furthermore, the idea of a modular design will be even more emphasized. Integration of different cooler types, like AIM's SX095 or rotary integral, will be possible without modification of the dewar. The paper will present development status of large format IR-modules at AIM as well as performance data and configuration considerations with respect to army applications.

  11. Hybridization in East African swarm-raiding army ants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hybridization can have complex effects on evolutionary dynamics in ants because of the combination of haplodiploid sex-determination and eusociality. While hybrid non-reproductive workers have been found in a range of species, examples of gene-flow via hybrid queens and males are rare. We studied hybridization in East African army ants (Dorylus subgenus Anomma) using morphology, mitochondrial DNA sequences, and nuclear microsatellites. Results While the mitochondrial phylogeny had a strong geographic signal, different species were not recovered as monophyletic. At our main study site at Kakamega Forest, a mitochondrial haplotype was shared between a "Dorylus molestus-like" and a "Dorylus wilverthi-like" form. This pattern is best explained by introgression following hybridization between D. molestus and D. wilverthi. Microsatellite data from workers showed that the two morphological forms correspond to two distinct genetic clusters, with a significant proportion of individuals being classified as hybrids. Conclusions We conclude that hybridization and gene-flow between the two army ant species D. molestus and D. wilverthi has occurred, and that mating between the two forms continues to regularly produce hybrid workers. Hybridization is particularly surprising in army ants because workers have control over which males are allowed to mate with a young virgin queen inside the colony. PMID:21859477

  12. Chimpanzees prey on army ants with specialized tool set.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Crickette M; Schöning, Caspar; Morgan, David B

    2010-01-01

    Several populations of chimpanzees have been reported to prey upon Dorylus army ants. The most common tool-using technique to gather these ants is with "dipping" probes, which vary in length with regard to aggressiveness and lifestyle of the prey species. We report the use of a tool set in army ant predation by chimpanzees in the Goualougo Triangle, Republic of Congo. We recovered 1,060 tools used in this context and collected 25 video recordings of chimpanzee tool-using behavior at ant nests. Two different types of tools were distinguished based on their form and function. The chimpanzees use a woody sapling to perforate the ant nest, and then a herb stem as a dipping tool to harvest the ants. All of the species of ants preyed upon in Goualougo are present and consumed by chimpanzees at other sites, but there are no other reports of such a regular or widespread use of more than one type of tool to prey upon Dorylus ants. Furthermore, this tool set differs from other types of tool combinations used by chimpanzees at this site for preying upon termites or gathering honey. Therefore, we conclude that these chimpanzees have developed a specialized method for preying upon army ants, which involves the use of an additional tool for opening nests. Further research is needed to determine which specific ecological and social factors may have shaped the emergence and maintenance of this technology. PMID:19731231

  13. Ghana's army goes into combat readiness against HIV.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Ghana's professional army of 12,000 men were joined by the national police in launching a campaign of education about AIDS which promotes condom use. The campaign received some funding from USAID and AIDS Tech/Family Health International. 94% of the soldiers had 7 years of education and 95% were married. 47% had never used the condom, 37% used it only occasionally, and only 19% used it regularly. An AIDS Awareness Day was followed up by 3000 posters, 1800 bumper stickers, 1500 T-shirts, 300 press packs, 1000 keychains and a video. Comic books in the local pidgin English idiom also proved popular for promotion. In a social marketing scheme, condoms were made available in barracks, army shops, and canteens for a modest price. The sales of condoms rose from about 500 a month in 1991 to 6000-7000 by January 1992. The army AIDS policy spelled out that HIV positivity will be revealed to the infected soldier. HIV-positive soldIers will not be sent abroad, curtailing the chances of disease transmission. They are kept in active service as long as they are capable of meeting their duties. Nevertheless, this policy hinges on the outcome of the AIDS education campaign whose failure could result in a policy of dismissing HIV-infected soldiers. PMID:12317821

  14. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  15. Chimpanzees prey on army ants at Seringbara, Nimba Mountains, Guinea: predation patterns and tool use characteristics.

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Schöning, Caspar; McGrew, William C; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-03-01

    Chimpanzees are renowned for their use of foraging tools in harvesting social insects and some populations use tools to prey on aggressive army ants (Dorylus spp.). Tool use in army ant predation varies across chimpanzee study sites with differences in tool length, harvesting technique, and army ant species targeted. However, surprisingly little is known about the detailed ecology of army ant predation. We studied army ant predation by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at the Seringbara study site in the Nimba Mountains, Guinea (West Africa), over 10 years (2003-2013). We investigated chimpanzee selectivity with regards to army ant prey species. We assessed the temporal variation in army ant-feeding and examined whether army ant predation was related to rainfall or ripe fruit availability. Moreover, we examined whether chimpanzees showed selectivity regarding plant species used for tool manufacture, as well as the relationship between tool species preference and tool collection distance. Lastly, we measured tool properties and investigated the use of tool sets and composite tools in army ant predation. Seringbara chimpanzees preyed on one army ant species (D. nigricans) more often than expected based on encounter rates, which may be explained by the overlap in altitudinal distribution between chimpanzees and D. nigricans. Army ant predation was not related to rainfall or fruit availability. Chimpanzees were selective in their choice of tool materials and collected their preferred tool species (Alchornea hirtella) from greater distances than they did other species. Lastly, Seringbara chimpanzees used both tool sets and composite tools (tree perch) in army ant predation. Tool types (dig vs. dip) differed in width and strength, but not length. Tool composites were found at 40% of ant-feeding sites. Our study sheds new light on the ecology of army ant predation and provides novel insights into chimpanzee selection of army ant prey and tool species. PMID:25315798

  16. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis. PMID:23471256

  17. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  18. Metal flowing of involute spline cold roll-beating forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Fengkui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Fengshou; Xu, Hongyu; Quan, Jianhui; Li, Yan

    2013-09-01

    The present research on involute spline cold roll-beating forming is mainly about the principles and motion relations of cold roll-beating, the theory of roller design, and the stress and strain field analysis of cold roll-beating, etc. However, the research on law of metal flow in the forming process of involute spline cold roll-beating is rare. According to the principle of involute spline cold roll-beating, the contact model between the rollers and the spline shaft blank in the process of cold roll-beating forming is established, and the theoretical analysis of metal flow in the cold roll-beating deforming region is proceeded. A finite element model of the spline cold roll-beating process is established, the formation mechanism of the involute spline tooth profile in cold roll-beating forming process is studied, and the node flow tracks of the deformation area are analyzed. The experimental research on the metal flow of cold roll-beating spline is conducted, and the metallographic structure variation, grain characteristics and metal flow line of the different tooth profile area are analyzed. The experimental results show that the particle flow directions of the deformable bodies in cold roll-beating deformation area are determined by the minimum moving resistance. There are five types of metal flow rules of the deforming region in the process of cold roll-beating forming. The characteristics of involute spline cold roll-beating forming are given, and the forming mechanism of involute spline cold roll-beating is revealed. This paper researches the law of metal flow in the forming process of involute spline cold roll-beating, which provides theoretical supports for solving the tooth profile forming quality problem.

  19. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  20. Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Installation 13307, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.; Smith, K.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard property located on Hunter Army Airfield (HAA) near Savannah, Georgia, known as Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) No. 3. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, the nature and amounts of wastes generated or stored at the facility, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the AASF No. 3 property, requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the area now occupied by AASF No. 3. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of HAA completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on AASF No. 3 for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of HAA.

  1. 75 FR 53264 - Restricted Area in Cape Fear River and Tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... at Sunny Point Army Terminal, Brunswick County, NC AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION... regulation for the restricted area in the Cape Fear River and its tributaries at Sunny Point Army Terminal... facility, including vessels loading and offloading at the Sunny Point Army Terminal. In the ``Rules...

  2. Primary cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prabodh Chandra; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bera, Mitali

    2011-07-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with severe pallor and intermittent passage of cola-coloured urine. Routine investigations were suggestive of auto-immune haemolytic anaemia. Red cell agglutination was observed in peripheral smear and patient's serum was positive for cold agglutinins. Thorough work-up ruled out secondary cold agglutinin disease. Patient was treated successfully with corticosteroids. PMID:22315851

  3. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  4. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  5. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  6. It's Not Academic, You're in the Army Now: Adjustment to the Army as a Comparative Context for Adjustment to University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintre, Maxine Gallander; Ben-Knaz, Revital

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the presumed efficacy of authoritative parenting in influencing adjustment during basic training to the Israeli army, a more authoritarian environment. Found that authoritatively reared children were at a disadvantage with regard to successful adjustment to the army. They were more depressed, experienced greater stress, and had lower…

  7. PREP (Army Predischarge Education Program) USA: An Analysis of the Predischarge Education Program of Army Posts in the Continental United States. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alburn, Norman; And Others

    Growth of the Army Pre-discharge Education Program (PREP) has been a slow and cumbersome process since Public Law 91-219 was passed in 1970. The Academy for Educational Development visited 12 major Army installations in the United States and made 22 recommendations for improving the PREP in six major areas: i.e., technology, evaluation and…

  8. Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather Hazard Heath and Aging Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard What Are The Signs Of Hypothermia? Taking ... cold air. But, not everyone knows that cold weather can also lower the temperature inside your body. ...

  9. Axion cold dark matter revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visinelli, L.; Gondolo, P.

    2010-01-01

    We study for what specific values of the theoretical parameters the axion can form the totality of cold dark matter. We examine the allowed axion parameter region in the light of recent data collected by the WMAP5 mission plus baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae [1], and assume an inflationary scenario and standard cosmology. We also upgrade the treatment of anharmonicities in the axion potential, which we find important in certain cases. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is restored after inflation, we recover the usual relation between axion mass and density, so that an axion mass ma = (85 ± 3) μeV makes the axion 100% of the cold dark matter. If the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is broken during inflation, the axion can instead be 100% of the cold dark matter for ma < 15 meV provided a specific value of the initial misalignment angle θi is chosen in correspondence to a given value of its mass ma. Large values of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale correspond to small, perhaps uncomfortably small, values of the initial misalignment angle θi.

  10. Mission aware energy saving strategies for Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattathreya, Macam S.

    Fuel energy is a basic necessity for this planet and the modern technology to perform many activities on earth. On the other hand, quadrupled automotive vehicle usage by the commercial industry and military has increased fuel consumption. Military readiness of Army ground vehicles is very important for a country to protect its people and resources. Fuel energy is a major requirement for Army ground vehicles. According to a report, a department of defense has spent nearly $13.6 billion on fuel and electricity to conduct ground missions. On the contrary, energy availability on this plant is slowly decreasing. Therefore, saving energy in Army ground vehicles is very important. Army ground vehicles are embedded with numerous electronic systems to conduct missions such as silent and normal stationary surveillance missions. Increasing electrical energy consumption of these systems is influencing higher fuel consumption of the vehicle. To save energy, the vehicles can use any of the existing techniques, but they require complex, expensive, and time consuming implementations. Therefore, cheaper and simpler approaches are required. In addition, the solutions have to save energy according to mission needs and also overcome size and weight constraints of the vehicle. Existing research in the current literature do not have any mission aware approaches to save energy. This dissertation research proposes mission aware online energy saving strategies for stationary Army ground vehicles to save energy as well as to meet the electrical needs of the vehicle during surveillance missions. The research also proposes theoretical models of surveillance missions, fuzzy logic models of engine and alternator efficiency data, and fuzzy logic algorithms. Based on these models, two energy saving strategies are proposed for silent and normal surveillance type of missions. During silent mission, the engine is on and batteries power the systems. During normal surveillance mission, the engine is

  11. Environmental regulatory compliance on army lands: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Robert B.; Laven, Richard D.

    1993-05-01

    A “finding of no significant impact” (FONSI) resulting from an environmental assessment (EA) was reported by the US Army in June 1986 for the construction and utilization of a multipurpose range complex (MPRC) at the Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii. There was little public response, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service and state agencies were consulted and had few comments concerning the results of the botanical surveys used in the assessment. Construction of the 24 million project was begun in 1988. Near the end of construction in 1989 a lawsuit was filed to halt construction because an environmental impact statement (EIS) had not been done for the project, and the plaintiff thought that significant damage had occurred to several unusual ecosystems. Judgment was against the plaintiff and construction continued. An appeal was filed with the 9th Circuit Court. As MPRC construction was nearly complete, and on advice of Department of Justice lawyers, the Department of Army agreed to settle out of court. The settlement in part called for: (1) the plaintiff to drop the appeal and allow construction to be completed as scheduled, and (2) the Department of Army to prepare an EIS for the operation of the MPRC. A subsequent botanical survey for the EIS discovered one endangered plant species, four category 1 candidate plant species (taxa with sufficient data to support listing as endangered or threatened), three category 2 candidate plant species (taxa with some evidence of vulnerability but insufficient data to support listing at this time), one category 3a species (presumably extinct taxa), and possibly three undescribed species growing within the MPRC boundary. The MPRC case study is an excellent example of why the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) must be modified to require in-depth and thorough environmental surveys.

  12. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ...On March 7, 2011 (76 FR 12508-12548), DoD published notice of approval of a personnel management demonstration project for eligible TARDEC employees. Within that notice the table showing the compensation regions defined by Normal Pay Ranges was misprinted. The Reduction-in- Force service credit was described erroneously, and several occupational series were omitted from the Occupational......

  13. Parasuicidal behavior on an active duty army training post.

    PubMed

    Koshes, R J; Rothberg, J M

    1992-07-01

    The incidence of suicidal behavior among active duty Army personnel at a training post has not been the subject of analysis since the advent of the all-volunteer military. A review of admissions over 16 consecutive months showed most of the behaviors to be parasuicidal, with low levels of lethality and high rescuability. Compared to previously published studies, the characteristics of these soldiers are little changed over the past 25 years. This report suggests a standard method for handling suicidal behavior which includes an active role for psychiatric consultation to units and commanders. PMID:1528469

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  16. Seroimmunity to polioviruses in U.S. Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Burke, D S; Gaydos, J C; Hodder, R A; Bancroft, W H

    1979-02-01

    Titers of neutralizing antibody to poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 were determined for serum specimens obtained from 268 U.S. Army recruits. Among those tested, 20.9% lacked neutralizing antibody to one or more types of poliovirus, and 1.1% lacked antibody to all three types. An analysis of demographic data showed that age of less than 18 years, schooling for less than 10 years, and residence in the northeastern United States were associated with higher percentages of recruits lacking neutralizing antibodies to polioviruses in serum. PMID:220335

  17. Consolidation of data base for Army generalized missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenke, D. J.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Data from plume interaction tests, nose mounted canard configuration tests, and high angle of attack tests on the Army Generalized Missile model are consolidated in a computer program which makes them readily accessible for plotting, listing, and evaluation. The program is written in FORTRAN and will run on an ordinary minicomputer. It has the capability of retrieving any coefficient from the existing DATAMAN tapes and displaying it in tabular or plotted form. Comparisons of data taken in several wind tunnels and of data with the predictions of Program MISSILE2 are also presented.

  18. What decides if a smarter army can win a battle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2007-03-01

    We study the kinetics associated with a ``war'' in which an attacking army attempts to win over a spatially dispersed defender on a 2D lattice. The levels of engagement are comparable in our study. The conflicting parties can annihilate, win or lose at any given site depending upon certain preselected rules of engagement. The attacker possesses higher intelligence, which is manifested through the moves of the attackers. We show that an ``intelligent'' attacker with subcritical number of attackers cannot win in the engagement.

  19. Modified US Army U-8F ground vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center conducted a ground vibration test on a modified U.S. Army U-8F airplane. Modifications included new engines, propellers, and engine-mounted truss assemblies. The ground vibration test was conducted using sine dwell, single-point random, and impact excitations. The test was performed to determine modal frequencies, mode shapes, and structural damping coefficients of the airframe and propeller with full and empty fuel tanks. The data presented include frequency response plots, rigid-body and structural modal frequencies, and mode shapes.

  20. Pensions and Retirement Among Black Union Army Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Dora L.

    2010-01-01

    I examine the effects of an unearned income transfer on the retirement rates and living arrangements of black Union Army veterans. I find that blacks were more than twice as responsive as whites to income transfers in their retirement decisions and 6 to 8 times as responsive in their choice of independent living arrangements. My findings have implications for understanding racial differences in rates of retirement and independent living at the beginning of the twentieth century, the rise in retirement prior to 1930, and the subsequent convergence in black-white retirement rates and living arrangements. PMID:21179379

  1. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  2. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  3. Febrile/cold agglutinins

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose certain infections and find the cause of hemolytic anemia (a type of anemia that occurs when red ... or cold agglutinins can help explain why the hemolytic anemia is occurring and direct treatment.

  4. The 1991 Department of the Army Service Response Force exercise: Procedural Guide SRFX-91

    SciTech Connect

    Madore, M.A.; Thomson, R.S.; Haffenden, R.A.; Baldwin, T.E.; Meleski, S.A.

    1991-09-01

    This procedural guide was written to assist the US Army in planning for a chemical emergency exercise at Tooele Army Depot in Utah. The roles of various members of the emergency response community are described for various accident scenarios, and the relationships between the various responders are identified. For the June 1991 exercise at Tooele, the emergency response community includes the command structure at Tooele Army Depot; the US Army Service Response Force and other Department of Defense agencies; emergency response personnel from Tooele, Salt Lake, and Utah counties and municipal governments; the Utah Comprehensive Emergency Management Agency and other state agencies; and various federal agencies.

  5. High Precision in AN Imprecise World: the Importance of the Molecular Spectroscopy Symposium to the Army

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatrud, David

    2010-06-01

    The Army Research Office has been a consistent supporter of the OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy for nearly 30 years. During this time, the Symposium has been of great value to the Army through a number of mechanisms. Not only have numerous specific research projects reported at the Symposium had major impacts on critical Army technologies; but in addition, an understanding of how to perform high-resolution spectroscopy research provides unique education and training on how to meaningfully model and explain many disparate complex phenomena. I will present historical examples, and also highlight related current Army research needs and thrusts.

  6. Environmental readiness pilot study at the Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, D.; Bhinge, D.; Patel, J.; Jones-Bateman, L.; Resnick, E.

    1994-12-31

    The Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) has been on standby status since the mid-1970s, prior to the enactment of the majority of Federal environmental regulations. As a result, BAAP is unprepared to begin production without the implementation of pollution prevention and treatment measures. The Army contracted SAIC to conduct a pilot study to develop an environmental readiness plan for BAAP in the event that the plant is reactivated to produce explosives and propellants for ammunition requirements during mobilization. This paper describes the process developed by SAIC to conduct this pilot study at BAAP and the relationship between this effort and the Army`s overall environmental mission.

  7. Hepatitis A in the US Army: epidemiology and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hoke, C H; Binn, L N; Egan, J E; DeFraites, R F; MacArthy, P O; Innis, B L; Eckels, K H; Dubois, D; D'Hondt, E; Sjogren, M H

    1992-01-01

    Control of hepatitis A has been an important concern for US military forces in war and peace. Immune serum globulin, although effective, is exceedingly cumbersome to use. The prevalence of antibody against hepatitis A is decreasing in young American soldiers, putting them at risk of hepatitis A during deployment. The US Army has been an active participant in development of hepatitis A vaccine. The first successful cell-culture-derived, formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine was developed at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. This prototype vaccine was shown, in 1986, to be safe and immunogenic for humans. Since then we have evaluated the following issues related to the use of inactivated hepatitis A vaccines in military populations. Immunogenicity of vaccine derived from the CLF and HM175 strains; immunogenicity of hepatitis A vaccine given by jet injector; immunogenicity of hepatitis A vaccine when given with hepatitis B vaccine; immunogenicity when given in shortened schedules; safety and immunogenicity in Thai children; and efficacy under field conditions in the tropics. The hepatitis A vaccines which we tested are safe and highly immunogenic. Immunization by jet gun confers immunity equivalent to immunization by needle. Hepatitis A vaccine is equally potent when given with hepatitis B vaccine. Data on rapid immunization schedules and efficacy are under evaluation. We conclude that hepatitis A vaccine is a major improvement in our ability to prevent hepatitis A in soldiers. PMID:1335665

  8. Maggot debridement therapy in modern army medicine: perceptions and prevalence.

    PubMed

    Heitkamp, Rae A; Peck, George W; Kirkup, Benjamin C

    2012-11-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT), despite its long history and safety profile, finds limited use in the military health care system. Although new methods are continually being investigated to debride wounds more quickly and effectively, MDT remains largely a therapy of last resort. We evaluated the frequency of MDT in the Army sector of the MHS and the decision-making process surrounding its use. A 22 question survey of Army physicians was prepared and distributed through select Medical Corps Consultants in specialties likely to practice debridement. 83% of respondents were familiar with MDT, and of those familiar, 63% were aware of FDA approval for the product and 10% had used the product themselves. The three most frequently cited reasons for not using the therapy were no need (52%), no access (23%), and insufficient experience (19%). Informing the 37% of physicians who are not aware of FDA approval is an obvious target for program improvement. However, as many do not find a need for MDT, targeted improvements to MDT access and education for those physicians who encounter indications for MDT would permit them to apply MDT where there is an unmet need. PMID:23198524

  9. MEMS-based phased arrays for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Holt, James C.; Mullins, James H.; Hudson, Tracy; Rock, Janice

    2007-04-01

    The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) initiated a research and development project several years ago to develop Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based phased arrays to provide rapid beam steering for sensors, optical and Radio Frequency (RF) missile seekers, and RF communication links. In particular, the joint AMRDEC/Army Research Laboratory (ARL) project, which leverages low-cost phased array components developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Low Cost Cruise Missile Defense (LCCMD) project, is developing RF switches, phase shifters, and passive phased sub-arrays to provide a fast scanning capability for pointing, acquisition, tracking, and data communication; and rugged, optical MEMS-based phased arrays to be employed in small volume, low-cost Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) seekers. The current status of the project is disclosed in this paper. Critical technical challenges, which include design and fabrication of the RF switches and phase shifters, design and fabrication of micro lens arrays, control of beam steering, scanning angular resolution and array losses, are discussed. Our approach to overcoming the technical barriers and achieving required performance is also discussed. Finally, the validity of a MEMS technology approach against competing low cost technologies is presented.

  10. Emergency response concept plan for Tooele Army Depot and vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, S.A.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.; Shumpert, B.L.; Miller, R.L.; Watson, A.P.; Chester, C.V.

    1989-10-01

    The continued storage and disposal of the United States' unitary chemical stockpile, including that portion stored at Tooele Army Depot (TEAD) near Tooele, Utah, have the potential for accidental releases that could escape installation boundaries and pose a threat to civilian populations. The US Army, in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other federal agencies, is committed to implement an emergency preparedness program that will significantly reduce the probability of adverse effects from such releases. This concept plan, which is but a part of a comprehensive ongoing effort, provides a framework for initiating such a program for the TEAD stockpile. This report develops information and methodologies that bear on two major decisions for such a program -- determining emergency planning zones and selecting protective action strategies. These decisions are based on the hazards posed by the TEAD stockpile and its disposal. These hazards, in turn, are based largely on the distribution of potential accidental releases associated with interim storage and disposal activities and associated external events (e.g., earthquakes and airplane crashes), the distribution of natural features that can affect an agent release (topographical features and meteorological characteristics), and the distribution of people and resources (e.g., homes, schools, and hospitals) potentially affected by an accidental release. 22 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Exploiting social media for Army operations: Syrian crisis use case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Al Amin, Tanvir; Abdelzaher, Tarek

    2014-05-01

    Millions of people exchange user-generated information through online social media (SM) services. The prevalence of SM use globally and its growing significance to the evolution of events has attracted the attention of the Army and other agencies charged with protecting national security interests. The information exchanged in SM sites and the networks of people who interact with these online communities can provide value to Army intelligence efforts. SM could facilitate the Military Decision Making Process by providing ongoing assessment of military actions from a local citizen perspective. Despite potential value, there are significant technological barriers to leveraging SM. SM collection and analysis are difficult in the dynamic SM environment and deception is a real concern. This paper introduces a credibility analysis approach and prototype fact-finding technology called the "Apollo Fact-finder" that mitigates the problem of inaccurate or falsified SM data. Apollo groups data into sets (or claims), corroborating specific observations, then iteratively assesses both claim and source credibility resulting in a ranking of claims by likelihood of occurrence. These credibility analysis approaches are discussed in the context of a conflict event, the Syrian civil war, and applied to tweets collected in the aftermath of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis.

  12. The US Army Foreign Comparative Test fuel cell program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostic, Elizabeth; Sifer, Nicholas; Bolton, Christopher; Ritter, Uli; Dubois, Terry

    The US Army RDECOM initiated a Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) Program to acquire lightweight, high-energy dense fuel cell systems from across the globe for evaluation as portable power sources in military applications. Five foreign companies, including NovArs, Smart Fuel Cell, Intelligent Energy, Ballard Power Systems, and Hydrogenics, Inc., were awarded competitive contracts under the RDECOM effort. This paper will report on the status of the program as well as the experimental results obtained from one of the units. The US Army has interests in evaluating and deploying a variety of fuel cell systems, where these systems show added value when compared to current power sources in use. For low-power applications, fuel cells utilizing high-energy dense fuels offer significant weight savings over current battery technologies. This helps reduce the load a solider must carry for longer missions. For high-power applications, the low operating signatures (acoustic and thermal) of fuel cell systems make them ideal power generators in stealth operations. Recent testing has been completed on the Smart Fuel Cell A25 system that was procured through the FCT program. The "A-25" is a direct methanol fuel cell hybrid and was evaluated as a potential candidate for soldier and sensor power applications.

  13. Physical Fitness and Depressive Symptoms during Army Basic Combat Training

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Shannon K.; Wilkinson, Larrell L.; Wigfall, Lisa T.; Reynolds, Alexandria M.; Muraca, Stephanie T.; Glover, Saundra H.; Wooten, Nikki R.; Sui, Xuemei; Beets, Michael W.; Durstine, J. Larry; Newman-Norlund, Roger D.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental health-related problems are a significant cause of attrition during Basic Combat Training (BCT). Evidence in civilian populations suggests that physical fitness is associated with psychological benefits in civilians, but little is known about the association between physical fitness and psychological adjustment during BCT. Methods This study prospectively examined the association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms in 300 BCT soldiers from May to July, 2012 at Fort Jackson, Columbia, SC. Soldiers completed a baseline Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and survey within one week of arriving at BCT, and an end of cycle survey after eight weeks of BCT. Soldiers were assigned to the “high” fitness category if they had a passing score on the standard APFT of greater than or equal to 180 points out of 300 points. Soldiers scoring less than 180 points on the APFT were assigned to the “ low” fitness category. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results In multivariate analyses, adjusting for baseline demographics, self-reported sleep prior to BCT, BCT confidence, Army identification, and depressive symptoms, the odds of reporting depressive symptoms were 60% lower for soldiers in the high fitness category (odds ratio, OR 0.40; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.19–0.84), compared to soldiers in the low fitness category. Conclusions Analogous to other positive outcomes of soldier fitness, improvement of soldier physical fitness prior to BCT might improve soldiers' psychological health outcomes. PMID:24870581

  14. Telemedicine in US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y Sammy; Cucura, Jon; Jain, Ram; Berry-Caban, Cristobal

    2015-10-01

    A retrospective study of a telemedicine clinic for active duty US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes was conducted. Fifty-one consecutive patients (mean age 33.9 years) were enrolled into the clinic. All soldiers with known or newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes received three weekly office visits for intensive diabetes education. After this, all communication occurred via a messaging system consisting of texting, web-based download, and/or email to a diabetes management team. For urgent matters, 24/7 direct paging or telephone access was provided. Routine adjustments in insulin dosing were accomplished via email. Soldiers were followed for a mean of 17.1 months. Baseline, three-month, and end of study glycated hemoglobin (A1C) values were 9.8, 7.3, and 6.9, respectively. There were no significant differences in end of study A1C levels between patients with known vs. newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, nor were there any differences between those patients who received insulin via pump therapy vs. multiple daily injections. Telemedicine was safe and effective in lowering A1C levels in US Army soldiers with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26033845

  15. Out of hours attendance in an army practice.

    PubMed

    Grundy-Wheeler, N J

    1991-05-01

    There is some evidence that rates of out of hours calls in army general practices are higher than the average for the NHS. In an attempt to reduce out of hours demand a programme of preventive and educational initiatives for patients was introduced at an army practice in Hohne, West Germany early in 1985. This included regular child development clinics, well woman clinics, a practice booklet and leaflets about the management of simple illnesses, a library of books and videos for patients and health education videos in the waiting room. The project was complemented by an audit of doctors' prescribing habits followed by drawing up agreed protocols for the treatment of common disorders such as sore throat. Annual attendance rates per registered patient were recorded for 1984-86 to compare use of out of hours services by patients before and after the introduction of the project. Out of hours attendance rates fell by 35% (from 0.17 per annum to 0.11 per annum) overall and by 61% in young children. The total annual attendance rate dropped by 14% (from 5.13 to 4.43) during the same period, but fell by only 1% over the same period at a similar practice in Osnabruck. The decrease was particularly marked for out of hours attendances which the doctor classified as lower urgency: attendances classed as very low urgency decreased by 78% between 1984 and 1986 but those classed as medium urgency decreased by only 2%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1878273

  16. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  17. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  18. Investigation of the Strawberry Acute Cold Response through Transcriptome Sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria xananassa) is a valuable perennial crop, yet in most growing regions cold temperature stress can dramatically impinge on fresh fruit production. In the interest of long-term crop improvement it is important to understand the molecular response of strawberry to cold, a...

  19. Cold stress as it affects animal production.

    PubMed

    Young, B A

    1981-01-01

    Almost two-thirds of all livestock in North America are raised in regions where the mean January temperature is below 0 C. The effects of cold conditions on productivity and efficiency of feed conversion by swine, dairy and beef cattle are reviewed. Swine are rather cold-susceptible and are therefore usually kept in heated housing when raised in colder regions. Lactating or fattening cattle are extremely cold-hardy and rarely experience climatic conditions below their lower critical temperature. Despite the absence of a challenge to homothermy in cattle, there are marked seasonal fluctuations in the cattle's level and efficiency of production which probably arise from hormonal and adaptive changes occurring as a consequence of mild cold stress. Primary among these changes are an increase resting metabolic rate, and hence an increased energy requirement for maintenance, and an increased rate of passage of digesta, which results in reduced digestive efficiency. With cold there is stimulation of appetite, which may partially counteract the reduced level of production but not the reduced efficiency of utilization of dietary energy. PMID:7240034

  20. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.