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Sample records for army size military

  1. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  2. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  3. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  4. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  5. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  6. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  7. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  8. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  9. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  10. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  11. U.S. Army Corrosion Office's storage and quality requirements for military MEMS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-04-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and DOD will rely on heavily to accomplish these objectives. Conditions for utilization of MEMS by the military are unique. Operational and storage environments for the military are significantly different than those found in the commercial sector. Issues unique to the military include; high G-forces during gun launch, extreme temperature and humidity ranges, extended periods of inactivity (20 years plus) and interaction with explosives and propellants. The military operational environments in which MEMS will be stored or required to function are extreme and far surpass any commercial operating conditions. Security and encryption are a must for all MEMS communication, tracking, or data reporting devices employed by the military. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless Radio Frequency Identifications (RFIDs) and network systems, GPS's, radar systems, mobile base systems and information technology. MEMS embedded into these weapons systems will provide the military with new levels of speed, awareness, lethality, and information dissemination. The system capabilities enhanced by MEMS will translate directly into tactical and strategic military advantages.

  12. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  13. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  14. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  15. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  16. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  17. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  18. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  19. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  20. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  1. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  2. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  3. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  4. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  5. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  6. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  7. Military, Biographical, and Demographic Correlates of Army Career Intentions. Technical Report 518.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John

    Organizational and personal correlates of intentions to reenlist or remain on active duty in the Army for both officers and enlisted service members were explored. Demographic and military characteristics and indices of commitment to continuation in the Army were gathered from 10 percent of the enlisted personnel and 30 percent of the officers…

  8. Correlates of Military Satisfaction and Attrition Among Army Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John P.; Bell, D. Bruce

    A study determined relationships between Army organizational variables and levels of soldier satisfaction and assessed correlates of attrition and battalion effectiveness ratings. It was based on a secondary analysis of data collected in the Army Life-78 Study, which considered relationships of organizational climate and unit effectiveness.…

  9. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  10. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  11. Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-14

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

  12. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action... will be advised of military installations to be surveyed under E.O. 11954 by a DOD or GSA survey...

  13. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action... will be advised of military installations to be surveyed under E.O. 11954 by a DOD or GSA survey...

  14. Military positions and post-service occupational mobility of Union Army veterans, 1861–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Although the Civil War has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention, little is known about how different wartime experiences of soldiers influenced their civilian lives after the war. This paper examines how military rank and duty of Union Army soldiers while in service affected their post-service occupational mobility. Higher ranks and non-infantry duties appear to have provided more opportunities for developing skills, especially those required for white-collar jobs. Among the recruits who were unskilled workers at the time of enlistment, commissioned and non-commissioned officers were much more likely to move up to a white-collar job by 1880. Similarly, unskilled recruits assigned to white-collar military duties were more likely to enter a white-collar occupation by 1880. The higher occupational mobility of higher-ranking soldiers is likely to have resulted from disparate human capital accumulations offered by their military positions rather than from their superior abilities. PMID:20234792

  15. The Adjustment of New Recruits to Military Life in the Chinese Army: The Longitudinal Predictive Power of MMPI-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lijun; Han, Jing; Han, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the findings of two studies analyzing new recruits' adjustment to army life in the Chinese military. In the first exploratory study, we developed a scale to measure new recruits' adjustment to military life, and found that new soldiers' adaptation could be divided into two distinct types: interpersonal…

  16. The role of the US Army Veterinary Corps in military family pet health.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Even though privately-owned pet care is a lower priority mission than military working dog care, food inspection,and the public health mission, it is still very important,and the one that many Veterinary Corps officers, civil-ian veterinarians, and technicians enjoy the most. The vast majority of veterinarians and technicians went into veterinary medicine because of a love for animals. It is fulfilling to offer guidance to a client with a new puppy or kitten, see a sick pet improve after treatment, and interact with dozens of animals and clients in a day. The services provided by the Army Veterinary Corps in car-ing for pets has expanded over the years and the standard of care has improved as well. It is truly a privilege to serve those who dedicate themselves to the protection of our Nation. The Army Veterinary Corps is indeed proud to provide care to the pets of Warfighters of the Army,Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard; their family members; and our military retirees. PMID:23277448

  17. Classifying U.S. Army Military Occupational Specialties Using the Occupational Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To derive job condition scales for future studies of the effects of job conditions on soldier health and job functioning across Army Military Occupation Specialties (MOSs) and Areas of Concentration (AOCs) using Department of Labor (DoL) Occupational Information Network (O*NET) ratings. Methods A consolidated administrative dataset was created for the “Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers” (Army STARRS) containing all soldiers on active duty between 2004 and 2009. A crosswalk between civilian occupations and MOS/AOCs (created by DoL and the Defense Manpower Data Center) was augmented to assign scores on all 246 O*NET dimensions to each soldier in the dataset. Principal components analysis was used to summarize these dimensions. Results Three correlated components explained the majority of O*NET dimension variance: “physical demands” (20.9% of variance), “interpersonal complexity” (17.5%), and “substantive complexity” (15.0%). Although broadly consistent with civilian studies, several discrepancies were found with civilian results reflecting potentially important differences in the structure of job conditions in the Army versus the civilian labor force. Conclusions Principal components scores for these scales provide a parsimonious characterization of key job conditions that can be used in future studies of the effects of MOS/AOC job conditions on diverse outcomes. PMID:25003860

  18. [Military Knowledge: War Sciences and Army Libraries in France in the 19th Century (c. 1800-c. 1900)].

    PubMed

    Thoral, Marie-Cecile

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the development of military knowledge in France in the 19th century, both in terms of production of knowledge (especially through the Dépôt de la Guerre) and of transmission through a network of army libraries. The strategic dimension of this form of knowledge required a direct intervention of the state, to control or restrict the publication of sensitive data. State intervention was also necessary to coordinate and generate a unified, applied military knowledge using data submitted by members of different army branches, or by civilians. The work of military librarians and bibliologists was all the more difficult because of the very wide range of sciences which could be used by the army. Growing state intervention and public funding were thus essential for the production and transmission of military knowledge. PMID:26902056

  19. U.S. Army-Baylor University Health Care Administration Program: evidenced-based outcomes in the military health system.

    PubMed

    Mangelsdorff, A David; Rogers, Jody; Finstuen, Kenn; Pryor, Rene

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System on some of the evidence-based educational outcomes for the Individual (student) and the Society (all Army Medical Treatment Facilities). The U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System (MHS). Since the majority of the graduate students are military officers who serve in military medical treatment facilities (MTFs), tracking their career progression allows assessing the value added of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA experience from 1951 to 2001 (n = 2234). The context of Society outcomes includes all the Army MTFs where U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA graduates execute their leadership skills. During the time from 1994 to 2001, all of the Army MTFs in the MHS (n = 38) were examined by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). In a similar but shorter time frame (1997-2001), DoD patient satisfaction assessments were conducted. The Individual outcomes (career advancement, increase in status, higher professional association membership) demonstrate that the selection criteria used for program admission appear to be successful. The Society outcomes showed higher JCAHO scores and satisfied consumers in Army facilities with Baylor graduates as the Deputy Commander for Administration (DCA). Continued internal program assessments (curriculum reviews) and external reviews (Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration accreditations of 5 years in 1987, 8 years in 1993 and 7 years in 2001, and 7 ACHE student chapter awards) attest to the strengths of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program. Educating the MHS shareholders (patients, beneficiaries, professional and support staff, senior leaders) and leveraging technology to. share best practices for all administrators (including non-Baylor graduates) will

  20. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  1. [Catering services bases in the Russian army under military regulation of Peter the Great].

    PubMed

    Konyshev, I S; adamenko, A M; Koshelev, V P

    2014-01-01

    At Peter I the regular army was organized and the system of target state deliveries to troops of the food is created. Provisioning and fodder was normalized as portion and ration. Portion was contained the products forpeoplefood, and ration - fodder for horses food who were used by the serviceman. Portion and ration unit was identical to all categories of the military personnel. Difference in food level consisted in that, how many portions and rations serviceman received. Up to the end of existence of Russian army in 1918 in each rota there were contractor and the cook who were engaged in foodstuff and cooking under sergeant-major and one of rota officers supervision. According to the Charter it was necessary to carry with respect and attention to officers and soldiers, their needs, including in the field of supply and catering services and providing with the food: Despite the lack of scientific justification, soldiers' nutrition was sufficient to provide fighting capacity of the Russian army. PMID:25816632

  2. Military Services Fitness Database: Development of a Computerized Physical Fitness and Weight Management Database for the U.S. Army

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald A.; Bathalon, Gaston P.; Sigrist, Lori D.; Allen, H. Raymond; Friedl, Karl E.; Young, Andrew J.; Martin, Corby K.; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Burrell, Lolita; Han, Hongmei; Hubbard, Van S.; Ryan, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has mandated development of a system to collect and manage data on the weight, percent body fat (%BF), and fitness of all military personnel. This project aimed to (1) develop a computerized weight and fitness database to track individuals and Army units over time allowing cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluations and (2) test the computerized system for feasibility and integrity of data collection over several years of usage. The computer application, the Military Services Fitness Database (MSFD), was designed for (1) storage and tracking of data related to height, weight, %BF for the Army Weight Control Program (AWCP) and Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and (2) generation of reports using these data. A 2.5-year pilot test of the MSFD indicated that it monitors population and individual trends of changing body weight, %BF, and fitness in a military population. PMID:19216292

  3. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  4. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  5. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  6. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  7. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  8. Achieving army nursing evidence-based practice competencies through a civilian-military nurse partnership.

    PubMed

    Siaki, Leilani A; Lentino, Cynthia V; Mark, Debra D; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's goal of 90% of all practice being evidence-based by 2020, educational and practice institutions are not on target to achieve this goal. Evidence-based practice is one of 5 core elements of the Army Nurse Corps' patient care delivery system and a key focus of the Hawaii State Center for Nursing. In order to increase evidence-based practice (EBP), a civilian-military partnership was formed to include healthcare organizations in the state, optimize resources, and share strategies for successful practice changes statewide. The partnership has been successful in meeting each of these goals using national EBP competencies and Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. The article presents a discussion regarding the history, processes, and outcomes of this partnership. PMID:24488872

  9. Crossover of marital dissatisfaction during military downsizing among Russian army officers and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mina; Vinokur, Amiram D; Hamilton, V Lee; Roziner, Ilan

    2004-10-01

    This study examined mechanisms of strain crossover within couples and the moderating role of gender. Data were collected at a time of military downsizing from a sample of 1,250 Russian army officers and their spouses. The authors tested a model that incorporated 3 mechanisms for the crossover of marital dissatisfaction among dual-earner couples. The model provided support for 2 suggested crossover mechanisms: direct reactions of crossover and indirect mediated effects through social undermining. Strong evidence was also provided for gender asymmetry in the crossover process. Marital dissatisfaction crossed over from husbands to wives but not vice versa, and social undermining behavior played a role in the process of crossover of marital dissatisfaction for husbands but not for wives. PMID:15506859

  10. Spouse abuse recidivism in the U.S. Army by gender and military status.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, J E; Thayer, L E; Liu, X; Newby, J H; Norwood, A E; Fullerton, C S; Ursano, R J

    2000-06-01

    Recidivism by spouse abusers was investigated using records of offenders in the U.S. Army Central Registry. Recidivism by gender and military status (active-duty or civilian spouse) was compared over a 70-month period. Between fiscal years 1989-1997, 48,330 offenders were identified in initial and recidivist incidents. Recidivism was analyzed by means of a Cox proportional hazard rate model, controlling for age, race, number of dependents, education, and substance abuse. Two different sets of survival curves were obtained: (a) Men were much more likely than women to have a recurrence and (b) within gender, civilians were more likely to have a recurrence than were active-duty military personnel. At 70 months, 30% of the male civilian offenders and 27% of the male active-duty offenders had committed a subsequent spouse abuse incident compared with 20% of the female civilian offenders and 18% of the female active-duty offenders, controlling for other variables. PMID:10883570

  11. An evidence-based vector control strategy for military deployments: the British Army experience.

    PubMed

    Croft, A M; Baker, D; von Bertele, M J

    2001-01-01

    We describe the British Army's current strategy for controlling arthropod vectors of disease during overseas deployments. Military commanders and medical officers have different, but complementary responsibilities in achieving vector control. In this paper we define a hierarchy of evidence-based vector control guidelines. Field guidelines must be based on the best available research evidence, preferably that derived from pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and from systematic reviews of trials. Assessing the effectiveness of different vector control measures involves a trade-off between the relative benefits and harm of different technology options. There is compelling scientific evidence that bed nets and screens treated with a pyrethroid insecticide are highly effective in protecting against nocturnally active, anthropophilic arthropods (including ectoparasites), and will reduce the incidence of malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis and Chagas' disease. Etofenprox and deltamethrin are the safest pyrethroids, and permethrin the least safe. Vector control strategies of probable effectiveness are the use of insecticide-treated clothing, the wearing of protective clothing, and the correct use of DEET-based topical insect repellents. Aerosol insecticides are of debatable effectiveness. Other effective vector control measures, of limited usefulness during deployments, include electric fans, mosquito coils/vaporising mats, and smoke. "Biological" vector control measures, and insect buzzers/electrocuters are ineffective. Practical insect avoidance measures, based on an understanding of vector biology, complete the military vector-control arsenal. We conclude that practical insect avoidance measures, combined with pyrethroid-treated nets and clothing, and DEET-based topical repellents, can achieve almost 100% protection against biting arthropods. PMID:11584666

  12. Evaluation of mouthguards for the prevention of orofacial injuries during United States Army basic military training.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Georgia G; Knapik, Joseph J; Birk, Marcella G

    2008-02-01

    Beginning in January 2000, all individuals participating in basic military training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, were issued boil-and-bite mouthguards. From January 2000 to March 2001, trainees were required to wear mouthguards only for a single activity, pugil stick training. After March 2001, mouthguards were required for four activities including pugil stick training, unarmed combat, rifle/bayonet training, and the confidence/obstacle course. Dentists systematically tracked trainees who reported to the dental clinic with orofacial injuries during three periods: January 2000-March 2001 (phase 1), April-September 2001 (phase 2) and September 2002-June 2003 (phase 3). Orofacial injury rates were 3.35, 1.89 and 1.91 cases/10,000 person-years in phases 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The overall risk of an orofacial injury was 1.76 (95% confidence interval = 1.03-3.02) times higher in phase 1 compared with the combined phases 2 and 3 (P = 0.006). Thus, orofacial injury rates were lower when mouthguards were required for four training activities as opposed to one training activity. Mouthguards are now required at all five Army basic training sites when trainees are performing any of the four training activities. PMID:18173673

  13. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level. PMID:26827509

  14. Influence of new military athletic footwear on the kinetics and kinematics of running in relation to army boots.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries in the lower extremities are common in military recruits. Army boots have frequently been cited as a potential mechanism behind these high injury rates. In response to this, the British Army introduced new footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), which are issued to each new recruit in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematic of the PT-03 and PT1000 footwear in relation to conventional army boots. Thirteen participants ran at 4.0 m·s in each footwear condition. Three-dimensional kinematics from the hip, knee, and ankle were measured using an 8-camera motion analysis system. In addition, simultaneous ground reaction forces were obtained. Kinetic parameters were obtained alongside joint kinematics and compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. The kinetic analysis revealed that impact parameters were significantly greater when running in the army boot compared with the PT-03 and PT1000. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison with the PT-03 and PT1000, running in army boots was associated with significantly greater eversion and tibial internal rotation. It was also found that when running in the PT-03 footwear, participants exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee abduction compared with the army boots and PT1000. The results of this study suggest that the army boots and PT-03 footwear are associated with kinetic and kinematic parameters that have been linked to the etiology of injury; thus, it is recommended that the PT1000 footwear be adopted for running exercises. PMID:24714532

  15. Shut Out of the Military: Today's High School Education Doesn't Mean You're Ready for Today's Army. K-12 Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theokas, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Many educators comfortably embrace the myth that the military will enlist any and all high school graduates who are interested. However, a new analysis from The Education Trust reports that too many of the nation's high school graduates have not been adequately prepared to serve in the U.S. Army. In "Shut Out of the Military," the first-ever…

  16. Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... investigation comes amid a rising suicide rate among military personnel throughout the last 15 years of continual war. ... at suicides among all active-duty enlisted U.S. military personnel as recorded by the "Suicide Data Repository." This ...

  17. The Roles of Women in the Army and Their Impact on Military Operations and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batts, John H.; And Others

    Problems inherent in the expanded utilization of female soldiers in the U.S. Army are numerous. Attitudes of a wide sample of Army personnel, men and women, enlisted and officer, were surveyed pertaining to those problems. Some problems such as uniforms, billeting, assignments, and training are obvious and with proper planning can and will be…

  18. Putting the military back into the history of the military-industrial complex: the management of technological innovation in the U.S. Army, 1945-1960.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    In 1946 General Dwight Eisenhower, the Army Chief of Staff, established the Research and Development (R&D) Division on the War Department General Staff to expedite major technological breakthroughs in weapons technology. This goal, based on the separation of the management of R&D from procurement, captured the Army's preference for qualitative rather than quantitative superiority on the battlefield, but it threatened to upend entrenched methods of incremental product improvement under way in the Army's supply organizations, collectively called the technical services. The division's brief existence (it ceased operations in 1947) contrasted sharply with the longevity of the Ordnance Department's in-house manufacturing arsenals; for more than a century they had exploited synergies between R&D and production to turn out new weapons mass-produced in industry. The history of the R&D Division and the corresponding management of technological innovation in the technical services broadens an otherwise narrow historiographical interpretation of postwar knowledge production in the United States that is still focused heavily on the moral and political economy of military-funded academic research. PMID:26027309

  19. Realizing Major William Borden's dream: military medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and its wounded warriors, 1909-2009: an essay review.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2011-07-01

    This essay review examines three books dealing with the founding and subsequent activities of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and the evolution of military medicine from 1909 to 2009 recently published by the US Army's Borden Institute. Established by fellow army doctor William Borden to honor Walter Reed himself, WRAMC, located in Washington, DC, soon became the public and professional face of medical care for American soldiers. The discussion highlights the ongoing issue of the care and treatment of combat amputees; aspects of gender within military medicine; and WRAMC's function as an educational and research facility. Also discussed are the archival and documentary bases for these books and their utility for historians. Complimentary analysis of two of the books which are, in particular, explicitly about the history of WRAMC is contextualized within the celebration of the centennial of this army post contemporaneously with its closure, amalgamation, and relocation primarily to Maryland. PMID:21724648

  20. Managing workers' compensation costs in the military setting: the Army's story.

    PubMed

    Cloeren, Marianne; Mallon, Timothy M

    2004-05-01

    Direct and indirect costs for the Army's workers' compensation payments have increased to more than 2 billion US dollars. Increasing attention is putting the spotlight on the problems at all levels, and a promising cooperative approach to injury prevention and case management is emerging. This article addresses the system within which the Army's workers' compensation program operates, provides some organizational history, gives an update on current status,and describes what is needed for sustained improvement. The onus is on the Army to develop and implement strategies that use available data to target high-risk occupations and employees to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Front-line managers bear the responsibility for educating the workforce and providing safe workplaces. Employees become the beneficiaries, not of medical and compensation benefits but of safe and healthy work environments. PMID:15182752

  1. Suicide in the Military: Army-NIH Funded Study Points to Risk and Protective Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office 301-443-4536 NIMHpress@nih.gov More Science News about Basic Research Military Service Members Suicide ... the Field News from the Field NIMH-Funded Science on EurekAlert Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's ...

  2. Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He also serves as an associate director of ... University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and associate director, research, Military Health Institute; June ...

  3. Autonomous intelligent military robots: Army ants, killer bees, and cybernetic soldiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Robert

    The rationale for developing autonomous intelligent robots in the military is to render conventional warfare systems ineffective and indefensible. The Desert Storm operation demonstrated the effectiveness of such systems as unmanned air and ground vehicles and indicated the future possibilities of robotic technology. Robotic military vehicles would have the advantages of expendability, low cost, lower complexity compared to manned systems, survivability, maneuverability, and a capability to share in instantaneous communication and distributed processing of combat information. Basic characteristics of intelligent systems and hierarchical control systems with sensor inputs are described. Genetic algorithms are seen as a means of achieving appropriate levels of intelligence in a robotic system. Potential impacts of robotic technology in the military are outlined.

  4. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and injury risk factors among army recruits in military police training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army military police (MP) training is a 19-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering skills, Army values and lifestyle, and law enforcement skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in MP training. Methods At the start of training, 1,838 male and 553 female MP recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, injury history, and menstrual history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Results Successfully graduating from the course were 94.3% of the men and 83.7% of the women. Experiencing at least one injury during training were 34.2% of the men and 66.7% of the women (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval = 1.79-2.13). Recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had smoked in the past, or had performed less frequent exercise or sports prior to MP training. Men were at higher injury risk if they reported a prior injury and women were at higher risk if they reported missing at least six menstrual cycles in the last year or had previously been pregnant. Conclusion The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during MP training. PMID:23327563

  5. The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air Pollutants on Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that pollution has a large impact on asthma and other respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. But this relationship and its implications are not well understood. I use changes in location due to military transfers, which occur entirely to satisfy the needs of the army, to identify the causal impact of pollution on…

  6. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  7. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  8. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  9. Integration and cooperation of Army logistics simulations for multiphased military deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Richard J.; Blachowicz, Dariusz; Bragen, Mark; Braun, Mary; Burke, James, Jr.; Howard, Dawn; Macal, Charles; Van Groningen, Charles; Widing, Mary Ann

    2004-08-01

    Military deployment planners and analysts must consider the constraints, options, and available infrastructure of a network of installations and ports, from the beginning of the transportation system in the United States to the end of the deployment in the host country. Argonne National Laboratory developed a suite of models that simulate and visualize these deployments. There are discrete event simulations (the Enhanced Logistics Intra-theater Support Tool, the Transportation System Capability model, and the Port Simulation model) as well as several data editing and visualization tools. This paper presents the models, and discusses how they interact and leverage their shared data and technologies, to facilitate deployment analysis.

  10. A study of hearing changes among military conscripts in the Swedish Army.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Per; Månsson, Bertil; Hellström, Per Anders

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and the relative risk of significant threshold shift (STS, >or=15 dB deterioration at any ear and audiometric frequency) during primary military service (7-9 months), and to investigate whether subjects with an initial slight hearing loss (thresholds>or=25 dB HL at any audiometric frequency and ear) were under increased risk. The investigation was made as a prospective audiometric study and included 747 men. An age-matched group of 138 individuals served as an unexposed control group, whose incidence of STS was 2.9%. In the exposed group the incidence was 7.9% and the relative risk 2.7 risk ratio (RR). In the subgroup of 95 persons, who already at reporting-for-training had a mild hearing loss, the incidence was 17%. The relative risk for STS in this group compared to the control group was 6.8 (RR), and compared to those with normal hearing at reporting was 3.1 (RR). In spite of hearing conservation efforts, hearing deterioration still occurs, above all in the artillery. Those who already at reporting-for-training had a mild hearing loss were at higher risk for STS compared to those with initially normal hearing. PMID:16684706

  11. [From Geomorphological Research in the Canton of Aargau to European Military Pathologies. Entangling Anthropological Discourses of Crisis through the Army, 1860-1900].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Military statistics and medical research were closely related over the 19th century. The army not only made use of these new forms of knowledge, but also provided an important institutional setting through the military medicine, which was of crucial importance to medical research in the 19th century. Besides that, Swiss military also played a crucial role in new geographical and geological research, resulting in a series of new mapping projects. This article looks on the ways, in which military context gained influence on scientific research practices in the second half of the 19th century, by analyzing the case of Heinrich Bircher's work on military recruiting statistics and the endemic goiter. New mapping projects and statistical practices were linked, transforming big parts of the country into pathological spaces. Coming from this point, the article discusses in how far the military context lead to politicizing medical discourses and, furthermore, linked them to discourses of an anthropological crisis, common in many European countries. PMID:26902058

  12. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  13. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  14. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  15. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  16. Microhabitat and body size effects on heat tolerance: implications for responses to climate change (army ants: Formicidae, Ecitoninae).

    PubMed

    Baudier, Kaitlin M; Mudd, Abigail E; Erickson, Shayna C; O'Donnell, Sean

    2015-09-01

    1. Models that predict organismal and population responses to climate change may be improved by considering ecological factors that affect species thermal tolerance. Species differences in microhabitat use can expose animals to diverse thermal selective environments at a given site and may cause sympatric species to evolve different thermal tolerances. 2. We tested the hypothesis that species differences in body size and microhabitat use (above- vs. below-ground activity) would correspond to differences in thermal tolerance (maximum critical temperatures: CTmax ). Thermal buffering effects of soil can reduce exposure to extreme high temperatures for below-ground active species. We predicted larger-bodied individuals and species would have higher CTmax and that species mean CTmax would covary positively with degree of above-ground activity. We used Neotropical army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) as models. Army ants vary in microhabitat use from largely subterranean to largely above-ground active species and are highly size polymorphic. 3. We collected data on above- and below-ground temperatures in habitats used by army ants to test for microhabitat temperature differences, and we conducted CTmax assays for army ant species with varying degrees of surface activity and with different body sizes within and between species. We then tested whether microhabitat use was associated with species differences in CTmax and whether microhabitat was a better predictor of CTmax than body size for species that overlapped in size. 4. Microhabitat use was a highly significant predictor of species' upper thermal tolerance limits, both for raw data and after accounting for the effects of phylogeny. Below-ground species were more thermally sensitive, with lower maximum critical temperatures (CTmax ). The smallest workers within each species were the least heat tolerant, but the magnitude of CTmax change with body size was greater in below-ground species. Species-typical microhabitat

  17. Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

  18. English Educational Policies of the U.S. Army Military Government in Korea from 1945 to 1948 and Their Effects on the Development of English Language Teaching in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun Gyong

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the English language teaching (ELT) policies and measures taken under the United States Army Military Government in Korea (USAMGIK) from 1945 to 1948, in an attempt to illuminate their implications on the current ELT in Korea. The study analyzes data derived from documents of the Korean and the U.S. governments, literature on…

  19. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article looks at how…

  20. Analysis of antibiotic resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter sp. isolates from military and civilian patients treated at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hujer, Kristine M; Hujer, Andrea M; Hulten, Edward A; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Adams, Jennifer M; Donskey, Curtis J; Ecker, David J; Massire, Christian; Eshoo, Mark W; Sampath, Rangarajan; Thomson, Jodi M; Rather, Philip N; Craft, David W; Fishbain, Joel T; Ewell, Allesa J; Jacobs, Michael R; Paterson, David L; Bonomo, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    Military medical facilities treating patients injured in Iraq and Afghanistan have identified a large number of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. In order to anticipate the impact of these pathogens on patient care, we analyzed the antibiotic resistance genes responsible for the MDR phenotype in Acinetobacter sp. isolates collected from patients at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). Susceptibility testing, PCR amplification of the genetic determinants of resistance, and clonality were determined. Seventy-five unique patient isolates were included in this study: 53% were from bloodstream infections, 89% were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 15% were resistant to all nine antibiotics tested. Thirty-seven percent of the isolates were recovered from patients nosocomially infected or colonized at the WRAMC. Sixteen unique resistance genes or gene families and four mobile genetic elements were detected. In addition, this is the first report of bla(OXA-58)-like and bla(PER)-like genes in the U.S. MDR A. baumannii isolates with at least eight identified resistance determinants were recovered from 49 of the 75 patients. Molecular typing revealed multiple clones, with eight major clonal types being nosocomially acquired and with more than 60% of the isolates being related to three pan-European types. This report gives a "snapshot" of the complex genetic background responsible for antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter spp. from the WRAMC. Identifying genes associated with the MDR phenotype and defining patterns of transmission serve as a starting point for devising strategies to limit the clinical impact of these serious infections. PMID:17000742

  1. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  2. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Steven G.; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  3. Modeling, simulation, and concept design for hybrid-electric medium-size military trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzoni, Giorgio; Josephson, John R.; Soliman, Ahmed; Hubert, Christopher; Cantemir, Codrin-Gruie; Dembski, Nicholas; Pisu, Pierluigi; Mikesell, David; Serrao, Lorenzo; Russell, James; Carroll, Mark

    2005-05-01

    A large scale design space exploration can provide valuable insight into vehicle design tradeoffs being considered for the U.S. Army"s FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles). Through a grant from TACOM (Tank-automotive and Armaments Command), researchers have generated detailed road, surface, and grade conditions representative of the performance criteria of this medium-sized truck and constructed a virtual powertrain simulator for both conventional and hybrid variants. The simulator incorporates the latest technology among vehicle design options, including scalable ultracapacitor and NiMH battery packs as well as a variety of generator and traction motor configurations. An energy management control strategy has also been developed to provide efficiency and performance. A design space exploration for the family of vehicles involves running a large number of simulations with systematically varied vehicle design parameters, where each variant is paced through several different mission profiles and multiple attributes of performance are measured. The resulting designs are filtered to remove dominated designs, exposing the multi-criterial surface of optimality (Pareto optimal designs), and revealing the design tradeoffs as they impact vehicle performance and economy. The results are not yet definitive because ride and drivability measures were not included, and work is not finished on fine-tuning the modeled dynamics of some powertrain components. However, the work so far completed demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach to design space exploration, and the results to date suggest the powertrain configuration best suited to the FMTV mission.

  4. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal... renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee... include the U.S. Army's joint professional military education programs, educational policies,...

  5. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  6. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  7. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  8. Suicide in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Timothy W; O'Connor, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  9. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  10. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft. PMID:9006884

  11. Hydraulic systems performance of Army engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, H.W.; Lestz, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A technical evaluation of qualified military specification lubricants was started by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research and Development Center and was performed at the U.S. Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory (AFLRL) located at Southwest Research Institute. This work was conducted to determine if such lubricants can be used as hydraulic fluids in Army Commercial Construction Equipment (CCE) and Selected Material Handling Equipment (SMHE). Sixteen military specification lubricants were extensively evaluated using twelve selected tests required by equipment manufacturers and one test developed by AFLRL in conjunction with John Deere. From the data developed, lubricants meeting Army specifications passed 88 percent of all the tests. It appears that the Army engine oils are good potential candidates for use as hydraulic and power transmission lubricants within the Army CCE/SMHE systems. Areas of concern include copper corrosion, wet brake/clutch frictional performance, and final drive gear wear.

  12. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  13. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... and/or DAC police accompanying civilian law enforcement officers remain directly responsible to,...

  14. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  15. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  16. Typology of Army Families: Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Russell C.

    The active duty Army has approximately 400,000 families who on a daily basis interact with the largest military system in the world. An all-pervasive culture unto itself, the Army affects the lives of each one of these people. This research was begun in order to look at the effects which this lifestyle has and how individuals and families…

  17. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  18. The Professional Environment in Army Laboratories and Its Effect on Scientific and Engineering Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Army Science and Technology.

    In response to a 1982 request by the U.S. Department of the Army, the National Research Council's Board on Army Science and Technology established the Committee on Army Manpower to investigate the professional environments and use of civilian and military scientists/engineers in Army laboratories. The committee's primary objective was to identify…

  19. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery....

  20. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  1. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  2. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  3. Army Space Systems For Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerman, Ronald L.; Gomez, Richard B.

    1988-04-01

    Army combat forces involved in global military operations require knowledge of the terrain and accurate positioning and navigation capability to effectively perform their missions. Combat critical data from satellite-based systems to augment ground and airborne data collection, processing, and dissemination systems are crucial for the delivery and use of the needed information and intelligence in near-real time. The Army is developing ground-based testbed systems to utilize terrain and weather data collected from space-based platforms to enhance Army commanders' battlefield capabilities, and is researching new applications for the NAVSAT Global Positioning System and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-sponsored (DARPA) LIGHTSAT program that are unique to the Army. In addition, the Army is designing experiments to be conducted on the Space Shuttle.

  4. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. PMID:27001366

  5. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  6. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  7. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  8. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  9. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  10. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  11. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  12. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors. PMID:15646182

  13. U.S. Army Signal School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Signal Center and School, Fort Monmouth, NJ.

    The U. S. Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, provides military education and appropriate practical training for Armed Forces men and women to prepare them for positions in communications-electronics activities and familiarize them with the application of doctrine, tactics, logistics, and electronic techniques pertinent to the…

  14. A Retrospective of Four Decades of Military Interest in Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzoni, Guido; Matthews, Selma

    2004-11-01

    Following a short discussion on the origin of Thermophotovoltaic (TPV), this presentation offers a retrospective of the progress and results of the recurrent efforts in TPV conducted in the United States by the Military during the last 40 years. The US Army's interest in TPV, for the development of portable power sources, started a few years after the energy conversion approach was conceived. TPV technology was seen to offer a solution for the Army's need for power in the 10 to 1500 Watt range. The technology offered the means to overcome the limitation of size and weight found in existing commercial power sources, with the additional advantage of silent and multifuel operation. Hence, the Army invested research and development (R&D) funding to investigate TPV feasibility for tactical field application. After an initial decade of continuous research studies by the Army, the support for this technology has experienced cycles of significant efforts interrupted by temporary waiting periods to allow this technology to further mature. Over the last four decades, several TPV proof of concept systems were developed. The results of their testing and evaluation have demonstrated the feasibility of the technology for development of power sources with output of several watts to a few hundreds watts. To date, the results have not been found to adequately demonstrate the applicability of TPV to the development of military power generators with output above 500 watts. TPV power sources have not been developed yet for Army field use or troop testing. The development risk is still considered to be moderate-to-high since practical-size systems that go beyond the laboratory test units have not been designed, constructed, tested. The greatest need is for system development, along with concurrent continued component development and improvement. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) support for TPV R&D effort has been drastically reduced. The Army is still pursuing a 500

  15. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Shoemaker, Chuck M.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army is undergoing a transformation from Cold War era "heavy" forward-deployed forces arrayed against a monolithic known enemy to lighter, more flexible, U.S.-based forces able to rapidly engage in a full spectrum of military operations. Unmanned systems can potentially contribute towards achieving this goal of a highly capable and flexible ground force. To support this effort, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has undertaken a long-term research program to support technology development for unmanned ground vehicle systems. Over the course of the past year, this multifaceted effort has made significant technical strides, demonstrating sufficient technological maturity to potentially enable incorporation of semi-autonomous unmanned vehicles into the initial fielding of Future Combat Systems (FCS), while successfully conducting additional research directed toward improved capabilities for later increments of FCS and Land Warrior systems.

  16. MEMS-based sensor arrays for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    2002-07-01

    Scientists and engineers at the Army Aviation Missile Command's (AMCOM) Research, Development and Engineering Center (RDEC) are cooperatively working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), other Army agencies, and industry to provide technical solutions for the Army's transformation efforts into the 21st Century force. Advanced technologies are being exposed to achieve the performance and cost goals dictated by the emerging missions of the Transformed Army. It is well established that MEMS technology offers the potential solution to cost, size, and weight issues for the soldier, missile, gun, ground vehicles, and aircraft applications. MEMS sensor arrays are currently being investigated to meet system performance requirements and provide more robust mission capability. A Science and Technology Objective, Research and Development Project is underway at AMCOM/RDEC to develop controlled MEMS sensor arrays to provide for full military dynamic performance ranges using miniature sensor system. MEMS-based angular rate sensors are enhanced with vibration feedback form MEMS accelerometers for output signal stabilization in high-vibration environments. Multi-range MEMS-based accelerometers, cooperatively developed by Government and industry, are being multiplexed to provide dynamic range expansion. An array of integrated accelerometers is expected to increase the dynamic range by an order of magnitude. Future projections suggest that MEMS sensor array technology will be applicable to a broad range of military applications, which include environmental sensor suites for structural health monitoring and forward reconnaissance and surveillance; and optical and radio frequency phased arrays for fast beam steering.

  17. Male and Female Soldiers' Beliefs about the "Appropriateness" of Various Jobs for Women in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savell, Joel M.; And Others

    A study was conducted to (1) document the expanding role of women in the U.S. Army and (2) determine whether soldiers in 1974 believed that certain military jobs were appropriate for women and whether those beliefs were related to respondent sex, rank, and expectation of leaving the army before retirement. An examination of army records revealed…

  18. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  19. New Directions in the Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgrim, Mark T.

    The Army has given to the Training and Doctrine Command the task of developing four Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) curricula to provide functional, job-related basic skills training. These would be Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Baseline Skills, English-as-a-Second Language (ESL), Military Life Coping Skills, and Learning Strategies.…

  20. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  1. Suicide prevention program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Gordana; Gordana, Dedic J; Panic, Milivoje; Milivoje, Panic

    2007-05-01

    Suicide, as one of the greatest problems of maladjustment to the military environment, has been a subject of investigation in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro (former Yugoslav Army) for more than six decades. The Suicide Prevention Program was implemented in December 2003. The aim of the study was to follow-up the application of the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro and its effect on the suicide rate and to compare its incidence in civilians. Results of the program application showed that the number of suicides in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro was constantly reducing over the period 2004 to 2005. For soldiers, it was even four times less than in the civilian male population, particularly in the period of adaptation to the military environment. Since the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro proved to be successful in decreasing the suicide number, it should be further improved and routinely applied. PMID:17521110

  2. Military Reading Assessment: What Theory Tells Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford-Carpenter, Rebecca L.; Schultz-Shiner, Linda J.

    This paper addresses practical Army problems in reading assessment from a theory base reflecting the most recent research on reading comprehension. Military and occupational research shows that reading proficiency is related to job performance. Reading assessment is a key issue in the Army due to changes in the reading ability levels of the Army…

  3. 78 FR 43796 - Indebtedness of Military Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... is removed, which was established in the Federal Register, March 3, 1986 (51 FR 7268). Rules in the... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 513 Indebtedness of Military Personnel AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule; removal. SUMMARY: This action removes regulations concerning indebtedness of...

  4. 76 FR 59119 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution...) 220-5870. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules...

  5. 76 FR 776 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution...: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No. 1. Background: The MFTURP No....

  6. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution... INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No. 1. Background:...

  7. 75 FR 15420 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: References: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  8. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  9. Military Career Guide: Employment and Training Opportunities in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This copiously illustrated guide is a single reference source for the diverse employment and training opportunities in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It is divided into two major sections. The first section contains descriptions of 134 enlisted military occupations and provides information regarding the aptitudes needed…

  10. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) component research and development for army missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Tracy D.; McMillen, Deanna K.; Ashley, Paul R.; Ruffin, Paul B.; Baeder, Janet

    1999-07-01

    The US Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center has identified MEMS as an emerging technology with high potential for fulfilling the mission of future missiles. The technology holds the promise of reducing the size, weight, cost, and power requirements for performing existing functions in Army missile systems, as well las providing opportunities for new computing, sensing, and actuation functions that cannot be achieved with conventional electromechanical technology. MEMS will enable the Army's next generation of smaller and lighter missiles. The military market drives the thrust for development of miniature sensor with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control system, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, missile and ground-based radar, radio frequency seekers, aerodynamic flow control, IR imagers, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Current efforts at AMCOM include the development of MEMS-based inertial components to include accelerometers with wide dynamic range, tactical grade gyros with high rate range, and miniature three-axis inertial measurement unit with common interface electronics. Performance requirements of such components will be presented in terms of current and future Army missile systems. Additional MEMS based efforts under investigation at AMCOM include missile storage health monitoring, RF MEMS components, encoders for actuators, and aerodynamic flow control will also be discussed.

  11. Ditching Tests of a 1/9-Size Model of the Army P-38 Airplane in Langley Tank No. 2 and at the Outdoor Catapult

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, George A.; Cederborg, Gibson A.

    1946-01-01

    A dynamically similar model of the Army P-38 airplane was tested to determine the best way to land this airplane on the water and to determine its probable ditching performance. The tests consisted of ditching the model at various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, weights, and conditions of simulated damage. The model was ditched in calm water from the tank towing carriage and a few ditching were made in both calm and rough water at the outdoor catapult. The performance of the model was determined by making visual observations, by recording lengths of run and time histories of decelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings.

  12. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for...-connected members or who have remarried after the interment of the service-connected spouse and...

  13. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for...-connected members or who have remarried after the interment of the service-connected spouse and...

  14. Educating the U.S. Army: Arthur L. Wagner and Reform, 1875-1905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brereton, T. R.

    Arthur Lockwood Wagner, who graduated from West Point in 1876, was one of the best known and most influential U.S. Army officers of his day. An intellectual and educator, Wagner was instrumental in some of the most critical reforms in U.S. Army history. He advocated enhanced military education, adopting modern combat techniques, holding…

  15. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  16. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  17. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  18. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  19. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  20. The Army Spouse: Perceptions of Educational Needs during Deployment and Nondeployment Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Alicia G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare educational needs and goals during deployment and nondeployment of spouses of active-duty Army service members. The sample consisted of spouses of active-duty military service members from the Army brigades who had recently returned from a deployment or who were experiencing a deployment…

  1. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE WITH LAKE WILSON IN THE FOREGROUND AND WAIANAE MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE, BETWEEN KUNIA ROAD, WILIKINA DRIVE, AND McMAHON ROAD, AS WELL AS ADJACENT PINEAPPLE FIELDS, AND LAKE WILSON. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Mission aware energy saving strategies for Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattathreya, Macam S.

    Fuel energy is a basic necessity for this planet and the modern technology to perform many activities on earth. On the other hand, quadrupled automotive vehicle usage by the commercial industry and military has increased fuel consumption. Military readiness of Army ground vehicles is very important for a country to protect its people and resources. Fuel energy is a major requirement for Army ground vehicles. According to a report, a department of defense has spent nearly $13.6 billion on fuel and electricity to conduct ground missions. On the contrary, energy availability on this plant is slowly decreasing. Therefore, saving energy in Army ground vehicles is very important. Army ground vehicles are embedded with numerous electronic systems to conduct missions such as silent and normal stationary surveillance missions. Increasing electrical energy consumption of these systems is influencing higher fuel consumption of the vehicle. To save energy, the vehicles can use any of the existing techniques, but they require complex, expensive, and time consuming implementations. Therefore, cheaper and simpler approaches are required. In addition, the solutions have to save energy according to mission needs and also overcome size and weight constraints of the vehicle. Existing research in the current literature do not have any mission aware approaches to save energy. This dissertation research proposes mission aware online energy saving strategies for stationary Army ground vehicles to save energy as well as to meet the electrical needs of the vehicle during surveillance missions. The research also proposes theoretical models of surveillance missions, fuzzy logic models of engine and alternator efficiency data, and fuzzy logic algorithms. Based on these models, two energy saving strategies are proposed for silent and normal surveillance type of missions. During silent mission, the engine is on and batteries power the systems. During normal surveillance mission, the engine is

  4. Reinforcement Management; An Approach to Motivating Army Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie

    To study the effectiveness of reinforcement management (contigency management) as applied to a military program of instruction already in operation, 335 students in an Army clerk-typist course in which self-paced instruction is used were given points for successive approximations to desired learning behavior. The points were exchangeable later for…

  5. Effectiveness of Interactive Videodisc in Army Communications Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, John D.; Polich, J. Michael

    This report presents the results of RAND research conducted at the U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive videodisc (IVD) system used to facilitate training in a variety of military occupational specialities. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a methodology for assessing the…

  6. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  7. Adjustment and Achievement Associated with Mobility in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, Karen H.; Medway, Frederic J.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated 40 Army families regarding history of geographic mobility, identification with Army life, personal well-being, and children's school achievement and social competence. Frequent relocation was not detrimental to service member or spouse and was positively associated with higher child and social competence. Military identification…

  8. 78 FR 70024 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3, Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ..., Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability... (DEIS) for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3 at Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO)....

  9. AIDS/HIV in the US military.

    PubMed

    Tramont, E C; Burke, D S

    1993-01-01

    HIV infection (AIDS) burst upon the scene a decade ago. Because it is a sexually transmitted disease that infects blood and kills its victim, it is military relevant and will impact on all aspects of the military. The US Army Medical Research and Development Command as 'Lead Agent for Infectious Disease Research' in the Department of Defense has developed a comprehensive approach to address military concerns: surveillance of infection rates (intelligence) around the world and in the military; behavioural research to develop more effective means of education to change behaviour; and biological research to develop a quick and easy field test, and a vaccine or drug to prevent the disease from occurring despite exposure. Its success will influence the success of the Army in the future. PMID:8488704

  10. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  11. Decision-Making Considerations for Mid-Career Army Officers to Pursue Master's Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why military students pursue a master's degree has become more important as the number of military students taking advantage of education benefits through the Post-911 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 has increased. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how U.S. Army officers attending the Command and…

  12. Exploring Collaboration System Effectiveness at the United States Army Brigade Echelon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Terry W.

    2012-01-01

    Since the attacks on September 11, 2001, a major transformation of the United States Army began to create a modular, scalable, and modernized military force. This effort was the most significant restructuring of military forces in the last 80 years. However, after 6 years of sustained combat operations in the Middle East many of the collaboration…

  13. Russian Basic Course: Military Situations, Exercises 1-35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    Thirty-five military situations treated in this volume provide exercises in the use of practical military terminology received from the United States Army General School. Each exercise is devoted to a specific topic, and in each case lists of new words and idioms together with their English equivalents are provided. Lessons consist primarily of…

  14. Education and the New Military: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnell, Jerrold B.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses three significant events, which are altering the educational future of military personnel: establishment of the Community College of the Air Force in 1972; expiration of the G.I. Bill in 1976; and formation of the all volunteer Army. He suggests that this will affect the education of military personnel adversely. (KC)

  15. Israeli Adolescents and Military Service: Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Amihay; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Asserts that inadequate attention has been paid to the problems of the young soldier entering army life in Israel. Delineates some areas of friction and vulnerability between the worlds of the youth and the military. Describes the systematization of these encounters into groups, creating the "Binary Model," which helps in locating and treating…

  16. Role of the Military, Unit III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on the role of the military in Wyoming history provides activities which focus on the system of forts which began in 1849, Indian conflicts, World War II, and the Army and Air National Guard. Student activities include illustrating various battles, locating major Wyoming forts on a map, field trips to F.E. Warren Air Force Base and Fort…

  17. Military Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    Argues that while a certain level of fairness is necessary in considering the equity of compulsory military service, the most important issue is that of "winning the war." Also asserts that sex, age, and race discrimination are more important than social class discrimination in military service. (Author/GC)

  18. Preliminary thoughts concerning potential US Army threats/roles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.; Solomon, K.A.; Miles, J.T.

    1991-06-01

    The rate at which the current world military/political perspective is changing demands consideration of a broader spectrum of potential threats then has been the case for the past few decades--during which the Soviet Union was the preeminent threat. Seemingly overnight, the cold war ceased, the requirement for massive U.S. military counters to the Soviet Union forces faded, and an era of constant (obvious) military threat disappeared. This situation has in turn been revolutionized by the Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the U.S. response. The paper addresses part of the problem facing military planners by defining a spectrum of threats that typify those the U.S. Army might face over the next decade or two. The purpose of the threat set is to support the evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness, to the U.S. Army, of advanced technologies. The set of threats is intended to provide a complete set of characteristics rather then to be a complete list of the possibilities; it is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Although largely completed before the war with Iraq started, its content is still valid in that its purpose is to provide a framework for thinking about future U.S. Army technology needs.

  19. The Relationship between the Perceived Level of Organizational Support for Families and Spouse Satisfaction with Military Life. Technical Report 874.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.; Neenan, Peter A.

    This study examined the relationship of satisfaction with the perceived level of organizational support for families and overall satisfaction with military life among civilian spouses of Army members. The report is based on an analysis of the responses of 2,814 Army spouses of the 1985 Department of Defense Survey of Military Spouses. The…

  20. A Surgical Business Composite Score for Army Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Douglas R; Robinson, Andrew B; Comer, Tracy A; Meno, Jenifer A; Welder, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Measuring surgical business performance for Army military treatment facilities is currently done through 6 business metrics developed by the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Surgical Services Service Line (3SL). Development of a composite score for business performance has the potential to simplify and synthesize measurement, improving focus for strategic goal setting and implementation. However, several considerations, ranging from data availability to submetric selection, must be addressed to ensure the score is accurate and representative. This article presents the methodology used in the composite score's creation and presents a metric based on return on investment and a measure of cases recaptured from private networks. PMID:27244067

  1. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  2. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  3. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  4. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  5. 78 FR 65977 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will not take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board... of appropriations, the Department of Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Military Academy...

  6. 77 FR 58529 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military Academy,...

  7. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military Academy,...

  8. 77 FR 31339 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... provide the Board updates on the following: Physical, Moral/Ethical and Military Programs, to...

  9. 76 FR 41490 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... States Military Academy, Office of the Secretary of the General Staff (MASG), 646 Swift Road, West...

  10. 75 FR 20827 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... provide the Board updates on the following: Military Program, Physical Program, Intercollegiate...

  11. 76 FR 31308 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Agenda: The Academy leadership will provide the Board updates on the following: Military...

  12. 78 FR 32241 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting AGENCY: Department... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013. 3. Time: 2 p... provide the Board updates on the following: Graduation 2013, Class of 2017, Military Program...

  13. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  14. 75 FR 7571 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Tuesday, March 9, 2010. 3. Time: 12:30... Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military ] Academy, Office of the Secretary of the...

  15. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011. ] 3. Time: 12...

  16. 78 FR 13030 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... (DFO) at: United States Military Academy, Office of the Secretary of the General Staff (MASG),...

  17. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  18. A Profile of Army Families in USAREUR: Results of the 1983 Families in Europe Survey. Research Report 1428.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkaptan, Halim; And Others

    This report contains the results of a survey conducted in May 1983 of Army families in USARFUR (United States Army--Europe). A total of 1,036 married and accompanied family members, both military member and spouse, were surveyed. The sample was representative of the approximately 60,000 families in USAREUR in terms of rank distribution, combat…

  19. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    PubMed

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:27035922

  20. Military issues.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Owens, Mark

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews of some of the lessons in trauma psychiatry learned by the US military through wartime and other trauma experiences during the past century. Current practice in the military's employment of stress control teams is reviewed. The military's efforts to prevent and limit psychological casualties, to include the care of battle casualties and prisoners of war (POWs), are addressed. Recent experiences that have informed further, and are shaping the military's approach to managing the psychological aftermath of trauma (such as the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the Pentagon and the current war with Iraq) are included. Guidelines developed after 9/11, and articulated in the "Mass Violence and Early Intervention" conference are presented. Finally, current ideas on preparation for and intervention after weapons of mass destruction will be outlined. PMID:15325487

  1. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  2. Body composition and military performance--many things to many people.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2012-07-01

    Soldiers are expected to maintain the highest possible level of physical readiness because they must be ready to mobilize and perform their duties anywhere in the world at any time. The objective of Army body composition standards is to motivate physical training and good nutrition habits to ensure a high state of readiness. Establishment of enforceable and rational standards to support this objective has been challenging even at extremes of body size. Morbidly obese individuals are clearly not suited to military service, but very large muscular individuals may be superbly qualified for soldier performance demands. For this reason, large individuals are measured for body fat using a waist circumference-based equation (female soldiers are also measured for hip circumference). The main challenge comes in setting appropriate fat standards to support the full range of Army requirements. Military appearance ideals dictate the most stringent body fat standards, whereas health risk thresholds anchor the most liberal standards, and physical performance associations fall on a spectrum between these 2 poles. Standards should not exclude or penalize specialized performance capabilities such as endurance running or power lifting across a spectrum of body sizes and fat. The full integration of women into the military further complicates the issue because of sexually dimorphic characteristics that make gender-appropriate standards essential and where inappropriately stringent standards can compromise both health and performance of this segment of the force. Other associations with body composition such as stress effects on intraabdominal fat distribution patterns and metabolic implications of a fat reserve for survival in extreme environments are also relevant considerations. This is a review of the science that underpins the U.S. Army body composition standards. PMID:22643136

  3. Building adaptive nurse leaders for future Army full spectrum operations.

    PubMed

    Funari, Tamara S; Gentzler, Kevin; Wyssling, Philip W; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2011-02-01

    The Army Nurse Corps (ANC) life cycle model outlines major milestones that are required, expected, or recommended to be achieved to prepare Army Nurses to become senior leaders. Army nurses must be prepared to function in uncertain future full spectrum operational environment. The purpose of this study was to determine specific education and developmental experiences that will assist in developing ANC officers to become adaptive leaders through a review of literature and qualitative study. Fifteen interviews were conducted with senior ANC officers. Purposive sampling was used, yielding a sample population with a variety of experiences, to include deployments, recruiting, command, and joint operational assignments. Results indicated that the major themes for senior leader preparation are military education, field experience, and the need to add a new career pathway to ensure equal opportunity of advancement for both clinicians and administrators. PMID:21366082

  4. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  5. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  6. Distance Education: A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Terri Moore; Freeman, Dexter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the relevance of an army-university partnership in view of the cultures of both public higher education and the military graduate education system. The article also outlines the planning model used to navigate through the various issues that should be considered when a university partners with a federal or military agency to…

  7. 75 FR 36643 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    .... 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and...). The update provides clearer guidance on when Transportation Service Providers (TSP) may charge...

  8. 78 FR 20299 - Meeting of the Department of Defense Military Family Readiness Council (MFRC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Council meeting is to review the military family programs which will be the focus for the Council for next... the Secretary of Defense. This meeting will focus on Army and Office of the Secretary of...

  9. 32 CFR 215.9 - Providing military resources to civil authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of the Army; (ii) The Director and Deputy Director of Military Support; or (iii) A Task Force... the General Counsel of the DoD, the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Installations and Logistics),...

  10. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  11. Review of US Army ionizing-radiation dosimetry system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Army civilian and military personnel are exposed occupationally to various forms of ionizing radiation, and the U.S. Army Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Center is responsible for monitoring these exposures. There are several accepted methods for monitoring radiation exposure, the oldest being the film badge method. A modern alternative method, which has achieved widespread acceptance, is the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badge. Inasmuch as the Radiation Dosimetry Center is in the process of converting from film badges to TLD badges for radiation monitoring, the Army requested assistance on how it might optimize the transition to this new monitoring system.

  12. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command. PMID:25830799

  13. 78 FR 77108 - Surplus Property Notice at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Pueblo Chemical Depot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Property List 1. Addition Colorado Pueblo Chemical Depot: 45825 Hwy 96E, Building 1, Pueblo, CO 81006- 9330... Department of the Army Surplus Property Notice at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Pueblo Chemical Depot, Colorado AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice...

  14. An update of military robotics activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lovece, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Military unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are beginning to break new ground that will strongly affect the future development of robotics. Current and planned future demonstrations of new UGV technologies are aiding in the maturation of control and navigation technologies critical to remotely controlled, supervised, and autonomous robots. The United States and its allies are spending millions of dollars to develop UGVs for military applications. The first systems will be deployed by the year 2000. The United States is leading the way, and its program is focused on the tactical UGV (TUGV) for the US Army and Marine Corps.

  15. Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Kneessy, A.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned and operated industrial plants, arsenals and depots, and privately owned and operated ordnance explosive establishments. The end of World War II was the beginning of the nuclear age and attendant Medical Department responsibilities for radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection. The US Army has undertaken the demilitarization of obsolete and excess chemical munitions. The Medical Systems Safety and Health Branch is tasked to survey Army hospitals within the United States, to identify and recommend corrective action for safety and health hazards. At present, a continuing study is underway to evaluate the waste anesthetic gases to operating room personnel in Army hospitals. Noise-induced hearing loss is considered the most widespread occupational injury incurred by DA personnel.

  16. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  17. Preferred emission factor techniques for army emission inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, L.M.; Robinson, D.L.; Alden, S.A.; Hopp, P.L.; Ruff, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA-90) present an unprecedented regulatory challenge to the Department of the Army and the entire US business community. Unlike previous legislation, which focused heavily on the substantive or emission control aspects of air quality management, this round of Amendments focused equal attention on the administrative aspects of air pollution control. Specifically, each new Title of the CAAA-90 is underpinned, either explicitly or implicitly, with the need to perform an emission inventory. The emission inventory is an implied prerequisite for determining the applicability of any of the emission control requirements of the 1990 Amendments, and it is the explicit center piece of the Title 5 operating permit program. Although the emission inventory is little more than a formal accounting of the number and type of emission sources and their associated air emissions, the resource requirements for preparing and maintaining the inventory can be substantial. The average contractor cost for preparing an initial emission inventory at an Army installation was over $100,000. Record keeping to support the inventory, and the annual inventory updates required for the Title 5 permit program will only expand these costs. In an effort to assist the Army community with the ongoing obligation to prepare these emission inventories, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has compiled a list of preferred emission inventory techniques for the various emission sources found at Army installations. The USACHPPM guidance identifies emission sources most likely to be found at an Army installation, as well as the most effective and preferred emission factors associated with these sources. This guidance is designed to be widely disseminated, and may have relevant applications in the non-military community.

  18. A New Approach to Managing the Army Selective Reenlistment Bonus. Technical Report 634.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Sheldon E.; And Others

    In this study, a theoretical model of profit maximization was developed in which the Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) is treated as a wage premium payable to military personnel who are more productive, more costly to recruit and train, and less likely to continue in the Army in the absence of the SRB. Empirical estimation of the model is based…

  19. Assessment for the U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program: The Global Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher; Park, Nansook; Castro, Carl A.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology and the U.S. military have a long history of collaboration. The U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program aims to measure the psychosocial strengths and assets of soldiers as well as their problems, to identify those in need of basic training in a given domain as well as those who would benefit from advanced training, and…

  20. Teaching at the United States Army War College: Philosophy, Practice, and Resources. AY [Academic Year] 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, John R., III

    This manual is intended for use as part of a 3-day orientation training for new faculty at the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) in Pennsylvania, a facility which trains tactical and operational leaders for policy and strategy roles in the military and related agencies. The orientation focuses on five factors which determine the value of an…

  1. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: bliss.eis@conus.army.mil . FOR... libraries: In El Paso (TX), the Richard Burges Regional Library, 9600 Dyer; the Irving Schwartz Branch... stationing package. Alternative 5 land use changes allow fixed sites (e.g., military bivouac),...

  2. The 1980 Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. [Volume] 2: Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Eugene J.; And Others

    For more than 35 years, this Guide has been the standard reference work for recognizing learning acquired in military life. All the courses offered by the Army are listed and briefly described. Each course description includes the course title and number: the length of the course, and where and when it was offered; the course objectives; the type…

  3. Psychological Issues in the Recovery of an Army Unit after Traumatic Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartone, Paul T.; And Others

    The United States Army battalion that suffered the heaviest losses (189 soldiers killed) in the December, 1985 military charter airline crash was studied longitudinally over the 6-month period following the disaster. Extensive interview and observational data were collected at approximately monthly intervals. The purpose of the study was to…

  4. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N.; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W.; Young, Andrew J.; Zambraski, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of…

  5. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  6. The U.S. Army's Impact on the History of Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Steve

    2005-01-01

    One of the most significant events that heralded the Department of Defense's commitment to distance education was the Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Initiative, which held its kickoff meeting in Washington, DC in 1997. This meeting provided the army and other military services the endorsement that had been lacking relative to implementing…

  7. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  8. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  9. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  10. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  11. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  12. The Success of a National Dialogue on Sustainable Military Range Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Lenny

    2003-01-01

    Military munitions are the silent giant of hazardous waste management and cleanup in the United States. Toward the end of the first Clinton administration, the Navy and Air Force prevailed upon the Army--the armed service with the biggest ordnance problem--to consider co-sponsoring a formal dialogue on military munitions facilitated by the…

  13. The Long War and Parental Combat Deployment: Effects on Military Children and At-Home Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Patricia; Peterson, Kris; Reeves, James; Knauss, Larry; Glover, Dorie; Mogil, Catherine; Duan, Naihua; Saltzman, William; Pynoos, Robert; Wilt, Katherine; Beardslee, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Given the growing number of military service members with families and the multiple combat deployments characterizing current war time duties, the impact of deployments on military children requires clarification. Behavioral and emotional adjustment problems were examined in children (aged 6 through 12) of an active duty Army or Marine…

  14. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  15. 75 FR 65006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Annual Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States...

  16. 75 FR 3901 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  17. 75 FR 34989 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Agency: Department of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Summer Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States...

  18. Survey of Speech Articulation Disorders Among Military Dependent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Don E.

    Reported was a study involving 20,000 (army) military dependent children (MDC) attending 75 schools in seven school systems throughout the continental United States during 1971. Testing of 412 randomly selected MDC using the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation revealed a significant correlation and associative factor between MDC speech…

  19. Educating the Military Work Force: A Worldwide Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald W.; Saltman, Lenore E.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Defense, in cooperation with a number of colleges and universities, offers a variety of higher education opportunities to military personnel: the Community College of the Air Force, the Army and Navy's Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges, and Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES). (SK)

  20. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  1. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  2. Occupational health and safety issues in military field hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    2001-10-01

    This paper considers the occupational health and safety issues that apply within a military field hospital. It considers NHS occupational health and safety activities and examines how these might be applied within an Army Medical Services unit. Areas that are unique to field hospitals are highlighted in comparison with a static NHS hospital. Some issues for future work are also considered. PMID:11766206

  3. Free Speech in the Military: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard A.

    Two recent decisions of the United States Supreme Court have emasculated First Amendment guarantees for military personnel. In the first case, Parker v. Levy, an Army captain urged enlisted Special Forces personnel at his post to refuse to go to Viet Nam, claiming that "Special Forces personnel are liars and thieves and killers of peasants and…

  4. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  5. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  6. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  7. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  8. Master of Military Art and Science (MMAS) Research and Thesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Command and General Staff Coll., Fort Leavenworth, KS.

    This document describes the requirements for the degree of Master of Military Art and Science (MMAS) at the United States Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC), Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Chapter one outlines program requirements for the MMAS, discusses the place of research at CGSC, describes research requirements for the MMAS, and…

  9. [Analysis of work in ambulatory military medicine].

    PubMed

    Bilić, Ivica

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the work of a military physician in an army healthcare institution and the scope and aim of activity of medical corps. The analysis includes data collected over one year and shows that officers and non-commissioned officers are more frequent users of medical services than conscripts. The consumption of medical products is high in both populations. The military physician has to face a number of organisational difficulties in everyday practice which diminish the quality of health services. Resolving these difficulties is a priority, especially in view of high healthcare and organisational standards set by NATO, which are eventually to be adopted and maintained by the Croatian medical corps in the process of joining. One of the tasks with that aim is to provide a continued medical training for military healthcare personnel. PMID:14994648

  10. [Military telemedicine: a network of networks].

    PubMed

    Menu, Jean-Pierre; Comtet, Gérald; Di Giusto, Vincent; Colomb, François; de Saint-Julien, Jacques

    2006-02-01

    Military telemedicine is a form of collaborative medicine based on the use of communication and information networks. It is more a network of networks than of independent systems. It comprises electronic medical files, epidemiological networks, and surgical and medical databases. Each system must be able to communicate with the others, thereby enabling the development of remote consultation, expertise and assistance. This requires networking between the army, the navy, and the air force communication networks, especially during special operations conducted abroad. We must also develop interoperability with systems in other countries, and with the French civilian health service. This means respecting the general rules governing these networks. The military health network is unique, in that it focuses on battlefield injuries. In addition, the French military health service operates under a single headquarters, governing nurses, paramedics and physicians. PMID:17001864

  11. 77 FR 50090 - Update to the 26 September 2011 Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and... Regulation (FAR) exempt transportation service contracts. Miscellaneous: This publication, as well as...

  12. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  13. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30). PMID:24378502

  14. Documented suicides within the British Army during the Crimean War 1854-1856.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey Allen; Masuhara, Kristi L; Frueh, B Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We have little understanding of the increased active duty military suicide rates found in the United States, and little understanding of what is historically normative for combatants. Therefore, we examined historical records on suicides among the British Army during the Crimean War for the years 1854-1856. There were 18 documented suicides in the British Army during this period. Calculating an accurate annual suicide rate per 100,000 is impossible because it is unclear how many of the 111,313 military personnel were in country for each of the 2 years of the war. However, the range is conservatively estimated between 8 and 16 per 100,000, with the likely answer somewhere near the middle. This suggests the possibility that increasing suicide rates among active duty military may be a modern U.S. phenomenon. PMID:25003856

  15. Comparison of occupational hearing losses among military engineers and their civilian counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.L.; Chandler, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    A previous study examined group hearing loss of 209 U.S.Army engineers by comparing current with reference audiograms. The sample was categorized by military occupation specialty, age, and time on job. The present study reports comparable data for 187 civilian engineers on the same Army post exposed to essentially the same noise. These had less hearing loss than their military counterparts. Some reasons are suggested, such as attrition of the civilian workforce because of hearing problems, and a likely greater exposure of the military engineers to noises not job-related. Age was less important than time on the job. Both groups, however, exhibited significantly lower hearing levels than the industrial population of Glorig et al at the 1954 Wisconsin State Fair, possibly because both military and civilian personnel at this Army post had been for some years in an aggressive hearing conservation program.

  16. Parasuicidal behavior on an active duty army training post.

    PubMed

    Koshes, R J; Rothberg, J M

    1992-07-01

    The incidence of suicidal behavior among active duty Army personnel at a training post has not been the subject of analysis since the advent of the all-volunteer military. A review of admissions over 16 consecutive months showed most of the behaviors to be parasuicidal, with low levels of lethality and high rescuability. Compared to previously published studies, the characteristics of these soldiers are little changed over the past 25 years. This report suggests a standard method for handling suicidal behavior which includes an active role for psychiatric consultation to units and commanders. PMID:1528469

  17. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  18. The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life among Soldiers. Technical Report 864.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.

    This study investigated the relationship between soldiers' satisfaction with the environment for families in the Army and satisfaction with the military way of life. The report is based on a secondary analysis of the responses of a stratified random sample of 9,198 Army personnel, a sample that participated in the 1985 Department of Defense…

  19. A survey of hearing loss in Army aircrew.

    PubMed

    Owen, M J

    1996-02-01

    Military aircrew are exposed to excessive noise at work, with the concurrent risks of acquiring Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Past studies have related aircrew NIHL to a variety of factors; however, no clear causal relationship has been shown. The difficulty of establishing NIHL due to flying remains when many other confounders are present, especially age and exposure to firearms noise in the military environment. A cross sectional prevalence study of hearing loss in Army Air Corps aircrew has been undertaken. One hundred and twenty one aircrew who had more than ten years flying experience were studied and the results show that there appears to be a threshold shift in excess of that expected from the ISO levels for otologically normal males of the same age. The hearing threshold shift was found to correlate with the number of years flying and aircrew age, with the number of flying hours being less significant. PMID:8672796

  20. Laser eye injuries among U.S. military personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Keeler, Natalie; Wartick, Ardith L.

    2003-06-01

    In this study reports of laser injuries in all three military services (Air Force, Army and Navy/Marine) are compared. In collecting data for this study laser injury reports provided by Rockwell Laser Industries (RLI), the United States Army Medical Research Detachment of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research which maintains the Laser Accident and Incident Registry (LAIR), the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the three service Safety Centers. We found a total of 29 laser injury reports that met our case definition. Since 1965, when the first injury occurred, there have been 6 Air Force, 15 Army, and 8 Navy/Marine injuries reported. Statistical analysis of data analyzed thus far shows no difference between the services in 8-year risk groupings between 1965-2002.

  1. [The General Military Medical Department during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, O A; Kulnev, S V; Taranov, S P

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to the contribution of the General Military Medical Department of the Red Army (GMMD) to organisation of health care support during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. In the summary you may follow the main ways of activity of the central governing body of medical (health) services of the Red. Army. The main focus of the article is made on conditions under which GMMD had to organize medical support of the Red. Army at the beginning of the war, the most difficult period of the Great Patriotic War. The authors payed attention to the forms and methods of the work of the head of GMMD and its subordinate departments under the conditions of rapidly changing environment of combat and rear situation, as well as interaction with GMMD People Commissariat of Health. The authors tried to highlight not well known but not less important moments in the activities of the Red Army GMMD. PMID:26829874

  2. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  3. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Post Iraq and Afghanistan: Prevalence Among Military Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; FFPH; Wessely, Simon; FMedSci; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-01-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD. PMID:25569079

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder post Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence among military subgroups.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-09-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD. PMID:25569079

  6. Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jeffrey S; Renshaw, Keith D; Allen, Elizabeth S; Markman, Howard J; Stanley, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members' and female spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service members' PTSD symptoms. Spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service was linked with higher marital satisfaction in spouses, regardless of service member's perceived meaningfulness of service. Service members' perceived meaningfulness of service was also associated with increased marital satisfaction in service members, but only when their spouses also perceived higher meaningfulness. There were no significant interactions between service members' PTSD and either partner's perceived meaningfulness. Implications for enhanced attention to spousal perceptions of meaningfulness of service are discussed. PMID:25046347

  7. Opportunities and challenges for MEMS technology in Army missile systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    1999-07-01

    The military market drives the thrust for the development of robust, high performance MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control systems, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, aerodynamic flow control, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Army missile applications will be a fertile market for MEMS products, such as MEMS-based inertial sensors. MEMS technology should significantly enhance performance and provide more robust mission capability in applications where arrays of MEMS devices are required. The Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is working diligently with other government agencies, academia, and industry to develop high performing MEMS devices to withstand shock, vibration, temperature, humidity, and long-term storage conditions often encountered by Army missile systems. The goals of the ongoing DARPA MEMS technology programs will meet a significant portion of the Army missile systems requirements. In lieu of presenting an all-inclusive review of Army MEMS applications, this paper addresses a number of opportunities and associated challenges for MEMS systems operating in military environments. Near term applications and the less mature, high-risk applications of MEMS devices are addressed.

  8. Effects of the men's program on U.S. Army soldiers' intentions to commit and willingness to intervene to prevent rape: a pretest posttest study.

    PubMed

    Foubert, John D; Masin, Ryan C

    2012-01-01

    Noncommissioned male officers in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany were trained to present a 1-hour rape prevention workshop--The Men's Program--to 237 enlisted male soldiers. A comparison group of 244 male soldiers received a briefing focused on reducing the individual's risk for experiencing sexual assault, discussion of myths and facts about sexual assault, and how to avoid being accused of sexual assault. Participants in The Men's Program experienced significant change in the predicted direction for bystander willingness to help, bystander efficacy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault with low to medium effect sizes. Comparison group participants experienced no effect on these variables except for a significant decline in rape myth acceptance with a very low effect size. Between-group differences pointed to the efficacy of The Men's Program. Implications of these results for rape prevention programming in the military are discussed. PMID:23393953

  9. Ingredients of military genius. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.M.

    1986-04-07

    This article deals with military genius from an historical and a classical theory perspective. The author modifies an approach developed by Carl von Clausewitz that makes use of theory as a framework for the study of history. Clausewitz used theory to study campaigns of Napoleon. This article uses Clausewitz's theory of military genius to study some of the great captains of the American Civil War and World War II. Using seven qualities of military genius that Clausewitz lists in his ON WAR, a study was made to ascertain commonalities of behavior displayed by great battlefield generals. Historical examples are given which reflect the qualities of military genius. The basic hypothesis of the article is that successful generals command their armies with their total being and not just one predominate aspect of their person. The underlying theme is that body, emotions, mind, and spirit must work in a relatively balanced manner which results in military genius being displayed. Historical example urges each senior officer to continually train and discipline his being in preparation for his possible future destiny.

  10. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  11. Battles: Intelligent Army versus Insurgency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2009-03-01

    A ``simple'' battle can be thought of as a conflict between two parties, each with finite reserves, and typically fought on one side’s territory. Modern battles are often strategic, based largely on the speed of information processing and decision making and are mission oriented rather than to annex new territory. Here, we analyze such battles using a simple model in which the ``blue'' army fights a strategic battle against a ``red'' army that is well matched in combat power and in red’s territory. We assume that the blue army attacks strategically while the red army attempts to neutralize the enemy when in close enough proximity, implemented here as ``on- site,'' with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. We show that minimizing risk exposure and making strategic moves based on local intelligence are often the deciding factors that determine the outcome of battles among well matched adversaries.

  12. The evolution of dependent medical care in the U.S. Army.

    PubMed

    Herold, Thomas J S

    2011-10-01

    There is great focus within the military medical community regarding the ever growing cost of medical care overall and dependent care specifically. A great deal of discussion relates to the delivery of care through a growing military-civilian partnership, where an increased amount of health care will be referred to an ever growing network of civilian providers. The U.S. military establishment now stands at an important crossroad leading into the future of dependent care. However, the special concerns, which arise from the responsibility of caring for military dependents, are not a solely recent phenomenon. Ever since the establishment of a permanent standing U.S. Army in the late 1700s, there have been families in need of medical treatment. Although changes occurred continuously, the development and evolution of policies regulating the delivery of medical care to dependants can be divided into three periods. The first is the longest and ranges from the establishment of the Army until the year 1900. The second period spans from 1900 to the post-Korean War year of 1956. The third and final period is from 1956 to 1975. Special changes and advances in each of these periods have served to shape the face of dependent care in today's Army Medical Department. PMID:22128648

  13. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  14. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  15. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for..., and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will...

  16. Hepatitis A in the US Army: epidemiology and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hoke, C H; Binn, L N; Egan, J E; DeFraites, R F; MacArthy, P O; Innis, B L; Eckels, K H; Dubois, D; D'Hondt, E; Sjogren, M H

    1992-01-01

    Control of hepatitis A has been an important concern for US military forces in war and peace. Immune serum globulin, although effective, is exceedingly cumbersome to use. The prevalence of antibody against hepatitis A is decreasing in young American soldiers, putting them at risk of hepatitis A during deployment. The US Army has been an active participant in development of hepatitis A vaccine. The first successful cell-culture-derived, formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine was developed at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. This prototype vaccine was shown, in 1986, to be safe and immunogenic for humans. Since then we have evaluated the following issues related to the use of inactivated hepatitis A vaccines in military populations. Immunogenicity of vaccine derived from the CLF and HM175 strains; immunogenicity of hepatitis A vaccine given by jet injector; immunogenicity of hepatitis A vaccine when given with hepatitis B vaccine; immunogenicity when given in shortened schedules; safety and immunogenicity in Thai children; and efficacy under field conditions in the tropics. The hepatitis A vaccines which we tested are safe and highly immunogenic. Immunization by jet gun confers immunity equivalent to immunization by needle. Hepatitis A vaccine is equally potent when given with hepatitis B vaccine. Data on rapid immunization schedules and efficacy are under evaluation. We conclude that hepatitis A vaccine is a major improvement in our ability to prevent hepatitis A in soldiers. PMID:1335665

  17. Exploiting social media for Army operations: Syrian crisis use case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Bowman, Elizabeth K.; Al Amin, Tanvir; Abdelzaher, Tarek

    2014-05-01

    Millions of people exchange user-generated information through online social media (SM) services. The prevalence of SM use globally and its growing significance to the evolution of events has attracted the attention of the Army and other agencies charged with protecting national security interests. The information exchanged in SM sites and the networks of people who interact with these online communities can provide value to Army intelligence efforts. SM could facilitate the Military Decision Making Process by providing ongoing assessment of military actions from a local citizen perspective. Despite potential value, there are significant technological barriers to leveraging SM. SM collection and analysis are difficult in the dynamic SM environment and deception is a real concern. This paper introduces a credibility analysis approach and prototype fact-finding technology called the "Apollo Fact-finder" that mitigates the problem of inaccurate or falsified SM data. Apollo groups data into sets (or claims), corroborating specific observations, then iteratively assesses both claim and source credibility resulting in a ranking of claims by likelihood of occurrence. These credibility analysis approaches are discussed in the context of a conflict event, the Syrian civil war, and applied to tweets collected in the aftermath of the Syrian chemical weapons crisis.

  18. The great disease enemy, Kak'ke (beriberi) and the Imperial Japanese Army.

    PubMed

    Hawk, Alan

    2006-04-01

    Although Japanese military officials had discovered that an improved diet could prevent beriberi by the late 19th century, their soldiers in the army suffered from beriberi during the Russo-Japanese War and World War II. A change in diet at the end of the Russo-Japanese War solved the problem and the army applied the lesson learned, along with postwar scientific discoveries about nutrition, toward the diet used during World War II. However, beriberi again plagued Japanese soldiers, this time due to poor logistics and unpalatable dietary supplements. PMID:16673750

  19. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to NEPA analysis and documentation. (10) Environmental analysis of strategic plans based on: (i... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.5 Army policies. (a) NEPA establishes...

  20. 76 FR 66282 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle... continued growth and development of the United States Army War College. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  1. ENLISTED MEN SEPARATING FROM THE MILITARY SERVICE AS A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF TEACHERS FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENSEL, JAMES W.; AND OTHERS

    THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE MILITARY SERVICES OFFERED A POTENTIAL SOURCE FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL TEACHERS. MILITARY OFFICIALS DESIGNATED ONE ARMY, ONE NAVY, AND ONE AIR FORCE BASE WHICH REPRESENTED A TYPICAL SEPARATION CENTER FOR EACH PARTICULAR SERVICE. A QUESTIONNAIRE, ADMINISTERED BY DESIGNATED BASE…

  2. 48 CFR 225.7702-2 - Acquisition of uniform components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. 225.7702-2 Section 225.7702-2 Federal Acquisition... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. Any textile components supplied by DoD to the Afghan National Army or the Afghan National Police for purpose of production of uniforms shall be produced in...

  3. 48 CFR 225.7702-2 - Acquisition of uniform components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. 225.7702-2 Section 225.7702-2 Federal Acquisition... components for the Afghan military or the Afghan police. Any textile components supplied by DoD to the Afghan National Army or the Afghan National Police for purpose of production of uniforms shall be produced in...

  4. The unsilencing of military wives: wartime deployment experiences and citizen responsibility.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Ward, David B; Storm, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    One of therapists' contemporary moral imperatives is to support American service members and their families regardless of personal position on the Global War on Terrorism. One way therapists can respond to this imperative is by seeking to understand Army wives' experiences during their husbands' wartime deployments. Therefore, this study utilized a combination of individual interviews with Army wives and a reflecting team of military wives and civilians to explore military wives' experiences. Two main themes were identified: the wives' experience was an emotional roller coaster and they felt silenced--and could be unsilenced--in their interactions with civilians. Therapists working with Army wives should (a) normalize the roller-coaster experience; (b) encourage wives to recognize negative and positive influencers and explore their idiosyncratic coping skills; (c) support positive civilian-military connections; and (d) as a civilian and as a therapist, seek to be a positive civilian connection by proactively showing support. PMID:21198688

  5. Performance in Five Army Jobs by Men at Different Aptitude (AFQT) Levels. I. Purpose and Design of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vineberg, Robert; And Others

    To provide information about the performance and characteristics of effective and ineffective marginal personnel in the Army, a study has been made of about 1,800 men with experience ranging up to 20 years in five military occupational specialities (MOSs): 11E, armor crewman; 63C, general vehicle repairman; 76Y, unit and organizational supply…

  6. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer. PMID:24340268

  7. The role of aerospace technologies and the military factor for national security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getsov, Petar; Penev, Pavel

    In the paper, the current state of using aerospace data in the Bulgarian Army is discussed. The potential application areas of aerospace images in military affairs are outlined. Peacetime, pre-war and wartime tasks are identified and classified. A National Centre for Aerospace Data and a Unit at the Bulgarian Army are suggsted to be established to enhance the preventive factor in national security.

  8. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinton and Trump Stand Behind the Uniform? Military families have some questions... More Suicide Prevention Awareness Month ... quick fact sheet about this program. Operation Purple Family Retreats Operation Purple Family Retreats provide military families ...

  9. Dealing with the stress of an HIV-positive diagnosis at an Army medical center.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, J M; Bain, M W; Boggiano, W; Cline, W R; Grace, W C; Holloway, H C; Rock, N L

    1990-03-01

    Following mandatory military-wide testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Army medical facilities have gained extensive experience with HIV-positive persons who undergo special stresses as a result of their affiliation with the military. The consequences of evacuation to medical centers for evaluation of HIV status are presented and the impact of this process on the medical center staff are considered. This paper is a description of one system designed to evaluate, treat, and support HIV-positive soldiers and their families. PMID:2107473

  10. Evaluation of anti-malarial effects of mass chemoprophylaxis in the Republic of Korea army.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Joon-Sup; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Oh, Sejoong; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Song, Kyoung-Jun; Oh, Young-Ha; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Young-A; Ahn, Sun-Young; Yang, Hwa-Young; Cha, Je-Eun; Park, Jae-Won

    2005-10-01

    Vivax malaria was endemic on the Korean peninsula for many centuries until the late 1970's when the Republic of Korea (ROK) was declared "malaria free". Since its re-emergence in 1993, the number of malaria cases in the military increased exponentially through 2000 near the demilitarized zone. Chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine and primaquine has been used in the ROK Army since 1997 in an attempt to reduce the number of the malaria cases throughout the ROK. Data show that chemoprophylaxis contributed, in part, to the decrease in the number of malaria cases among military personnel. However, mass chemoprophylaxis on a large scale in the ROK Army is unprecedented and extensive supervision and monitoring is warranted to determine its effectiveness and to monitor the appearance of chloroquine tolerant/resistant strains of Plasmodium vivax. PMID:16224140

  11. 'We did the best we could'--the United States Army nurses of Ie Shima.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Francie

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, Army Nurses of the 156th Army Evacuation Hospital delivered care while under attack, demonstrated incredible bravery, endured extreme hardships, and unknowingly defined advanced nursing practice as we know it today. First Lieutenant Edythe (Goldstein) Pallin, BS, RN, was a 23-year old registered nurse who served in the Pacific and was stationed near the front lines on the remote island of Ie Shima in the Ryukyu Island Chain near Okinawa. This article, as told to Edythe's daughter, draws heavily on her memories and her military photo album stored in the attic of her home for over 50 years. Edythe only acknowledges her military experience by saying, "We did the best we could." Yes, these nurses not only did the best they could, they also changed nursing from a subservient position to an independent practice long before nurses even understood their professional possibilities. Edythe passed away October 26, 2012. PMID:23734553

  12. [Petechial typhus. History of men, armies and pedicula].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    Since the Classical age, humankind has had to cope with petechial typhus, especially during wars and famine. Epidemics chiefly occurred during sieges and followed the paths of armies, when infected soldiers transmitted the infection to populations with whom they came into contact. Winter exacerbated the disease due to the use of unhygienic woollen clothes that allowed the spread of pediculosis. It was only in the early 18th century that petechial typhus outbreaks diminished thanks to the use of Marseille soap and to the new custom of changing clothing at bedtime. In many military campaigns, deaths from typhus were higher than those due to war wounds: recent studies established that the French defeat during the Napoleonic Russian military campaign has to be attributed more to typhus than to the military superiority of the enemy. Indeed, the contagion is estimated to have affected 80% of the 600,000 troops involved. The role of Pediculus as a vehicle of infection established in 1909 by Charles Nicolle, microbiological isolation performed by Howard Ricketts and Stanislaus von Prowazck, and finally the advent of antibiotic therapy, all laid the basis for controlling the disease in the 20th century. PMID:17127831

  13. Army Reserve 63d RSC Achieves 85% Savings in Parking Lot Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Army Reserve 63d Regional Support Command (RSC) achieved 85% energy savings and $4,000 per year in cost savings by replacing 12 old light fixtures with light-emitting diode fixtures in the military equipment parking area. This project was part of a camp-wide parking lighting retrofit which, on average, delivered 78% energy savings and a simple payback of 4.4 years.

  14. The military medical school of Mexico: a tradition of excellence.

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, J Leonel; Merrill, Daniel M; Rich, Norman M

    2005-01-01

    It is a historical fact that warfare and surgery have been linked together as far back as military history has been recorded. In the 18th century, the tendency of most armies to dismiss their medical services at the end of every major conflict resulted in higher mortality at the beginning of the next war. This became evident in the French and British Armies during the Battle of Waterloo. These countries went to great efforts to mobilize their civilian reserve physicians, only to discover that more than half of the medical personnel declined to serve. The scarcity of physicians and the inexperience of those caring for the wounded resulted in a high casualty rate. The current armed conflicts throughout the world with their high number of victims are living evidence of the need for preparedness of the military medical personnel. In this article, we review the systems of military medical education in several countries, and offer the example of the Escuela Medico Militar (Military Medical School) of Mexico, a prestigious source of military medical physicians for the Mexican armed forces. PMID:15815819

  15. Parachuting injuries among Army Rangers: a prospective survey of an elite airborne battalion.

    PubMed

    Kragh, J F; Jones, B H; Amaroso, P J; Heekin, R D

    1996-07-01

    Injuries are common in sports and military parachuting. This paper presents results of a prospective survey of parachuting injuries in an airborne Ranger battalion. The Ranger regiment is the U.S Army's most elite airborne infantry, prepared for worldwide deployment without advanced notice. Average unit size was 556 Rangers for the 18 months of follow-up. Other variables examined were type of landing area and time of day. During the follow-up period, all injuries occurring in the battalion were documented, as were all airborne operations. During the survey period, 65 airborne operations were conducted (7,948 static-line and free-fall jumps), which caused 163 injuries to Rangers. Fifty-five percent of the operations and jumps were made at night, and 63, 23, and 14% of operations were onto fields, airports, and unimproved airplane landing strips, respectively. All operations were performed in a tactical environment with equipment. The "static-line" injury rate was 2.2%. The types of injuries were similar to those found in previous reports. Dirt landing strips (4.7% injured) and airports (2.3%) appeared to be more hazardous landing areas than fields (1.6%) and water (0%), and more injuries occurred during night operations (2.7%) than during the day (1.4%). Two and one-half times as many severe injuries occurred at night versus day. This type of information is important for combat airborne operations. PMID:8754716

  16. Nursing in the Sardinian-Piedmontese Army during the Crimean War.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Anna; Lusignani, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary history considers the Crimean War one of the most important European military campaign between the Napoleonic Wars and World War I. For the history of nursing this is an historical landmark, where, thanks to Florence Nightingale, the professional nursing was born. At the moment, the organization of health care and nursing of the Sardinian Piedmontese Army has not been the subject of extensive study. This report is meant to start the analysis of their commitment. Through analysis of primary historical sources, we would like to highlight the role of healthcare and nursing in the Sardinian-Piedmontese Army starting from 1855, during the Crimean War. We have analyzed the records stored in the archive of the Ispettorato Generale (part of the Ministry of War) in Turin and the reports by Army chief physician Dr. Comissetti, as well as the surveys in the archive of the Sisters of Charity at the convent of San Salvato in Turin, the letters of Florence Nightingale and the French doctors' testimonies. So we were able to shed light on the people involved in assistance and healthcare in the Sardinian -Piedmontese Army. A new, unprecedented historical research has shown the dedication and the daily work of male military personnel and religious during the Crimean War, a new aspect during this war that of what would later become the basis of the profession nursing. PMID:24388158

  17. [Demographic problems of military reform in the USSR].

    PubMed

    Kvasha, A

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses future reforms in the procedures for drafting personnel into the Soviet army. The analysis is based primarily on the experiences of armies in Western countries. The author also takes into consideration peculiarities of the political and economic structures in the USSR, as well as the attitude of the Soviet people toward military service. The demographic situation at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first century is examined, as is the possibility that a decrease in fertility, worsening life expectancy, and increase in international migration could make the military draft process even more complicated. Data for cohorts born in 1972, 1977, 1982, and 1987 are used as illustrations. The possibility of developing an alternative service is suggested. PMID:12178731

  18. [Viktor Borisovich von Gyubbenet--a military physician, a surgeon and a social activist].

    PubMed

    Ishutin, O S

    2015-02-01

    The current article is dedicated to a talented surgeon, an organizer of military health care, an extraordinary personality and a public figure--Doctor of Medicine, a privy councilor Victor Borisovich von Guebbenet. A talent of von Gyubbenea as a doctor-surgeon and an organizer of the surgical help on theater of war was especially brightly shown during two big military conflicts of the beginning of the XX century--the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905) and the First World War I (1914-1918). In the first case doctor von Gyubbenet, being a surgeon of the 3rd Siberian corps successfully manage the activity of military-medical divisions and establishments of Port Arthur garrison. In the second military conflict Victor Borisovich as a doctor and an organizer headed sanitary part of armies of the Western front and successfully directed a medical support of armies of the front since 1915 and until the end of war. PMID:25920178

  19. Military personnel recognition system using texture, colour, and SURF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhebhude, Martins E.; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic, machine vision based, military personnel identification and classification system. Classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) on sets of Army, Air Force and Navy camouflage uniform personnel datasets. In the proposed system, the arm of service of personnel is recognised by the camouflage of a persons uniform, type of cap and the type of badge/logo. The detailed analysis done include; camouflage cap and plain cap differentiation using gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture feature; classification on Army, Air Force and Navy camouflaged uniforms using GLCM texture and colour histogram bin features; plain cap badge classification into Army, Air Force and Navy using Speed Up Robust Feature (SURF). The proposed method recognised camouflage personnel arm of service on sets of data retrieved from google images and selected military websites. Correlation-based Feature Selection (CFS) was used to improve recognition and reduce dimensionality, thereby speeding the classification process. With this method success rates recorded during the analysis include 93.8% for camouflage appearance category, 100%, 90% and 100% rates of plain cap and camouflage cap categories for Army, Air Force and Navy categories, respectively. Accurate recognition was recorded using SURF for the plain cap badge category. Substantial analysis has been carried out and results prove that the proposed method can correctly classify military personnel into various arms of service. We show that the proposed method can be integrated into a face recognition system, which will recognise personnel in addition to determining the arm of service which the personnel belong. Such a system can be used to enhance the security of a military base or facility.

  20. [The military role in a flu pandemic].

    PubMed

    Molina Hazan, Vered; Balicer, Ran D; Groto, Itamar; Zarka, Salman; Ankol, Omer E; Bar-Zeev, Yael; Levine, Hagai; Ash, Nachman

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic influenza is a major challenge to emergency preparedness agencies and health systems throughout the world. It requires preparation for a situation of widespread morbidity due to flu and its complications which will lead to a huge burden on the health system in the community and in hospitals, and work absenteeism, also among health care personnel. This may require major involvement of the army in both preparedness and measures to be taken to tackle such an event. This article reviews the different roles armies could take in such a crisis, and presents the Israeli test case. Defense systems are characterized by a number of attributes that may be major advantages during pandemic influenza: crisis management capacities, ability to deal with varied tasks in sub-optimal conditions, logistic resources (fuel, food and water), widespread deployment in the country and sometimes in the world, and the ability to activate people in risky situations, even against their will. The army roles during pandemic outbreaks could include: taking national and regional command of the event, assigning workforce for essential civilian missions, use of logistic and military resources, maintaining public order and implementing public health measures such as isolation and quarantine. In addition, the army must continue its primary role of maintaining the security and guarding the borders of the state, especially in times of global geopolitical changes due to pandemic. Since March 2009, the influenza A/H1N1 2009 virus spread throughout the world, leading the WHO to declare a state of pandemic influenza. According to Israeli preparedness plans, the management of the event was supposed to pass to the defense system. However, due to the moderate severity of the illness, it was decided to leave the management of the event to the health system. In view of the necessity of maintaining military combat capabilities, and the possibility of outbreaks in combat units, which actually occurred, the

  1. TEC Revolutionizes Military Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracco, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Training Extension Course (TEC) system, based on individual, performance-oriented achievement, represents a revolution in Army training concepts and practices. It involves using measurable behavioral objectives, criterion-referenced testing, and validated training materials. (JOW)

  2. The Army's Use of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilse, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    Tactical operations require military commanders to be mobile and have a high level of independence in their actions. Communications capabilities providing intelligence and command orders in these tactical situations have been limited to simple voice communications or low-rate narrow bandwidth communications because of the need for immediate reliable connectivity. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) has brought an improved communications tool to the tactical commander giving the ability to gain access to a global communications system using high data rates and wide bandwidths. The Army has successfully tested this new capability of bandwidth-on-demand and high data rates for commanders in real-world conditions during Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY in Haiti during the fall and winter of 1994. This paper examines ACTS use by field commanders and details the success of the ACTS system in support of a wide variety of field condition command functions.

  3. A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MILITARY COMMANDER MESSAGES ABOUT TOBACCO AND OTHER HEALTH ISSUES IN MILITARY INSTALLATION NEWSPAPERS: WHAT DO MILITARY COMMANDERS SAY ABOUT TOBACCO?

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Hyder, Melissa L.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2014-01-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders’ messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders’ messages (n=39 Air Force, n=19 Army, n=7 Navy, n=1 Marine, and n=9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published between January 2012–December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders’ messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ2=5.019, p=0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/DUI (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders’ messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  4. 78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB) Winter Plenary Session. Date: January 15.... Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for the Army Science Board to review the results of...

  5. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: 1. Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date: Wednesday, July 17..., Colorado 80903-1685. 5. Purpose of Meeting: The purpose of the meeting is for Army Science Board members...

  6. 77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 26, 2012...: Adopt the findings and recommendations for the following studies: Strategic Direction for Army...

  7. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, Attn: ATTG-OPS-EI...

  8. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting... following address: Army Education Advisory Committee, Designated Federal Officer, ATTN: ATTG-OPS-EO...

  9. 78 FR 24735 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of Meeting: Thursday... standards so the Army can provide credible, rigorous, and relevant training and education for its force...

  10. Measuring secondary traumatic stress symptoms in military spouses with the posttraumatic stress disorder checklist military version.

    PubMed

    Bjornestad, Andrea G; Schweinle, Amy; Elhai, Jon D

    2014-12-01

    Little research to date has examined secondary traumatic stress symptoms in spouses of military veterans. This study investigated the presence and severity of posttraumatic stress symptoms in a sample of 227 Army National Guard veterans and secondary traumatic stress symptoms among their spouses. The veterans completed the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Checklist Military Version (PCL-M) (Weathers et al., 1993) to determine the probable prevalence rate of posttraumatic stress symptoms. A modified version of the PCL-M was used to assess secondary traumatic stress symptoms in the spouses. A confirmatory factor analysis showed that the modified version of the PCL-M used to assess secondary traumatic stress symptoms in spouses fits using the same four-factor PTSD structure as the PCL-M for veterans. This study provides initial evidence on the underlying symptom structure of secondary traumatic stress symptoms among spouses of traumatic event victims. PMID:25386765

  11. Perspectives on Aerobic and Strength Influences on Military Physical Readiness: Report of an International Military Physiology Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E; Knapik, Joseph J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Baumgartner, Neal; Groeller, Herbert; Taylor, Nigel A S; Duarte, Antonio F A; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Jones, Bruce H; Kraemer, William J; Nindl, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Physical fitness training of military recruits is an enduring focus of armies. This is important for safe and effective performance of general tasks that anyone may have to perform in a military setting as well as preparation for more specialized training in specific job specialties. Decades of studies on occupationally specific physical requirements have characterized the dual aerobic and strength demands of typical military tasks; however, scientifically founded strategies to prepare recruits with a good mix of these 2 physiologically opposing capabilities have not been well established. High levels of aerobic training can compromise resistance training gains and increase injury rates. Resistance training requires a greater commitment of time and resources as well as a greater understanding of the science to produce true strength gains that may be beneficial to military performance. These are critical issues for modern armies with increased demands for well-prepared soldiers and fewer injury losses. The actual physical requirements tied to metrics of success in military jobs are also under renewed examination as women are increasingly integrated into military jobs previously performed only by men. At the third International Congress on Soldiers' Physical Performance, a roundtable of 10 physiologists with military expertise presented comparative perspectives on aerobic and strength training. These topics included the physiological basis of training benefits, how to train effectively, how to measure training effectiveness, considerations for the integration of women, and the big perspective. Key discussion points centered on (a) the significance of findings from research on integrated training, (b) strategies for effective strength development, and PMID:26506170

  12. Maggot debridement therapy in modern army medicine: perceptions and prevalence.

    PubMed

    Heitkamp, Rae A; Peck, George W; Kirkup, Benjamin C

    2012-11-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT), despite its long history and safety profile, finds limited use in the military health care system. Although new methods are continually being investigated to debride wounds more quickly and effectively, MDT remains largely a therapy of last resort. We evaluated the frequency of MDT in the Army sector of the MHS and the decision-making process surrounding its use. A 22 question survey of Army physicians was prepared and distributed through select Medical Corps Consultants in specialties likely to practice debridement. 83% of respondents were familiar with MDT, and of those familiar, 63% were aware of FDA approval for the product and 10% had used the product themselves. The three most frequently cited reasons for not using the therapy were no need (52%), no access (23%), and insufficient experience (19%). Informing the 37% of physicians who are not aware of FDA approval is an obvious target for program improvement. However, as many do not find a need for MDT, targeted improvements to MDT access and education for those physicians who encounter indications for MDT would permit them to apply MDT where there is an unmet need. PMID:23198524

  13. The US Army Foreign Comparative Test fuel cell program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostic, Elizabeth; Sifer, Nicholas; Bolton, Christopher; Ritter, Uli; Dubois, Terry

    The US Army RDECOM initiated a Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) Program to acquire lightweight, high-energy dense fuel cell systems from across the globe for evaluation as portable power sources in military applications. Five foreign companies, including NovArs, Smart Fuel Cell, Intelligent Energy, Ballard Power Systems, and Hydrogenics, Inc., were awarded competitive contracts under the RDECOM effort. This paper will report on the status of the program as well as the experimental results obtained from one of the units. The US Army has interests in evaluating and deploying a variety of fuel cell systems, where these systems show added value when compared to current power sources in use. For low-power applications, fuel cells utilizing high-energy dense fuels offer significant weight savings over current battery technologies. This helps reduce the load a solider must carry for longer missions. For high-power applications, the low operating signatures (acoustic and thermal) of fuel cell systems make them ideal power generators in stealth operations. Recent testing has been completed on the Smart Fuel Cell A25 system that was procured through the FCT program. The "A-25" is a direct methanol fuel cell hybrid and was evaluated as a potential candidate for soldier and sensor power applications.

  14. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Register (71 FR 46052), the Department of the Army issued a final rule. This final rule corrects the... Litigation Division when complaints citing the Privacy Act are filed in order to correct the mailing address in Sec. 505.12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing the...

  15. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  16. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... selection of alternatives (40 CFR 1506.1). In accordance with DOD 5000.2.R, the MATDEV is responsible for... the public; and (v) Adaptive management of Army operations to stay on course with the strategic plan's... policies are violated should be identified to ASA (I&E) for resolution. (e) Army leadership and...

  17. OLED study for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barre, F.; Chiquard, A.; Faure, S.; Landais, L.; Patry, P.

    2005-07-01

    The presentation deals with some applications of OLED displays in military optronic systems, which are scheduled by SAGEM DS (Defence and Security). SAGEM DS, one of the largest group in the defence and security market, is currently investigating OLED Technologies for military programs. This technology is close from being chosen for optronic equipment such as future infantry night vision goggles, rifle-sight, or, more generally, vision enhancement systems. Most of those applications requires micro-display with an active matrix size below 1". Some others, such as, for instance, ruggedized flat displays do have a need for higher active matrix size (1,5" to 15"). SAGEM DS takes advantages of this flat, high luminance and emissive technology in highly integrated systems. In any case, many requirements have to be fulfilled: ultra-low power consumption, wide viewing angle, good pixel to pixel uniformity, and satisfactory behaviour in extreme environmental conditions.... Accurate measurements have been achieved at SAGEM DS on some micro display OLEDs and will be detailed: luminance (over 2000 cd/m2 achieved), area uniformity and pixel to pixel uniformity, robustness at low and high temperature (-40°C to +60°C), lifetime. These results, which refer to military requirements, provide a valuable feedback representative of the state of the art OLED performances.

  18. Portable fuel cell systems for America's army: technology transition to the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ashok S.; Dubois, Terry G.; Sifer, Nicholas; Bostic, Elizabeth; Gardner, Kristopher; Quah, Michael; Bolton, Christopher

    The US Army Communications, Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) envisions three thrust areas for portable fuel cell systems for military applications. These areas include soldier power (<500 W), sensor power (0-100 W), and auxiliary power units or APUs (0.5-10 kW). Soldier and sensor fuel cell systems may be man-portable/backpackable while APUs could be employed as squad battery chargers or as 'Silent Watch' APUs where low signature (acoustic, thermal, etc.) operation is a requirement. The Army's research and development efforts are focusing on methods of either storing or generating hydrogen on the battlefield. Hydrogen storage technology is considered critical to small military and/or commercial fuel cell systems, and is being pursued in a host of commercial and government programs. CERDEC, in a joint effort with the Army Research Office (ARO) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is developing several promising hydrogen generating technologies. The goal of this program is a safe, reliable hydrogen source that can provide rates up to 100 W with an energy density of greater than 1000 Wh/kg. For larger fuel cell units (>500 W), it is imperative that the fuel cell power units be able to operate on fuels within the military logistics chain [DOD 4140.25-M, DOD Directive 4140.25 (1993)]. CERDEC is currently conducting research on catalysts and microchannel fuel reformers that offer great promise for the reforming of diesel and JP-8 fuels into hydrogen. In addition to research work on PEM fuel cells and enabling technologies, the Army is also conducting research on direct methanol and solid oxide fuel cells, and combined heat and power applications utilizing new high temperature fuel cells.

  19. [The historical experience of therapeutic service in the Army and Navy during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Yu V

    2015-05-01

    The author presents the experience of therapeutic services of the army and navy during the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945) and its importance for the present. This experience became a-general methodological framework-for the development of principles for the organization of work of military physicians in a modern warfare and the application of new weapons. The history of development, aims and objectives of the new section of Military Medicine--the Military Field Therapy as a unified system of organization and delivery of health care to servicemen based on the principles of a unified military field medical doctrine. A problem of organization of new health facilities (hospitals, hospital databases), their acquisition of trained personnel, especially the structure of internal medicine in the war years, the treatment and the early rehabilitation of wounded and sick, between the military and civilian medical institutions-is highlighted. There is an information that 90.6%, or more than 6.5 million soldiers and officers who were treated in hospitals with various diseases, were returned to duty. The experience of the medical service in World War II and the actual demand and is now planning for a package of measures aimed at further improvement of the health status of military-personnel. PMID:26513860

  20. Advancing botnet modeling techniques for military and security simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2011-06-01

    Simulation environments serve many purposes, but they are only as good as their content. One of the most challenging and pressing areas that call for improved content is the simulation of bot armies (botnets) and their effects upon networks and computer systems. Botnets are a new type of malware, a type that is more powerful and potentially dangerous than any other type of malware. A botnet's power derives from several capabilities including the following: 1) the botnet's capability to be controlled and directed throughout all phases of its activity, 2) a command and control structure that grows increasingly sophisticated, and 3) the ability of a bot's software to be updated at any time by the owner of the bot (a person commonly called a bot master or bot herder.) Not only is a bot army powerful and agile in its technical capabilities, a bot army can be extremely large, can be comprised of tens of thousands, if not millions, of compromised computers or it can be as small as a few thousand targeted systems. In all botnets, their members can surreptitiously communicate with each other and their command and control centers. In sum, these capabilities allow a bot army to execute attacks that are technically sophisticated, difficult to trace, tactically agile, massive, and coordinated. To improve our understanding of their operation and potential, we believe that it is necessary to develop computer security simulations that accurately portray bot army activities, with the goal of including bot army simulations within military simulation environments. In this paper, we investigate issues that arise when simulating bot armies and propose a combination of the biologically inspired MSEIR infection spread model coupled with the jump-diffusion infection spread model to portray botnet propagation.

  1. Military display market segment: helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of one of its segments: helicopter displays. Parameters requiring special consideration, to include luminance ranges, contrast ratio, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are examined. Performance requirements for rotary-wing displays relative to several premier applications are summarized. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platforms, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area sizes across helicopter platforms, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or greater, is illustrated. Rotary-wing displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Rugged commercial, versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military helicopter programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. The military display market study is summarized with breakouts for the helicopter market segment. Our defense-wide study as of March 2004 has documented 1,015,494 direct view and virtual image displays distributed across 1,181 display sizes and 503 weapon systems. Helicopter displays account for 67,472 displays (just 6.6% of DoD total) and comprise 83 sizes (7.0% of total DoD) in 76 platforms (15.1% of total DoD). Some 47.6% of these rotary-wing applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, as per fixed-wing aircraft, the predominant instantiation involves higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  2. Supplement use by UK-based British Army soldiers in training.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anna; Hughes, Jason; Izard, Rachel M; Greeves, Julie P

    2014-10-14

    The use of supplements is widespread at all levels of civilian sport and a prevalence of 60-90 % is reported among high-performance UK athletes, including juniors. The prevalence of supplement use among UK-based British Army personnel is not known. The aim of the present study was to establish the point prevalence of supplement use in UK-based British Army soldiers under training (SuTs) and associated staff. A cross-sectional anonymous survey was carried out in 3168 British Army SuTs and soldiers, equating to 3·1 % of regular Army strength, based at eleven Phase 1, 2 and 3 UK Army training sites. Overall, 38 % of the respondents reported current use of supplements, but prevalence varied according to the course attended by the respondents. The number of different supplements used was 4·7 (sd 2·9). Supplements most commonly used were protein bars, powders and drinks (66 %), isotonic carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drinks (49 %), creatine (38 %), recovery sports drinks (35 %), multivitamins (31 %) and vitamin C (25 %). A small proportion of respondents reported the use of amphetamines and similar compounds (1·6 %), cocaine (0·8 %), anabolic androgenic steroids (1·1 %), growth hormone (2·0 %), and other anabolic agents, e.g. testosterone (4·2 %). Logistic regression modelling indicated that, for current users, younger age, being female, smoking and undergoing Officer Cadet training were associated with greater supplement use. This is the first study to investigate the prevalence of dietary and training supplement use in UK-based British military personnel. Self-administration of a wide range of supplements is reported by British military personnel in training, which is at least as great as that reported by those on deployment, and has implications for Defence policy and educational needs. PMID:25119518

  3. The Evolution of Extreme Polyandry in Social Insects: Insights from Army Ants

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Matthias Benjamin; Moritz, Robin Frederik Alexander; Kraus, Frank Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The unique nomadic life-history pattern of army ants (army ant adaptive syndrome), including obligate colony fission and strongly male-biased sex-ratios, makes army ants prone to heavily reduced effective population sizes (Ne). Excessive multiple mating by queens (polyandry) has been suggested to compensate these negative effects by increasing genetic variance in colonies and populations. However, the combined effects and evolutionary consequences of polyandry and army ant life history on genetic colony and population structure have only been studied in a few selected species. Here we provide new genetic data on paternity frequencies, colony structure and paternity skew for the five Neotropical army ants Eciton mexicanum, E. vagans, Labidus coecus, L. praedator and Nomamyrmex esenbeckii; and compare those data among a total of nine army ant species (including literature data). The number of effective matings per queen ranged from about 6 up to 25 in our tested species, and we show that such extreme polyandry is in two ways highly adaptive. First, given the detected low intracolonial relatedness and population differentiation extreme polyandry may counteract inbreeding and low Ne. Second, as indicated by a negative correlation of paternity frequency and paternity skew, queens maximize intracolonial genotypic variance by increasingly equalizing paternity shares with higher numbers of sires. Thus, extreme polyandry is not only an integral part of the army ant syndrome, but generally adaptive in social insects by improving genetic variance, even at the high end spectrum of mating frequencies. PMID:25144731

  4. The evolution of extreme polyandry in social insects: insights from army ants.

    PubMed

    Barth, Matthias Benjamin; Moritz, Robin Frederik Alexander; Kraus, Frank Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The unique nomadic life-history pattern of army ants (army ant adaptive syndrome), including obligate colony fission and strongly male-biased sex-ratios, makes army ants prone to heavily reduced effective population sizes (Ne). Excessive multiple mating by queens (polyandry) has been suggested to compensate these negative effects by increasing genetic variance in colonies and populations. However, the combined effects and evolutionary consequences of polyandry and army ant life history on genetic colony and population structure have only been studied in a few selected species. Here we provide new genetic data on paternity frequencies, colony structure and paternity skew for the five Neotropical army ants Eciton mexicanum, E. vagans, Labidus coecus, L. praedator and Nomamyrmex esenbeckii; and compare those data among a total of nine army ant species (including literature data). The number of effective matings per queen ranged from about 6 up to 25 in our tested species, and we show that such extreme polyandry is in two ways highly adaptive. First, given the detected low intracolonial relatedness and population differentiation extreme polyandry may counteract inbreeding and low Ne. Second, as indicated by a negative correlation of paternity frequency and paternity skew, queens maximize intracolonial genotypic variance by increasingly equalizing paternity shares with higher numbers of sires. Thus, extreme polyandry is not only an integral part of the army ant syndrome, but generally adaptive in social insects by improving genetic variance, even at the high end spectrum of mating frequencies. PMID:25144731

  5. Characteristics of suicides among US army active duty personnel in 17 US states from 2005 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph; Skopp, Nancy A; Karch, Debra; Reger, Mark A; Gahm, Gregory A

    2012-03-01

    Suicides are increasing among active duty US Army soldiers. To help focus prevention strategies, we characterized 56 US Army suicides that occurred from 2005 to 2007 in 17 US states using 2 large-scale surveillance systems. We found that intimate partner problems and military-related stress, particularly job stress, were common among decedents. Many decedents were also identified as having suicidal ideation, a sad or depressed mood, or a recent crisis before death. Focusing efforts to prevent these forms of stress might reduce suicides among soldiers. PMID:22390599

  6. 77 FR 73455 - Change to the Military Freight Carrier Registration Program (FCRP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Army Change to the Military Freight Carrier Registration Program (FCRP) AGENCY: Department... provider (TSP) registrations during the FCRP open season which will run 1 September through 30 November... services, utilizing an open season for freight motor carrier registration, allows SDDC to...

  7. Description, Evaluation, and Validation of a Pilot Developmental Assessment Center in a Military-Educational Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Richard P.; And Others

    The purpose of this report is to describe, evaluate, and validate a pilot assessment center (AC) established in the Center for Leadership and Personal Development at the U.S. Military Academy to develop cadets on job skills needed by newly commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The AC programs employ a leadership evaluation development method…

  8. Aptitude Level and the Acquisition of Skills and Knowledges in a Variety of Military Training Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Wayne L.; And Others

    To assess the effects of wide aptitude differences on the acquisition of military knowledges and skills, a sample of 183 Army recruits was divided into three maximally distant aptitude groups on the basis of Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) scores: high aptitude (AFQT 90-99); middle aptitude (AFQT 45-55); low aptitude (AFQT 10-21). Recruits…

  9. Research Training Fellowship Program (Formerly Military Medicine and Allied Sciences Course).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, DC.

    This document provides an outline of the Research Training Fellowship Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Emphasizing the scientific foundations of military medicine, the course aims at preparing medical corps officers for careers in laboratory research or clinical investigation and teaching. The intent is to give officers who…

  10. Suicides and Suicide Attempts in the U.S. Military, 2008-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Nigel E.; Reger, Mark A.; Luxton, David D.; Skopp, Nancy A.; Kinn, Julie; Smolenski, Derek; Gahm, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report Program collects extensive information on suicides and suicide attempts from the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. Data are compiled on demographics, suicide event details, behavioral health treatment history, military history, and information about other potential risk factors such as…

  11. SUNY Colleges in the North Country: A Successful Partnership with the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsica, Joanne Y.; Johnson, Donald R.; Lancaster, Wanda Rushing

    2002-01-01

    Describes the SUNY Colleges in the North Country Consortium, which comprises nine higher education institutions committed to working collaboratively and in concert with an Army Education Center at Fort Drum. The consortium provides educational services to active-duty military and their spouses. (EV)

  12. Lessons Learned about Workplace Literacy from Military Job-Specific Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippi, Jorie W.

    For almost half a century the United States military services have incorporated formal literacy programs into job training for those enlistees who are less than fully qualified. Over the years, several successful job-specific reading programs have evolved. In 1975, the Army began the Functional Literacy (FLIT) Program, a program based on a…

  13. Teaching Mental Skills for Self-Esteem Enhancement in a Military Healthcare Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammermeister, Jon; Pickering, Michael A.; Ohlson, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    The need exists for educational methods which can positively influence self-esteem, especially in demanding military healthcare settings. Warrior Transition Units (WTU's) are tasked with the challenging mission of caring for seriously injured or ill U.S. Army Soldiers. This paper explored the hypothesis that an educationally-based Mental Skills…

  14. Bite Protection Performance of New Factory-Level Permethrin-Treated Military Uniforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethrin-treatment of field-worn U.S. Military uniforms has been standard practice since 1991. The uniform fabric composition has changed significantly from 100% cotton to 50:50 nylon:cotton Battle Dress Uniforms (BDUs), to 50:50 nylon:cotton Army Combat Uniforms (ACUs) with wrinkle-free finish, ...

  15. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim. PMID:22984878

  16. Baron Dominique-Jean Larrey (1766-1842): founder of military surgery and trauma care.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Rosenberg, T; Liakakos, T; Androutsos, G

    2011-01-01

    Dominique-Jean Larrey was a distinguished surgeon in chief of Napoleon's army and a faithful servant of the Empire. His surgical skills and inventions, his absolute attachment and devotion to his profession, his humanitarian spirit and courage entitled him as one of history's greatest military surgeons. PMID:21520773

  17. 75 FR 24667 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    .... 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) is providing notice that it released an interim change to the MFTURP No. 1 on April 26... Motor Surveillance (SNS) (and DDP and PSS) for 1.1 to 1.3 Ammunition and Explosives (A&E) to Section...

  18. 78 FR 60266 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Focus Areas; Academic, Military, and Physical Program Updates; Budget, MILCON, Sustainment Restoration... respect violations by the Army Rugby Team; and the removal of a Head of an academic department, and an... of the Secretary of the General Staff (MASG), 646 Swift Road, West Point, NY 10996-1905 or faxed...

  19. Distance Education for Corporate and Military Training. Readings in Distance Education, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G., Ed.

    This publication, which consists of selected readings from volumes 1-5 of The American Journal of Distance Education, is designed for corporate and military trainers who want research-grounded materials that can be used in programs that train trainers. The 12 articles, whose authors come from the army, navy, and airforce, from universities and…

  20. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  1. Ambulatory physical activity in Swiss Army recruits.

    PubMed

    Wyss, T; Scheffler, J; Mäder, U

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess and compare the type, duration and intensity of physical activity during the basic training provided by each of 5 selected Swiss Army occupational specialties. The first objective was to develop and validate a method to assess distance covered on foot. The second objective was to describe and compare physical activity levels among occupational specialties. In the first part of the study, 30 male volunteers completed 6 laps of 290 m at different gait velocities. Data from 15 volunteers were used to develop linear regression equations for the relationship between step frequency and gait velocity, and data from the other 15 volunteers were used to verify the accuracy of these equations. In the second part of the study, 250 volunteers from 5 military schools (each training school for a different occupational specialty) wore heart-rate, acceleration and step-count monitors during workdays of weeks 2, 4, 8 and 10 of their basic training. Sensor data were used to identify physically demanding activities, estimate energy expenditure (based on already published algorithms) and estimate distance covered on foot (based on the algorithm developed in the first part of this study). A branched model using 2 regression equations (gait velocity=0.705∙step frequency for walking speeds below 1 m/s and gait velocity=1.675∙step frequency - 1.464 for faster gait velocities) was shown to be accurate for estimating distance covered on foot. In the training schools investigated, average physical activity energy expenditure was 10.5 ± 2.4 MJ per day, and trainees covered 12.9 ± 3.3 km per day on foot. Recruits spent 61.0 ± 23.3 min per day marching and 33.1 ± 19.5 min per day performing physically demanding materials-handling activities. Average physical activity energy expenditure decreased significantly from week 2 to week 8. The measurement system utilised in the present study yielded data comparable to those of prior studies that

  2. [French military nurses during the First World War (1914-1918)].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Julien; Lefort, Hugues; Lamache, Christophe; Tabbagh, Xavier; Olier, François

    2014-06-01

    In 1914, beingthe heirs of the ambulance soldiers who had been created during the time of the Empire, the military males-nurses were overwhelmed by the armies huge needs in paramedics. Facing both the callings of commandment which demanded the recruitment of soldiers and the necessity--which had been set up as a duty by the health service--to attend the doctors, the military male-nurse gave way, in 1918 to a new comer: the female military nurse. PMID:25069359

  3. Military dependent medical care during World War II.

    PubMed

    Potter, M

    1990-02-01

    Dependent medical care at Army expense or at Army facilities during World War II was offered only on an emergency basis and at the discretion of the facility commanding officer. This had been the practice since 1884 when such care was specifically authorized by Congressional appropriation. Mobilization in 1898 and 1917 had brought a large number of state militiamen or inductees into the army--men who could leave their families behind. When mobilization began again in 1940, it was thought that a similar procedure would be followed. Events, however, overwhelmed the system as commanders of Army bases faced large numbers of young, pregnant wives who had followed their husbands. This had happened, in part, because of the dislocations of the Great Depression and, in part, because the wives of military inductees hoped to find work close to where their husbands were stationed. Although dependent medical care was not increased in proportion to the numbers of new dependents brought in by the war mobilization, medical care was provided for the four lower grades under the Emergency Maternity and Infant Care section of the Social Security Act of 1935. Subsequent to World War II and the experience of the Korean War, Congress saw it fit to specifically authorize medical care for dependents of military personnel as part of the soldiers' terms of employment, as a device to stimulate retention in service of both soldiers and doctors. In 1956 the United States Congress established the right at law of military dependents to medical care as specified in the Dependents' Medical Care Act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2106646

  4. Risky business: challenges and successes in military radiation risk communication.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Mark A; Geckle, Lori S; Davidson, Bethney A

    2012-01-01

    Given the general public's overall lack of knowledge about radiation and their heightened fear of its harmful effects, effective communication of radiation risks is often difficult. This is especially true when it comes to communicating the radiation risks stemming from military operations. Part of this difficulty stems from a lingering distrust of the military that harkens back to the controversy surrounding Veteran exposures to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War along with the often classified nature of many military operations. Additionally, there are unique military exposure scenarios, such as the use of nuclear weapons and combat use of depleted uranium as antiarmor munitions that are not found in the civilian sector. Also, the large, diverse nature of the military makes consistent risk communication across the vast and widespread organization very difficult. This manuscript highlights and discusses both the common and the distinctive challenges of effectively communicating military radiation risks, to include communicating through the media. The paper also introduces the Army's Health Risk Communication Program and its role in assisting in effective risk communication efforts. The authors draw on their extensive collective experience to share 3 risk communication success stories that were accomplished through the innovative use of a matrixed, team approach that combines both health physics and risk communication expertise. PMID:22815169

  5. Intimate partner violence among female service members and veterans: information and resources available through military and non-military websites.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy; Joshi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of women's roles in the military, the number of female service members and veterans has increased. Considerable knowledge about intimate partner violence (IPV) in civilian couples exists but little is known about IPV among female service members and veterans. Prevalence rates of IPV range from 17% to 39% for female service members, and 21.9% to 74% for veterans. Most service members and veterans indicated using the Internet at least occasionally and expressed willingness to seek information about services via the Internet. Informed by data, we conducted a systematic review of military (Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps) and non-military (Veterans Affairs and Google) websites to explore the availability and presentation of information and resources related to IPV. The websites search revealed a variety of resources and information available, and important differences between sites with regard to what and how information is presented. Implications for practice and further research are discussed. PMID:25255337

  6. Army requirements for micro and nanotechnology-based sensors in weapons health and battlefield environmental monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene; Hutcheson, Guilford

    2006-03-01

    The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) and the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) have initiated a joint advanced technology demonstration program entitled "Prognostics/Diagnostics for the Future Force (PDFF)" with a key objective of developing low or no power embedded sensor suites for harsh environmental monitoring. The most critical challenge of the program is to specify requirements for the embedded sensor suites which will perform on-board diagnostics, maintain a history of sensor data, and forecast weapon health. The authors are currently collaborating with the PDFF program managers and potential customers to quantify the requirements for remotely operated, micro/nano-technology-based sensors for a host of candidate weapon systems. After requirements are finalized, current micro/nanotechnology-based temperature, humidity, g-shock, vibration and chemical sensors for monitoring the out-gassing of weapons propellant, as well as hazardous gaseous species on the battlefield and in urban environments will be improved to meet the full requirements of the PDFF program. In this paper, performance requirements such as power consumption, reliability, maintainability, survivability, size, and cost, along with the associated technical challenges for micro/nanotechnology-based sensor systems operating in military environments, are discussed. In addition, laboratory results from the design and testing of a wireless sensor array, which was developed using a thin film of functionalized carbon nanotube materials, are presented. Conclusions from the research indicate that the detection of bio-hazardous materials is possible using passive and active wireless sensors based on monitoring the reflected phase from the sensor.

  7. [Sanitary service of West Special Military District on the eve and in the first days of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Ishutin, O S; Leonik, S I

    2011-06-01

    This article evaluates military and political situation in the world and operational-strategic environment on the West Theater of operations on the eve of the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945). We analyze structure and overall condition of sanitary service of West Special Military District of the Workers and Peasants Red Army and causes of failure of mobilization, organization and deployment of military units and establishments from the beginning of aggression of Fascist Germany to the Soviet Union. PMID:21899072

  8. Inaugural editorial: Military Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Military medicine is one of the most innovative part of human civilization. Along with the rapid development of medicine and advances in military techniques, military medicine has become the focus and intersection of new knowledge and new technologies. Innovation and development within military medicine are always ongoing, with a long and challenging path ahead. The establishment of "Military Medical Research" is expected to be a bounden responsibility in the frontline of Chinese military medicine. PMID:25722860

  9. US army land condition-trend analysis (LCTA) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersing, Victor E.; Shaw, Robert B.; Tazik, David J.

    1992-05-01

    The US Army Land Condition-Trend Analysis (LCTA) program is a standardized method of data collection, analysis, and reporting designed to meet multiple goals and objectives. The method utilizes vascular plant inventories, permanent field plot data, and wildlife inventories. Vascular plant inventories are used for environmental documentation, training of personnel, species identification during LCTA implementation, and as a survey for state and federal endangered or threatened species. The permanent field plot data documents the vegetational, edaphic, topographic, and disturbance characteristics of the installation. Inventory plots are allocated in a stratified random fashion across the installation utilizing a geographic information system that integrates satellite imagery and soil survey information. Ground cover, canopy cover, woody plant density, slope length, slope gradient, soil information, and disturbance data are collected at each plot. Plot data are used to: (1) describe plant communities, (2) characterize wildlife and threatened and endangered species habitat, (3) document amount and kind of military and nonmilitary disturbance, (4) determine the impact of military training on vegetation and soil resources, (5) estimate soil erosion potential, (6) classify land as to the kind and amount of use it can support, (7) determine allowable use estimates for tracked vehicle training, (8) document concealment resources, (9) identify lands that require restoration and evaluate the effectiveness of restorative techniques, and (10) evaluate potential acquisition property. Wildlife inventories survey small and midsize mammals, birds, bats, amphibians, and reptiles. Data from these surveys can be used for environmental documentation, to identify state and federal endangered and threatened species, and to evaluate the impact of military activities on wildlife populations. Short- and long-term monitoring of permanent field plots is used to evaluate and adjust land

  10. [Health situation of the armies in the Crimean war and a document related to this].

    PubMed

    Dağlar, Oya

    2004-01-01

    Although the Crimean War seems to be a war between the Ottoman and Russian with the support of England an France, in reality, it was a power struggle between the biggest European countries. The cooperation between England - Ottoman Empire and France in the Crimean War meanly determined the result of the war. The Crimean War should not only be evaluated in militarian and political aspect, but also from other perspectives. One of the most important problems for the allied armies in Istanbul and Crimea was related to the health concepts. During the two years long war, problems were the freezing cold and contagious diseases before the Russian soldiers. And thypus, scorbut, cholera and malaria prepears the dead of a large number of soldiers. Although the allied armies won the battle but all the sides fighting in the was lost many people due to contagious diseases. According to the resources, the contagious diseases such as, thypus, cholera and malaria led to the deads of more than ten times of the people who were in the battle field. Thats why, The European armies understood the importance of the treatment diseases in the war and gave importance to the development of military medical services and form this point, the Crimean War became the begining of an important development in military health concept. PMID:15487045

  11. Filmless Radiographic System For Army Field Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedband, Melvin P.; Grenzow, Frank C.; Gray, James; Heilman, Craig A.; Zhang, Hui L.

    1989-05-01

    Small computers incorporating hard disc memory, multiple high resolution monitors and the small computer systems interface (SCSI) can be used for low-cost filmless radiography. A system has been constructed which can perform all of the functions required of a small clinic or field hospital including scheduling, reporting, image acquisition and display, image annotation, image storage and transmission, and control of peripheral devices. The peripheral devices include an optical card reader/writer, an optical disc reader/writer, a SCSI to DIN/PACS port, an Ethernet port and a SCSI to a long distance telephone/computer port, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) port. Individual patient optical data cards may be prepared, all images and reports may be archived in a small optical disc in the computer, other image sources may be coupled to the system via the DIN/PACS port, data may be exchanged with the local DIN via the Ethernet port and with distant sites via the ISDN port. The small optical data cards, about the size of a credit card, are used for individual patient images and reports. An independent viewer may be used to display the contents of the cards. The result is a complete "filmless and paperless" medical imaging system. The system was developed on Contract DAMD17-88C-8058 with the US Army Medical Research and Development Command.

  12. BSEP/CSEP Reading Evaluation: A Study of the Effectiveness of the U.S. Army Europe's Basic Skills/Career Skills Job-Specific Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippi, Jorie W.

    To measure the effectiveness of the Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) reading curriculum--eight reading skill modules employing military job-specific reading materials and used by the U.S. Army in Europe (USAREUR)--and to provide information for improving it, a study examined 183 soldiers from 38 European posts who were enrolled in the BSEP…

  13. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 68 - Addendum for Education Services Between [Name of Educational Institution] and the U.S. Army

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Addendum for Education Services Between and the U.S. Army C Appendix C to Part 68 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN VOLUNTARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS Pt. 68, App. C Appendix C to Part...

  14. 75 FR 76444 - Department of the Air Force and U.S. Army; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Modernization and Enhancement EIS. Fox 3 Military Operations Area (MOA) Expansion and New Paxon MOA: The Air Force and Army propose to expand the Fox 3 MOA and establish a new, adjacent Paxon MOA to provide the... following alternatives, as well as a No Action Alternative: Alternative A includes the proposed expanded...

  15. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  16. 76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ....S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA, Command Conference Room, Root Hall, Carlisle...: Attn: Designated Federal Officer, Dept. of Academic Affairs, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle, PA 17013....

  17. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  18. Physics in Aerospace and Military Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat, Hong

    2006-12-01

    Aerospace, which includes both commercial and military applications, provides a wide variety of challenging opportunities in physics. I have worked primarily in the area of sensors with projects including airport baggage scanners and defect detection for the Space Shuttle. In my current role on the Army's Future Combat Systems, we use physical models to predict battlefield sensor performance. This talk will focus on the physical principles involved in modeling electro-optical sensor performance, including the fundamental concept of minimum resolvable contrast and minimum resolvable temperature curves. I will also touch upon my experiences at Boeing and give an overview of the range of physics-related projects at Boeing. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited, TACOM 15 SEP 2006, case 06-188

  19. High-performance IR detector modules for Army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Rutzinger, S.; Schallenberg, T.; Wendler, J.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Since many years AIM delivers IR-modules for army applications like pilotage, weapon sights, UAVs or vehicle platforms. State-of-the-art 640x512, 15μm pitch detector modules are in production in manifold configurations optimized for specific key requirements on system level. This is possible due to a modular design, which is best suited to meet the diversity of system needs in army applications. Examples are optimization of detector-dewar length for gimbal applications, size weight and power reduction for UAVs or lifetime enhancement for vehicle platforms. In 2012 AIM presented first prototypes of megapixel detectors (1280x1024, 15μm pitch) for both spectral bands MWIR and LWIR. These large format detector arrays fulfill the demand for higher spatial resolution, which is requested for applications like rotorcraft pilotage, persistent surveillance or tasks like determination of threat level in personnel targets. Recently, a new tactical dewar has been developed for the 1280x1024 detector arrays. It is designed to withstand environmental stresses and, at the same time, to quest for a compact overall package. Furthermore, the idea of a modular design will be even more emphasized. Integration of different cooler types, like AIM's SX095 or rotary integral, will be possible without modification of the dewar. The paper will present development status of large format IR-modules at AIM as well as performance data and configuration considerations with respect to army applications.

  20. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  1. [Nicolas Dobo and Pierre Jame about the army medical general Lucian Jame].

    PubMed

    Dobo, N; Jame, P

    1996-01-01

    Lucien Jame was born October the 20th 1891 at Gourdon (Lot). State Police Officer's son, he studied in Lyon at the Military Health School. Called up August the 6th 1914, he shined among many fights and wore a lot of medals. After the armistice he defended his thesis upon "Venereal diseases prophylaxis study". March the 9th 1921, medical Officer in South Algeria, he published some original articles regarding to leprosis, tuberculosis and malaria. After a competitive examination in France, Lucien Jame became a Medical Commanding Officer of Military Health Service in Toulouse where Nicolas Dobo was at his disposal. August the 6th 1943, in the same rank in Algier then in Rabat, Lucien Jame reached the top of his career as Chief Executive of Military Health Service. He planed First French army medical operations through Italy, France and Germany battles. "Grand-Officier de la Légion d'honneur", the Army Medical General Lucien Jame retired but kept on with works dedicated to hygiene and preventive medicine till he died, June the 16th, 1969. PMID:11624989

  2. [Medical service of Russian Army in the First World War 1914-1918 (to the 95th anniversary of the beginning of war)].

    PubMed

    Korniushko, I G; Gladkikh, P F; Loktev, A E

    2009-08-01

    During the First World War 1914-1918 Russian Army hadn't a united medical service, military-medical affair was diluted in multiple governances. Evacuation of wounded and ill persons was an affair of Evacuation Governance of Main Governance the General Staff. Process of treatment in field and stationary medical formations was administered by sanitarium chiefs of armies and theaters of operation, bureaucrats of Russian Red Cross Society, Russian Union of Cities and Territorial Union. Supply by medical property, accounting and arrangement of medical staff was administered by Main Military-Sanitarium Governance, supply by sanitarium-household property--by Main Indent Governance, health resort affair--by Governance of Supreme chief of sanitarium and evacuation part in Empire of prince Ol'denburgskiy P.A. On the base of different sources were characterized casualty of Russian Army during the war. PMID:19916317

  3. Families in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... have led to deployment of large numbers of military personnel (active duty, Reserves, National Guard). As a result ... worries and plans for the future. Let your child know that the family member is making a ...

  4. WAR & Military Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

  5. Hydration Status in US Military Officer Students.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Reva; Cole, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Relocation from a cool to a hot climate is a frequent occurrence in military service. Acclimatization requires time and exposure to heat. Nonacclimatized individuals frequently consume inadequate fluid leading to hypohydration, which can quickly result in dehydration with increased risk of heat illness/injury. This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed the hydration status of 196 officers attending the US Army Medical Department's Officer Basic Course (67%) or Captain's Career Course (33%) in San Antonio, Texas, prior to taking the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT). Consenting Soldiers provided a first morning void urine sample and demographic survey (age, rank, sex, previous geographic location, etc) prior to the APFT. Height, weight, and APFT event scores were collected from a subject-coded, APFT scorecard without personal information data. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify variables that contribute to predicting hypohydration status. The sample population was 54% male, a mean age of 30 years, 5.2 years of military service, and a mean body mass index of 25 kg/m². Nearly one-third met the criteria for hypohydration (≥1.02 urine specific gravity). Soldiers who relocated from a cool environment within 9 days of taking the APFT had 2.1 higher odds of being hypohydrated compared with individuals who had resided in a hot environment for more than 9 days. Women had a 0.5 lower odds of being hypohydrated as compared to males. Significantly more Soldiers were hypohydrated on Monday compared to those tested on Tuesday (33% vs 16%, P=.004). Given these findings, the authors provided 5 recommendations to reduce the number of Soldiers exercising in a hypohydrated state. PMID:26874093

  6. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    .... Background In the April 14, 2010, issue of the Federal Register (75 FR 19302), the Army issued a proposed..., 2007 (72 FR 55864) that became effective on November 30, 2007. The Army received no comments on its... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of...

  7. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  8. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption. FOR FURTHER...

  9. Quality in Government: The Army Intern Intake Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungvarsky, Diane M.; Lilienthal, Richard A.

    The development of the Army Intern Intake Survey (AIIS) is described. The AIIS focuses on the Army civilian intern program, a vehicle for entry-level employees to progress in Army civilian jobs, which produces a profile of past and current interns. The AIIS will identify changes in intern quality over time and will make comparisons of Army interns…

  10. 75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: July 21, 2010....

  11. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  12. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  13. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting...

  14. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do.... General deliberations leading to provisional findings will be referred to the Army Education...

  15. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  16. A comparison of research utilization among nurses working in Canadian civilian and United States Army healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Kenny, Deborah J; Adewale, Adeniyi J; Cummings, Greta G; Mallidou, Anastasia A

    2007-06-01

    Researchers and theorists working in the field of knowledge translation point to the importance of organizational context in influencing research utilization. The study purpose was to compare research utilization in two different healthcare contexts--Canadian civilian and United States (US) Army settings. Contrary to the investigators' expectations, research utilization scores were lower in US Army settings, after controlling for potential predictors. In-service attendance, library access, belief suspension, gender, and years of experience interacted significantly with the setting (military or civilian) for research utilization. Predictors of research utilization common to both settings were attitude and belief suspension. Predictors in the US Army setting were trust and years of experience, and in the Canadian civilian setting were in-service attendance, time (organizational), research champion, and library access. While context is of central importance, individual and organizational predictors interact with context in important although not well-understood ways, and should not be ignored. PMID:17514725

  17. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  18. The Role of Army Nurse Practitioners Supporting Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C; Yackel, Edward; Prior, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Family nurse practitioners are an essential member of the military medical team. They were incorporated into the Army medical system almost as soon as there was an academic program to develop the role in primary care settings. The role for nurse practitioners during deployment has not been as clear. Even though they have been around for 50 years, the specific role nurse practitioners provide is still evolving. This article explores the incorporation of nurse practitioners into Army medicine with a focus on deployed medicine. Nurse practitioners have been shown to be very versatile providers with the requisite skill sets to meet the demands of the combat environment and are able to substitute for other medical assets that are critically short due to sustained conflict. Clarifying the value a nurse practitioner brings to medical care in the combat environment is essential to insure all assets are being employed to provide the best medical care to the US fighting force. PMID:27215868

  19. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  20. Creating and sustaining a military women's Health Research Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Candy; Trego, Lori; Rychnovsky, Jacqueline; Steele, Nancy; Foradori, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, four doctorate military nurse scientists representing the triservices (Army, Navy, and Air Force) identified a common interest in the health and care of all women in the armed forces. For 7 years, the team's shared vision to improve servicewomen's health inspired them to commit to a rigorous schedule of planning, developing, and implementing an innovative program that has the capability of advancing scientific knowledge and influencing health policy and practice through research. The ultimate goal of the Military Women's Health Research Interest Group (MWHRIG) is to support military clinicians and leaders in making evidence-based practice and policy decisions. They developed a 4-pronged approach to cultivate the science of military women's healthcare: evaluate the existing evidence, develop a research agenda that addresses gaps in knowledge, facilitate the collaboration of multidisciplinary research, and build the bench of future researchers. The MWHRIG has been a resource to key leaders; its value has been validated by multiservice and multidisciplinary consultations. However, the journey to goal attainment has only been achieved by the enduring commitment of these MWHRIG leaders and their passion to ensure the health and wellbeing of the many women who serve in the United States military. This article describes their journey of dedication. PMID:26101911

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of dietary supplement use by military personnel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a number of studies have been conducted on the prevalence of dietary supplement (DS) use in military personnel, these investigations have not been previously summarized. This article provides a systematic literature review of this topic. Methods Literature databases, reference lists, and other sources were searched to find studies that quantitatively examined the prevalence of DS use in uniformed military groups. Prevalence data were summarized by gender and military service. Where there were at least two investigations, meta-analysis was performed using a random model and homogeneity of the prevalence values was assessed. Results The prevalence of any DS use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 55%, 60%, 60%, and 61%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 65%, 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. Prevalence of multivitamin and/or multimineral (MVM) use for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 32%, 46%, 47%, and 41%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 40%, 55%, 63%, and 53%, respectively. Use prevalence of any individual vitamin or mineral supplement for Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps men was 18%, 27%, 25%, and 24%, respectively; for women corresponding values were 29%, 36%, 40%, and 33%, respectively. Men in elite military groups (Navy Special Operations, Army Rangers, and Army Special Forces) had a use prevalence of 76% for any DS and 37% for MVM, although individual studies were not homogenous. Among Army men, Army women, and elite military men, use prevalence of Vitamin C was 15% for all three groups; for Vitamin E, use prevalence was 8%, 7%, and 9%, respectively; for sport drinks, use prevalence was 22%, 25% and 39%, respectively. Use prevalence of herbal supplements was generally low compared to vitamins, minerals, and sport drinks, ≤5% in most investigations. Conclusions Compared to men, military women had a higher use prevalence of any DS and MVM. Army men and women tended to

  2. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  3. Army Distance Learning: Potential for Reducing Shortages in Army Enlisted Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Michael G.; Leonard, Henry A.; Winkler, John D.

    The potential of distance learning (DL) to expedite the U.S. Army's efforts to redress personnel shortages in Army enlisted occupations was studied by evaluating how DL-based training strategies might affect skill shortages in the following occupations: helicopter repairer; electronic switching system operator; microwave systems…

  4. Suicide prevention in an army infantry division: a multi-disciplinary program.

    PubMed

    James, L C; Kowalski, T J

    1996-02-01

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the 25th Infantry Division (Light) Suicide Prevention Program. A multidisciplinary intervention model, it outlines the role of chaplains and division mental health officers as well as indicators or warning signs relevant to army personnel who have committed suicide. Prevention strategies applicable to the military community, including Crisis Intervention Command Consultations, will be recommended. It is hoped that this information will not only assist professionals in identifying personnel at risk for suicide, but aid in the development of other suicide prevention programs. PMID:8857222

  5. The evolution of a school behavioral health model in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Faran, Michael E; Johnson, Patti L; Ban, Paul; Shue, Tracy; Weist, Mark D

    2015-04-01

    The US Army has developed an innovative School Behavioral Health (SBH) program, part of the Child and Family Behavioral Health System, a collaborative, consultative behavioral health care model that includes SBH, standardized training of primary care providers in treatment of common behavioral health problems, use of tele-consultation/tele-behavioral health, optimizing community outreach services, and integration with other related behavioral health services. In this article, the needs of military children, adolescents, and families are reviewed, a history of this initiative is presented, key themes are discussed, and next steps in advancing this evolving, innovative system of health care featuring SBH are described. PMID:25773333

  6. Health, Information, and Migration: Geographic Mobility of Union Army Veterans, 1860–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    This article explores how injuries, sickness, and the geographic mobility of Union Army veterans while in service affected their postservice migrations. Wartime wounds and illnesses significantly diminished the geographic mobility of veterans after the war. Geographic moves while carrying out military missions had strong positive effects on their postservice geographic mobility. Geographic moves while in service also influenced the choice of destination among the migrants. I discuss some implications of the results for the elements of self-selection in migration, the roles of different types of information in migration decisions, and the overall impact of the Civil War on geographic mobility. PMID:20234796

  7. Selective, annotated bibliography on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army. Volume II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeGlopper, D.R.; Savada, A.M.; Sismanidis, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    This bibliography series provides selective annotations of information published in open-source materials on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army. The bibliographies are arranged according to the following topics: General; Historical/Biographical; Ground Forces; Naval Forces; Air Force; Space; Missile; Nuclear; an Military Modernization. Entries have been derived primarily from Chinese and English language source material. An author, index and list of serials consulted are provided at the end of the volume. Illustrations derived from Chinese sources follow the title page of series supersedes.

  8. Selective, annotated bibliography on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army. Volume III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sismanidis, R.D.; Savada, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    This bibliography series provides selective annotations of information published in open-source materials on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army. The bibliographies are arranged according to the following topics: General; Historical/Biographical; Ground Forces; Naval Forces; Air Force; Space; Missile; Nuclear; an Military Modernization. Entries have been derived primarily from Chinese and English language source material. An author, index and list of serials consulted are provided at the end of the volume. Illustrations derived from Chinese sources follow the title page of series supersedes.

  9. Edgar Allan Poe: The Army Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, J. Thomas

    This issue of the United States Military Academy Library Bulletin reviews the reported facts of Poe's biography from his enlistment at the age of 15 to the termination of his military sojourn. The 1831 and the 1966 Corps of Cadets' subscriptions for Poe's "Poems" are also discussed, and a long-term inaccuracy regarding the poet's West Point…

  10. Early Roman military fortifications and the origin of Trieste, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Federico; Vinci, Giacomo; Horvat, Jana; De Min, Angelo; Forte, Emanuele; Furlani, Stefano; Lenaz, Davide; Pipan, Michele; Zhao, Wenke; Sgambati, Alessandro; Potleca, Michele; Micheli, Roberto; Fragiacomo, Andrea; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary study of the archaeological landscape of the Trieste area (northeastern Italy), mainly based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and archaeological surveys, has led to the discovery of an early Roman fortification system, composed of a big central camp (San Rocco) flanked by two minor forts. The most ancient archaeological findings, including a Greco–Italic amphora rim produced in Latium or Campania, provide a relative chronology for the first installation of the structures between the end of the third century B.C. and the first decades of the second century B.C. whereas other materials, such as Lamboglia 2 amphorae and a military footwear hobnail (type D of Alesia), indicate that they maintained a strategic role at least up to the mid first century B.C. According to archaeological data and literary sources, the sites were probably established in connection with the Roman conquest of the Istria peninsula in 178–177 B.C. They were in use, perhaps not continuously, at least until the foundation of Tergeste, the ancestor of Trieste, in the mid first century B.C. The San Rocco site, with its exceptional size and imposing fortifications, is the main known Roman evidence of the Trieste area during this phase and could correspond to the location of the first settlement of Tergeste preceding the colony foundation. This hypothesis would also be supported by literary sources that describe it as a phrourion (Strabo, V, 1, 9, C 215), a term used by ancient writers to designate the fortifications of the Roman army. PMID:25775558

  11. Early Roman military fortifications and the origin of Trieste, Italy.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Federico; Vinci, Giacomo; Horvat, Jana; De Min, Angelo; Forte, Emanuele; Furlani, Stefano; Lenaz, Davide; Pipan, Michele; Zhao, Wenke; Sgambati, Alessandro; Potleca, Michele; Micheli, Roberto; Fragiacomo, Andrea; Tuniz, Claudio

    2015-03-31

    An interdisciplinary study of the archaeological landscape of the Trieste area (northeastern Italy), mainly based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and archaeological surveys, has led to the discovery of an early Roman fortification system, composed of a big central camp (San Rocco) flanked by two minor forts. The most ancient archaeological findings, including a Greco-Italic amphora rim produced in Latium or Campania, provide a relative chronology for the first installation of the structures between the end of the third century B.C. and the first decades of the second century B.C. whereas other materials, such as Lamboglia 2 amphorae and a military footwear hobnail (type D of Alesia), indicate that they maintained a strategic role at least up to the mid first century B.C. According to archaeological data and literary sources, the sites were probably established in connection with the Roman conquest of the Istria peninsula in 178-177 B.C. They were in use, perhaps not continuously, at least until the foundation of Tergeste, the ancestor of Trieste, in the mid first century B.C. The San Rocco site, with its exceptional size and imposing fortifications, is the main known Roman evidence of the Trieste area during this phase and could correspond to the location of the first settlement of Tergeste preceding the colony foundation. This hypothesis would also be supported by literary sources that describe it as a phrourion (Strabo, V, 1, 9, C 215), a term used by ancient writers to designate the fortifications of the Roman army. PMID:25775558

  12. The development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army 1850-1918: equipping the RAMC for war.

    PubMed

    Atenstaedt, R L

    2010-09-01

    The recent 90 year anniversary of the end of the First World War is an opportune time to reconsider the important role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in this conflict. One area which has been neglected is the role of the Royal Army Medical Corps in responding to infectious diseases and to understand this properly it is important to consider the development of bacteriology, sanitation science and allied research in the British Army up to the Great War. The context of the home front is also central, with the British population from 1880-1914 increasingly benefiting from improved public sanitation and the new science of bacteriology. Historians acknowledge that the British campaign in the Crimea in the 1850s was pursued with inadequate medical provision and as a result, the Army suffered severely from infectious diseases. Limited changes were introduced after the Crimean War, such as the establishment of the Army Medical School, with its high quality instruction in military hygiene and later bacteriology. Army medics also led the way in various branches of scientific research, through research in the colonies. As compared with the continental powers, however, the application of bacteriology and sanitation to field craft in the British Army was delayed. It took the experiences of the South African and Russo-Japanese Wars for the importance of these sciences to be recognised by the Army as a whole. These subjects began to form part of the education of army Medical Officers, but training was basic and few trainees had specialised in bacteriology by 1914. In spite of these limitations, the Royal Army Medical Corps responded well to the demands placed upon it by World War One, recruiting civilian bacteriologists to its ranks, developing technological innovations such as mobile bacteriological laboratories for them to work in, forming a sanitation service and fostering medical research. PMID:20919615

  13. Bot armies as threats to network security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  14. Evaluating the Impact of Hospital Efficiency on Wellness in the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Nathaniel D; Kang, Hyojung; Swenson, Eric R; Fulton, Lawrence V; Griffin, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    Like all health care delivery systems, the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System (MHS) strives to achieve top preventative care and population health outcomes for its members while operating at an efficient level and containing costs. The objective of this study is to understand the overall efficiency performance of military hospitals and investigate the relationship between efficiency and wellness. This study uses data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis to compare the efficiency of 128 military treatment facilities from the Army, Navy, and Air Force during the period of 2011 to 2013. Fixed effects panel regression is used to determine the association between the hospital efficiency and wellness scores. The results indicate that data envelopment analysis and stochastic frontier analysis efficiency scores are congruent in direction. Both results indicate that the majority of the MHS hospitals and clinics can potentially improve their productive efficiency by managing their input resources better. When comparing the performance of the three military branches of service, Army hospitals as a group outperformed their Navy and Air Force counterparts; thus, best practices from the Army should be shared across service components. The findings also suggest no statistically significant, positive association between efficiency and wellness over time in the MHS. PMID:27483520

  15. Risk Factors for Accident Death in the U.S. Army, 2004–2009

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Peterson, Christopher; Berglund, Patricia A.; Collins, Stacey; Cox, Kenneth; Hauret, Keith; Jones, Bruce; Kessler, Ronald C.; Mitchell, Colter; Park, Nansook; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accidents are one of the leading causes of death among U.S. active duty Army soldiers. Evidence-based approaches to injury prevention could be strengthened by adding person-level characteristics (e.g., demographics) to risk models tested on diverse soldier samples studied over time. Purpose To identify person-level risk indicators of accident deaths in Regular Army soldiers during a time frame of intense military operations, and to discriminate risk of not-line-of-duty (NLOD) from line-of-duty (LOD) accident deaths. Methods Administrative data acquired from multiple Army/Department of Defense sources for active duty Army soldiers during 2004–2009 were analyzed in 2013. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify person-level sociodemographic, service-related, occupational, and mental health predictors of accident deaths. Results Delayed rank progression or demotion and being male, unmarried, in a combat arms specialty, and of low rank/service length increased odds of accident death for enlisted soldiers. Unique to officers was high risk associated with aviation specialties. Accident death risk decreased over time for currently deployed, enlisted soldiers while increasing for those never deployed. Mental health diagnosis was associated with risk only for previous and never-deployed, enlisted soldiers. Models did not discriminate NLOD from LOD accident deaths. Conclusions Adding more refined person-level and situational risk indicators to current models could enhance understanding of accident death risk specific to soldier rank and deployment status. Stable predictors could help identify high risk of accident deaths in future cohorts of Regular Army soldiers. PMID:25441238

  16. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  17. Noise induced hearing loss in military helicopter aircrew--a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Owen, J P

    1995-06-01

    Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) has been recognised for some time. In the military environment one group of personnel at risk are Army helicopter aircrew who are exposed to continuous noise levels of up to 100 dB(A) in flight. The evidence for the damaging effect of this occupational noise is reviewed and some of the difficulties in drawing conclusions are highlighted. The current protection offered for the Mk 4 helmet is discussed and the incorporation of Active Noise Reduction (ANR) is suggested as a likely way of ensuring that the in-flight noise exposure in Army aircrew is kept as low as possible. PMID:7562746

  18. Army Reserve Comprehensive Water Efficiency Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Kearney, Jaime

    2015-04-14

    The Army Reserve has partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop comprehensive water assessments for numerous Army Reserve Centers in all five regions including the Pacific islands and Puerto Rico, and at Fort Buchanan and Fort Hunter Liggett. The objective of these assessments is to quantify water use at the site, and identify innovative water efficiency projects that can be implemented to help reduce water demand and increase efficiency. Several of these assessments have focused on a strategic plan for achieving net zero water to help meet the Army’s Net Zero Directive . The Army Reserve has also leveraged this approach as part of the energy conservation investment program (ECIP), energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs), and utility energy service contracts (UESCs). This article documents the process involved.

  19. [Combat burn injury. The Afghanistan and Iraq military campaign experience].

    PubMed

    Ivchenko, E V; Golota, A S; Kondratenko, D G; Krassiĭ, A B

    2014-08-01

    The current article briefly reviews the experience of combat burns care obtained in the course of 2001-2013 military campaign in Afghanistan and Iraq as it has been covered in the foreign scientific medical publications. The following topics are covered: statistics, the prehospital medical care, aeromedical evacuation, the Burn Center of the US Army Institute of Surgical Research. The new method.of the .initial intravenous infusion rate estimation, so called the "Rule of 10 formula, is marked: At the end, the list of freely available publications summarized the modern combat burns care experience is presented. PMID:25546957

  20. NASA MODIS Products For Military Land Monitoring and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozar, R. C.; Balbach, H. E.

    2002-12-01

    The US Army Corps on Engineers Engineering Research and Development Center, ERDC-CERL, is using MODIS products to study a large portion of the Sandhills and Sonora Desert ecoregions for monitoring ecosystem wide condition and provide a basis for military installation encroachment indicators. Because of the extent of these areas, MODIS products provide a practical input to regularly and inexpensively support the monitoring initiative. Here we illustrate how MODIS products have potential applications within an automated framework (e.g. ATtILA and FragStats) and on a case-by-case basis.

  1. The military healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Shelton, H H

    2001-09-01

    Throughout our Nation's history, healthcare has been a prominent issue for the military. TRICARE is the managed healthcare program for active duty and retired members of the uniformed services, their families, and survivors. During the past few years, the Joint Chiefs of Staff have put forth a concerted effort to work with the Congress and the Administration to ensure that TRICARE provides high quality healthcare for all members of the uniformed services, our retirees, and their families. Ensuring quality medical care for military retirees honors a promise made to those currently serving and to those who served their country in the past. PMID:11569432

  2. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  3. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  4. [Veterinary relations between Germany and Turkey on the military level at the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Doğanay-Feldhaus, S

    1991-09-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century the veterinary relations between Turkey and Germany intensified at the military level. After the Balkan Wars there were urgent attempts to reorganize the army, which lead to the visit of a German military mission under General L. von Sanders, who was appointed to review the army. Along with other members of the German military mission A. Thieme (1881-1949) belonged to the staff of the Turkish Army's Supreme Command as orderly officer and as advisory army veterinarian. During the First World War (1914-1918) there were 44 German veterinary officers, 23 in Turkish and 21 in German uniform. The veterinary officers in Turkish formations were assigned to the military mission, where the veterinary major Dr. K. Dreyer served as official adviser. Moreover mixed German-Turkish special units were formed under German leadership in Turkey, which included German veterinary officers in German uniform. The higher salaries were paid to the German veterinary officers than their Turkish colleagues by the Turkish government. As far as can gathered three German officers perished in Turkey. PMID:1954861

  5. Perceptions of Leader Attributes and Satisfaction with Military Life. Personnel Accession and Utilization Technical Area. Technical Paper 307.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleda, Paul R.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study assessed the relative degree of association between quality of army life and perceived attributes of different types of leaders. Interviews with one hundred thirty lower ranking enlisted personnel provided information about soldiers' satisfaction with various facets of military experience and their perceptions of the behavior of…

  6. Net Zero Fort Carson: Integrating Energy, Water, and Waste Strategies to Lower the Environmental Impact of a Military Base

    EPA Science Inventory

    Military bases resemble small cities and face similar sustainability challenges. As pilot studies in the U.S. Army Net Zero program, 17 locations are moving to 100% renewable energy, zero depletion of water resources, and/or zero waste to landfill by 2020. Some bases target net z...

  7. Career perspective: Ralph F. Goldman—military ergonomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Military Ergonomics is a name I made up when the Commander at the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) told me 'The Surgeon General wants to give you a Research Division of your own.’ I demurred, saying 'That would make me an Administrator, and I prefer research,’ but the C.O. (who was a friend) insisted, saying that what I wanted had no impact on what the General wanted and I had to become the Director of either the Heat, Cold, Work, or Altitude Divisions. Thinking fast, I said 'I want the “Military Ergonomics Division” ’, and when he asked 'What's that?’ I said 'That's good- it means I can continue my studies on the effects of heat, cold, terrain, load carried, clothing, food, & water intake on troops.’ PMID:24313972

  8. Substance Abuse in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although illicit drug use is lower among U.S. military personnel than among civilians, heavy alcohol and tobacco use, ... in identifying and treating substance use problems in military personnel, as does lack of confidentiality that deters many ...

  9. Preventing Suicides in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Preventing Suicides Preventing Suicides in the Military Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Family Hotline 1-800-984-8523 Read More "Preventing Suicides" Articles Preventing Suicides in the Military / Who's ...

  10. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  11. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  12. From the laboratory to the soldier: providing tactical behaviors for Army robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knichel, David G.; Bruemmer, David J.

    2008-04-01

    The Army Future Combat System (FCS) Operational Requirement Document has identified a number of advanced robot tactical behavior requirements to enable the Future Brigade Combat Team (FBCT). The FBCT advanced tactical behaviors include Sentinel Behavior, Obstacle Avoidance Behavior, and Scaled Levels of Human-Machine control Behavior. The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, (TRADOC) Maneuver Support Center (MANSCEN) has also documented a number of robotic behavior requirements for the Army non FCS forces such as the Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT), Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT), and Heavy Brigade Combat Team (HBCT). The general categories of useful robot tactical behaviors include Ground/Air Mobility behaviors, Tactical Mission behaviors, Manned-Unmanned Teaming behaviors, and Soldier-Robot Interface behaviors. Many DoD research and development centers are achieving the necessary components necessary for artificial tactical behaviors for ground and air robots to include the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM), Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center, US Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and non DoD labs such as Department of Energy (DOL). With the support of the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE) through DoD and non DoD labs the Army Maneuver Support Center has recently concluded successful field trails of ground and air robots with specialized tactical behaviors and sensors to enable semi autonomous detection, reporting, and marking of explosive hazards to include Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) and landmines. A specific goal of this effort was to assess how collaborative behaviors for multiple unmanned air and ground vehicles can reduce risks to Soldiers and increase efficiency for on and off route explosive hazard detection, reporting, and marking. This paper discusses experimental results achieved with a robotic countermine system

  13. Development of the Army thermal oxidation lube oil tester

    SciTech Connect

    Valtierra, M.; Lestz, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a bench-scale test capable of evaluating ground vehicle engine and gear lubricant performance in the area of oil deposition. The test should be capable of providing initial screening for candidate military specification lubricants, oil base stocks, and re-refined oils and should correlate with full-scale engine tests. The following conclusions may be drawn from this work: (1) the Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory-developed LUBTOT, thermal oxidation lube oil tester appears to be an effective test device for evaluating lubricants regarding oil deposits that are formed under a set of controlled test conditions. The tester has several distinct advantages, namely: ease of controlling test variables, small oil sample required, ease of cleaning between tests, simple unbias deposit rating method, and low cost per test; (2) the test method developed thus far does correlate with some of the Caterpillar single-cylinder reference tests. However, the method does not correlate with the 1-D, 1-H, and 1-H2 test results performed on selected REO oils; (3) the LUBTOT appears to be capable of differentiating between different re-refined base stock, which can be important in identifying base stock consistency; and (4) the LUBTOT can determine the effectiveness of the additive package in formulated oils regarding oil deposits caused by high-temperature operation.

  14. Guidelines for return to duty (play) after heat illness: a military perspective.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Francis G; Williams, Aaron D; Blivin, Steve; Heled, Yuval; Deuster, Patricia; Flinn, Scott D

    2007-08-01

    Since Biblical times, heat injuries have been a major focus of military medical personnel. Heat illness accounts for considerable morbidity during recruit training and remains a common cause of preventable nontraumatic exertional death in the United States military. This brief report describes current regulations used by Army, Air Force, and Navy medical personnel to return active duty warfighters who are affected by a heat illness back to full duty. In addition, a description of the profile system used in evaluating the different body systems, and how it relates to military return to duty, are detailed. Current guidelines require clinical resolution, as well as a profile that that protects a soldier through repeated heat cycles, prior to returning to full duty. The Israeli Defense Force, in contrast, incorporates a heat tolerance test to return to duty those soldiers afflicted by heat stroke, which is briefly described. Future directions for U.S. military medicine are discussed. PMID:17923729

  15. Hypertension in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alys; Holdsworth, D A; D'Arcy, J; Bailey, K; Casadei, B

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension and hypertension-related diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A diagnosis of hypertension can have serious occupational implications for military personnel. This article examines the diagnosis and management of hypertension in military personnel, in the context of current international standards. We consider the consequences of hypertension in the military environment and potential military-specific issues relating to hypertension. PMID:26253125

  16. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. PMID:24434764

  17. Improving the Classroom Performance of Army Instructors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melching, William H.; Larson, Susan M.

    Using "A Model of the Functions of Master Instructor" (HumRRO-TR-73-23) as a guide, procedures and materials for training Army instructors to improve their classroom effectiveness were developed. In constructing the model, various materials on instructor characteristics and responsibilities in four main areas (training programs, classroom…

  18. Army health care operations in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Young, Richard S K; Gillan, Eileen; Dingmann, Philip; Casinelli, Paul; Taylor, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Four years of warfare in the urban environment of Iraq have produced fundamental changes in the Army's health-care system. First, improved communications and air evacuation have streamlined the transport of the wounded soldierfrom the battlefield to stateside medical centers. Second, individual ballistic armor has decreased the number of U.S. troops killed while the number of wounded soldiers has increased. Third, battling an unseen enemy has produced a marked increase in acute stress disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Deployment of soldiers with chronic mental health disorders such as anxiety, attention deficit disorder, and depression is problematic. The stress of long combat tours has doubled the incidence of abuse and neglect in children of deployed service members. Comparedto active-componentsoldiers, the prevalence ofmental health disorders is twice as great in soldiers of the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. Finally, the difficulty in determining friend vs. foe in Iraq results in the incarceration of thousands of Iraqis creating both medical and ethical challenges for Army physicians. PMID:18286877

  19. Handbook on Volunteers in Army Community Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This handbook has been prepared for the purpose of offering guidance and assistance in the development and administration of a volunteer program within Army Community Service. It contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 is the Introduction. Chapter 2, Volunteers Are Partners and Team Members, considers the importance of attitudes, agreement on volunteer…

  20. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting: U.S... issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study techniques, assemble a working ] group for the concentrated review of institutional policies and a working group to address...

  1. 76 FR 12087 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Dates of Meeting: March 24, 2011. Place of Meeting: U.S... issues; assess resident and distance education programs, self- study techniques, assemble a working group for the concentrated review of institutional policies and a working group to address...

  2. Old Challenges and New Perspectives on Developing Military Physicians: The First 4 Years of the New Israeli Model.

    PubMed

    Hartal, Michael; Yavnai, Nirit; Yaniv, Gal; Gertz, S David; Fleshler, Erica; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2016-02-01

    Military medicine comprises a set of unique characteristics that differentiate it from other medical specialties. Faced with challenges in recruiting, educating, and training military physicians, the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps redefined the paradigm for educating military physicians by establishing the Army Program for Excellence in medicine (APEX). This program created a military medical track at the Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Medicine in Jerusalem. All military track students attend a single medical school, which allows for a more focused and efficient program. The students study, dorm, and train together, forming a strong social network. They also receive significant financial, logistical, academic, and educational support. Finally, the program provides a full curriculum in military medical studies, composed of academic courses given for credits and an integrated training schedule designed to build and improve physical and mental fitness for the military environment. In this article, we provide an overview of APEX, including the admissions process and a descriptive analysis of the student body, and present our comprehensive approach to teaching academic military medicine. To the best of our knowledge, APEX represents one of the few fully integrated undergraduate longitudinal military medical education programs, allowing us to educate military physicians "from day one." PMID:26837081

  3. Evaluation of CS (o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile) concentrations during U.S. Army mask confidence training.

    PubMed

    Hout, Joseph J; Kluchinsky, Timothy; LaPuma, Peter T; White, Duvel W

    2011-10-01

    All soldiers in the U.S. Army are required to complete mask confidence training with o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS). To instill confidence in the protective capability of the military protective mask, CS is thermally dispersed in a room where soldiers wearing military protective masks are required to conduct various physical exercises, break the seal of their mask, speak, and remove their mask. Soldiers immediately feel the irritating effects of CS when the seal of the mask is broken, which reinforces the mask's ability to shield the soldier from airborne chemical hazards. In the study described in this article, the authors examined the CS concentration inside a mask confidence chamber operated in accordance with U.S. Army training guidelines. The daily average CS concentrations ranged from 2.33-3.29 mg/m3 and exceeded the threshold limit value ceiling, the recommended exposure limit ceiling, and the concentration deemed immediately dangerous to life and health. The minimum and maximum CS concentration used during mask confidence training should be evaluated. PMID:22010329

  4. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter research focusing on the past 25 years.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, Kent B; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W; Young, Andrew J; Zambraski, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of pocket guides providing guidance for sustaining Warfighter health and performance in Southwest Asia, Somalia, the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Haiti. Issues identified during Operation Desert Storm elicited research that improved nutritional guidelines for protracted desert operations; safer use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective clothing; equipment, development, and fielding of efficient microclimate cooling systems; and effective evaluation of pharmaceuticals to protect soldiers from chemical and biological threats. During the first decade of the 21st century, USARIEM and the Department of the Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism focused research to improve doctrines for hot, cold, and high-altitude operations, reduce musculoskeletal training injuries, provide improved field nutrition, more efficient planning for operational water requirements, and improve both military clothing and materiel. This article also describes the critically important interactions and communications between USARIEM and deployed units and the benefits to Warfighters from this association. This report presents USARIEM's unique and world-class facilities, organizational changes, scientific and support personnel, and major research accomplishments, including the publication of 2,200 scientific papers over the past 25 yr. PMID:22139770

  5. Spousal Military Deployment During Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Amy; Schiff, Melissa A; Davis, Beth E

    2016-03-01

    Pregnant women with a military-deployed spouse have increased risk of depression and self-reported stress. In nonmilitary populations, depression and stress during pregnancy are associated with adverse birth outcomes. This study assesses the association between a spouse's military deployment and adverse birth outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a large military medicine center in the Northwest and evaluated records of singleton deliveries to dependent Army spouses from September 2001 to September 2011. We used logistic regression to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the associations between deployment and low birth weight (<2,500 g), preterm delivery (<37 weeks), small for gestational age (SGA, <10 percentile for gestational age), and cesarean delivery. We identified 10,536 births; 1,364 (12.9%) spouses were deployed at delivery. No associations were observed in the overall population. Among women with two or more children, we observed an 81% increased risk of SGA (95% CI 1.18-2.79). Women 30 to 34 years old had an 82% (95% CI 1.06-3.14) increased risk of low birth weight and an 84% increased risk of SGA (95% CI 1.13-2.98). Deployment's effects vary by maternal age and the number of children in the household. These findings may inform programs and practitioners to best serve women with military-deployed spouses. PMID:26926749

  6. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    PubMed

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology. PMID:25102529

  7. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  8. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  9. Brief Report: Sexual Risk Behaviors of HIV Seroconverters in the US Army, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Stephanie L.; Pacha, Laura A.; Peel, Sheila A.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Cersovsky, Steven B.; Scott, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The United States (US) Army implemented a comprehensive HIV characterization program in 2012 following repeal of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy banning openly homosexual individuals from serving in the US military. Program staff administered a standardized case report form to soldiers newly diagnosed with HIV from 2012 to 2014 in compliance with new program requirements. The case report form documented sociodemographic, sexual, and other risk behavior information elicited from US Army regulation-mandated epidemiologic interviews at initial HIV notification. A majority of HIV-infected soldiers were male and of black/African American racial origin. In the HIV risk period, male soldiers commonly reported male–male sexual contact, civilian partners, online partner-seeking, unprotected anal sex, and expressed surprise at having a positive HIV result. Don't Ask, Don't Tell repeal allows for risk screening and reduction interventions targeting a newly identifiable risk category in the US Army. At-risk populations need to be identified and assessed for possible unmet health needs. PMID:26247893

  10. Recent Advances in Forward Surgical Team Training at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Department.

    PubMed

    Allen, Casey J; Straker, Richard J; Murray, Clark R; Hannay, William M; Hanna, Mena M; Meizoso, Jonathan P; Manning, Ronald J; Schulman, Carl I; Seery, Jason M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2016-06-01

    U.S. Army Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) are elite, multidisciplinary units that are highly mobile, and rapidly deployable. The mission of the FST is to provide resuscitative and damage control surgery for stabilization of life-threatening injuries in austere environments. The Army Trauma Training Center began in 2001 at the University of Miami Ryder Trauma Center under the direction of COL T. E. Knuth, MC USA (Ret.), as a multimodality combination of lectures, laboratory exercises, and clinical experiences that provided the only predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training center for all FSTs. Each of the subsequent five directors has restructured the training based on dynamic feedback from trainees, current military needs, and on the rapid advances in combat casualty care. We have highlighted these evolutionary changes at the Army Trauma Training Center in previous reviews. Under the current director, LTC J. M. Seery, MC USA, there are new team-building exercises, mobile learning modules and simulators, and other alternative methods in the mass casualty exercise. This report summarizes the latest updates to the state of the art training since the last review. PMID:27244065

  11. Brief Report: Sexual Risk Behaviors of HIV Seroconverters in the US Army, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Hakre, Shilpa; Scoville, Stephanie L; Pacha, Laura A; Peel, Sheila A; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Cersovsky, Steven B; Scott, Paul T

    2015-12-01

    The United States (US) Army implemented a comprehensive HIV characterization program in 2012 following repeal of the Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy banning openly homosexual individuals from serving in the US military. Program staff administered a standardized case report form to soldiers newly diagnosed with HIV from 2012 to 2014 in compliance with new program requirements. The case report form documented sociodemographic, sexual, and other risk behavior information elicited from US Army regulation-mandated epidemiologic interviews at initial HIV notification. A majority of HIV-infected soldiers were male and of black/African American racial origin. In the HIV risk period, male soldiers commonly reported male-male sexual contact, civilian partners, online partner-seeking, unprotected anal sex, and expressed surprise at having a positive HIV result. Don't Ask, Don't Tell repeal allows for risk screening and reduction interventions targeting a newly identifiable risk category in the US Army. At-risk populations need to be identified and assessed for possible unmet health needs. PMID:26247893

  12. [Sanitary reform in the British army: introducing knowledge about practical healthcare].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuriko

    2008-03-01

    This paper focuses on the development of healthcare and health instruction in the British army in the late nineteenth to twentieth centuries. Knowledge of health, nutrition and cooking could be just as important for men as for women, even though men did not have so many opportunities to know about these things in civilian life. In fact, the greatest chance for men to learn about healthcare was in military service. Its necessity, especially regarding personal care, was acknowledged at the time of the Crimean war, although it took a long time to put improvements into practice. Cookery developed as an effective way to deliver practical knowledge about health to soldiers; indeed, cooking and healthcare instruction became a part ofArmy regulations and medical officers expected that the instruction given would translate into useful common sense for later life. Cookery education started as training for hospital cooks; later it extended to individual cooking for troops in the field. For many young men, therefore, joining the armed forces provided a unique opportunity to alter their unhealthy life style, not only for the sake of the Army but for their own benefit and that of society at large. PMID:19048810

  13. Suicides and suicide attempts in the U.S. Military, 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nigel E; Reger, Mark A; Luxton, David D; Skopp, Nancy A; Kinn, Julie; Smolenski, Derek; Gahm, Gregory A

    2013-06-01

    The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report Program collects extensive information on suicides and suicide attempts from the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy. Data are compiled on demographics, suicide event details, behavioral health treatment history, military history, and information about other potential risk factors such as psychosocial stressors that were present at the time of the event. The ultimate goal of this standardized suicide surveillance program is to assist suicide prevention in the U.S. military. Descriptive data are presented on 816 suicides and 1,514 suicide attempts reported through the program between 2008 and 2010. PMID:23330611

  14. Strategies for optimizing military physical readiness and preventing musculoskeletal injuries in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Williams, Thomas J; Deuster, Patricia A; Butler, Nikki L; Jones, Bruce H

    2013-01-01

    With downsizing of the military services and significant budget cuts, it will be more important than ever to optimize the health and performance of individual service members. Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) represent a major threat to the health and fitness of Soldiers and other service members that degrade our nation's ability to project military power. This affects both financial (such as the economic burden from medical, healthcare, and disability costs) and human manpower resources (Soldiers medically unable to optimally perform their duties and to deploy). For example, in 2012, MSIs represented the leading cause of medical care visits across the military services resulting in almost 2,200,000 medical encounters. They also result in more disability discharges than any other health condition. Nonbattle injuries (NBIs) have caused more medical evacuations (34%) from recent theaters of operation than any other cause including combat injuries. Physical training and sports are the main cause of these NBIs. The majority (56%) of these injuries are the direct result of physical training. Higher levels of physical fitness protect against such injuries; however, more physical training to improve fitness also causes higher injury rates. Thus, military physical training programs must balance the need for fitness with the risks of injuries. The Army has launched several initiatives that may potentially improve military physical readiness and reduce injuries. These include the US Army Training and Doctrine Command's Baseline Soldier Physical Readiness Requirements and Gender Neutral Physical Performance Standards studies, as well as the reimplementation of the Master Fitness Trainer program and the Army Medical Command's Soldier Medical Readiness and Performance Triad Campaigns. It is imperative for military leaders to understand that military physical readiness can be enhanced at the same time that MSIs are prevented. A strategic paradigm shift in the military's approach

  15. Variable Mortality From the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic During Military Training.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis; Burroughs, Steven; Sohn, Joshua D; Waters, Norman C; Smith, Virginia F; Waller, Michael; Brundage, John F

    2016-08-01

    During the 1918-1919 pandemic, influenza mortality widely varied across populations and locations. Records of U.S. military members in mobilization camps (n = 40), military academies, and officer training schools were examined to document differences in influenza experiences during the fall 1918. During the fall-winter 1918-1919, mortality percentages were higher among soldiers in U.S. Army mobilization camps (0.34-4.3%) than among officer trainees (0-1.0%). Susceptibility to infection and clinical expressions of 1918 pandemic influenza varied largely based on host epidemiological characteristics rather than the inherent virulence of the virus. PMID:27483527

  16. [Typhus fever morbidity among the military personnel and civilians in the regions around Volga river during World War I].

    PubMed

    Raĭkova, S V; Zav'ialov, A I

    2013-07-01

    The article is concerned to the materials about epidemiologic situation of typhus fever in the regions around Volga river (Saratovsky, Samarsky and others) during World War I (1914-1918) among the military personnel of the Russian army and among the civilians. The main reasons for spread of infection, ways of the transmission, and also measures for decreasing of level of morbidity on the different stages of evacuation of patients with typhus fever in the safer hospitals are shown. The most important methods of fighting against epidemic of typhus fever were: isolation of patients in separate special hospitals, desincection and disinfection measures in the foci of infection and organization appropriate sanitary conditions for military man in the army and among civilians. Acquired valuable experience of territorial and military doctors during the period of epidemic of typhus fever allowed receiving complex effective antiepidemic measures of fighting and prevention from this disease. PMID:24341012

  17. Promoting Health During the American Occupation of Japan The Public Health Section, Kyoto Military Government Team, 1945-1949

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Sey

    2008-01-01

    During the American occupation of Japan (1945–1952), young public health officers from the US Army Medical Corps were posted in local US Army military government teams. These young doctors (aged 25 to 27 years), who had not absorbed the strong anti-Japanese tradition of the US military during World War II, seem to have alleviated the initial resentment felt by the Japanese toward the new governors of their homeland. The case of the Kyoto Military Government Team illustrates the Kyoto citizenry’s positive view of some American-directed public health measures. The team’s services helped to counter widely held negative views on colonialism, occupation, and public health; lessened resentment toward the unilateral command structure of the occupation forces; and contributed to improved relations between the United States and Japan at the local level. PMID:18235076

  18. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six component Army STARRS studies. These include: an integrated study of historical administrative data systems (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e., those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQ] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. DoD/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of Military Macaw (Ara militaris): its comparison with mitogenomes of two other Ara species.

    PubMed

    Dawid Urantowka, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The Military Macaw is one of the eight species of the genus Ara. The genus is one of six genera, which form morphologically diverse group termed as Macaws. Parrots of this group differ in body size on demand of the genus and species. Six of Ara species are classified as large Macaws. Based on morphological similarities and differences, these species can be segregated into three pairs according to their plumage coloration. Representative mitochondrial genomes were sequenced only for A. glaucogularis (blue and yellow coloration) and A. macao (predominantly red/scarlet). Ara militaris is one of two predominantly green species and full mitochondrial genome of considered species was sequenced in this study. It's comparison with A. glaucogularis and A. macao mitogenomes revealed higher degree of identity between militaris and macao sequences than between militaris and glaucogularis mtDNAs. Ara militaris mitogenome will be indispensable to refine the phylogenetic relationships within Macaw group. PMID:25703844

  20. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  1. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  2. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section 644.416 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... works lands. The Secretary of the Army is authorized to exchange lands acquired for river and harbor...

  3. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581... REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section)...

  4. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  5. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581... REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section)...

  6. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  7. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1... § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions—(1) Constitution, purpose, and jurisdiction of review board. (i) The Army Disability Review Board (called the review board in this section) is...

  8. "Panic": the impact of Le Bon's crowd psychology on U.S. military thought.

    PubMed

    Bendersky, Joseph W

    2007-01-01

    The controversial crowd psychology of Gustave Le Bon has been both praised as an incisive contribution to social theory and also condemned as a doctrine of irrationality and mass manipulation associated with fascism. New archival documentation now demonstrates that Le Bon exercised significant influence on U.S. military thinking and practice through World War II. Army writings and officer training on morale, leadership, and battlefield psychology rested substantially on his theory of crowds, particularly regarding races and panic. Le Bon's racial psychology took on additional importance when the African-American 92 nd Infantry Division panicked during combat in Italy. This new evidence offers an excellent case study of the direct and enduring impact of a peculiar type of social psychology on the institutional culture of the army from the classrooms at the Army War College to the battlefield itself. PMID:17623871

  9. [The Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, V B; Abashin, V G; Polovinka, V S

    2014-05-01

    The article is devoted to activity of the Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War. The research is based on declassified orders of PCD and orders of the chef of hospital. Authors presented the role of the hospital in organization of medical aid for officers of PCD, members of their families, Red Army soldiers, junior and senior Red Army commanders; the role of the hospital in organization of medical facilities for combat army; medical supply for evacuation of family members of PCD's officers ( en route and in evacuation places); delivery of child health care to children of officers of PCD in the hospital and education in kindergartens of PCD. PMID:25286563

  10. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  11. Active coatings technologies for tailorable military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of the U.S. Army's Active Coatings Technologies Program is to develop technologies that can be used in combination to tailor coatings for utilization on Army Materiel. The Active Coatings Technologies Program, ACT, is divided into several thrusts, including the Smart Coatings Materiel Program, Munitions Coatings Technologies, Active Sensor packages, Systems Health Monitoring, Novel Technology Development, as well as other advanced technologies. The goal of the ACT Program is to conduct research leading to the development of multiple coatings systems for use on various military platforms, incorporating unique properties such as self repair, selective removal, corrosion resistance, sensing, ability to modify coatings' physical properties, colorizing, and alerting logistics staff when tanks or weaponry require more extensive repair. A partnership between the U.S. Army Corrosion Office at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ along with researchers at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ, Clemson University, SC, University of New Hampshire, NH, and University of Massachusetts (Lowell), MA, are developing the next generation of Smart Coatings Materiel via novel technologies such as nanotechnology, Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS), meta-materials, flexible electronics, electrochromics, electroluminescence, etc. This paper will provide the reader with an overview of the Active Coatings Technologies Program, including an update of the on-going Smart Coatings Materiel Program, its progress thus far, description of the prototype Smart Coatings Systems and research tasks as well as future nanotechnology concepts, and applications for the Department of Defense.

  12. Poor Design and Management Hamper Army's Basic Skills Education Program. Report to the Secretary of the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) was studied to consider whether it was properly designed to determine the basic skills needed in Army jobs and to be effectively implemented. Information and reports on BSEP were reviewed, and three major commands were selected for evaluation. In designing the program, the Army did not identify the…

  13. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

  14. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... records of the soldier or former soldier obtained from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). (6) The... behalf, missing, or deceased. Depending on the circumstances, a child, spouse, parent or other close relative, heir, or legal representative (such as a guardian or executor) of the soldier or former...

  15. [The technique of army nursing in the Meiji period].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y

    1994-06-01

    It was in the nineteenth year of Meiji that Japan introduced the modern nursing system from Europe on the nation-wide level. But the Japanese army introduced the new nursing system from the sixth year of Meiji. For that reason, I studied whether the technique of the army nursing system was modern or not. Since the technical level of the nursing system is represented by the teaching methods and text books, I studied these aspects of the Japanese army nursing system. As the result, I confirmed that the army nursing system was modern. The Japanese army was the first to introduce the modern nursing system from Europe in Japan. PMID:11639784

  16. Influence of oral health on combat readiness in the Croatian army.

    PubMed

    Skec, Vjekoslav; Macan, Darko; Spicek, Jasna; Susac, Marija; Luksić, Ivica

    2002-12-01

    The impact of the acute stomatological conditions on the reducing of the combat readiness is an important responsibility for the military planners. Classification of dental health is the primary condition for research and assessment of the army dental readiness for combat. Clinical examination of teeth and mouth included 912 soldiers, 650 of whom were recruits and 262 active duty military personnel. According to their oral status, the examinees were divided into three classes. Class 1 included all those examinees that did not require any dental treatment or reevaluation within 12 months. Class 2 included all of the examinees whose oral health was such that if regularly controlled or followed up, they were not expected to have a dental emergency within 12 months. Class 3 included all of the examinees that required dental treatment to correct both their dental and oral health because the present condition was likely to cause acute stomatological conditions during the 12-month period. This survey designated 130 (14.3%) of the examinees to class 1,178 (19.5%) to class 2, and 604 (66.2%) to class 3. The combat readiness of the 604 (66.2%) examinees in the third class was reduced because a dental emergency can cause the need for dental treatment. The recruits do not have satisfactory dental status even at the beginning of their army service. Unfortunately, active duty military personnel do not have satisfactory dental status either, although they have access to cost-free dental care (prosthetics and orthodontics are not included). This increases the possibility for development of dental emergencies that would have a negative impact on combat readiness. PMID:12502177

  17. Transforming US Army trauma care: an evidence-based review of the trauma literature.

    PubMed

    Remick, Kyle N; Dickerson, James A; Nessen, Shawn C; Rush, Robert M; Beilman, Greg J

    2010-01-01

    The US Army has been charged to transform to meet the demands of current and anticipated near-future combat needs, covering a full spectrum of military operations. The US Army combat trauma care system was created to deliver combat casualty care in a variety of situations and has been adapted to meet the needs of such care in both Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Questions related to our current system include the use and positioning of medical evacuation assets, the type of training for our trauma care providers, the positioning of these providers in proximity to the battlefield, and the type of units most suited to the wide variety of medical operations required of today's military medical team. The review was performed to evaluate available information in light of anticipated future needs to ensure preparedness. We reviewed trauma literature regarding the areas of civilian trauma systems, military trauma systems, presurgical trauma care, medical evacuation times, and the medical evacuation system. Among the conclusions drawn from the reviewed data include the following: regional trauma systems improve outcomes in significantly-injured patients; rural trauma care as part of a trauma system yields improved results compared to nontrauma hospitals and comparable results to those at a higher level center; and delivery of advanced trauma life support care has the potential to extend the period of time of safe medical evacuation to surgical capabilities. These lessons are used to discuss components of an improved system of trauma care, flexible for the varied needs of modern battlefield trauma and adaptable to provide support for anticipated future conflicts. PMID:21181650

  18. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. Multimedia architecture for teleradiology in the U.S. Army virtual radiology environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jay F.; Chimiak, William J.

    1998-07-01

    The U.S. Army Medical Command, lead by the Brooke Army Medical Center, has embarked on a futuristic project which will revolutionize the practice of radiology in the DoD. The U.S. Army Virtual Radiology Environment (USAVRE) is a CONUS-based network that connects all the Army's major medical centers and Regional Medical Commands (RMC). The purpose of the USAVRE is to improve the quality, access, and cost of radiology services in the Army via the use of state-of-the-art medical imaging, computer, and networking technologies. The USAVRE contains multimedia-viewing workstations for static and dynamic modality cases. The storage and archiving systems are based on a distributed computing environment using Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) middleware protocols. Collaboration between archive centers and viewing workstations are managed by CORBA functions and multimedia object streams. The underlying Telecommunications network is an ATM based backbone network that connects to the RMC regional networks and PACS local networks at medical centers and RMC clinics. The U.S. Army Information Systems Engineering Command (USAISEC) at Ft. Huachuca, AZ is responsible for the ATM backbone network to the RMC sites. The virtual Radiology services in a USAVRE must be applied to several radiology modalities in a virtual network environment. In this discussion, we assume the existence of several PACS networks within a USAVRE environment that have a need to exchange multimedia images and patient information. We define a multimedia collaborative distributed computing environment (DCE) in medical imaging and radiology as a collection of collaborating PACS networks with workstations and image archive systems for the purposes of acquiring and exchanging patient static and video sequence images; storage, retrieval, and archival of those images; performing image analysis and multimedia consultation on patient cases; operation and management of the network to optimize its resources

  20. Predictors of Suicide and Accident Death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Cox, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. OBJECTIVES To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. RESULTS The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view

  1. "More fatal than powder and shot": dysentery in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, 1846-48.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Vincent J

    2009-01-01

    In terms of deaths due to disease, the Mexican War (1846-48) was the deadliest of all American wars. Nearly 13% of the entire U.S. force perished from disease. Of the total 12,535 war deaths, 10,986 (88%) were due to infectious diseases (overwhelmingly dysentery, both bacterial and amoebic); seven men died from disease for every man killed by Mexican musket balls. Camp pollution was the greatest error committed by U.S. troops in the Mexican War. The indifference of line officers and recruits to the need for proper sanitation and military hygiene fueled the dysentery outbreaks, and the poor conditions in military hospitals contributed further to the spread of disease. This defect in military culture undermined the health of the army and led to medical disaster. Disease caused an enormous drain on the U.S. Army's resources, eroded troop morale, and influenced strategy and tactics. As we enter the 21st century, dysentery is still a major public health threat, killing hundreds of thousands of people annually-primarily children in developing countries where personal hygiene is poor and disposal of human and animal wastes is indiscriminate. PMID:19684375

  2. Evaluation of electrodialysis for chronic acid recovery and purification at Corpus Christi Army Depot. Final report, Oct 89-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    A large quantity of hazardous waste is generated during the maintenance, repair, and overhaul of a wide variety of military equipment at Army depots. Some of this waste is generated by the use of chromic acid solutions for chromium electroplating and the application and removal of chromate conversion coatings. Hazardous waste results when metal contamination builds up in the solutions to such a degree that the solutions must be disposed of as hazardous waste. Removal of this metal contamination should result in a lengthened bath life and reduced hazardous wate generation. As part of its pollution abatement and environmental control mission, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) is pursuing R and D projects to assist depots in meeting the Army goal of a 50 percent reduction in hazardous waste by the end of 1992 compared with 1985 baseline levels. In one project, USATHAMA purchased, installed, operated, and evaluated an electrodialysis system on two chromic acid process solutions at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) in Corpus Christi, Texas. The objective of this task was to evaluate the system's ability to remove metal contamination and oxidize trivalent chromium (an impurity) to hexavalent chromium (chromic acid).

  3. Military display market: fourth comprehensive edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.; Marasco, Peter L.; Byrd, James C.; Neubauer, Jon

    2006-05-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of all fully electronic and many electro-mechanical displays used on combat platforms across all DoD Services. The military market for displays is defined by parameters such as active area, bezel-to-bezel measurement and technology. Other characteristics such as luminance, contrast ratio, gray levels, resolution, viewing angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility are noted. This study takes into account all displays that are either installed or funded for installation. In some few cases, it also includes planned displays. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platform fleets, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area across platform fleets, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or more, is illustrated. Military displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Ruggedized Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (RCOTS), versus Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. Our defense-wide study as of February 2006 has documented 1,195 direct-view and 15 virtualview display sizes across 628 weapon system platforms for a total of 1,161,977 displays.

  4. Sexual assault in the military.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara; Schuyler, Ashley C; Lucas, Carrie L; Warner, Christopher H

    2015-07-01

    Military sexual assault is a pervasive problem throughout the military services, despite numerous initiatives to end it. No doubt the military's lack of progress stems from the complexity of sexual assaults, yet in order to develop effective strategies and programs to end sexual assault, deep understanding and appreciation of these complexities are needed. In this paper, we describe the root causes and numerous myths surrounding sexual assault, the military cultural factors that may unintentionally contribute to sexual assault, and the uncomfortable issues surrounding sexual assault that are often ignored (such as the prevalence of male sexual assault within the military). We conclude by offering a broad, yet comprehensive set of recommendations that considers all of these factors for developing effective strategies and programs for ending sexual assault within in the military. PMID:25980511

  5. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  6. Search and detection modeling of military imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Tana; Wilson, David L.; Driggers, Ronald G.

    2013-04-01

    For more than 50 years, the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has been studying the science behind the human processes of searching and detecting, and using that knowledge to develop and refine its models for military imaging systems. Modeling how human observers perform military tasks while using imaging systems in the field and linking that model with the physics of the systems has resulted in the comprehensive sensor models we have today. These models are used by the government, military, industry, and academia for sensor development, sensor system acquisition, military tactics development, and war-gaming. From the original hypothesis put forth by John Johnson in 1958, to modeling time-limited search, to modeling the impact of motion on target detection, to modeling target acquisition performance in different spectral bands, the concept of search has a wide-ranging history. Our purpose is to present a snapshot of that history; as such, it will begin with a description of the search-modeling task, followed by a summary of highlights from the early years, and concluding with a discussion of search and detection modeling today and the changing battlefield. Some of the topics to be discussed will be classic search, clutter, computational vision models and the ACQUIRE model with its variants. We do not claim to present a complete history here, but rather a look at some of the work that has been done, and this is meant to be an introduction to an extensive amount of work on a complex topic. That said, it is hoped that this overview of the history of search and detection modeling of military imaging systems pursued by NVESD directly, or in association with other government agencies or contractors, will provide both the novice and experienced search modeler with a useful historical summary and an introduction to current issues and future challenges.

  7. Battles between an insurgent army and an advanced army - focus on strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Surajit; Shanahan, Linda

    2008-03-01

    Detailed and aggregate analyses of the outcome of past battles focusing on rates of troop losses or on the ratios of forces on each side is at the heart of present knowledge about battles. Here we present non-equilibrium statistical mechanics based studies of possible outcomes of well matched strategic battles by a ``blue'' army against insurgency based attacks by well matched opponents in a ``red'' army in red territory. We assume that the red army attacks with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. Our results reveal that while unpredictable events play a major role in battles, a balance between risk of exposure in a battlefield and the use of short range intelligence is needed in determining whether one side can decimate the other, and hence force a battle to end.

  8. Graduate Medical Education and Military Medicine: Report of a Study by a Committee of the Institute of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Graduate medical education (GME) in the military services was investigated with respect to the following concerns: the maximum capacity of each military medical department to conduct GME programs in its own hospital; how these programs affect the recruitment and retention of military physicians; and the optimal sizes of such programs. It is…

  9. Join the Army and See the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galgano, Francis A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This article maintains that nobody has a bigger stake in successful global cultural education than the United States Military Academy (USMA) in West Point, New York. Since the early 1990s, a bipolar world dominated by two superpowers has evolved into a world with a far less certain strategic outlook. This has spawned an increase in nontraditional…

  10. Evolution of Military Combat Eye Protection.

    PubMed

    Auvil, James R

    2016-01-01

    Appreciation for combat eye protection steadily increased following World War II. Products derived from experiences in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Iran/Iraq war drove technical improvements throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Dismal wear compliance prior to 2004 indicates Soldiers and their leaders did not appreciate these improvements and found little value in the bulky, ugly, and uncomfortable products. In 2003, the 10th Mountain Division requested enhanced eye protection. Program Executive Office Soldier, the optometry consultant to the Army Surgeon General, members of the Tri-Service Vision Conservation and Readiness Program, and other subject matter experts selected and tested commercial off-the-shelf eye protection against military ballistic impact standards. Optical devices that met ballistic standards formed the first Authorized Protective Eyewear List and were fielded beginning in 2004. Wear compliance rose dramatically for the stylish protective eyewear, reaching 85% to 95% and eye injuries decreased across the Department of Defense even as the incidence of attacks in Iraq increased. Researchers continue to evaluate new materials and designs to increase the capabilities, features and level of protection of future ballistic eyewear. PMID:27215881

  11. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), U.S. Engineer Office, New York District, Harbor Defenses of New York Mine Boathouse, location plan and elevations, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, July 1943 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  12. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) Gillespie, G.L., map of a portion of Sandy Hook, NJ showing condition of beach in vicinity of dynamite gun emplacements, 1894 Engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  13. Military sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Diane M; Haley, Jenna L; Bouder, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Nurses' awareness of MST as a specific type of sexual assault within the military culture and sensitivity to the physical and psychological symptoms are important aspects of care. Nurses must treat the physical and emotional components of sexual assault in all settings; however, referral to the veterans administration programs and resources is key for the woman veteran to receive the specialized care developed by the healthcare system. Women veterans who have PTSD from MST and combat exposure are prone to depression, suicide and substance use/abuse. Nurses must not fear asking the woman if she is having suicidal thoughts or has a plan and intent to follow through with the plan. MST and PTSD may result in internalized anger, shame, self-blame, helplessness, hopelessness and powerlessness. Patient safety is of utmost importance. Assessing Patients for Sexual Violence, A Guide for Health Care Providers (2009) is a useful resource for nurses. The National Center for PTSD (2009) newsletter on the topic of MST includes a list of research studies. The work of Benedict (2007) and Corbett (2007) provide additional personal accounts of women soldiers who were in the Middle East conflicts. The nurse's referral to specialized services to treat MST and PTSD with evidence-based therapies is a crucial first step in the resiliency and well-being of these brave women who have served in all branches of the U.S. military. PMID:22359967

  14. Institutional Guidance of Affective Bonding: Moral Values Development in Brazilian Military Education.

    PubMed

    Wortmeyer, Daniela Schmitz; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2016-09-01

    In this article, our aim is to analyze institutional practices guided to promote the development of moral values within the context of military education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers. From a cultural psychological approach, we discuss how social guidance within military culture operates at different levels of the affective-semiotic regulation of individuals, structuring complex experiences that give rise to hypergeneralized meaning fields regarding morality and military values. For this goal, we first introduce some theoretical topics related to values development, emphasizing their affective roots and role in the emergence, maintenance, amplification and attenuation of all relations between the person and the environment. Following a brief discussion on how social institutions try to promote changes in personal values, we provide an overview of values present in the military culture and socialization. Finally, the text focuses on the education of Brazilian Army combatant commissioned officers, describing how practices related to different levels of affective-semiotic experience combine in order to promote the internalization and externalization of specific moral values. We conclude suggesting issues for future investigation. PMID:26960934

  15. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ursano, Robert J.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    Importance/Objective Although the suicide rate in the U.S. Army has traditionally been below age-gender matched civilian rates, it has climbed steadily since the beginning of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts and since 2008 has exceeded the demographically matched civilian rate. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge about risk and resilience factors for suicidality and its psychopathological correlates. This paper presents an overview of the Army STARRS component study designs and of recent findings. Design/Setting/Participants/Intervention Army STARRS includes six main component studies: (1) the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) of Army and Department of Defense (DoD) administrative data systems (including records of suicidal behaviors) for all soldiers on active duty 2004–2009 aimed at finding administrative record predictors of suicides; (2) retrospective case-control studies of fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors (each planned to have n = 150 cases and n = 300 controls); (3) a study of new soldiers (n = 50,765 completed surveys) assessed just before beginning basic combat training (BCT) with self-administered questionnaires (SAQ), neurocognitive tests, and blood samples; (4) a cross-sectional study of approximately 35,000 (completed SAQs) soldiers representative of all other (i.e., exclusive of BCT) active duty soldiers; (5) a pre-post deployment study (with blood samples) of soldiers in brigade combat teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (n = 9,421 completed baseline surveys), with sub-samples assessed again one, three, and nine months after returning from deployment; and (6) a pilot study to follow-up SAQ respondents transitioning to civilian life. Army/DoD administrative data are being linked prospectively to the large-scale survey

  16. Preliminary validation of the military low back pain questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanja C; Fish, Karen L; Lopez, Heather P; Piva, Sara R

    2014-02-01

    Soldiers must perform a variety of physical tasks that the civilian population does not. The Modified Oswestry Disability Index (M-ODI) is the most widely used measure of function in patients with low back pain but does not include military tasks. The Military Low Back Pain Questionnaire (MBQ) was developed by military Physical Therapists to include tasks such as wearing body armor. The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary evidence for the reliability, responsiveness, and validity of the MBQ in nondeployed Soldiers. The MBQ had good reliability compared to the M-ODI. The inter-rater correlation coefficient for the M-ODI was 0.79 and 0.75 for the MBQ. Cronbach's alpha was 0.75 and 0.85 for the M-ODI and MBQ, respectively. The minimal detectable change for the M-ODI was 21.03 and 22.97 for the MBQ. Responsiveness was assessed using a global rating of change; area under the curve for the M-ODI was 0.82 and 0.90 for the MBQ. The correlation between the M-ODI and the MBQ was r = 0.80 indicating good concurrent validity. The MBQ was as reliable as the M-ODI in an Army population. There were trends in the psychometrics suggesting the MBQ may be more sensitive to change than the M-ODI in this population. PMID:24491605

  17. Coordination Motor Skills of Military Pilots Subjected to Survival Training.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Survival training of military pilots in the Polish Army gains significance because polish pilots have taken part in more and more military missions. Prolonged exercise of moderate intensity with restricted sleep or sleep deprivation is known to deteriorate performance. The aim of the study was thus to determine the effects of a strenuous 36-hour exercise with restricted sleep on selected motor coordination and psychomotor indices. Thirteen military pilots aged 30-56 years were examined twice: pretraining and posttraining. The following tests were applied: running motor adjustment (15-m sprint, 3 × 5-m shuttle run, 15-m slalom, and 15-m squat), divided attention, dynamic body balance, handgrip strength differentiation. Survival training resulted in significant decreases in maximum handgrip strength (from 672 to 630 N), corrected 50% max handgrip (from 427 to 367 N), error 50% max (from 26 to 17%), 15-m sprint (from 5.01 to 4.64 m·s), and 15-m squat (2.20 to 1.98 m·s). The training improvements took place in divided attention test (from 48.2 to 57.2%). The survival training applied to pilots only moderately affected some of their motor adjustment skills, the divided attention, and dynamic body balance remaining unaffected or even improved. Further studies aimed at designing a set of tests for coordination motor skills and of soldiers' capacity to fight for survival under conditions of isolation are needed. PMID:25719921

  18. Military nutrition: maintaining health and rebuilding injured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Neil; Fallowfield, Joanne; Price, Susan; Wilson, Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Food and nutrition are fundamental to military capability. Historical examples demonstrate that a failure to supply adequate nutrition to armies inevitably leads to disaster; however, innovative measures to overcome difficulties in feeding reap benefits, and save lives. In barracks, UK Armed Forces are currently fed according to the relatively new Pay As You Dine policy, which has attracted criticism from some quarters. The recently introduced Multi-Climate Ration has been developed specifically to deal with issues arising from Iraq and the current conflict in Afghanistan. Severely wounded military personnel are likely to lose a significant amount of their muscle mass, in spite of the best medical care. Nutritional support is unable to prevent this, but can ameliorate the effects of the catabolic process. Measuring and quantifying nutritional status during critical illness is difficult. A consensus is beginning to emerge from studies investigating the effects of nutritional interventions on how, what and when to feed patients with critical illness. The Ministry of Defence is currently undertaking research to address specific concerns related to nutrition as well as seeking to promote healthy eating in military personnel. PMID:21149358

  19. The Development of an Open-Access, Performance Oriented Curriculum for Training the Military Policeman (MOS 95B20). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchman, J. Richard; And Others

    In accordance with the Army's emphasis on performance-oriented instruction, this project was undertaken to revise the Basic Law Enforcement Course (BLEC) offered by the U.S. Military Police School at Fort Gordon. Through a unique combination of systems engineering, group problem-solving, and peer instruction, an individualized, open-access…

  20. Results of NASA/Army transmission research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coe, Harold H.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1970 the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command have shared an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components are outlined. The major goals of the program were (and continue to be) to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability, reduce the weight, noise, and vibration, and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. Major historical milestones are reviewed, significant advances in technology for bearings, gears, and transmissions are discussed, and the outlook for the future is presented. The reference list is comprehensive.

  1. Tune v. Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia directed the removal of life support from a 71-year-old terminally ill cancer patient at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The court held that competent adult patients who are in federal medical facilities and who are afflicted with terminal illnesses have a right to decide for themselves whether to allow their lives to be prolonged by artificial means, including the right to demand the withdrawal of life support already begun. Societal concern for the prevention of suicide was not involved because permission was being sought merely to allow nature to take its course. PMID:11648165

  2. The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.

  3. Review of ground water modeling needs for the US Army

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The report was prepared to assist the U.S. Army in remediation of ground water contamination from hazardous, toxic, and radioactive wastes at Army installations. The Waterways Experiment Station of the Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Water Science and Technology Board evaluate the state of the art in mathematical models of ground water flow and contaminant transport, and then advise the Corps of Engineers on how it might support and use such models to meet Army's ground water remediation needs over the next ten years. The study recommends that the Army develop in-house expertise in ground water modeling, expand partnership programs between the Army and academic researchers, and develop a ground water modeling support center to help focus research, technology transfer and training activities.

  4. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  5. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  6. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  7. Selective, annotated bibliography on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army (August 1977 - December 1980). Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Savada, A.M.; Sismanidis, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    This bibliography series provides selective annotations of information published in open-source materials on the Chinese People`s Liberation Army. The bibliographies are arranged according to the following topics: General; Historical/Biographical; Ground Forces; Naval Forces; Air Force; Space; Missile; Nuclear; an Military Modernization. Entries have been derived primarily from Chinese and English language source material. An author, index and list of serials consulted are provided at the end of the volume. Illustrations derived from Chinese sources follow the title page of series supersedes.

  8. Life as a military spouse.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Military spouses live a capricious life. They often move away from everything familiar to support their active duty spouse. Honor, courage, and commitment are values military spouses need to assist them in being strong and resilient. Effective coping skills aid in the various roles these spouses assume, which may cause personal sacrifices to be made in support of the service member. PMID:23734557

  9. Economic Conditions of Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, James; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors found that the economic circumstances of military families are good, certainly much improved compared with even a decade ago. The military context is nonetheless challenging, with long hours, dangerous work, frequent transfers, and stressful absences during deployment. Service members receive relatively high pay and…

  10. HIV in military.

    PubMed

    1996-05-31

    The House of Representatives approved a defense authorization bill that requires the Pentagon to discharge service members who test positive for HIV antibodies. This is the second measure of its kind. Last year, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA) pushed through Congress a similar measure that was repealed after encountering public opposition. President Clinton said he will veto the defense bill in its current form. The bill provides $13 billion in spending beyond the amount the Pentagon requested, resurrects plans for the Star Wars missile defense system, and rescinds Clinton's don't ask, don't tell policy toward gay men and lesbians in the military. Rep. Peter Torkildsen (R-MA) is confident that the HIV provision can be stricken when the bill goes to a House-Senate conference committee in a few weeks. PMID:11363494

  11. Porridge and peas: C. Stanton Hicks and Australian army rations.

    PubMed

    Collingham, Lizzie

    2009-09-01

    In 1942 Australian troops came back from fighting the Japanese in New Guinea exhausted and malnourished. The army rations of bully beef and biscuits were insufficiently rich in vitamins to sustain men in combat in tropical conditions. The nutritionist C. Stanton Hicks was one of a vast army of scientists who worked behind the scenes to maximize the war effort. He made it his mission to improve the army diet. He set up the Australian Army Catering Corps, invented combat ration packs and tried to introduce vitamin-rich foods into the soldiers' diet. Two of his more idiosyncratic innovations were wheat porridge and Tasmanian blue peas. PMID:19539373

  12. Military display market segment: wearable and portable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2003-09-01

    The military display market (MDM) is analyzed in terms of one of its segments, wearable and portable displays. Wearable and portable displays are those embedded in gear worn or carried by warfighters. Categories include hand-mobile (direct-view and monocular/binocular), palm-held, head/helmet-mounted, body-strapped, knee-attached, lap-born, neck-lanyard, and pocket/backpack-stowed. Some 62 fielded and developmental display sizes are identified in this wearable/portable MDM segment. Parameters requiring special consideration, such as weight, luminance ranges, light emission, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are summarized and compared. Ruggedized commercial versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted; and a number of custom displays are also found in this MDM category. Display sizes having aggregate quantities of 5,000 units or greater or having 2 or more program applications are identified. Wearable and portable displays are also analyzed by technology (LCD, LED, CRT, OLED and plasma). The technical specifications and program history of several high-profile military programs are discussed to provide a systems context for some representative displays and their function. As of August 2002 our defense-wide military display market study has documented 438,882 total display units distributed across 1,163 display sizes and 438 weapon systems. Wearable and portable displays account for 202,593 displays (46% of total DoD) yet comprise just 62 sizes (5% of total DoD) in 120 weapons systems (27% of total DoD). Some 66% of these wearable and portable applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, there is an accelerating trend towards higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  13. The automated Army ROTC Questionnaire (ARQ)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David L. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadet Command (ROTCCC) takes applications for its officer training program from college students and Army enlisted personnel worldwide. Each applicant is required to complete a set of application forms prior to acceptance into the ROTC program. These forms are covered by several regulations that govern the eligibility of potential applicants and guide the applicant through the application process. Eligibility criteria changes as Army regulations are periodically revised. Outdated information results in a loss of applications attributable to frustration and error. ROTCCC asked for an inexpensive and reliable way of automating their application process. After reviewing the process, it was determined that an expert system with good end user interface capabilities could be used to solve a large part of the problem. The system captures the knowledge contained within the regulations, enables the quick distribution and implementation of eligibility criteria changes, and distributes the expertise of the admissions personnel to the education centers and colleges. The expert system uses a modified version of CLIPS that was streamlined to make the most efficient use of its capabilities. A user interface with windowing capabilities provides the applicant with a simple and effective way to input his/her personal data.

  14. Nonfatal Suicidal Behaviors in U.S. Army Administrative Records, 2004–2009: Results from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Naifeh, James A.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Vegella, Patti; Mash, Holly Herberman; Buckley, Christina; Colpe, Lisa J.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although the U.S. Army suicide rate is known to have risen sharply over the past decade, information about medically documented, nonfatal suicidal behaviors is far more limited. Here we examine trends and sociodemographic correlates of suicide attempts, suspicious injuries, and suicide ideation among regular Army soldiers. Methods Data come from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS), which integrates administrative records for all soldiers on active duty during the years 2004 through 2009 (n = 1.66 million). Results We identified 21,740 unique regular Army soldiers with a nonfatal suicidal event documented at some point during the HADS study period. There were substantial increases in the annual incidence rates of suicide attempts (179–400/100,000 person-years) and suicide ideation (557–830/100,000 person-years), but not suspicious injuries. Using hierarchical classification rules to identify the first instance of each soldier's most severe behavior, we found increased risk of all outcomes among those who were female, non-Hispanic White, never married, lower-ranking enlisted, less educated, and of younger age when entering Army service. These sociodemographic associations significantly differed across outcomes, despite some patterns that appear similar. Conclusion Results provide a broad overview of nonfatal suicidal trends in the U.S. Army during 2004 through 2009 and demonstrate that integration of multiple administrative data systems enriches analysis of the predictors of such events. PMID:26168022

  15. 75 FR 34714 - Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure Realignment Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Department of the Army Updated Record of Decision (ROD) for Revised Army Growth and Force; Structure... Department of the Army announces the availability of an updated ROD for Army Growth and Force Structure... Army growth and force structure realignment. The Army's decision at the time grew the Army by...

  16. A forgotten epidemic that changed medicine: measles in the US Army, 1917-18.

    PubMed

    Morens, David M; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2015-07-01

    A US army-wide measles outbreak in 1917-18 resulted in more than 95,000 cases and more than 3000 deaths. An outbreak investigation implicated measles and streptococcal co-infections in most deaths, and also characterised a parallel epidemic of primary streptococcal pneumonia in soldiers without measles. For the first time, the natural history and pathogenesis of these diseases was able to be well characterised by a broad-interdisciplinary research effort with hundreds of military and civilian physicians and scientists representing disciplines such as internal medicine, pathology, microbiology, radiology, surgery, preventive medicine, and rehabilitation medicine. A clear conceptualisation of bronchopneumonia resulting from viral-bacterial interactions between pathogens was developed, and prevention and treatment approaches were developed and optimised in real time. These approaches were used in the 1918 influenza pandemic, which began as the measles epidemic waned. The outbreak findings remain relevant to the understanding and medical management of severe pneumonia. PMID:26070967

  17. Boundary issues in clinical practice as reported by Army social workers.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Kyle Lynn; Hamlin, Elwood R

    2002-01-01

    Clinical practice in military settings requires the clinician to be acutely aware of boundary issues that may arise. Given the legal significance associated with therapeutic relationships in which one stands in a special relationship of trust, confidence, or responsibility, setting appropriate boundaries in practice is critical. This article specifically addresses various questions faced by mental health practitioners in making boundary-related choices. The code of ethics of the National Association of Social Work as well as those of other disciplines now place increasing emphasis on the obligation to protect the public from known or perceived risks emanating from boundary crossings. This article presents the findings of a study involving active duty and reserve Army clinical social work officers regarding boundary issues. The study addresses the social work officers' perceptions of boundary issues and behavior related to boundary choices in clinical practice. The results provide insight regarding boundary crossings, boundary violations, and dual relationships. PMID:11799807

  18. Army nurses' knowledge base for determining triage categories in a mass casualty.

    PubMed

    Robison, Jennifer L

    2002-10-01

    The timing, location, and participants in a mass casualty scenario cannot be predicted. Nurses may be involved in performing triage, yet there is no published documentation of military nurses' ability to triage. A prospective design was used to describe 82 Army nurses' knowledge base related to designating triage categories for patients during a mass causality, examining the relationships among their education and experience as evaluated by The Darnall Mass Casualty Triage Test and Demographic Data Form. The most significant areas associated with higher scores on the Triage Test were: completion of Advanced Cardiac Life Support, advanced certification as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists, Certified Emergency Nurse, or Critical Care Registered Nurse, and attendance to the Medical Management of Nuclear Weapons Course. An improved average score for nurses overall was also noted when compared with previous work with the Darnall MASCAL Triage Test. PMID:12392246

  19. Aircrew-aircraft integration: A summary of US Army research programs and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, D. L.; Aiken, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    A review of selected programs which illustrate the research efforts of the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory in the area of aircrew-aircraft integration is presented. Plans for research programs to support the development of future military rotorcraft are also described. The crew of a combat helicopter must, in general, perform two major functions during the conduct of a particular mission: flightpath control and mission management. Accordingly, the research programs described are being conducted in the same two major categories: (1) flightpath control, which encompasses the areas of handling qualities, stability and control, and displays for the pilot's control of the rotorcraft's flightpath, and (2) mission management, which includes human factors and cockpit integration research topics related to performance of navigation, communication, and aircraft systems management tasks.

  20. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste (HTRW) program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnstad, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this presentation is an overview of the US Army Corps of Engineers role in the cleanup of this country`s Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste sites. To many outside of the agency, the Corps organizational structure is complex. This presentation presents the Corps team members for both Civil (Superfund and support for other agencies) and Military cleanups. Over the last 12 years, the role of the Corps in Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste cleanup has been evolving. This emerging role is discussed, with emphasis on where the Corp`s current responsibilities are focused. Corps mission and non-mission assignments are discussed along with the Corps policy of limited decentralization for project execution.

  1. Aircrew-aircraft integration - A summary of U.S. Army research programs and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, D. L.; Aiken, E. W.

    1984-01-01

    A review of selected programs which illustrate the research efforts of the U.S. Army Aeromechanics Laboratory in the area of aircrew-aircraft integration is presented. Plans for research programs to support the development of future military rotorcraft are also described. The crew of a combat helicopter must, in general, perform two major functions during the conduct of a particular mission: flightpath control and mission management. Accordingly, the research programs described are being conducted in the same two major categories: (1) flightpath control, which encompasses the areas of handling qualities, stability and control, and displays for the pilot's control of the rotorcraft's flightpath, and (2) mission management, which includes human factors and cockpit integration research topics related to performance of navigation, communication, and aircraft systems management tasks.

  2. Epidemiology of U.K. military burns.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mark Anthony; Moledina, Jamil; Jeffery, Steve L A

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the etiology of U.K. military burns in light of increasing hybrid warfare. Analysis of the nature of these injured personnel will provide commanders with the evidence to plan for on-going and future operations. Case notes of all U.K. Armed Forces burn injured patients who were evacuated to the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine were reviewed. Demographics, burn severity, pattern, and mortality details were included. There were 134 U.K. military personnel with burns requiring return to the United Kingdom during 2001-2007. The median age was 27 (20-62) years. Overall, 60% of burns seen were "accidental." Burning waste, misuse or disrespect of fuel, and scalds were the most prevalent noncombat burns. Areas commonly burned were the face, legs, and hands. During 2006-2007 in the two major conflicts, more than 59% (n = 36) of the burned patients evacuated to the United Kingdom were injured during combat. Burns sustained in combat represent 5.8% of all combat casualties and were commonly associated with other injuries. Improvised explosive device, minestrike, and rocket-propelled grenade were common causes. The mean TBSA affected for both groups was 5% (1-70). The majority of combat burn injuries have been small in size. Greater provision of flame retardant equipment and clothing may reduce the extent and number of combat burns in the future. The numbers of noncombat burns are being reduced by good military discipline. PMID:21422938

  3. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  4. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Request for information regarding support to Army Core Competencies...) research, operational concepts, and mission support innovations to support Army core competencies. No...

  5. Comparing military and civilian critical thinking and information processes in operational risk management: what are the lessons?

    PubMed

    VanVactor, Jerry D; Gill, Tony

    2010-03-01

    Business continuity has expanded into a discipline that spans most functional areas of large enterprises. Both the military and financial sectors have consistently demonstrated an aptitude to expand the boundaries of continuity planning and crisis mitigation. A comparison of both enterprises is provided to see how their respective methodologies compare. Interestingly, the similarities far outweigh the differences. The paper provides commentary related to comparative insight from risk practitioners' perspectives from within the US Army, one of the largest military organisations in the world, and the Bank of Montreal, one of Canada's leading financial institutions. PMID:20494875

  6. The Importance of Military Cultural Competence.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Eric G; Writer, Brian W; Brim, William

    2016-03-01

    Military cultural competence has recently gained national attention. Experts have posited that limited outcomes in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in the military may be related to limited familiarity with the military. National surveys have indicated low military cultural competence among providers and limited educational efforts on military culture or pertinent military pathology in medical schools and residency training programs. Military families, with their own unique military cultural identity, have been identified as a population with increased risks associated with deployment. In response to these findings, several curricula regarding military culture have been established and widely distributed. Assessments of military cultural competence have also been developed. The clinical impact of enhanced cultural competence in general has thus far been limited. The military, however, with its highly prescribed cultural identity, may be a model culture for further study. PMID:26830884

  7. The use of unit watch or command interest profile in the management of suicide and homicide risk: rationale and guidelines for the military mental health professional.

    PubMed

    Payne, Samuel E; Hill, Jeffrey V; Johnson, David E

    2008-01-01

    Military mental health care professionals have, for decades, recommended that commanders implement a unit watch (now called a "command interest profile" at most Army posts) as a tool for enhancing the safety of personnel in the unit when a soldier presents with suicidal or homicidal ideation. Although these procedures are used extensively in garrison and in operational settings, there exists no specific body of literature or Army publication to offer either a rationale or a set of guidelines for their use. We have successfully used unit watch protocols for years both in the deployment setting and in garrison. This article provides both a rationale and a set of guidelines for their use based on fundamental military psychiatric principles, review of the relevant literature, and anecdotal experience with this intervention. Although further research is indicated, this article provides support for the use of unit watch in military settings. PMID:18251328

  8. Concepts for Army use of robotic-artificial intelligence in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Crumley, D.V.

    1982-06-01

    This report identifies potential military applications of robotic-artificial intelligence technology and considers near-, mid-, and far-term technological projections. Criteria for applications include their potential cost effectiveness, as already proven in civilian industry; the speed, accuracy and uniform quality of effort which robots can achieve; their ability to perform in hazardous environments; their role as soldier replacements or multipliers; and their ability to save lives on high risk missions. The author concludes that there are a great many feasible applications, but for the Army to realize the great potentials of this field by the turn of the century, research and development in all robotic related sciences must be better funded and better coordinated. The author makes the following recommendations: Training and Doctrine Command should verify the potential applications as soon as possible, arrange them in order of tactical importance, and relay those requirements to materiel developers. Department of Defense/or Department of Army should take the top two or three of the most important applications and have them pursued independently by agencies which are unencumbered by normal research and development bureaucracies.

  9. Embedded behavioral health providers: an assessment with the Army National Guard.

    PubMed

    Russell, Dale W; Whalen, Ronald J; Riviere, Lyndon A; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Bliese, Paul D; Keller, Darc D; Pangelian, Susan I; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-08-01

    Although the Army has recently begun the practice of embedding behavioral health care providers (EBHP) in units in an effort to improve soldier well-being, the efficacy of this practice has not been evaluated. This study assesses 1 of the first programs implemented by the military. Using cross-sectional data obtained from a confidential survey of 12 company-level units in the California Army National Guard (n = 1,132), this study examines differences between units with and without EBHPs across a number of measures. Multilevel analysis of behavioral health symptoms, unit climate, perceptions of stigma, and practical barriers to care failed to detect main effects between units with EBHPs relative to those without. However, cross-level interactions were detected between unit EBHP status and soldiers reporting close relationship (e.g., spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend) impairment. Exploratory findings suggest that, among soldiers reporting close relationship impairment, those belonging to units with EBHPs reported significantly lower behavioral health symptoms and significantly more positive unit climates. Based on these limited exploratory finings, this study suggests that EBHPs in reserve units may have a positive effect on a subset of soldiers (i.e., those reporting close relationship impairment). More assessments of embed programs should be conducted, particularly using prospective longitudinal data among randomized units. PMID:24841511

  10. Filmless radiology at Brooke Army Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    The hospital at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas has an essentially filmless radiology department. Mammography is one of the few services still using film. The radiology department at Brooke takes advantage of a very capable Lockheed Martin PACS to achieve the filmless operation. The old hospital has been replaced by a new hospital, the new Brooke Army Medical Center. As a basis for predictions of activity at new Brooke, the activities at the old Brooke Army Medical Center were examined. The heart of the PACS at Brooke is the image server with an associated database. The image server has the performance required to keep the radiologist from returning to film for diagnosis. A directly connected workstation can present a full screen of images in less than two seconds, even during the busiest hour of the day for this large hospital. In addition the database is used to organize the workflow for the radiology examinations through the hospital. Information about the activity at the new Brooke hospital is used to predict the utilization of the short term storage and the long term storage. In particular, the time that an examination will be retained on the new Brooke short term storage is measured. The Brooke medical complex generates 384.8 exams per day on a typical weekday. The number of exams on a weekend is 40 percent of the exams on the weekday. The storage required is 18.3 gigabytes per day in the short term storage of the Image Storage Unit (ISU) and 9.7 gigabytes per day in the archive. The 256 gigabytes of the ISU will hold 11.7 weeks or about 2.5 months of exams. The archive will hold four years of exams in tow jukeboxes. A working year will have an effective 300 days of equivalent weekday radiology load. By ten years from now the hospital complex can be expected to handle to load that is estimated to be about 160 percent of the current load. With the changes in the storage of disks and archive media that will have occurred by that time, the

  11. Drug Abuse in the Military. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Children, Family, Drugs and Alcoholism of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on Reviewing the Problem of Drug Abuse in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document contains transcripts of testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the effects of illicit drug use and alcoholism on military personnel. Following statements by Senators Hawkins, Grassley, and Kerry, testimonies from representatives of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard are…

  12. [Sanitary-hygienic and antiepidemic support for the Red army during the last stage of the Great Patriotic War (1944-1945)].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, L E; Loktev, A E

    2016-04-01

    Sanitation measures of the final period of World War II included the sanitary surveillance of water and power forces, observation of their placement and content of the territory occupied by them, monitor the implementation of military rules of personal hygiene and health education. The content of anti-epidemic measures was control of vectors of infectious and parasitic diseases, the protection of troops against the penetration of these diseases from the outside, the sanitary-epidemiological investigation and vaccination of staff, early detection and isolation of infectious patients, their timely hospitalization, disinfection of the source of infection, identify the sources of infection and epidemiological surveillance behind the hearth. Epidemiological welfare of the Red Army has been achieved by the virtue of the hard and persistent work of many thousands of military doctors, good organization of anti-epidemic protection of troops and use of military medical service of science. PMID:27416724

  13. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a) General... Secretary of Defense. The authority to determine whether the use of an Army band at a public gathering is... Forces, veterans, and patriotic organizations. (3) At public rallies and parades intended to...

  14. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... final rule which establishes requirements for the expanded definition of byproduct material. 72 FR 55864... was made in a separate rulemaking for 10 CFR Part 110 (April 20, 2006; 71 FR 20336). The Department of... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of...

  15. The Army Collegiate Commissioning Program--A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, P. E.

    This study examined the feasibility of a U.S. Army collegiate commissioning program (CCP) as a supplemental method of officer procurement. Investigated were the U.S. undergraduate population, Army procurement goals, program production capabilities, costs, and retention rates projected through fiscal year 1982. A sufficient college population will…

  16. Explaining Recent Army and Navy Minority Recruiting Trends. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2007, the representation of blacks among high-quality Army recruits declined, while in the Navy, black representation remained stable; the representation of Hispanics among high-quality recruits in both the Army and Navy grew during this period. RAND researchers identified factors that explain these recruiting trends and found…

  17. Cultural Assimilator for Training Army Personnel in Racial Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Roland J.; And Others

    A cultural assimilator was developed to teach white junior officers about black culture in the army. Scenarios involving misunderstandings between blacks and whites in the army were presented, and respondents were asked to identify "correct" reasons for the misunderstandings. In the first of three field tests respondents showed evidence of…

  18. New Tools and Metrics for Evaluating Army Distributed Learning. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straus, Susan G.; Shanley, Michael G.; Yeung, Douglas; Rothenberg, Jeff; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Leuschner, Kristin J.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed learning (DL) is a key element of the Army's training strategy, and the Army has ambitious goals for expanding the future use of DL and for changing how it is developed and delivered. Program-level evaluation of DL can play an essential role in accomplishing those goals and in identifying strategic directions for the overall program.…

  19. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a) Fee-owned land and easements. (1) Action by Division/District...

  20. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army civil works real property. 644.329 Section... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a) Fee-owned land and easements. (1) Action by Division/District...