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Sample records for army size military

  1. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  2. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  3. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  4. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  5. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328 Section 644.328 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military leased property. (a) Department of the Army command installations or parts thereof held by...

  6. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  7. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  8. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  9. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  10. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 Section 644.326 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... military real property. Military real property, including industrial real property, under the control...

  11. U.S. Army Corrosion Office's storage and quality requirements for military MEMS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, J. L., III; Skelton, D. R.

    2007-04-01

    As the Army transforms into a more lethal, lighter and agile force, the technologies that support these systems must decrease in size while increasing in intelligence. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are one such technology that the Army and DOD will rely on heavily to accomplish these objectives. Conditions for utilization of MEMS by the military are unique. Operational and storage environments for the military are significantly different than those found in the commercial sector. Issues unique to the military include; high G-forces during gun launch, extreme temperature and humidity ranges, extended periods of inactivity (20 years plus) and interaction with explosives and propellants. The military operational environments in which MEMS will be stored or required to function are extreme and far surpass any commercial operating conditions. Security and encryption are a must for all MEMS communication, tracking, or data reporting devices employed by the military. Current and future military applications of MEMS devices include safety and arming devices, fuzing devices, various guidance systems, sensors/detectors, inertial measurement units, tracking devices, radio frequency devices, wireless Radio Frequency Identifications (RFIDs) and network systems, GPS's, radar systems, mobile base systems and information technology. MEMS embedded into these weapons systems will provide the military with new levels of speed, awareness, lethality, and information dissemination. The system capabilities enhanced by MEMS will translate directly into tactical and strategic military advantages.

  12. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  13. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  14. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  15. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  16. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  17. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  18. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  19. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  20. 32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Board for Correction of Military Records... PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. (a) General—(1) Purpose. This section prescribes the policies and procedures for correction of military records by...

  1. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  2. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  3. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  4. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  5. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  6. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  7. Military, Biographical, and Demographic Correlates of Army Career Intentions. Technical Report 518.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John

    Organizational and personal correlates of intentions to reenlist or remain on active duty in the Army for both officers and enlisted service members were explored. Demographic and military characteristics and indices of commitment to continuation in the Army were gathered from 10 percent of the enlisted personnel and 30 percent of the officers…

  8. Correlates of Military Satisfaction and Attrition Among Army Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, John P.; Bell, D. Bruce

    A study determined relationships between Army organizational variables and levels of soldier satisfaction and assessed correlates of attrition and battalion effectiveness ratings. It was based on a secondary analysis of data collected in the Army Life-78 Study, which considered relationships of organizational climate and unit effectiveness.…

  9. The U.S. Army Person-Event Data Environment: A Military-Civilian Big Data Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Vie, Loryana L; Scheier, Lawrence M; Lester, Paul B; Ho, Tiffany E; Labarthe, Darwin R; Seligman, Martin E P

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a groundbreaking military-civilian collaboration that benefits from an Army and Department of Defense (DoD) big data business intelligence platform called the Person-Event Data Environment (PDE). The PDE is a consolidated data repository that contains unclassified but sensitive manpower, training, financial, health, and medical records covering U.S. Army personnel (Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard), civilian contractors, and military dependents. These unique data assets provide a veridical timeline capturing each soldier's military experience from entry to separation from the armed forces. The PDE was designed to afford unprecedented cost-efficiencies by bringing researchers and military scientists to a single computerized repository rather than porting vast data resources to individual laboratories. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Positive Psychology Center joined forces with the U.S. Army Research Facilitation Laboratory, forming the scientific backbone of the military-civilian collaboration. This unparalleled opportunity was necessitated by a growing need to learn more about relations between psychological and health assets and health outcomes, including healthcare utilization and costs-issues of major importance for both military and civilian population health. The PDE represents more than 100 times the population size and many times the number of linked variables covered by the nation's leading sources of population health data (e.g., the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). Following extensive Army vetting procedures, civilian researchers can mine the PDE's trove of information using a suite of statistical packages made available in a Citrix Virtual Desktop. A SharePoint collaboration and governance management environment ensures user compliance with federal and DoD regulations concerning human subjects' protections and also provides a secure

  10. Old Age, the Ancient Military, and Alexander's Army: Positive Examples for a Graying America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kebric, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Presents examples from ancient Greece and Rome illustrating working aged and intergenerational dependence. Describes normal active participation of elderly as officers and common soldiers in ancient military as example of their capabilities. Notes that Alexander the Great's army, in particular, depended on contributions of older men. (Author/NB)

  11. Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-14

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

  12. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action... will be advised of military installations to be surveyed under E.O. 11954 by a DOD or GSA survey...

  13. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action... will be advised of military installations to be surveyed under E.O. 11954 by a DOD or GSA survey...

  14. Military positions and post-service occupational mobility of Union Army veterans, 1861–1880

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Although the Civil War has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention, little is known about how different wartime experiences of soldiers influenced their civilian lives after the war. This paper examines how military rank and duty of Union Army soldiers while in service affected their post-service occupational mobility. Higher ranks and non-infantry duties appear to have provided more opportunities for developing skills, especially those required for white-collar jobs. Among the recruits who were unskilled workers at the time of enlistment, commissioned and non-commissioned officers were much more likely to move up to a white-collar job by 1880. Similarly, unskilled recruits assigned to white-collar military duties were more likely to enter a white-collar occupation by 1880. The higher occupational mobility of higher-ranking soldiers is likely to have resulted from disparate human capital accumulations offered by their military positions rather than from their superior abilities. PMID:20234792

  15. The Adjustment of New Recruits to Military Life in the Chinese Army: The Longitudinal Predictive Power of MMPI-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Lijun; Han, Jing; Han, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the findings of two studies analyzing new recruits' adjustment to army life in the Chinese military. In the first exploratory study, we developed a scale to measure new recruits' adjustment to military life, and found that new soldiers' adaptation could be divided into two distinct types: interpersonal…

  16. The role of the US Army Veterinary Corps in military family pet health.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Johnson, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Even though privately-owned pet care is a lower priority mission than military working dog care, food inspection,and the public health mission, it is still very important,and the one that many Veterinary Corps officers, civil-ian veterinarians, and technicians enjoy the most. The vast majority of veterinarians and technicians went into veterinary medicine because of a love for animals. It is fulfilling to offer guidance to a client with a new puppy or kitten, see a sick pet improve after treatment, and interact with dozens of animals and clients in a day. The services provided by the Army Veterinary Corps in car-ing for pets has expanded over the years and the standard of care has improved as well. It is truly a privilege to serve those who dedicate themselves to the protection of our Nation. The Army Veterinary Corps is indeed proud to provide care to the pets of Warfighters of the Army,Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard; their family members; and our military retirees. PMID:23277448

  17. Classifying U.S. Army Military Occupational Specialties Using the Occupational Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Gadermann, Anne M.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To derive job condition scales for future studies of the effects of job conditions on soldier health and job functioning across Army Military Occupation Specialties (MOSs) and Areas of Concentration (AOCs) using Department of Labor (DoL) Occupational Information Network (O*NET) ratings. Methods A consolidated administrative dataset was created for the “Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers” (Army STARRS) containing all soldiers on active duty between 2004 and 2009. A crosswalk between civilian occupations and MOS/AOCs (created by DoL and the Defense Manpower Data Center) was augmented to assign scores on all 246 O*NET dimensions to each soldier in the dataset. Principal components analysis was used to summarize these dimensions. Results Three correlated components explained the majority of O*NET dimension variance: “physical demands” (20.9% of variance), “interpersonal complexity” (17.5%), and “substantive complexity” (15.0%). Although broadly consistent with civilian studies, several discrepancies were found with civilian results reflecting potentially important differences in the structure of job conditions in the Army versus the civilian labor force. Conclusions Principal components scores for these scales provide a parsimonious characterization of key job conditions that can be used in future studies of the effects of MOS/AOC job conditions on diverse outcomes. PMID:25003860

  18. [Military Knowledge: War Sciences and Army Libraries in France in the 19th Century (c. 1800-c. 1900)].

    PubMed

    Thoral, Marie-Cecile

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the development of military knowledge in France in the 19th century, both in terms of production of knowledge (especially through the Dépôt de la Guerre) and of transmission through a network of army libraries. The strategic dimension of this form of knowledge required a direct intervention of the state, to control or restrict the publication of sensitive data. State intervention was also necessary to coordinate and generate a unified, applied military knowledge using data submitted by members of different army branches, or by civilians. The work of military librarians and bibliologists was all the more difficult because of the very wide range of sciences which could be used by the army. Growing state intervention and public funding were thus essential for the production and transmission of military knowledge. PMID:26902056

  19. U.S. Army-Baylor University Health Care Administration Program: evidenced-based outcomes in the military health system.

    PubMed

    Mangelsdorff, A David; Rogers, Jody; Finstuen, Kenn; Pryor, Rene

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System on some of the evidence-based educational outcomes for the Individual (student) and the Society (all Army Medical Treatment Facilities). The U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of an educational program on the Military Health System (MHS). Since the majority of the graduate students are military officers who serve in military medical treatment facilities (MTFs), tracking their career progression allows assessing the value added of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA experience from 1951 to 2001 (n = 2234). The context of Society outcomes includes all the Army MTFs where U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA graduates execute their leadership skills. During the time from 1994 to 2001, all of the Army MTFs in the MHS (n = 38) were examined by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). In a similar but shorter time frame (1997-2001), DoD patient satisfaction assessments were conducted. The Individual outcomes (career advancement, increase in status, higher professional association membership) demonstrate that the selection criteria used for program admission appear to be successful. The Society outcomes showed higher JCAHO scores and satisfied consumers in Army facilities with Baylor graduates as the Deputy Commander for Administration (DCA). Continued internal program assessments (curriculum reviews) and external reviews (Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration accreditations of 5 years in 1987, 8 years in 1993 and 7 years in 2001, and 7 ACHE student chapter awards) attest to the strengths of the U.S. Army-Baylor University HCA program. Educating the MHS shareholders (patients, beneficiaries, professional and support staff, senior leaders) and leveraging technology to. share best practices for all administrators (including non-Baylor graduates) will

  20. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  1. [Catering services bases in the Russian army under military regulation of Peter the Great].

    PubMed

    Konyshev, I S; adamenko, A M; Koshelev, V P

    2014-01-01

    At Peter I the regular army was organized and the system of target state deliveries to troops of the food is created. Provisioning and fodder was normalized as portion and ration. Portion was contained the products forpeoplefood, and ration - fodder for horses food who were used by the serviceman. Portion and ration unit was identical to all categories of the military personnel. Difference in food level consisted in that, how many portions and rations serviceman received. Up to the end of existence of Russian army in 1918 in each rota there were contractor and the cook who were engaged in foodstuff and cooking under sergeant-major and one of rota officers supervision. According to the Charter it was necessary to carry with respect and attention to officers and soldiers, their needs, including in the field of supply and catering services and providing with the food: Despite the lack of scientific justification, soldiers' nutrition was sufficient to provide fighting capacity of the Russian army. PMID:25816632

  2. Military Services Fitness Database: Development of a Computerized Physical Fitness and Weight Management Database for the U.S. Army

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald A.; Bathalon, Gaston P.; Sigrist, Lori D.; Allen, H. Raymond; Friedl, Karl E.; Young, Andrew J.; Martin, Corby K.; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Burrell, Lolita; Han, Hongmei; Hubbard, Van S.; Ryan, Donna

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has mandated development of a system to collect and manage data on the weight, percent body fat (%BF), and fitness of all military personnel. This project aimed to (1) develop a computerized weight and fitness database to track individuals and Army units over time allowing cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluations and (2) test the computerized system for feasibility and integrity of data collection over several years of usage. The computer application, the Military Services Fitness Database (MSFD), was designed for (1) storage and tracking of data related to height, weight, %BF for the Army Weight Control Program (AWCP) and Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores and (2) generation of reports using these data. A 2.5-year pilot test of the MSFD indicated that it monitors population and individual trends of changing body weight, %BF, and fitness in a military population. PMID:19216292

  3. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  4. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  5. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  6. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  7. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. 334..., Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation; Fort Knox, Kentucky; danger zone. (a.... Otter Creek from Point D (latitude 37°51′31.77″ N; longitude 86°00′03.79″ W) located approximately...

  8. Achieving army nursing evidence-based practice competencies through a civilian-military nurse partnership.

    PubMed

    Siaki, Leilani A; Lentino, Cynthia V; Mark, Debra D; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's goal of 90% of all practice being evidence-based by 2020, educational and practice institutions are not on target to achieve this goal. Evidence-based practice is one of 5 core elements of the Army Nurse Corps' patient care delivery system and a key focus of the Hawaii State Center for Nursing. In order to increase evidence-based practice (EBP), a civilian-military partnership was formed to include healthcare organizations in the state, optimize resources, and share strategies for successful practice changes statewide. The partnership has been successful in meeting each of these goals using national EBP competencies and Bloom's taxonomy as a guide. The article presents a discussion regarding the history, processes, and outcomes of this partnership. PMID:24488872

  9. Crossover of marital dissatisfaction during military downsizing among Russian army officers and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mina; Vinokur, Amiram D; Hamilton, V Lee; Roziner, Ilan

    2004-10-01

    This study examined mechanisms of strain crossover within couples and the moderating role of gender. Data were collected at a time of military downsizing from a sample of 1,250 Russian army officers and their spouses. The authors tested a model that incorporated 3 mechanisms for the crossover of marital dissatisfaction among dual-earner couples. The model provided support for 2 suggested crossover mechanisms: direct reactions of crossover and indirect mediated effects through social undermining. Strong evidence was also provided for gender asymmetry in the crossover process. Marital dissatisfaction crossed over from husbands to wives but not vice versa, and social undermining behavior played a role in the process of crossover of marital dissatisfaction for husbands but not for wives. PMID:15506859

  10. Spouse abuse recidivism in the U.S. Army by gender and military status.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, J E; Thayer, L E; Liu, X; Newby, J H; Norwood, A E; Fullerton, C S; Ursano, R J

    2000-06-01

    Recidivism by spouse abusers was investigated using records of offenders in the U.S. Army Central Registry. Recidivism by gender and military status (active-duty or civilian spouse) was compared over a 70-month period. Between fiscal years 1989-1997, 48,330 offenders were identified in initial and recidivist incidents. Recidivism was analyzed by means of a Cox proportional hazard rate model, controlling for age, race, number of dependents, education, and substance abuse. Two different sets of survival curves were obtained: (a) Men were much more likely than women to have a recurrence and (b) within gender, civilians were more likely to have a recurrence than were active-duty military personnel. At 70 months, 30% of the male civilian offenders and 27% of the male active-duty offenders had committed a subsequent spouse abuse incident compared with 20% of the female civilian offenders and 18% of the female active-duty offenders, controlling for other variables. PMID:10883570

  11. An evidence-based vector control strategy for military deployments: the British Army experience.

    PubMed

    Croft, A M; Baker, D; von Bertele, M J

    2001-01-01

    We describe the British Army's current strategy for controlling arthropod vectors of disease during overseas deployments. Military commanders and medical officers have different, but complementary responsibilities in achieving vector control. In this paper we define a hierarchy of evidence-based vector control guidelines. Field guidelines must be based on the best available research evidence, preferably that derived from pragmatic randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and from systematic reviews of trials. Assessing the effectiveness of different vector control measures involves a trade-off between the relative benefits and harm of different technology options. There is compelling scientific evidence that bed nets and screens treated with a pyrethroid insecticide are highly effective in protecting against nocturnally active, anthropophilic arthropods (including ectoparasites), and will reduce the incidence of malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis and Chagas' disease. Etofenprox and deltamethrin are the safest pyrethroids, and permethrin the least safe. Vector control strategies of probable effectiveness are the use of insecticide-treated clothing, the wearing of protective clothing, and the correct use of DEET-based topical insect repellents. Aerosol insecticides are of debatable effectiveness. Other effective vector control measures, of limited usefulness during deployments, include electric fans, mosquito coils/vaporising mats, and smoke. "Biological" vector control measures, and insect buzzers/electrocuters are ineffective. Practical insect avoidance measures, based on an understanding of vector biology, complete the military vector-control arsenal. We conclude that practical insect avoidance measures, combined with pyrethroid-treated nets and clothing, and DEET-based topical repellents, can achieve almost 100% protection against biting arthropods. PMID:11584666

  12. Evaluation of mouthguards for the prevention of orofacial injuries during United States Army basic military training.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Georgia G; Knapik, Joseph J; Birk, Marcella G

    2008-02-01

    Beginning in January 2000, all individuals participating in basic military training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, were issued boil-and-bite mouthguards. From January 2000 to March 2001, trainees were required to wear mouthguards only for a single activity, pugil stick training. After March 2001, mouthguards were required for four activities including pugil stick training, unarmed combat, rifle/bayonet training, and the confidence/obstacle course. Dentists systematically tracked trainees who reported to the dental clinic with orofacial injuries during three periods: January 2000-March 2001 (phase 1), April-September 2001 (phase 2) and September 2002-June 2003 (phase 3). Orofacial injury rates were 3.35, 1.89 and 1.91 cases/10,000 person-years in phases 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The overall risk of an orofacial injury was 1.76 (95% confidence interval = 1.03-3.02) times higher in phase 1 compared with the combined phases 2 and 3 (P = 0.006). Thus, orofacial injury rates were lower when mouthguards were required for four training activities as opposed to one training activity. Mouthguards are now required at all five Army basic training sites when trainees are performing any of the four training activities. PMID:18173673

  13. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level. PMID:26827509

  14. Influence of new military athletic footwear on the kinetics and kinematics of running in relation to army boots.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries in the lower extremities are common in military recruits. Army boots have frequently been cited as a potential mechanism behind these high injury rates. In response to this, the British Army introduced new footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), which are issued to each new recruit in an attempt to reduce the incidence of these injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematic of the PT-03 and PT1000 footwear in relation to conventional army boots. Thirteen participants ran at 4.0 m·s in each footwear condition. Three-dimensional kinematics from the hip, knee, and ankle were measured using an 8-camera motion analysis system. In addition, simultaneous ground reaction forces were obtained. Kinetic parameters were obtained alongside joint kinematics and compared using repeated-measures analyses of variance. The kinetic analysis revealed that impact parameters were significantly greater when running in the army boot compared with the PT-03 and PT1000. The kinematic analysis indicated that, in comparison with the PT-03 and PT1000, running in army boots was associated with significantly greater eversion and tibial internal rotation. It was also found that when running in the PT-03 footwear, participants exhibited significantly greater hip adduction and knee abduction compared with the army boots and PT1000. The results of this study suggest that the army boots and PT-03 footwear are associated with kinetic and kinematic parameters that have been linked to the etiology of injury; thus, it is recommended that the PT1000 footwear be adopted for running exercises. PMID:24714532

  15. Shut Out of the Military: Today's High School Education Doesn't Mean You're Ready for Today's Army. K-12 Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theokas, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Many educators comfortably embrace the myth that the military will enlist any and all high school graduates who are interested. However, a new analysis from The Education Trust reports that too many of the nation's high school graduates have not been adequately prepared to serve in the U.S. Army. In "Shut Out of the Military," the first-ever…

  16. Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... investigation comes amid a rising suicide rate among military personnel throughout the last 15 years of continual war. ... at suicides among all active-duty enlisted U.S. military personnel as recorded by the "Suicide Data Repository." This ...

  17. The Roles of Women in the Army and Their Impact on Military Operations and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batts, John H.; And Others

    Problems inherent in the expanded utilization of female soldiers in the U.S. Army are numerous. Attitudes of a wide sample of Army personnel, men and women, enlisted and officer, were surveyed pertaining to those problems. Some problems such as uniforms, billeting, assignments, and training are obvious and with proper planning can and will be…

  18. Putting the military back into the history of the military-industrial complex: the management of technological innovation in the U.S. Army, 1945-1960.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    In 1946 General Dwight Eisenhower, the Army Chief of Staff, established the Research and Development (R&D) Division on the War Department General Staff to expedite major technological breakthroughs in weapons technology. This goal, based on the separation of the management of R&D from procurement, captured the Army's preference for qualitative rather than quantitative superiority on the battlefield, but it threatened to upend entrenched methods of incremental product improvement under way in the Army's supply organizations, collectively called the technical services. The division's brief existence (it ceased operations in 1947) contrasted sharply with the longevity of the Ordnance Department's in-house manufacturing arsenals; for more than a century they had exploited synergies between R&D and production to turn out new weapons mass-produced in industry. The history of the R&D Division and the corresponding management of technological innovation in the technical services broadens an otherwise narrow historiographical interpretation of postwar knowledge production in the United States that is still focused heavily on the moral and political economy of military-funded academic research. PMID:26027309

  19. Realizing Major William Borden's dream: military medicine, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and its wounded warriors, 1909-2009: an essay review.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2011-07-01

    This essay review examines three books dealing with the founding and subsequent activities of Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) and the evolution of military medicine from 1909 to 2009 recently published by the US Army's Borden Institute. Established by fellow army doctor William Borden to honor Walter Reed himself, WRAMC, located in Washington, DC, soon became the public and professional face of medical care for American soldiers. The discussion highlights the ongoing issue of the care and treatment of combat amputees; aspects of gender within military medicine; and WRAMC's function as an educational and research facility. Also discussed are the archival and documentary bases for these books and their utility for historians. Complimentary analysis of two of the books which are, in particular, explicitly about the history of WRAMC is contextualized within the celebration of the centennial of this army post contemporaneously with its closure, amalgamation, and relocation primarily to Maryland. PMID:21724648

  20. Managing workers' compensation costs in the military setting: the Army's story.

    PubMed

    Cloeren, Marianne; Mallon, Timothy M

    2004-05-01

    Direct and indirect costs for the Army's workers' compensation payments have increased to more than 2 billion US dollars. Increasing attention is putting the spotlight on the problems at all levels, and a promising cooperative approach to injury prevention and case management is emerging. This article addresses the system within which the Army's workers' compensation program operates, provides some organizational history, gives an update on current status,and describes what is needed for sustained improvement. The onus is on the Army to develop and implement strategies that use available data to target high-risk occupations and employees to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Front-line managers bear the responsibility for educating the workforce and providing safe workplaces. Employees become the beneficiaries, not of medical and compensation benefits but of safe and healthy work environments. PMID:15182752

  1. Among U.S. Military, Army Members Face Highest Suicide Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He also serves as an associate director of ... University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and associate director, research, Military Health Institute; June ...

  2. Suicide in the Military: Army-NIH Funded Study Points to Risk and Protective Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Office 301-443-4536 NIMHpress@nih.gov More Science News about Basic Research Military Service Members Suicide ... the Field News from the Field NIMH-Funded Science on EurekAlert Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's ...

  3. Autonomous intelligent military robots: Army ants, killer bees, and cybernetic soldiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Robert

    The rationale for developing autonomous intelligent robots in the military is to render conventional warfare systems ineffective and indefensible. The Desert Storm operation demonstrated the effectiveness of such systems as unmanned air and ground vehicles and indicated the future possibilities of robotic technology. Robotic military vehicles would have the advantages of expendability, low cost, lower complexity compared to manned systems, survivability, maneuverability, and a capability to share in instantaneous communication and distributed processing of combat information. Basic characteristics of intelligent systems and hierarchical control systems with sensor inputs are described. Genetic algorithms are seen as a means of achieving appropriate levels of intelligence in a robotic system. Potential impacts of robotic technology in the military are outlined.

  4. A prospective investigation of injury incidence and injury risk factors among army recruits in military police training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background United States Army military police (MP) training is a 19-week course designed to introduce new recruits to basic soldiering skills, Army values and lifestyle, and law enforcement skills and knowledge. The present investigation examined injury rates and injury risk factors in MP training. Methods At the start of training, 1,838 male and 553 female MP recruits were administered a questionnaire containing items on date of birth, height, weight, tobacco use, prior physical activity, injury history, and menstrual history. Injuries during training were obtained from electronic medical records and the training units provided data on student graduation and attrition. Results Successfully graduating from the course were 94.3% of the men and 83.7% of the women. Experiencing at least one injury during training were 34.2% of the men and 66.7% of the women (risk ratio (women/men) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval = 1.79-2.13). Recruits were at higher injury risk if they reported that they were older, had smoked in the past, or had performed less frequent exercise or sports prior to MP training. Men were at higher injury risk if they reported a prior injury and women were at higher risk if they reported missing at least six menstrual cycles in the last year or had previously been pregnant. Conclusion The present investigation was the first to identify injury rates and identify specific factors increasing injury risk during MP training. PMID:23327563

  5. The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air Pollutants on Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that pollution has a large impact on asthma and other respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. But this relationship and its implications are not well understood. I use changes in location due to military transfers, which occur entirely to satisfy the needs of the army, to identify the causal impact of pollution on…

  6. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  7. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  8. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  9. Integration and cooperation of Army logistics simulations for multiphased military deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Richard J.; Blachowicz, Dariusz; Bragen, Mark; Braun, Mary; Burke, James, Jr.; Howard, Dawn; Macal, Charles; Van Groningen, Charles; Widing, Mary Ann

    2004-08-01

    Military deployment planners and analysts must consider the constraints, options, and available infrastructure of a network of installations and ports, from the beginning of the transportation system in the United States to the end of the deployment in the host country. Argonne National Laboratory developed a suite of models that simulate and visualize these deployments. There are discrete event simulations (the Enhanced Logistics Intra-theater Support Tool, the Transportation System Capability model, and the Port Simulation model) as well as several data editing and visualization tools. This paper presents the models, and discusses how they interact and leverage their shared data and technologies, to facilitate deployment analysis.

  10. A study of hearing changes among military conscripts in the Swedish Army.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Per; Månsson, Bertil; Hellström, Per Anders

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and the relative risk of significant threshold shift (STS, >or=15 dB deterioration at any ear and audiometric frequency) during primary military service (7-9 months), and to investigate whether subjects with an initial slight hearing loss (thresholds>or=25 dB HL at any audiometric frequency and ear) were under increased risk. The investigation was made as a prospective audiometric study and included 747 men. An age-matched group of 138 individuals served as an unexposed control group, whose incidence of STS was 2.9%. In the exposed group the incidence was 7.9% and the relative risk 2.7 risk ratio (RR). In the subgroup of 95 persons, who already at reporting-for-training had a mild hearing loss, the incidence was 17%. The relative risk for STS in this group compared to the control group was 6.8 (RR), and compared to those with normal hearing at reporting was 3.1 (RR). In spite of hearing conservation efforts, hearing deterioration still occurs, above all in the artillery. Those who already at reporting-for-training had a mild hearing loss were at higher risk for STS compared to those with initially normal hearing. PMID:16684706

  11. [From Geomorphological Research in the Canton of Aargau to European Military Pathologies. Entangling Anthropological Discourses of Crisis through the Army, 1860-1900].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Military statistics and medical research were closely related over the 19th century. The army not only made use of these new forms of knowledge, but also provided an important institutional setting through the military medicine, which was of crucial importance to medical research in the 19th century. Besides that, Swiss military also played a crucial role in new geographical and geological research, resulting in a series of new mapping projects. This article looks on the ways, in which military context gained influence on scientific research practices in the second half of the 19th century, by analyzing the case of Heinrich Bircher's work on military recruiting statistics and the endemic goiter. New mapping projects and statistical practices were linked, transforming big parts of the country into pathological spaces. Coming from this point, the article discusses in how far the military context lead to politicizing medical discourses and, furthermore, linked them to discourses of an anthropological crisis, common in many European countries. PMID:26902058

  12. Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

  13. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  14. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  15. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a) DEs..., appropriate commanders and DEs will be advised. The major commander will be requested to submit a Report of Excess pursuant to AR 405-90 to HQDA (DAEN-REM) Washington, DC 20314 within 15 days. DEs will...

  16. Microhabitat and body size effects on heat tolerance: implications for responses to climate change (army ants: Formicidae, Ecitoninae).

    PubMed

    Baudier, Kaitlin M; Mudd, Abigail E; Erickson, Shayna C; O'Donnell, Sean

    2015-09-01

    1. Models that predict organismal and population responses to climate change may be improved by considering ecological factors that affect species thermal tolerance. Species differences in microhabitat use can expose animals to diverse thermal selective environments at a given site and may cause sympatric species to evolve different thermal tolerances. 2. We tested the hypothesis that species differences in body size and microhabitat use (above- vs. below-ground activity) would correspond to differences in thermal tolerance (maximum critical temperatures: CTmax ). Thermal buffering effects of soil can reduce exposure to extreme high temperatures for below-ground active species. We predicted larger-bodied individuals and species would have higher CTmax and that species mean CTmax would covary positively with degree of above-ground activity. We used Neotropical army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) as models. Army ants vary in microhabitat use from largely subterranean to largely above-ground active species and are highly size polymorphic. 3. We collected data on above- and below-ground temperatures in habitats used by army ants to test for microhabitat temperature differences, and we conducted CTmax assays for army ant species with varying degrees of surface activity and with different body sizes within and between species. We then tested whether microhabitat use was associated with species differences in CTmax and whether microhabitat was a better predictor of CTmax than body size for species that overlapped in size. 4. Microhabitat use was a highly significant predictor of species' upper thermal tolerance limits, both for raw data and after accounting for the effects of phylogeny. Below-ground species were more thermally sensitive, with lower maximum critical temperatures (CTmax ). The smallest workers within each species were the least heat tolerant, but the magnitude of CTmax change with body size was greater in below-ground species. Species-typical microhabitat

  17. Evaluation of the utility and energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Army, Europe, 409th Base Support Battalion, Military Community at Grafenwoehr, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Broders, M.A.; Ruppel, F.R.

    1993-05-01

    Under the provisions of Interagency Agreement DOE 1938-B090-A1 between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Europe (USAREUR), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., is providing technical assistance to USAREUR in the areas of computer science, information engineering, energy studies, and engineering and systems development. One of the initial projects authorized under this interagency agreement is the evaluation of utility and energy monitoring and control systems (UEMCSs) installed at selected US Army installations in Europe. This report is an evaluation of the overall energy-conservation effectiveness and use of the UEMCS at the 409th Base Support Battalion located in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The 409th Base Support Battalion is a large USAREUR military training facility that comprises a large training area, leased housing, the main post area, and the camp areas that include Camps Aachen, Algier, Normandy, Cheb, and Kasserine. All of these facilities are consumers of electrical and thermal energy. However, only buildings and facilities in the main post area and Camps Aachen, Algier, and Normandy are under the control of the UEMCS. The focus of this evaluation report is on these specific areas. Recommendations to further increase energy and cost savings and to improve operation of the UEMCS are proposed.

  18. English Educational Policies of the U.S. Army Military Government in Korea from 1945 to 1948 and Their Effects on the Development of English Language Teaching in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun Gyong

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the English language teaching (ELT) policies and measures taken under the United States Army Military Government in Korea (USAMGIK) from 1945 to 1948, in an attempt to illuminate their implications on the current ELT in Korea. The study analyzes data derived from documents of the Korean and the U.S. governments, literature on…

  19. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article looks at how…

  20. Analysis of antibiotic resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter sp. isolates from military and civilian patients treated at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hujer, Kristine M; Hujer, Andrea M; Hulten, Edward A; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Adams, Jennifer M; Donskey, Curtis J; Ecker, David J; Massire, Christian; Eshoo, Mark W; Sampath, Rangarajan; Thomson, Jodi M; Rather, Philip N; Craft, David W; Fishbain, Joel T; Ewell, Allesa J; Jacobs, Michael R; Paterson, David L; Bonomo, Robert A

    2006-12-01

    Military medical facilities treating patients injured in Iraq and Afghanistan have identified a large number of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. In order to anticipate the impact of these pathogens on patient care, we analyzed the antibiotic resistance genes responsible for the MDR phenotype in Acinetobacter sp. isolates collected from patients at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC). Susceptibility testing, PCR amplification of the genetic determinants of resistance, and clonality were determined. Seventy-five unique patient isolates were included in this study: 53% were from bloodstream infections, 89% were resistant to at least three classes of antibiotics, and 15% were resistant to all nine antibiotics tested. Thirty-seven percent of the isolates were recovered from patients nosocomially infected or colonized at the WRAMC. Sixteen unique resistance genes or gene families and four mobile genetic elements were detected. In addition, this is the first report of bla(OXA-58)-like and bla(PER)-like genes in the U.S. MDR A. baumannii isolates with at least eight identified resistance determinants were recovered from 49 of the 75 patients. Molecular typing revealed multiple clones, with eight major clonal types being nosocomially acquired and with more than 60% of the isolates being related to three pan-European types. This report gives a "snapshot" of the complex genetic background responsible for antimicrobial resistance in Acinetobacter spp. from the WRAMC. Identifying genes associated with the MDR phenotype and defining patterns of transmission serve as a starting point for devising strategies to limit the clinical impact of these serious infections. PMID:17000742

  1. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Heeringa, Steven G.; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  2. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  3. Modeling, simulation, and concept design for hybrid-electric medium-size military trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzoni, Giorgio; Josephson, John R.; Soliman, Ahmed; Hubert, Christopher; Cantemir, Codrin-Gruie; Dembski, Nicholas; Pisu, Pierluigi; Mikesell, David; Serrao, Lorenzo; Russell, James; Carroll, Mark

    2005-05-01

    A large scale design space exploration can provide valuable insight into vehicle design tradeoffs being considered for the U.S. Army"s FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles). Through a grant from TACOM (Tank-automotive and Armaments Command), researchers have generated detailed road, surface, and grade conditions representative of the performance criteria of this medium-sized truck and constructed a virtual powertrain simulator for both conventional and hybrid variants. The simulator incorporates the latest technology among vehicle design options, including scalable ultracapacitor and NiMH battery packs as well as a variety of generator and traction motor configurations. An energy management control strategy has also been developed to provide efficiency and performance. A design space exploration for the family of vehicles involves running a large number of simulations with systematically varied vehicle design parameters, where each variant is paced through several different mission profiles and multiple attributes of performance are measured. The resulting designs are filtered to remove dominated designs, exposing the multi-criterial surface of optimality (Pareto optimal designs), and revealing the design tradeoffs as they impact vehicle performance and economy. The results are not yet definitive because ride and drivability measures were not included, and work is not finished on fine-tuning the modeled dynamics of some powertrain components. However, the work so far completed demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach to design space exploration, and the results to date suggest the powertrain configuration best suited to the FMTV mission.

  4. 75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal... renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee... include the U.S. Army's joint professional military education programs, educational policies,...

  5. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  6. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  7. 32 CFR 644.388 - Army military-screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. 644.388 Section 644.388 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.388 Army military—screening, clearance, preliminary report of excess, except where an E.O. 11954 survey has been made. Upon receipt of a copy of the...

  8. Suicide in the US Army.

    PubMed

    Lineberry, Timothy W; O'Connor, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  9. Suicide in the US Army

    PubMed Central

    Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

  10. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft. PMID:9006884

  11. Hydraulic systems performance of Army engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, H.W.; Lestz, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A technical evaluation of qualified military specification lubricants was started by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research and Development Center and was performed at the U.S. Army Fuels and Lubricants Research Laboratory (AFLRL) located at Southwest Research Institute. This work was conducted to determine if such lubricants can be used as hydraulic fluids in Army Commercial Construction Equipment (CCE) and Selected Material Handling Equipment (SMHE). Sixteen military specification lubricants were extensively evaluated using twelve selected tests required by equipment manufacturers and one test developed by AFLRL in conjunction with John Deere. From the data developed, lubricants meeting Army specifications passed 88 percent of all the tests. It appears that the Army engine oils are good potential candidates for use as hydraulic and power transmission lubricants within the Army CCE/SMHE systems. Areas of concern include copper corrosion, wet brake/clutch frictional performance, and final drive gear wear.

  12. THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

  13. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Soldiers, military and/or Department of the Army Civilian (DAC) police performing off-installation... areas OCONUS. (b) Military and/or DAC police assigned to off-installation operations have the sole... and/or DAC police accompanying civilian law enforcement officers remain directly responsible to,...

  14. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  15. 32 CFR 575.1 - Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military Academy. 575.1 Section 575.1 National... MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.1 Military Academy. (a) Organization and administration. (1) The United States Military Academy is under the general direction and supervision of the Department of the Army....

  16. Typology of Army Families: Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Russell C.

    The active duty Army has approximately 400,000 families who on a daily basis interact with the largest military system in the world. An all-pervasive culture unto itself, the Army affects the lives of each one of these people. This research was begun in order to look at the effects which this lifestyle has and how individuals and families…

  17. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S. Army has committed to a paradigm shift in the way future ground military operations will be conducted. It envisions highly mobile, lethal, and survivable forces that seamlessly combine manned and unmanned elements. To support this vision, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, together with an alliance of government, industrial and academic organizations, has embarked upon a concerted research program focusing upon development of the technologies required for autonomous ground mobility by unmanned systems. This paper will discuss technical activities of the past year and research directions for the future.

  18. The Professional Environment in Army Laboratories and Its Effect on Scientific and Engineering Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Board on Army Science and Technology.

    In response to a 1982 request by the U.S. Department of the Army, the National Research Council's Board on Army Science and Technology established the Committee on Army Manpower to investigate the professional environments and use of civilian and military scientists/engineers in Army laboratories. The committee's primary objective was to identify…

  19. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery....

  20. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  1. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons... spouse and whose remarriage is still valid are not eligible because of the decedent's service....

  2. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  3. Army Space Systems For Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerman, Ronald L.; Gomez, Richard B.

    1988-04-01

    Army combat forces involved in global military operations require knowledge of the terrain and accurate positioning and navigation capability to effectively perform their missions. Combat critical data from satellite-based systems to augment ground and airborne data collection, processing, and dissemination systems are crucial for the delivery and use of the needed information and intelligence in near-real time. The Army is developing ground-based testbed systems to utilize terrain and weather data collected from space-based platforms to enhance Army commanders' battlefield capabilities, and is researching new applications for the NAVSAT Global Positioning System and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-sponsored (DARPA) LIGHTSAT program that are unique to the Army. In addition, the Army is designing experiments to be conducted on the Space Shuttle.

  4. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply. PMID:27001366

  5. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  6. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  7. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  8. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  9. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  10. 32 CFR 1602.17 - Military service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military service. 1602.17 Section 1602.17 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.17 Military service. The term military service includes service in the Army, the Navy, the Air...

  11. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

  12. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors. PMID:15646182

  13. U.S. Army Signal School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Signal Center and School, Fort Monmouth, NJ.

    The U. S. Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, provides military education and appropriate practical training for Armed Forces men and women to prepare them for positions in communications-electronics activities and familiarize them with the application of doctrine, tactics, logistics, and electronic techniques pertinent to the…

  14. A Retrospective of Four Decades of Military Interest in Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzoni, Guido; Matthews, Selma

    2004-11-01

    Following a short discussion on the origin of Thermophotovoltaic (TPV), this presentation offers a retrospective of the progress and results of the recurrent efforts in TPV conducted in the United States by the Military during the last 40 years. The US Army's interest in TPV, for the development of portable power sources, started a few years after the energy conversion approach was conceived. TPV technology was seen to offer a solution for the Army's need for power in the 10 to 1500 Watt range. The technology offered the means to overcome the limitation of size and weight found in existing commercial power sources, with the additional advantage of silent and multifuel operation. Hence, the Army invested research and development (R&D) funding to investigate TPV feasibility for tactical field application. After an initial decade of continuous research studies by the Army, the support for this technology has experienced cycles of significant efforts interrupted by temporary waiting periods to allow this technology to further mature. Over the last four decades, several TPV proof of concept systems were developed. The results of their testing and evaluation have demonstrated the feasibility of the technology for development of power sources with output of several watts to a few hundreds watts. To date, the results have not been found to adequately demonstrate the applicability of TPV to the development of military power generators with output above 500 watts. TPV power sources have not been developed yet for Army field use or troop testing. The development risk is still considered to be moderate-to-high since practical-size systems that go beyond the laboratory test units have not been designed, constructed, tested. The greatest need is for system development, along with concurrent continued component development and improvement. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) support for TPV R&D effort has been drastically reduced. The Army is still pursuing a 500

  15. Army ground robotics research program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Shoemaker, Chuck M.

    2003-09-01

    The U.S. Army is undergoing a transformation from Cold War era "heavy" forward-deployed forces arrayed against a monolithic known enemy to lighter, more flexible, U.S.-based forces able to rapidly engage in a full spectrum of military operations. Unmanned systems can potentially contribute towards achieving this goal of a highly capable and flexible ground force. To support this effort, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory has undertaken a long-term research program to support technology development for unmanned ground vehicle systems. Over the course of the past year, this multifaceted effort has made significant technical strides, demonstrating sufficient technological maturity to potentially enable incorporation of semi-autonomous unmanned vehicles into the initial fielding of Future Combat Systems (FCS), while successfully conducting additional research directed toward improved capabilities for later increments of FCS and Land Warrior systems.

  16. MEMS-based sensor arrays for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    2002-07-01

    Scientists and engineers at the Army Aviation Missile Command's (AMCOM) Research, Development and Engineering Center (RDEC) are cooperatively working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), other Army agencies, and industry to provide technical solutions for the Army's transformation efforts into the 21st Century force. Advanced technologies are being exposed to achieve the performance and cost goals dictated by the emerging missions of the Transformed Army. It is well established that MEMS technology offers the potential solution to cost, size, and weight issues for the soldier, missile, gun, ground vehicles, and aircraft applications. MEMS sensor arrays are currently being investigated to meet system performance requirements and provide more robust mission capability. A Science and Technology Objective, Research and Development Project is underway at AMCOM/RDEC to develop controlled MEMS sensor arrays to provide for full military dynamic performance ranges using miniature sensor system. MEMS-based angular rate sensors are enhanced with vibration feedback form MEMS accelerometers for output signal stabilization in high-vibration environments. Multi-range MEMS-based accelerometers, cooperatively developed by Government and industry, are being multiplexed to provide dynamic range expansion. An array of integrated accelerometers is expected to increase the dynamic range by an order of magnitude. Future projections suggest that MEMS sensor array technology will be applicable to a broad range of military applications, which include environmental sensor suites for structural health monitoring and forward reconnaissance and surveillance; and optical and radio frequency phased arrays for fast beam steering.

  17. Male and Female Soldiers' Beliefs about the "Appropriateness" of Various Jobs for Women in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savell, Joel M.; And Others

    A study was conducted to (1) document the expanding role of women in the U.S. Army and (2) determine whether soldiers in 1974 believed that certain military jobs were appropriate for women and whether those beliefs were related to respondent sex, rank, and expectation of leaving the army before retirement. An examination of army records revealed…

  18. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  19. Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James

    2012-01-01

    Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

  20. New Directions in the Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgrim, Mark T.

    The Army has given to the Training and Doctrine Command the task of developing four Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) curricula to provide functional, job-related basic skills training. These would be Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Baseline Skills, English-as-a-Second Language (ESL), Military Life Coping Skills, and Learning Strategies.…

  1. 78 FR 43796 - Indebtedness of Military Personnel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... is removed, which was established in the Federal Register, March 3, 1986 (51 FR 7268). Rules in the... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 513 Indebtedness of Military Personnel AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule; removal. SUMMARY: This action removes regulations concerning indebtedness of...

  2. Military Reading Assessment: What Theory Tells Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford-Carpenter, Rebecca L.; Schultz-Shiner, Linda J.

    This paper addresses practical Army problems in reading assessment from a theory base reflecting the most recent research on reading comprehension. Military and occupational research shows that reading proficiency is related to job performance. Reading assessment is a key issue in the Army due to changes in the reading ability levels of the Army…

  3. Suicide prevention program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Dedic, Gordana; Gordana, Dedic J; Panic, Milivoje; Milivoje, Panic

    2007-05-01

    Suicide, as one of the greatest problems of maladjustment to the military environment, has been a subject of investigation in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro (former Yugoslav Army) for more than six decades. The Suicide Prevention Program was implemented in December 2003. The aim of the study was to follow-up the application of the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro and its effect on the suicide rate and to compare its incidence in civilians. Results of the program application showed that the number of suicides in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro was constantly reducing over the period 2004 to 2005. For soldiers, it was even four times less than in the civilian male population, particularly in the period of adaptation to the military environment. Since the Suicide Prevention Program in the Army of Serbia and Montenegro proved to be successful in decreasing the suicide number, it should be further improved and routinely applied. PMID:17521110

  4. 76 FR 59119 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution...) 220-5870. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules...

  5. 76 FR 776 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution...: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No. 1. Background: The MFTURP No....

  6. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution... INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No. 1. Background:...

  7. 75 FR 15420 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: References: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  8. 75 FR 60436 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reference: Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publications (MFTURP) No....

  9. Military Career Guide: Employment and Training Opportunities in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This copiously illustrated guide is a single reference source for the diverse employment and training opportunities in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It is divided into two major sections. The first section contains descriptions of 134 enlisted military occupations and provides information regarding the aptitudes needed…

  10. Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) component research and development for army missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Tracy D.; McMillen, Deanna K.; Ashley, Paul R.; Ruffin, Paul B.; Baeder, Janet

    1999-07-01

    The US Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center has identified MEMS as an emerging technology with high potential for fulfilling the mission of future missiles. The technology holds the promise of reducing the size, weight, cost, and power requirements for performing existing functions in Army missile systems, as well las providing opportunities for new computing, sensing, and actuation functions that cannot be achieved with conventional electromechanical technology. MEMS will enable the Army's next generation of smaller and lighter missiles. The military market drives the thrust for development of miniature sensor with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control system, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, missile and ground-based radar, radio frequency seekers, aerodynamic flow control, IR imagers, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Current efforts at AMCOM include the development of MEMS-based inertial components to include accelerometers with wide dynamic range, tactical grade gyros with high rate range, and miniature three-axis inertial measurement unit with common interface electronics. Performance requirements of such components will be presented in terms of current and future Army missile systems. Additional MEMS based efforts under investigation at AMCOM include missile storage health monitoring, RF MEMS components, encoders for actuators, and aerodynamic flow control will also be discussed.

  11. Ditching Tests of a 1/9-Size Model of the Army P-38 Airplane in Langley Tank No. 2 and at the Outdoor Catapult

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, George A.; Cederborg, Gibson A.

    1946-01-01

    A dynamically similar model of the Army P-38 airplane was tested to determine the best way to land this airplane on the water and to determine its probable ditching performance. The tests consisted of ditching the model at various landing attitudes, flap settings, speeds, weights, and conditions of simulated damage. The model was ditched in calm water from the tank towing carriage and a few ditching were made in both calm and rough water at the outdoor catapult. The performance of the model was determined by making visual observations, by recording lengths of run and time histories of decelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings.

  12. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for...-connected members or who have remarried after the interment of the service-connected spouse and...

  13. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for...-connected members or who have remarried after the interment of the service-connected spouse and...

  14. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE WITH LAKE WILSON IN THE FOREGROUND AND WAIANAE MOUNTAINS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of recent aerial photograph (from U.S. Army Support Command Hawaii, Wheeler Army Air Base, Hawaii) Photographer unknown, Circa 1990 AERIAL VIEW SHOWING MAIN SECTION OF BASE, BETWEEN KUNIA ROAD, WILIKINA DRIVE, AND McMAHON ROAD, AS WELL AS ADJACENT PINEAPPLE FIELDS, AND LAKE WILSON. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. The Army Spouse: Perceptions of Educational Needs during Deployment and Nondeployment Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Alicia G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare educational needs and goals during deployment and nondeployment of spouses of active-duty Army service members. The sample consisted of spouses of active-duty military service members from the Army brigades who had recently returned from a deployment or who were experiencing a deployment…

  17. Educating the U.S. Army: Arthur L. Wagner and Reform, 1875-1905.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brereton, T. R.

    Arthur Lockwood Wagner, who graduated from West Point in 1876, was one of the best known and most influential U.S. Army officers of his day. An intellectual and educator, Wagner was instrumental in some of the most critical reforms in U.S. Army history. He advocated enhanced military education, adopting modern combat techniques, holding…

  18. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  19. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  20. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  1. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  2. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  3. Mission aware energy saving strategies for Army ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattathreya, Macam S.

    Fuel energy is a basic necessity for this planet and the modern technology to perform many activities on earth. On the other hand, quadrupled automotive vehicle usage by the commercial industry and military has increased fuel consumption. Military readiness of Army ground vehicles is very important for a country to protect its people and resources. Fuel energy is a major requirement for Army ground vehicles. According to a report, a department of defense has spent nearly $13.6 billion on fuel and electricity to conduct ground missions. On the contrary, energy availability on this plant is slowly decreasing. Therefore, saving energy in Army ground vehicles is very important. Army ground vehicles are embedded with numerous electronic systems to conduct missions such as silent and normal stationary surveillance missions. Increasing electrical energy consumption of these systems is influencing higher fuel consumption of the vehicle. To save energy, the vehicles can use any of the existing techniques, but they require complex, expensive, and time consuming implementations. Therefore, cheaper and simpler approaches are required. In addition, the solutions have to save energy according to mission needs and also overcome size and weight constraints of the vehicle. Existing research in the current literature do not have any mission aware approaches to save energy. This dissertation research proposes mission aware online energy saving strategies for stationary Army ground vehicles to save energy as well as to meet the electrical needs of the vehicle during surveillance missions. The research also proposes theoretical models of surveillance missions, fuzzy logic models of engine and alternator efficiency data, and fuzzy logic algorithms. Based on these models, two energy saving strategies are proposed for silent and normal surveillance type of missions. During silent mission, the engine is on and batteries power the systems. During normal surveillance mission, the engine is

  4. Reinforcement Management; An Approach to Motivating Army Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie

    To study the effectiveness of reinforcement management (contigency management) as applied to a military program of instruction already in operation, 335 students in an Army clerk-typist course in which self-paced instruction is used were given points for successive approximations to desired learning behavior. The points were exchangeable later for…

  5. Effectiveness of Interactive Videodisc in Army Communications Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, John D.; Polich, J. Michael

    This report presents the results of RAND research conducted at the U.S. Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia, to evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive videodisc (IVD) system used to facilitate training in a variety of military occupational specialities. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a methodology for assessing the…

  6. Commentary on "The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)": Army STARRS: a Framingham-like study of psychological health risk factors in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Kerry J; Schoomaker, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Although historically the Army suicide rate has been significantly lower than the civilian rate, in 2004, the suicide and accidental death rates began trending upward. By 2008, the Army suicide rate had risen above the national average (20.2 per 100,000). In 2009, 160 active duty Soldiers took their lives, making suicide the third leading cause of death among the Army population. If accidental death, frequently the result of high-risk behavior, is included, then more Soldiers died by their own actions than in combat in 2009. The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) was thus created in 2009 to begin to address these problems. The Army STARRS project is a large consortium of seven different studies to develop data-driven methods for mitigating or preventing suicide behaviors and improving the overall mental health and behavioral functioning of Army Soldiers during and after their Army service. The first research articles from the Army STARRS project were published in late 2013 and early 2014. This work has already begun to outline important facets of risk in the military, and it is helping to drive an empirically derived approach to improvements in understanding mental disorders and risk behavior and to improve prevention and support of mental health and resilience. The Framingham Heart Study, started in the 1940s, marked a watershed event in utilizing large cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal collaborative research to identify and understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The Army STARRS project, through its collaborative, prospective, and robust innovative design and implementation, may provide the beginning of a similar scientific cohort in mental disorders. The work of this project will help understand biological and psychological aspects of military service, including those leading to suicide. When coupled with timely feedback to Army leadership, it permits near real-time steps to diagnose, mitigate, and

  7. Adjustment and Achievement Associated with Mobility in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, Karen H.; Medway, Frederic J.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated 40 Army families regarding history of geographic mobility, identification with Army life, personal well-being, and children's school achievement and social competence. Frequent relocation was not detrimental to service member or spouse and was positively associated with higher child and social competence. Military identification…

  8. 78 FR 70024 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3, Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ..., Military Ocean Terminal Concord, CA AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability... (DEIS) for the Modernization and Repair of Piers 2 and 3 at Military Ocean Terminal Concord (MOTCO)....

  9. AIDS/HIV in the US military.

    PubMed

    Tramont, E C; Burke, D S

    1993-01-01

    HIV infection (AIDS) burst upon the scene a decade ago. Because it is a sexually transmitted disease that infects blood and kills its victim, it is military relevant and will impact on all aspects of the military. The US Army Medical Research and Development Command as 'Lead Agent for Infectious Disease Research' in the Department of Defense has developed a comprehensive approach to address military concerns: surveillance of infection rates (intelligence) around the world and in the military; behavioural research to develop more effective means of education to change behaviour; and biological research to develop a quick and easy field test, and a vaccine or drug to prevent the disease from occurring despite exposure. Its success will influence the success of the Army in the future. PMID:8488704

  10. Decision-Making Considerations for Mid-Career Army Officers to Pursue Master's Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding why military students pursue a master's degree has become more important as the number of military students taking advantage of education benefits through the Post-911 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 has increased. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore how U.S. Army officers attending the Command and…

  11. Exploring Collaboration System Effectiveness at the United States Army Brigade Echelon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Terry W.

    2012-01-01

    Since the attacks on September 11, 2001, a major transformation of the United States Army began to create a modular, scalable, and modernized military force. This effort was the most significant restructuring of military forces in the last 80 years. However, after 6 years of sustained combat operations in the Middle East many of the collaboration…

  12. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  13. Russian Basic Course: Military Situations, Exercises 1-35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    Thirty-five military situations treated in this volume provide exercises in the use of practical military terminology received from the United States Army General School. Each exercise is devoted to a specific topic, and in each case lists of new words and idioms together with their English equivalents are provided. Lessons consist primarily of…

  14. Education and the New Military: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnell, Jerrold B.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses three significant events, which are altering the educational future of military personnel: establishment of the Community College of the Air Force in 1972; expiration of the G.I. Bill in 1976; and formation of the all volunteer Army. He suggests that this will affect the education of military personnel adversely. (KC)

  15. Role of the Military, Unit III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on the role of the military in Wyoming history provides activities which focus on the system of forts which began in 1849, Indian conflicts, World War II, and the Army and Air National Guard. Student activities include illustrating various battles, locating major Wyoming forts on a map, field trips to F.E. Warren Air Force Base and Fort…

  16. Israeli Adolescents and Military Service: Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Amihay; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Asserts that inadequate attention has been paid to the problems of the young soldier entering army life in Israel. Delineates some areas of friction and vulnerability between the worlds of the youth and the military. Describes the systematization of these encounters into groups, creating the "Binary Model," which helps in locating and treating…

  17. Military Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    Argues that while a certain level of fairness is necessary in considering the equity of compulsory military service, the most important issue is that of "winning the war." Also asserts that sex, age, and race discrimination are more important than social class discrimination in military service. (Author/GC)

  18. The Relationship between the Perceived Level of Organizational Support for Families and Spouse Satisfaction with Military Life. Technical Report 874.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.; Neenan, Peter A.

    This study examined the relationship of satisfaction with the perceived level of organizational support for families and overall satisfaction with military life among civilian spouses of Army members. The report is based on an analysis of the responses of 2,814 Army spouses of the 1985 Department of Defense Survey of Military Spouses. The…

  19. Preliminary thoughts concerning potential US Army threats/roles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.; Solomon, K.A.; Miles, J.T.

    1991-06-01

    The rate at which the current world military/political perspective is changing demands consideration of a broader spectrum of potential threats then has been the case for the past few decades--during which the Soviet Union was the preeminent threat. Seemingly overnight, the cold war ceased, the requirement for massive U.S. military counters to the Soviet Union forces faded, and an era of constant (obvious) military threat disappeared. This situation has in turn been revolutionized by the Iraq invasion of Kuwait and the U.S. response. The paper addresses part of the problem facing military planners by defining a spectrum of threats that typify those the U.S. Army might face over the next decade or two. The purpose of the threat set is to support the evaluation of the effectiveness and usefulness, to the U.S. Army, of advanced technologies. The set of threats is intended to provide a complete set of characteristics rather then to be a complete list of the possibilities; it is illustrative rather than exhaustive. Although largely completed before the war with Iraq started, its content is still valid in that its purpose is to provide a framework for thinking about future U.S. Army technology needs.

  20. 78 FR 65977 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will not take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board... of appropriations, the Department of Defense cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Military Academy...

  1. 77 FR 58529 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military Academy,...

  2. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military Academy,...

  3. 77 FR 31339 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... provide the Board updates on the following: Physical, Moral/Ethical and Military Programs, to...

  4. 76 FR 41490 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... States Military Academy, Office of the Secretary of the General Staff (MASG), 646 Swift Road, West...

  5. 75 FR 20827 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... provide the Board updates on the following: Military Program, Physical Program, Intercollegiate...

  6. 76 FR 31308 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Agenda: The Academy leadership will provide the Board updates on the following: Military...

  7. 78 FR 32241 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting AGENCY: Department... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013. 3. Time: 2 p... provide the Board updates on the following: Graduation 2013, Class of 2017, Military Program...

  8. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  9. 75 FR 7571 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Tuesday, March 9, 2010. 3. Time: 12:30... Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States Military ] Academy, Office of the Secretary of the...

  10. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011. ] 3. Time: 12...

  11. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  12. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  13. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  14. 32 CFR 643.13 - Military requirement for real estate under grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Military requirement for real estate under grant... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE General § 643.13 Military requirement for real estate under grant. When a military requirement arises for real estate which is being used under a grant of non-Army use,...

  15. 78 FR 13030 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... (DFO) at: United States Military Academy, Office of the Secretary of the General Staff (MASG),...

  16. A Surgical Business Composite Score for Army Medicine.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Douglas R; Robinson, Andrew B; Comer, Tracy A; Meno, Jenifer A; Welder, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Measuring surgical business performance for Army military treatment facilities is currently done through 6 business metrics developed by the Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Surgical Services Service Line (3SL). Development of a composite score for business performance has the potential to simplify and synthesize measurement, improving focus for strategic goal setting and implementation. However, several considerations, ranging from data availability to submetric selection, must be addressed to ensure the score is accurate and representative. This article presents the methodology used in the composite score's creation and presents a metric based on return on investment and a measure of cases recaptured from private networks. PMID:27244067

  17. 2D electronic materials for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Terrance; Perconti, Philip

    2015-05-01

    The record electronic properties achieved in monolayer graphene and related 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide and hexagonal boron nitride show promise for revolutionary high-speed and low-power electronic devices. Heterogeneous 2D-stacked materials may create enabling technology for future communication and computation applications to meet soldier requirements. For instance, transparent, flexible and even wearable systems may become feasible. With soldier and squad level electronic power demands increasing, the Army is committed to developing and harnessing graphene-like 2D materials for compact low size-weight-and-power-cost (SWAP-C) systems. This paper will review developments in 2D electronic materials at the Army Research Laboratory over the last five years and discuss directions for future army applications.

  18. A Profile of Army Families in USAREUR: Results of the 1983 Families in Europe Survey. Research Report 1428.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkaptan, Halim; And Others

    This report contains the results of a survey conducted in May 1983 of Army families in USARFUR (United States Army--Europe). A total of 1,036 married and accompanied family members, both military member and spouse, were surveyed. The sample was representative of the approximately 60,000 families in USAREUR in terms of rank distribution, combat…

  19. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    PubMed

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:27035922

  20. Military issues.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Owens, Mark

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews of some of the lessons in trauma psychiatry learned by the US military through wartime and other trauma experiences during the past century. Current practice in the military's employment of stress control teams is reviewed. The military's efforts to prevent and limit psychological casualties, to include the care of battle casualties and prisoners of war (POWs), are addressed. Recent experiences that have informed further, and are shaping the military's approach to managing the psychological aftermath of trauma (such as the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the Pentagon and the current war with Iraq) are included. Guidelines developed after 9/11, and articulated in the "Mass Violence and Early Intervention" conference are presented. Finally, current ideas on preparation for and intervention after weapons of mass destruction will be outlined. PMID:15325487

  1. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  2. Body composition and military performance--many things to many people.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2012-07-01

    Soldiers are expected to maintain the highest possible level of physical readiness because they must be ready to mobilize and perform their duties anywhere in the world at any time. The objective of Army body composition standards is to motivate physical training and good nutrition habits to ensure a high state of readiness. Establishment of enforceable and rational standards to support this objective has been challenging even at extremes of body size. Morbidly obese individuals are clearly not suited to military service, but very large muscular individuals may be superbly qualified for soldier performance demands. For this reason, large individuals are measured for body fat using a waist circumference-based equation (female soldiers are also measured for hip circumference). The main challenge comes in setting appropriate fat standards to support the full range of Army requirements. Military appearance ideals dictate the most stringent body fat standards, whereas health risk thresholds anchor the most liberal standards, and physical performance associations fall on a spectrum between these 2 poles. Standards should not exclude or penalize specialized performance capabilities such as endurance running or power lifting across a spectrum of body sizes and fat. The full integration of women into the military further complicates the issue because of sexually dimorphic characteristics that make gender-appropriate standards essential and where inappropriately stringent standards can compromise both health and performance of this segment of the force. Other associations with body composition such as stress effects on intraabdominal fat distribution patterns and metabolic implications of a fat reserve for survival in extreme environments are also relevant considerations. This is a review of the science that underpins the U.S. Army body composition standards. PMID:22643136

  3. Building adaptive nurse leaders for future Army full spectrum operations.

    PubMed

    Funari, Tamara S; Gentzler, Kevin; Wyssling, Philip W; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2011-02-01

    The Army Nurse Corps (ANC) life cycle model outlines major milestones that are required, expected, or recommended to be achieved to prepare Army Nurses to become senior leaders. Army nurses must be prepared to function in uncertain future full spectrum operational environment. The purpose of this study was to determine specific education and developmental experiences that will assist in developing ANC officers to become adaptive leaders through a review of literature and qualitative study. Fifteen interviews were conducted with senior ANC officers. Purposive sampling was used, yielding a sample population with a variety of experiences, to include deployments, recruiting, command, and joint operational assignments. Results indicated that the major themes for senior leader preparation are military education, field experience, and the need to add a new career pathway to ensure equal opportunity of advancement for both clinicians and administrators. PMID:21366082

  4. Population trends of San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.

    1992-10-01

    Population trends of a San Joaquin kit fox population (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California, from November 1989 through August 1991. Six semiannual livetrapping sessions and eight scent-station survey sessions were conducted. Livetrapping results and radiotelemetry data were used to calculate minimum population size, density, and distribution. A total of 175 individual foxes were trapped 463 times. The number of individuals trapped and minimum population size calculations showed a decline over time. The highest minimum population (109) was observed in winter 1988. Summer 1991 had the lowest minimum population size (45). No evidence was found to indicate that the apparent population decline was a result of military-authorized activities.

  5. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  6. Distance Education: A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Terri Moore; Freeman, Dexter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the relevance of an army-university partnership in view of the cultures of both public higher education and the military graduate education system. The article also outlines the planning model used to navigate through the various issues that should be considered when a university partners with a federal or military agency to…

  7. 75 FR 36643 - Interim Change to the Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) No. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    .... 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and...). The update provides clearer guidance on when Transportation Service Providers (TSP) may charge...

  8. 78 FR 20299 - Meeting of the Department of Defense Military Family Readiness Council (MFRC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Council meeting is to review the military family programs which will be the focus for the Council for next... the Secretary of Defense. This meeting will focus on Army and Office of the Secretary of...

  9. 32 CFR 215.9 - Providing military resources to civil authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of the Army; (ii) The Director and Deputy Director of Military Support; or (iii) A Task Force... the General Counsel of the DoD, the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Installations and Logistics),...

  10. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  11. Review of US Army ionizing-radiation dosimetry system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Army civilian and military personnel are exposed occupationally to various forms of ionizing radiation, and the U.S. Army Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry Center is responsible for monitoring these exposures. There are several accepted methods for monitoring radiation exposure, the oldest being the film badge method. A modern alternative method, which has achieved widespread acceptance, is the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badge. Inasmuch as the Radiation Dosimetry Center is in the process of converting from film badges to TLD badges for radiation monitoring, the Army requested assistance on how it might optimize the transition to this new monitoring system.

  12. Raising the clinical standard of care for suicidal soldiers: an army process improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Archuleta, Debra; Jobes, David A; Pujol, Lynette; Jennings, Keith; Crumlish, Jennifer; Lento, Rene M; Brazaitis, Katherine; Moore, Bret A; Crow, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    From 2004 to 2008, the suicide rate among US Army Soldiers increased 80%, reaching a record high in 2008 and surpassing the civilian rate for the first time in recorded history. In recent years, the rate of Army suicides rose again; the year 2012 reflects the highest rate of military suicides on record. There is a need to assess current behavioral health practices to identify both effective and ineffective practices, and to adapt services to meet the needs of the Army behavioral health patient population. This paper discusses a process improvement initiative developed in an effort to improve clinical processes for suicide risk mitigation in an Army behavioral health clinic located in the catchment area of the US Army Southern Regional Medical Command. PMID:25830799

  13. An update of military robotics activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lovece, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Military unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are beginning to break new ground that will strongly affect the future development of robotics. Current and planned future demonstrations of new UGV technologies are aiding in the maturation of control and navigation technologies critical to remotely controlled, supervised, and autonomous robots. The United States and its allies are spending millions of dollars to develop UGVs for military applications. The first systems will be deployed by the year 2000. The United States is leading the way, and its program is focused on the tactical UGV (TUGV) for the US Army and Marine Corps.

  14. 78 FR 77108 - Surplus Property Notice at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Pueblo Chemical Depot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Property List 1. Addition Colorado Pueblo Chemical Depot: 45825 Hwy 96E, Building 1, Pueblo, CO 81006- 9330... Department of the Army Surplus Property Notice at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Pueblo Chemical Depot, Colorado AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice...

  15. Army occupational health and AEJA (Army Environmental Hygiene Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Kneessy, A.D.

    1981-05-01

    The Army Environmental Hygiene Agency (AEHA) recently celebrated 38 years of continuous service in support of occupational health programs of the Army. This report briefly reviews its historical development, examine some of its current occupational and industrial hygiene programs, and touches on future program efforts. The Army Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, conducts surveys and investigations concerning occupational health hazards in Army-owned and operated industrial plants, arsenals and depots, and privately owned and operated ordnance explosive establishments. The end of World War II was the beginning of the nuclear age and attendant Medical Department responsibilities for radiation protection programs beyond the traditional concern for x-ray protection. The US Army has undertaken the demilitarization of obsolete and excess chemical munitions. The Medical Systems Safety and Health Branch is tasked to survey Army hospitals within the United States, to identify and recommend corrective action for safety and health hazards. At present, a continuing study is underway to evaluate the waste anesthetic gases to operating room personnel in Army hospitals. Noise-induced hearing loss is considered the most widespread occupational injury incurred by DA personnel.

  16. Occupational differences in US Army suicide rates

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R. C.; Stein, M. B.; Bliese, P. D.; Bromet, E. J.; Chiu, W. T.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gilman, S. E.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S. G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Zaslavsky, A. M.; Ursano, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Civilian suicide rates vary by occupation in ways related to occupational stress exposure. Comparable military research finds suicide rates elevated in combat arms occupations. However, no research has evaluated variation in this pattern by deployment history, the indicator of occupation stress widely considered responsible for the recent rise in the military suicide rate. Method The joint associations of Army occupation and deployment history in predicting suicides were analysed in an administrative dataset for the 729 337 male enlisted Regular Army soldiers in the US Army between 2004 and 2009. Results There were 496 suicides over the study period (22.4/100 000 person-years). Only two occupational categories, both in combat arms, had significantly elevated suicide rates: infantrymen (37.2/100 000 person-years) and combat engineers (38.2/100 000 person-years). However, the suicide rates in these two categories were significantly lower when currently deployed (30.6/100 000 person-years) than never deployed or previously deployed (41.2–39.1/100 000 person-years), whereas the suicide rate of other soldiers was significantly higher when currently deployed and previously deployed (20.2–22.4/100 000 person-years) than never deployed (14.5/100 000 person-years), resulting in the adjusted suicide rate of infantrymen and combat engineers being most elevated when never deployed [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1–4.1], less so when previously deployed (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.1), and not at all when currently deployed (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.8–1.8). Adjustment for a differential ‘healthy warrior effect’ cannot explain this variation in the relative suicide rates of never-deployed infantrymen and combat engineers by deployment status. Conclusions Efforts are needed to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying this interaction to guide preventive interventions for soldiers at high suicide risk. PMID:26190760

  17. Preferred emission factor techniques for army emission inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, L.M.; Robinson, D.L.; Alden, S.A.; Hopp, P.L.; Ruff, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA-90) present an unprecedented regulatory challenge to the Department of the Army and the entire US business community. Unlike previous legislation, which focused heavily on the substantive or emission control aspects of air quality management, this round of Amendments focused equal attention on the administrative aspects of air pollution control. Specifically, each new Title of the CAAA-90 is underpinned, either explicitly or implicitly, with the need to perform an emission inventory. The emission inventory is an implied prerequisite for determining the applicability of any of the emission control requirements of the 1990 Amendments, and it is the explicit center piece of the Title 5 operating permit program. Although the emission inventory is little more than a formal accounting of the number and type of emission sources and their associated air emissions, the resource requirements for preparing and maintaining the inventory can be substantial. The average contractor cost for preparing an initial emission inventory at an Army installation was over $100,000. Record keeping to support the inventory, and the annual inventory updates required for the Title 5 permit program will only expand these costs. In an effort to assist the Army community with the ongoing obligation to prepare these emission inventories, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has compiled a list of preferred emission inventory techniques for the various emission sources found at Army installations. The USACHPPM guidance identifies emission sources most likely to be found at an Army installation, as well as the most effective and preferred emission factors associated with these sources. This guidance is designed to be widely disseminated, and may have relevant applications in the non-military community.

  18. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  19. Psychological Issues in the Recovery of an Army Unit after Traumatic Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartone, Paul T.; And Others

    The United States Army battalion that suffered the heaviest losses (189 soldiers killed) in the December, 1985 military charter airline crash was studied longitudinally over the 6-month period following the disaster. Extensive interview and observational data were collected at approximately monthly intervals. The purpose of the study was to…

  20. The U.S. Army's Impact on the History of Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Steve

    2005-01-01

    One of the most significant events that heralded the Department of Defense's commitment to distance education was the Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) Initiative, which held its kickoff meeting in Washington, DC in 1997. This meeting provided the army and other military services the endorsement that had been lacking relative to implementing…

  1. A New Approach to Managing the Army Selective Reenlistment Bonus. Technical Report 634.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Sheldon E.; And Others

    In this study, a theoretical model of profit maximization was developed in which the Selective Reenlistment Bonus (SRB) is treated as a wage premium payable to military personnel who are more productive, more costly to recruit and train, and less likely to continue in the Army in the absence of the SRB. Empirical estimation of the model is based…

  2. Assessment for the U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program: The Global Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher; Park, Nansook; Castro, Carl A.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology and the U.S. military have a long history of collaboration. The U.S. Army Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program aims to measure the psychosocial strengths and assets of soldiers as well as their problems, to identify those in need of basic training in a given domain as well as those who would benefit from advanced training, and…

  3. Teaching at the United States Army War College: Philosophy, Practice, and Resources. AY [Academic Year] 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, John R., III

    This manual is intended for use as part of a 3-day orientation training for new faculty at the U.S. Army War College (USAWC) in Pennsylvania, a facility which trains tactical and operational leaders for policy and strategy roles in the military and related agencies. The orientation focuses on five factors which determine the value of an…

  4. 75 FR 24930 - Fort Bliss (Texas) Army Growth and Force Structure Realignment Final Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...-PWE, Building 624, Taylor Road, Fort Bliss, TX 79916-6812; e- mail: bliss.eis@conus.army.mil . FOR... libraries: In El Paso (TX), the Richard Burges Regional Library, 9600 Dyer; the Irving Schwartz Branch... stationing package. Alternative 5 land use changes allow fixed sites (e.g., military bivouac),...

  5. The 1980 Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. [Volume] 2: Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Eugene J.; And Others

    For more than 35 years, this Guide has been the standard reference work for recognizing learning acquired in military life. All the courses offered by the Army are listed and briefly described. Each course description includes the course title and number: the length of the course, and where and when it was offered; the course objectives; the type…

  6. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N.; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W.; Young, Andrew J.; Zambraski, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of…

  7. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  8. 75 FR 65006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Annual Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States...

  9. 75 FR 3901 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of.... Written statements should be sent to the Designated Federal Officer (DFO) at: United States...

  10. 75 FR 34989 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Agency: Department of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Summer Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States...

  11. The Long War and Parental Combat Deployment: Effects on Military Children and At-Home Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Patricia; Peterson, Kris; Reeves, James; Knauss, Larry; Glover, Dorie; Mogil, Catherine; Duan, Naihua; Saltzman, William; Pynoos, Robert; Wilt, Katherine; Beardslee, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Given the growing number of military service members with families and the multiple combat deployments characterizing current war time duties, the impact of deployments on military children requires clarification. Behavioral and emotional adjustment problems were examined in children (aged 6 through 12) of an active duty Army or Marine…

  12. The Success of a National Dialogue on Sustainable Military Range Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Lenny

    2003-01-01

    Military munitions are the silent giant of hazardous waste management and cleanup in the United States. Toward the end of the first Clinton administration, the Navy and Air Force prevailed upon the Army--the armed service with the biggest ordnance problem--to consider co-sponsoring a formal dialogue on military munitions facilitated by the…

  13. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  14. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  15. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  16. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  17. 32 CFR 536.76 - Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Claims not payable under the Military Claims Act. 536.76 Section 536.76 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under the Military Claims Act § 536.76 Claims not payable under the...

  18. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  19. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  20. Occupational health and safety issues in military field hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C

    2001-10-01

    This paper considers the occupational health and safety issues that apply within a military field hospital. It considers NHS occupational health and safety activities and examines how these might be applied within an Army Medical Services unit. Areas that are unique to field hospitals are highlighted in comparison with a static NHS hospital. Some issues for future work are also considered. PMID:11766206

  1. Free Speech in the Military: A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard A.

    Two recent decisions of the United States Supreme Court have emasculated First Amendment guarantees for military personnel. In the first case, Parker v. Levy, an Army captain urged enlisted Special Forces personnel at his post to refuse to go to Viet Nam, claiming that "Special Forces personnel are liars and thieves and killers of peasants and…

  2. Survey of Speech Articulation Disorders Among Military Dependent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Don E.

    Reported was a study involving 20,000 (army) military dependent children (MDC) attending 75 schools in seven school systems throughout the continental United States during 1971. Testing of 412 randomly selected MDC using the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation revealed a significant correlation and associative factor between MDC speech…

  3. Educating the Military Work Force: A Worldwide Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald W.; Saltman, Lenore E.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Defense, in cooperation with a number of colleges and universities, offers a variety of higher education opportunities to military personnel: the Community College of the Air Force, the Army and Navy's Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges, and Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES). (SK)

  4. Health Potential of Female Candidates to the Professional Military Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Alicja; Sokolowski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess health and social characteristics of female candidates for professional officers and non-commissioned officers of Polish Army. Material and methods: All female students of officer and non-commissioned officer Military Academies (16 each) were studied in 2009. Two questionnaires were applied in the study: IPAQ (short) for…

  5. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  6. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  7. 32 CFR 644.522 - Clearance of military scrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Clearance of military scrap. 644.522 Section 644.522 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...

  8. Master of Military Art and Science (MMAS) Research and Thesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Command and General Staff Coll., Fort Leavenworth, KS.

    This document describes the requirements for the degree of Master of Military Art and Science (MMAS) at the United States Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC), Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Chapter one outlines program requirements for the MMAS, discusses the place of research at CGSC, describes research requirements for the MMAS, and…

  9. [Analysis of work in ambulatory military medicine].

    PubMed

    Bilić, Ivica

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the work of a military physician in an army healthcare institution and the scope and aim of activity of medical corps. The analysis includes data collected over one year and shows that officers and non-commissioned officers are more frequent users of medical services than conscripts. The consumption of medical products is high in both populations. The military physician has to face a number of organisational difficulties in everyday practice which diminish the quality of health services. Resolving these difficulties is a priority, especially in view of high healthcare and organisational standards set by NATO, which are eventually to be adopted and maintained by the Croatian medical corps in the process of joining. One of the tasks with that aim is to provide a continued medical training for military healthcare personnel. PMID:14994648

  10. [Military telemedicine: a network of networks].

    PubMed

    Menu, Jean-Pierre; Comtet, Gérald; Di Giusto, Vincent; Colomb, François; de Saint-Julien, Jacques

    2006-02-01

    Military telemedicine is a form of collaborative medicine based on the use of communication and information networks. It is more a network of networks than of independent systems. It comprises electronic medical files, epidemiological networks, and surgical and medical databases. Each system must be able to communicate with the others, thereby enabling the development of remote consultation, expertise and assistance. This requires networking between the army, the navy, and the air force communication networks, especially during special operations conducted abroad. We must also develop interoperability with systems in other countries, and with the French civilian health service. This means respecting the general rules governing these networks. The military health network is unique, in that it focuses on battlefield injuries. In addition, the French military health service operates under a single headquarters, governing nurses, paramedics and physicians. PMID:17001864

  11. 77 FR 50090 - Update to the 26 September 2011 Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication (MFTURP) NO. 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... (MFTURP) NO. 1 AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. SUMMARY: The Military Surface Deployment and... Regulation (FAR) exempt transportation service contracts. Miscellaneous: This publication, as well as...

  12. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  13. Radiation exposure of U.S. military individuals.

    PubMed

    Blake, Paul K; Komp, Gregory R

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. military consists of five armed services: the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. It directly employs 1.4 million active duty military, 1.3 million National Guard and reserve military, and 700,000 civilian individuals. This paper describes the military guidance used to preserve and maintain the health of military personnel while they accomplish necessary and purposeful work in areas where they are exposed to radiation. It also discusses military exposure cohorts and associated radiogenic disease compensation programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the U.S. Department of Labor. With a few exceptions, the U.S. military has effectively employed ionizing radiation since it was first introduced during the Spanish-American War in 1898. The U.S military annually monitors 70,000 individuals for occupational radiation exposure: ~2% of its workforce. In recent years, the Departments of the Navy (including the Marine Corps), the Army, and the Air Force all have a low collective dose that remains close to 1 person-Sv annually. Only a few Coast Guard individuals are now routinely monitored for radiation exposure. As with the nuclear industry as a whole, the Naval Reactors program has a higher collective dose than the remainder of the U.S. military. The U.S. military maintains occupational radiation exposure records on over two million individuals from 1945 through the present. These records are controlled in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 but are available to affected individuals or their designees and other groups performing sanctioned epidemiology studies.Introduction of Radiation Exposure of U.S. Military Individuals (Video 2:19, http://links.lww.com/HP/A30). PMID:24378502

  14. Comparison of occupational hearing losses among military engineers and their civilian counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.L.; Chandler, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    A previous study examined group hearing loss of 209 U.S.Army engineers by comparing current with reference audiograms. The sample was categorized by military occupation specialty, age, and time on job. The present study reports comparable data for 187 civilian engineers on the same Army post exposed to essentially the same noise. These had less hearing loss than their military counterparts. Some reasons are suggested, such as attrition of the civilian workforce because of hearing problems, and a likely greater exposure of the military engineers to noises not job-related. Age was less important than time on the job. Both groups, however, exhibited significantly lower hearing levels than the industrial population of Glorig et al at the 1954 Wisconsin State Fair, possibly because both military and civilian personnel at this Army post had been for some years in an aggressive hearing conservation program.

  15. Documented suicides within the British Army during the Crimean War 1854-1856.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey Allen; Masuhara, Kristi L; Frueh, B Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We have little understanding of the increased active duty military suicide rates found in the United States, and little understanding of what is historically normative for combatants. Therefore, we examined historical records on suicides among the British Army during the Crimean War for the years 1854-1856. There were 18 documented suicides in the British Army during this period. Calculating an accurate annual suicide rate per 100,000 is impossible because it is unclear how many of the 111,313 military personnel were in country for each of the 2 years of the war. However, the range is conservatively estimated between 8 and 16 per 100,000, with the likely answer somewhere near the middle. This suggests the possibility that increasing suicide rates among active duty military may be a modern U.S. phenomenon. PMID:25003856

  16. Parasuicidal behavior on an active duty army training post.

    PubMed

    Koshes, R J; Rothberg, J M

    1992-07-01

    The incidence of suicidal behavior among active duty Army personnel at a training post has not been the subject of analysis since the advent of the all-volunteer military. A review of admissions over 16 consecutive months showed most of the behaviors to be parasuicidal, with low levels of lethality and high rescuability. Compared to previously published studies, the characteristics of these soldiers are little changed over the past 25 years. This report suggests a standard method for handling suicidal behavior which includes an active role for psychiatric consultation to units and commanders. PMID:1528469

  17. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  18. The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life among Soldiers. Technical Report 864.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Gary L.

    This study investigated the relationship between soldiers' satisfaction with the environment for families in the Army and satisfaction with the military way of life. The report is based on a secondary analysis of the responses of a stratified random sample of 9,198 Army personnel, a sample that participated in the 1985 Department of Defense…

  19. [The General Military Medical Department during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, O A; Kulnev, S V; Taranov, S P

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to the contribution of the General Military Medical Department of the Red Army (GMMD) to organisation of health care support during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. In the summary you may follow the main ways of activity of the central governing body of medical (health) services of the Red. Army. The main focus of the article is made on conditions under which GMMD had to organize medical support of the Red. Army at the beginning of the war, the most difficult period of the Great Patriotic War. The authors payed attention to the forms and methods of the work of the head of GMMD and its subordinate departments under the conditions of rapidly changing environment of combat and rear situation, as well as interaction with GMMD People Commissariat of Health. The authors tried to highlight not well known but not less important moments in the activities of the Red Army GMMD. PMID:26829874

  20. Laser eye injuries among U.S. military personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Keeler, Natalie; Wartick, Ardith L.

    2003-06-01

    In this study reports of laser injuries in all three military services (Air Force, Army and Navy/Marine) are compared. In collecting data for this study laser injury reports provided by Rockwell Laser Industries (RLI), the United States Army Medical Research Detachment of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research which maintains the Laser Accident and Incident Registry (LAIR), the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the three service Safety Centers. We found a total of 29 laser injury reports that met our case definition. Since 1965, when the first injury occurred, there have been 6 Air Force, 15 Army, and 8 Navy/Marine injuries reported. Statistical analysis of data analyzed thus far shows no difference between the services in 8-year risk groupings between 1965-2002.

  1. A survey of hearing loss in Army aircrew.

    PubMed

    Owen, M J

    1996-02-01

    Military aircrew are exposed to excessive noise at work, with the concurrent risks of acquiring Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Past studies have related aircrew NIHL to a variety of factors; however, no clear causal relationship has been shown. The difficulty of establishing NIHL due to flying remains when many other confounders are present, especially age and exposure to firearms noise in the military environment. A cross sectional prevalence study of hearing loss in Army Air Corps aircrew has been undertaken. One hundred and twenty one aircrew who had more than ten years flying experience were studied and the results show that there appears to be a threshold shift in excess of that expected from the ISO levels for otologically normal males of the same age. The hearing threshold shift was found to correlate with the number of years flying and aircrew age, with the number of flying hours being less significant. PMID:8672796

  2. Precipitating circumstances of suicide among active duty U.S. Army personnel versus U.S. civilians, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents' military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  3. Precipitating Circumstances of Suicide among Active Duty U.S. Army Personnel Versus U.S. Civilians, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Joseph E; Skopp, Nancy A; Reger, Mark A; Gladden, Matt; Smolenski, Derek J; Floyd, C Faye; Gahm, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    To help understand suicide among soldiers, we compared suicide events between active duty U.S. Army versus civilian decedents to identify differences and inform military prevention efforts. We linked 141 Army suicide records from 2005 to 2010 to National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) data. We described the decedents’ military background and compared their precipitators of death captured in NVDRS to those of demographically matched civilian suicide decedents. Both groups commonly had mental health and intimate partner precipitating circumstances, but soldier decedents less commonly disclosed suicide intent. PMID:25093259

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder post Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence among military subgroups.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-09-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD. PMID:25569079

  5. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Post Iraq and Afghanistan: Prevalence Among Military Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Lindsey A; Sundin, Josefin; Rona, Roberto J; FFPH; Wessely, Simon; FMedSci; Fear, Nicola T

    2014-01-01

    A large body of research has been produced in recent years investigating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, resulting in apparent differences in PTSD prevalence. We compare prevalence estimates for current PTSD between military subgroups, providing insight into how groups may be differentially affected by deployment. Systematic literature searches using the terms PTSD, stress disorder, and acute stress, combined with terms relating to military personnel, identified 49 relevant papers. Studies with a sample size of less than 100 and studies based on data for treatment seeking or injured populations were excluded. Studies were categorized according to theatre of deployment (Iraq or Afghanistan), combat and noncombat deployed samples, sex, enlistment type (regular or reserve and [or] National Guard), and service branch (for example, army, navy, and air force). Meta-analysis was used to assess PTSD prevalence across subgroups. There was large variability in PTSD prevalence between studies, but, regardless of heterogeneity, prevalence rates of PTSD were higher among studies of Iraq-deployed personnel (12.9%; 95% CI 11.3% to 14.4%), compared with personnel deployed to Afghanistan (7.1%; 95% CI 4.6% to 9.6%), combat deployed personnel, and personnel serving in the Canadian, US, or UK army or the navy or marines (12.4%; 95% CI 10.9% to 13.4%), compared with the other services (4.9%; 95% CI 1.4% to 8.4%). Contrary to findings from within-study comparisons, we did not find a difference in PTSD prevalence for regular active-duty and reserve or National Guard personnel. Categorizing studies according to deployment location and branch of service identified differences among subgroups that provide further support for factors underlying the development of PTSD. PMID:25569079

  6. Meaningfulness of service and marital satisfaction in Army couples.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jeffrey S; Renshaw, Keith D; Allen, Elizabeth S; Markman, Howard J; Stanley, Scott M

    2014-10-01

    The vast numbers of military service members who have been deployed since 2001 highlights the need to better understand relationships of military couples. A unique consideration in military couples is the concept of meaningfulness of service, or the value service members and their partners place on military service in spite of the sacrifices it requires. In a sample of 606 Army couples, the authors used path analysis to examine how male service members' and female spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service added to the prediction of marital satisfaction in both members of the couple, when accounting for service members' PTSD symptoms. Spouses' perceived meaningfulness of service was linked with higher marital satisfaction in spouses, regardless of service member's perceived meaningfulness of service. Service members' perceived meaningfulness of service was also associated with increased marital satisfaction in service members, but only when their spouses also perceived higher meaningfulness. There were no significant interactions between service members' PTSD and either partner's perceived meaningfulness. Implications for enhanced attention to spousal perceptions of meaningfulness of service are discussed. PMID:25046347

  7. Opportunities and challenges for MEMS technology in Army missile systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    1999-07-01

    The military market drives the thrust for the development of robust, high performance MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control systems, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, aerodynamic flow control, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Army missile applications will be a fertile market for MEMS products, such as MEMS-based inertial sensors. MEMS technology should significantly enhance performance and provide more robust mission capability in applications where arrays of MEMS devices are required. The Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is working diligently with other government agencies, academia, and industry to develop high performing MEMS devices to withstand shock, vibration, temperature, humidity, and long-term storage conditions often encountered by Army missile systems. The goals of the ongoing DARPA MEMS technology programs will meet a significant portion of the Army missile systems requirements. In lieu of presenting an all-inclusive review of Army MEMS applications, this paper addresses a number of opportunities and associated challenges for MEMS systems operating in military environments. Near term applications and the less mature, high-risk applications of MEMS devices are addressed.

  8. Effects of the men's program on U.S. Army soldiers' intentions to commit and willingness to intervene to prevent rape: a pretest posttest study.

    PubMed

    Foubert, John D; Masin, Ryan C

    2012-01-01

    Noncommissioned male officers in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany were trained to present a 1-hour rape prevention workshop--The Men's Program--to 237 enlisted male soldiers. A comparison group of 244 male soldiers received a briefing focused on reducing the individual's risk for experiencing sexual assault, discussion of myths and facts about sexual assault, and how to avoid being accused of sexual assault. Participants in The Men's Program experienced significant change in the predicted direction for bystander willingness to help, bystander efficacy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault with low to medium effect sizes. Comparison group participants experienced no effect on these variables except for a significant decline in rape myth acceptance with a very low effect size. Between-group differences pointed to the efficacy of The Men's Program. Implications of these results for rape prevention programming in the military are discussed. PMID:23393953

  9. Ingredients of military genius. Student essay

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.M.

    1986-04-07

    This article deals with military genius from an historical and a classical theory perspective. The author modifies an approach developed by Carl von Clausewitz that makes use of theory as a framework for the study of history. Clausewitz used theory to study campaigns of Napoleon. This article uses Clausewitz's theory of military genius to study some of the great captains of the American Civil War and World War II. Using seven qualities of military genius that Clausewitz lists in his ON WAR, a study was made to ascertain commonalities of behavior displayed by great battlefield generals. Historical examples are given which reflect the qualities of military genius. The basic hypothesis of the article is that successful generals command their armies with their total being and not just one predominate aspect of their person. The underlying theme is that body, emotions, mind, and spirit must work in a relatively balanced manner which results in military genius being displayed. Historical example urges each senior officer to continually train and discipline his being in preparation for his possible future destiny.

  10. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.