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1

The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.  

PubMed Central

In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

1983-01-01

2

Ocular trauma in the United States Army: hospitalization records from 1985 through 1994  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: To determine the incidence of hospitalized ocular injury in the United States Army and evaluate specific types and external causes of these injuries.METHODS: A US Army database that captured all hospital discharge records for Army personnel admitted to military and civilian hospitals was used to determine incident episodes of ocular injury requiring hospitalization from 1985 through 1994. Denominator data

Tien Yin Wong; Gordon S Smith; Andrew E Lincoln; James M Tielsch

2000-01-01

3

Military nursing at the forefront: the Army Forward Surgical Team.  

PubMed

From World War II to current conflicts, history has validated the need for early surgical intervention to save lives and established the need for FSTs. Historically 10% to 15% of soldiers wounded in action require surgery to control hemorrhage and to provide stabilization sufficient for evacuation to a medical treatment facility where definitive care can be provided. Undoubtedly, many lives were saved in past conflicts because resuscitative surgery and care were available a short time after being wounded. The need for surgical stabilization for patients to survive a long evacuation was well-established during military operations such as Operation Desert Storm. Resuscitative surgery capability must be present on the battlefield, and this capability must be able to move with the units the FST is supporting. These two imperatives were the driving force of the creation of the US Army's FSTs: they are light, easily transportable, and able to keep pace with the supported units. FSTs are an integral and essential element in providing surgical care to save soldiers' lives on the modem battlefield. The US military has been involved in more operations and deployments since the end of the Cold War than in the preceding years. FSTs participated in many of these operations and have performed superbly. FSTs will continue to have a critical role in providing combat health service support to soldiers on the battlefield of the twenty-first century, and FST nurses will continue to be an indispensable asset. PMID:12755185

Hough, Charlotte; Sadler, Michael; Patrician, Patricia A

2003-06-01

4

Sports and physical training injury hospitalizations in the Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Injuries are the leading health problem in the military services. Sports and physical training activities are an area in which a substantial number of injuries can occur. Although athletic injuries are not often investigated in military populations, the Armed Forces database provides a unique opportunity to investigate sports injuries.Methods: An Army database of all hospital admissions for active duty

Tamara D Lauder; Susan P Baker; Gordon S Smith; Andrew E Lincoln

2000-01-01

5

Hospital Admissions Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in the US Army during Peacetime: 1990s Trends  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: This paper examines 10-year trends in traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related hospitalization rates for active duty US Army personnel in the 1990s. It does this within the context of various factors, including enhanced injury prevention policies and changed hospital admission practices, that may have affected TBI hospitalization rates. It also compares TBI hospitalization rates in the Army to those from

Brian J. Ivins; Karen A. Schwab; Gayle Baker; Deborah L. Warden

2006-01-01

6

Continuous Commissioning of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Continuous Commissioning® (CC®) of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital facility was a two phase project. The first phase consisted of a point-to-point verification of a newly upgraded Energy Management Control System (EMCS) and calibration of key...

Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Martinez, J. T.

2007-01-01

7

Predictors of Enrollment in TRICARE Prime at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In preparation for TRICARE, a survey of 987 beneficiaries from the Fort Campbell catchment area was conducted in order to estimate enrollment in TRICARE Prime at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH). The survey was also used to identify variables th...

D. A. Brandsma

1997-01-01

8

Graduate Management Project: Optimizing Cardiology and Radiology Services at Evans Army Community Hospital.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During fiscal years 2003 and 2004, Evans Army Community Hospital (EACH), Port Carson, Colorado, diligently prepared itself to meet the operating challenges under the new TRICARE contracts. As part of EACH's preparation efforts, this study provides an opti...

H. J. Geolingo

2004-01-01

9

Strategic Analysis and Associated Management Products Supporting the Reengineering of Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital: Consultative Products and Findings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In support of strategic reengineering of Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital (BJACH), this consultative project provides a strategic analysis of the hospital, an overview of planned strategies of the hospital, and five management products based upon requi...

L. Fulton

1998-01-01

10

CPAP Use in a Hospital or Surgical Setting  

MedlinePLUS

... org * 888.293.3650 CPAP USE IN A HOSPITAL OR SURGICAL SETTING This Patient Education Bulletin specifically ... Also, refer to the ASAA Patient Education Bulletin “HOSPITAL CHECKLIST FOR OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS”. We suggest ...

11

Hospital-acquired infections among surgical patients in a Brazilian hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

A historical cohort study was conducted among surgical patients in a large general hospital in Porto Alegre, Brazil between March 1992 and May 1993. Data were collected by means of a retrospective chart review, which followed a standardized method based on the systematic review of all clinical and laboratory information available in the hospital records. The criteria for diagnosis of

M. B. Wagner; N. B. da Silva; A. R. Vinciprova; A. B. Becker; L. M. Burtet; A. J. Hall

1997-01-01

12

Evolving a Successful Acute Care Surgical\\/Surgical Critical Care Group at a Nontrauma Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large acute care but nontrauma teaching hospital in Manhattan, New York performing 24 000 operations\\/year has evolved a Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) Service with 3 attendings and 5 physician assistants over 9 years. The division follows nationally recognized, published best practices in shock, sepsis, ventilator management, nutrition, and antibiotic use and has maintained a total mortality of 1.9%

Marvin A. McMillen

2011-01-01

13

77 FR 24409 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0938-AQ26 Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program...Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment;...

2012-04-24

14

77 FR 217 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0938-AQ26 Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program...Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment;...

2012-01-04

15

The founding of walter reed general hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.  

PubMed

When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

Adler, Jessica L

2014-10-01

16

Impact of age on in-hospital mortality of surgical patients in a German university hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the frequency of major surgical procedures in elderly patients is increasing, the impact of age as an independent factor on in-hospital mortality and capacity planning is uncertain. Therefore, we analyzed how age, gender, number of diagnoses, and number of operations per patient are reflecting the demographic changes going on in the last decade. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of

Andrej Udelnow; Steffen Leinung; Dierk Schreiter; Manfred Schönfelder; Peter Würl

2005-01-01

17

Pediatric hospital medicine role in the comanagement of the hospitalized surgical patient.  

PubMed

Medical comanagement of surgical patients by pediatric hospital medicine providers has become increasingly common. Subjectively, the comanagement model is superior to more traditional consultative models because of the anticipatory preventive care and coordination hospitalists provide to patients and hospital colleagues. Although some studies have demonstrated the value of the comanagement model in adults and children, others have failed to do so. The coming years are both exciting and challenging for this emerging field as it attempts to sustain its early progress and define its future in pediatric hospital medicine. PMID:25084714

Schaffzin, Joshua K; Simon, Tamara D

2014-08-01

18

Hospital admissions related to mental disorders in U.S. Army soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan.  

PubMed

We conducted a retrospective study of 473,964 U.S. Army soldiers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan through December 2004 using deployment and admission records. We categorized mental disorder diagnoses using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) and identified attempted suicide/ self-inflicted injuries using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes E950-E959. We estimated and evaluated relative risks (RR) using Poisson regression models. Analysis found 1,948 psychiatric hospitalizations of deployed soldiers. The most common mental problems were mood, adjustment, and anxiety disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]). RR of mental disorders ranged from 1.6 to 3 for females and 2 to 6 for enlisted soldiers compared to their counterparts. Younger soldiers had 30-60% higher substance abuse disorders. Combat units in Iraq demonstrated higher risk of any mental disorder and anxiety problems compared to combat support units. Younger women had the highest incidence of attempted suicide/ self-inflicted injuries. Further mental disorders surveillance is recommended. PMID:19891211

Wojcik, Barbara E; Akhtar, Fatema Z; Hassell, L Harrison

2009-10-01

19

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-print Network

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases...

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-04-30

20

Surgical Management of Uterine Fibroids at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine the influence of age and parity on the surgical management of uterine fibroids, clinical presentation, presence of pelvic adhesions, cadre of surgeons, and postoperative complications at the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. Methods. A retrospective analysis of 105 cases of uterine fibroids that were managed between 1st January 2003 and 31st December 2007. Results. The period prevalence of uterine fibroids was 24.7% of all major gynecological operations. The mean age was 35.8 ± 7.6 and mean parity 4.7 ± 2.8. Abdominal hysterectomy accounted for 58.1% of the cases and myomectomy 41.9%. The odd of using abdominal hysterectomy was about twice that of myomectomy. Pelvic adhesions were found in 67.6% of the cases. Menorrhagia (86.7%) was the commonest symptom, while post operative anemia and pyrexia showed significant association with myomectomy. There was no maternal mortality. Conclusion. Surgical operations for uterine fibroids are safe and common kind of gynecological operations at the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Uterine fibroid is associated more with high parity and dominance of abdominal hysterectomy over myomectomy, because early girl marriage is common in our community. PMID:22135680

Omole-Ohonsi, Abiodun; Belga, Francis

2012-01-01

21

Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in a Turkish university hospital.  

PubMed

A prospective study was performed to assess the practice of antibiotic prophylaxis for surgical procedures in Pamukkale University Hospital, Denizli, Turkey. All surgical procedures performed between April 1 and July 31, 2001, were included. During the study period 897 operations were reviewed. 96% of all procedures were elective, 4% emergencies. Approximately 70.7% were clean surgery, 25.3% clean-contaminated, 2.8% contaminated, and 1.2% dirty. 98% of patients (879) received antibiotic prophylaxis. Although timing of prophylaxis was appropriate in all procedures, the duration of prophylaxis was optimal in only 47.7% of all cases. Sulbactam/ampicillin (SAM), cefazolin and cefepime were the most commonly used antibiotics during the study period. The results of our study suggest that the choice of prophylactic antimicrobial agent was inappropriate in most cases. In conclusion, we think that compliance regarding the optimal choice, frequency, and duration of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not adequate in our hospital, and that more education on the subject is necessary. PMID:12420855

Yalçin, A N; Serin, S; Gurses, E; Zencir, M

2002-08-01

22

HOSPITAL REORGANIZATION: HOW TO HELP DECISION A DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE FOR THE SURGICAL  

E-print Network

HOSPITAL REORGANIZATION: HOW TO HELP DECISION MAKERS? A DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE FOR THE SURGICAL and surgical protocols, hospitals have to consider radical organisational changes to ensure continuous of hospital managers' choices during each phase of the reengineering project thanks to a discreet even

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Surgical resident supervision in the operating room and outcomes of care in Veterans Affairs hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThere has been concern that a reduced level of surgical resident supervision in the operating room (OR) is correlated with worse patient outcomes. Until September 2004, Veterans’ Affairs (VA) hospitals entered in the surgical record level 3 supervision on every surgical case when the attending physician was available but not physically present in the OR or the OR suite. In

Kamal M. F. Itani; Ralph G. DePalma; Tracy Schifftner; Karen M. Sanders; Barbara K. Chang; William G. Henderson; Shukri F. Khuri

2005-01-01

24

Use of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in selected surgical procedures — Results of a survey in 889 surgical departments in German hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In 1989, a survey on perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was conducted in 2,739 surgical (general surgical, orthopedic, traumatologic, and cardiothoracic) departments of German hospitals. In all, 889 (32.5%) questionnaires were returned. Regarding the choice of antibiotic and the duration of prophylaxis the respective rates of correct statements were as follows: 32.6% and 55.0% in gastric surgery, 29.5% and 42.9% in

Ines Kappstein; F. D. Daschner

1991-01-01

25

Descriptive Epidemiologic Survey of Head Injury in the Army: 1983 Hospitalized Cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

A descriptive epidemiologic study of head injury cases that were discharged from army medical facilities during fiscal year 1983 was performed. For the diagnosis of concussion, the male and female rates were approximately equal between the ages 18–24 and 25–34 and for the total, ages 18–34. For the diagnosis of other- intracranial injury and the total of all head injuries,

James E. McCarroll; Kenneth A. Zych

1989-01-01

26

[Structural and clinical characteristics of elderly and senile patients' treatment in regional surgical hospital].  

PubMed

Treatment results of 1219 patients of elderly and senile age, hospitalized in surgical departments of Turkestan during 2001-2008 were analyzed. Demographic characteristics, spectrum of profile pathology as well as concurrent diseases were given. Operative activity and average hospital stay, hospital lethality and complication rates were defined. PMID:21716221

Gavrilov, A O; Se?dinov, Sh M; Iusupov, A A

2011-01-01

27

Variation in Surgical Readmissions and Relationship to Quality of Hospital Care  

PubMed Central

Background Reducing readmissions is a clinical and policy priority, but little is known about variations in readmission rates after major surgery and whether a hospital's surgical readmission rates are related to other markers of high-quality surgical care. Methods Using national Medicare data, we calculated 30-day readmission rates after hospitalization for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), pulmonary lobectomy, endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (AAA), colectomy, and hip replacement. We used bivariate and multivariable techniques to assess the relationship between readmission rates and other measures of surgical quality, including performance on surgical process measures, procedure volume, and mortality. Results There were 479,471 discharges following one of the six index procedures from 3,004 hospitals. The median risk-adjusted six-procedure composite 30-day readmission rate was 13.1% [interquartile range, IQR 9.9%-17.1%}. Adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that hospitals in the highest quartile of surgical volume had lower readmission rates than the lowest-volume hospitals (12.7% vs. 16.8%, p<0.001), and hospitals with the lowest mortality rates had significantly lower readmission rates than hospitals with high mortality rates (13.3% vs. 14.2%, p<0.001). High performance on surgical process of care performance measures was only marginally associated with readmission rates (13.1% versus 13.6%, p=0.021). Patterns were similar when each of the six major surgeries was examined individually. Conclusion Nearly one in seven patients is readmitted within 30 days of discharge following a major surgical procedure. High volume and low mortality hospitals have lower surgical readmissions than other hospitals. PMID:24047062

Tsai, Thomas C.; Joynt, Karen E.; Orav, E. John; Gawande, Atul A.; Jha, Ashish K.

2014-01-01

28

38 CFR 3.358 - Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment, examinations or vocational rehabilitation training (§ 3.800). 3.358 Section 3.358 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS...

2013-07-01

29

Strategic Marketing Plan for Women and Infant Services, DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This market research paper analyzes DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System's Women and Infant Services from a marketing perspective, and proposes 10 'action plans' for attracting and retaining more patients. Maternal/Child Health...

K. E. Soh

1999-01-01

30

Epidemiology of Surgical Admissions to a Children’s Disability Hospital in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The goal of this retrospective review was to characterize the spectrum of surgical admissions to a tertiary hospital specializing\\u000a in musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents in Nepal.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We reviewed hospital records from 1996 to 2006 to categorize all major surgical procedures. Additional information collected\\u000a included diagnosis, patient age, gender, and home district.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Of 7,556 major surgical procedures performed from

David A. SpiegelOm; Om P. Shrestha; Tarun Rajbhandary; Binod Bijukachhe; Prakash Sitoula; Bibek Banskota; Ashok Banskota

2010-01-01

31

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Forces’ (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities. PMID:22854149

Talbot, Max; Meunier, Bethann; Trottier, Vincent; Christian, Michael; Hillier, Tracey; Berger, Chris; McAlister, Vivian; Taylor, Scott

2012-01-01

32

Analyzing total knee arthroplasty using surgical volume of different hospital levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research is to discover valuable medical facts by mining TKA (total knee arthroplasty) surgical volume of three different hospital levels from Taiwan NHI (National Health Insurance) database. In this paper, there are three main objectives provided: (1) to build up the learning curves using the patients¿ outcomes of three different hospital levels; (2) to characterize whether

Y. T. Cheng; C. H. Cheng; J. S. Chen

2008-01-01

33

Implementation of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: critical steps to success for surgeons and hospitals.  

PubMed

The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), as administered by the American College of Surgeons, became available to private sector hospitals across the United States in 2004. The program works to improve surgical outcomes by providing high-quality, risk-adjusted data to surgeons at a given hospital to stimulate discussion and define target areas for improvement. Although the NSQIP began in the early 1990s with Veterans Administration hospitals and expanded to private sector hospitals nearly 5 years ago, the "how to" process for NSQIP implementation has been left to individual institutions to manage on their own. The NSQIP was instituted at a large tertiary hospital in 2005, identifying through experience 12 critical steps to help surgeons and hospitals implement the NSQIP. PMID:19584373

Velanovich, Vic; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Patton, Joe H; Ritz, Jennifer; Jordan, Jack; Dulchavsky, Scott

2009-01-01

34

Nurses' use of research in practice at three US Army hospitals.  

PubMed

Translation of research into clinical nursing practice has been extensively studied with nurses in civilian institutions. However, limited examination has been made of research utilization in US military facilities. A quantitative survey approach, using Estabrooks's adapted Research Utilization Survey and Mylle's Organizational Climate Survey, was employed to determine the extent that registered nurses in selected US Army Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) use research findings for their own practice and to describe the factors, both professional and organizational, that enhance or hinder research utilization. This study found that nurses at the MTFs reported using research in their practice less than half the time. Variables most significantly correlated with research utilization were belief suspension and attitudes toward research. The variable of support correlated significantly with all types of research utilization except indirect. Other organizational factors influencing nurses' use of research findings in practice were time, accessibility to research and a champion to assist their efforts. Interestingly, the number of years worked in nursing and in the facilities correlated inversely with research utilization, suggesting that over time, nurses may begin to rely on past experience rather than seek out new knowledge for practice. PMID:16372787

Kenny, Deborah J

2005-01-01

35

[Surgical aspects of breast cancer screening at our hospital].  

PubMed

In addition to discussing effectiveness of breast cancer screening initiated within the National Public Health Programme, the problem of how to treat non-palpable, early invasive and in situ breast cancer (DCIS) is considered. The theoretical issue of the sentinel lymph node and its impact on biopsy practice have also been dealt with. In the authors' region, screening was introduced in 1999 and after a short break has been continued since 2002. Patient data of three periods, each of two years, each with ten years' interval (1982-1983, 1992-1993, 2002-2003) have been analysed. Changes in the number of surgical operations and tumour size, incidence of in situ cancer, lymph node involvement and distribution of types of surgery have been studied. Biopsy of the sentinel lymph node has been applied since May, 2003 (with 45 biopsies performed until 31 December, 2004). The number of persons participating in the screening programme has gradually increased, the number of surgical operations because of breast cancer increased from period to period. Size of the detected tumours has decreased, the percentage of non-palpable cases has been significant (445 surgical interventions during the years 2002-2004: surgery: 19%). The proportion of DCIS has increased to nearly four times as compared to data of years immediately preceding the era of screening (1993-1998: 11 cases, 2%; 1999-2004: 62 cases, 7.5%). Specificity of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 90%, with a sensitivity of 65%. The proportion of breast saving surgery has increased above 50%. The authors regard screening as successful, in their opinion, its benefits cannot be questioned, in spite of some controversial issues. As to the treatment of non-palpable, early invasive cancer, they underline the importance of preoperative evaluation--cytology, core biopsy--and establishing dignity. The issues of localisation--wire hook marking--and histological processing--large blocks--have also been dealt with. In spite of the fact that the risk for potential malignancy of DCIS lesions has not yet been fully clarified, adequate treatment is indicated; the authors take stand on the issues of indication for surgery, postoperative radiotherapy and use of Tamoxifen. Indications and contraindications of sentinel lymph node biopsy have been summed up. PMID:17201346

Márkus, Béla; Bajner, Agnes; Csejtei, András; Firisz, Borbála; Hegedus, Agnes; Kocsis, Eszter; Kovács, Beáta; Pintér, Gábor; Tóth, Csaba

2006-10-01

36

Surgical wound infection surveillance in general surgery procedures at a teaching hospital in Pakistan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A surveillance system was established at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, to determine surgical wound infection (SWI) rates, trends, and risk factors; and to compare rates with those reported by the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods: Surveillance was performed from January 1997 to December 1999. Risk

Turab Pishori; Amna Rehana Siddiqui; Mushtaq Ahmed

2003-01-01

37

Evaluation of parenteral nutritional support in the surgical and medical wards of a referral teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose Malnutrition is a common problem in patients who are hospitalized in surgical and medical wards. Surgical patients, geriatric populations and individuals with severe illness are more vulnerable to malnutrition during their hospitalization course. The purpose of this study was evaluation of parenteral nutrition services in a referral teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. Method Medical records of 72 patients who received parenteral nutrition during one year period in different surgical and medical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were reviewed retrospectively by clinical pharmacists. Criteria for initiation of parenteral nutrition, selection of appropriate formulation and monitoring parameters were assessed based on the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations. Results Based on the patients' anthropometric parameters and serum albumin levels, 4.2%, 75% and 20.8% of the patients were well-nourished, moderately malnourished and severely malnourished respectively at the hospital admission and before nutritional support. Adequate calorie, protein, carbohydrate and lipid supports were achieved in 21.1%, 32.4%, 23.7% and 10.5% of the patients respectively. About 91% of the patients experienced at least one complication of the nutritional support. Conclusion In this evaluation, several errors in assessment, establishing goals, and monitoring of parenteral nutrition regimens have been detected. Approximately all of the patients did not receive to the trace elements supports goals. PMID:23351175

2012-01-01

38

Patient attitudes toward the use of surgical scrubs in a military hospital clinic  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether obstetrics and gynecology (ob/gyn) patients in a large military teaching hospital have a negative attitude toward the wearing of surgical scrubs by ob/gyn providers. Methods A convenience sample questionnaire on patient preferences, including two questions relating independently to military and civilian staff attire, was offered to clinic patients over a 2 month period. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify patient groups less accepting of the surgical scrubs in clinics. Results Over ninety-one percent of respondents viewed surgical scrubs with a white coat to be acceptable clinical attire for military or civilian providers. Eight percent preferred the more formal uniform or business dress. Non-white and Hispanic patients had higher rates of preference for more formal dress. Conclusions The majority of ob/gyn patients surveyed did not view the use of surgical scrubs with a white coat negatively. PMID:19920961

Lund, Jon D; Rohrer, James E; Goldfarb, Susana

2008-01-01

39

Surgical therapies for corneal perforations: 10 years of cases in a tertiary referral hospital  

PubMed Central

Purpose To report surgical therapies for corneal perforations in a tertiary referral hospital. Methods Thirty-one eyes of 31 patients (aged 62.4±18.3 years) with surgically treated corneal perforations from January 2002 to July 2013 were included in this study. Demographic data such as cause of corneal perforation, surgical procedures, and visual outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. Results The causes of corneal perforation (n=31) were divided into infectious (n=8, 26%) and noninfectious (n=23, 74%) categories. Infectious causes included fungal ulcer, herpetic stromal necrotizing keratitis, and bacterial ulcer. The causes of noninfectious keratopathy included corneal melting after removal of a metal foreign body, severe dry eye, lagophthalmos, canaliculitis, the oral anticancer drug S-1, keratoconus, rheumatoid arthritis, neurotrophic ulcer, atopic keratoconjunctivitis, and unknown causes. Initial surgical procedures included central large corneal graft (n=17), small corneal graft (n=7), and amniotic membrane transplantation (n=7). In two cases the perforation could not be sealed during the first surgical treatment and required subsequent procedures. All infectious keratitis required central large penetrating keratoplasty to obtain anatomical cure. In contrast, several surgical options were used for the treatment of noninfectious keratitis. After surgical treatment, anatomical cure was obtained in all cases. Mean postoperative best corrected visual acuity was better at 6 months (logMAR 1.3) than preoperatively (logMAR 1.8). Conclusion Surgical therapies for corneal perforations in our hospital included central large lamellar/penetrating keratoplasty, small peripheral patch graft, and amniotic membrane transplantation. All treatments were effective. Corneal perforation due to the oral anticancer drug S-1 is newly reported. PMID:25378903

Yokogawa, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Natsuko; Masaki, Toshinori; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

2014-01-01

40

Rate of venous thromboembolism among surgical patients in Australian hospitals: a multicentre retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Despite the burden of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among surgical patients on health systems in Australia, data on VTE incidence and its variation within Australia are lacking. We aim to explore VTE and subsequent mortality rates, trends and variations across Australian acute public hospitals. Setting A large retrospective cohort study using all elective surgical patients in 82 acute public hospitals during 2002–2009 in New South Wales, Australia. Participants Patients underwent elective surgery within 2?days of admission, aged between 18 and 90?years, and who were not transferred to another acute care facility; 4?362?624 patients were included. Outcome measures VTE incidents were identified by secondary diagnostic codes. Poisson mixed models were used to derive adjusted incidence rates and rate ratios (IRR). Results 2/1000 patients developed postoperative VTE. VTE increased by 30% (IRR=1.30, CI 1.19 to 1.42) over the study period. Differences in the VTE rates, trends between hospital peer groups and between hospitals with the highest and those with the lowest rates were significant (between-hospital variation). Smaller hospitals, accommodated in two peer groups, had the lowest overall VTE rates (IRR=0.56:0.33 to 0.95; IRR=0.37:0.23 to 0.61) and exhibited a greater increase (64% and 237% vs 19%) overtime and greater between-hospital variations compared to larger hospitals (IRR=8.64:6.23 to 11.98; IRR=8.92:5.49 to 14.49 vs IRR=3.70:3.32 to 4.12). Mortality among patients with postoperative VTE was 8% and remained stable overtime. No differences in post-VTE death rates and trends were seen between hospital groups; however, larger hospitals exhibited less between-hospital variations (IRR=1.78:1.30 to 2.44) compared to small hospitals (IRR>23). Hospitals performed differently in prevention versus treatment of postoperative VTE. Conclusions VTE incidence is increasing and there is large variation between-hospital and within-hospital peer groups suggesting a varied compliance with VTE preventative strategies and the potential for targeted interventions and quality improvement opportunities. PMID:25280806

Assareh, Hassan; Chen, Jack; Ou, Lixin; Hollis, Stephanie J; Hillman, Kenneth; Flabouris, Arthas

2014-01-01

41

Predictors of Medical or Surgical and Psychiatric Hospitalizations Among a Population-Based Cohort of Homeless Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We identified factors associated with inpatient hospitalizations among a population-based cohort of homeless adults in Toronto, Ontario. Methods. We recruited participants from shelters and meal programs. We then linked them to administrative databases to capture hospital admissions during the study (2005–2009). We used logistic regression to identify predictors of medical or surgical and psychiatric hospitalizations. Results. Among 1165 homeless adults, 20% had a medical or surgical hospitalization, and 12% had a psychiatric hospitalization during the study. These individuals had a total of 921 hospitalizations, of which 548 were medical or surgical and 373 were psychiatric. Independent predictors of medical or surgical hospitalization included birth in Canada, having a primary care provider, higher perceived external health locus of control, and lower health status. Independent predictors of psychiatric hospitalization included being a current smoker, having a recent mental health problem, and having a lower perceived internal health locus of control. Being accompanied by a partner or dependent children was protective for hospitalization. Conclusions. Health care need was a strong predictor of medical or surgical and psychiatric hospitalizations. Some hospitalizations among homeless adults were potentially avoidable, whereas others represented an unavoidable use of health services. PMID:24148040

Chambers, Catharine; Katic, Marko; Chiu, Shirley; Redelmeier, Donald A.; Levinson, Wendy; Kiss, Alex

2013-01-01

42

The first successful laparoscopic Whipple procedure at Hat Yai Hospital: surgical technique and a case report.  

PubMed

Whipple procedure is the most complex abdominal surgical procedure to treat periampullary carcinoma. With the benefit of minimally invasive approach, many institutes attempt to do Whipple procedure laparoscopically. However, only 146 cases of laparoscopic Whipple procedure have yet been reported in the literature worldwide between 1994 and 2008. The authors reported the first laparoscopic Whipple procedure at Hat Yai Hospital in December 2009. The patient was a 40-year-old, Thai-Muslim female, with the diagnosis of ampullary carcinoma. The operating time was 685 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 14 without serious complication. The surgical technique and postoperative progress of the patient were described. PMID:20873085

Khaimook, Araya; Borkird, Jumpot; Alapach, Sakda

2010-09-01

43

Educational Instruction on a Hospital Information System for Medical Students During Their Surgical Rotations  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo evaluate the benefit, for medical students on their surgical rotations, of real-time educational instruction during order entry on a hospital information system.DesignProspective controlled trial.InterventionAccess to educational information during computerized order entry.SubjectsMedical students in their final year at the University of Calgary.Main outcomesAttainment of the surgery rotation educational objectives, as measured by performance on a multiple-choice examination.MethodsBefore they began their

Robert Patterson; Peter Harasym

2001-01-01

44

Variations in surgical rates in Quebec: does access to teaching hospitals make a difference?  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To document the geographic variations in the rates of 10 common surgical procedures in Quebec and to examine the relation between surgical rates and level of access to teaching hospitals. DESIGN: Population-based rates standardized for age and sex were calculated from 1985-88 data from MED-ECHO (the provincial hospital discharge database) for each of the 32 community health districts (départements de santé communautaire [DSCs]) in Quebec. Variation across DSCs was analysed with the use of the ratio of the highest to the lowest rate, the coefficient of variation and the systematic component of variation. On the basis of an urbanization index designed by Statistics Canada, DSCs were classified as having a low, medium, high or very high level of access to teaching hospitals. PATIENTS: All Quebec residents except those whose DSC of residence could not be traced (accounting for no more than 1.7% of patients for any study procedure) and aboriginal people from northern Quebec. SURGICAL PROCEDURES STUDIED: Appendectomy, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), hysterectomy, inguinal hernia repair, prostatectomy, tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy, total hip replacement and varicose vein stripping. RESULTS: There was considerable systematic variation in the surgical rates for all 10 procedures. Cesarean section, the rates of which varied the least, still exhibited almost a twofold variation between the highest and lowest rates. The rates of tonsillectomy varied the most, by a factor of more than five. With a few exceptions there was relatively little relation between the rates of the procedures within the DSCs. The rates of appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy and tonsillectomy tended to be lower in the DSCs containing teaching hospitals, whereas the reverse was true for CABG. For the other procedures the relation between the rates and the level of access to teaching hospitals was nonsignificant. CONCLUSIONS: The overall consistency of the observed variations with those of previous studies invites a closer look at the practice patterns and the scientific basis of the clinical decisions associated with procedures showing high variations in rates. The lack of a systematic relation between the surgical rates and the level of access to teaching hospitals challenges the belief that remote regions are underserved with respect to the procedures studied. PMID:8485676

Blais, R

1993-01-01

45

Study of the cost-savings potential of the Military - Civilian Health Services Partnership Program in the nuclear medicine and radioimmunoassay services at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky. Master's thesis, July 1987-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

Using workload data for Calendar Year 1987, a cost savings analysis was performed on the following three options (involving the Nuclear Medicine Department at Ireland Army Community Hospital); (1) Elimination of Radioimmunoassay Internal Service, (2) Civilian Military Health Service Partnership Program and (3) Fixed price contract for Nuclear Medicine Services. This study revealed the Civilian-Military Health Services Partnership Program would potentially generate the greatest cost savings and recommended that it be implemented in other areas throughout the Army Medical Department.

Amon, T.M.

1989-01-01

46

Reducing Avoidable Deaths Among Veterans: Directing Private-Sector Surgical Care to High-Performance Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We quantified older (65 years and older) Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients’ use of the private sector to obtain 14 surgical procedures and assessed the potential impact of directing that care to high-performance hospitals. Methods. Using a merged VHA–Medicare inpatient database for 2000 and 2001, we determined where older VHA enrollees obtained 6 cardiovascular surgeries and 8 cancer resections and whether private-sector care was obtained in high- or low-performance hospitals (based on historical performance and determined 2 years in advance of the service year). We then modeled the mortality and travel burden effect of directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals. Results. Older veterans obtained most of their procedures in the private sector, but that care was equally distributed across high- and low-performance hospitals. Directing private-sector care to high-performance hospitals could have led to the avoidance of 376 to 584 deaths, most through improved cardiovascular care outcomes. Using historical mortality to define performance would produce better outcomes with lower travel time. Conclusions. Policy that directs older VHA enrollees’ private-sector care to high-performance hospitals promises to reduce mortality for VHA’s service population and warrants further exploration. PMID:17971543

Weeks, William B.; West, Alan N.; Wallace, Amy E.; Lee, Richard E.; Goodman, David C.; Dimick, Justin B.; Bagian, James P.

2007-01-01

47

Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ?20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications.

de Aquino, Jose Luiz Braga

2014-01-01

48

Elective surgical patients' narratives of hospitalization: the co-construction of safety.  

PubMed

This research explores how elective surgical patients make sense of their hospitalization experiences. We explore sensemaking using longitudinal narrative interviews (n=72) with 38 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures between June 2010 and February 2011. We consider patients' narratives, the stories they tell of their prior expectations, and subsequent post-surgery experiences of their care in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital. An emergent pre-surgery theme is that of a paradoxical position in which they choose to make themselves vulnerable by agreeing to surgery to enhance their health, this necessitating trust of clinicians (doctors and nurses). To make sense of their situation, patients draw on technical (doctors' expert knowledge and skills), bureaucratic (National Health Service as a revered institution) and ideological (hospitals as places of safety), discourses. Post-operatively, themes of 'chaos' and 'suffering' emerge from the narratives of patients whose pre-surgery expectations (and trust) have been violated. Their stories tell of unmet expectations and of inability to make shared sense of experiences with clinicians who are responsible for their care. We add to knowledge of how patients play a critical part in the co-construction of safety by demonstrating how patient-clinician intersubjectivity contributes to the type of harm that patients describe. Our results suggest that approaches to enhancing patients' safety will be limited if they fail to reflect patients' involvement in the negotiated process of healthcare. We also provide further evidence of the contribution narrative inquiry can make to patient safety. PMID:24331879

Doherty, Carole; Saunders, Mark N K

2013-12-01

49

[Building of the surgical pavilion of the County Hospital in Bjelovar].  

PubMed

Preparations for the construction of the surgical pavilion of the County hospital in Bjelovar began in 1913 initiated by doctor Antun Gottlieb. The entire project documentation was drawn by Ignjat Fischer (1870-1948), the architect who specialized in the construction of medical buildings in the first decades of the 20th century. Fischer designed the Bjelovar Pavillion as a two-storey building with an annexe in which double operating rooms were situated. In this paper Fischer's early functionalist approach to the designing of medical buildings is dealt with and the parallels between the Bjelovar Surgical Pavilion and other Fischer's medical buildings are drawn. The Bjelovar Pavilion has only been slightly reconstructed to date, and the arrangement of the majority of facilities--compared to the Fischer's project--has remained unchanged, which bears testimony to the high quality of Fischer's designing procedure. PMID:18198631

Bagari?, Marina

2007-01-01

50

Surgical Site Infections Following Bariatric Surgery in Community Hospitals: A Weighty Concern?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI), specific risk factors for SSI among obese\\u000a patients undergoing bariatric surgery (BS) have not been well-defined.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We performed a prospective cohort study on patients who underwent BS at nine community hospitals in the USA between 7\\/1\\/2007\\u000a and 12\\/31\\/2008. Each patient had the following data recorded: National Nosocomial Infection

Joshua T. Freeman; Deverick J. Anderson; Matthew G. Hartwig; Daniel J. Sexton

2011-01-01

51

Incidence of healthcare associated infection in the surgical ICU of a tertiary care hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare associated infections (HAI) have taken on a new dimension with outbreaks of increasingly resistant organisms becoming common. Protocol-based infection control practices in the intensive care unit (ICU) are extremely important. Moreover, baseline information of the incidence of HAI helps in planning-specific interventions at infection control. Methods This hospital-based observational study was carried out from Dec 2009 to May 2010 in the 10-bedded surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital. CDC HAI definitions were used to diagnose HAI. Results A total of 293 patients were admitted in the ICU. 204 of these were included in the study. 36 of these patients developed HAI with a frequency of 17.6%. The incidence rate (IR) of catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) was 16/1000 Central Venous Catheter (CVC) days [95% C.I. 9–26]. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) 9/1000 urinary catheter days [95% C.I. 4–18] and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAP) 32/1000 ventilator days [95% confidence interval 22–45]. Conclusion The HAI rates in our ICU are less than other hospitals in developing countries. The incidence of VAP is comparable to other studies. Institution of an independent formal infection control monitoring and surveillance team to monitor & undertake infection control practices is an inescapable need in service hospitals. PMID:24600084

Singh, Shivinder; Chaturvedi, R.; Garg, S.M.; Datta, Rashmi; Kumar, Ambikesh

2012-01-01

52

Study of the cost-savings potential of the Military - Civilian Health Services Partnership Program in the nuclear medicine and radioimmunoassay services at Ireland Army Community Hospital, Fort Knox, Kentucky. Master's thesis, July 1987July 1988  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using workload data for Calendar Year 1987, a cost savings analysis was performed on the following three options (involving the Nuclear Medicine Department at Ireland Army Community Hospital); (1) Elimination of Radioimmunoassay Internal Service, (2) Civilian Military Health Service Partnership Program and (3) Fixed price contract for Nuclear Medicine Services. This study revealed the Civilian-Military Health Services Partnership Program would

Amon

1989-01-01

53

77 FR 68209 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of the Act F. OPPS Payment to Certain Cancer Hospitals Described by Section 1886...Background 2. Payment Adjustment for Certain Cancer Hospitals for CY 2013 G. Hospital Outpatient...care hospitals, children's hospitals, cancer hospitals, and community mental...

2012-11-15

54

Misdiagnosis and Quality of Management in Paediatric Surgical Patients Referred to a Tertiary Care Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background: The literature on diagnosis and management prior to transfer paediatric surgical patients to a tertiary care center is scarce. In referral centers, it is common to receive patients previously subjected to inadequate or inappropriate health care. Aim: Analyze the prevalence of misdiagnosis and quality of management in patients before being referred and factors related to misdiagnosis and inadequate management. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, comparative study between patients with appropriate and inappropriate submission diagnosis and between patients with adequate or inadequate treatment. Setting: Third level care hospital, Mexico City. Participants: Newborn to adolescents referred to Paediatric Surgery Department. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Misdiagnosis and quality of management prior to being referred. Result: Two hundred patients were evaluated. Correlation between submission diagnosis and final diagnosis showed that 70% were correct and 30% incorrect; 48.5% were properly managed and 51.5% inappropriately managed. Incorrect diagnosis was more frequent when referred from first-or second-level hospitals and in inflammatory conditions. Patients referred by paediatricians had a higher rate of adequate management. Conclusion: We present the frequency of incorrect diagnosis and inadequate patient management in a highly selected population. Sample size should be increased as well as performing these studies in other hospital settings in order to determine whether the results are reproducible. PMID:24959495

Cazares-Rangel, Joel; Zalles-Vidal, Cristian; Davila-Perez, Roberto

2014-01-01

55

Quality of Surgical Case Notes at Dow University Hospital according to modified ANKLe score  

PubMed Central

Objective: To find out quality of surgical case notes according to modified Adjusted Note keeping and Legibility (ANKLe) score in Dow University Hospital. Methods: For this audit, medical records of all the patients admitted in Dow University Hospital surgery department were reviewed from February 2012 to April 2012. The modified ANKLe score (total 24) is formed by the combination of, the content (out of 20) and legibility (out of 4) to give an overall score out of 24. A score of at least 20 (content score 17/20; legibility score 3/4) is considered as acceptable. It means that a surgical record is legible and the majority of the essential content is recorded. Results: A total of 236 records were evaluated. Overall mean ± standard deviation (SD) of ANKLe score was 18.4± 2.1 out of maximum score of 24. Content and legibility has overall mean scores of 14.4 out of 20 and 3.9 out of 4 respectively. Only two variables, patient’s name and consultant on call were documented in 100% of records while the least documented variable were social history 2 (0.2%). Legibility scoring system provides that 218notes out of total set of 236 notes (that is 92.4% of overall notes) have achieved a score of 4. The benchmark of 80% was achieved in 26.1% for total ANKLe score, 6.8% for contents and 99.1% for legibility. Conclusion: Overall, quality of records is not good but legibility part scores exceptionally high. PMID:24353683

Jawaid, Masood; Bakhtiar, Nighat; Khalique, Abdul; Masood, Zubia

2013-01-01

56

A Comparative Study of Team and Primary Nursing Care on Two Surgical Inpatient Units of a Teaching Hospital.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a report of the activities, findings, and recommendations of a project aimed at comparing team and primary nursing care on two surgical inpatient units in a short-term, acute-care hospital. Data were obtained in 1976 and 1979 that related to direc...

J. P. Young, P. B. J. Giovannetti, D. Lewison

1980-01-01

57

Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to

Arvid S Haugen; Eirik Søfteland; Geir E Eide; Monica W Nortvedt; Karina Aase; Stig Harthug

2010-01-01

58

The direct cost of care among surgical inpatients at a tertiary hospital in south west Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study was conducted to assess the direct cost of care and its determinants among surgical inpatients at university College Hospital, Ibadan. Methods A retrospective review of records of 404 inpatients that had surgery from January to December, 2010 was conducted. Information was extracted on socio-demographic variables, investigations, drugs, length of stay (LOS) and cost of carewith a semi-structured pro-forma. Mean cost of care were compared using t-test and Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants of cost of care. Level of significance of 5% was used. In year 2010 $1 was equivalent to 150 naira ($1=? 150). Results The median age of patients was 30 years with inter-quartile range of 13-42 years. Males were 257(63. 6%). The mean overall cost of care was ?66,983 ± ?31,985. Cost of surgery is about 50% of total cost of care. Patient first seen at the Accident and Emergency had a significantly higher mean cost of care of ß = ?17,207(95% CI: ?4,003 to ?30,410). Neuro Surgery (ß=?36,210), and Orthopaedic Surgery versus General Surgery(ß=?10,258),and Blood transfusion (ß=?18,493) all contributed to cost of care significantly. Increase of one day in LOS significantly increased cost of care by ?2,372. 57. Conclusion The evidence evaluated here shows that costs and LOS are interrelated. Attempt at reducing LOS will reduce the costs of care of surgical inpatient.

Ilesanmi, Olayinka Stephen; Fatiregun, Akinola Ayoola

2014-01-01

59

Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.  

PubMed

In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

Kolawole, Deboye O; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L; Lawal, Oladejo O; Amusa, Yemisi B; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten

2013-01-01

60

Uppsala University Hospital 300 years--a survey of the surgical development.  

PubMed

Professor Lars Roberg, the initiator of the Nosocomium Academicum (1708), our first university hospital in Sweden, claimed that 'no-one who does not understand surgery is a completely trained doctor'. However, it was not until the end of 19th century that modern surgery was born. The Academic Hospital was opened in 1867, and at the turn of that century Uppsala had a flourishing period under the influence of Karl Gustav Lennander, professor of surgery. In 1889 he performed the first appendectomy in Scandinavia. At the end of the 19th century the surgical tree began to branch out. In Uppsala gynaecology and obstetrics was the first to be an independent speciality (1891). It was followed by ophthalmology (1894) with Allvar Gullstrand as professor and head of the department. Gullstrand received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1911. A separate department for diseases of the ear, nose, and throat was founded in 1916 with the Nobel laureate Robert Bárány as head. Thoracic surgery began in Uppsala in the 1940s with lung surgery and was separated from general surgery in 1958 with Viking Olov Björk as head of the department. Björk introduced open heart surgery in Uppsala. In 1951 reconstructive plastic surgery was organized by Tord Skoog, who devoted special interest to operations for cleft lip and palate surgery. Neurosurgery was established in 1962, and Uppsala has held a prominent position in the development of modern neurointensive care. During the 1970s general surgery became subspecialized into gastrointestinal, endocrine, and vascular surgery. At the same time fracture surgery was transferred to the orthopaedists, and urological surgery became an independent speciality. Transplantation surgery was introduced in Uppsala in 1967, when Professor Lars Thorén performed the first kidney transplantation. Today Uppsala has a leading position in transplantation of pancreatic islets cells. PMID:19242867

Johansson, Henry

2009-01-01

61

Characterization of Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Surgical Wards' Patients in a Nigerian University Hospital  

PubMed Central

In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

Kolawole, Deboye O.; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L.; Lawal, Oladejo O.; Amusa, Yemisi B.; Kock, Robin; Becker, Karsten

2013-01-01

62

Official U.S. Army Internet Sources Army Home page: www.army.mil  

E-print Network

Official U.S. Army Internet Sources Army Home page: www.army.mil News: http://www.army: https://myarmybenefits.us.army.mil Audio/video: http://www.army.mil/media/amp/ Mobile phone apps: http://www.army, audio, video, presentations, and Army Live, the official Army blog. The U.S. Army Installation

US Army Corps of Engineers

63

Dietary inflammatory index as a potential determinant of a length of hospitalization among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer  

PubMed Central

Background/objectives: Inflammation is a central process responsible for health outcomes among surgical patients. Immunonutrition has been investigated as a promising modifying factor; however, inflammatory properties of habitual diet have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to describe inflammatory properties of diet measured by the dietary inflammatory index (DII) among surgical patients treated for colorectal cancer and to link inflammatory properties of habitual diet with a duration of hospitalization. Subjects/methods: A follow-up study among colorectal cancer patients treated surgically was performed in Krakow, Poland. In total, 689 patients were recruited for the study. Habitual diet was assessed using a standardized semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Overall, 23 dietary items (including macro-and micronutrients) were used to calculate individuals' DII. Gender, age, marital status, body mass index, smoking status, lifetime physical activity, taking vitamin supplements, number of chronic diseases, cancer site, Duke's staging and surgery type were considered as potential covariates. Results: Participants were aged 58 years, with the average hospitalization time of 11 days. Higher DII (meaning diet with higher anti-inflammatory properties) was negatively associated with the duration of hospitalization (univariable linear regression: b=?0.59; P=0.005). Multivariable logistic regression has shown the decrease of the risk of longer stays (>7 days) among patients with the DII >?4.25, but only among younger (?60 years) patients, irrespective of Duke's staging. Conclusions: The DII might be used as a potential predictor of longer hospitalization among colorectal cancer patients treated surgically. The study provides evidence for the role of dietary-related low-grade inflammation among surgical patients. PMID:25005677

Galas, A; Kulig, P; Kulig, J

2014-01-01

64

Surgical Management of Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: A Teaching Hospital Experience  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) consists of a group of distinct disorders that are caused by compression of the brachial plexus and/or subclavian artery and vein. The aim of this study was to highlight the different modalities of diagnosing and treating vascular TOS and evaluate outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study between 1999 and 2011 using the medical records database from a teaching hospital. Results: During the study period, 54 cases with vascular TOS were identified in 38 patients. Bilateral TOS was in 16 patients. The median age of the patients was 33 years (range 12–49), and the majority (79%) were female. Arterial TOS represented forty-nine cases (90.7%). Preoperative information derived from plain x-ray, duplex scanning and in selected cases computed tomography (CT) and/or angiography. Decompression of the TOS was performed through a supraclavicular approach in all cases with scalenectomy coupled with either cervical rib excision (70%), 1st rib excision alone (15%) and excision of both cervical and 1st ribs (15%). Adjunctive vascular reconstructive procedures were done in 11 cases (20.3%); 9 arterial cases and 2 venous cases. There was no mortality; however, postoperative complications occurred in 7 cases (13%). Conclusion: The use of advanced radiological imaging and careful surgical planning for Vascular TOS in a high volume center resulted in good outcomes. PMID:23641288

Al-Omran, Mohammed

2013-01-01

65

Impact of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions on hospital costs in inpatient surgical patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Inadequate surgical hemostasis may lead to transfusion and\\/or other bleeding-related complications. This study examines the\\u000a incidence and costs of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions occurring as a consequence of surgery\\u000a in various inpatient surgical cohorts.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective analysis was conducted using Premier's Perspective™ hospital database. Patients who had an inpatient procedure\\u000a within a specialty of interest (cardiac, vascular, non-cardiac

Michael E Stokes; Xin Ye; Manan Shah; Katie Mercaldi; Matthew W Reynolds; Marcia FT Rupnow; Jeffrey Hammond

2011-01-01

66

78 FR 54842 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...0938-AR54 Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory...Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program; Organ...Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and...

2013-09-06

67

The surgical treatment for acute aortic dissection —A retrospective study from the statistics of affiliated hospital of a medical school—  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective study was conducted for the surgical treatment on acute aortic dissection among the cardiovascular services\\u000a of 5 affiliated hospital of a medical school. The total of 74 cases were operated for the last 5 yers period from Jan., 1991\\u000a to Dec, 1995, in which 64 cases were classified as Type A and 10 for Type B. The average

Nobuyuki Nakajima; Hiroshi Watanabe; Yoshiharu Takahara; Shigeaki Uemura; Hirokazu Murayama; Shigeyasu Takeuchi

1998-01-01

68

Early experience with the da Vinci® surgical system robot in gynecological surgery at King Abdulaziz University Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to review our experience and the challenges of using the da Vinci® surgical system robot during gynecological surgery at King Abdulaziz University Hospital. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to review all cases of robot-assisted gynecologic surgery performed at our institution between January 2008 and December 2010. The patients were reviewed for indications, complications, length of hospital stay, and conversion rate, as well as console and docking times. Results: Over the three-year period, we operated on 35 patients with benign or malignant conditions using the robot for a total of 62 surgical procedures. The docking times averaged seven minutes. The mean console times for simple hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy were 125, 47, and 62 minutes, respectively. In four patients, laparoscopic procedures were converted to open procedures, giving a conversion rate of 6.5%. All of the conversions were among the first 15 procedures performed. The average hospital stay was 3 days. Complications occurred in five patients (14%), and none were directly related to the robotic system. Conclusion: Our early experience with the robot show that with proper training of the robotic team, technical difficulty with the robotic system is limited. There is definitely a learning curve that requires performance of gynecological surgical procedures using the robot. PMID:21845067

Sait, Khalid H

2011-01-01

69

Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-01-01

70

76 FR 42169 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the hospital resources associated with performing the common combinations of these services...efficiencies hospitals can achieve when performing multiple imaging procedures during a...directly related to, and supportive of, performing the main independent procedures...

2011-07-18

71

78 FR 43533 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...efficiencies hospitals can achieve when performing multiple imaging procedures during a...efficiencies hospitals can achieve when performing multiple imaging procedures...we have included those payments when performing OPPS budget...

2013-07-19

72

The implementation of a surgical antibiotic prophylaxis program: The pivotal contribution of the hospital pharmacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although surgical site infection rates have decreased with the prophylactic use of antibiotics, the inappropriateness of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is still a worldwide problem. Various strategies have been used to address this problem. This study describes the implementation of a perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis protocol that emphasizes the contribution of the pharmacist. Methods: A descriptive study design was used to

Maria Aparecida M. B. Prado; Maria Patelli J. S. Lima; Irene da Rocha H. Gomes; Gun Bergsten-Mendes

2002-01-01

73

Informed consent practices for surgical care at university teaching hospitals: a case in a low resource setting  

PubMed Central

Background Informed consent in medical practice is essential and a global standard that should be sought at all the times doctors interact with patients. Its intensity would vary depending on the invasiveness and risks associated with the anticipated treatment. To our knowledge there has not been any systematic review of consent practices to document best practices and identify areas that need improvement in our setting. The objective of the study was to evaluate the informed consent practices of surgeons at University teaching Hospitals in a low resource setting. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted at three university teaching hospitals in Uganda. Self-guided questionnaires were left at a central location in each of the surgical departments after verbally communicating to the surgeons of the intention of the study. Filled questionnaires were returned at the same location by the respondents for collection by the research team. In addition, 20 in-depth interviews were held with surgeons and a review of 384 patients’ record files for informed consent documentation was done. Results A total of 132 (62.1%) out of 214 questionnaires were completed and returned. Respondents were intern doctors, residents and specialists from General surgery, Orthopedic surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, Obstetrics and Gynaecology departments. The average working experience of respondents was 4.8 years (SD 4.454, range 0–39 years). 48.8% of the respondents said they obtained consent all the time surgery is done while 51.2% did not obtain consent all the time. Many of the respondents indicated that informed consent was not obtained by the surgeon who operated the patient but was obtained either at admission or by nurses in the surgical units. The consent forms used in the hospitals were found to be inadequate and many times signed at admission before diagnosing the patient’s disease. Conclusions Informed consent administration and documentation for surgical health care is still inadequate at University teaching hospitals in Uganda. PMID:24885609

2014-01-01

74

Microbial Contamination on Used Surgical Masks among Hospital Personnel and Microbial Air Quality in their Working Wards: A Hospital in Bangkok  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the relationship of bacterial and fungal contamination on used surgical masks worn by the hospital personnel and microbial air quality in their working wards. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 230 used surgical masks collected from 214 hospital personnel, and 215 indoor air samples collected from their working wards to culture for bacterial and fungal counts. This study was carried out at the hospital in Bangkok. Group or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lacto-phenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient at the significant level of p<0.050. Results Means and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal contamination on inside area of the used masks were 47 ± 56 and 15 ± 9 cfu/ml/piece, and on outside area were 166 ± 199 and 34 ± 18 cfu/ml/piece, respectively, p<0.001. The bacterial and fungal contamination on used masks from hospital personnel working in the male and female medical wards and out-patient department, as well as the bacterial and fungal counts of the indoor air sample collected from the same area were relatively higher than the other wards. The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi contaminated on inside and outside areas of the used masks and air samples were similar (Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp.; respectively). For its relationship, results found that bacterial and fungal counts in air samples showed significantly positive correlation with the bacterial contamination load on outside area of the used masks, r=0.16, p=0.018 and r=0.21, p=0.003, respectively. Conclusion High bacterial contamination on outside area of the used masks was demonstrated, and it showed a significant correlation with microbial air quality of working wards. PMID:25337311

Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Aiempradit, Natkitta; Vatanasomboon, Pisit

2014-01-01

75

Methodologies used in surveillance of surgical wound infections and bacteremia in Australian hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The prevalence of nosocomial infection in Australian hospitals is estimated to be between 5.5% and 6.3%. Since 1989, infection control professionals (ICPs) in hospitals accredited by the Australian Council on Health Care Standards (ACHS) have been encouraged to collect nosocomial infection data according to ACHS methodology. Method: In 1996, we surveyed members of the Australian Infection Control Association to

Cathryn L. Murphy; M.-L. McLaws

1999-01-01

76

Cost Determinants of Percutaneous and Surgical Interventions for Treatment of Intermittent Claudication from the Perspective of the Hospital  

SciTech Connect

Purpose. To identify pretreatment predictors of procedural costs in percutaneous and surgical interventions for intermittent claudication due to aortoiliac and/or femoropopliteal disease. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in 97 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous or surgical interventions over 15 months at a tertiary care center. Nineteen clinical predictive variables were collected at baseline. Procedural costs (outcome) were assessed from the perspective of the hospital by direct calculation, not based on ratios of costs-to-charges. A multivariable regression model was built to identify significant cost predictors. Follow-up information was obtained to provide multidimensional assessment of clinical outcome, including technical success (arteriographic score) and clinical result (changes in ankle-brachial pressure index; cumulative patency, mortality, and complication rates). Results. The linear regression model shows that procedural costs per patient are 25% lower in percutaneous patients (versus surgical), 42% lower for patients without rest pain than for those with, 28% lower if treated lesions are unilateral (versus bilateral), 12% lower if the treated lesion is stenotic rather than occlusive, 34% higher in sedentary patients, and 11% higher in patients with a history of cardiac disease. After a mean clinical follow-up >2 years, between-group differences between percutaneous and surgical patients were small and of limited significance in all dimensions of clinical outcome. Conclusion. Predictors of clinical outcome are different from predictors of costs, and one should include both types of variables in the decision-making process. The choice of percutaneous versus surgical strategy, the presence of rest pain, and the bilaterality of the culprit lesions were the main pretreatment determinants of procedural costs. When possible choices of treatment strategy overlap, percutaneous treatment should provide an acceptable result that is less expensive (although not equal to surgery)

Janne d'Othee, Bertrand [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging and Intervention (United States)], E-mail: bjannedothee@partners.org; Morris, Michael F. [Banner Good Samaritan Hospital (United States); Powell, Richard J. [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Bettmann, Michael A. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Department of Radiological Science (United States)

2008-01-15

77

Adherence to American society of health-system pharmacists surgical antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines in a teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

Objective: Surgical site infections are the second most common type of adverse events occurring in hospitalized patients, whereas an estimated 40-60% of these infections are thought to be preventable. Choice of regimen, administration timing or duration of antibiotic prophylaxis is reported to be inappropriate in approximately 25-50% of cases. We tried to evaluate an antibiotic administration pattern for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in a teaching hospital. Methods: This study was conducted at the general surgery and orthopedic wards of a teaching hospital affiliated with Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. The medical records of admitted patients who underwent different surgical procedures were reviewed. Compliance was assessed with the recommendations of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' guidelines for every aspect of antibiotic prophylaxis. All data were coded and analyzed by SPSS16 software using Student's t-test and Chi-square test. Findings: During 1 year, 759 patients who underwent different surgeries were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 32.02 ± 18.79 years. Hand and foot fractures repair were the most frequent surgery types. About 56.4% of administered prophylactic antibiotics were in accordance with the American Society of Health System Pharmacists (ASHP) guidelines regarding prophylaxis indication. The most commonly antibiotic used was cefazolin and antibiotic choices were appropriate in 104 of 168 surgical procedures (62%). Gentamicin, metronidazole and ceftriaxone were the most frequently antibiotics that used inappropriately. Only in 100 of 168 procedures, duration was concordant with the ASHP guideline, whereas in 68 procedures, duration was longer than recommended time. In 98 procedures, the dose was lower and in one procedure, it was higher than recommended doses. Conclusion: Although such guidelines have been in place for many years, studies showed that much inappropriate antibiotic use as prophylaxis and poor adherence to guidelines are still major issues. It is essential for surgeons to be aware to consider the best antibiotic choices, dose and duration based on reliable guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:25114939

Rafati, Mohammadreza; Shiva, Afshin; Ahmadi, Amirhosein; Habibi, Omran

2014-01-01

78

Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students' perceptions  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results Only 17 students (12.1%) declined to participate in the study. The students’ current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical) were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001). The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45) and surgical (mean: 3.05) ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001). Conclusion Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside teaching experience for their students. PMID:24101889

AlMutar, Sara; AlTourah, Lulwa; Sadeq, Hussain; Karim, Jumanah; Marwan, Yousef

2013-01-01

79

Assessment of surgical site infection risk factors at Imam Reza hospital, Mashhad, Iran between 2006 and 2011  

PubMed Central

Background: The present study was conducted to establish the patterns and risk factors of surgical site infections in our institution between 2006 and 2011. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study. The surgical site infection (SSI) was identified based on the presence of ICD-10-CM diagnostic code in hospital discharge records. By using a standardized data collection form predictor variables including patient characteristics, preoperative, intra-operative and postoperative data were obtained. Results: Ninety five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The patients were admitted for various procedures including both elective (62.1%) and emergency (37.9%) operations. Colectomy (13.7%) was the leading procedure followed by umbilical herniation (12.6) and appendix perforation (12.6%). The mean age was 47.13 years with standard deviation of 19.60 years. Twenty percent were addicted to opium. Midline incision above and below the umbilicus (40%) had the highest prevalence of infection. Most patients (46.3%) had cleancontaminated wounds and 30.5% had contaminated one. The quantitative variables which were also measured include duration of surgery, pre-operative and post-operative hospital stay with the mean of 2.9±1.45 hours, 1.02±1.42 and 7.75±6.75 days respectively. The most antibiotics prescribed post-operatively were the combination of ceftriaxone and metronidazole (51.6%). Conclusion: The contaminated and clean-contaminated wounds are associated with higher rate of SSIs. Also, there was a converse relation between length of surgical incision and rate of SSIs. In overall, we found type of surgery as the main risk factor in developing the SSIs.

Motie, Mohammad Reza; Ansari, Majid; Nasrollahi, Hamid Reza

2014-01-01

80

Efficacy of Parenteral Nutrition Supplemented With Glutamine Dipeptide to Decrease Hospital Infections in Critically Ill Surgical Patients  

PubMed Central

Background Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Clinical benefits of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition may occur in hospitalized surgical patients, but efficacy data in different surgical subgroups are lacking. The objective was to determine whether glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition differentially affects nosocomial infection rates in selected subgroups of SICU patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition in SICU patients requiring parenteral nutrition and SICU care after surgery for pancreatic necrosis, cardiac, vascular, or colonic surgery. Subjects (n = 59) received isocaloric/isonitrogenous parenteral nutrition, providing 1.5 g/kg/d standard glutamine-free amino acids (STD-PN) or 1.0 g/kg/d standard amino acids + 0.5 g/kg/d glutamine dipeptide (GLN-PN). Enteral feedings were advanced as tolerated. Nosocomial infections were determined until hospital discharge. Results Baseline clinical/metabolic data were similar between groups. Plasma glutamine concentrations were low in all groups and were increased by GLN-PN. GLN-PN did not alter infection rates after pancreatic necrosis surgery (17 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN patients). In nonpancreatic surgery patients (12 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN), GLN-PN was associated with significantly decreased total nosocomial infections (STD-PN 36 vs GLN-PN 13, P < .030), bloodstream infections (7 vs 0, P < .01), pneumonias (16 vs 6, P < .05), and infections attributed to Staphylococcus aureus (P < .01), fungi, and enteric Gram-negative bacteria (each P < .05). Conclusions Glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition did not alter infection rates following pancreatic necrosis surgery but significantly decreased infections in SICU patients after cardiac, vascular, and colonic surgery. PMID:18596310

Estivariz, Concepcion F.; Griffith, Daniel P.; Luo, Menghua; Szeszycki, Elaina E.; Bazargan, Niloofar; Dave, Nisha; Daignault, Nicole M.; Bergman, Glen F.; McNally, Therese; Battey, Cindy H.; Furr, Celeste E.; Hao, Li; Ramsay, James G.; Accardi, Carolyn R.; Cotsonis, George A.; Jones, Dean P.; Galloway, John R.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

2011-01-01

81

Trends and Variations in the Rates of Hospital Complications, Failure-to-Rescue and 30-Day Mortality in Surgical Patients in New South Wales, Australia, 2002-2009  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the increased acceptance of failure-to-rescue (FTR) as an important patient safety indicator (defined as the percentage of deaths among surgical patients with treatable complications), there has not been any large epidemiological study reporting FTR in an Australian setting nor any evaluation on its suitability as a performance indicator. Methods We conducted a population-based study on elective surgical patients from 82 public acute hospitals in New South Wales, Australia between 2002 and 2009, exploring the trends and variations in rates of hospital complications, FTR and 30-day mortality. We used Poisson regression models to derive relative risk ratios (RRs) after adjusting for a range of patient and hospital characteristics. Results The average rates of complications, FTR and 30-day mortality were 13.8 per 1000 admissions, 14.1% and 6.1 per 1000 admission, respectively. The rates of complications and 30-day mortality were stable throughout the study period however there was a significant decrease in FTR rate after 2006, coinciding with the establishment of national and state-level peak patient safety agencies. There were marked variations in the three rates within the top 20% of hospitals (best) and bottom 20% of hospitals (worst) for each of the four peer-hospital groups. The group comprising the largest volume hospitals (principal referral/teaching hospitals) had a significantly higher rate of FTR in comparison to the other three groups of smaller-sized peer hospital groups (RR?=?0.78, 0.57, and 0.61, respectively). Adjusted rates of complications, FTR and 30-day mortality varied widely for individual surgical procedures between the best and worst quintile hospitals within the principal referral hospital group. Conclusions The decrease in FTR rate over the study period appears to be associated with a wide range of patient safety programs. The marked variations in the three rates between- and within- peer hospital groups highlight the potential for further quality improvement intervention opportunities. PMID:24788787

Ou, Lixin; Chen, Jack; Assareh, Hassan; Hollis, Stephanie J.; Hillman, Ken; Flabouris, Arthas

2014-01-01

82

Army Efficiency Initiatives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1988 the Secretary of Defense directed the military services to incorporate Total Quality Management (TQM) principles throughout their organizations. Beginning in 1992, Total Army Quality (TAQ) was the Army's new management philosophy in response to th...

D. B. Rivers

2011-01-01

83

Predictors of preoperative anxiety among surgical patients in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, South Western Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Hospitalization and surgery are critical negative life events that lead to the experience of considerable anxiety in patients. Patients may perceive the day of surgery as the biggest and the most threatening day in their lives. There is paucity of information on predictors of anxiety in the current study area. The main objective of this study is to assess predictors of preoperative anxiety among patients scheduled for surgery in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted using quantitative data collection technique in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital from February 13 to April 13, 2012 on 239 patients scheduled for surgery. The data were collected by five trained diploma nurses using structured interviewer administered questionnaires that were prepared based on state trait anxiety inventory measurement scale. The quantitative data were entered into SPSS for windows version 16. 0 and descriptive, simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Results A total of 239 patients were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 93.0%. Their mean age was 42.7?±?1.8 years (range 16 to 85 years). Nearly over half 53.6% were females, while 48.1% illiterate, 72.4% Oromo and 56.5% were Muslim followers. Significant preoperative anxiety was seen in 70.3% patients. The most common factors that lead to anxiety were fear of death 38.1% and fear of unknown origin 24.3% and the most common strategy mentioned by patient in reducing anxiety were talking to other patient 79.8% and religious belief. Conclusions In the present study, two third 70.3% of preoperative patients had anxiety. Factors which were positively correlated with anxiety were trait anxiety, single and divorced, time of operation and income. Factors which were shown to reduce anxiety were preoperative anxiety related information provision and afternoon operation. Health professionals working in the hospital should provide anxiety related information for patients. PMID:25189274

2014-01-01

84

Surgical Revascularization for Acute Coronary Insufficiency: Analysis of Risk Factors for Hospital Mortality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. A retrospective study of 444 patients undergoing urgent and emergent coronary artery bypass grafting for acute coronary insufficiency was performed to identify the risk factors for hospital death specifically associated with the clinical severity of the acute coronary insufficiency syndrome.Methods. The patients were divided into three groups—urgent, emergent A, and emergent B—on the basis of the evolution of the

Biagio Tomasco; Antonino Cappiello; Rosario Fiorilli; Archimede Leccese; Raniero Lupino; Antonio Romiti; Ugo F Tesler

1997-01-01

85

Surgical pathology in the 20th century at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.  

PubMed

How did the education of surgical pathology, and pathology in general, differ at Mount Sinai? Passing the examination of the American Board of Pathology was never the focus of the department. Learning criteria or quoting references was de-emphasized, but mastery of macroscopic pathology was required, supported in both word and action by two brilliant surgical pathologists, Otani and Kaneko, and by two extraordinary medical pathologists, Klemperer and Popper. Meticulous microscopy emphasized pattern rather than reliance on lists of discrete features. Otani developed a regular "problem case" meeting for a community of pathologists, made up of alumni and other interested pathologists, as well as active department members. These monthly sessions provided the highest level of "continuing medical education." Otani and Kaneko unequivocally believed in learning from cases, and Mount Sinai residents were fortunate both in the one-to-one teaching and in the wealth of material, in all systems, that came to surgical pathology. Outstanding pathologists who came from Mount Sinai settled throughout the country and provided the highest level of diagnoses, but, with the exception of Bernard Wagner, Emanuel Rubin, Fiorenzo Paronetto, Richard Horowitz, Michael Gerber, Marc Rosenblum, Bruce Wenig, Jaishree Jagirdar, Swan Thung, Cesar Moran, Hideko Kamino, Philip LeBoit, Alberto Marchevsky, and others, there were relatively few academic leaders. Otani and Kaneko did not have national reputations. Klemperer, although world renowned, was relatively unassuming, and his disciples numbered almost as many nonpathologists as pathologists. Popper did establish a major center for liver pathology, with students coming from around the world, but did not particularly promote general surgical pathology. Can the Mount Sinai approach still be applied? The decline in the numbers of autopsies performed, the demands for rapid turnaround time, the de-emphasis of gross pathology as newer technologies (eg, immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics, molecular pathology) gain place, the increasing tendency to select investigators, including basic scientists, as teaching department chairs and the financial constraints requiring increasing use of nonphysician workers all speak to the relegation of the Otani-Kaneko era to history. Is this a loss to Pathology? It is certainly a style of practice that has been lost. However, there is no reason to bemoan the state of Pathology in the beginning years of the 21st century. Pathology practice is outstanding at many medical centers throughout the world, including at Mount Sinai under the very able and creative leadership of Alan Schiller, who has presided over great enhancements of the department in both anatomic and clinical pathology, including significant advances in the study of diseases by molecular methods. Surgical Pathology at Mount Sinai has been led by James Strauchen, a renowned hematopathologist recruited by Schiller's predecessor, Jerome Kleinerman, and is currently directed by Ira Bleiweiss, a student of Kaneko. Other techniques and technologies have, to a degree, compensated for some of the changes since the Otani-Kaneko years and it is almost certain that advances in molecular pathology will allow for increasing sophistication in establishing diagnoses, and likely even grading and staging, probably even on blood, rather than tissue, samples. The science of Pathology will advance, as the art declines. Those who learned at Mount Sinai during the Otani-Kaneko years will, however, very likely tell you that they were privileged to have learned Pathology there and, especially, to have learned a distinct philosophy of Pathology under the guidance of caring, thoughtful, and especially gifted pathologists. PMID:19007103

Geller, Stephen A

2008-08-01

86

Major Harvey Cushing's difficulties with the British and American armies during World War I.  

PubMed

This historical review explores Harvey Cushing's difficulties with both the British and American armies during his World War I service to definitively examine the rumor of his possible court martial. It also provides a further understanding of Cushing the man. While in France during World War I, Cushing was initially assigned to British hospital units. This service began in May 1917 and ended abruptly in May 1918 when the British cashiered him for repeated censorship violations. Returning to American command, he feared court martial. The army file on this matter (retrieved from the United States National Archives) indicates that US Army authorities recommended that Cushing be reprimanded and returned to the US for his violations. The army carried out neither recommendation, and no evidence exists that a court martial was considered. Cushing's army career and possible future academic life were protected by the actions of his surgical peers and Merritte Ireland, Chief Surgeon of the US Army in France. After this censorship episode, Cushing was made a neurosurgical consultant but was also sternly warned that further rule violations would not be tolerated by the US Army. Thereafter, despite the onset of a severe peripheral neuropathy, probably Guillian Barré's syndrome, Cushing was indefatigable in ministering to neurosurgical needs in the US sector in France. Cushing's repeated defying of censorship regulations reveals poor judgment plus an initial inability to be a "team player." The explanations he offered for his censorship violations showed an ability to bend the truth. Cushing's war journal is unclear as to exactly what transpired between him and the British and US armies. It also shows no recognition of the help he received from others who were instrumental in preventing his ignominious removal from service in France. Had that happened, his academic future and ability to train future neurosurgical leaders may have been seriously threatened. Cushing's foibles notwithstanding, all realized that he contributed greatly to both British and US war neurosurgery. United States Army surgeons who operated upon brain wounds in France recognized Cushing as their leader. PMID:24949679

Carey, Michael E

2014-08-01

87

The results of the three-month co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team in a role II military hospital in Afghanistan  

PubMed Central

Background and Aim: There are a lot of unique challenges for the military medical personnel assigned to Afghanistan. We evaluate the results of the co-operation between a German and a Greek surgical team during a 3-month period in a role II hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients who were admitted to the role II German hospital of Kunduz were evaluated. We reviewed the type of diseases, mechanism and location of injuries, management, types of surgical procedures, blood supply, and outcome. Results: The data included 792 ISAF patients, 18 NGOs patients, and 296 local patients. Out of them, 71.6% of the patients were ISAF personnel; 51 patients underwent a surgical operation; 35 of them were operated in an emergency base. Fifty-five surgical procedures were performed. In 22 (43.1%) of these patients, orthopedic procedures were performed, while in the rest 29 (56.9%) patients the operations were of general surgery interest. Gunshot injuries were the main mechanism of injury for locals, whereas ISAF personnel were usually presented with injuries after IEDs and rocket attacks. A total number of 11 patients were transferred to role III military hospitals for further treatment within 24 hours. Conclusions: The co-operation between surgical teams from different countries, when appropriately trained, staffed, and equipped, can be highly effective in a combat environment. PMID:22416153

Gourgiotis, Stavros; Triantafyllou, Christos; Karamitros, Athanasios; Thinnes, Katrin; Thuringen, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Roland

2012-01-01

88

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers . Combat and Construction m W'. Army Engineem in World War I by Charles Hendricks #12;of History U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fort Belvoir, Virginia 1993 US. Army engineer recruiting poste1: On the cover: US Army engineers construct a corduruy road used to carry supplies

US Army Corps of Engineers

89

Army Regulation 2001 Environmental Quality  

E-print Network

of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The terms "Army environmental pro- grams" and "ArmyArmy Regulation 200­1 Environmental Quality Environmental Protection and Enhancement Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 13 December 2007 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 200

US Army Corps of Engineers

90

US Army War College  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Strategic Studies Institute is the primary research faculty of the U.S. Army War College, and includes both civilian scholars and uniformed military officers with extensive experience in national security and military affairs. The most common products of the Institute are SSI Studies which deal with topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger National Security community. Additional information is available on the mission, history, and organization of SSI, plus a link to the U.S. Army Military History Institute. http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usassi/

91

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

92

Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

93

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

94

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

95

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

96

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

97

Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

98

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

99

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

100

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

101

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

102

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

103

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

104

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

105

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

106

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

107

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

108

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

109

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

110

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

111

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

112

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

113

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

114

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

115

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

116

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

117

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

118

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

119

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

120

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

121

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

122

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

123

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

124

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

125

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

126

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

127

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

128

Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

129

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

130

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

131

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

132

Latex allergies - for hospital patients  

MedlinePLUS

Latex products - hospital; Latex allergy - hospital; Latex sensitivity - hospital ... Common hospital items that may contain latex include: Surgical and exam gloves Catheters and other tubing Sticky tape or ...

133

[Surgical treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. Last 15 years of experience in Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare].  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to investigate the particular course of the patients operated for severe acute pancreatitis in a period of 15 years in surgical department of Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare. Medical records of 202 patients admitted and operated for severe acute pancreatitis, were studied. Follow-up parameters were: age, gender, etiology, moment of operation, the type of operations and postoperative evolution of this patients. In the group of deceased patients alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis was prevailing. Almost a half of patients were operated in the first day of admission. A high number of patients were operated for diagnosis of acute abdomen with intention of exploratory laparotomy. In the last years, besides the usual closed drainage, open drainage and planning drainage were performed. Postoperative mortality is still high. The diagnose of severe acute pancreatitis is difficult in emergency. Global mortality in pancreatitis remains high, especially in the period of enzymatic shock, and is correlated with masculine gender, alcoholic etiology and somewhat with precocity of operation. PMID:16372670

Le?e, Mihaela; T?m??an, Anca; Stoicescu, B; Brându?e, M; Puia, Ioana; Mare, C; Laz?r, C

2005-01-01

134

ATTENTION OF DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-print Network

: Principal Officials of Headquarters, Department of the Army Commander U.S. Army Forces Command U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command U.S. Army Materiel Command U.S. Army Europe U.S. Army Central U.S. Army North U.S. Army South U.S. Army Pacific U.S. Army Africa U.S. Army Special Operations Command Military

US Army Corps of Engineers

135

Matching bacteriological and medico-administrative databases is efficient for a computer-enhanced surveillance of surgical site infections: retrospective analysis of 4,400 surgical procedures in a French university hospital.  

PubMed

Objective.?Our goal was to estimate the performance statistics of an electronic surveillance system for surgical site infections (SSIs), generally applicable in French hospitals. Methods.?Three detection algorithms using 2 different data sources were tested retrospectively on 9 types of surgical procedures performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in the University Hospital of Nantes. The first algorithm was based on administrative codes, the second was based on bacteriological data, and the third used both data sources. For each algorithm, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated. The reference method was the hospital's routine surveillance: a comprehensive review of the computerized medical charts of the patients who underwent one of the targeted procedures during the study period. Setting.?A 3,000-bed teaching hospital in western France. Population.?We analyzed 4,400 targeted surgical procedures. Results.?Sensitivity results varied significantly between the three algorithms, from 25% (95% confidence interval, 17-33) when using only administrative codes to 87% (80%-93%) with the bacteriological data and 90% (85%-96%) with the combined algorithm. Fewer variations were observed for specificity (91%-98%), PPV (21%-25%), and NPV (98% to nearly 100%). Overall, performance statistics were higher for deep SSIs than for superficial infections. Conclusions.?A reliable computer-enhanced SSI surveillance can easily be implemented in French hospitals using common data sources. This should allow infection control professionals to spend more time on prevention and education duties. However, a multicenter study should be conducted to assess the generalizability of this method. PMID:25333426

Leclère, Brice; Lasserre, Camille; Bourigault, Céline; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Chaillet, Marie-Pierre; Mauduit, Nicolas; Caillon, Jocelyne; Hanf, Matthieu; Lepelletier, Didier

2014-11-01

136

41. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

41. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, First Floor Plan, Main Laboratory Section and Plan, Building 1006. no date BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

137

42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

138

Army Regulation 2555 Information Management: Records  

E-print Network

, the Army National Guard, the U.S. Army Reserve, and organizations for which the Department of the Army for Active Army, Army National Guard, and U.S. Army Re- serve. Contents (Listed by paragraph and page numberArmy Regulation 25­55 Information Management: Records Management The Department of the Army Freedom

US Army Corps of Engineers

139

ARMY SUPPORT TO SECURITY COOPERATION  

E-print Network

is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;FM 3-22, C1FM 3-22 ARMY SUPPORT TO SECURITY COOPERATION JANUARY 2013 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY #12;This publication

US Army Corps of Engineers

140

December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS  

E-print Network

at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine DigitalFM 4-02.1 December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available

US Army Corps of Engineers

141

Army Personnel Recovery November 2011  

E-print Network

at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine DigitalFM 3-50.1 Army Personnel Recovery November 2011 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available

US Army Corps of Engineers

142

Army Water Supply Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper has two goals: (1) describe current Army efforts to improve the capability and sustainability of its reverse osmosis (RO) based water purification equipment and (2) discuss the ongoing efforts being made under the Water Purification Technology ...

B. Shalewitz, J. S. Dusenbury

2003-01-01

143

A qualitative study comparing experiences of the surgical safety checklist in hospitals in high-income and low-income countries  

PubMed Central

Objective Bold claims have been made for the ability of the WHO surgical checklist to reduce surgical morbidity and mortality and improve patient safety regardless of the setting. Little is known about how far the challenges faced by low-income countries are the same as those in high-income countries or different. We aimed to identify and compare the influences on checklist implementation and compliance in the UK and Africa. Design Ethnographic study involving observations, interviews and collection of documents. Thematic analysis of the data. Setting Operating theatres in one African university hospital and two UK university hospitals. Participants 112?h of observations were undertaken. Interviews with 39 theatre and administrative staff were conducted. Results Many staff saw value in the checklist in the UK and African hospitals. Some resentment was present in all settings, linked to conflicts between the philosophy behind the checklist and the realities of local cultural, social and economic contexts. Compliance—involving use, completeness and fidelity—was considerably higher, though not perfect, in the UK settings. In these hospitals, compliance was supported by established structures and systems, and was not significantly undermined by major resource constraints; the same was not true of the low-income context. Hierarchical relationships were a major barrier to implementation in all settings, but were more marked in the low-income setting. Introducing a checklist in a professional environment characterised by a lack of accountability and transparency could make the staff feel jeopardised legally, professionally, and personally, and it encouraged them to make misleading records of what had actually been done. Conclusions Surgical checklist implementation is likely to be optimised, regardless of the setting, when used as a tool in multifaceted cultural and organisational programmes to strengthen patient safety. It cannot be assumed that the introduction of a checklist will automatically lead to improved communication and clinical processes. PMID:23950205

Aveling, Emma-Louise; McCulloch, Peter; Dixon-Woods, Mary

2013-01-01

144

Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records  

E-print Network

Army personnel, including personnel of the Army National Guard of the United States and the U.S. Army Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to U.S. Army Re- cords Management and Declassification, B, C, D, and E for Active Army, Army National Guard of the U.S., and U.S. Army Reserve. Contents

US Army Corps of Engineers

145

Evaluation of current practices in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in primary total hip prosthesis--a multicentre survey in private and public French hospitals.  

PubMed

Deep wound infection is a rare but dreaded postoperative complication after total hip prosthesis (THP) procedures but its incidence can be reduced by systemic antimicrobial prophylaxis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether antimicrobial prophylaxis for elective primary THP in patients without any history of hip infection, in orthopaedic wards, participating on a voluntary basis, in French public hospitals and private institutions, complies with published guidelines. Three types of data were collected from anaesthetic and surgical records (November 2000-January 2001) in participating hospitals: (1) administrative data on the hospitals and orthopaedic wards, (2) data on patients, (3) data on compliance of practices with five critical criteria derived from published French guidelines. These criteria concerned administration of prophylaxis, choice of antimicrobial agent, dose of first injection, timing of administration and total length of prophylaxis. Thirty institutions sent data files on 1257 THPs to the coordination centre. Compliance exceeded 80% for all criteria except one (interval between first and second injection). Cumulative compliance with the five criteria was 66.9%. Major compliance failures were an inappropriate interval between the first injection and incision, and total antimicrobial prophylaxis exceeding 48 h. Cumulative compliance was 87.9% in teaching hospitals, 61.8% in general hospitals and 67.7% in private institutions (P<1 x 10(-6)). It was slightly higher when the annual number of interventions was > or =100 (69.4 versus 62.3%; P<0.02). Although the protocol for antimicrobial prophylaxis in THP was clear and easy, one-third of practices did not conform with all five standards. Knowledge of the results by the participating institutions should encourage them to set up working groups to draft care protocols for THP and other surgical interventions, in order to improve practice and perhaps reduce costs. PMID:15003668

Quenon, J-L; Eveillard, M; Vivien, A; Bourderont, D; Lepape, A; Lathelize, M; Jestin, C

2004-03-01

146

Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

Mellon, Ericka

2011-01-01

147

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

(m]I I 11~11 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Technical Report A-98-2 July Liquid and Slow-Release Pellet Applications by Michael D. Netherland U.S. Army Corps of Engineers report Approved for public releaee; distribution is unlimited Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

US Army Corps of Engineers

148

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

[m]I I 11~11 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Technical Report A-98-1 May. --.-- .-- -- -- ...-- --.. Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps, IN 46168-1245 Kurt D. Getsinger, John D. Madsen, John G. Skogerboe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways

US Army Corps of Engineers

149

Army Low Impact Development Technical User Guide  

E-print Network

for Installation Management Prepared by: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District U.S. Army Development Center, Inc. #12; #12;Army Low Impact Development Technical User Guide U.S. Army Corps sustainability goals. #12;Army Low Impact Development Technical User Guide U.S. Army Corps of Engineers January

US Army Corps of Engineers

150

WVU Healthcare Employee Donates to Pediatric Ophthalmology Lacy Fisher, surgical technician at Ruby Hospital, has been assisting our ophthalmologists for  

E-print Network

from pediatric strabismus to cornea transplants. Lacy loves her work and the patients she cares for years old. Because Lacy wanted to do something special for the children cared for in pediatric on a child's face like a stuffed toy." "Lacy's contributions to the quality of care we provide our surgical

Mohaghegh, Shahab

151

Frequency of use and knowledge of the WHO-surgical checklist in Swiss hospitals: a cross-sectional online survey  

PubMed Central

Background The WHO-surgical checklist is strongly recommended as a highly effective yet economically simple intervention to improve patient safety. Its use and potentially influential factors were investigated as little data exist on the current situation in Switzerland. Methods A cross-sectional online survey with members (N?=?1378) of three Swiss professional associations of invasive health care professionals was conducted in German, French, and Italian. The survey assessed use of, knowledge of and satisfaction with the WHO-surgical checklist. T-Tests and ANOVA were conducted to test for differences between professional groups. Bivariate correlations were computed to test for associations between measures of knowledge and satisfaction. Results 1090 (79.1%) reported the use of a surgical checklist. 346 (25.1%) use the WHO-checklist, 532 (38.6%) use the Swiss Patient Safety Foundation recommendations to avoid Wrong Site Surgery, and 212 (15.7%) reported the use of other checklists. Satisfaction with checklist use was generally high (doctors: 71.9% satisfied, nurses: 60.8% satisfied) and knowledge was moderate depending on the use of the WHO-checklist. No association between measures of subjective and objective knowledge was found. Conclusions Implementation of a surgical checklist remains an important task for health care institutions in Switzerland. Although checklist use is present in Switzerland on a regular basis, a substantial group of health care personnel still do not use a checklist as a routine. Influential factors and the associations among themselves need to be addressed in future studies in more detail. PMID:24304634

2013-01-01

152

A Historical Look at Alcohol Abuse Trends in Army and Civilian Populations, 1980-1995  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare civilian and Army alcohol-related hospitalization trends and to plot temporal changes in rates relative to alcohol-related legislation and social policies. Method We compared population-based civilian and Army annual hospitalization rates for overall alcohol-related diagnoses and for alcohol-related diagnostic subgroups (1980–1995) and plotted them against civilian and military substance abuse regulations. Civilian data were adjusted to Army age, gender, and race. Results Although overall civilian and Army alcohol hospitalization rates were similar, alcohol subgroup rates varied. Simultaneous drug and alcohol abuse (polyabuse) rates were higher among civilians (16.6 per 10,000) than Army soldiers (5.1 per 10,000). Army rates for dependent alcohol-related disorders were higher and increased. Army nondependent alcohol disorders tracked with alcohol-related regulations as rates fell 69% between 1985 and 1995. Conclusion Army and civilian alcohol abuse trends vary by abuse type. Without longitudinal, diagnosis-specific subgroup analyses, these trends would not have emerged. Army policies and screening may explain divergent nondependent alcohol abuse and lower polyabuse rates. PMID:17937358

Benjamin, Katy L.; Bell, Nicole S.; Hollander, Ilyssa E.

2007-01-01

153

Circulating immune parameters predicting the progression from hospital-acquired pneumonia to septic shock in surgical patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Hospital-acquired pneumonia after surgery is one of the major causes of septic shock. The excessive inflammatory response appears to be responsible for the increased susceptibility to infections and subsequent sepsis. The primary aim of this study was to investigate immune parameters at the onset of pneumonia, before the development of subsequent septic shock. The secondary aim was to investigate

Vera von Dossow; Koschka Rotard; Uwe Redlich; Ortrud Vargas Hein; Claudia D Spies

2005-01-01

154

Circulating immune parameters predicting the progression from hospital-acquired pneumonia to septic shock in surgical patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction Hospital-acquired pneumonia after surgery is one of the major causes of septic shock. The excessive inflammatory response appears to be responsible for the increased susceptibility to infections and subsequent sepsis. The primary aim of this study was to investigate immune parameters at the onset of pneumonia, before the development of subsequent septic shock. The secondary aim was to investigate the usefulness of these immune parameters in predicting progression from hospital-acquired pneumonia to septic shock. Methods This propective clinical study included 76 patients with the diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Approval was obtained from the local institutional ethics committee and relatives of the patients gave informed consent. Of the 76 patients, 29 subsequently developed septic shock. All patients were included within 4 h of establishing the diagnosis of hospital-acquired pneumonia (first collection of blood samples and the analysis of immune mediators). In addition, we defined early (within 12 h of onset of septic shock) and late (within 72 to 96 h of onset) stages of septic shock for the collection of blood samples and the analysis of immune mediators. The immune parameters tumor necrosis factor-?, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 as well as the endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule were analyzed. Results In the pneumonia group with subsequent septic shock, levels of IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 were significantly increased before the onset of septic shock compared to patients without subsequent septic shock. This progression was best predicted by IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 (area under the curve ? 0.8). Conclusion At the onset of hospital-acquired pneumonia, a significant relevant systemic cytokine mediated response had already been initiated. It might, therefore, be possible to identify patients at risk for septic shock with these predictive markers during early pneumonia. In addition, immune modulating therapy might be considered as adjuvant therapy. PMID:16280065

von Dossow, Vera; Rotard, Koschka; Redlich, Uwe; Hein, Ortrud Vargas; Spies, Claudia D

2005-01-01

155

A Study on the Usage Pattern of Antimicrobial Agents for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital  

PubMed Central

Context: Inappropriate antimicrobial use increases the incidence of drug resistance, drug toxicity and superinfections, thereby increasing the healthcare costs. Various approaches for rationalizing the antimicrobial therapy, have been suggested. Collection of baseline data on the pattern of the antimicrobial use is usually suggested as the first step in this direction, which will help in identifying the problem areas, which demand our attention. Aims: To study the usage pattern of prophylactic antimicrobials in surgical patients, in order to detect any inappropriateness concerning the selection, timing, redosing and the duration of antimicrobial administration. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of the randomly selected medical records of general surgical cases over an 8 month period in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: The medical records of 258 patients who had undergone surgical procedures were verified for the appropriateness of the antimicrobial prophylaxis, with respect to the choice of the antimicrobial agent, the time of its administration, the intraoperative dosing, and the duration of the postoperative use. The obtained data was analyzed and conclusions were drawn with the help of descriptive statistics. Results: Third generation cephalosporins were used preoperatively in all the 258(100%) patients through the intravenous route. In addition, 77(30%) patients received metronidazole or amikacin. The antimicrobials were administered half an hour to one hour before the surgery. No intraoperative redosing was given. The duration of the postoperative prophylaxis was extended to 36 hours or more in 248(96%) of the cases. Conclusions: The timing of administration of the preoperative dose was appropriate and well delegated to the operating room nurse. The intra operative dose was appropriately omitted. The main concern was the increasing use of the third generation cephalosporins and the unnecessary prolonged duration of the postoperative prophylaxis, which needed to be addressed. PMID:23730643

Khan A.K, Afzal; P.V, Mirshad; Rashed, Mohammed Rafiuddin; Banu, Gausia

2013-01-01

156

Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma  

E-print Network

Letterkenny Army Depot: The Army Teaches Business a Lesson in Lean Six Sigma is a case study of Letterkenny Army Depot, one of five Army maintenance depots. Letterkenny recapitalizes missiles, HMMWV's, generators, and other ...

Harvey, Roger K.

2006-05-23

157

Engineer Pamphlet Department of the Army  

E-print Network

CEHO Engineer Pamphlet 870-1-52 Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC GENERAL ERNEST GRAVES U.S. Army Office of History U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Alexandria, Virginia #12 General Ernest Graves, U.S. Army. p. cm. -- (Engineer memoirs) (EP ; 870-1-52) Interviewer, Frank N

US Army Corps of Engineers

158

Army Regulation 2530 Information Management: Publishing and  

E-print Network

) and sometimes to the U.S. Army Military District of Washington (MDW). They implement United States CodeArmy Regulation 25­30 Information Management: Publishing and Printing The Army Publishing Program information visit: www.apd.army.mil Army Policy PublicAtionS As of 8/24/2011 #12;Footnotes legend on page 3

US Army Corps of Engineers

159

Department of the Army Pamphlet 38510  

E-print Network

National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. It also applies to Army civilian employ- ees and the U.S. Army Corps of Engi- neers and Civil Works activities and tenants National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve. Contents (Listed

US Army Corps of Engineers

160

Optimization of surgical supply inventory and kitting  

E-print Network

This project centered on inventory optimization for operative custom surgical packs and soft good supplies for Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a 947-bed medical center. Custom surgical packs are used in every surgical ...

Schlanser, Matthew R. (Matthew Ross)

2013-01-01

161

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

162

Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

163

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

164

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

165

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

166

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

167

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

168

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

169

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

170

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

171

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

172

76 FR 72914 - Army Educational Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2011. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes Avenue, Carlisle...and development of the United States Army War College. For Further Information...717) 245-3907 or Donald.myers@us.army.mil Supplementary Information:...

2011-11-28

173

78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...amending its rule on notification of the Army Litigation Division when complaints...12. The address for notifying the Army Litigation Division of cases citing...703-693-1009, email: lisa.bloom@us.army.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY...

2013-03-27

174

Enlisted Assignment System for a Transformed Army.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Army's enlisted assignment system has evolved over time to support an individual replacement system that focuses on career development and desires, rather than Army needs and readiness. Whether the Army should use an individual assignment or unit repl...

J. T. Manta

2001-01-01

175

Outcome of Trans-Axillary Approach for Surgical Decompression of Thoracic Outlet: A Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the trans-axillary surgical approach in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome. Methods This retrospective study is comprised of data acquired from January 1998 until Oct 2008. Case histories of all the patients were reviewed from the Medical Records Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute. Relevant information and follow-up of the patients was carried out by examining the relevant clinical notes available by telephone interviews and personal contact whenever possible. All data was compiled and analyzed statistically. Results There were a total of 139 patients. The female: male ratio was about 6:1. Pain was the most common presenting symptom followed by weakness and parasthesia. Nerve conduction velocity was abnormal in 111 patients. Twenty-eight patients had abnormal Doppler study of subclavian vessels. Preoperative symptoms persisted in 13 patients. Overall, 126 patients showed improvement in symptoms and no recurrence or persistence of symptoms on follow-up examination. Conclusion Trans-axillary approach provides a good exposure and cosmesis in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome. It should be considered as the gold standard in the management of thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:24936283

Lattoo, Mohd Riyaz; Dar, Abdul Majeed; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Ahangar, Abdul Gani; Lone, Gh Nabi; Singh, Shyam; Zaman, Muzaffar; Lone, Reyaz Ahmad

2014-01-01

176

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

Barry R. Sude for Office of History and Environmental Division Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of. Corps of Engineers. Office ofHistory. V. United States. Army. Corps ofEngineers. Environmental Division, ordnance, explosives, and chemical warfare materials often created environmental hazards at former

US Army Corps of Engineers

177

Developing Leaders for Army 2020.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Every officer in the United States Army is required to complete a Multi-Source Assessment and Feedback survey (MSAF/360) every three years in accordance with Army Regulation 350-1, to enhance self-awareness and enable officers to be more effective leaders...

D. A. Lesperance

2012-01-01

178

Predictors and outcome of surgical repair of obstetric fistula at a regional referral hospital, Mbarara, western Uganda  

PubMed Central

Background Obstetric fistula although virtually eliminated in high income countries, still remains a prevalent and debilitating condition in many parts of the developing world. It occurs in areas where access to care at childbirth is limited, or of poor quality and where few hospitals offer the necessary corrective surgery. Methods This was a prospective observational study where all women who attended Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in western Uganda with obstetric fistula during the study period were assessed pre-operatively for social demographics, fistula characteristics, classification and outcomes after surgery. Assessment for fistula closure and stress incontinence after surgery was done using a dye test before discharge Results Of the 77 women who were recruited in this study, 60 (77.9%) had successful closure of their fistulae. Unsuccessful fistula closure was significantly associated with large fistula size (Odds Ratio 6 95% Confidential interval 1.46-24.63), circumferential fistulae (Odds ratio 9.33 95% Confidential interval 2.23-39.12) and moderate to severe vaginal scarring (Odds ratio 12.24 95% Confidential interval 1.52-98.30). Vaginal scarring was the only factor independently associated with unsuccessful fistula repair (Odds ratio 10 95% confidential interval 1.12-100.57). Residual stress incontinence after successful fistula closure was associated with type IIb fistulae (Odds ratio 5.56 95% Confidential interval 1.34-23.02), circumferential fistulae (Odds ratio 10.5 95% Confidential interval 1.39-79.13) and previous unsuccessful fistula repair (Odds ratio 4.8 95% Confidential interval 1.27-18.11). Independent predictors for residual stress incontinence after successful fistula closure were urethral involvement (Odds Ratio 4.024 95% Confidential interval 2.77-5.83) and previous unsuccessful fistula repair (Odds ratio 38.69 95% Confidential interval 2.13-703.88). Conclusions This study demonstrated that large fistula size, circumferential fistulae and marked vaginal scarring are predictors for unsuccessful fistula repair while predictors for residual stress incontinence after successful fistula closure were urethral involvement, circumferential fistulae and previous unsuccessful fistula repair. PMID:22151960

2011-01-01

179

Randomized Study Comparing a Basal-Bolus With a Basal Plus Correction Insulin Regimen for the Hospital Management of Medical and Surgical Patients With Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Effective and easily implemented insulin regimens are needed to facilitate hospital glycemic control in general medical and surgical patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This multicenter trial randomized 375 patients with T2D treated with diet, oral antidiabetic agents, or low-dose insulin (?0.4 units/kg/day) to receive a basal-bolus regimen with glargine once daily and glulisine before meals, a basal plus regimen with glargine once daily and supplemental doses of glulisine, and sliding scale regular insulin (SSI). RESULTS Improvement in mean daily blood glucose (BG) after the first day of therapy was similar between basal-bolus and basal plus groups (P = 0.16), and both regimens resulted in a lower mean daily BG than did SSI (P = 0.04). In addition, treatment with basal-bolus and basal plus regimens resulted in less treatment failure (defined as >2 consecutive BG >240 mg/dL or a mean daily BG >240 mg/dL) than did treatment with SSI (0 vs. 2 vs. 19%, respectively; P < 0.001). A BG <70 mg/dL occurred in 16% of patients in the basal-bolus group, 13% in the basal plus group, and 3% in the SSI group (P = 0.02). There was no difference among the groups in the frequency of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dL; P = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS The use of a basal plus regimen with glargine once daily plus corrective doses with glulisine insulin before meals resulted in glycemic control similar to a standard basal-bolus regimen. The basal plus approach is an effective alternative to the use of a basal-bolus regimen in general medical and surgical patients with T2D. PMID:23435159

Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Smiley, Dawn; Hermayer, Kathie; Khan, Amna; Olson, Darin E.; Newton, Christopher; Jacobs, Sol; Rizzo, Monica; Peng, Limin; Reyes, David; Pinzon, Ingrid; Fereira, Maria Eugenia; Hunt, Vicky; Gore, Ashwini; Toyoshima, Marcos T.; Fonseca, Vivian A.

2013-01-01

180

Clinical profile and outcome of surgical treatment of perforated peptic ulcers in Northwestern Tanzania: A tertiary hospital experience  

PubMed Central

Background Perforated peptic ulcer is a serious complication of peptic ulcers with potential risk of grave complications. There is paucity of published reports on perforated peptic ulcer disease in our local environment. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical presentation, management and outcome of patients with peptic ulcer perforation in our setting and to identify predictors of outcome of these patients. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for perforated peptic ulcers at Bugando Medical Centre between April 2006 and March 2011. Data were collected using a pre-tested and coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15.0. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authority before the commencement of the study. Results A total of 84 patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.3: 1. Their median age was 28 years and the modal age group was 21-30 years. The median duration of illness was 5.8 days. The majority of patients (69.0%) had no previous history of treatment for peptic ulcer disease. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, alcohol and smoking was reported in 10.7%, 85.7% and 64.3% respectively. Eight (9.5%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4 count of 220 cells/?l. Most perforations were located on the duodenum {90.4%) with the duodenal to gastric ulcers ratio of 12.7: 1. Graham's omental patch (Graham's omentopexy) of the perforations was performed in 83.3% of cases. Complication and mortality rates were 29.8% and 10.7% respectively. The factors significantly related to complications were premorbid illness, HIV status, CD 4 count < 200 cells/?l, treatment delay and acute perforation (P < 0.001). Mortality rate was high in patients who had age ? 40 years, delayed presentation (>24 hrs), shock at admission (systolic BP < 90 mmHg), HIV positivity, low CD4 count (<200 cells/?l), gastric ulcers, concomitant diseases and presence of complications (P < 0.001). The median overall length of hospital stay was 14 days. Excellent results using Visick's grading system were obtained in 82.6% of surviving patients. Conclusion Perforation of peptic ulcer remains a frequent clinical problem in our environment predominantly affecting young males not known to suffer from PUD. Simple closure with omental patch followed by Helicobacter pylori eradication was effective with excellent results in majority of survivors despite patients' late presentation in our center. PMID:21871104

2011-01-01

181

US Army lithium cell applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The how, why and where the Army is applying lithium batteries are addressed. The Army is committing its efforts to the utilization of lithium batteries in new equipment that will be going into the field possibly from FY-80 and thereafter. The Army's philosophy is to guide their users and the equipment designers, to use battery packs are opposed to singel cells. After a detailed description of the battery types that are being considered, a discussion is presented in which questions and comments are exchanged among the Workshop participants.

Legath, A. J.

1978-01-01

182

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).  

E-print Network

#12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army Army Doctrine Reference Publication No. 3-05 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 31 ........................................................................... 1-10 Army Special Operations Forces Characteristics ............................................ 1

US Army Corps of Engineers

183

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� Coastal as workshop) 3 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/workshops/nap12/NAP-Workshop.html #12;Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Draft CMS User Manual 4 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/wiki/CMS #12;

US Army Corps of Engineers

184

Army Regulation 2530 Information Management: Publishing and  

E-print Network

States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated." o Deletes references to the decentralized departmental publishing programs throughout. o Authorizes the Deputy for U.S. Army Services and Operations) and the new status of the U.S. Army South as a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Forces Command (fig

US Army Corps of Engineers

185

Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records  

E-print Network

"Civilian" for internal Army correspondence when referring to U.S. Department of the Army civilians and used Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. Proponent and exception (Recom- mended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to U.S. Army Re- cords Management

US Army Corps of Engineers

186

Department of the Army Pamphlet 2201  

E-print Network

Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. It also appliesDepartment of the Army Pamphlet 220­1 Field Organizations Defense Readiness Reporting System­Army Procedures Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 16 November 2011 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY DA

US Army Corps of Engineers

187

LEGAL SUPPORT TO THE OPERATIONAL ARMY  

E-print Network

is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;*FM 1.............................................................. 4-4 The Office of the Staff Judge Advocate�Brigade Legal Section Relationship ... 4-8 U.S. ArmyFM 1-04 LEGAL SUPPORT TO THE OPERATIONAL ARMY MARCH 2013 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved

US Army Corps of Engineers

188

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Coastal Material CMS-Flow data folder (same as workshop) 3 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/workshops/nap12/NAP-Workshop.html #12;Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Draft CMS User Manual 4 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/wiki/CMS #12;

US Army Corps of Engineers

189

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� Coastal Material CMS-Flow data folder (same as workshop) 3 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/workshops/nap12/NAP-Workshop.html #12;Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory Draft CMS User Manual 4 http://cirp.usace.army.mil/wiki/CMS #12;

US Army Corps of Engineers

190

Salvation Army : the next generation  

E-print Network

The Salvation Army thrift stores are retail entities in the center of neighborhoods which collect and resell used objects. Although historically dear to many, it seems that the physical condition, market visibility, and ...

Francpourmoi, Salomé

2010-01-01

191

Process Improvement at Army Installations  

E-print Network

production methods to reduce pollution. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) that enhance pollution prevention have been compiled through research at many installations, including United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL...

Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

192

Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; physician-owned hospitals: data sources for expansion exception; physician certification of inpatient hospital services; Medicare Advantage organizations and Part D sponsors: CMS-identified overpayments associated with submitted payment data. Final rule with comment period.  

PubMed

This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2015 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. In this document, we also are making changes to the data sources permitted for expansion requests for physician-owned hospitals under the physician self-referral regulations; changes to the underlying authority for the requirement of an admission order for all hospital inpatient admissions and changes to require physician certification for hospital inpatient admissions only for long-stay cases and outlier cases; and changes to establish a formal process, including a three-level appeals process, to recoup overpayments that result from the submission of erroneous payment data by Medicare Advantage (MA) organizations and Part D sponsors in the limited circumstances in which the organization or sponsor fails to correct these data. PMID:25387387

2014-11-10

193

Robotics In Manufacturing: Army View  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

(Figure 1) This is an outline of my presentation today. The U. S. Army has a dual interest in the use of robots, namely: 1. As a substitute for or an extension of the soldier in the battlefield, and 2. in the factories that make Army materiel, or - as we call it -the the production base. The Production Base can again be divided into three separate segments, i.e., the Army owned and operated facilities or GOG6s, such as Rock Island and Watervliet arsenals, and not to be overlooked, the depot operations. There the Army manufactures gun tubes and other related parts for artillery weapons and repairs and overhauls them. A second category is the Army owned and contractor operated facilities or GOCOs,such as the ammunition plants, the tank plants at Lima, Ohio and Warren, Michigan and the Stratford Engine Plant in Connecticut where gas turbines for helicopter and the Abrams tank are manufactured. The last category covers the industrial base, that is those factories which are not only operated but also owned by the contractor himself also referred to as COCOs. You can see from this description that the Army is supported by a base which produces a diversified line of products. Therefore, the task of technology development and technology insertion is considerably more complex than what one encounters in the average U. S. Manufacturing organization.

Michel, F. J.

1983-05-01

194

Ventilator-associated pneumonia in an adult clinical-surgical intensive care unit of a Brazilian university hospital: incidence, risk factors, etiology, and antibiotic resistance.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical characteristics, etiology, and resistance to antimicrobial agents, among patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A case study vs. patients control under mechanical ventilation and hospitalized into clinical-surgical adults ICU of HC-UFU was performed from March/2005 to March/2006. Patients under ventilation for over 48 h were included in the study including 84 with diagnosis of VAP, and 191 without VAP (control group). Laboratory diagnosis was carried out through quantitative microbiological evaluation of tracheal aspirate. The identification of pathogens was performed by classical microbiological tests, and the antibiotics sensitivity spectrum was determined through the CLSI technique. VAP incidence rate over 1,000 days of ventilation was 24.59. The mean (+/- SD) duration of mechanical ventilation prior to VAP diagnosis was 23.2 +/- 17.2 days. By multivariate analysis the risk factors predisposing for VAP were: mechanical ventilation time and mechanical ventilation > seven days, tracheostomy and use of > or = three antibiotics. Mortality rate was high (32.1 %) but lower than that of the control group (46.5%). Major pathogens were identified in most of patients (95.2%) and included: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (29%), Staphylococcus aureus (26%), Enterobacter/Klebsiella/Serratia (19%) and Acinetobacter spp. (18%), with expressive frequencies of P. aeruginosa (52%), S. aureus (65.4%) and Enterobacteriaceae (43.7%) resistant to imipenem, oxacillin and 3/4 generation cephalosporins, respectively. In conclusion, our observation showed VAPs caused by multiresistant microorganisms, the prescription of > or = three antibiotics, and mortality with unacceptably high rates. The practice of de-escalation therapy appears to be urgently needed in order to improve the situation. PMID:18553020

Rocha, Laura de Andrade da; Vilela, Carolina Assis Pereira; Cezário, Renata Cristina; Almeida, Alair Benedito; Gontijo Filho, Paulo

2008-02-01

195

Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works  

E-print Network

1 Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works Program Five-Year Development"...................................................................... 38 Flood and Coastal Storm Damage Reduction

US Army Corps of Engineers

196

Walter Reed Army Institute of Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some readers might be aware of the well-known Walter Reed Hospital, but they may have never heard of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Located in Silver Spring, Maryland, the Institute is the largest and most diverse biomedical research laboratory in the Department of Defense. First-time visitors will want to look over their "News" area, which provides a bit of background on their programs and research initiatives. Moving on, the "Divisions" area contains links to the Institute's different research divisions, which include military casualty research, preventive medicine, and retrovirology. In each of these sections, visitors can learn about their recent success stories, the history of each division, and about their formal training programs, and upcoming clinical trials. The site also includes information for those who might be interested in joining an upcoming clinical trial.

197

Suicide in the US Army  

PubMed Central

Suicide in the US Army is a high-profile public health problem that is complex and poorly understood. Adding to the confusion surrounding Army suicide is the challenge of defining and understanding individuals/populations dying by suicide. Data from recent studies have led to a better understanding of risk factors for suicide that may be specifically associated with military service, including the impact of combat and deployment on increased rates of psychiatric illness in military personnel. The next steps involve applying these results to the development of empirically supported suicide prevention approaches specific to the military population. This special article provides an overview of suicide in the Army by synthesizing new information and providing clinical pearls based on research evidence. PMID:22958991

Lineberry, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Stephen S.

2012-01-01

198

Surgical Mesh  

MedlinePLUS

... July 13, 2011. Information on Surgical Mesh for Hernia Repairs Information on Surgical Mesh for Pelvic Organ ... Stress Urinary Incontinence Information on Surgical Mesh for Hernia Repairs FDA wants to inform you about complications ...

199

Tattooed Army Soldiers: Incidence, Behavior, and Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Primary prevention is a priority for Army Medical Personnel. Despite societal popularity and a long association of tattooing in the military, little is known about the tattooed Army soldier, thus hampering primary health planning. Basic Recruits and Advan...

M. L. Armstrong

1998-01-01

200

Army High Performance Computing Research Center  

E-print Network

Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science and engineering to critical Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science and engineering to critical Army

Prinz, Friedrich B.

201

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® US Army Corps of Engineers Permitting Process Chad;Rivers & Harbors Act · Oldest Federal environmental law in the U.S. · Prohibits unauthorized obstruction

Minnesota, University of

202

Water conservation opportunities at Army installations  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews aspects of water conservation at Army installations describing the current status and usage on installations and unique attributes pertinent to Army conditions. It also describes a model water conservation analysis at one installation.

Scholze, R.J.

1997-06-01

203

Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities  

E-print Network

The United States Army Materiel Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM) is responsible for the life cycle functions for all assigned materiel systems of the United States Army and Department of Defense agencies. DARCOM installations account...

Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

1984-01-01

204

U.S. Army Medical Department  

MedlinePLUS

... Medicine Careers Recruiting for Civilian Positions Recruiting for Military Positions A Day in Army Medicine Doing Business ... Army Medicine Services Assistance Programs DoD Safe Helpline Military OneSource Suicide Prevention Program Veterans Crisis Line Vets4Warriors ...

205

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and  

E-print Network

#12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at (www.train.army.mil). #12;FMI 6-02.45, C1 Change 1 HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Washington, DC, 7 May 2008 Signal Support to Theater

US Army Corps of Engineers

206

ATTVn'10H 0' DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-print Network

. ARMY EUROPE' SEVENTH ARMY, ATTN: AEAGF-M COMMANDERS U. S. ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND, ATTN: AMCPD-SE U.S. ARMY INFORMATION SYSTEMS COMMAND, ATTN: ASPC-VE U.S. ARMY FORCES COMMAND, ATTN: FCJ8-RMP-(G) u. S. ARMY TRAINING' DOCTRINE COMMAND, ATTN: ATRM-EP U.S. ARMY HEALTH SERVICES COMMAND, ATTN: HSRM-MA U.S. ARMY

US Army Corps of Engineers

207

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers® Vicksburg District Water's Edge THE Fall 2012 #12;The Water's Edge: The Water's Edge is an authorized magazine of the Vicksburg District. The Water's Edge is published. Commander's Corner Colonel Jeffrey R. Eckstein .............................. 3 District subject matter

US Army Corps of Engineers

208

Army Regulation 690600 Civilian Personnel  

E-print Network

a t p r o h i b i t discrimination based on race, color, reli- gion, sex, national origin, age, physicalArmy Regulation 690­600 Civilian Personnel Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints­600 Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints This revision dated 9 February 2004--- o Contains

US Army Corps of Engineers

209

ANTBIRDS PARASITIZE FORAGING ARMY ANTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the tropical forests of Central and South America, army ants of the Eci- tonini tribe, and the numerous animals that follow them through the understory, share a complex relationship that has far-reaching effects on population dynamics and community structure. Although considerable study has been made of various participants in this re- lationship, no research has explicitly examined the nature

Peter H. Wrege; Martin Wikelski; James T. Mandel; Thomas Rassweiler; Iain D. Couzin

2005-01-01

210

US Army Cor of Engineers @  

E-print Network

ingenuity, Corps civilian and military engineers studied the behavior of rivers and the motion of water for the US Army Center of Military History in Washington, DC. He holds a Ph.D. in military history from ........................................... 24 The Theory of Hydrology .......................................... 27 Dam Safety and the Big Flood

US Army Corps of Engineers

211

Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army  

E-print Network

Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Richard Kidd Deputy Assistant of the Army, Energy and Sustainability infrastructure. The development of Army-wide sustainability principles coupled with investments, training

Hall, Sharon J.

212

Technical Report DOER-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

Technical Report DOER-1 June 1998 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Dredging Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report. Clausner, Marian P. Rollings Gregory L. Williams, Tommy E. Myers U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways

US Army Corps of Engineers

213

Engineer Regulation Department of the Army  

E-print Network

CECW-P Engineer Regulation 1105-2-100 Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-2-100 U. S. Army Corps of Engineers CECW-P Washington, D.C. 20314-1000 Regulation No. 1105-2-100 22 April...................................................................................................................3-1 3-3. Flood Damage Reduction

US Army Corps of Engineers

214

[The seven wounds Ernst Jünger at the time of the Great War. Reflection of the health service of the imperial army].  

PubMed

Thanks to Ernt Junger's amazing career--and despite his many injuries--we have a great view of the German Imperial Army's sanitary corps. This can be observed from the actions of the stretcher-bearers to German hospitals in general, and with the organization of their sanitary transport, as well as their medico-surgical concerns. We can see, therefore, that very few differences existed with the French medico-surgical structures except for the fact that,from the very beginning, Imperial medical warfare was able to adjust to the changes from field to trench situations. Thanks to its adaptable system of triage, and its ability to offer the most coherent medico-surgical choices and options, it was possible to save time. It enabled surgical actions in places that were close to the battlefield. Furthermore, we have been able to find out about the personal experience of an exceptional 20th century writer who later became a great European citizen. PMID:23038865

Ségal, Alain; Ferrandis, Jean-Jacques

2012-01-01

215

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY  

E-print Network

in the enclosed chart. 3. Additionally, forty-four Army employees seconded by the U.S. government, on a fully (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY COMMANDER U.S. EUROPEAN. ARMY FORCES COMMAND U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND U.S. ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND U.S. ARMY

US Army Corps of Engineers

216

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 10-1-54 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 10-1-54 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CECW-CE Washington, DC 20314, AND CONSEQUENCES PRODUCTION CENTER #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK #12;i DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 10-1-54 U #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK #12;DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 10-1-54 U.S. Army Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

217

National Hospital Discharge Survey  

Cancer.gov

The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS), which has been conducted annually since 1965, collects data from a sample of approximately 270,000 inpatient records acquired from a national sample of about 500 hospitals. Only hospitals with an average length of stay of fewer than 30 days for all patients, general hospitals, or children's general hospitals are included in the survey. Information collected includes diagnoses, surgical and nonsurgical procedures, prescription and over-the-counter drugs, immunizations, allergy shots, anesthetics, and dietary supplements.

218

Surgical history.  

PubMed

The importance of surgical history for surgeons and students of this field of knowledge is undeniable. Knowing surgical history makes us aware of findings and discoveries we never knew before. Surgical history helps us in defining how surgery evolved through the centuries and mostly how those observations have shaped surgical thought. In this writing, I introduce my own observations of the field and explain how I grew to learn and appreciate the evolution of surgical history through my own personal experience. And, as important, at least for me, I narrate my observations as to how my education and contributions to the discipline shaped my knowledge of surgical history. PMID:20001807

Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

2009-01-01

219

Tratamento cirúrgico do tumor de corpo carotídeo: experiência de 30 anos do Hospital de Clínicas da UFPR Surgical treatment of the carotid body tumor: a 30-year experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Carotid body tumors are rare and they must always be part of the differential diagnosis of tumor masses in the cervical region. Advances in vascular surgical techniques have reduced the risks of perioperative complications such as carotid injury, stroke and death. The objective of this article is to report the authors' experience in 20 carotid body tumor resections. Methods:

Luís Henrique; Gil França; Caroline Gomes Bredt; Alessandra Vedolin

220

Waste-to-Energy Projects at ArmyWaste to Energy Projects at Army Installations  

E-print Network

. Holcomb Chief, Energy Branch U.SU.S. Army. Army ERDCERDC--CERLCERL Champaign IL USAChampaign IL USAp gp g) Champaign, IL Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) Champaign, IL Topographic Engineering

221

U. S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Registry: Army Aviators with Diabetes Mellitus and Impaired Glucose Tolerance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army Aviation Epidemiology Data Register (AEDR) was queried for Army aviators with the finding of glycosuria, hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes mellitus (DM), use of oral hypoglycemic agents, or use of insulin for the peri...

K. T. Mason, S. G. Shannon

1994-01-01

222

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUILDING STRONG® MEDIA RELEASE U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ­ Vicksburg District Vicksburg, Miss., http://www.mvk.usace.army.mil/. Find us on Facebook at facebook Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers topics, contact the Vicksburg District Public Affairs

US Army Corps of Engineers

223

Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army  

E-print Network

in whatever missions our Nation gives us in the future. Through stewardship, Army professionals commitADP 1, C1 Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 7 November 2012 The Army 2012 By order of the Secretary of the Army: RAYMOND T. ODIERNO General, United States Army Chief

US Army Corps of Engineers

224

September 2013 OUR PROFESSIONhttp://CAPE.ARMY.MIL  

E-print Network

?................................................................1 The U.S. Army as a ProfessionSeptember 2013 OUR PROFESSIONhttp://CAPE.ARMY.MIL #12;America's Army ­ Our Profession STAND STRONG During Fiscal Year 2014, the United States Army will launch the America's Army ­ Our Profession "STAND

US Army Corps of Engineers

225

The Impact of Surgical?Site Infections Following Orthopedic Surgery at a Community Hospital and a University Hospital: Adverse Quality of Life, Excess Length of Stay, and Extra Cost  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To measure the impact of orthopedic surgi- cal-site infections (SSIs) on quality of life, length of hospitalization, and cost. DESIGN: A pairwise-matched (1:1) case-control study within a cohort. SETTING: A tertiary-care university medical center and a community hospital. PATIENTS: Cases of orthopedic SSIs were prospectively identified by infection control professionals. Matched controls were selected from the entire cohort of

James D. Whitehouse; N. Deborah Friedman; Kathryn B. Kirkland; William J. Richardson; Daniel J. Sexton

2002-01-01

226

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. ARMY CORP.S OF ENGINEERS  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. ARMY CORP.S OF ENGINEERS 441 G STREET, NW WASHINGTON, DC 20314 the U.S. Army Corps ofEngineers (Corps) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) which focuses on modifying. These dams and other Corps flood risk management efforts reduce the risk offlood damages to homes

US Army Corps of Engineers

227

Norwalk-like viral gastroenteritis outbreak in U.S. Army trainees.  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis hospitalized 99 (12%) of 835 U. S. Army trainees at Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas, from August 27 to September 1, 1998. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests for Norwalk-like virus were positive for genogroup 2. Gastroenteritis was associated with one post dining facility and with soft drinks. PMID:10756159

Arness, M. K.; Feighner, B. H.; Canham, M. L.; Taylor, D. N.; Monroe, S. S.; Cieslak, T. J.; Hoedebecke, E. L.; Polyak, C. S.; Cuthie, J. C.; Fankhauser, R. L.; Humphrey, C. D.; Barker, T. L.; Jenkins, C. D.; Skillman, D. R.

2000-01-01

228

Health and Occupational Consequences of Spouse Abuse Victimization among Male U.S. Army Soldiers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about health and occupational outcomes of male spouse abuse victims. In all, 11,294 male spouse abuse victims with a history of spouse abuse perpetration, 3,277 victims without prior spouse abuse perpetration, and 72,855 nonvictims and nonperpetrators were followed for 12 years to assess army attrition and hospitalization risk. In…

Bell, Nicole S.

2009-01-01

229

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

230

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).  

E-print Network

#12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army, describes the role of United States Army Special Operations Forces (ARSOF) in the U.S. Army's operating and integrated use of military information support, cyber, and civil affairs operations. The relevance of Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

231

Bronson Methodist Hospital Founded in 1900, today Bronson Methodist Hospital  

E-print Network

Bronson Methodist Hospital Founded in 1900, today Bronson Methodist Hospital (BMH) is a state provides care in virtually every specialty: cardiology (Heart Hospital at Bronson), general surgical's Hospital at Bronson), and adult critical care services. As a tertiary care center, BMH includes a Level I

Magee, Joseph W.

232

Correcting for bias when estimating the cost of hospital-acquired infection: an analysis of lower respiratory tract infections in non-surgical patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hospital acquired infections (HAI) are costly but many are avoidable. Evaluating prevention programmes requires data on their costs and benefits. Estimating the actual costs of HAI (a measure of the cost savings due to prevention) is difficult as HAI changes cost by extending patient length of stay, yet, length of stay is a major risk factor for HAI. This endogeneity

Nicholas Graves; Diana Weinhold; Jennifer A. Roberts

2005-01-01

233

WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL  

E-print Network

2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL 2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL Army EquipmEnt modErnizAtion plAn #12;The estimated cost. This includes $6,780 in expenses and $25,000 in DoD labor. Generated on 2013 May 17 Ref ID: 4-77B1D72 #12;U.S. ARMY 13 May 2013 2014 Army EquipmEnt modErnizAtion plAn #12;#12;#12;#12;Table of Contents Foreword

US Army Corps of Engineers

234

Factors Influencing Job Satisfaction among Army Chaplains.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research on job satisfaction among US Army chaplains is based on a mail survey response of 998 chaplains out of 1411 in the Army chaplaincy. Factors which influence job satisfaction were explored by means of a three-fold model: (1) How chaplains see ...

K. D. Johnson

1976-01-01

235

Complications of male circumcision treated at a military hospital in Afghanistan.  

PubMed

Circumcision of male infants and children is a common ritual in Afghanistan. As in many other developing countries, there are few safeguards relating to the procedure, particularly in rural areas. Performance of ritual circumcision may result in complications requiring treatment beyond the capabilities of the practitioner performing the initial procedure. It is not uncommon for local nationals to seek care at deployed military medical facilities for a wide variety of problems, and complications related to attempted circumcision are no exception. We describe 2 such cases recently presented to a US Army combat support hospital in rural Afghanistan for surgical treatment of the unintended consequences of male circumcision. We offer a review of the most common complications associated with circumcision and treatment options for each. It is valuable for the surgeon operating at the military medical hospital in remote areas of the world to be familiar with the management of the most common complications of circumcision. PMID:23584915

Gurney, Jennifer M; Jaszczak, Nicholas; Perkins, Jennifer H; Lentz-Kapua, Sarah L; Soderdahl, Douglas W; Renz, Evan M

2013-01-01

236

Surgical Simulation  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

2006-01-01

237

Goal-directed intraoperative therapy based on autocalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis reduces hospital stay in high-risk surgical patients: a randomized, controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Several studies have shown that goal-directed hemodynamic and fluid optimization may result in improved outcome. However, the methods used were either invasive or had other limitations. The aim of this study was to perform intraoperative goal-directed therapy with a minimally invasive, easy to use device (FloTrac/Vigileo), and to evaluate possible improvements in patient outcome determined by the duration of hospital stay and the incidence of complications compared to a standard management protocol. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial 60 high-risk patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were included. Patients were allocated into either an enhanced hemodynamic monitoring group using a cardiac index based intraoperative optimization protocol (FloTrac/Vigileo device, GDT-group, n = 30) or a standard management group (Control-group, n = 30), based on standard monitoring data. Results The median duration of hospital stay was significantly reduced in the GDT-group with 15 (12 - 17.75) days versus 19 (14 - 23.5) days (P = 0.006) and fewer patients developed complications than in the Control-group [6 patients (20%) versus 15 patients (50%), P = 0.03]. The total number of complications was reduced in the GDT-group (17 versus 49 complications, P = 0.001). Conclusions In high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, implementation of an intraoperative goal-directed hemodynamic optimization protocol using the FloTrac/Vigileo device was associated with a reduced length of hospital stay and a lower incidence of complications compared to a standard management protocol. Trial Registration Clinical trial registration information: Unique identifier: NCT00549419 PMID:20156348

2010-01-01

238

Incidence of Major Tendon Ruptures and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in US Army Soldiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Although a rare event, the prevalence of major tendon rupture has increased in recent decades. Identification of risk factors is important for prevention purposes.Hypothesis: Race is a risk factor for major tendon ruptures.Study Design: Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 2.Methods: All patients admitted for surgical management of a rupture of a major tendon at Womack Army Medical Center,

Daniel W. White; Joseph C. Wenke; Dan S. Mosely; Sally B. Mountcastle; Carl J. Basamania

2007-01-01

239

Recruiter Selection Model and Implementation Within the United States Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

On April 10, 2006, Major General Bostick, the Commanding General of the United States Army Recruiting Command (USAREC), in conjunction with the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs, approved a new method of selecting individuals from within the Army for recruiting duty. Implementation currently waits for similar and current research concerning drill sergeants. Previously, the Army

John B. Halstead

2009-01-01

240

77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting...amended), the Sunshine in the Government Act of 1976 (U.S.C. 552b...Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s...Strategic Directions for Army Science and Technology and vote...

2012-04-12

241

77 FR 40030 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting...amended), the Sunshine in the Government Act of 1976 (U.S.C. 552b...Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s...Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology and Small...

2012-07-06

242

78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Session...amended), the Sunshine in the Government Act of 1976 (U.S.C. 552b...Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). 2. Date...of the meeting is for Army Science Board members to review,...

2013-06-03

243

ERDCTR-12-5 Army Environmental Quality/Installations Program  

E-print Network

L. Brandon, Heather K. Smith, and Agnes B. Morrow U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 #12;ERDC TR-12-5 ii Abstract The ArmyERDCTR-12-5 Army Environmental Quality/Installations Program Environmental Assessment During

US Army Corps of Engineers

244

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� October 2013 US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING Presenter Name Presenter Title North Atlantic Division November 2013 #12;U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Relief Appropriations Act, 2013 Hurricane Sandy Oct. 29, 2012 3 #12;U.S. Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING

US Army Corps of Engineers

245

US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center  

E-print Network

1 US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development Center U.S. Army Energy Material Handling H2 Vehicles #12;2 US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development Center Goals · Opportunities & Conclusions #12;3 US Army Corps of Engineers® Engineer Research and Development

246

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

247

Transformation: Effectively Marketing Change in the Army.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Transformation reform modernization change - whatever one calls it - is not a new phenomenon in the Army. Change is an ongoing dynamic associated with practically all modern institutions regardless of the label. The recent controversy surrounding the U.S....

J. M. Waring

2004-01-01

248

HEADQUARTERS CHANGE 1 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-print Network

PHYSICAL FITNESS TRAINING 1. Change FM 21-20, 30 September 1992, as follows: REMOVE OLD PAGES INSERT NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..13-2 ARMY PHYSICAL FITNESS TEST Methods of Evaluation PROFILE FORM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-0 PHYSICAL FITNESS LOG

de Lijser, Peter

249

Army Regulation 6701 Uniform and Insignia  

E-print Network

Redeployment, dated 22 August 2011; ALARACT 241/2011 Modifying Wear of Improved Physical Fitness Uniform (IPFU of Improved Physical Fitness Uniform(IPFU),dated 23 June 2011; ALARACT 230/2011 Changes to Wear of the Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

250

Army Installation Green Procurement Program Implementation Guide  

E-print Network

Army Installation Green Procurement Program Implementation Guide Version 2 December 2010 Prepared OF GREEN PROCUREMENT ............................................. 1 4 DEFINITIONS-Depleting Substances (ODS)............................................... 4 5.6 Alternative Fuels and Alternatively

US Army Corps of Engineers

251

Hypermedia Applications for Army Installation Master Planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Army installation master planning involves a wide range of technical, economic, environmental, and social issues. Planning decisions are often formulated by groups whose members have varying degrees and areas of expertise, and their information is drawn f...

B. E. Aley, M. J. Shiffer, M. A. Shiffer, R. I. Adiguzel, C. J. Neal

1993-01-01

252

U.S. Army Modernizes Munitions Plants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Headquartered at Joliet, Illinois, the Army Ammunition Procurement and Supply Agency aims to mechanize and clean up its manufacturing facilities. Six go-co (government owned - contractor operated) plants involved in the modernization program are described. (BL)

Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

1972-01-01

253

Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

2008-08-01

254

Assuring structural integrity in Army systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

1985-01-01

255

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).  

E-print Network

#12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command. Send comments and recommendations on a DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) to Commander, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command

US Army Corps of Engineers

256

This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).  

E-print Network

#12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;ADP 3-28 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i Army Doctrine Publication No. 3-28 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 26 July 2012 Defense

US Army Corps of Engineers

257

Robotic surgical training.  

PubMed

In July 2000, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc) received Food and Drug Administration approval for intracardiac applications, and the first mitral valve repair was done at the East Carolina Heart Institute in May 2000. The system is now approved and used in many surgical specialties. With this disruptive technology and accepted use, surgeons and hospitals are seeking the most efficacious training pathway leading to safe use and responsible credentialing.One of the most important issues related to safe use is assembling the appropriate team of professionals involved with patient care. Moreover, proper patient selection and setting obtainable goals are also important.Creation and maintenance of a successful program are discussed in the article focusing on realistic goals. This begins with a partnership between surgeon leaders, hospital administrators, and industry support. Through this partnership, an appropriate training pathway and clinical pathway for success can be outlined. A timeline can then be created with periods of data analysis and adjustments as necessary. A successful program is attainable by following this pathway and attending to every detail along the journey. PMID:23528718

Ben-Or, Sharon; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

2013-01-01

258

32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2011-07-01 true Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army...CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by...

2012-07-01

259

32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).  

... 2013-07-01 true Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army...CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by...

2014-07-01

260

32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army...CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by...

2013-07-01

261

32 CFR 655.10 - Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army entities (AR 385-10).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by non-Army...CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RADIATION SOURCES ON ARMY LAND § 655.10 Oversight of radiation sources brought on Army land by...

2011-07-01

262

Accounting for army recruitment: White and non-white soldiers and the British Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

A statistically based enquiry into recruitment into the British Army over the period 1987-2000 shows that two factors tend to induce young men to enlist: high levels of unemployment in the civilian sector and positive signals from the authorities that the Army is in a recruiting phase. The same result obtains, broadly speaking, in the context of both white and

Ian Bellany

2003-01-01

263

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY u.s. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS  

E-print Network

establishes and prescribes the composition ofthe National NonstructurallFlood Proofing Committee ofthe U.SDEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY u.s. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS 441 G STREET NW WASHINGTON, D.C. 20314-1000 JUL nonstructural flood risk /flood damage reduction measures. k. Provide technical and planning assistance

US Army Corps of Engineers

264

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF TtiE ASSISTANT SECRETARY  

E-print Network

STANT TO THE SECRETARY OF THE ARMY COMMANDER U.S. AFRICA COMMAND U.S. EUROPEAN COMMAND U.S. PACIFIC COMMAND U.S. SOUTHERN COMMAND U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND U.S. ARMY FORCES COMMAND U.S. ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND U.S. ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND U.S. ARMY PACIFIC U.S. ARMY EUROPE U.S. ARMY CENTRAL U.S. ARMY NORTH U.S. ARMY

US Army Corps of Engineers

265

Violence against surgical residents.  

PubMed Central

Violence against hospital personnel is underreported (less than one in five assaults), and accurate statistics as to the rate of violence against hospital personnel are thus difficult to establish. In the psychiatric discipline, an abundance of information has been published regarding violence in the health care setting, but few studies have examined violence outside psychiatric hospitals or by patients not diagnosed with psychiatric ailments. Using a survey that elicits information about workplace violence, we sought to gauge the prevalence of violent acts affecting general hospital workers who treat victims of violence on a daily basis. The survey was completed by a cohort of surgical staff nationwide (475 responses from 57 residency programs). Two hundred and eighty residents reported having witnessed one or more physical attacks, and 179 reported having been attacked. Violent acts were more likely to be committed in a public hospital than a private institution (P = 0.05). As shown in previous research, most attacks occurred in the emergency room (P = 0.01); the wards and parking lot were next in frequency. Women residents were more likely than men to call hospital security to intervene in a potentially violent situation (P = 0.04), and junior residents (postgraduate years 1-4) were more likely to be attacked than senior residents (> or = 5 years) (P = 0.04). The attacker was most likely to be a young black male between ages 19 and 30 (P = 0.01). We found no statistical relationship between the attacker and the victim regarding sex or race. Of the 475 respondents, 470 reported that they carry a gun themselves or know someone in the hospital environment who carries a gun. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291743

Barlow, C B; Rizzo, A G

1997-01-01

266

Surgical complications of typhoid fever: Enteric perforation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Typhoid fever remains a prevalent disease in developing nations as the result of adverse socioeconomic factors. The most frequent complication, and principal cause of mortality, is perforation of the terminal ileum. This report presents our experience with 96 patients surgically treated at Cayetano Heredia University Hospital in Lima, Peru from 1972 to 1986. The clinical characteristics and the diverse surgical

Miguel Santillana

1991-01-01

267

Bot armies as threats to network security  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

2007-04-01

268

Army's Activities In Artificial Intelligence/Robotics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A historical summary of the Army activities in artificial intelligence and robotics (AI/R) in the last one and one-half years indicates Army interest in AI/R from the laboratories to the Secretariat. Numerous funded and unfunded efforts are now planned by the laboratories even though AI/R technologies lack maturity necessary for autonomous battlefield systems in the 1990's. The potential applications of AI/R systems to Army needs appear to be limitless. DARCOM and TRADOC have prioritized AI/R requirements and plans for five high priority Demonstrators have been prepared. These demonstrators reflect the need to get started with todays technologies. Technological enhancements provided by additional research and development can provide additional autonomy in product improvement phases of the system development cycle.

Leighty, Robert D.

1983-05-01

269

Discrepant perceptions of communication, teamwork and situation awareness among surgical team members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess surgical team members' differences in perception of non-technical skills. Design: Questionnaire design. Setting: Operating theatres (OTs) at one university hospital, three teaching hospitals and one general hospital in the Netherlands. Participants: Sixty-six surgeons, 97 OT nurses, 18 anaesthetists and 40 nurse anaesthetists. Methods: All surgical team members, of five hospitals, were asked to complete a questionnaire and

L. S. G. L. Wauben; C. M. Dekker-van Doorn; Wijngaarden van J. D. H; R. H. M. Goossens; R. Huijsman; J. Klein; J. F. Lange

2011-01-01

270

Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment  

SciTech Connect

There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating with other existing data sources, thus minimizing manually entered data.

Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

2011-09-01

271

ARMI National Atlas for Amphibian Distributions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site, from The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI), is a compilation of current and historic records of amphibian occurrences. The atlas is organized taxonomically. There are separate sections for frogs and toads, and salamanders and newts. The location of each species is mapped separately. The ARMI Atlas is meant to be an educational tool for people wanting to learn or teach others about amphibians. It can also serve as a reference for habitat managers and researchers, identifying areas where more research is needed, as well as providing information about research that has previously been done.

272

32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a) General....

2010-07-01

273

32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed at Hunter Army...

2010-07-01

274

75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...rule, ``ionizing radiation source'' means any...would require a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation Authorization (ARA...proponent for the Army Radiation Safety Program is revising...regulation to reflect the Nuclear Regulatory...

2010-04-14

275

76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...rule, ``ionizing radiation source'' means any...would require a specific Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license or Army Radiation Authorization (ARA...20.1003. Special nuclear material has the same...1003. (b) Army radiation permits are...

2011-02-08

276

Automation Management Study, Director of Army Automation (DAA).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Automation Management Study was a 7-month study effort which produced the Charter and implementing documents for the central manager of Army Automation, the Director of Army Automation (DAA). The DAA organizationally and functionally replaced the Dire...

M. F. Levine

1977-01-01

277

Motivational Factors Affecting Army Research and Development Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Effective personnel management of civilian employees in the Army is hampered by a number of recurring problems. The Military Selection Research Laboratory, U. S. Army Personnel Research Office, has monitored research contracts on three pressing problems c...

D. W. Dysinger

1966-01-01

278

Russia's New Look Army Reforms and Russian Foreign Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In December 2009 the first stage of an ambitious military reform of the Russian Federation's army was implemented: the former Soviet, and post-Soviet, four-tiered command structure: military district-army-division-regiment, was replaced with a three tiered command structure: military district-army-brigade. In this process, the brigade replaced the division as the primary tactical unit in the Russian army, and most “cadre-strength” units, partially

Gregory P. Lannon

2011-01-01

279

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Webinar Creation ­ A How To Guide 2010 Julie B. Marcy ERDC-EL #12;BUILDING STRONG® Webinar Provider There are many commercial web meeting providers. ACE. This presentation contains information on using AT&T's webinar service. ACE IT AT&T #12;BUILDING STRONG® Webinar

US Army Corps of Engineers

280

Homosexuality, Manliness, and the United States Army.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This monograph investigates the following: (1) the nature of the resistance within the United States Army to the inclusion of openly homosexual service members into the force, and (2) the preparation for social change that would be necessary at the macro ...

J. C. Dayhoff

2010-01-01

281

The Army's High Priority Physical Fitness Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the importance of physical fitness in the United States Army. The development of expanded fitness assessment and programs is related to health and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Improved physical training programs, improved nutrition, and fundamental research are necessary for maintaining a highly fit and healthy…

Drews, Fred R.

1984-01-01

282

Department of the Army Pamphlet 38564  

E-print Network

- sives (also referred to as military muni- tions) safety standards. It implements the safety requirementsDepartment of the Army Pamphlet 385­64 Safety Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards October 2013 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE DA PAM 385­64 Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards

US Army Corps of Engineers

283

Future flexible OLED displays for army applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic light emitting diodes have been fabricated on an active matrix backplane from an 180C processed amorphous Si thin film transistors on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates. Organic light emitting diodes have been fabricated on the active matrix backplane. The presentation will include organic material development from ARL in the context of future Army applications.

E. W. Forsythe; J. Shi; S. Liu; D. C. Morton; D. Loy; Yong Kyun Lee; C. Bell; M. Richards; E. Bawolek; S. Ageno; C. Moyer; M. Marrs; J. Kaminski; N. Colaneri; S. M. O'Rourke; J. Silvernail; K. Rajan; Ruiqing Ma; M. Hack; J. J. Brown

2009-01-01

284

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG  

E-print Network

US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® External Communication and Media Issues Nate Herring response #12;BUILDING STRONG® Social media response #12;BUILDING STRONG® Social media response #12;BUILDING STRONG® Social media response #12;BUILDING STRONG® Social media response #12;BUILDING STRONG® Social

US Army Corps of Engineers

285

U.S. Army Signal School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U. S. Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, provides military education and appropriate practical training for Armed Forces men and women to prepare them for positions in communications-electronics activities and familiarize them with the application of doctrine, tactics, logistics, and electronic techniques pertinent to the…

Army Signal Center and School, Fort Monmouth, NJ.

286

75 FR 38504 - Army Science Board Plenary Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department...as amended), the Sunshine in the Government Act of 1976 (U.S.C. 552b, as amended...committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of...

2010-07-02

287

76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department...as amended), the Sunshine in the Government Act of 1976 (U.S.C. 552b, as amended...committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of...

2011-07-22

288

78 FR 64205 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department...60864) has been cancelled due to the Government Furlough and will be rescheduled at a...cancelled the meeting of the U.S. Army Science Board on October 16, 2013. As a...

2013-10-28

289

The US Army enlisted personnel system: a system dynamics approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States Army's enlisted personnel strength management system consists of several planning and operations processes within multiple command organizations. Within this framework, planners on the staffs of the Department of the Army develop policies and goals to achieve annual Congressionally-mandated manning levels within budgetary constraints. These policy decisions significantly affect recruiting, training, and manning the Army. Separate models and

David A. Thomas; Brigitte T. Kwinn; Michael McGinnis; Bruce A. Bowman; Mark D. Entner

1997-01-01

290

Miscellaneous Paper A-95-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

-- -- --- --- --- Miscellaneous Paper A-95-1 March 1995 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising in Submersed Aquatic Plants: A Review by Susan L. Sprecher, Michael D. Netherland U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

US Army Corps of Engineers

291

Miscellaneous Paper A-96-2 us Army Corps  

E-print Network

-2 July 1996 us Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control Research Release; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The V. Morrow, Jr. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road

US Army Corps of Engineers

292

Miscellaneous Paper A-97-3 us Army Corps  

E-print Network

---- - ---- - --- -- - -- - -- - -- - -- m Miscellaneous Paper A-97-3 March 1997 us Army Corps; Distribution Is Unlimited. Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents, R. Michael Smart U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road

US Army Corps of Engineers

293

m Miscellaneous Paper A-94-2 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

-94-2 June 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment 5m~f'fStation Aquatic Plant Control; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ~ #12;The contents, Maryland Final report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared for U.S. Army Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

294

Instruction Report A-99-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

WES Instruction Report A-99-1 July 1999 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report by Elly P. H. Best, William A. Boyd U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls

US Army Corps of Engineers

295

m Technical Report A-94-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

A-94-1 March 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control - - --- --- --=:;=== ---- _. Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps-6199 Final report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared for U.S. Army Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

296

Instruction Report A-96-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

WES Instruction Report A-96-1 May 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report-1 May 1996 HYDRIL (Version 1.0): A Simulation Model for Growth of Hydrilla by William A. Boyd U.S. Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

297

One Team Destined For Greatness US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-print Network

One Team Destined For Greatness US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG� Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) URGWOM Project Manager Amy Louise January 10, 2013 #12;US Army Corps of Engineers? Memorandum of Understanding Ongoing Development Projects Future Development & Use 2 #12;US Army Corps

Johnson, Eric E.

298

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY  

E-print Network

SAMR DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS 111 ARMY of the Army Fiscal Year 2013 Administrative Furlough This memorandum supersedes reference 1.c., below, subject: Furloughs. b. U.S. Office of Personnel Management Guidance for Administrative Furloughs

US Army Corps of Engineers

299

m Technical Report A-94-3 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

m Technical Report A-94-3 May 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be used Stewart U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS

US Army Corps of Engineers

300

America's Army Game: Its (Virtual) Reality Representation and Cocaine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The game chosen for the present research is developed by the American Army for the purpose of online training of the world wide public and recruitment. The America's Army game is an online game, a combination between entertainment and defence, being a result of the modelling and simulation ideas used by American Army after the 80'. The game is a

Stefan Alexa

2004-01-01

301

THE CHALLENGE OF MOLDS FOR THE U.S. ARMY  

EPA Science Inventory

The US Army and all armies have been interested in molds since there were armies. The most obvious interest was human infections by molds like trench foot. Then there were losses of military animals and contamination of their fodder, most notably the Soviet loss of thousands o...

302

A Study of the Army's Advanced Civilian Schooling Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the study is to review the official and unofficial U.S. Army policy toward graduate level education at civilian institutions. Particular attention is paid to: (1) the Army's advanced civilian schooling programs; (2) whether the Army receives a reasonable return on its financial and manpower expenditures on these programs; (3) what…

King, Joseph S.

303

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

304

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

305

The MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL SURGICAL SOCIETY  

E-print Network

'. Pediatric, plastic and cardiac surgery cases migrated to privatized subspecialty ser- vices decades ago Surgery programs (29 %). By their tabulation, operative insufficiencies were the most frequent deficiency will then be a narrower focus or subspe- cialty of surgery for all residents, rather than the pretense of general

Mootha, Vamsi K.

306

The MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL SURGICAL SOCIETY  

E-print Network

on the MGH Thoracic Aortic Center was given by Alan Hilgenberg. The sections ofcardiac and vascular surgery as a pediatric surgeon in developing pharmacologic treatments for ovarian cancer. Mark Katlic dis- cussed his by Gregory Hirsch described the Nova Scotia experience in the delivery of cardiac care in a single tier

Mootha, Vamsi K.

307

Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)  

PubMed Central

The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce U.S. Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six component Army STARRS studies. These include: an integrated study of historical administrative data systems (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e., those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQ] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. DoD/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

Kessler, Ronald C.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Heeringa, Steven G.

2014-01-01

308

The U.S. Army's VehicleThe U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP):Intelligence Program (AVIP)  

E-print Network

The U.S. Army's VehicleThe U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP):Intelligence Program-5000 USA Phone: (810) 574-7413 Fax: (810) 574-6996 E-mail: GorsichD@tacom.army.mil IV2001 IEEE Intelligent;Vehicle IntelligenceVehicle Intelligence VI provides new driving functionalities, and enhances existing

309

An Assessment of Drug Education-Prevention Programs in the U. S. Army. Army Research Institute Technical Paper 261.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years the Army has been concerned about the widespread use of psychoactive drugs by all classes of young people and the effects of this use on the Army. In order to curb this use among soldiers the Army initiated a comprehensive program to prevent and control the abuse of alcohol and drugs. Prevention was considered to include education,…

Cook, Royer F.; Morton, Anton S.

310

Hospitality in hospitals?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore an organization-wide philosophy of hospitality in a hospital setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An exploratory case study method approach matched the research purpose. First, a hospitality centric philosophy (HCP) was defined from the literature review. Next, a triangulation of unstructured visits, structured visits and key informant interviews is used to further explore

Denver Severt; Taryn Aiello; Shannon Elswick; Cheryl Cyr

2008-01-01

311

[Surgical treatment of duodenal ulcer].  

PubMed

The medical and endoscopic treatment of duodenal ulcer are decreasing the frequency of surgical treatment in this disease. The authors study the operations performed for duodenal ulcer within the period 1989-1999 in the County Hospital Baia Mare. The decrease of the rate of surgical interventions is the pure effect of the medical treatment, as long as the endoscopic treatment is not yet available in our service. The rate of ulcer--induced perforations remained, however, unmodified (48% of total operatory indications), as well as the postoperative morbidity and--mortality (18% respectively 9%). The last category seems not to be influenced by the type of chosen surgical procedure, but by the patient's age, duration of the disease, and associated pathology. PMID:12731191

Lese, M; Naghi, I; Pop, C

2001-01-01

312

[Hospital schools during the Russian-Turkish War 1735-1739].  

PubMed

In 1733 besides the school before the Moscow hospital also three hospital schools were open before Saint-Petersburg terrestrial and admiralty hospitals and before the hospital in Kronshtadt. The process of transfer of students from schools to army was the most intensive during the military conflicts with that is rich Russian history in XVIII century. According to documents, presented in the article, during the Russian-Turkish War in 1735-1739 hospital schools worked active and discharged a task of recruiting of medical service of the Russian Army. The most important precondition was basis of military-medical education grounded by Peter at the beginning of XVIII century. PMID:23156118

Karpenko, I V

2012-09-01

313

Surgical Planning Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As a laboratory within the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) does research and development in image processing algorithms, software systems, and medical applications. While visitors with an interest in these matters will appreciate the sections of this site that provide details on this work, visitors from the health sciences will also appreciate the educational materials offered in the "Resources" area even more. In the "Training and Tutorials" area, visitors can learn more about medical imaging through a self-paced tutorial. Moving on, the "Image Gallery" area contains over forty medical images that can be useful for those who are looking to learn about identifying various neurological conditions. Finally, the site also has a database of publications created by members of the research team at the SPL.

314

Surgical treatment of thymoma  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe experience with the surgical treatment of thymoma. Design A retrospective study. Setting A teaching hospital at the University of Ottawa. Patients Over 25 years, 42 consecutive patients (22 men, 20 women) who had a thymoma requiring operation. Interventions Thymectomy. Outcome measures Age, sex, association with myasthenia gravis, presence of a paraneoplastic syndrome, extent of surgical resection, tumour size, histologic features of the tumour, clinical staging of the thymoma and short- and long-term outcome after surgery. Results The mean (and standard deviation) age of the patients was 52.8 (12.5) years. Thirteen patients had myasthenia gravis. With respect to tumour staging, 24 patients had stage I, 7 had stage II and 11 had stage III disease. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Radiotherapy was used as an adjunct to surgical treatment in 83% of patients with stages II and III disease. Fifty-one percent of patients available for follow-up survived 175.1 months, and the cumulative 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 87.3% and 81.4% respectively. Only 1 patient died of metastatic thymoma. Complete or partial remission of myasthenia gravis was seen in 10 (77%) affected patients. Mixed cellular histologic features and a tumour size of less than 115 cm3 were more commonly seen with stage I disease. Conclusions Thymomas are characterized by slow growth and prolonged survival even in patients with invasive disease as long as the tumour is resected completely and treatment is accompanied by radiotherapy. PMID:11837917

Mehran, Reza; Ghosh, Rishi; Maziak, Donna; O'Rourke, Keith; Shamji, Farid

2002-01-01

315

Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires federal facilities to be built to achieve 30% energy savings over the 2004 International Energy Code or American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2004, as appropriate. The Engineer Research and Development Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing target energy budgets and design guides with a prescriptive path to achieve 30% energy savings over a baseline built to the minimum requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This project covers eight building types in 15 U.S. climate zones. The building types include barracks, administrative buildings, a maintenance facility, a dining facility, a child development center, and an Army reserve center. All the design guides will be completed by the end of 2008. This paper focuses on the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing (UEPH). The UEPH buildings are similar to apartment buildings with double occupancy units. For each building type, a baseline was established following typical Army construction and ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Appendix G modeling rules. Improvements in energy performance were achieved for the envelope using the NREL optimization platform for commercial buildings and previous ASHRAE design guides. Credit was also taken for tightening the building envelope by using proposed envelope leakage rates from ASHRAE and the Army. Two HVAC systems, including a dedicated outdoor air system, were considered. The final results achieved 29% site energy savings in two climates and greater than 30% site energy savings in all other climates. Results of this study were implemented in the Army's standard RFP process for new UEPH barracks construction in late 2007. New UEPH design/construction begun in 2008 and beyond will require the contractor to design and construct a UEPH facility that meets the target energy budget developed in this study using either a custom design or the design guide's prescriptive path developed as part of this study.

Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

2008-01-01

316

Battles between an insurgent army and an advanced army - focus on strategy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed and aggregate analyses of the outcome of past battles focusing on rates of troop losses or on the ratios of forces on each side is at the heart of present knowledge about battles. Here we present non-equilibrium statistical mechanics based studies of possible outcomes of well matched strategic battles by a ``blue'' army against insurgency based attacks by well matched opponents in a ``red'' army in red territory. We assume that the red army attacks with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. Our results reveal that while unpredictable events play a major role in battles, a balance between risk of exposure in a battlefield and the use of short range intelligence is needed in determining whether one side can decimate the other, and hence force a battle to end.

Sen, Surajit; Shanahan, Linda

2008-03-01

317

Heritage of Army Audiology and the Road Ahead: The Army Hearing Program  

PubMed Central

Noise-induced hearing loss has been documented as early as the 16th century, when a French surgeon, Ambroise Paré, wrote of the treatment of injuries sustained by firearms and described acoustic trauma in great detail. Even so, the protection of hearing would not be addressed for three more centuries, when the jet engine was invented and resulted in a long overdue whirlwind of policy development addressing the prevention of hearing loss. We present a synopsis of hearing loss prevention in the US Army and describe the current Army Hearing Program, which aims to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in soldiers and to ensure their maximum combat effectiveness. PMID:18923117

Gates, Kathy; Ciliax, Donald

2008-01-01

318

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) Gillespie, G.L., map of a portion of Sandy Hook, NJ showing condition of beach in vicinity of dynamite gun emplacements, 1894 Engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

319

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), U.S. Engineer Office, New York District, Harbor Defenses of New York Mine Boathouse, location plan and elevations, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, July 1943 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

320

Variation in duration of hospital stay between hospitals and between doctors within hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients, significant length-of-stay variations have been reported. As is the case for variations in the

Gert P. Westert; Anna P. Nieboer; Peter P. Groenewegen

1993-01-01

321

Surgical video systems.  

PubMed

Surgical video systems (SVSs), which typically consist of a video camera attached to an optical endoscope, a video processor, a light source, and a video monitor, are now being used to perform a significant number of minimally invasive surgical procedures. SVSs offer several advantages (e.g., multiple viewer visualization of the surgical site, increased clinician comfort) over nonvideo systems and have increased the practicality and convenience of minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Currently, SVSs are used by hospitals in their general, obstetric/gynecologic, orthopedic, thoracic, and urologic procedures, as well as in other specialties for which MIS is feasible. In this study, we evaluated 19 SVSs from 10 manufacturers, focusing on their use in laparoscopic applications in general surgery. We based our ratings on the usefulness of each system's video performance and features in helping clinicians provide safe and efficacious laparoscopic surgery. We rated 18 of the systems Acceptable because of their overall good performance and features. We rated 1 system Conditionally Acceptable because, compared with the other evaluated systems, this SVS presents a greater risk of thermal injury resulting from excessive heating at the distal tip of the laparoscope. Readers should be aware that our test results, conclusions, and ratings apply only to the specific systems and components tested in this Evaluation. In addition, although our discussion focuses on the laparoscopic application of SVSs, much of the information in this study also applies to other MIS applications, and the evaluated devices can be used in a variety of surgical procedures. To help hospitals gain the perspectives necessary to assess the appropriateness of specific SVSs to ensure that the needs of their patients, as well as the expectations of their clinicians, will be satisfied, we have included a Selection and Purchasing Guide that can be used as a supplement to our Evaluation findings. We have also included a Glossary of relevant terminology and the supplementary article, "Fiberoptic Illumination Systems and the Risk of Burns or Fire during Endoscopic Procedures," which addresses a safety concern with the use of these devices. While we made every effort to present the most current information, readers should recognize that this is a rapidly evolving technology, and developments occurring after our study was complete may not be reflected in the text. For additional information on topics related to this study, refer to the following Health Devices articles: (1) our Guidance Article, "Surgical Video Systems Used in Laparoscopy," 24(1), January 1995, which serves as an introduction to SVS terminology and includes a discussion of the significance of many SVS specifications; (2) our Evaluation, "Video Colonoscope Systems," 23(5), May 1994, which includes a detailed overview of video endoscopic applications and technology; and (3) our Evaluations of laparoscopic insufflators (21[5], May 1992, and 24[7], July 1995), which address issues related to the creation of a viewing and working space inside the peritoneal cavity to facilitate visualization in laparoscopic procedures. PMID:8750067

1995-11-01

322

An examination of the US Army's Environmental Ethic  

E-print Network

. In its national defense and civil works missions the Army manages more than 20 million acres of land, including many unique natural and cultural resources (US Army Environmental Center). It consumes or utilizes vast quantities of other natural... an attempt at j usti fication. These latter methods, however, fail in providing a moral basis for an Anny environmental ethic. The nature of the Army's mission and its uncodified professional military ethic necessitate that human considerations take...

Danner, Benton Allen

2012-06-07

323

76 FR 65885 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Centers Patient Rights Conditions for Coverage  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Ambulatory Surgical Centers Patient Rights Conditions for Coverage; Reform of Hospital...the Ambulatory Surgical Centers Patient Rights Conditions for Coverage AGENCY: Centers...for coverage (CfC) to allow patient rights information to be provided to the...

2011-10-24

324

The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

Gall, Joseph A.

2009-01-01

325

ATTP 1-19 (FM 12-50) U.S. Army Bands  

E-print Network

ATTP 1-19 (FM 12-50) U.S. Army Bands JULY 2010 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital, Techniques, and Procedures No. 1-19 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 7 July 2010 U.S. Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

326

Special Army Reports Prepared by Defense Finance and Accounting Service Indianapolis Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Army and Army personnel responsible for preparing and using special Army reports should read this report. This is the second in a series of reports related to Army budget execution operations. The first report discussed the transmission of Army budget exe...

J. L. Armstrong, L. M. Barnes, P. A. Marsh, P. C. Wenzel, P. J. Granetto

2007-01-01

327

[Volgograd military hospital--70 years].  

PubMed

History of the Volgograd military hospital dates back to July 24, 1941, when on the basis of the regional children's bone tuberculosis sanatorium in Krasnodar was transformed into 2150th military hospital consisted of 240 beds. Since May 1944 relocated in the city of Stalingrad became a garrison hospital. Today the hospital is a multidisciplinary health centre of the Russian Defense Ministry. Annually, the hospital performed at least 3000 surgical procedures, including more than 37%--are complex. In surgery, improved endovideosurgical direction, over 31% of emergency operations performed using this method. Since December 2009 the hospital became a structural division of the District Hospital in 1602 in Rostov on Don. The close connection between the branch and district hospital allows for complex diagnostic situations to consult leading experts, including consultation, thus ensuring the most effective treatment results. PMID:22545455

Novikov, V Ia; Alborov, Z Ts

2012-01-01

328

The NASA/Army Autonomous Rotorcraft Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview of the NASA Ames Research Center Autonomous Rotorcraft Project (ARP) is presented. The project brings together several technologies to address NASA and US Army autonomous vehicle needs, including a reactive planner for mission planning and execution, control system design incorporating a detailed understanding of the platform dynamics, and health monitoring and diagnostics. A candidate reconnaissance and surveillance mission is described. The autonomous agent architecture and its application to the candidate mission are presented. Details of the vehicle hardware and software development are provided.

Whalley, M.; Freed, M.; Takahashi, M.; Christian, D.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Schulein, G.; Harris, R.

2002-01-01

329

Results of NASA/Army transmission research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since 1970 the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command have shared an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components are outlined. The major goals of the program were (and continue to be) to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability, reduce the weight, noise, and vibration, and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. Major historical milestones are reviewed, significant advances in technology for bearings, gears, and transmissions are discussed, and the outlook for the future is presented. The reference list is comprehensive.

Coy, John J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coe, Harold H.

1988-01-01

330

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY u.s. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS  

E-print Network

-Dade County, Florida, Project Implementation Report and Integrated Environmental Impact Statement (PIRIEIS) 1 Project Implementation Report and Environmental Impact Statement u.S. Army Corps of Engineers Response Implementation Report (PIR) with integrated Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The !EPR panel reviewed

US Army Corps of Engineers

331

Medical Robots Surgical Assistants  

E-print Network

1 Medical Robots Surgical Assistants · Efficacy of Procedure ­ Accuracy ­ Longevity ­ Invasiveness · Augment human capabilities ­ Enabling new procedures ­ Time under anaesthetic #12;2 Surgical Robots) ­ Sensei (Hansen Medical) Autonomous Surgical Robots Robodoc.com #12;3 Guided Surgical Robots Makosurgical

Pulfrey, David L.

332

The quality of surgical clerkships.  

PubMed

Many of the contours of a surgical clerkship can be designed, implemented, and evaluated with varying degrees of objectivity. The recently established Association for Surgical Education and its expanding membership have performed in an excellent fashion in addressing the objectives, content, process, and evaluation of surgical clerkships. There are several factors that influence the quality of a clerkship that are not readily subjected to measurement but that have a significant impact on the environment and conduct of clerkships. Criticism, mainly from the academic community, has been directed recently to distortions of the learning process and the continuing use of traditional teaching methods that do not serve medical educational programs and students optimally. More attention should be paid to the principle that a surgical clerkship should be designed to provide an elemental comprehension of the major surgical diseases irrespective of how the students will select multiple specialties for their careers. The quality of a clinical teaching program is influenced in a realistic way by the quality of care provided to the patients. The image of the staff, especially the resident staff, plays an important role in affecting students' incentives, the development of self-discipline, their attitudes toward patients and families, and the ultimate selection of careers. As much responsibility as possible for the diagnosis of disease and the care of patients should be given to students under close supervision and always with the best interests of the patients in mind. The environment of medical schools and teaching hospitals is changing rapidly. The corporate practice of medicine will have an impact on the quality of surgical clerkships, we hope not adversely. PMID:4002120

Holden, W D

1985-06-01

333

Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate  

E-print Network

Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas #12;Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army The Breakfast Analogy #12;11/11/2008 3 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army

334

Simulation in Surgical Education  

PubMed Central

The pedagogical approach to surgical training has changed significantly over the past few decades. No longer are surgical skills solely acquired through a traditional apprenticeship model of training. The acquisition of many technical and nontechnical skills is moving from the operating room to the surgical skills laboratory through the use of simulation. Many platforms exist for the learning and assessment of surgical skills. In this article, the authors provide a broad overview of some of the currently available surgical simulation modalities including bench-top models, laparoscopic simulators, simulation for new surgical technologies, and simulation for nontechnical surgical skills. PMID:23997671

de Montbrun, Sandra L.; MacRae, Helen

2012-01-01

335

The automated Army ROTC Questionnaire (ARQ)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Reserve Officer Training Corps Cadet Command (ROTCCC) takes applications for its officer training program from college students and Army enlisted personnel worldwide. Each applicant is required to complete a set of application forms prior to acceptance into the ROTC program. These forms are covered by several regulations that govern the eligibility of potential applicants and guide the applicant through the application process. Eligibility criteria changes as Army regulations are periodically revised. Outdated information results in a loss of applications attributable to frustration and error. ROTCCC asked for an inexpensive and reliable way of automating their application process. After reviewing the process, it was determined that an expert system with good end user interface capabilities could be used to solve a large part of the problem. The system captures the knowledge contained within the regulations, enables the quick distribution and implementation of eligibility criteria changes, and distributes the expertise of the admissions personnel to the education centers and colleges. The expert system uses a modified version of CLIPS that was streamlined to make the most efficient use of its capabilities. A user interface with windowing capabilities provides the applicant with a simple and effective way to input his/her personal data.

Young, David L. H.

1991-01-01

336

ATTP 4-0.1 (FM 100-10-1) Army Theater Distribution  

E-print Network

ATTP 4-0.1 (FM 100-10-1) Army Theater Distribution May 2011 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved of the Army Washington, D.C., 20 May 2011 Army Theater Distribution Contents Page PREFACE .............................................................................................................iii Chapter 1 THEATER DISTRIBUTION

US Army Corps of Engineers

337

75 FR 22756 - Federal Advisory Committee; United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...United States Army Science Board; Charter Renewal...C. Appendix), the Government in the Sunshine Act...the United States Army Science Board (hereafter referred...shall serve as special government employees, shall be...designated ``Senior Army Science Board...

2010-04-30

338

32 CFR 623.6 - Reimbursement for loan of Army materiel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... true Reimbursement for loan of Army materiel. 623.6 Section 623...by technical inspectors according to Army Regulation 735-11. When qualified inspectors...represent the total claim by the US Army for property loaned...

2012-07-01

339

32 CFR 623.6 - Reimbursement for loan of Army materiel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... true Reimbursement for loan of Army materiel. 623.6 Section 623...by technical inspectors according to Army Regulation 735-11. When qualified inspectors...represent the total claim by the US Army for property loaned...

2011-07-01

340

32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense...AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

2012-07-01

341

32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense...AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

2013-07-01

342

32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries  

...2014-07-01 false Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense...AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

2014-07-01

343

32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense...AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

2010-07-01

344

32 CFR Appendix G to Part 623 - Continental US Army Boundaries  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2009-07-01 true Continental US Army Boundaries G Appendix G to Part 623 National Defense Department of Defense...AND EQUIPMENT LOAN OF ARMY MATERIEL Pt. 623, App. G Appendix G to Part 623—Continental US Army...

2011-07-01

345

32 CFR 552.25 - Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. 552.25 Section... Entry Regulations for Certain Army Training Areas in Hawaii § 552.25 Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. (a)...

2011-07-01

346

32 CFR 552.25 - Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. 552.25 Section... Entry Regulations for Certain Army Training Areas in Hawaii § 552.25 Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. (a)...

2013-07-01

347

Guidelines for reducing pathogens in veterinary hospitals: hospital design and special considerations.  

PubMed

Prevention of nosocomial infection begins with the hospital layout and identification of special considerations for particular patients. The construction of a new hospital or renovation of an existing hospital requires careful planning and consideration of the needs of the expected patient population and hospital staff. This article discusses considerations for preventing cross-contamination of pathogens through hospital design, as well as special considerations for particular patients, specifically those in isolation areas and surgical suites. PMID:20949419

Portner, Joshua A; Johnson, Justine A

2010-05-01

348

Surgical innovation as sui generis surgical research.  

PubMed

Successful innovative 'leaps' in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation especially resistant to classification as 'research', with all of the attendant methodological and ethical obligations--of planning, regulation, monitoring, reporting, and publication--associated with such a classification. This paper proposes conceptual and ethical grounds for a restricted definition according to which innovation in surgical technique is classified as a form of sui generis surgical 'research', where the explicit goal of adopting such a definition is to bring about needed improvements in knowledge transfer and thereby benefit current and future patients. PMID:24242289

Lotz, Mianna

2013-12-01

349

Solutions to Surgical Suite Temperature and Humidity Control  

E-print Network

The demand for lower air temperatures inside the operating room (OR) has placed unrealistic expectations upon existing cued water systems in hospitals. Lower temperatures are required to keep the surgical staff comfortable during extended procedures...

Crooks, K. W.

1996-01-01

350

The Lord's Resistance Army and African International Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the past two decades, the Lord's Resistance Army has waged a devastating war against the central government and the local population in northern Uganda. It is estimated that tens of thousands of civilians have been killed or kidnapped so far. In recent years, Lord's Resistance Army forces led by Joseph Kony have moved beyond the confines of northern Uganda,

Kevin C. Dunn

2010-01-01

351

Discourses of Gender in the Contemporary British Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is about the discourses of gender which circulate within debates about the inclusion of women in the British Army. Drawing on material from elite policy debates within the British Ministry of Defence, Army, and Parliament, the article uses a methodology informed by theories of discourse analysis to examine how the figures of the male and female soldier are

Rachel Woodward; Patricia Winter

2004-01-01

352

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY  

E-print Network

for students attending CES courses at the Army Management Staff College (AMSC). Army civilian employees scheduled to attend a CES resident course at AMSC during this period must coordinate with their supervisors's agreement to follow AMSC policy in establishing the period of the employee's furlough throughout his

US Army Corps of Engineers

353

CASE STUDY: US ARMY UTILITY HELICOPTER FLEET MODERNIZATION ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army has relied heavily on helicopter support for more than 30 years. These aircraft have been used for a variety of purposes, with the most widely identified category being the utility, or general-purpose transport, mission area. Currently, the US Army is confronting the problem of managing an aging equipment fleet (its helicopters) in the face of significant budgetary

GEORGE C. PRUEITT

2000-01-01

354

20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, Corps of Engineers, 1964 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) REPAIRS OF SPALLED CONCRETE-PIERS 2,3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

355

History of food acceptance research in the US Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of food acceptance research by the US Army in Chicago and Natick is reviewed. The review covers the staff of the two research centers, the research programs, and the significant accomplishments of the Army laboratories from the 1940s to the present. Accomplishments begin with the development of the nine-point hedonic scale, and the development of the first Food

Herbert L. Meiselman; Howard G. Schutz

2003-01-01

356

The Chinese People's Liberation Army and Space Warfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Space warfare will be an integrated part of battle planning by the Chinese People's Liberation Army in any future conflict with the United States. The People's Liberation Army has carefully absorbed and is reacting to what the American armed forces have published on space warfare and counter-space operations. Chinese strategists and legal scholars are engaged in an internal debate on

Larry M. Wortzel

2008-01-01

357

ENERGYPROGRAM U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center  

E-print Network

://www.facebook.com/HuntsvilleCenter May 2014 The U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville employs more than 800 civilian and military personnel and manages nearly $1.7 billion of work annually. The multi-disciplinary experts include Contact ESPC The Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) program is a partnership between the Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

358

Achieving Competence: Army-VOTEC School Partnership Pilot Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To reduce Army training costs, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) investigated use of training at civilian secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical (VOTEC) institutions as an alternative to initial job training in Army service schools. Three models were used in the pilot study: the preservice training model in which…

Stout, Mary W.

359

An Evaluation of Drug Education in the United States Army.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an attempt to prevent drug abuse, the U.S. Army developed drug education programs (DEP) at all its installations to inform soldiers about the dynamics and consequences of drug use. This paper presents the findings of the recently completed evaluation of Army DEP. The study surveyed 1,716 enlisted men at 16 posts about exposure to the DEP and…

Morton, Anton S.; And Others

360

No. 1165-2-208 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-print Network

CECW-PB Regulation No. 1165-2-208 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. Army Corps ofEngineers Washington, DC (WRDA) of2007 (42 U.S.C. 1962d-5b) (hereinafter referred to as "Section 221"). The revised language toward its required cash contribution (excluding the required 5 percent cash for structural flood damage

US Army Corps of Engineers

361

Survey of Alcohol Use in the U.S. Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide information about the frequency, attitudes, and consequences of alcohol use in the U.S. Army. A questionnaire was used to assess the frequency of alcohol consumption, attitudes related to the use of alcohol, and adverse consequences experienced with alcohol use. The survey was conducted at Walter Reed Army Medical

R. Gregory Lande; Barbara A. Marin; Audrey S. Chang; Galen R. Lande

2008-01-01

362

Soldier Education in the British Army, 1920-2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article surveys the history of compulsory education for soldiers' career advancement in the British army. It begins with an examination of the organizational context before analyzing the rationale, syllabus, teaching and assessment of soldier education. It concludes that for members of the army education organization their self-perception as…

Beach, Jim

2008-01-01

363

FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership  

E-print Network

;Foreword Competent leaders of character are necessary for the Army to meet the challenges in the dangerous. It establishes leadership doctrine and fundamental principles for all officers, noncommissioned officers and Doctrine Digital Library at (www.train.army.mil). #12;*FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Distribution Restriction

US Army Corps of Engineers

364

78 FR 60864 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...results of the Fiscal Year 2013 study titled, ``Creating an Innovation Culture in the Army.'' The ASB board members will cast a vote to accept the results of this study and record that vote for record according to the Army Science Board bylaws,...

2013-10-02

365

[The Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War].  

PubMed

The article is devoted to activity of the Central Military Hospital of the People's Commissariat for Defence during the Great Patriotic War. The research is based on declassified orders of PCD and orders of the chef of hospital. Authors presented the role of the hospital in organization of medical aid for officers of PCD, members of their families, Red Army soldiers, junior and senior Red Army commanders; the role of the hospital in organization of medical facilities for combat army; medical supply for evacuation of family members of PCD's officers ( en route and in evacuation places); delivery of child health care to children of officers of PCD in the hospital and education in kindergartens of PCD. PMID:25286563

2014-05-01

366

The Chiari II Malformation: A Surgical Series  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty patients between the ages of 7 months and 24 years were treated surgically for symptomatic Chiari II malformation at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital. All patients underwent at least bony decompression of the malformation. Assessments of the patients’ conditions were made at 6 weeks and 1 year after surgery, and complications of surgery were noted. For a majority of the

Charles Teo; Erik C. Parker; Sharon Aureli; Frederick A. Boop

1997-01-01

367

The Challenge of Military Surgical Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Now that field hospitals and rescue stations have been provided with state-of-the-art equipment, it is important to tailor the medical qualifications of military surgeons to the specific requirements of missions outside Germany. The objective of this article is to provide guidelines for a new training model. Einsatzchirurgie is defined as surgical treatment provided under restricted conditions in an unfamiliar environment.

Horst Peter Becker; Heinz Gerngross; Robert Schwab

2005-01-01

368

Perioperative use of antibiotics in elective surgical patients: timing of administration.  

PubMed

The practice of perioperative antibiotics administration in relation to surgical incision was analyzed in 525 elective surgical patients at St Vincent University Hospital, Dublin. 82.86 % (435) patients received the perioperative antibiotics before surgical incision was made and 17.14 % (90) patients received it after the surgical incision was made. The issue of timely administration of perioperative antibiotic should be included in the surgical time out to improve compliance in this regard. PMID:19743679

Zaidi, Nadeem; Tariq, Muhammad; Breslin, Dara

2009-07-01

369

Extraordinary Predation by the Neotropical Army Ant Cheliomyrmex andicola: Implications for the Evolution of the Army Ant Syndrome1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workers of the genus Cheliomyrmex are unique among the New world army ants (subfamily Ecitoninae) in that their mandibles are armed with elongate, spine-like teeth. We present the first prey records for this genus. Cheliomyrmex andicola prey on large-bodied ground dwelling invertebrates and, possibly, on vertebrates. Unlike other army ants, C. andicola workers use their sting during prey capture. The

Sean O'Donnell; Michael Kaspari; John Lattke

2005-01-01

370

Discrepant perceptions of communication, teamwork and situation awareness among surgical team members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To assess surgical team members’ differences in perception of non-technical skills. \\u000aDesign Questionnaire design. \\u000aSetting Operating theatres (OTs) at one university hospital, three teaching hospitals and one general hospital in the Netherlands. \\u000aParticipants Sixty-six surgeons, 97 OT nurses, 18 anaesthetists and 40 nurse anaesthetists. \\u000aMethods All surgical team members, of five hospitals, were asked to complete a questionnaire and

L. S. G. L. Wauben; C. M. Dekker-van Doorn; J. H. D. Van Wijngaarden; R. H. M. Goossens; R. Huijsman; J. Klein; J. F. Lange

2011-01-01

371

Predicting Surgical Site Infections in Real-Time Akpene Gbegnon  

E-print Network

temperature, larger estimated blood loss (EBL), longer procedure duration, larger transfusion volume, specificPredicting Surgical Site Infections in Real-Time Akpene Gbegnon University of Iowa Hospitals City, IA 52242 1-319-384-7359 john-cromwell@uiowa.edu ABSTRACT Surgical site infections (SSIs

Street, Nick

372

Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

1996-01-01

373

Adverse outcomes in Belgian acute hospitals: retrospective analysis of the national hospital discharge dataset  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. The prevalence and variability of adverse outcome rates in Belgian acute hospitals is examined by using the national hospital discharge database. Design, setting, and participants. Retrospective analysis based on administrative data of all Belgian acute hospitals, covering the full medical (n = 1 024 743) and surgical (n = 633 027) in-patients population for the year 2000. Main outcome

KOEN VAN DEN HEEDE; WALTER SERMEUS; LUWIS DIYA; EMMANUEL LESAFFRE; ARTHUR VLEUGELS

2006-01-01

374

ISTAR concept experimentation for Canada's future army  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper reviews future Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) concepts being explored for the Canadian Army. These concepts build upon the realities of battle-space digitisation and the opportunities of a network-centric approach. The paper presents experimentation underway to flesh out and validate these concepts. The vision of the future ISTAR capability is driven by the information requirements to support a commander's decision- making in attaining mission effectiveness. The system environment is characterized by multi-user interaction in which the exchange of real-time information and collaborative work is the norm. This common environment is well suited to support the multifunctional complexity required by the different actors within the system and the diversity of the missions that they serve.

Clairoux, G.; Gareau, M.; Thibault, G.; Vezina, Guy; Walker, Robert S.

2002-08-01

375

A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

2010-01-01

376

Organizational Determinants of Work Outcomes and Quality Care Ratings Among Army Medical Department Registered Nurses  

PubMed Central

The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and several single-item measures were administered to registered nurses (RNs) working within 23 U.S.-based Army Medical Department (AMEDD) hospitals. Data were analyzed with logistic regression for nested data. Unfavorable nursing practice environments had a substantial association with job dissatisfaction (OR 13.75, p < .01), emotional exhaustion (OR 12.70, p < .01), intent to leave (OR 3.03, p < .01), and fair to poor quality of care (OR 10.66, p < .01). This study provides the first system-wide analyses of nursing practice environments in AMEDD hospitals in the U.S. Similar to findings in civilian samples, poor quality work environments are associated with less favorable RN work outcomes and quality of care ratings. PMID:20151409

Patrician, Patricia A.; Shang, Jingjing; Lake, Eileen T.

2010-01-01

377

Compare Hospitals  

MedlinePLUS

2014 Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Now Available Thank you for visiting the Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results Website. These results are based on surveys submitted by hospitals across the country that have demonstrated a commitment ...

378

Hospital-acquired infections: are prevention strategies matching incidence rates?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of hospital-acquired infections, although known, continues to rise. Are hospitals setting guidelines in order to prevent hospital infections? If so, arethe setguidelines effective? A study conducted across three hospitals showed asignificant drop in the rates of surgical site infections (SSI) and hospital-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) by increasing the awareness of hospital-acquired infections among healthcare workers. An education

Joyce B. Suchitra; Nanjaiah Lakshmidevi

2009-01-01

379

Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.  

PubMed

In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences. PMID:22124867

Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

2011-01-01

380

U.S. Army Center of Military History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH) is a directorate within the office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army. It provides a vast range of services designed to support the historical research efforts of different sections and organizations within the Army. First-time visitors may wish to start at the Medal of Honor area, which provides some detailed information about this most celebrated award, along with its recipients. The Force Structure and Unit History Branch area provides information about the various units and divisions within the Army, including those that no longer exist. The Army Museum System area provides detailed information about the various museums around the United States that cover the vast military history of the different states. The Artwork & Images area contains hundreds of artistic images that include dramatic paintings of key military excursions, along with thematic photographic collections like Army Libraries Through the Years and Buffalo Soldiers on the Eve of World War II. Visitors shouldn't leave without looking over the The Green Books series. This series covers all aspects of the Army's involvement in World War II; titles include "The War in the Pacific," "The Middle East Theater," and "The Technical Services." [KMG

2013-01-10

381

Guide to Surgical Specialists  

MedlinePLUS

... ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Educational Programs SESAP SESAP ... ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education ...

382

Army tests show stack flow restrictors save little energy  

SciTech Connect

Government performance tests of flue-stack flow restrictors made by Thermiser Ltd. and Thrifty Vents show only minor improvement in the efficiency of gas-fired furnaces. The Army tested the devices as a guideline for army bases after approaches by several vendors, and will soon release its full report on 288 separate tests. Both products are designed to reduce the amount of air to be heated. Furnace derating had the greatest effect on efficiency during the tests. Similar tests by the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity showed no significant savings. Both the Army and Navy tests are challenged by the manufacturers. (DCK)

Galvin, C.

1982-10-04

383

Bacterial Colonisation of Doppler Probes on Vascular Surgical Wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: hospital acquired infections cost the NHS £1 billion each year and medical equipment may act both as source and vector of nosocomial infection. This study examined bacterial contamination of Doppler ultrasound probes (USP) in routine use on vascular surgical wards in six hospitals and the knowledge of staff about the potential for cross infection from contaminated probes. Methods: probe

S. M. G Kibria; K. G Kerr; J Dave; M. J Gough; S Homer-Vanniasinkam; A. I. D Mavor

2002-01-01

384

ATTP 4-41 (FM 10-23) Army Field Feeding and  

E-print Network

;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. ReimerATTP 4-41 (FM 10-23) Army Field Feeding and Class I Operations OCTOBER 2010 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12

US Army Corps of Engineers

385

Volume XVI, No. 3 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency  

E-print Network

Volume XVI, No. 3 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency May/June 2004 U.S/June 2004 Public Works Digest is an unofficial publication of the U.S. Army Installa- tion Management Agency of the Department of the Army. Address mail to: U.S. Army Installation Management Agency 2511 Jefferson Davis

US Army Corps of Engineers

386

Volume XV, No. 6 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency  

E-print Network

Volume XV, No. 6 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency November/December 2003 U.S. Army Installation Management Agency #12;Public Works Digest is an unofficial publication of the U.S. Army Installa- tion Management Agency, under AR 360-1, The Army Public Affairs Pro- gram

US Army Corps of Engineers

387

m Miscellaneous Paper A-94-1 US Army Corps -MAMENof Engineers  

E-print Network

----- -- - - - - ----- ----- - ----- - - - --- m Miscellaneous Paper A-94-1 March 1994 US Army Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ~and U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland Honnell, Judy Shearer, R. Michael Smart Environmental Laboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways

US Army Corps of Engineers

388

Volume XVII, No. 3 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency  

E-print Network

Volume XVII, No. 3 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency May/June 2005 U.S publication of the U.S. Army Installa- tion Management Agency, under AR 360-1, The Army Public Affairs Pro views and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Department of the Army. Address mail to: U.S

US Army Corps of Engineers

389

ATP 4-91 (FMI 4-93.41) Army Field Support Brigade  

E-print Network

is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and DoctrineATP 4-91 (FMI 4-93.41) Army Field Support Brigade December 2011 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication

US Army Corps of Engineers

390

FM 4-01.502 (FM 55-502) Army Watercraft Safety  

E-print Network

is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and DoctrineFM 4-01.502 (FM 55-502) Army Watercraft Safety May 2008 Distribution Restriction: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication

US Army Corps of Engineers

391

An Examination of Current and Future Directions in the U.S. Army's Mentoring Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study included a literature review of mentoring practices in Army and civilian organizations and an exploratory research effort concerning mentoring practices in the U.S. Army. The research effort consisted of 11 people (9 Army personnel and 2 civilians) were associated with training programs at an Army post. Participants completed a…

Shlechter, Theodore M.

392

HEADQUARTERS FM 3-23.35 (FM 23-35) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY  

E-print Network

publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training National Guard, and U.S. Army Reserve: To be distributed in accordance with the initial distribution numberHEADQUARTERS FM 3-23.35 (FM 23-35) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY COMBAT TRAINING WITH PISTOLS, M9 AND M11

US Army Corps of Engineers

393

Pediatric hospitalist comanagement of surgical patients: Structural, quality, and financial considerations.  

PubMed

Comanagement of surgical patients is occurring more commonly among adult and pediatric patients. These systems of care can vary according to institution type, comanagement structure, and type of patient. Comanagement can impact quality, safety, and costs of care. We review these implications for pediatric surgical patients. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2014;9:737-742. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:25283766

Rappaport, David I; Rosenberg, Rebecca E; Shaughnessy, Erin E; Schaffzin, Joshua K; O'Connor, Katherine M; Melwani, Anjna; McLeod, Lisa M

2014-11-01

394

76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Army National Cemeteries Program, including, but not limited to: a. Management and operational issues, including bereavement practices; b. Plans and strategies for addressing long-term governance challenges; c. Resource planning and...

2011-11-15

395

77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Army National Cemeteries Program, including, but not limited to: a. Management and operational issues, including bereavement practices; b. Plans and strategies for addressing long-term governance challenges; c. Resource planning and...

2012-02-17

396

Award Recipient U.S. Army Armament Research,  

E-print Network

sensors, and advanced weaponry based on high-power microwaves, high-energy lasers, and nanotechnology the best weaponry and ammunition available. The U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering

Magee, Joseph W.

397

Plowman v. U.S. Department of the Army.  

PubMed

A former civilian employee of the U.S. Army brought suit against the Army and his former supervisor, alleging that he was forced to resign his position after testing positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The plaintiff asserted that the Army had breached his employment contract. Additionally, his supervisor had violated his right to privacy and his Fourth Amendment right to be secure in his person from unreasonable searches and seizures, and had intentionally inflicted emotional distress. In granting the defendants' motion to dismiss the suit, the District Court held that: (1) the employee served by appointment and therefore the Army could not be held liable for breach of contract; and (2) his former supervisor was not liable for breach of the plaintiff's privacy or Fourth Amendment rights. PMID:11648181

1988-10-19

398

A BSN Program for the U.S. Army Reserve.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Army Reserve offers a nursing program through Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts. The collaborative effort has resulted in an innovative program that can serve as a model for other colleges and universities. (JOW)

Foley, Barbara Jo; And Others

1993-01-01

399

U.S. Army High Energy Laser (HEL) technology program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The US Army is investing in Solid State Laser (SSL) technology to assess counter rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) and counter unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) capabilities of solid state based HEL systems, as well as other potential applications for HELs of interest to the Army. The Army HEL program thrust areas are systematically moving the technology forward toward weaponization, including solid state laser technologies, advances in beam control technology, and conducting major demonstrations. The High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) will be a major step toward demonstrating HEL weapon capability to the soldier. The US Army will continue to pursue technologies that enable more compact systems compatible with, for example, a Stryker tactical vehicle as a crucial part of our strategy to provide a capability to the warfighter that can maneuver with the force.

Lavan, Michael J.; Wachs, John J.

2011-11-01

400

The U.S. Army and the lessons of history  

E-print Network

with the belief that lessons learned from its war experience could improve its training, tactical doctrine, and schools. This thesis, using the field artillery as a case study, will appraise how the United States Army institutionalized the lessons learns process...

Shugart, David Adams

2012-06-07

401

Racial Disparity in Surgical Complications in New York State  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine the relationship between race and surgical complications. Summary Background Data: Blacks have been reported to experience higher rates of surgical complications than whites, but the reasons are not known. Methods: The effect of the black race on risk of any surgical complication (from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators) was examined using New York State (NYS) hospital discharge data from 1998 to 2000. Sequential, hierarchical analyses controlled for: 1) patient age and gender, 2) morbidity length of stay, 3) individual social factors, 4) hospital characteristics, and 5) ecologic factors (region of state, percent black and Medicaid annual discharges, and mean income of admitted patients). Results: Following adjustment for patient age and gender, blacks had 65% higher odds for a surgical complication. Further adjustment for comorbidity and length of stay (LOS) reduced the odds substantially to 1.18. Additional adjustment for American Hospital Association hospital characteristics essentially eliminated the risk. Final adjustment for hospital ecologic variables reduced the odds to 1.0. Conclusions: Higher rates of surgical complications among blacks than whites in NYS are primarily explained by differences in comorbidity LOS and the hospital where the surgery occurred. PMID:16041203

Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Peter; Meldrum, Sean; Barnett, Steven

2005-01-01

402

Congenital heart surgery: surgical performance according to the Aristotle complexity score  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Aristotle score methodology defines surgical performance as ‘complexity score times hospital survival’. We analysed how this performance evolved over time and in correlation with case volume. Methods: Aristotle basic and comprehensive complexity scores and corresponding basic and comprehensive surgical performances were determined for primary (main) procedures carried out from 2006 to 2009. Surgical case volume performance described as unit

Claudia Arenz; Boulos Asfour; Viktor Hraska; Joachim Photiadis; Christoph Haun; Ehrenfried Schindler; Nicodème Sinzobahamvya

2011-01-01

403

Survey of Surgical Indications and Results of Primary Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several surgical techniques to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment have been developed. Recently, both the method of reattaching the retina and of obtaining an early visual recovery are considered important factors when determining which surgical techniques to perform to treat retinal detachment.Cases: The surgical outcome in a series of 63 consecutive patients, who were treated at Osaka Rosai Hospital between

Yusuke Oshima; Kazuyuki Emi; Masanobu Motokura; Shigeki Yamanishi

1999-01-01

404

Surgical evacuation of acute subdural hematoma improves cerebral hemodynamics in children: a transcranial Doppler evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective The objective was to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in young children with acute subdural hematoma (SDH) and the impact of surgical treatment using transcranial Doppler (TCD). Design The design was a prospective study of infants with SDH requiring surgical evacuation. Setting The setting was the neuro intensive care unit of a university hospital. Interventions Indications for surgical evacuation were based

Philippe Gabriel Meyer; Sarah Ducrocq; Thibault Rackelbom; Gilles Orliaguet; Dominique Renier; Pierre Carli

2005-01-01

405

US Army remotely piloted vehicle supporting technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Essential technology programs that lead to the full scale engineering development of the Aquila Remotely Piloted Vehicle system for U.S. Army are described. The Aquila system uses a small recoverable and reusable RPV to provide target acquisition, designation, and aerial reconnaissance mission support for artillery and smart munitions. Developments that will provide growth capabilities to the Aquila RPV system, as well as future RPV mission concepts being considered by the U.S. Army are presented.

Gossett, T. D.

1981-01-01

406

The Eighth Army's Combat Readiness Before Korea: A New Appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This case study of the 27th Infantry Regiment demonstrates the fallacy of many generalizations surrounding interpretations of the U.S. Army's performance in the opening weeks of the Korean War. It describes the training of a typical infantry regiment in the Eighth U.S. Army from April 1949, until the outbreak of the Korean War on 25 June 1950. The evolution of

Thomas E. Hanson

2003-01-01

407

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the United States Army Corps of Engineers comes this index of engineering documents that includes technical manuals, engineering instructions, public works, and technical bulletins, among other resources. This valuable index unites collections from a number of different Army Corps of Engineers offices and divisions. Many of the documents come as full-text searchable PDF files and include graphs and charts. This is a good resource for teachers and students of civil engineering and includes a wealth of resources.

2007-06-17

408

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Army Nurse Corps Vietnam Veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results are presented from an epidemiologic investigation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Army nurse veterans. Analysis of questionnaire data from more than 700 Vietnam and Vietnam-era veterans still on active duty in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps reveals a current PTSD rate for Vietnam veteran nurses of 3.3%. This rate is comparable to that found among nonnurse active duty

Robert H. Stretch; James D. Vail; Joseph P. Maloney

1985-01-01

409

Hepatitis B antigen and antibody in the U.S. Army: prevalence in health care personnel.  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HB(S)Ag) and antibody (anti-HB(S)) seropositivity and the association of seropositivity with demographic, personal health, and professional experiences were studied in a cohort of Army Medical Department officer personnel. Serologic evidence of Hepatitis B infection was found in 5.0 per cent of personnel and was associated with age, sex, place of birth, history of hepatitis, history of blood transfusion, and previous overseas assignments. Seropositivity rates were higher for patient care oriented officer personnel, especially for those in surgical specialties, and rose with increasing professional experience. These data present a composite of risk factors operative in the acquisition of Hepatitis B seropositivity and identify a cohort for prospective study. PMID:937614

Segal, H E; Llewellyn, C H; Irwin, G; Bancroft, W H; Boe, G P; Balaban, D J

1976-01-01

410

Image enhancement technology research for army applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recognition and identification ranges are limited to the quality of the images. Both the received contrast and the spatial resolution determine if objects are recognizable. Several aspects affect the image quality. First of all the sensor itself. The image quality depends on the size of the infrared detector array and the sensitivity. Second, also the intervening atmosphere, in particular over longer ranges, has an impact on the image quality. It degrades the contrast, due to transmission effects, as well as it influences the resolution, due to turbulence blur, of the image. We present studies in the field of infrared image enhancement. Several techniques are described: noise reduction, super resolution, turbulence compensation, contrast enhancement, stabilization. These techniques operate in real-time on COTS/MOTS platforms. They are especially effective in the army theatre, where long horizontal paths, and short line-of-sight limited urban operations are both present. Application of these techniques on observation masts, such as on military camp sites, and on UAVs and moving ground vehicles are discussed. Examples will be presented from several trials in which these techniques were demonstrated, including the presentation of test results.

Schwering, Piet B. W.; Kemp, Rob A. W.; Schutte, Klamer

2013-06-01

411

[Secondary aortoenteric fistula, multidisciplinary surgical management].  

PubMed

The authors report the clinical case of a 77-year old man, who underwent the surgical treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurism 11 years before, admitted in the hospital emergency department complaining of abdominal pain and melena. Clinical and laboratorial findings, together with CT-scan and endoscopy data, lead to the diagnosis of secondary aortoenteric fistula. This is a rare clinical entity, coursing with high morbimortality levels of and is still one of the most controversial issues in vascular surgery. The successful surgical treatment of this patient is described and the solution of choice is discussed, as well as other alternative approaches. PMID:23610769

Cunha E Sá, Diogo; De Andrade, J Rebelo; Roquete, Paulo; Pestana, Cristina; Cabral, Gonçalo; Tiago, José; Dinis da Gama, A

2011-01-01

412

[Surgical procedure in combined proctologic diseases].  

PubMed

In 301 (23%) out of 1264 surgical cases with various pathologies of the rectum, pararectal and sacrococcygeal regions some combined diseases were observed. Such combinations as chronic paraproctitis (rectal fistulae) with hemorrhoids and with anal fissure are the most common ones. 176 one-stage operations and 63 double-stage operations were carried out. The average period of hospitalization was 16 days after one-stage operation and 24 days after double-stage operation. The authors believe that timely diagnosing of combined pathology allows to prevent the development of possible complications and to choose the most helpful surgical tactics in every specific case. PMID:716150

Nazarov, L U; Orgusian, R V

1978-10-01

413

Hospital Greenspace Lawson Memorial Hospital,  

E-print Network

H Hospital Greenspace Lawson Memorial Hospital, Golspie ­ Greenspace Case Study Background to hospital greenspace to be carried out in the Highlands. This project is now entering its third phase. Phase of Phase 2. This resulted in the identification of the Lawson Memorial Hospital as the site

414

Surgical checklists: the human factor  

PubMed Central

Background Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. Methods Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. Results Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. Conclusion In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed. PMID:23672665

2013-01-01

415

Study of the Reproductive Effects in Rats Surgically Implanted With Depleted Uranium for Up to 90 Days  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2001, the Naval Health Research Center Toxicology Detachment was funded by the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity (USAMRAA) to conduct a study of the effects of surgically implanted depleted uranium (DU) pellets on adult rat reproductive success and development across two successive generations. This article presents some of the findings for the group of offspring from adult rats

D. P. Arfsten; M. Bekkedal; E. R. Wilfong; J. Rossi III; K. A. Grasman; L. B. Healey; J. M. Rutkiewicz; E. W. Johnson; A. R. Thitoff; A. E. Jung; S. R. Lohrke; D. J. Schaeffer; K. R. Still

2005-01-01

416

Raising a Pragmatic Army: Officer Education at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1946-1986  

E-print Network

of professional military education in general leaves a faint trail, and few scholarly works trace the College?s evolution. The touchstone work is Timothy K. Nenninger, The Leavenworth Schools and the Old Army.6 Nenninger investigated CGSC?s role... an international perspective are Gregory C. Kennedy and Keith Neilson, eds. Military Education: Past, Present and Future (Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002) and Michael D. Stephens, ed. The Educating of Armies (New York: St. Martin?s Press, 1989). 6 Timothy K...

Stewart, Michael David

2010-04-23

417

Rural hospitals  

PubMed Central

The 340B Drug Pricing Program has the potential to reduce outpatient pharmaceutical costs for qualifying hospitals—hut many rural hospital administrators are unaware of their organization’s eligibility. PMID:18637547

Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Schur, Claudia; Cheung, Karen; Baernholdt, Marianne

2013-01-01

418

Norovirus - hospital  

MedlinePLUS

... be severe, becoming dehydrated (dried out) is common. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ... to understand an outbreak (for instance in a hospital setting). This test is done by collecting and ...

419

CDRP - Funded Institutions - Daniel Freeman Memorial Hospital  

Cancer.gov

Centinela Freeman Regional Medical Center Memorial Campus is owned and operated by Memorial Campus local hospital administrtors, physicians and community leaders. Memorial Campus is a 358-bed acute care community hospital offering a wide array of greatly needed medical and surgical services, including cancer treatment, obstetrics, neonatal intensive care, pediatrics, neurology, neurosurgery, acute rehabilitation and emergency room services. Memorial Campus continues the hospital's almost 50-year mission of service to the Inglewood community since it acquired the facility in 2001.

420

Laparoscopic and robotic surgical training in urology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most important change in urology during the past decade was the development of minimally invasive surgery, particularly\\u000a laparoscopy. However, the main drawback of laparoscopy is a steep learning curve, which results from the significant changes\\u000a in the surgical environment. Although laparoscopy can provide important advantages for the patient, including decreased length\\u000a of hospitalization, decreased analgesic requirement, and a shortened

András Hoznek; Ran Katz; Matthew Gettman; Laurent Salomon; Patrick Antiphon; Alexandre de la Taille; René Yiou; Dominique Chopin; Clément-Claude Abbou

2003-01-01

421

Surgical treatment of hilar bile duct carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

From June, 1986 to June 1989, 24 cases of hilar bile duct carcinoma were explored in the Surgical Department of General Hospital\\u000a of PLA, 16\\/24 cases were resected, a resectability rate of 66%. The increase of resectability rate was due to earlier recognition\\u000a of this condition and the extension of surgery, including major resection of liver as well as radical

Zhiqiang Huang

1990-01-01

422

Surgical Management of Adnexal Masses in Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Our objective was to review the surgical management, surgical outcomes, and obstetric outcomes of adnexal masses in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of pregnant women before 20 weeks of gestation who underwent laparoscopy or laparotomy for management of an adnexal mass during the period of January 2005 to June 2012 at a university-affiliated hospital. Results: Thirty-five pregnant women underwent surgical removal of adnexal masses during the 7.5-year study period: 21 (60.0%) underwent laparoscopic surgery, and 14 (40.0%) underwent laparotomy. The left upper quadrant entry technique was used in 20 women. Conversion to laparotomy was required in 2 women because of extensive pelvic adhesions. The mean gestational age at surgery was 15.2 ± 1.9 weeks. All women had undergone ovarian cystectomy. A malignant mass was found in 3 (8.6%) women. The laparoscopy group had a significantly less blood loss (67.4 ± 55.8 vs 153.6 ± 181.0 mL, P = .048) and shorter mean hospital stay (2.8 ± 1.0 vs 3.8 ± 1.1 days, P = .006) than the laparotomy group. One woman miscarried soon after surgery. There was no significant difference in obstetric outcomes between the laparoscopy and laparotomy groups. Conclusion: Surgical management of adnexal masses during pregnancy appears to have favorable outcomes for the mother and the fetus. PMID:24680147

Cheung, Vincent Y. T.; Pun, Ting-Chung

2014-01-01

423

Deriving DICOM surgical extensions from surgical workflows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The generation, storage, transfer, and representation of image data in radiology are standardized by DICOM. To cover the needs of image guided surgery or computer assisted surgery in general one needs to handle patient information besides image data. A large number of objects must be defined in DICOM to address the needs of surgery. We propose an analysis process based on Surgical Workflows that helps to identify these objects together with use cases and requirements motivating for their specification. As the first result we confirmed the need for the specification of representation and transfer of geometric models. The analysis of Surgical Workflows has shown that geometric models are widely used to represent planned procedure steps, surgical tools, anatomical structures, or prosthesis in the context of surgical planning, image guided surgery, augmented reality, and simulation. By now, the models are stored and transferred in several file formats bare of contextual information. The standardization of data types including contextual information and specifications for handling of geometric models allows a broader usage of such models. This paper explains the specification process leading to Geometry Mesh Service Object Pair classes. This process can be a template for the definition of further DICOM classes.

Burgert, O.; Neumuth, T.; Gessat, M.; Jacobs, S.; Lemke, H. U.

2007-03-01

424

CULTIVATING NETWORKS: IMPLEMENTING SURGICAL  

E-print Network

i CULTIVATING NETWORKS: IMPLEMENTING SURGICAL TELEMEDICINE Margunn Aanestad THE INTERVENTIONAL OF MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF OSLO #12;ii CULTIVATING NETWORKS: IMPLEMENTING SURGICAL.2.1 Technology as an actor? 14 3.2.2 Information infrastructures 15 3.2.3 Cultivating, not designing information

Sahay, Sundeep

425

Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

2012-01-01

426

Cross?Protection between Successive Waves of the 1918–1919 Influenza Pandemic: Epidemiological Evidence from US Army Camps and from Britain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The current worst-case scenario for pandemic influenza planning is based on the catastrophic 1918 -1919 pandemic. In this article, we examine the strength of cross-protection between successive waves of the 1918 -1919 pandemic, which has remained a long-standing issue of debate. Method. We studied monthly hospitalization and mortality rates for respiratory illness in 37 army camps, as well as

Cécile Viboud; Lone Simonsen

2008-01-01

427

Aggressive Management of Surgical Emergencies  

PubMed Central

Increasing evidence suggests that two factors significantly influence outcome in a surgical emergency – premorbid health and the degree of inflammation during the first 24 h following trauma. Repeat observations suggest that the depth of post-trauma immunoparalysis reflects the height of early inflammatory response. Administration to surgical emergencies, as was routine in the past, of larger amounts of fluid and electrolytes, fat, sugar and nutrients seems counterproductive as it increases immune dysfunction, impairs resistance to disease and, in fact, increases morbidity. Instead, strong efforts should be made to limit the obvious superinflammation, which occurs during the first 24 h after trauma and, thereby, reduce the subsequent immuno-paralysis. paralysis. Several approaches show efficacy in limiting early superinflammation such as strict control of blood glucose, avoida nce of stored blood when possible, supply of antioxidants, live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres. This review focuses mainly on use of live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres, often called synbiotics. Encouraging experience is reported from clinical trials in liver transplantation, severe pancreatitis and extensive trauma. Immediate control of inflammation by enteral nutrition and supply of antioxidants, lactic acid bacteria and fibres is facilitated by feeding tubes, introduced as early as possible on arrival at the hospital. PMID:17132308

Bengmark, Stig

2006-01-01

428

Aggressive management of surgical emergencies.  

PubMed

Increasing evidence suggests that two factors significantly influence outcome in a surgical emergency - premorbid health and the degree of inflammation during the first 24 h following trauma. Repeat observations suggest that the depth of post-trauma immunoparalysis reflects the height of early inflammatory response. Administration to surgical emergencies, as was routine in the past, of larger amounts of fluid and electrolytes, fat, sugar and nutrients seems counterproductive as it increases immune dysfunction, impairs resistance to disease and, in fact, increases morbidity. Instead, strong efforts should be made to limit the obvious superinflammation, which occurs during the first 24 h after trauma and, thereby, reduce the subsequent immunoparalysis. Several approaches show efficacy in limiting early superinflammation such as strict control of blood glucose, avoidance of stored blood when possible, supply of antioxidants, live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres. This review focuses mainly on use of live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres, often called synbiotics. Encouraging experience is reported from clinical trials in liver transplantation, severe pancreatitis and extensive trauma. Immediate control of inflammation by enteral nutrition and supply of antioxidants, lactic acid bacteria and fibres is facilitated by feeding tubes, introduced as early as possible on arrival at the hospital. PMID:17132308

Bengmark, Stig

2006-11-01

429

Response bias, weighting adjustments, and design effects in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).  

PubMed

The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase knowledge about determinants of suicidality. Three Army STARRS component studies are large-scale surveys: one of new soldiers prior to beginning Basic Combat Training (BCT; n?=?50,765 completed self-administered questionnaires); another of other soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (n?=?35,372); and a third of three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan who are being followed multiple times after returning from deployment (n?=?9421). Although the response rates in these surveys are quite good (72.0-90.8%), questions can be raised about sample biases in estimating prevalence of mental disorders and suicidality, the main outcomes of the surveys based on evidence that people in the general population with mental disorders are under-represented in community surveys. This paper presents the results of analyses designed to determine whether such bias exists in the Army STARRS surveys and, if so, to develop weights to correct for these biases. Data are also presented on sample inefficiencies introduced by weighting and sample clustering and on analyses of the trade-off between bias and efficiency in weight trimming. PMID:24318218

Kessler, Ronald C; Heeringa, Steven G; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Hwang, Irving; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

2013-12-01

430

Conceptual Design for the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2000, the President of the United States (US) and Congress directed Department of Interior (DOI) agencies to develop a program for monitoring trends in amphibian populations on DOI lands and to conduct research into causes of declines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was given lead responsibility for planning and implementing the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bureau of Land Management. The program objectives are to (1) establish a network for monitoring the status and distribution of amphibian species on DOI lands; (2) identify and monitor environmental conditions known to affect amphibian populations; (3) conduct research on causes of amphibian population change and malformations; and (4) provide information to resource managers, policy makers, and the public in support of amphibian conservation. The ARMI program will integrate research efforts of USGS, other Federal, and non-federal herpetologists, hydrologists, and geographers across the Nation. ARMI will conduct a small number (~20) of intensive research efforts (for example, studies linking amphibian population changes to hydrologic conditions) and a larger number (~50) of more generalized inventory and monitoring studies encompassing broader areas such as NPS units. ARMI will coordinate with and try to augment other amphibian inventory studies such as the National Amphibian Atlas and the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program. ARMI will develop and test protocols for the standardized collection of amphibian data and provide a centrally managed database designed to simplify data entry, retrieval, and analysis. ARMI pilot projects are underway at locations across the US.

Battaglin, W. A.; Langtimm, C. A.; Adams, M. J.; Gallant, A. L.; James, D. L.

2001-12-01

431

Preferred emission factor techniques for army emission inventories  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA-90) present an unprecedented regulatory challenge to the Department of the Army and the entire US business community. Unlike previous legislation, which focused heavily on the substantive or emission control aspects of air quality management, this round of Amendments focused equal attention on the administrative aspects of air pollution control. Specifically, each new Title of the CAAA-90 is underpinned, either explicitly or implicitly, with the need to perform an emission inventory. The emission inventory is an implied prerequisite for determining the applicability of any of the emission control requirements of the 1990 Amendments, and it is the explicit center piece of the Title 5 operating permit program. Although the emission inventory is little more than a formal accounting of the number and type of emission sources and their associated air emissions, the resource requirements for preparing and maintaining the inventory can be substantial. The average contractor cost for preparing an initial emission inventory at an Army installation was over $100,000. Record keeping to support the inventory, and the annual inventory updates required for the Title 5 permit program will only expand these costs. In an effort to assist the Army community with the ongoing obligation to prepare these emission inventories, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has compiled a list of preferred emission inventory techniques for the various emission sources found at Army installations. The USACHPPM guidance identifies emission sources most likely to be found at an Army installation, as well as the most effective and preferred emission factors associated with these sources. This guidance is designed to be widely disseminated, and may have relevant applications in the non-military community.

Polyak, L.M.; Robinson, D.L.; Alden, S.A.; Hopp, P.L.; Ruff, T.E. [Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States). Ambient Air Quality Management Program

1997-12-31

432

Innovation in Hospital Podiatric Residencies: Waldo General Hospital--A Model Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Waldo General Hospital Podiatric Residency Program, designed to be an intense, "well-rounded," multifaceted, single year of postgraduate practical training for the podiatric physician, is described. Surgical training, internal medicine, "outside rotations," in-hospital rotations, and meetings and lectures are discussed. A podiatric lecture…

Miller, Stephen J.

1980-01-01

433

Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

Weichel, Derek

2012-01-01

434

Systems Approaches to Surgical Quality and Safety  

PubMed Central

Objective: This approach provides the basis of our research program, which aims to expand operative assessment beyond patient factors and the technical skills of the surgeon; to extend assessment of surgical skills beyond bench models to the operating theater; to provide a basis for assessing interventions; and to provide a deeper understanding of surgical outcomes. Summary Background Data: Research into surgical outcomes has primarily focused on the role of patient pathophysiological risk factors and on the skills of the individual surgeon. However, this approach neglects a wide range of factors that have been found to be of important in achieving safe, high-quality performance in other high-risk environments. The outcome of surgery is also dependent on the quality of care received throughout the patient's stay in hospital and the performance of a considerable number of health professionals, all of whom are influenced by the environment in which they work. Methods: Drawing on the wider literature on safety and quality in healthcare, and recent papers on surgery, this article argues for a much wider assessment of factors that may be relevant to surgical outcome. In particular, we suggest the development of an “operation profile” to capture all the salient features of a surgical operation, including such factors as equipment design and use, communication, team coordination, factors affecting individual performance, and the working environment. Methods of assessing such factors are outlined, and ethical issues and other potential concerns are discussed. PMID:15024308

Vincent, Charles; Moorthy, Krishna; Sarker, Sudip K.; Chang, Avril; Darzi, Ara W.

2004-01-01

435

Flagging vigilance: the post-Vietnam "Hollow Army"  

E-print Network

the manner in which those mistakes were corrected. If an evaluation of )4eyer's assessments of the state of the army in 1980 prove that he was correct, then perhaps the methods applied in correcting the situation throughout the Rowan Scarborough, "Report... the manner in which those mistakes were corrected. If an evaluation of )4eyer's assessments of the state of the army in 1980 prove that he was correct, then perhaps the methods applied in correcting the situation throughout the Rowan Scarborough, "Report...

Lee, Robert Matthew

2012-06-07

436

[Change of surgical treatment in benign thyroid gland diseases-- influence of surgical management on perioperative complications].  

PubMed

Since the beginning of 1994 standardized primary radical resection was performed in benign thyroid diseases at the surgical department, Barmherzige Brueder Hospital, Graz. In multinodular euthyroid goiter bilateral lobectomy or near total lobectomy respectively was done. In case of Graves' disease unilateral lobectomy and contralateral near total resection or "en bloc" thyroidectomy was performed. In accordance with literature a significant reduction of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis from approximately 9% to 1.2% occurred in our patients if this surgical procedure was performed consequently. Hypocalcemia rate after surgery needing treatment was approximately 1% at the time of demission. PMID:10812464

Hebenstreit, H; Papadi, H; Konrad, G; Seitinger, G; Reisenberger, F J; Kratochvil, A; Berger, A

2000-01-01

437

Surgical navigation in reconstruction.  

PubMed

Navigational systems are paramount in solving today's traffic dilemmas, and have important applications in the human body. Current imaging must be diagnostic and is often dictated by the radiologist, but it is up to the surgeon to consider surgical procedures and to decide in which case surgical navigation (SN) has advantages. Knowledge of the surgical capabilities of SN is indispensable. The aims of this article are to support real-time image-guided SN, present routine and advanced cases with precise preoperative planning, and show the scientific capabilities of SN. PMID:23642674

Kaduk, Wolfram M H; Podmelle, Fred; Louis, Patrick J

2013-05-01

438

Multiscale Surgical Telerobots  

SciTech Connect

A project was undertaken to improve robotic surgical tools for telerobotic minimally invasive surgery. The major objectives were to reduce the size of the tools to permit new surgical procedures in confined spaces such as the heart and to improve control of surgical tools by locating positional sensors and actuators at the end effector rather than external to the patient as is currently the state of the technology. A new compact end-effector with wrist-like flexibility was designed. Positional sensors based on MEMS microfabrication techniques were designed.

Miles, R R; Seward, K P; Benett, W J; Tendick, F; Bentley, L; Stephan, P L

2002-01-23

439

Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures  

SciTech Connect

In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01

440

Augmented reality in surgical procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

2008-02-01

441

Hospital support.  

PubMed

Setting up a successful trauma system requires a significant amount of hospital support. This includes personnel and programs to assist with quality assurance programs, clinical compliance, and rural support and development. It is imperative that orthopaedic trauma surgeons are well versed in the types of hospital support available and the costs associated with each support measure. With this understanding, a strong, sustainable physician-hospital relationship can be created. PMID:24918831

O?Mara, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

2014-07-01

442

32 CFR 516.14 - Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Service of Process § 516.14 Service of process on DA or Secretary of Army. The Chief,...

2010-07-01

443

32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.  

...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC...

2014-07-01

444

32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC...

2012-07-01

445

32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC...

2010-07-01

446

32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC...

2013-07-01

447

32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC...

2011-07-01

448

The potential of America's Army, the video game as civilian-military public sphere  

E-print Network

The US Army developed multiplayer online First Person Shooter video game, America's Army, was examined as the first instance of an entirely state-produced and directed enterprise leveraging video game popular culture. ...

Li, Zhan, 1979-

2004-01-01

449

75 FR 22757 - Federal Advisory Committee; Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Army Education Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: Department of Defense...Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Army Education Advisory Committee...education programs, educational policies, school curriculums, educational philosophy...

2010-04-30

450

Analysis of the Impact of the U.S. Army Program of Organizational Effectiveness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes research conducted to assess the impact of the Army's Organizational Effectiveness (OE) program on the Army. The researchers interviewed Users (Commanders), OE Consultants, and others who had participated in 35 selected OE operations...

U. S. James, M. D. McCorcle, A. J. Brothers, L. W. Oliver

1984-01-01

451

Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory: Interim Report, 2013-2014.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The charge of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board (ARLTAB) is to provide biennial assessments of the scientific and technical quality of the research, development, and analysis programs at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). The ARLTAB...

2014-01-01

452

MEDBASE: Strategic Planning and Implementation of an Army Medical Department Software Application.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to provide recommendations for the strategy and implementation of MEDBASE an Army Medical Department (AMEDD) software application. MEDBASE began as an Army physician assistant's pet project used to ease medical readiness re...

F. S. Kim

2003-01-01

453

32 CFR 581.3 - Army Board for Correction of Military Records.  

... false Army Board for Correction of Military Records. 581...581.3 Army Board for Correction of Military Records. ...connection with an application for correction of military records under...monitor progress through rehabilitation or follow-up)....

2014-07-01

454

Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise : synchronizing geospatial-intelligence to the dismounted soldier  

E-print Network

The Army's Geospatial Enterprise (AGE) has an emerging identity and value proposition arising from the need to synchronize geospatial information activities across the Army in order to deliver value to military decision ...

Richards, James E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01

455

32 CFR 552.25 - Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii: That area reserved...civilians of the United States in the performance...Commander, United States Army Support Command, Hawaii, or his authorized...Commander, United States Army Support Command, Hawaii, shall, in...

2010-07-01

456

Surgical consultation and intervention during pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Children undergoing HSCT are at risk for complications due to immune system impairment, toxicity from prior therapies and conditioning regimens, and long-term use of indwelling catheters. These problems may require assessment by the surgical team. We sought to characterize the role of surgical consultation during primary hospital stay for HSCT. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients undergoing HSCT between September 2010 and September 2012. One hundred and seventy-three patients underwent 189 HSCTs. General surgery consultations occurred during 33% (n = 62) of primary hospitalizations for HSCT, with a total of 85 consults. Sixty-three (73%) consults resulted in an intervention in the operating room or at the bedside. The majority of consults were for CVL issues (59%, n = 50), followed by abdominal complaints (16%, n = 14). Patients requiring surgical consultation had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (16% vs. 2%, p < 0.01) and 100-day TRM (10% vs. 2%, p < 0.01), compared with those not requiring consultation. Patients undergoing HSCT often require surgical consultation, most commonly for line-related issues. Surgical consultation heralded an increased risk of in-hospital and 100-day TRM. Issues among this high-risk cohort of children who have undergone HSCT must be familiar to the general surgeon and oncologist alike. PMID:25224384

Madenci, Arin L; Lehmann, Leslie E; Weldon, Christopher B

2014-12-01

457

Hospital diversification.  

PubMed

Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered. PMID:18972998

Eastaugh, Steven R

2005-01-01

458

Surgical Management of Hemorrhoids  

PubMed Central

Hemorrhoids are common human afflictions known since the dawn of history. Surgical management of this condition has made tremendous progress from complex ligation and excision procedures in the past to simpler techniques that allow the patient to return to normal life within a short period. Newer techniques try to improve on the post-operative complications of older ones. The surgical options for the management of hemorrhoids today are many. Capturing all in a single article may be difficult if not impossible. The aim of this study therefore is to present in a concise form some of the common surgical options in current literature, highlighting some important post operative complications. Current literature is searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane library. The conclusion is that even though there are many surgical options in the management of hemorrhoids today, most employ the ligature and excision technique with newer ones having reduced post operative pain and bleeding. PMID:22413048

Agbo, S. P.

2011-01-01

459

Surgical Technology Program Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains statewide standards for the surgical technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

460

Civilian management of the military : Elihu Root and the 1903 reorganization of the army general staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines Secretary of War Elihu Root’s 1903 reorganization of the US Army. Prior to Root, the Army suffered major organizational problems, including no central authority and an ambiguous chain-of-command. Post-Civil War antimilitary sentiment had left the Army poorly funded, undermanned and barely capable of waging war on the Indians. In 1898, the ineptly fought Spanish-American War highlighted Army deficiencies. Root’s

Richard D. White

1998-01-01

461

Postoperative and late survival outcomes after major amputation: Findings from the Department of Veterans Affairs National Surgical Quality Improvement Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. A surgical risk model is used to analyze postoperative mortality and late survival for older veterans who underwent above- or below-knee amputations in 119 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals from 1991 to 1995. Methods. Preoperative medical conditions and laboratory values abstracted by the VA National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were linked to subsequent hospitalization and survival through 1999. Logistic regression

Joe Feinglass; William H. Pearce; Gary J. Martin; James Gibbs; Diane Cowper; Mark Sorensen; William G. Henderson; Jennifer Daley; Shukri Khuri

2001-01-01

462

Conjunctivochalasis: a surgical technique.  

PubMed

Conjunctivochalasis can be surgically corrected when it gives an appearance of a moist eye, produces tearing by mechanical obstruction of the lower punctum, or if it impedes the normal outflow of the lacrimal film. We present a surgical technique that provides a satisfactory anatomical reconstruction, does not leave a deformity, and will not lead to a retraction that could produce a cicatricial ectropion. We stress the importance of a complete ophthalmologic examination to rule out more common causes of tearing. PMID:2630968

Serrano, F; Mora, L M

1989-12-01

463

Assessing the Performance of the Army Reserve Components School System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The operation of the U.S. Army's Reserve Components (RC) school system was assessed. Three areas were identified that were fundamental to the system where organizational changes could make a difference. First, the project assessed training requirements and school delivery of courses. In serving a sizable training requirement for reclassification…

Winkler, John D.; And Others

464

Targeting the Delivery of Army Advertisements on Television.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Army uses advertisements to affect the knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions of youth to effectively recruit manpower. Both the message content and the delivery of the message are targeted to recruit soldiers who are most likely to prov...

T. Ellig

1988-01-01

465

Teaching Cultural Perspectives to Future Army Officers at West Point  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main concern of this article is to illustrate how West Point equips future Army officers with an appreciation and understanding of cultural knowledge. A unique, multidisciplinary goal-based approach to curricular design and assessment (of students as well as the academic program) is described, focusing on the structure, process, and content of…

Forest, James J. F.

2005-01-01

466

ARMY MASS TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM Outside the National Capital Region  

E-print Network

of the Army as a military member, civilian employee or non-appropriated fund employee. My claim for benefits is as a Federal employee or military service member, and not as a contract employee. I certify that I understand and Reveiw: Please provide the accounting classification that funds your salary: IV. Funding Information (SF

467

Assessing the Army Power and Energy Efforts for the Warfighter.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Armies are dependent on power and energy. When these resources for any reason are not available on the front lines, everything is affected. The importance of petroleum-based liquid fuels in warfare became evident in 1892 when Rudolph Diesel developed his ...

J. J. Valdes, J. W. Lyons, R. Chait

2011-01-01

468

Michael J. Farrell Colonel, U.S. Army  

E-print Network

) for the U.S. Army Corps ofEngineers' (Corps) operation and maintenance ofDaguerre Point Dam on the YubaDaguerre Point Dam on the lower Yuba River. Operation and maintenance at Daguerre Point Dam includes operation ofthe fish ladders (flow gates, baffle boards, debris removal), sediment management, flashboard

US Army Corps of Engineers

469

Process Energy Inventory at Kansas Army Ammunition Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Detailed energy audits were performed on each of the processes involved in the production of 155 mm M483 ICM rounds at the Kansas Army Ammunition Plant. Energy consumption baselines were established for all of the individual operations associated with thi...

W. A. Cook, R. E. Walden, M. D. Griffin, P. E. Kennedy, K. J. Henrich

1980-01-01

470

Design and development of the Army KE ASAT ACS thruster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly ambitious missions for advanced kinetic energy (KE) weapons have necessitated the development of a lightweight storable-propellant attitude control system (ACS) thruster capable of very fast response and long duration firings. This paper summarizes the results of a ACS thruster design and development test effort, performed for the U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) on the KE Anti

Jeff Craddock; Bruce Janeski

1993-01-01

471

US Army Chemical Corps Vietnam veterans health study: preliminary results.  

PubMed

The long-term health consequences of exposure to phenoxyherbicides used in Vietnam has been a great concern to the veterans. In addition to the Air Force Ranch Hand personnel, Army Chemical Corps personnel who served in Vietnam are thought to have had some of the highest herbicide exposures. The Department of Veterans Affairs commenced a study of veterans who served in Vietnam as members of the Army Chemical Corps and a comparison cohort of Army Chemical Corps personnel who served elsewhere. A total of 2872 Vietnam veterans and 2737 non-Vietnam veterans who served in the Army Chemical Corps were identified for inclusion in a telephone health interview survey with a random 20% sample of veterans receiving serum dioxin and other congeners assessments. In a feasibility study which included 284 Vietnam veterans and 281 non-Vietnam veterans, 100 serum assessments were conducted of which 95 were included in the analysis. Vietnam veterans with a history of spraying herbicides were found to have a statistically significant elevation in their current serum 2,3,7,8-TCDD concentrations compared to non-Vietnam veterans without a spray history (P = 0.05). Other 2,3,7,8-substituted dioxins levels were comparable to the levels found in the non-Vietnam veterans. This feasibility study demonstrated that serum dioxin concentrations from a sample of the study participants can be used to identify exposure variables in the health survey that can serve as a surrogate measure of phenoxyherbicide exposure. PMID:11372888

Kang, H K; Dalager, N A; Needham, L L; Patterson, D G; Matanoski, G M; Kanchanaraksa, S; Lees, P S

2001-01-01

472

ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program  

E-print Network

, pulverized paper (which is not suitable for recycling), consumer-contami- nated paper (not suitable for recycling), damaged wood pallets, and sludge from the wastewater treatment plants. Waste records from FtERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste at Fort Polk

US Army Corps of Engineers

473

Educating Army Officers For the 21st Century.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The challenges faced by the Army of the 21th century will be vastly different than those faced over the last two hundred years. As society continues to change ever more rapidly, new weapons and systems will be introduced into military arsenals at a greate...

G. P. Dudevoir

2000-01-01

474

Army Reserves Strategy to Support the DOD in 2025.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As our nation and the leadership in the Department of Defense transitions from continuous wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to re-setting the force, perspective must be given to the future manning, equipping, and missions of the Army Reserve Forces. For the pa...

M. C. Peeters

2011-01-01

475

Integration of New Technology in Army Libraries. Appendices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight appendices provide information related to a study which was conducted to determine the feasibility of introducing new automatic techniques to Army library technical processing activities; to examine and recommend appropriate systems and configurations for library automation; and to determine costs of implementing the recommendations. The…

DAMANS and Associates, Rockville, MD.

476

Teaching Cultural Perspectives to Future Army Officers at West Point.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main focus of this paper is to illustrate how West Point (New York) equips future U.S. Army officers with an appreciation and understanding of cultural knowledge. A unique, multidisciplinary goal-based approach to curricular design and assessment of students, as well as the academic program, is described, focusing on the structure, process,…

Forest, James J. F.

477

The US Army Foreign Comparative Test fuel cell program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army RDECOM initiated a Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) Program to acquire lightweight, high-energy dense fuel cell systems from across the globe for evaluation as portable power sources in military applications. Five foreign companies, including NovArs, Smart Fuel Cell, Intelligent Energy, Ballard Power Systems, and Hydrogenics, Inc., were awarded competitive contracts under the RDECOM effort. This paper will report

Elizabeth Bostic; Nicholas Sifer; Christopher Bolton; Uli Ritter; Terry Dubois

2004-01-01

478

Metrics to improve the US Army software development process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Software T&E Panel (STEP) was organized in September 1989 to address the problem that most delays in Army system operational tests were caused by immature software. STEP focused attention on software T&E, but also considered related issues of software development and deployment. STEP is currently implementing three major products: (1) policy and procedures to improve the formal process of

R. A. Paul

1993-01-01

479

Army Science and Technology Fellowship: Physics of Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is an Army Science and Technology Fellowship on the physics of materials. A computer controlled plasma assisted CVD chamber was designed and built. This system was then used to fabricate thin film coatings on different glasses, including ZBL glass (w...

W. A. Lanford

1990-01-01

480

The Significance of the Chinese People's Liberation Army White Paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

In December 2004 the People's Liberation Army issued its status report, the White Paper, summarising its view of the global configuration of forces and projecting its response. The operating assumptions are: (1) while the international situation is stable, there are factors present of instability, uncertainty and insecurity, which are increasing, at the same time that hegemonism and unilateralism are gaining;

S. J. Noumoff

2005-01-01

481

Reinforcement Management; An Approach to Motivating Army Trainees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To study the effectiveness of reinforcement management (contigency management) as applied to a military program of instruction already in operation, 335 students in an Army clerk-typist course in which self-paced instruction is used were given points for successive approximations to desired learning behavior. The points were exchangeable later for…

Cassileth, Barrie

482

THE U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS  

E-print Network

references (p. 154-170). 1. Oil spills - Environmental aspects - Alaska - Prince William Sound Region. 2 aspects -Alaska - Prince William Sound Region. I. Title. II. Title: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers response' response to the Lorna Prieta earthquake. Currently she is writing a history of the Corps' support to U

US Army Corps of Engineers

483

Soldier to Civilian: Army Education and Postwar New Zealand Citizenship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New Zealand's army education schemes were established in 1943, following overseas practice, with several objectives in mind. Those on active service often suffered from boredom, and the schemes' libraries, movies and study courses offered one means of boosting flagging spirits. At the same time, military personnel needed to be prepared for an…

Brickell, Chris

2010-01-01

484

Ecological risk assessment procedures for U.S. Army sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses US Army guidance procedures for ecological risk assessments (ERA) for risk assessors under contract to the US Army. Using this approach provides the Army with cost-effective, tiered procedures with which to direct and coordinate the scientific and technical efforts of contractors involved in ERA. Employing a common framework across sites can assure the Army that requirements of state and federal regulators are satisfied. The process described in this report follows the EPA Framework paradigm put forward in 1992. This document is a technical road map, with examples and discussion of the thought process to lead environmental scientists through this effort. A tiered or phased approach has been put forward as a rational procedure by several scientists. The purpose of a tiered approach is to do the necessary and sufficient amount of work to characterize the risk to an ecological system with an acceptable degree of uncertainty. The assessment should proceed if risk is possible, but complete characterization of risk cannot be determined due to significant data gaps. The assessment should not proceed if no significant risk is apparent, or if the risk is so great that action (e.g., remediation, containment, etc.) is immediately warranted.

Wentsel, R.S.; Simini, M.; Checkai, R.T.; Ludwig, D.; La Point, T.W. [Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1997-09-01

485

Suicide in the Army National Guard: An Empirical Inquiry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2004, suicides in the U.S. military have risen, most notably in the Army National Guard (ARNG). Data used in this study were obtained for suicides occurring from 2007 to 2010 and for a random sample of nonsuicides from the general ARNG population. Of the military-related variables considered, a few showed relationships to suicide. Rather,…

Griffith, James

2012-01-01

486

Using AI Planning Techniques for Army Small Unit Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we outline the requirements of a planning and decision aid to support US Army small unit operations in urban terrain and show how AI planning technologies can be exploited in that context. The work is a rare example of a comprehensive use of AI technologies across the whole planning lifecycle, set in a realistic application in which

Austin Tate; John Levine; Peter Jarvis; Jeffrey Dalton

2000-01-01

487

Using AI Planning Technology for Army Small Unit Operations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we outline the requirements of a planning and decision aid to support US Army small unit operations in urban terrain and show how AI planning technologies can be exploited in that context. The work is a rare example of a comprehensive use of AI technologies across the whole planning lifecycle, set in a realistic application in which

Austin Tate; John Levine; Peter Jarvis; Jeff Dalton

2000-01-01

488

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Department of Military Science  

E-print Network

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Department of Military Science University of Colorado at Boulder Boulder and challenging. Our cadets are consistently ranked as Distinguished Military Graduates in the top 20 and are rewarded with free tickets to watch the games extremely close to the field. Military Appreciation games

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

489

m Technical Report A-95-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

of Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum spicatum L. by Harvey L. Jones Approved For Public (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum spicatum L. by Harvey L. Jones U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways to inhibit the growth of HydrilJa verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Myriophyllum spicatum L. / by Harvey L. Jones

US Army Corps of Engineers

490

System Description: DLV with Aggregates Tina Dell'Armi  

E-print Network

System Description: DLV with Aggregates Tina Dell'Armi ¡ , Wolfgang Faber ¢ , Giuseppe Ielpa is an efficient Answer Set Programming (ASP) system implementing the (con- sistent) answer set semantics [GL91] with various language extensions like weak con- straints [BLR00], queries, and built-in predicates. A strong

Faber, Wolfgang

491

Master Resilience Training in the U.S. Army  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Army Master Resilience Trainer (MRT) course, which provides face-to-face resilience training, is one of the foundational pillars of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program. The 10-day MRT course is the foundation for training resilience skills to sergeants and for teaching sergeants how to teach these skills to their soldiers. The…

Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; McBride, Sharon

2011-01-01

492

Failure and Disengagement in the Red Army Faction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the factors that have contributed to the end of the Red Army Faction (RAF), and places particular emphasis on the causes and characteristics of individual disengagement of RAF members from the armed struggle. It discusses the evolution, ideology, and decline of each of the three generations of the RAF. The article's contribution is twofold. First, by assessing

Assaf Moghadam

2012-01-01

493

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY  

E-print Network

Wion Quality Act issues that your organization raised with the U.S. Army Gorp$ of Errgineers on the Mc. I offer you my sincere apology for the lack of a prompt response. I have taken steps to assure of respondingto inquiriesthrough the InformdtionQuality Act, Requestfor Corrections (RFC) is complex. Upon receipt

US Army Corps of Engineers

494

US army chemical corps Vietnam veterans health study: preliminary results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The long-term health consequences of exposure to phenoxyherbicides used in Vietnam has been a great concern to the veterans. In addition to the Air Force Ranch Hand personnel, Army Chemical Corps personnel who served in Vietnam are thought to have had some of the highest herbicide exposures. The Department of Veterans Affairs commenced a study of veterans who served in

Han K. Kang; Nancy A. Dalager; Larry L. Needham; Donald G. Patterson; Genevieve M. Matanoski; Sukon Kanchanaraksa; Peter S. J. Lees

2001-01-01

495

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 255 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hopital, Building 255, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

496

Training in Mechanized Stock Accounting Systems in Army Logistics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Army experience with a small mechanized stock accounting system, the NCR 500, was studied with respect to personnel and training, in order to improve implementation of newer and more complex computer-based logistics systems. Officers and enlisted personnel in various duty positions connected with NCR 500 systems in four Far Eastern commands were…

Leedy, Herbert B.

497

78 FR 73852 - Army Science Board Winter Plenary Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...public vote on the results of the Fiscal Year 2013 ``Creating an Innovation Culture'' Study. The ASB board members will cast a vote to accept the results of this study and record that vote for the record according to the Army Science Board Bylaws,...

2013-12-09

498

Army hypersonic compact kinetic-energy missile laser window design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC) is currently developing the Compact Kinetic Energy Missile (CKEM) which achieves hypersonic velocities at sea level. The system incorporates guidance to the target and requires active guidance technology. CKEM\\

Gerald W. Russell; Stephen C. Cayson; Michael M. Jones; Wendy Carriger; Robert R. Mitchell; Forrest A. Strobel; Michael Rembert; David A. Gibson

2003-01-01

499

a Miscellaneous Paper A-96-1 US Army Corps  

E-print Network

Research Program .. Integrated Use of Fluridone and a Fungal Pathogen for Control of Hydrilla by Michael D Netherland, Michael D. Integrated use of fluridone and a fungal pathogen for control of hydrilla / by Michael A-96-1 June 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control

US Army Corps of Engineers

500

Development of an Internet\\/Population-Based Weight Management Program for the U.S. Army  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant number of Army soldiers are sufficiently overweight to exceed the maximum weight allowances defined by the Army weight control program (AR600-9). Also, the body weights of a substantial number of soldiers approach the maximum weight allowances. These soldiers should not gain additional weight if they are to meet Army weight allowances. The conventional approach to this overweight problem

Tiffany Stewart; Sandra May; H. Raymond Allen; Gaston P. Bathalon; Guy Lavergne; Lori Sigrist; Donna Ryan; Donald A. Williamson

2008-01-01