Sample records for army surgical hospital

  1. The mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH): a military and surgical legacy.

    PubMed Central

    King, Booker; Jatoi, Ismalil

    2005-01-01

    Operation Iraqi Freedom was perhaps the last military campaign that will ever utilize the services of a mobile Army surgical hospital (MASH). The Army has now essentially replaced the MASH with combat surgical hospitals (CSH) and forward surgical teams (FST). MASH units were designed as mobile, flexible, forward-deployed military hospitals, providing care for the wounded near the frontlines of the battlefield. These hospitals not only saved thousands of lives during war but also greatly influenced the delivery of trauma and critical care in civilian hospitals. The MASH was made popular by the television series of the 1970s, depicting the 4077th during the Korean War. Although a comical series, these television episodes provided viewers with a glimpse of life in a MASH during time of war. This article chronicles the history of the MASH from its inception during World War II to recent experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p656-a PMID:15926641

  2. Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D S; Batty, C G; Ryan, J M; McGregor, W S P

    2007-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. PMID:18214085

  3. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Women's Army Corps Recreation & Administration Building, North Hickey Street, west side, 75 feet north of intersection of West Pennington Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Continuous Commissioning of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    E-print Network

    Turner, W. D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Martinez, J. T.

    2007-01-01

    Continuous Commissioning ® of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital Fort Sill, Oklahoma Joseph T. Martinez Assistant Research Engineer W. Dan Turner, P.E., Ph,D. Professor and Director Juan Carlos Baltazar, Ph,D. Research Associate... Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Facilities Branch Management Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma ABSTRACT Continuous Commissioning ® (CC ®1 ) of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital...

  5. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41?087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57?622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27?732 and 44?142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13?204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177?141); craniotomy (rupees 75?982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53?398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  6. The Hospital That Became a College: Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, Montpelier, Vermont. Norwich University Library Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, William A.

    A historical review is presented of Sloan U.S. Army General Hospital, the second largest Union Army hospital in Vermont, which operated from June 1864 to October 1865. Sloan Hospital later became Vermont College, which in 1972 merged with Norwich University. Sloan Hospital operated during the last year and a half of the Civil War and consisted of…

  7. Point-to-Point Verification of Monitored Sensors at Reynolds Army Clinic and Hospital Final Report 

    E-print Network

    Martinez, J.; Linenschmidt, S.; Turner, D.

    2004-01-01

    A point-to-point verification of the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system of the Reynolds Army Community Hospital (RACH) in Fort Sill, Oklahoma was done by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University. Work began...

  8. The MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL SURGICAL SOCIETY

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    as an artificial lung. Sarah Thayer then spoke on developmental path- ways in pancreatic cancer. An update as a pediatric surgeon in developing pharmacologic treatments for ovarian cancer. Mark Katlic dis- cussed his longstanding interest in the surgical treatment of geriatric patients. The last talk of the morning sessions

  9. Mycobacterium goodii Infections Associated with Surgical Implants at Colorado Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Ken; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew J.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2004-01-01

    From February to October 2003, Mycobacterium goodii wound infections were identified among three patients who received surgical implants at a Colorado hospital. This report summarizes the investigation of the first reported nosocomial outbreak of M. goodii. Increased awareness is needed about the potential for nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause postoperative wound infections. PMID:15504281

  10. Self-reported risk-taking behaviors and hospitalization for motor vehicle injury among active duty Army personnel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole S Bell; Paul J Amoroso; Michelle M Yore; Gordon S Smith; Bruce H Jones

    2000-01-01

    Background: Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury in the Army. Behaviors increasing risk for motor vehicle crashes are also prevalent, but research has not linked these behaviors directly to injury outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations).Methods: To evaluate the relationship between behavior and motor vehicle crash injuries, 99,981 Army personnel who completed Health Risk Appraisal surveys in 1992 were followed

  11. Predeployment mass casualty and clinical trauma training for US Army forward surgical teams.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bruno M T; Ryan, Mark L; Ogilvie, Michael P; Gomez-Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; McAndrew, Patrick; Garcia, George D; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2010-07-01

    Since the beginning of the program in 2002, 84 Forward Surgical Teams (FSTs) have rotated through the Army Trauma Training Center (ATTC) at the University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center including all those deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The purpose of this study was to provide the latest updates of our experience with FSTs at the ATTC. Before deployment, each FST participates in a 2-week training rotation at the ATTC. The rotation is divided into 3 phases. Phase 1 is to refresh FST knowledge regarding the initial evaluation and management of the trauma patient. Phase 2 is the clinical phase and is conducted entirely at the Ryder Trauma Center. The training rotation culminates in phase 3, the Capstone exercise. During the Capstone portion of their training, the entire 20-person FST remains at the Ryder Trauma Center and is primarily responsible for the evaluation and resuscitation of all patients arriving over a 24-hour period. Subject awareness concerning their role within the team improved from 71% to 95%, indicating that functioning as a team in the context of the mass casualty training exercise along with clinical codes was beneficial. The clinical component of the rotation was considered by 47% to be the most valuable aspect of the training. Our experience strongly suggests that a multimodality approach is beneficial for preparing a team of individuals with minimal combat (or trauma) experience for the rigors of medical care and triage on the battlefield. The data provided by participants rotating through the ATTC show that through clinical exposure and simulation over a 2-week period, FST performance is optimized by defining provider roles and improving communication. The mass casualty training exercise is a vital component of predeployment training that participants feel is valuable in preparing them for the challenges that lay ahead. PMID:20613574

  12. Horizontal strabismus surgical outcomes in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Z; Dooley, I; Fahy, G

    2014-06-01

    Strabismus may result in impaired stereopsis, diplopia, undesirable appearance, amblyopia and negative psychological impact. This study provides epidemiological and surgical outcome information about patients attending University College Hospital Galway requiring strabismus surgery. We report a retrospective analysis of 75 consecutive patients, who underwent horizontal strabismus surgery. Sixty-one (81.3%) patients had clinically significant refractive errors, hyperopia being the most common. Thirty-four (45.3%) patients had amblyopia and nine (12%) required further treatment. A cosmetically acceptable result with a post-operative ocular deviation within 25 prism dioptres of straight (grade 2) was achieved in 70/75 (93.3%) of patients. The overall mean change in ocular deviation per mm of muscle operated was 3.25 prism dioptre/mm. The outcomes of strabismus surgery in an Irish hospital compare very favourably with other jurisdictions. This data will help plan service delivery. PMID:24988834

  13. Statistical models to predict the need for postoperative intensive care and hospitalization in pediatric surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanwaljeet J. Anand; Sarah E. Hopkins; Jean A. Wright; Richard R. Ricketts; Dana W. Flanders

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To develop statistical models for predicting postoperative hospital and ICU stay in pediatric surgical patients based on preoperative clinical characteristics and operative factors related to the degree of surgical stress. We hypothesized that preoperative and operative factors will predict the need for ICU admission and may be used to forecast the length of ICU stay or postoperative hospital stay.

  14. Assessment of protocols for surgical-site preparation in a regional network of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Peńalver-Mompeán, Maria Dolores; Saturno-Hernández, Pedro Jesus; Fonseca-Miranda, Yadira; Gama, Zenewton André da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a preventable adverse event. Implementation of good practices for correct surgical-site preparation can contribute to lessen this safety problem. The objective of this study was to describe the presence and quality of protocols on surgical-site preparation in the Murcia (Spain) regional network of public hospitals. The indicator "existence of protocol for surgical-site preparation" was assessed, as well as the formal quality (expected attributes) and contents (compared to current evidence-based recommendations) of existing documents. Seven of the nine hospitals have a protocol for surgical-site preparation. Opportunities to improve have been identified in relation to the protocols' formal quality and contents. Recommendations related to skin asepsis are incomplete and those related to hair removal contradict existing evidence. Most hospitals have protocols for surgical-site preparation; however, there is great room for improvement, in relation to their expected attributes and to the inclusion of evidence-based recommendations. PMID:22699732

  15. Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals 

    E-print Network

    Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

    2013-04-30

    The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership ...

  16. Variation in Surgical Readmissions and Relationship to Quality of Hospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Thomas C.; Joynt, Karen E.; Orav, E. John; Gawande, Atul A.; Jha, Ashish K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reducing readmissions is a clinical and policy priority, but little is known about variations in readmission rates after major surgery and whether a hospital's surgical readmission rates are related to other markers of high-quality surgical care. Methods Using national Medicare data, we calculated 30-day readmission rates after hospitalization for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), pulmonary lobectomy, endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (AAA), colectomy, and hip replacement. We used bivariate and multivariable techniques to assess the relationship between readmission rates and other measures of surgical quality, including performance on surgical process measures, procedure volume, and mortality. Results There were 479,471 discharges following one of the six index procedures from 3,004 hospitals. The median risk-adjusted six-procedure composite 30-day readmission rate was 13.1% [interquartile range, IQR 9.9%-17.1%}. Adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that hospitals in the highest quartile of surgical volume had lower readmission rates than the lowest-volume hospitals (12.7% vs. 16.8%, p<0.001), and hospitals with the lowest mortality rates had significantly lower readmission rates than hospitals with high mortality rates (13.3% vs. 14.2%, p<0.001). High performance on surgical process of care performance measures was only marginally associated with readmission rates (13.1% versus 13.6%, p=0.021). Patterns were similar when each of the six major surgeries was examined individually. Conclusion Nearly one in seven patients is readmitted within 30 days of discharge following a major surgical procedure. High volume and low mortality hospitals have lower surgical readmissions than other hospitals. PMID:24047062

  17. 78 FR 9940 - Naugatuck Valley Surgical Center, Department of Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, CT: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ...Training Administration [TA-W-82,137] Naugatuck Valley Surgical Center, Department of Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, CT: Notice of Affirmative Determination, Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated January 16, 2013,...

  18. HOSPITAL REORGANIZATION: HOW TO HELP DECISION A DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE FOR THE SURGICAL

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HOSPITAL REORGANIZATION: HOW TO HELP DECISION MAKERS? A DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE FOR THE SURGICAL proposes a global and complete decision support tool able to help decision makers in the reengineering and `generic' model to support the design of a new surgical suite. In another field, researches on decision

  19. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), energy survey of Evans US Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a study analyzing energy requirements and energy conservation opportunities at Evans U.S. Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado. This study includes the following major tasks: Perform a complete energy audit of the hospital, Identify and evaluate all energy conservation opportunities (ECOs), Determine the feasibility of expanding the existing energy monitoring and control system (EMCS) to increase energy savings, List and prioritize all recommended ECOs, Prepare a comprehensive report which documents the work accomplished, the results, and the recommendations, Prepare funding documentation for all justifiable energy conservation opportunities. The basic methodology of the entire study has three main elements: Survey, Analysis and Reporting.

  20. From Pergamon to Army Base Hospital No. 5: the history and significance of the galea aponeurotica in the evolution of neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nanda, Anil

    2014-08-01

    The authors trace the etymology and historical significance of galea or epicranial aponeurosis. In ancient Greece, galea referred to a helmet worn by soldiers, typically made of animal hide or leather. Throughout antiquity, physicians referred to all soft tissue between the skin and the skull as panniculus, a standard established by Galen of Pergamon. A manual of surgery in the Middle Ages referred to the entire scalp as a "great panicle that is called pericranium." During the early Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci famously and stylistically analogized the dissection of the cranium with the peeling of an onion. Not until 1724 would the tendinous sheath connecting the frontalis and occipitalis muscles be defined as "Galea tendinosa cranii." By 1741, the convention of referring to the galea as an aponeurosis was well established. Harvey Cushing's wartime experiences at Army Base Hospital No. 5 reinforced the surgical significance of the galea. Operative mortality was significantly diminished due to "closure of the wounds with buried sutures in the galea." This operative nuance was then passed from teacher to pupil and has now become one of the tenets of modern neurosurgical practice. PMID:24926652

  1. Reducing serious injury from falls in two veterans' hospital medical-surgical units.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Hahm, Bridget; Collazo, Sonia; Gibson, Wanda; Janzen, Sandra; Powell-Cope, Gail; Rice, Fanny; Sarduy, Innette; Tyndall, Kyna; White, Susan V

    2009-01-01

    A large veteran's hospital participated in a year-long collaborative project across 9 hospitals to reduce serious injury from falls in acute care, targeting medical-surgical units. The primary objective of this project was to develop and test a set of interventions (bundles) to prevent serious physical injury (fractures and hemorrhagic bleeds) from patient falls. The interventions were implemented using tests of change on 2 medical-surgical units focused on engaging unit-based staff and combining innovations for vulnerable populations at greatest risk for injury if they fall. PMID:19092477

  2. Patterns of antimicrobial resistance in a surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aysen Bayram; Iclal Balci

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported higher rates of antimicrobial resistance among isolates from intensive care units than among isolates from general patient-care areas. The aims of this study were to review the pathogens associated with nosocomial infections in a surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital in Turkey and to summarize rates of antimicrobial resistance in the most common

  3. Evaluation of parenteral nutritional support in the surgical and medical wards of a referral teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Malnutrition is a common problem in patients who are hospitalized in surgical and medical wards. Surgical patients, geriatric populations and individuals with severe illness are more vulnerable to malnutrition during their hospitalization course. The purpose of this study was evaluation of parenteral nutrition services in a referral teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. Method Medical records of 72 patients who received parenteral nutrition during one year period in different surgical and medical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were reviewed retrospectively by clinical pharmacists. Criteria for initiation of parenteral nutrition, selection of appropriate formulation and monitoring parameters were assessed based on the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations. Results Based on the patients' anthropometric parameters and serum albumin levels, 4.2%, 75% and 20.8% of the patients were well-nourished, moderately malnourished and severely malnourished respectively at the hospital admission and before nutritional support. Adequate calorie, protein, carbohydrate and lipid supports were achieved in 21.1%, 32.4%, 23.7% and 10.5% of the patients respectively. About 91% of the patients experienced at least one complication of the nutritional support. Conclusion In this evaluation, several errors in assessment, establishing goals, and monitoring of parenteral nutrition regimens have been detected. Approximately all of the patients did not receive to the trace elements supports goals. PMID:23351175

  4. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  5. Epidemiology of paediatric surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the impact of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve paediatric surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of paediatric admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving paediatric surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193

  6. Surgical audit: Comparison of the work load and results of two hospitals in the same district.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, O J; Griffiths, N J; Connolly, J C; Dunlop, A W; Hart, S; Thomson, J P; Todd, I P

    1980-01-01

    Surgical audit is being undertaken to monitor and compare (by computer) the type of patient, work load, and results of two similar surgical units. Both units are in the City and Hackney District of London, one at St Bartholomew's Hospital and the other at Hackney Hospital. During 1978, 736 patients were admitted by the unit at St Bartholomew's Hospital and 902 by the unit at Hackney. At St Bartholomew's 70% of admissions were elective compared with 49% at Hackney, where 86% of patients lived within the district compared with only 36% at St Bartholomew's. The wound was the commonest site for complications, infection affecting 9% of those at Hackney and 6% at St Bartholomew's, despite identical antibiotic policies. There were six post-operative deaths at St Bartholomew's and 32 at Hackney. In both hospitals the length of stay was similar, 50% of patients being discharged within one week and 80% within two weeks. As a result of the audit a vigorous venous thrombosis prophylactic regimen has been instituted, and at Hackney the anaesthetic department has been strengthened and a new intensive care unit opened. PMID:7427572

  7. Immediate versus delayed hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma: surgical morbidity and hospital stay

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, J.T.; Kapp, D.S.; Lawrence, R.; Kohorn, E.I.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1985-02-01

    A retrospective review presented is of the intraoperative complications, postoperative morbidity, and length of hospitalization in 138 patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma treated at Yale-New Haven Hospital from January 1, 1977 to December 31, 1981. One group (stage IA, grade 1) was treated with surgery alone; two groups were treated with preoperative intracavitary radium, followed with either an immediate or a delayed hysterectomy. The three groups were comparable in age, weight, and major preoperative medical problems. The mean estimated blood loss during surgery and transfusion requirements during hospitalization were similar for all three groups. The duration of the surgery in the immediate group was longer than the other two groups. The occurrence of febrile morbidity and major postoperative complications in the three groups was similar, except for bacteriuria, which was significantly more common in the immediate group. The length of the postoperative hospitalization was the same for each group; however, the delayed group as compared with the immediate group had a total hospitalization of two days longer. Hence, in the current study, immediate hysterectomy did not significantly increase the surgical or postoperative morbidity rate, compared with delayed hysterectomy. The single hospital stay in the former treatment group represented cost containment.

  8. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ?20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  9. Trends in hospital admissions and surgical procedures for acquired toe deformities in the West Midlands, England 1988–1997

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Dunn; D. J. McBride; S. A. Bridgman

    1999-01-01

    Background: Acquired toe deformities are relatively common, but there is a relative paucity of epidemiological information. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of hospital admissions for acquired toe deformities. Method: Analysis of National Health Service hospital admissions in the West Midlands (UK) between 1988 and 1997, with a diagnosis of acquired toe deformities. Results: Surgical procedure

  10. [Building of the surgical pavilion of the County Hospital in Bjelovar].

    PubMed

    Bagari?, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Preparations for the construction of the surgical pavilion of the County hospital in Bjelovar began in 1913 initiated by doctor Antun Gottlieb. The entire project documentation was drawn by Ignjat Fischer (1870-1948), the architect who specialized in the construction of medical buildings in the first decades of the 20th century. Fischer designed the Bjelovar Pavillion as a two-storey building with an annexe in which double operating rooms were situated. In this paper Fischer's early functionalist approach to the designing of medical buildings is dealt with and the parallels between the Bjelovar Surgical Pavilion and other Fischer's medical buildings are drawn. The Bjelovar Pavilion has only been slightly reconstructed to date, and the arrangement of the majority of facilities--compared to the Fischer's project--has remained unchanged, which bears testimony to the high quality of Fischer's designing procedure. PMID:18198631

  11. Patient, Surgery, and Hospital Related Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections following Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios; Memtsoudis, Stavros; Poultsides, Lazaros A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have a significantly adverse impact on patient outcomes and pose a great challenge to the treating surgeon. Therefore, timely recognition of those patients at risk for this complication is very important, as it allows for adopting measures to reduce this risk. This review discusses literature reported risk factors for SSI after THA. These can be classified into patient-related factors (age, gender, obesity, comorbidities, history of infection, primary diagnosis, and socioeconomic profile), surgery-related factors (allogeneic blood transfusion, DVT prophylaxis and coagulopathy, duration of surgery, antibiotic prophylaxis, bearing surface and fixation, bilateral procedures, NNIS index score, and anesthesia type), and hospital-related factors (duration of hospitalization, institution and surgeon volume, and admission from a healthcare facility). All these factors are discussed with respect to potential measures that can be taken to reduce their effect and consequently the overall risk for infection.

  12. Morbidity associated with surgical treatment of ureteric calculi in a teaching hospital in Kuwait.

    PubMed Central

    Kehinde, E. O.; Al-Awadi, K. A.; Al-Hunayan, A.; Okasha, G. H.; Al-Tawheed, A.; Ali, Y.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ureteric lithiasis is a common urological problem in Kuwait. Because of the different interventional approaches, we carried out an audit on the morbidity associated with the surgical management of the disorder. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The surgical records were reviewed of all patients with the diagnosis of ureteric lithiasis that were managed surgically by ureteroscopy or ureterolithotomy in Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital in Kuwait between January 1996 and December 1999. Patients' bio-data, location of calculi, indications for surgical intervention, types of therapeutic interventions, operating surgeon and complications were analysed. Patients managed primarily and successfully by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1383 patients with ureteric calculus were managed in the period under review--775 (56%), 567 (41%), and 41 (3%) patients were managed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy and ureterolithotomy, respectively. The 608 patients managed by ureteroscopy or ureterolithotomy had a total of 710 operations. The commonest surgical procedure performed was ureteroscopy with Dormia basket with or without double 'J' stenting and this accounted for 418 (58.9%) operations. The least common procedure was ureteric meatotomy with Dormia basket and with or without double 'J' stenting in 9 (1.3%) patients. The overall complication rate was 110 out of 710 (15.5%) operations. Of the complications, 101 (92%) were minor (e.g. haematuria, fever, and mucosal injury). Nine (8%) complications were major complications (e.g. ureteric perforation and ureteric avulsions). Ureterolithotomy and ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy were associated with the highest complication rates. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis has shown that with technological advances, the treatment of ureteric lithiasis has improved and major complications have decreased. However, with so many therapeutic options to choose from, there is a need to audit the various therapeutic options and select those associated with the least morbidity rates in each urology unit. PMID:14594540

  13. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  14. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arvid S Haugen; Eirik Sřfteland; Geir E Eide; Monica W Nortvedt; Karina Aase; Stig Harthug

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to

  15. Uppsala University Hospital 300 years—a survey of the surgical development

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Professor Lars Roberg, the initiator of the Nosocomium Academicum (1708), our first university hospital in Sweden, claimed that ‘no-one who does not understand surgery is a completely trained doctor’. However, it was not until the end of 19th century that modern surgery was born. The Academic Hospital was opened in 1867, and at the turn of that century Uppsala had a flourishing period under the influence of Karl Gustav Lennander, professor of surgery. In 1889 he performed the first appendectomy in Scandinavia. At the end of the 19th century the surgical tree began to branch out. In Uppsala gynaecology and obstetrics was the first to be an independent speciality (1891). It was followed by ophthalmology (1894) with Allvar Gullstrand as professor and head of the department. Gullstrand received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1911. A separate department for diseases of the ear, nose, and throat was founded in 1916 with the Nobel laureate Robert Bárány as head. Thoracic surgery began in Uppsala in the 1940s with lung surgery and was separated from general surgery in 1958 with Viking Olov Björk as head of the department. Björk introduced open heart surgery in Uppsala. In 1951 reconstructive plastic surgery was organized by Tord Skoog, who devoted special interest to operations for cleft lip and palate surgery. Neurosurgery was established in 1962, and Uppsala has held a prominent position in the development of modern neurointensive care. During the 1970s general surgery became subspecialized into gastrointestinal, endocrine, and vascular surgery. At the same time fracture surgery was transferred to the orthopaedists, and urological surgery became an independent speciality. Transplantation surgery was introduced in Uppsala in 1967, when Professor Lars Thorén performed the first kidney transplantation. Today Uppsala has a leading position in transplantation of pancreatic islets cells. PMID:19242867

  16. Characterization of Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Surgical Wards' Patients in a Nigerian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Deboye O.; Adeyanju, Adeniran; Schaumburg, Frieder; Akinyoola, Akinyele L.; Lawal, Oladejo O.; Amusa, Yemisi B.; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr) and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST). Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg), exfoliative toxins (ETs) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n?=?61). Of these isolates, 7 (11.5%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0%) followed by seb (29.5%), sea (19.7%), seh (14.7%) and sec (11.5). The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P?=?0.602). PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr) showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n?=?20), group II (n?=?17), group III (n?=?14) and group IV (n?=?10). Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes. PMID:23935883

  17. Impact of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions on hospital costs in inpatient surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael E Stokes; Xin Ye; Manan Shah; Katie Mercaldi; Matthew W Reynolds; Marcia FT Rupnow; Jeffrey Hammond

    2011-01-01

    Background  Inadequate surgical hemostasis may lead to transfusion and\\/or other bleeding-related complications. This study examines the\\u000a incidence and costs of bleeding-related complications and\\/or blood product transfusions occurring as a consequence of surgery\\u000a in various inpatient surgical cohorts.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A retrospective analysis was conducted using Premier's Perspective™ hospital database. Patients who had an inpatient procedure\\u000a within a specialty of interest (cardiac, vascular, non-cardiac

  18. [The surgically treated gunshot injury : Securing evidence in hospitals without primary participation of police or legal medicine].

    PubMed

    Zack, F; Manhart, J; Rummel, J; Büttner, A

    2015-05-01

    Against the background of a problematic reconstruction of a hunting accident, the question arises how such cases can be handled in hospitals and how exhibits can be adequately dealt with. After evaluating a questionnaire on current conditions of securing evidence in cases of surgically treated gunshot wounds from 26 surgical institutions in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and in consideration of the certified advanced training in the field of legal medicine, recommendations are given regarding the securing of evidence within the clinical setting without primary involvement of police or legal medicine. PMID:25027356

  19. Changing Use of Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Thika Hospital, Kenya: A Quality Improvement Intervention with an Interrupted Time Series Design

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Alexander M.; Wanyoro, Anthony K.; Mwangi, Jonah; Juma, Francis; Mugoya, Isaac K.; Scott, J. Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In low-income countries, Surgical Site Infection (SSI) is a common form of hospital-acquired infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective method of preventing these infections, if given immediately before the start of surgery. Although several studies in Africa have compared pre-operative versus post-operative prophylaxis, there are no studies describing the implementation of policies to improve prescribing of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in African hospitals. Methods We conducted SSI surveillance at a typical Government hospital in Kenya over a 16 month period between August 2010 and December 2011, using standard definitions of SSI and the extent of contamination of surgical wounds. As an intervention, we developed a hospital policy that advised pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis and discouraged extended post-operative antibiotics use. We measured process, outcome and balancing effects of this intervention in using an interrupted time series design. Results From a starting point of near-exclusive post-operative antibiotic use, after policy introduction in February 2011 there was rapid adoption of the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (60% of operations at 1 week; 98% at 6 weeks) and a substantial decrease in the use of post-operative antibiotics (40% of operations at 1 week; 10% at 6 weeks) in Clean and Clean-Contaminated surgery. There was no immediate step-change in risk of SSI, but overall, there appeared to be a moderate reduction in the risk of superficial SSI across all levels of wound contamination. There were marked reductions in the costs associated with antibiotic use, the number of intravenous injections performed and nursing time spent administering these. Conclusion Implementation of a locally developed policy regarding surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is an achievable quality improvement target for hospitals in low-income countries, and can lead to substantial benefits for individual patients and the institution. PMID:24244390

  20. Risk factors associated with surgical site infections following vascular surgery at a German university hospital.

    PubMed

    Ott, E; Bange, F-Ch; Sohr, D; Teebken, O; Mattner, F

    2013-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after vascular surgery is a serious complication increasing morbidity, mortality, and costs for healthcare systems. A 4-year retrospective cohort study was performed in a university hospital with patients who had undergone arterial vascular surgery below the aortic arch. Investigated variables included demographics and clinical data. Forty-four of 756 patients experienced SSI, 29 of which were superficial, five were deep, and 10 had organ/space infections. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (22%), enterococci (20%), and Staphylococcus aureus (18%) were the most common pathogens. Independent risk factors for SSIs were femoral grafting [odds ratio (OR) 6·7], peripheral atherosclerotic disease, Fontaine stages III-IV (OR 4·1), postoperative drainage >5 days (OR 3·6), immunosuppression (OR 2·8), duration of operation >214 min (OR 2·8), and body mass index >29 (OR 2·6). The application of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent protective factor (OR 0·2). Patients with certain risk factors for SSIs warrant special attention for infection prevention. PMID:22906362

  1. Analysis of wounds incurred by U.S. Army Seventh Corps personnel treated in Corps hospitals during Operation Desert Storm, February 20 to March 10, 1991.

    PubMed

    Carey, M E

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and forty-three soldiers who received ballistic injury were actively treated at U.S. Army Seventh Corps hospitals during Operation Desert Storm. Ninety-five percent were wounded by fragments, 5% by bullets. Many had wounds of several body parts, including 17.3% who received a head wound; 4.3% a neck wound; 5.8% a chest wound; 9.3% an abdominal wound; and 90% who had extremity wounds. Three hospital deaths occurred--a 2.1% mortality rate. Only two soldiers sustained a brain wound; in both, the missile entered below the skull area protected by the Kevlar helmet. One brainwounded individual was treated and lived; the other died from hemorrhage and shock from concomitant traumatic lower-extremity amputations. The current U.S. helmet appears to provide significant protection from fragmenting ordnance as does the armored vest. Hemorrhage from proximal extremity wounds caused hospital deaths. Treatment of such wounds will have to be improved to reduce future combat mortality. PMID:8606402

  2. Radiation Therapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Does Hospital Surgical Volume Matter? A Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chun-Ru [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pan, I-Wen [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tsai, Yi-Wen [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, National Yang-Ming University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Teressa [Center of Health Policy Research and Development, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shih, Ya-Chen Tina, E-mail: yashih@mdanderson.org [Section of Health Services Research, Department of Biostatistics, Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between hospital surgical volume and the use of radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Taiwan. Methods and Materials: We used claims data from the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan (1997-2005) in this retrospective population-based study. We identified patients with breast cancer, receipt of BCS, use of radiation, and the factors that could potentially associated with the use of RT from enrollment records, and the ICD-9 and billing codes in claims. We conducted logistic regression to examine factors associated with RT use after BCS, and performed subgroup analyses to examine whether the association differs by medical center status or hospital volumes. Results: Among 5,094 patients with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer who underwent BCS, the rate of RT was significantly lower in low-volume hospitals (74% vs. 82%, p < 0.01). Patients treated in low-volume hospitals were less likely to receive RT after BCS (odds ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.83). In addition, patients treated after the implementation of the voluntary pay-for-performance policy in 2001 were more likely to receive RT (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.45). Subgroup analyses indicated that the high-volume effect was limited to hospitals accredited as non-medical centers, and that the effect of the pay-for-performance policy was most pronounced among low-volume hospitals. Conclusions: Using population-based data from Taiwan, our study concluded that hospital surgical volume and pay-for-performance policy are positively associated with RT use after BCS.

  3. Postoperative Pain Management among Surgically Treated Patients in an Ethiopian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Eshetie, Tesfahun Chanie; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie

    2014-01-01

    Background Incidence of postoperative pain has been reported to be between 47–100%. Ineffective postoperative pain management results in tangible and intangible costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the processes and outcomes of pain management in the surgical wards of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Methods and Findings A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 252 postoperative patients during February 13 to April 30, 2012. A contextually modified and validated (Cronbach’s ? coefficient of 0.78) American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire was used to assess pain experience of patients. Patients’ charts were reviewed to assess the pattern of analgesic use. Incidence of postoperative pain was 91.4%, and remained high over 3 measurements (McNemar’s; p<0.05), and 80.1% of the patients were undertreated. The mean pain intensity, and pain interference on functional status were 6.72±1.44 and 5.61±1.13 on a 10 point Numerical rating scale respectively; both being strongly correlated(r?=?0.86: p<0.001). Pain intensity was varied by ethnicity, education and preoperative information (ANOVA; P<0.05). Only 50% of the patients were adequately satisfied with their pain management. As needed (prn), solo analgesic, null analgesic, and intramuscular orders were noted for 31.3%, 89.29%, 9.7% and 20.1% of the prescription orders respectively. Though under dose, diclofenac and tramadol were the top prescribed medications, and only 57% of their dose was administered. Linear regression model showed that the predictors of satisfaction were sex of an individual and pain interference with functional status. Conclusion Despite patients’ paradoxical high satisfaction with pain management, the majority of patients were inadequately and inappropriately treated. Thus, further research is needed to determine how best to break down current barriers to effective pain management. PMID:25033399

  4. Common isolation of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a large surgical hospital in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, H H; Ehsani, S; Shibayama, K; Matsui, M; Suzuki, S; Nguyen, M B; Tran, D N; Tran, V P; Tran, D L; Nguyen, H T; Dang, D A; Trinh, H S; Nguyen, T H; Wertheim, H F L

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to monitor the presence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and the proportion New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1)-producing bacteria between August 2010 and December 2012 in a surgical hospital in Vietnam. We identified 47 CRE strains from a total of 4,096 Enterobacteriaceae isolates (1.1 %) that were NDM-1-positive from 45 patients admitted to 11 different departments, with the majority being from the urology department. The NDM-1 gene was found in seven different species. Genotyping revealed limited clonality of NDM-1-positive isolates. Most of the isolates carried the NDM-1 gene on a plasmid and 17.8 % (8/45) of those were readily transferable. We found five patients at admission and one patient at discharge with NDM-1-positive bacteria in their stool. From 200 screening environmental hospital samples, five were confirmed to be NDM-1-positive and included Acinetobacter species (n?=?3) and Enterobacter aerogenes (n?=?2). The results reveal that NDM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae are commonly isolated in patients admitted to a Vietnamese surgical hospital and are also detected in the hospital environment. PMID:25732142

  5. Mobile emergency (surgical) hospital: Development and application in medical relief of "4.20" Lushan earthquake in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bin; Shi, Ruo-Fei; Du, Ding-Yuan; Hu, Ping; Feng, Jun; Huang, Guang-Bin; Cai, An-Ning; Yin, Wei; Yang, Rong-Gang

    2015-02-01

    In the 21st century, natural disasters and emergencies occur frequently worldwide, which leads to the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives as well as the direct and indirect economic losses. China has a vast territory frequently struck by natural disasters. However, the reality is not optimistic. Poor organization and management during the rescue actions, the lack of large-scale, systematic medical rescue equipment were all great barriers to the outcomes. Mobile hospitals are expected to provide better health care. We were inspired by the concept of mobile hospital. Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, has set up trauma care system since 1988, in which prehospital care, intensive care, and in-hospital treatment is fully integrated. As a major advantage, such a system provided assurance of "golden hour" rescue treatment. Providing mobile intensive care and prehospital surgical service for severe trauma patients could reduce mortality significantly. Based on the civilian experiences in Chongqing Emergency Medical Center, the mobile emergency (surgical) hospital was developed. PMID:26169086

  6. Decrease of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence after introduction of a surgical antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in an Italian hospital.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Leone, Sebastiano; Petrosillo, Nicola; Ballardini, Milva; Pisanelli, Claudio; Magrini, Patrizia; Cerquetani, Franco; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Comandini, Emma; Narciso, Pasquale; Meledandri, Marcello

    2008-10-01

    The use of antimicrobials is an important factor contributing to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. The goal of our study was to evaluate the impact of the introduction of an antibiotic surgical prophylaxis protocol on the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in a tertiary care hospital. The protocol of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis was designed by a multidisciplinary team and was implemented in December 2001. Between January 2002 and December 2002, pharmacy, laboratory and active surveillance-records were prospectively reviewed to calculate prevalence rates of defined daily doses (DDD), microorganism isolation and health-care related infections. A progressive decrease from 1.58 to 0.56 of MRSA isolations per 1000 patient-days and from 76.4% to 29.4% MRSA prevalence rate was reported (p<0.001). Monthly prevalence rates of MRSA showed a significant linear correlation with the reduction of the DDD of the 3rd generation cephalosporins (r=0.90; p<0.001). MRSA surgical site and blood stream infections decreased from 78% to 38% and from 89% to 38%, respectively (p=0.017 and p=0.026). In our experience, the reduction of 3rd generation cephalosporin use was an effective strategy to reduce the MRSA infection rate and was associated with the reduction of the overall expenditure for antibiotics in the hospital. PMID:19123308

  7. Spectrum of surgical trauma and associated head injuries at a university hospital in eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bajracharya, A; Agrawal, A; Yam, BR; Agrawal, CS; Lewis, Owen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Trauma is one of the common surgical emergencies presenting at B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal, a tertiary referral center catering to the needs of the population of Eastern Nepal and nearby districts of India. Objective: The objective of this study is to analyze the magnitude, epidemiological, clinical profile and outcome of trauma at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences. Materials and Methods: This descriptive case series study includes all patients with history of trauma coming to BPKIHS emergency and referred to the surgery department. We noted the detailed clinical history and examination, demographics, mechanism of injury, nature of injury, time of reporting in emergency, treatment offered (operative or non operative management) and analyzed details of operative procedure (i.e. laparotomy, thoracotomy, craniotomy etc.), average length of hospital stay, morbidity and outcome (according to Glasgow outcome scale). Collected data were analyzed using EpiInfo 2000 statistical software. Results: There were 1848 patients eligible to be included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 28.9 ± 19.3 years. Majority of the patients (38%) belonged to the age group of 21 - 40 years and the male to female ratio was 2.7:1. Most of the trauma victims were students (30%) followed by laborers (27%) and farmers (22%) respectively. The commonest causes of injury were fall from height (39%), road traffic accident (38%) and physical assault (18%); 78% of the patients were managed conservatively and 22% underwent operative management. Postoperative complications were seen in 18%. Wound infection 7.5%, neurological deficit including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otrorrhea was seen in 2.2% patients. Good recovery was seen in 84%, moderate disability in 5.2% patients and severe disability in 1.4% patients. The mortally was 6.3% and most of the deaths were related to traumatic brain injuries. Conclusions: In Nepal, trauma-related injury contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and is the third leading cause of death. There are very few studies on trauma from this country and hence this study will help in understanding the etiology and outcome particularly in the Eastern region of Nepal. PMID:21799609

  8. Cost Determinants of Percutaneous and Surgical Interventions for Treatment of Intermittent Claudication from the Perspective of the Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Janne d'Othee, Bertrand [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging and Intervention (United States)], E-mail: bjannedothee@partners.org; Morris, Michael F. [Banner Good Samaritan Hospital (United States); Powell, Richard J. [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Department of Surgery (United States); Bettmann, Michael A. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Department of Radiological Science (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To identify pretreatment predictors of procedural costs in percutaneous and surgical interventions for intermittent claudication due to aortoiliac and/or femoropopliteal disease. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in 97 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous or surgical interventions over 15 months at a tertiary care center. Nineteen clinical predictive variables were collected at baseline. Procedural costs (outcome) were assessed from the perspective of the hospital by direct calculation, not based on ratios of costs-to-charges. A multivariable regression model was built to identify significant cost predictors. Follow-up information was obtained to provide multidimensional assessment of clinical outcome, including technical success (arteriographic score) and clinical result (changes in ankle-brachial pressure index; cumulative patency, mortality, and complication rates). Results. The linear regression model shows that procedural costs per patient are 25% lower in percutaneous patients (versus surgical), 42% lower for patients without rest pain than for those with, 28% lower if treated lesions are unilateral (versus bilateral), 12% lower if the treated lesion is stenotic rather than occlusive, 34% higher in sedentary patients, and 11% higher in patients with a history of cardiac disease. After a mean clinical follow-up >2 years, between-group differences between percutaneous and surgical patients were small and of limited significance in all dimensions of clinical outcome. Conclusion. Predictors of clinical outcome are different from predictors of costs, and one should include both types of variables in the decision-making process. The choice of percutaneous versus surgical strategy, the presence of rest pain, and the bilaterality of the culprit lesions were the main pretreatment determinants of procedural costs. When possible choices of treatment strategy overlap, percutaneous treatment should provide an acceptable result that is less expensive (although not equal to surgery)

  9. Implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial stewardship has been promoted as a key strategy for coping with the problems of antimicrobial resistance and Clostridium difficile. Despite the current call for stewardship in community hospitals, including smaller community hospitals, practical examples of stewardship programs are scarce in the reported literature. The purpose of the current report is to describe the implementation of an antimicrobial stewardship program on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital employing a core strategy of post-prescriptive audit with intervention and feedback. Methods For one hour twice weekly, an infectious diseases physician and a clinical pharmacist audited medical records of inpatients receiving systemic antimicrobial therapy and made non-binding, written recommendations that were subsequently scored for implementation. Defined daily doses (DDDs; World Health Organization Center for Drug Statistics Methodology) and acquisition costs per admission and per patient-day were calculated monthly for all administered antimicrobial agents. Results The antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) made one or more recommendations for 313 of 367 audits during a 16-month intervention period (September 2009 – December 2010). Physicians implemented recommendation(s) from each of 234 (75%) audits, including from 85 of 115 for which discontinuation of all antimicrobial therapy was recommended. In comparison to an 8-month baseline period (January 2009 – August 2009), there was a 22% decrease in defined daily doses per 100 admissions (P = .006) and a 16% reduction per 1000 patient-days (P = .013). There was a 32% reduction in antimicrobial acquisition cost per admission (P = .013) and a 25% acquisition cost reduction per patient-day (P = .022). Conclusions An effective antimicrobial stewardship program was implemented with limited resources on the medical-surgical service of a 100-bed community hospital. PMID:23043720

  10. Efficacy of Parenteral Nutrition Supplemented With Glutamine Dipeptide to Decrease Hospital Infections in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estívariz, Concepción F.; Griffith, Daniel P.; Luo, Menghua; Szeszycki, Elaina E.; Bazargan, Niloofar; Dave, Nisha; Daignault, Nicole M.; Bergman, Glen F.; McNally, Therese; Battey, Cindy H.; Furr, Celeste E.; Hao, Li; Ramsay, James G.; Accardi, Carolyn R.; Cotsonis, George A.; Jones, Dean P.; Galloway, John R.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). Clinical benefits of glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition may occur in hospitalized surgical patients, but efficacy data in different surgical subgroups are lacking. The objective was to determine whether glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition differentially affects nosocomial infection rates in selected subgroups of SICU patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition in SICU patients requiring parenteral nutrition and SICU care after surgery for pancreatic necrosis, cardiac, vascular, or colonic surgery. Subjects (n = 59) received isocaloric/isonitrogenous parenteral nutrition, providing 1.5 g/kg/d standard glutamine-free amino acids (STD-PN) or 1.0 g/kg/d standard amino acids + 0.5 g/kg/d glutamine dipeptide (GLN-PN). Enteral feedings were advanced as tolerated. Nosocomial infections were determined until hospital discharge. Results Baseline clinical/metabolic data were similar between groups. Plasma glutamine concentrations were low in all groups and were increased by GLN-PN. GLN-PN did not alter infection rates after pancreatic necrosis surgery (17 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN patients). In nonpancreatic surgery patients (12 STD-PN and 15 GLN-PN), GLN-PN was associated with significantly decreased total nosocomial infections (STD-PN 36 vs GLN-PN 13, P < .030), bloodstream infections (7 vs 0, P < .01), pneumonias (16 vs 6, P < .05), and infections attributed to Staphylococcus aureus (P < .01), fungi, and enteric Gram-negative bacteria (each P < .05). Conclusions Glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition did not alter infection rates following pancreatic necrosis surgery but significantly decreased infections in SICU patients after cardiac, vascular, and colonic surgery. PMID:18596310

  11. GLOSSARY: ARMY RANK, ACRONYMS,

    E-print Network

    Kasman, Alex

    GLOSSARY: ARMY RANK, ACRONYMS, & ARABIC PHRASES Army Rank, Commissioned Officers in Descending Order: General of the Army General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant, Second Lieutenant Army Rank, Enlisted Soldiers in Descending Order

  12. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration. PMID:25026965

  13. 79 FR 66769 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-11-10

    ...Requests for CMS Review of Applications...ASC Wage Index c. Updating...Measures B. Process for Retention...reconciliation process for cost...Mid-Session Review, is approximately...HospitalOutpatientPPS/index.html...McrPartBDrugAvgSalesPrice/index.html...application and review process for...

  14. Impact of Surgical Experience on In-Hospital Complication Rates in Patients Undergoing Minimally Invasive Prostatectomy: A Population-Based Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Budäus; Maxine Sun; Firas Abdollah; Kevin C. Zorn; Monica Morgan; Rupinder Johal; Daniel Liberman; Rodolphe Thuret; Hendrik Isbarn; Georg Salomon; Alexander Haese; Francesco Montorsi; Shahrokh F. Shariat; Paul Perrotte; Markus Graefen; Pierre I. Karakiewicz

    2011-01-01

    Background  The relationship between provider volume and complication and transfusion rates in patients undergoing minimally invasive\\u000a prostatectomy (MIRP) for prostate cancer has not been assessed. Temporal trends in MIRP annual surgical caseload (AC), impact\\u000a of MIRP surgical experience (SE), and in-hospital complication and transfusion rates were evaluated.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Between 2002 and 2008, 2,666 patients in Florida underwent MIRP. Surgical experience was defined

  15. Surgical Travellers: Tapestry to Bayeux

    PubMed Central

    Hedley-Whyte, John; Milamed, Debra R

    2014-01-01

    The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant Surgeons was of great value to the Allies. PMID:25484466

  16. Atrial septal defects: Pattern, clinical profile, surgical techniques and outcome at Innova heart hospital: A 4-year review

    PubMed Central

    Adiele, Daberechi K.; Chinawa, Josephat M.; Arodiwe, Ijeoma O.; Gouthami, V.; Murthy, K. S.; Eze, John C.; Obidike, Egbuna. O.; Ujunwa, Fortune A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital heart defect that leads to shunting of blood between left and right atria. It may be asymptomatic and sometimes may present with heart failure. Surgical repair is definitive, but currently non-surgical procedure is used to close the defect. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective study of patients who underwent transcatheter closure of ASD at Innova Heart Hospital, Hyderabad, India. Echocardiography was repeated at intervals of 24 hours, then at 1, 3 and 6 months after the procedure to assess complications. The morphological characteristics of the ASD, including its diameter, location, shape and the width of surrounding septal margins, were also evaluated. Results: From April 2007 to June 2011, 69 consecutive children (29 males, 40 females) with a median age of 9.0 years (range = 3.2–19 years) registered with diagnosis of ASD. The median weight was 31.5 kg (range = 7.5–39.0 kg). Five patients (7.2%) were young children aged 3–5 years. Forty-four (63.8%) of these children presented with symptoms of heart failure, whereas 47 (68.1%) of the cases repaired with device were large-sized ASD. The most common interventional procedures done were Searcare Heart® and Amplatzer® technique with a highest success rate obtained in 2010. Conclusions: ASD is a common congenital heart disease with a high success rate for those who undergo intervention. PMID:24791045

  17. Comparison of pain management in paediatric surgical patients in two hospitals in France and Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonia Prot-Labarthe; Élaine Pelletier; Ursula Winterfeld; Edith Villeneuve; Chantal Wood; Jean-François Bussičres; Françoise Brion; Olivier Bourdon

    2008-01-01

    Objective Pain management in children has improved substantially over the last few years but continues to vary widely across institutions.\\u000a Our objective was to describe the evaluation and treatment of pain in paediatric patients in two hospitals (Robert Debré in\\u000a Paris, France, and Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Canada) and to compare conformity with quality criteria. Method Retrospective medical chart of a total

  18. Predictors of preoperative anxiety among surgical patients in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, South Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitalization and surgery are critical negative life events that lead to the experience of considerable anxiety in patients. Patients may perceive the day of surgery as the biggest and the most threatening day in their lives. There is paucity of information on predictors of anxiety in the current study area. The main objective of this study is to assess predictors of preoperative anxiety among patients scheduled for surgery in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted using quantitative data collection technique in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital from February 13 to April 13, 2012 on 239 patients scheduled for surgery. The data were collected by five trained diploma nurses using structured interviewer administered questionnaires that were prepared based on state trait anxiety inventory measurement scale. The quantitative data were entered into SPSS for windows version 16. 0 and descriptive, simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Results A total of 239 patients were enrolled in the study with a response rate of 93.0%. Their mean age was 42.7?±?1.8 years (range 16 to 85 years). Nearly over half 53.6% were females, while 48.1% illiterate, 72.4% Oromo and 56.5% were Muslim followers. Significant preoperative anxiety was seen in 70.3% patients. The most common factors that lead to anxiety were fear of death 38.1% and fear of unknown origin 24.3% and the most common strategy mentioned by patient in reducing anxiety were talking to other patient 79.8% and religious belief. Conclusions In the present study, two third 70.3% of preoperative patients had anxiety. Factors which were positively correlated with anxiety were trait anxiety, single and divorced, time of operation and income. Factors which were shown to reduce anxiety were preoperative anxiety related information provision and afternoon operation. Health professionals working in the hospital should provide anxiety related information for patients. PMID:25189274

  19. Surgical pathology in the 20th century at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

    PubMed

    Geller, Stephen A

    2008-08-01

    How did the education of surgical pathology, and pathology in general, differ at Mount Sinai? Passing the examination of the American Board of Pathology was never the focus of the department. Learning criteria or quoting references was de-emphasized, but mastery of macroscopic pathology was required, supported in both word and action by two brilliant surgical pathologists, Otani and Kaneko, and by two extraordinary medical pathologists, Klemperer and Popper. Meticulous microscopy emphasized pattern rather than reliance on lists of discrete features. Otani developed a regular "problem case" meeting for a community of pathologists, made up of alumni and other interested pathologists, as well as active department members. These monthly sessions provided the highest level of "continuing medical education." Otani and Kaneko unequivocally believed in learning from cases, and Mount Sinai residents were fortunate both in the one-to-one teaching and in the wealth of material, in all systems, that came to surgical pathology. Outstanding pathologists who came from Mount Sinai settled throughout the country and provided the highest level of diagnoses, but, with the exception of Bernard Wagner, Emanuel Rubin, Fiorenzo Paronetto, Richard Horowitz, Michael Gerber, Marc Rosenblum, Bruce Wenig, Jaishree Jagirdar, Swan Thung, Cesar Moran, Hideko Kamino, Philip LeBoit, Alberto Marchevsky, and others, there were relatively few academic leaders. Otani and Kaneko did not have national reputations. Klemperer, although world renowned, was relatively unassuming, and his disciples numbered almost as many nonpathologists as pathologists. Popper did establish a major center for liver pathology, with students coming from around the world, but did not particularly promote general surgical pathology. Can the Mount Sinai approach still be applied? The decline in the numbers of autopsies performed, the demands for rapid turnaround time, the de-emphasis of gross pathology as newer technologies (eg, immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics, molecular pathology) gain place, the increasing tendency to select investigators, including basic scientists, as teaching department chairs and the financial constraints requiring increasing use of nonphysician workers all speak to the relegation of the Otani-Kaneko era to history. Is this a loss to Pathology? It is certainly a style of practice that has been lost. However, there is no reason to bemoan the state of Pathology in the beginning years of the 21st century. Pathology practice is outstanding at many medical centers throughout the world, including at Mount Sinai under the very able and creative leadership of Alan Schiller, who has presided over great enhancements of the department in both anatomic and clinical pathology, including significant advances in the study of diseases by molecular methods. Surgical Pathology at Mount Sinai has been led by James Strauchen, a renowned hematopathologist recruited by Schiller's predecessor, Jerome Kleinerman, and is currently directed by Ira Bleiweiss, a student of Kaneko. Other techniques and technologies have, to a degree, compensated for some of the changes since the Otani-Kaneko years and it is almost certain that advances in molecular pathology will allow for increasing sophistication in establishing diagnoses, and likely even grading and staging, probably even on blood, rather than tissue, samples. The science of Pathology will advance, as the art declines. Those who learned at Mount Sinai during the Otani-Kaneko years will, however, very likely tell you that they were privileged to have learned Pathology there and, especially, to have learned a distinct philosophy of Pathology under the guidance of caring, thoughtful, and especially gifted pathologists. PMID:19007103

  20. Tuberculous bowel obstruction at a university teaching hospital in Northwestern Tanzania: a surgical experience with 118 cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bowel obstruction resulting from intestinal tuberculosis has been reported to be more prevalent in developing countries including Tanzania. This study was undertaken to describe the clinicopathological profile, surgical management and outcome of tuberculous intestinal obstruction in our local setting and to identify factors responsible for poor outcome among these patients. Methods This was a prospective descriptive study of patients operated for tuberculous intestinal obstruction at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) in northwestern Tanzania from April 2008 to March 2012. Ethical approval to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Statistical data analysis was performed using SPSS version 17.0. Results A total of 118 patients with tuberculous intestinal obstruction were studied. The male to female ratio was 1.8: 1. The median age was 26 years (range 11-67 years). The modal age group was 21-30 years. Thirty-one (26.3%) patients had associated pulmonary tuberculosis and 25 (21.2%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4+ count of 225 cells /?l. Small bowel strictures were the most common operative findings accounting for 72.9% of cases. The ileo-caecal region was the commonest area of involvement in 68 (57.6%) patients. The right hemicolectomy with ileo-transverse anastomosis was the most frequent surgical procedure performed in 66 (55.9%) patients. Postoperatively all the patients received antituberculous drugs for a period of one year. Postoperative complication rate was 37.3% and surgical site infection (SSI) was the most frequent complication in 42.8% of cases. HIV positivity and low CD4+ count were the main predictors of SSI (p?hospital stay was 24 days. Patients who had postoperative complications stayed longer in the hospital and this was statistically significant (p?=?0.011). Mortality rate was 28.8% and it was significantly associated with co-existing medical illness, delayed presentation, HIV positivity, low CD 4 count (<200 cells/?l), ASA class and presence of complications (p?

  1. Ultra–fast track hospital discharge using conventional cardiac surgical techniques 1 1 This article has been selected for the open discussion forum on the STS Web site: http:\\/\\/www.sts.org\\/section\\/atsdiscussion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salim Walji; Richard J Peterson; Pat Neis; Robert DuBroff; William A Gray; William Benge

    1999-01-01

    Background. Recent introduction of minimally invasive adult cardiac surgical techniques has emphasized the advantage of early hospital discharge. However, we chose an alternative approach to determine the safety, efficacy, and feasibility of ultra–fast track protocols while retaining both standard surgical exposure (median sternotomy) and conventional cardiac surgical techniques (hypothermia, cardiopulmonary bypass with cardiac arrest, and optimal myocardial protection).Methods. From September

  2. Army Regulation 38510 Headquarters

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 385­10 Safety The Army Safety Program Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 27 November 2013 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 385­10 The Army Safety Program This major revision, dated 27 November 2013-- o Adds responsibility for U.S. Army Technical Center

  3. Benchmarking the Use of a Rapid Response Team by Surgical Services at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Barocas, Daniel A; Kulahalli, Chirag S; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Kapu, April N; Penson, David F; You, Chaochen (Chad); Weavind, Lisa; Dmochowski, Roger

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Rapid response teams (RRT) are used to prevent adverse events in patients with acute clinical deterioration, and to save costs of unnecessary transfer in patients with lower-acuity problems. However, determining the optimal use of RRT services is challenging. One method of benchmarking performance is to determine whether a department's event rate is commensurate with its volume and acuity. STUDY DESIGN Using admissions between 2009 and 2011 to 18 distinct surgical services at a tertiary care center, we developed logistic regression models to predict RRT activation, accounting for days at-risk for RRT and patient acuity, using claims modifiers for risk of mortality (ROM) and severity of illness (SOI). The model was used to compute observed-to-expected (O/E) RRT use by service. RESULTS Of 45,651 admissions, 728 (1.6%, or 3.2 per 1,000 inpatient days) resulted in 1 or more RRT activations. Use varied widely across services (0.4% to 6.2% of admissions; 1.39 to 8.73 per 1,000 inpatient days, unadjusted). In the multivariable model, the greatest contributors to the likelihood of RRT were days at risk, SOI, and ROM. The O/E RRT use ranged from 0.32 to 2.82 across services, with 8 services having an observed value that was significantly higher or lower than predicted by the model. CONCLUSIONS We developed a tool for identifying outlying use of an important institutional medical resource. The O/E computation provides a starting point for further investigation into the reasons for variability among services, and a benchmark for quality and process improvement efforts in patient safety. PMID:24275072

  4. Official U.S. Army Internet Sources Army Home page: www.army.mil

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Official U.S. Army Internet Sources Army Home page: www.army.mil News: http://www.army.mil/news/ Early Bird: http://ebird.osd.mil/ebird2/index.html Information: http://www.army.mil/info/ Benefits: https://myarmybenefits.us.army.mil Audio/video: http://www.army.mil/media/amp/ Mobile phone apps: http://www.army

  5. [Medical support of the 65th Army during the East Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front].

    PubMed

    Shelepov, A M; Leonik, S I; Lemeshkin, R N

    2015-02-01

    Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front. An activity of the medical An activity of the medical service of the 65th Army during the East Prussian offensive operation performed by the 2nd Belorussian Front is a typical example of the medical support of troops during the final stages of World War II. Forms and methods of medical support management, which were developed during the war, haven't lost their importance in modern conditions. These methods include the establishment of specialized surgical and therapeutic field hospital, establishment of medical institutions in the Army, which worked on the evacuation directions and reserve of mobile hospitals and transport, timely extension of the first echelons of the hospital base front to change institutions hospital deployed the army base. A research of experience in organizing medical support of the offensive operations performed during the last year of World War II provides the material for the development of the theory of modern medical support operations and ability to provide on this basis, the continuity of the hospitals, the continuity of qualified and specialized medical care, improve the performance of diagnostic and treatment work. PMID:25920177

  6. [Estimation for bugeting and evaluation of surgical procedures within the scope of comparative hospital administration. Value of LKA, PPR and DRG systems].

    PubMed

    Pinnau, R; Rostock, K; Gudath, R; Mansky, T; Meyer-Pannwitt, U

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of costing and performances of individual departments or hospitals are required by the statute book of social affairs (Sozialgesetzbuch V; SGB V), but have not been fully introduced in Germany. LBK Hamburg, a trust of 8 hospitals with 17 surgical departments, evaluated the significance of performance and cost-accounting systems such as performance and cost-accounting (LKA), nursing staff regulation (PPR), and the diagnosis-related group system in order to distribute a three-year budget (1996-1998) and to compare, e.g., performance of surgical departments. The DRG system seems to be the best choice, since it weights all cases by means in 640 groups according to the degree of difficulty. With a given closed budget, the DRG system may compare the actual cost with the target figures. PMID:9931741

  7. ARMY Energy Security Considerations

    E-print Network

    ARMY Energy Security Considerations Don Juhasz, PE, CEM HQDA, OACSIM, DAIM-FDF Telephone: (703)-601-0374 E-mail: don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil FUEL CELL OPPORTUNITIES 26 April 2007 1 of 10Don Juhasz DAIM-FDF (703) 601-0374 (DSN 329) / don.juhasz@hqda.army.mil 5 April 2007 Army Energy · · · · FOREIGN OIL 2

  8. Environment US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environment The Corps US Army Corps of Engineers ® April 2012 Vol. 13, No. 2 See Earth Day page 10 of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers A s we approach Earth Day 2012, it affords us the opportunity to look The U.S. Army Earth Day poster. (Illustration by U.S. Army Environmental Command) and technical

  9. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) that are participating in Medicare. We are establishing requirements for the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. PMID:22937544

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. 42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital, X-Ray Department and Second Floor Plan, X-Ray Department Plan, Building 1006. no date. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman Army Hospital. EKG Cardiology Clinic, Building 1049. December 1955. BUILDING 1049. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 12, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  13. WVU Healthcare Employee Donates to Pediatric Ophthalmology Lacy Fisher, surgical technician at Ruby Hospital, has been assisting our ophthalmologists for

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    from pediatric strabismus to cornea transplants. Lacy loves her work and the patients she cares for years old. Because Lacy wanted to do something special for the children cared for in pediatric on a child's face like a stuffed toy." "Lacy's contributions to the quality of care we provide our surgical

  14. Which Kind of Provider’s Operation Volumes Matters? Associations between CABG Surgical Site Infection Risk and Hospital and Surgeon Operation Volumes among Medical Centers in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsung-Hsien; Tung, Yu-Chi; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2015-01-01

    Background Volume-infection relationships have been examined for high-risk surgical procedures, but the conclusions remain controversial. The inconsistency might be due to inaccurate identification of cases of infection and different methods of categorizing service volumes. This study takes coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgical site infections (SSIs) as an example to examine whether a relationship exists between operation volumes and SSIs, when different SSIs case identification, definitions and categorization methods of operation volumes were implemented. Methods A population-based cross-sectional multilevel study was conducted. A total of 7,007 patients who received CABG surgery between 2006 and 2008 from19 medical centers in Taiwan were recruited. SSIs associated with CABG surgery were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9 CM) codes and a Classification and Regression Trees (CART) model. Two definitions of surgeon and hospital operation volumes were used: (1) the cumulative CABG operation volumes within the study period; and (2) the cumulative CABG operation volumes in the previous one year before each CABG surgery. Operation volumes were further treated in three different ways: (1) a continuous variable; (2) a categorical variable based on the quartile; and (3) a data-driven categorical variable based on k-means clustering algorithm. Furthermore, subgroup analysis for comorbidities was also conducted. Results This study showed that hospital volumes were not significantly associated with SSIs, no matter which definitions or categorization methods of operation volume, or SSIs case identification approaches were used. On the contrary, the relationships between surgeon’s volumes varied. Most of the models demonstrated that the low-volume surgeons had higher risk than high-volume surgeons. Conclusion Surgeon volumes were more important than hospital volumes in exploring the relationship between CABG operation volumes and SSIs in Taiwan. However, the relationships were not robust. Definitions and categorization methods of operation volume and correct identification of SSIs are important issues for future research. PMID:26053035

  15. Foramen magnum meningiomas: detailed surgical approaches and technical aspects at Lariboisičre Hospital and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    George, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Foramen magnum meningiomas are challenging tumors, requiring special considerations because of the vicinity of the medulla oblongata, the lower cranial nerves, and the vertebral artery. After detailing the relevant anatomy of the foramen magnum area, we will explain our classification system based on the compartment of development, the dural insertion, and the relation to the vertebral artery. The compartment of development is most of the time intradural and less frequently extradural or both intraextradural. Intradurally, foramen magnum meningiomas are classified posterior, lateral, and anterior if their insertion is, respectively, posterior to the dentate ligament, anterior to the dentate ligament, and anterior to the dentate ligament with extension over the midline. This classification system helps to define the best surgical approach and the lateral extent of drilling needed and anticipate the relation with the lower cranial nerves. In our department, three basic surgical approaches were used: the posterior midline, the postero-lateral, and the antero-lateral approaches. We will explain in detail our surgical technique. Finally, a review of the literature is provided to allow comparison with the treatment options advocated by other skull base surgeons. PMID:17882459

  16. Optimization of surgical supply inventory and kitting

    E-print Network

    Schlanser, Matthew R. (Matthew Ross)

    2013-01-01

    This project centered on inventory optimization for operative custom surgical packs and soft good supplies for Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a 947-bed medical center. Custom surgical packs are used in every surgical ...

  17. [Spectrum of surgical procedures performed in German rescue centers and the field hospital in Afghanistan in 2008].

    PubMed

    Güsgen, C; Achatz, G; Palm, H-G; Kollig, E; Engelhardt, M; Willy, C; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    From the military perspective detailed knowledge about the spectrum of operations undertaken abroad is of particular interest to provide indications of the skills that will be required by the surgeons. Therefore, all surgical reports produced in 2008 in the operation theatres of Mazar-e-Sharif, Feyzabad and Kunduz were reviewed. The overview shows that a total of 799 operations were performed equivalent to 0.4-1.6 operations/day. Most of the patients who underwent surgery were local civilians and most of these operations involved osteosynthesis, débridement and soft tissue procedures. Of the surgical procedures 11% involved patients who were German service personnel of which 85% were urgent or emergency procedures and 25% of these involved treatment of combat injuries. When civilian patients with life-threatening injuries or diseases are referred to the medical facilities there is little opportunity to make decisions with regard to acceptance. Often it may be necessary for surgeons to perform procedures which are outside their field of specialization. In order to ensure a favorable outcome in acute situations surgeons mainly required skills in emergency surgery of the body cavities (visceral and thoracic surgery). PMID:20094698

  18. December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 4-02.1 December 2009 ARMY MEDICAL LOGISTICS DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital

  19. Army Personnel Recovery November 2011

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 3-50.1 Army Personnel Recovery November 2011 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital

  20. ARMY SUPPORT TO SECURITY COOPERATION

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 3-22 ARMY SUPPORT TO SECURITY COOPERATION JANUARY 2013 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;FM 3-22, C1

  1. WELDON SPRING FORMER ARMY

    E-print Network

    .S. Armed Services. A series of land transfers left the Army with 1,655 acres, which it has operated since samples from the building were taken. The interior wooden boards were removed and replaced with sheetrock

  2. Experiences with Surgical treatment of chronic lower limb ulcers at a Tertiary hospital in northwestern Tanzania: A prospective review of 300 cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic lower limb ulcers constitute a major public health problem of great important all over the world and contribute significantly to high morbidity and long-term disabilities. There is paucity of information regarding chronic lower limb ulcers in our setting; therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the patterns and outcome of chronic lower limb ulcers and to identify predictors of outcome in our local setting. Methods This was a descriptive prospective study of patients with chronic lower limb ulcers conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between November 2010 and April 2012. Ethical approval to conduct the study was sought from relevant authorities. Statistical data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 and STATA version 11.0. Results A total of 300 patients were studied. Their ages ranged from 3 months to 85 years (median 32 years). The male to female ratio was 2:1. The median duration of illness was 44 days. Traumatic ulcer was the most frequent type of ulcer accounting for 60.3% of patients. The median duration of illness was 44 days. The leg was commonly affected in 33.7% of cases and the right side (48.7%) was frequently involved. Out of 300 patients, 212 (70.7%) had positive aerobic bacterial growth within 48 hours of incubation. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25.5%) was the most frequent gram negative bacteria isolated, whereas gram positive bacteria commonly isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (13.7%). Twenty (6.7%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4+ count of 350 cells/?l. Mycological investigation was not performed. Bony involvement was radiologically reported in 83.0% of cases. Histopathological examination performed in 56 patients revealed malignancy in 20 (35.7%) patients, of which malignant melanoma (45.0%) was the most common histopathological type. The vast majority of patients, 270 (90.0%) were treated surgically, and surgical debridement was the most common surgical procedure performed in 24.1% of cases. Limb amputation rate was 8.7%. Postoperative complication rate was 58.3% of which surgical site infection (77.5%) was the most common post-operative complications. The median length of hospital stay was 23 days. Mortality rate was 4.3%. Out of the two hundred and eighty-seven (95.7%) survivors, 253 (91.6%) were treated successfully and discharged well (healed). After discharge, only 35.5% of cases were available for follow up at the end of study period. Conclusion Chronic lower limb ulcers remain a major public health problem in this part of Tanzania. The majority of patients in our environment present late when the disease is already in advanced stages. Early recognition and aggressive treatment of the acute phase of chronic lower limb ulcers at the peripheral hospitals and close follow-up are urgently needed to improve outcomes of these patients in our environment. PMID:23020814

  3. Surgical outcome of pulmonary aspergilloma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alaa Brik; Abdel Meged Salem; Al Rady Kamal; Mohamed Abdel-Sadek; Mohamed Essa; Mamdoh El Sharawy; Ahmed Deebes; Khaled Abdel Bary

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical resection offers the only realistic chance of permanent cure for pulmonary aspergilloma. This prospective study was designed to evaluate our indications and surgical outcome of pulmonary aspergilloma with analysis of postoperative complications. Patients and methods: Between 2001 and 2008, 42 patients underwent surgical treatment for pulmonary aspergilloma at Zagazig University Hospital. The patients were divided into two groups,

  4. Surgical outcome of pulmonary aspergilloma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alaa Brik; Abdel Meged Salem; Rady Kamal; Mohamed Abdel-Sadek; Mohamed Essa; Mamdoh El Sharawy; Ahmed Deebes; Khaled Abdel Bary

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical resection offers the only realistic chance of permanent cure for pulmonary aspergilloma. This prospective study was designed to evaluate our indications and surgical outcome of pulmonary aspergilloma with analysis of postoperative complications. Patients and methods: Between 2001 and 2008, 42 patients underwent surgical treatment for pulmonary aspergilloma at Zagazig University Hospital. The patients were divided into two groups,

  5. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePLUS

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion uses a vacuum to remove the fetus and related pregnancy material from the uterus. The procedure is ...

  6. Expectations and received knowledge by surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SIRKKU RANKINEN; SANNA SALANTERA; KATJA HEIKKINEN; KIRSI JOHANSSON; ANNE KALJONEN; HELI VIRTANEN; HELENA LEINO-KILPI

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Here, the aim is to compare surgical patients' knowledge expectations at admission with the knowledge they received during their hospital stay. Design. The study used a descriptive and comparative design. Setting. The study was conducted on surgical wards at one randomly selected university hospital in Finland. Participants. The sample (n Ľ 237) consisted of surgical patients (traumatological, gastroenterological, urological

  7. U.S. Army Says Goodbye to MASH

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    Last U.S. MASH Unit Handed Over to Pakistanhttp://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5219020Mission to quake-ravaged Kashmir is farewell for MASHhttp://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-02-15-mash-farewell_x.htmKorean War 50th Anniversary [Macromedia Flash Player]http://korea50.army.mil/index.htmlKorean War Casualty Listshttp://www.archives.gov/research/korean-war/casualty-lists/index.htmlM*A*S*H Television Show Guidehttp://www.tv.com/m-a-s-h/show/119/summary.htmlIn a remote valley in Pakistan this Thursday, the United States Army said farewell to the last remaining Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) unit. These tremendously helpful and durable units were best known as a result of the very popular television show set during the Korean War, which featured a wise-cracking cast that included Alan Alda, Loretta Swit, and Harry Morgan. This particular MASH unit had been stationed in northern Pakistan for four months helping give medical aid to the thousands of people affected by the October 8th earthquake that devastated the region. The Armyâ??s decision to donate the unit to Pakistan was part of a broader change in their medical operations, namely one that places a premium on the â??combat support hospitalâ?ť system. This system is inherently more flexible, and utilizes surgical squads that can go out into the field. Most of the Pakistani medical staff scheduled to take over the MASH unit had never seen the television show of the same name, but one of the spokesmen for the Pakistani Army, Major Farooq Nasir, mentioned that he had seen the show. He remarked, â??It was a nice comedy. They didnâ??t behave like that here. They were quite seriousâ?ť.The first link will take visitors to a news article from The Guardian that discusses the last MASH unit. The second link leads to a National Public Radio feature about the MASH units, and includes a brief interview with Rear Admiral Michael LeFever about the handover of the unit to Pakistan. The third link leads to some additional news coverage provided by USA Todayâ??s Paul Wiseman. The fourth link leads to a site created by the Department of Defense to provide information about the 50th Anniversary of the Korean War. The fifth link leads to a site provided by the National Archives, which allows users to search casualty lists from the Korean War. The final link will take users to a site created by TV.com that provides information about the television show MASH, complete with cast biographies and episode summaries.

  8. Typhoid intestinal perforations at a University teaching hospital in Northwestern Tanzania: A surgical experience of 104 cases in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Typhoid intestinal perforation is still prevalent in many developing countries. Despite the advances in the management, the outcome in these patients in resource limited countries is still very poor. This study was to review our experiences on the surgical management of typhoid intestinal perforation and to determine the prognostic factors for mortality in our local setting. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for typhoid intestinal perforation at Bugando Medical Centre between August 2006 and September 2011. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15. Results A total of 104 patients were studied representing 8.7% of typhoid fever cases. Males were affected twice more than the females (2.6:1). Their ages ranged from 8 to 76 years with a median age of 18.5 years. The peak age incidence was in the 11-20 years age group. Fever and abdominal pain were the most common presenting symptoms and majority of the patients (80.8%) perforated between within 14 days of illness. Chest and abdominal radiographs revealed pneumoperitonium in 74.7% of cases. Ultrasound showed free peritoneal collection in 85.7% of cases. Nine (10.2%) patients were HIV positive with a median CD4+ count of 261 cells/?l. The perforation-surgery interval was more than 72 hours in 90(86.5%) patients. The majority of patients (84.6%) had single perforations and ileum was the most common part of the bowel affected occurring in 86.2% of cases. Simple closure of the perforations was the most commonly performed procedure accounting for 78.8% of cases. Postoperative complication rate was 39.4% and surgical site infection was the most frequent complication in 55.5% of cases. Mortality rate was 23.1% and it was statistically significantly associated with delayed presentation, inadequate antibiotic treatment prior to admission, shock on admission, HIV positivity, low CD4 count (< 200 cells/?l), high ASA classes (III-V), delayed operation, multiple perforations, severe peritoneal contamination and presence of postoperative complications (P < 0.001). The median overall length of hospital stay was 28 days. Conclusion Typhoid intestinal perforation is still endemic in our setting and carries high morbidity and mortality. This study has attempted to determine the factors that statistically influence mortality in typhoid perforation in our environment. Appropriate measures focusing at these factors are vital in order to deliver optimal care for these patients in this region. PMID:22401289

  9. Army Regulation 2530 Information Management: Publishing and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­30 Information Management: Publishing and Printing The Army Publishing Program information visit: www.apd.army.mil Army Policy PublicAtionS As of 8/24/2011 #12;Footnotes legend on page 3 Transparency Army Policy Publications Army Directive (AD) PurPose/uses: ADs are Armywide directives

  10. Army Regulation 690600 Civilian Personnel

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 690­600 Civilian Personnel Equal Employment Opportunity Discrimination Complaints Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 9 February 2004 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 690 discrimination complaints. o Requires Army activities to establish an alternative dispute resolution program

  11. Army Regulation 2001 Environmental Quality

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 200­1 Environmental Quality Environmental Protection and Enhancement Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 13 December 2007 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 200 the policy regarding Army Program Guidance Memorandum (para 15-1). o Corrects typographical errors throughout

  12. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    (m]I I 11~11 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Technical Report A-98-2 July.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication Department of the Army position, unless so desig- nated by other authorized documents. @ PRINTED ON RECYCLED

  13. Surgical Management in Sicklemia

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Clinton E.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the history and pathophysiology of sickle cell disease is given. The clinical types (crises) are discussed along with their relationship to surgical occurrences, both elective and emergency. Specifics of perioperative management are discussed and the cardinal features of importance are enumerated. A retrospective study of sickle cell disease in a community hospital is presented, outlining the surgical experience over a ten-year period. PMID:448754

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Reconstruction of Punitive Ear Amputations in Uganda: A Unique Surgical Burden of Disease.

    PubMed

    Dusseldorp, Joseph; Hodges, Andrew; Patel, Anup; Marchac, Alexandre; Firmin, Françoise

    2015-06-01

    Over the course of 12 months, a plastic surgical team from Paris, France, undertook 2 intensive ear reconstruction missions with plastic surgeons from the CoRSU Rehabilitation Hospital in Uganda. A cohort of over 30 adult women was assessed having been subjected to ear amputations by members of the Lords Resistance Army in Northern Uganda in the 1990s. The patients were identified, mobilized, and transferred to Kampala for surgery by a charitable arm of the Watoto Church, known as Living Hope. The surgical team performed 15 ear reconstruction cases during the first 1-week mission and 16 ear reconstruction cases during the second 1-week mission. All cases were reconstructed successfully using the 2-stage autologous auricular reconstruction method advocated by the senior author (FF). Local skin was used to cover the costal cartilage framework in the first stage without need for temporo-parietal fascial flaps. Technical challenges included the older age of patients and ossified costal cartilage, high prevalence of HIV positivity, bilateral amputation, and difficulty of surgical follow-up. The main modifications to standard practice were routine pre-op testing of the costal cartilage, pre-op viral load and CD4 count screening in HIV-positive patients, simultaneous bilateral first-stage ear reconstruction, prolonged hospital stay, and implementation of routine surgical counting procedures. PMID:26080156

  5. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Multi-site study of surgical practice in neurosurgery based on Surgical Process Models

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Multi-site study of surgical practice in neurosurgery based on Surgical Process Models Germain, Montreal, Canada (4) Department of Neurosurgery, Pontchaillou University Hospital, Rennes, France (5 of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Germany (7) Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals

  7. Active Army and Army Reserve Soldiers: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkan, JoJo T.; And Others

    A study determined whether chemical operations specialists at skill level 1 differ in terms of aptitude, job knowledge, job confidence, and perceptions of task difficulty, task importance, task frequency, and task training, depending on whether the specialists are active U.S. Army soldiers or are in the Army Reserve. The subjects for whom complete…

  8. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .S. Army in the U.S., Europe, and Southwest Asia as an ammunition specialist. For the last several years Ammunition Center. He has served the U.S. Army in the U.S. and Europe as an ammunition specialist. Harper, Thomas R. Reinhardt, Barry R. Sude. p.cm Includes bibliographical references. 1. Hazardous waste

  9. The adjustment of Army illiterates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. D. Altus

    1945-01-01

    The validity of a short, orally administered adjustment test in an Army Special Training Center is demonstrated in two ways. The two criteria of validity were (1) the trainee's type of disposition and (2) the number of times the Army physicians could find nothing organically wrong with a trainee who reported himself as ill.

  10. Parietal Lobe Epilepsy: Surgical Treatment and Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi Heon Kim; Chun-Kee Chung; Sang Kun Lee; Yoon Kyung Lee; Je G. Chi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE) is neither common nor easily diagnosed because of its variable clinical features. To elucidate its characteristics and surgical outcome, the authors reviewed their surgical experiences. Methods: Between September 1994 and August 2001, 38 patients with PLE received surgical treatment at the Seoul National University Hospital. All patients underwent resection, mainly involving the parietal lobe. Results:

  11. WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL 2014 WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL Army EquipmEnt modErnizAtion plAn #12;The estimated cost.S. ARMY 13 May 2013 2014 Army EquipmEnt modErnizAtion plAn #12;#12;#12;#12;Table of Contents Foreword.......................................................................................... 7 Linking Resource Decisions to Army Strategy ....................................... 9 Army Fiscal

  12. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army Army Doctrine Reference Publication No. 3-05 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 31 ........................................................................... 1-10 Army Special Operations Forces Characteristics ............................................ 1

  13. The actuarial survival analysis of the surgical and non-surgical therapy regimen for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui-Li Gan; Jian-Qun Zhang; Ping Bo; Qi-Wen Zhou; Sheng-Xun Wang

    2010-01-01

    Aim To characterize the in-hospital mortality and the actuarial survival of surgical and non-surgical therapy regimen in the\\u000a treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 504 patients with CTEPH, who were treated surgically (n = 360), or non-surgically (n = 144) in Anzhen Hospital from February 1989 to August 2007. The patients in surgical group received

  14. Army Low Impact Development Technical User Guide

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Low Impact Development Technical User Guide 4 January 2013 Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management #12; #12; Army Low Impact for Installation Management Prepared by: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District U.S. Army

  15. LEGAL SUPPORT TO THE OPERATIONAL ARMY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 1-04 LEGAL SUPPORT TO THE OPERATIONAL ARMY MARCH 2013 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;*FM 1

  16. Army Regulation 2555 Information Management: Records

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­55 Information Management: Records Management The Department of the Army Freedom of Information Act Program Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 1 November 1997 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 25­55 The Department of the Army Freedom of Information Act Program This revision-- o

  17. Department of the Army Pamphlet 2201

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Department of the Army Pamphlet 220­1 Field Organizations Defense Readiness Reporting System­Army Procedures Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 16 November 2011 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY DA PAM 220­1 Defense Readiness Reporting System­Army Procedures This new publication, dated 16 November

  18. Department of the Army Pamphlet 38510

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Department of the Army Pamphlet 385­10 Safety Army Safety Program Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 23 May 2008 Rapid Action Revision (RAR) Issue Date: 19 January 2010 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE DA PAM 385­10 Army Safety Program This rapid action revision, dated 19 January

  19. Army Regulation 2530 Information Management: Publishing and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­30 Information Management: Publishing and Printing The Army Publishing Program Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 27 March 2006 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 25­30 The Army Publishing Program This rapid action revision, dated 27 March 2006-- o Changes Deputy Chief

  20. ATTENTION OF DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    REPLY TO ATTENTION OF DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE ARMY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND COMPTROLLER 109 ARMY PENTAGON WASHINGTON DC 20310·0109 JAN 16 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT Secretary of the Army (SECARMY) Memorandum, 16 Jan 2013, Subject: Risk Mitigation in the Face of Fiscal

  1. British army leadership: is it gendered?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Dunn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the female British Army officer, to determine whether female Army officers lead in different ways to male Army officers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The conceptual framework was transformational and transactional leadership theory. Data were gathered in semi structured interviews with 24 Army officers, split 50:50 between men and women

  2. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  3. Efficacy and safety of haloperidol prophylaxis for delirium prevention in older medical and surgical at-risk patients acutely admitted to hospital through the emergency department: study protocol of a multicenter, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delirium is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality rates in elderly hospitalised patients, and a growing problem due to increase in life expectancy. Implementation of standardised non-pharmacological delirium prevention strategies is challenging and adherence remains low. Pharmacological delirium prevention with haloperidol, currently the drug of choice for delirium, seems promising. However, the generalisability of randomised controlled trial results is questionable since studies have only been performed in selected postoperative hip-surgery and intensive care unit patient populations. We therefore present the design of the multicenter, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on early pharmacological intervention to prevent delirium: haloperidol prophylaxis in older emergency department patients (The HARPOON study). Methods/Design In six Dutch hospitals, at-risk patients aged 70 years or older acutely admitted through the emergency department for general medicine and surgical specialties are randomised (n?=?390) for treatment with prophylactic haloperidol 1 mg or placebo twice daily for a maximum of seven consecutive days. Primary outcome measure is the incidence of in-hospital delirium within seven days of start of the study intervention, diagnosed with the Confusion Assessment Method, and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria for delirium. Secondary outcome measures include delirium severity and duration assessed with the Delirium Rating Scale Revised 98; number of delirium-free days; adverse events; hospital length-of-stay; all-cause mortality; new institutionalisation; (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living assessed with the Katz Index of ADL, and Lawton IADL scale; cognitive function assessed with the Six-item Cognitive Impairment Test, and the Dutch short form Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly. Patients will be contacted by telephone three and six months post-discharge to collect data on cognitive- and physical function, home residency, all-cause hospital admissions, and all-cause mortality. Discussion The HARPOON study will provide relevant information on the efficacy and safety of prophylactic haloperidol treatment for in-hospital delirium and its effects on relevant clinical outcomes in elderly at-risk medical and surgical patients. Trial registration EudraCT Number: 201100476215; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01530308; Dutch Clinical Trial Registry: NTR3207 PMID:25168927

  4. LIEUTENANT GENERAL PERRY L. WIGGINS United States Army North (Fifth Army)

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    LIEUTENANT GENERAL PERRY L. WIGGINS Commander, United States Army North (Fifth Army) and Senior States Army North (Fifth Army) on 4 September 2013. He had served as the Deputy Commanding General since 24 January 2013. He recently served as the Commanding General of First Army Division (West) at Fort

  5. Medicare program; hospital outpatient prospective payment system and CY 2007 payment rates; CY 2007 update to the ambulatory surgical center covered procedures list; Medicare administrative contractors; and reporting hospital quality data for FY 2008 inpatient prospective payment system annual payment update program--HCAHPS survey, SCIP, and mortality. Final rule with comment period and final rule.

    PubMed

    2006-11-24

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system, and to implement certain related provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 and the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. In this final rule with comment period, we describe changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. In addition, this final rule with comment period implements future CY 2009 required reporting on quality measures for hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. This final rule with comment period revises the current list of procedures that are covered when furnished in a Medicare-approved ambulatory surgical center (ASC), which are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. This final rule with comment period revises the emergency medical screening requirements for critical access hospitals (CAHs). This final rule with comment period supports implementation of a restructuring of the contracting entities responsibilities and functions that support the adjudication of Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims. This restructuring is directed by section 1874A of the Act, as added by section 911 of the MMA. The prior separate Medicare intermediary and Medicare carrier contracting authorities under Title XVIII of the Act have been replaced with the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) authority. This final rule continues to implement the requirements of the DRA that require that we expand the "starter set" of 10 quality measures that we used in FY 2005 and FY 2006 for the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) Reporting Hospital Quality Data for the Annual Payment Update (RHQDAPU) program. We began to adopt expanded measures effective for payments beginning in FY 2007. In this rule, we are finalizing additional quality measures for the expanded set of measures for FY 2008 payment purposes. These measures include the HCAHPS survey, as well as Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP, formerly Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP)), and Mortality quality measures. PMID:17133695

  6. The Impact of Surgical?Site Infections Following Orthopedic Surgery at a Community Hospital and a University Hospital: Adverse Quality of Life, Excess Length of Stay, and Extra Cost

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Whitehouse; N. Deborah Friedman; Kathryn B. Kirkland; William J. Richardson; Daniel J. Sexton

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the impact of orthopedic surgi- cal-site infections (SSIs) on quality of life, length of hospitalization, and cost. DESIGN: A pairwise-matched (1:1) case-control study within a cohort. SETTING: A tertiary-care university medical center and a community hospital. PATIENTS: Cases of orthopedic SSIs were prospectively identified by infection control professionals. Matched controls were selected from the entire cohort of

  7. Process Improvement at Army Installations 

    E-print Network

    Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

    1997-01-01

    ). Executive Orders require the Army to reduce the use of energy and related environmental impacts by promoting renewable energy technologies. These new energy and environmental directives usually exceed the performance capabilities of DODs currently installed...

  8. Salvation Army : the next generation

    E-print Network

    Francpourmoi, Salomé

    2010-01-01

    The Salvation Army thrift stores are retail entities in the center of neighborhoods which collect and resell used objects. Although historically dear to many, it seems that the physical condition, market visibility, and ...

  9. Process Improvement at Army Installations

    E-print Network

    Northrup, J.; Smith, E. D.; Lin, M.; Baird, J.

    production methods to reduce pollution. Energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) that enhance pollution prevention have been compiled through research at many installations, including United States Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL...

  10. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. The effect of cumulative length of hospital stay on the antifungal resistance of Candida strains isolated from critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kourkoumpetis, Themistoklis K; Velmahos, George C; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Manolakaki, Dimitra; Coleman, Jeffrey J; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-02-01

    Fluconazole is the first line of therapy for the management of candidiasis. However, fluconazole-resistant strains pose an emerging challenge in everyday clinical practice. In this study, we sought to determine whether cumulative length of hospital stay (CLOS) is a predictive factor for the acquisition of non-susceptible Candida strains to fluconazole. Thirty-three critically ill emergency surgery patients with 56 Candida isolates were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided our isolates according to their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to fluconazole using 8 mcg/ml as a cutoff. We then compared the two groups with respect to basic demographics, antifungal agents prescribed, number of wide-spectrum antibiotics, duration of central venous catheter placement, elapsed time to positive culture, duration of prior hospital stay, and length of hospital stay. Non-susceptible fluconazole samples belonged to patients with a significantly longer prior hospital stay and a longer CLOS (P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). The difference between the 2 groups regarding non-albicans strains was statistically significant (P < 0.001). By fitting a non-parametric receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve into our analysis, a CLOS ? 29 days predicted the occurrence of non-susceptible strains with 90% sensitivity and 79.6% specificity (correct classification 81.5%). A CLOS ? 29 days is a strong predictor for the isolation of non-susceptible Candida isolates to fluconazole among critically ill emergency surgery patients. Clinicians should consider the duration of previous hospital stay when deciding on empiric antifungal therapy. PMID:20927595

  12. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  13. Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Leanne M.; Middleton, Philippa F.; Anthony, Adrian; Hamdorf, Jeffrey; Cregan, Patrick; Scott, David; Maddern, Guy J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of surgical simulation compared with other methods of surgical training. Summary Background Data: Surgical simulation (with or without computers) is attractive because it avoids the use of patients for skills practice and provides relevant technical training for trainees before they operate on humans. Methods: Studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other databases until April 2005. Included studies must have been randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing any training technique using at least some elements of surgical simulation, which reported measures of surgical task performance. Results: Thirty RCTs with 760 participants were able to be included, although the quality of the RCTs was often poor. Computer simulation generally showed better results than no training at all (and than physical trainer/model training in one RCT), but was not convincingly superior to standard training (such as surgical drills) or video simulation (particularly when assessed by operative performance). Video simulation did not show consistently better results than groups with no training at all, and there were not enough data to determine if video simulation was better than standard training or the use of models. Model simulation may have been better than standard training, and cadaver training may have been better than model training. Conclusions: While there may be compelling reasons to reduce reliance on patients, cadavers, and animals for surgical training, none of the methods of simulated training has yet been shown to be better than other forms of surgical training. PMID:16495690

  14. 77 FR 21977 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ...Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department...Strategic Directions for Army Science and Technology and vote on...Strategic Directions for Army Science & Technology study and vote on adoption....

  15. Water conservation opportunities at Army installations

    SciTech Connect

    Scholze, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reviews aspects of water conservation at Army installations describing the current status and usage on installations and unique attributes pertinent to Army conditions. It also describes a model water conservation analysis at one installation.

  16. A recommended Army alternative water supply policy

    SciTech Connect

    Valcik, J.A.; Kistner, S.L.; Leach, G.J. [Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A US Army Environmental Hygiene Agency recommended policy and guidance for initiating and rescinding alternative drinking water supplies in response to on and offpost contamination of potable water supplies caused by Army activities has been developed. This policy and guidance were prompted by occasional situations arising from Army actions or activities resulting in the environmental contamination of off-post water supply wells in the conduct of the Army`s Installation Restoration Program. In these situations, the Army is responsible for providing an alternative water supply to affected well users which meets acceptable drinking water criteria, pursuant to the Army`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) authority and liability.

  17. Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    E-print Network

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science and engineering to critical Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science and engineering to critical Army

  18. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...balance environmental concerns with mission requirements, technical requirements, economic feasibility, and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will also encourage the wise stewardship of natural...

  19. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...balance environmental concerns with mission requirements, technical requirements, economic feasibility, and long-term sustainability of Army operations. While carrying out its mission, the Army will also encourage the wise stewardship of natural...

  20. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at (www.train.army.mil). #12;FMI 6-02.45, C1 Change 1 HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Washington, DC, 7 May 2008 Signal Support to Theater

  1. Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army

    E-print Network

    Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved Lieutenant O-2 First Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade O-1 Second Lieutenant Ensign Air Force Army Marine Warrant Officer 5 Air Force Army Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard E-9 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air

  2. First Army First Army, commanded by Lt. Gen. Mick

    E-print Network

    Defense mission in the National Capitol Region, to two-person Unit Ministry Teams in support of Combatant, Brigade Combat Teams conducting Full Spectrum Operations, Combat Aviation Brigades, Brigade Security) ExecutiveAgent for Reserve Compo- nent (RC) mobilization. FirstArmy provides training support in accordance

  3. Regulation No. Department of the Army

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    CECW-PA Regulation No. 1165-2-120 Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington-2-120 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, D.C. 20314-1000 CECW-RP Regulation No. 1165 and shipment of waterborne cargoes on inland waters. The term does not include projects on the Great Lakes

  4. September 2013 OUR PROFESSIONhttp://CAPE.ARMY.MIL

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    September 2013 OUR PROFESSIONhttp://CAPE.ARMY.MIL #12;America's Army ­ Our Profession STAND STRONG During Fiscal Year 2014, the United States Army will launch the America's Army ­ Our Profession "STAND development for Soldiers and Army Civilians. The program reinforces Trust among Army Professionals

  5. Comparison of minimally invasive surgical approaches for hysterectomy at a community hospital: robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy and laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Giep, Bang N; Giep, Hoang N; Hubert, Helen B

    2010-09-01

    The study reported here compares outcomes of three approaches to minimally invasive hysterectomy for benign indications, namely, robotic-assisted laparoscopic (RALH), laparoscopic-assisted vaginal (LAVH) and laparoscopic supracervical (LSH) hysterectomy. The total patient cohort comprised the first 237 patients undergoing robotic surgeries at our hospital between August 2007 and June 2009; the last 100 patients undergoing LAVH by the same surgeons between July 2006 and February 2008 and 165 patients undergoing LAVHs performed by nine surgeons between January 2008 and June 2009; 87 patients undergoing LSH by the same nine surgeons between January 2008 and June 2009. Among the RALH patients were cases of greater complexity: (1) higher prevalence of prior abdominopelvic surgery than that found among LAVH patients; (2) an increased number of procedures for endometriosis and pelvic reconstruction. Uterine weights also were greater in RALH patients [207.4 vs. 149.6 (LAVH; P < 0.001) and 141.1 g (LSH; P = 0.005)]. Despite case complexity, operative time was significantly lower in RALH than in LAVH (89.9 vs. 124.8 min, P < 0.001) and similar to that in LSH (89.6 min). Estimated blood loss was greater in LAVH (167.9 ml) than in RALH (59.0 ml, P < 0.001) or LSH (65.7 ml, P < 0.001). Length of hospital stay was shorter for RALH than for LAVH or LSH. Conversion and complication rates were low and similar across procedures. Multivariable regression indicated that LAVH, obesity, uterine weight ?250 g and older age predicted significantly longer operative time. The learning curve for RALH demonstrated improved operative time over the case series. Our findings show the benefits of RALH over LAVH. Outcomes in RALH can be as good as or better than those in LSH, suggesting the latter should be the choice primarily for women desiring cervix-sparing surgery. PMID:20835393

  6. Robotic surgical training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Or, Sharon; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-01-01

    In July 2000, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc) received Food and Drug Administration approval for intracardiac applications, and the first mitral valve repair was done at the East Carolina Heart Institute in May 2000. The system is now approved and used in many surgical specialties. With this disruptive technology and accepted use, surgeons and hospitals are seeking the most efficacious training pathway leading to safe use and responsible credentialing.One of the most important issues related to safe use is assembling the appropriate team of professionals involved with patient care. Moreover, proper patient selection and setting obtainable goals are also important.Creation and maintenance of a successful program are discussed in the article focusing on realistic goals. This begins with a partnership between surgeon leaders, hospital administrators, and industry support. Through this partnership, an appropriate training pathway and clinical pathway for success can be outlined. A timeline can then be created with periods of data analysis and adjustments as necessary. A successful program is attainable by following this pathway and attending to every detail along the journey. PMID:23528718

  7. Understanding Reenlistment in the Union Army

    E-print Network

    Understanding Reenlistment in the Union Army during the American Civil War Mario Trottini and John that influenced the reelinst­ ment decision of the volunteers who fought in the Union Army during the American army, though enlarged for the war, could not supply such a number of men. Both the Union

  8. Montana State University 1 Military Science -Army

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ROTC scholarship is given to students pursuing degrees in nursing, engineering, the physical sciences an undergraduate degree in the field in which the scholarship is awarded. High Technology in Today's Army Today in the Advanced Course. Army ROTC Scholarships and Financial Assistance Army ROTC scholarships for two, three

  9. Algeria's Army, Algeria's Agony Lahouari ADDI

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Algeria's Army, Algeria's Agony Lahouari ADDI Lahouari Addi, a Visiting Professor of Sociology fundamentalists and more on the key player in Algeria's politics: the army: Islamist guerrilla warfare broke out in January 1992, after the army canceled elections won by the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS). Blocked from

  10. Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Richard Kidd Deputy Assistant of the Army, Energy and Sustainability The Army's ability to accomplish its global mission depends on secure, uninterrupted access to power

  11. TABLE OF SERVICE EQUIVALENT UNIFORMS ARMY MARINE

    E-print Network

    1 TABLE OF SERVICE EQUIVALENT UNIFORMS EVENT WHEN WORN ARMY MARINE CORPS NAVY AIR FORCE COAST GUARD White Jacket Mess Dress Dinner Dress White Jacket Tuxedo Evening Gown Army Blue (bow tie) Blue Dress "A Dress Less formal occasions requiring more formality than service uniforms Army White (bow tie) Blue

  12. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy. (a) Soldiers, military...

  13. Project Title: Student Volunteer Army: Logistics Stories

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Project Title: Student Volunteer Army: Logistics Stories Bachelor of Arts Internship Company/Organization: Volunteer Army Foundation Intern Position Title: Focus Group Leader ­ Logistics Stories Organisation Advisor Deadline: 2 December 2011 The Student Volunteer Army (SVA) (www.sva.org.nz) is renowned for its dedication

  14. HEADQUARTERS CHANGE 1 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    #12;FM 21-20 C1 HEADQUARTERS CHANGE 1 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Washington, DC, 1 October 1998 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..13-2 ARMY PHYSICAL FITNESS TEST Methods of Evaluation equipped, but well-trained, North Korean People's Army. As American soldiers withdrew, they left behind

  15. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy. (a) Soldiers, military...

  16. Department of the Army Pamphlet 38564

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Department of the Army Pamphlet 385­64 Safety Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 24 May 2011 Rapid Action Revision (RAR) Issue Date: 10 This rapid action, dated 10 October 2013-- o Updates mandatory and suggested Army explosive safety courses

  17. 32 CFR 631.14 - Army policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army policy. 631.14 Section 631.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Activities) and Policy § 631.14 Army policy. (a) Soldiers, military...

  18. Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­50 Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Correspondence Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 17 May 2013 UNCLASSIFED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE proponency for the Army's correspondence program from the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1 to the Administrative

  19. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT

    E-print Network

    Rock, Chris

    ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE BROAD AGENCY ANNOUNCEMENT FOR BASIC AND APPLIED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH W911NF-12-R-0012 15 May 2012 ­ 31 March 2017 ISSUED BY: U.S. Army Contracting Command-Aberdeen Proving Ground.................................................................................................... 7 1. ARMY RESEARCH OFFICE (ARO

  20. Army Regulation 2550 Information Management: Records

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Army Regulation 25­50 Information Management: Records Management Preparing and Managing Correspondence Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC 5 March 2001 UNCLASSIFIED #12;SUMMARY of CHANGE on Letterhead stationery contained in AR 25- 30, The Army Publishing and Printing Program, 21 June 1999. o

  1. SAM: The Swiss Army Menu David Bonnet

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SAM: The Swiss Army Menu David Bonnet Université Paris-Sud - INRIA - CNRS Orsay, France bonnet´esente le Swiss Army Menu (SAM), un menu circulaire permettant de rendre accessible un tr`es grand nom- bre Dispositif mobile, technique de menu, widget ABSTRACT This article introduces the Swiss Army Menu (SAM), a ra

  2. TWVTHE ARMY TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLE STRATEGY INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;#12;3 TWVTHE ARMY TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLE STRATEGY INTRODUCTION The purpose of this document is to provide the Army with a Tactical Wheeled Vehicle (TWV) Strategy that synchronizes the plans and actions of all Army agencies involved in TWV requirements, procurement, integration, sustainment

  3. Technical Report DOER-1 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Technical Report DOER-1 June 1998 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Dredging Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position, unless so desig- nated by other authorized

  4. header for SPIE use Army Research Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Steele, Adam

    header for SPIE use Army Research Laboratory Advanced Displays and Interactive Displays Fedlab engineering results are being readied for transition to various Army customers. In this paper we describe some of the research results along with their potential Army applications. Keywords: Displays, cognitive engineering

  5. UNITED STATES ARMY HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-print Network

    Van Stryland, Eric

    , the minimum obligation for medical students is two years. For dental, clinical psychology, optometry, nurse is comprised of six corps: the Medical Corps, Dental Corps, Medical Service Corps, Medical Specialist Corps- renowned health care facilities, such as Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., or Madigan

  6. Mass Recruitment by Army Ants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Chadab; Carl W. Rettenmeyer

    1975-01-01

    A single army ant (Ecitoninae) can attract and direct scores of workers to prey by means of a chemical trail and momentary contact between the recruiter and workers on a raid column. Recruited workers, in turn, attract more ants, resulting in a continuous stream of recruits. While the recruitment mechanism is basically similar, the speed and the number of ants

  7. ARMY VEHICLE DURABILITY OPTIMIZATION & RELIABILITY

    E-print Network

    Kusiak, Andrew

    ARMY VEHICLE DURABILITY OPTIMIZATION & RELIABILITY How to Optimize the Vehicle Design to Minimize/Reduce the Weight? Under These Uncertainties, How to Achieve Component Level Reliability? Under These Uncertainties, How to Achieve System Level Reliability? Dynamics Analysis FE Model System Model Dynamic Stress

  8. US Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1998 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Aquatic Dissipation of the Herbicide Triclopyr in Lake. --.-- .-- -- -- ...-- --.. Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use

  9. Battles: Intelligent Army versus Insurgency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Linda; Sen, Surajit

    2009-03-01

    A ``simple'' battle can be thought of as a conflict between two parties, each with finite reserves, and typically fought on one side’s territory. Modern battles are often strategic, based largely on the speed of information processing and decision making and are mission oriented rather than to annex new territory. Here, we analyze such battles using a simple model in which the ``blue'' army fights a strategic battle against a ``red'' army that is well matched in combat power and in red’s territory. We assume that the blue army attacks strategically while the red army attempts to neutralize the enemy when in close enough proximity, implemented here as ``on- site,'' with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. We show that minimizing risk exposure and making strategic moves based on local intelligence are often the deciding factors that determine the outcome of battles among well matched adversaries.

  10. Cholelithiasis in pregnancy: surgical versus medical management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonya Lee; James P. Bradley; Michele M. Mele; Harish M. Sehdev; Jack Ludmir

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare surgical versus medical management of symptomatic biliary disease in pregnancy.Methods: An 8-year retrospective review was conducted of patients hospitalized for symptomatic gallbladder disease in pregnancy.Results: Thirty-five pregnant patients were hospitalized for symptomatic biliary disease (19 biliary colic, 8 acute cholecystitis, 7 choledocholithiasis, and 1 gallstone pancreatitis). Patients were managed according to obstetrician preference. Those managed surgically tended

  11. Surgical complications of ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, B

    1991-01-01

    Over the past 25 years (1963-1988), a total of 311 children under 12 years of age were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service of the San Vicente de Paúl University Hospital, Medellín, Colombia, with complications resulting from infection with Entamoeba histolytica or Ascaris lumbricoides. In this group, the abdominal complications produced by ascariasis numbered 145, and included intestinal obstruction (n = 107), perforation of the appendix (n = 10), and migration of the parasite to the biliary tree or to the peritoneal cavity (n = 28). Evaluation of the living conditions of a significant subgroup of our patients confirms that intestinal parasitism is an endemic condition prevailing in nations that exhibit deep social and economic imbalance, where large sectors of the population remain deprived of the basic services of education, health, housing, and recreation. Massive infestation in children may give rise to grave complications that demand expert surgical care. Third World surgeons practicing in general hospitals that take care of patients of low economic capacity are usually familiar with the diagnosis and management of this pathology; surgeons who practice in the industrialized nations will only occasionally face such problems. The greater mobility of today's societies and the rather massive migrations that take place in current times have resulted in an increasing incidence of these entities in the hospital populations of the large urban centers of these nations. It is for the surgeons practicing in such centers that the information presented herein may be of greater value. PMID:2031358

  12. Health and Occupational Consequences of Spouse Abuse Victimization among Male U.S. Army Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Nicole S.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about health and occupational outcomes of male spouse abuse victims. In all, 11,294 male spouse abuse victims with a history of spouse abuse perpetration, 3,277 victims without prior spouse abuse perpetration, and 72,855 nonvictims and nonperpetrators were followed for 12 years to assess army attrition and hospitalization risk. In…

  13. Adverse events in surgical patients in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. KABLE; R. W. GIBBERD; A. D. SPIGELMAN

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To determine the adverse event (AE) rate for surgical patients in Australia. Design. A two-stage retrospective medical record review was conducted to determine the occurrence of AEs in hospital admissions. Medical records were screened for 18 criteria and positive records were reviewed by two medical officers using a structured questionnaire. Setting. Admissions in 1992 to 28 randomly selected hospitals

  14. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  15. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ADP 1, C1 Change No. 1 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 7 November 2012 The Army 2012 By order of the Secretary of the Army: RAYMOND T. ODIERNO General, United States Army Chief of Staff Official: JOYCE E. MORROW Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army 1229701

  17. ARMY MASS TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM Outside the National Capital Region

    E-print Network

    ARMY MASS TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM Outside the National Capital Region Application Form Last Telephone (include area code): Army Civilian Employee Army Active Duty Enlisted Army Active Duty Officer Army Nonappropriated Fund Employee - Please provide 9-digit Standard NAFI Number: Effective Date 1

  18. US Army synchronisiert logistische Kernprozesse mit SAP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Ledwon; Jonathan Roth; Thomas Gulledge

    Zum Aufbau ihres Single Army Logistics Enterprise (SALE) arbeitet die US Army mit der ARIS Business Suite und dem SAP Solution\\u000a Manager. Es ist bislang eine der umfassendsten SAP-ERP-Implementierungen. Mit ihrer Hilfe schafft die US Army den Wandel von\\u000a einem nachschuborientierten und oft eingleisigen Logistikunternehmen in ein integriertes, reaktionsfähiges und verteilungsorientiertes\\u000a Unternehmen, das „dem Soldaten die passenden Ressourcen am richtigen

  19. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army, describes the role of United States Army Special Operations Forces (ARSOF) in the U.S. Army's operating and integrated use of military information support, cyber, and civil affairs operations. The relevance of Army

  20. Crucible of fire: the Boer War and the birth of the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, I

    1995-01-01

    Although Canada's military physicians didn't come to prominence until WW I and WW II, the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC), the forerunner of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps and the current Canadian Forces Medical Service, actually had its origins in the Boer War. During that turn-of-the-century conflict, field hospitals accompanied Canadian troops to South Africa. Ian McCulloch discusses that early type of medical service and the steps that led to the creation of the CAMC. Images p1495-a p1496-a PMID:7585380

  1. MISSION: CAPE, on behalf of the Commanding General, Combined Arms Center, serves as the proponent for the Army Profession, the Army Ethic, and Character Development of Army Professionals to reinforce

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    for the Army Profession, the Army Ethic, and Character Development of Army Professionals to reinforce Trust within the Profession and with the American people. KEY TASKS: · Support Army-wide efforts (Army Campaign). · Create and integrate Army Profession, Army Ethic, and Character Development doctrine and concepts

  2. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance of ordnance contaminated excess Army military real property is...

  3. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance of ordnance contaminated excess Army military real property is...

  4. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance of ordnance contaminated excess Army military real property is...

  5. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance of ordnance contaminated excess Army military real property is...

  6. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from...Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance of ordnance contaminated excess Army military real property is...

  7. 78 FR 64205 - Army Science Board Fall Plenary Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science...Plenary Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION...date. Due to the lapse of appropriations, the Department of Defense cancelled the meeting...

  8. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14...

  9. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration....

  10. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.328 Army military leased property. (a)...

  11. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2009-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14...

  12. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration....

  13. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.328 Army military leased property. (a)...

  14. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14...

  15. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14...

  16. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military real property. 644.326 ...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.326 Army military real property....

  17. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.328 Army military leased property. (a)...

  18. 32 CFR 536.14 - Commanders of major Army commands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2009-07-01 true Commanders of major Army commands. 536.14 Section 536.14...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.14...

  19. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military leased property. 644.328...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.328 Army military leased property. (a)...

  20. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration....

  1. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military real property. 644.326 ...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.326 Army military real property....

  2. 32 CFR 644.328 - Army military leased property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military leased property. 644.328...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.328 Army military leased property. (a)...

  3. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration....

  4. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions...

  5. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions...

  6. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions...

  7. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions...

  8. 32 CFR 581.1 - Army Disability Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Disability Review Board. 581.1 Section 581.1 National...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERSONNEL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD § 581.1 Army Disability Review Board. (a) General provisions...

  9. [Surgical humour at Rigshospitalet].

    PubMed

    Andreassen, M

    1999-01-01

    Medical humour is often an important part of the treatment of patients in hospitals and in general practice. Therefore, medical humour should be distinguished from other forms of humour. The author of this article has served over forty years in Rigshospitalet of Copenhagen. He has observed the remarkable difference in the frequency of homour in the two surgical departments of the hospital. Department D had as a chief Wilhelm Schaldemose. He seemed to be completely without any sense of humour, and this spread to the rest of the department. When Schaldemose died Sigurd Kjaergard became head of the department. His sense of humour was limited, and he was not able to induce the humour to the rest of the department. It was first in 1953 when Erik Husfeldt took over as chief that the humour developed in the department, and it took several years before humour became a part of the daily treatment of patients. On the other department C the humour has always had good days starting with Thorkild Rovsing, the first chief, and later when Erling Dahl-Iversen was leader of the department. He had a special way to educate his staff in his sense of humour which became well known all over the hospital. In the beginning of this year a new society: >Nordic Society of Medical Humour< has been founded in Norway. This seems to be a remarkable positive development in the field of medical humour. PMID:11639163

  10. Incidence of Major Tendon Ruptures and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in US Army Soldiers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel W. White; Joseph C. Wenke; Dan S. Mosely; Sally B. Mountcastle; Carl J. Basamania

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although a rare event, the prevalence of major tendon rupture has increased in recent decades. Identification of risk factors is important for prevention purposes.Hypothesis: Race is a risk factor for major tendon ruptures.Study Design: Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 2.Methods: All patients admitted for surgical management of a rupture of a major tendon at Womack Army Medical Center,

  11. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (NSQIP) and the Quality of Surgical Care in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the safety, quality, and value of surgical care have become increasingly important to surgeons and hospitals. Quality improvement in surgical care requires the ability to collect, measure, and act upon reliable and clinically relevant data. One example of a large-scale quality effort is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-Pediatric), the only nationwide, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program evaluating pediatric surgical care. PMID:26049305

  12. Hospitality in hospitals?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denver Severt; Taryn Aiello; Shannon Elswick; Cheryl Cyr

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore an organization-wide philosophy of hospitality in a hospital setting. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An exploratory case study method approach matched the research purpose. First, a hospitality centric philosophy (HCP) was defined from the literature review. Next, a triangulation of unstructured visits, structured visits and key informant interviews is used to further explore

  13. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  14. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  15. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  16. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  17. 32 CFR 635.22 - Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Reserve component, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard personnel. 635.22 Section 635...Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...

  18. Education and Training in the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, W. C.

    Higher education and the military have much in common: both are vitally concerned with youth and in preparing young people for effective functioning in society. The army is heavily involved in education and training; in addition to West Point, there is an Army school system which consists of 2 colleges, 20 branch schools, and 11 specialist…

  19. Designing and implementing an Army capability model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael W. Brinn; Matthew Carpenter; Michael Kamon; David Pigott; Gregory S. Parnell; Brian Stokes

    2003-01-01

    The United States Army is transforming itself from a heavy mechanized force designed for cold war missions to a more mobile objective force tailored to the demands of an asymmetric warfare involving many diverse missions, from peacekeeping to land warfare. The Army Objective Force will be based on rapid mobility, information dominance, and tactical superiority. We developed a decision support

  20. 78 FR 18473 - Army Privacy Act Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ...citing the Privacy Act and filed in a U.S. District Court has changed. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective March 27...citing the Privacy Act is filed in a U.S. District Court against the Department of the Army, an Army...

  1. Predicting Surgical Site Infections in Real-Time Akpene Gbegnon

    E-print Network

    Street, Nick

    ) are a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and hospital readmissions in general surgery patients. Real and hospital readmission, affecting 3-11% of general surgery patients in the United States [1Predicting Surgical Site Infections in Real-Time Akpene Gbegnon University of Iowa Hospitals

  2. [Surgical treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, B A; Korotkov, A V; Belianko, I E; Sandrikov, V A; Dolotov V K; Ternovskaia, E A; Eremenko, A A; Kolpakov, P E

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of different variants of left ventricular geometrical reconstruction (LVGR) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DKMP) were studied in 2-stage clinical trial during 4 years. Results of left ventricle plication, "Myosplint" surgery and implantation of extracardial net framework (ECNF) complemented with mitral insufficiency correction (in case of need) have been evaluated on the first stage of the study. Based on this study, the implantation of ECNF and correction of mitral insufficiency are recognized as the most effective and safe method of DKMP surgical treatment. Short- and long-term results of these surgical procedures have been studied on the second stage of the study. Overall 30 surgeries of LVGR have been performed (18 on stage 1 and 12 on stage 2 of the study). Hospital lethality on stage 1 was 27%, 4-year actuarial survival rate (taking into account hospital lethality)--54+/-12%. Original protocols of surgical, anesthetic and intensive care management led to decrease of hospital lethality to 8% and an increase of 2-year actuarial survival rate to 91.6+/-7.9% (that significantly higher than in the control group treated with therapeutic methods only). PMID:17047625

  3. [Volgograd military hospital--70 years].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V Ia; Alborov, Z Ts

    2012-01-01

    History of the Volgograd military hospital dates back to July 24, 1941, when on the basis of the regional children's bone tuberculosis sanatorium in Krasnodar was transformed into 2150th military hospital consisted of 240 beds. Since May 1944 relocated in the city of Stalingrad became a garrison hospital. Today the hospital is a multidisciplinary health centre of the Russian Defense Ministry. Annually, the hospital performed at least 3000 surgical procedures, including more than 37%--are complex. In surgery, improved endovideosurgical direction, over 31% of emergency operations performed using this method. Since December 2009 the hospital became a structural division of the District Hospital in 1602 in Rostov on Don. The close connection between the branch and district hospital allows for complex diagnostic situations to consult leading experts, including consultation, thus ensuring the most effective treatment results. PMID:22545455

  4. Modeling of Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miletta, J.R.; Chase, R.J.; Luu, B.B. (Army Research Lab., Adelphi, MD (United States)); Williams, J.W.; Viverito, V.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Models are required that permit the estimation of emitted field signatures from EMP simulators to design the simulator antenna structure, to establish the usable test volumes, and to estimate human exposure risk. This paper presents the capabilities and limitations of a variety of EMP simulator models useful to the Army's EMP survivability programs. Comparisons among frequency and time-domain models are provided for two powerful US Army Research Laboratory EMP simulators: AESOP (Army EMP Simulator Operations) and VEMPS II (Vertical EMP Simulator II).

  5. The Army Virtual Housing Experience What is it?

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Army Virtual Housing Experience What is it? The Army virtual housing experience provides choices about off-post, privatized and military housing options at their next duty stations.. The Army Housing Online User Services (AHOUS) website is the single-point-of-entry for all Army housing information

  6. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army...

  7. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army...

  8. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SAMR DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS 111 ARMY Administrative Furlough Guidance (Change 3) 1. Reference a. Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) memorandum, 17 May 2013, subject: Department of the Army Fiscal Year 2013 Administrative Furlough

  9. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  10. Morphological phylogeny of army ants and other dorylomorphs (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    E-print Network

    Ward, Philip S.

    Morphological phylogeny of army ants and other dorylomorphs (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) S E A´ N G of ants comprises the three subfamilies of army ants (Aenictinae, Dorylinae, Ecitoninae) together a single origin of army ants. The Old World army ant genus Dorylus forms a monophyletic group

  11. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army...

  12. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army...

  13. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Army claims mission. 536.6 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army...

  14. Army, State and Nation in Algeria Lahouari ADDI

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Army, State and Nation in Algeria Lahouari ADDI Professor at the Institut of Political Studies of Lyon In Kees Kooning and Dirk Kruijt, Political Armies. The Military and Nation Building in the Age Bouteflika · The Army as a Political Party · The Army as Embodiment of the Nation and Master of the State

  15. Army Recruiters: "Counseling" High-Schoolers to Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrow, John

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with Army recruitment in high schools. Students get to ask questions and hear stories about life In the Army from a soldier of the year, officers, and recruiters. Some brave students will even get a physical taste of life in the Army. According to an Army officer, the primary reason why recruiters go on high school campuses is…

  16. Guerrillas versus a conventional army 1 The model

    E-print Network

    Gibbon, J. D.

    Guerrillas versus a conventional army 1 The model Consider a single country with band of guerrillas of strength x(t) in combat with a con- ventional army of strength y(t). The equations we write down are x for guerrilla losses in encounters with the army; army losses are assumed to be relatively negligible

  17. [Surgical sepsis].

    PubMed

    Sganga, Gabriele

    2015-06-11

    Sepsis represents a clinical syndrome following an infection and it is characterized by classical signs of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS): fever or ipothermia, tachycardia, tachipnea, leucocytosis or leucopenia. There may also be symptoms related to a specific infection such as a cough in pneumonia or burning with urination in a kidney infection, and abdominal pain in an intraabdominal sepsis. Common locations for the primary infection include lungs, brain, urinary tract, skin and soft tissues, and mainly abdominal organs. Patients who develop sepsis have an increased risk of complications and death and face higher healthcare costs and longer treatment. The infection is caused most commonly by bacteria, but can also be by fungi, viruses, or parasites. Severe sepsis is sepsis causing poor organ function or insufficient blood flow; septic shock is the situation with ipotension and/or need for high dosage of inotropes or vasopressors and multiple organ failure syndrome is when multiple organ dysfunction or failure is present. Outcomes depend on the severity of disease with the risk of death from sepsis being as high as 30%, severe sepsis as high as 50%, and septic shock as high as 80%. Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment, both medical (antibiotics) and surgical (source control), together with the prompt intensive care and organ support are crucial to increase survival rate. PMID:25754409

  18. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army. *This manual supersedes FM 4-0, dated 30 April 2009. i Army Doctrine Publication No. 4-0 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 31 July 2012 Sustainment Contents Page PREFACE

  19. This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html).

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (https://armypubs.us.army.mil/doctrine/index.html). #12;ADP 3-28 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. i Army Doctrine Publication No. 3-28 Headquarters Department of the Army Washington, DC, 26 July 2012 Defense

  20. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ...furnishing of hospital, medical, surgical, or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the...furnishing of hospital, medical, surgical, or dental care. During the...

  1. U.S. Army Modernizes Munitions Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Headquartered at Joliet, Illinois, the Army Ammunition Procurement and Supply Agency aims to mechanize and clean up its manufacturing facilities. Six go-co (government owned - contractor operated) plants involved in the modernization program are described. (BL)

  2. Energy Design Guides for Army Barracks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Herron, D.

    2008-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and NREL are developing target energy budgets and design guides to achieve 30% energy savings. This paper focuses the design guide for one type of barracks called unaccompanied enlisted personal housing.

  3. U.S. Army Redstone Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    U.S. Army Redstone Rocket: The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone rocket was also known as 'Old Reliable' because of its many diverse missions. The first Redstone Missile was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on August 30, 1953.

  4. Army SATCOM OTM full elevation performance characterization”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herald Beljour; Saul Foresta; Rich Hoffmann; Laurie Shamblin; Joseph Shields; Andrew Stevens; Chip Uhler; Eric Carl; Michael Eriksson

    2011-01-01

    The Army has a well established requirement for satellite communications (SATCOM) on-the-move (OTM), in order to support the needed level of real-time, tactically-relevant information on a non-contiguous battlefield. The US Army CERDEC Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate Joint SATCOM Engineering Center (JSEC) is doing relevant research and development in order to provide the best SATCOM OTM technology for transition to

  5. Uncommon surgical emergencies in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Angotti, R; Bulotta, A L; Ferrara, F; Molinaro, F; Cerchia, E; Meucci, D; Messina, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Over the past decade, multiple factors have changed the pattern of neonatal surgical emergencies. An increase in prenatal screenings and the development of neonatal tertiary care centres have changed the clinical approach to these kids. Materials and methods. Between 1995 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with diagnosis of uncommon rare neonatal surgical emergencies at our institute. We analyzed: sex, gestational age, weight at birth, primary pathology, prenatal diagnosis, associated anomalies, age and weight at surgery, clinical presentation, start of oral feeding and hospitalization. The follow-up was performed at 6,12, 24 and 36 months. Results. There were 21 male and 13 female. The gestational age ranged between 28 and 36 weeks. The weight at birth ranged between 700 and 1400 grams. Oral feeding was started between 4th and 10th postoperative day. The average hospitalization was about 70.47 days. To date, all patients have finished the followup. They are healthy. Conclusion. The outcome of the patients with uncommon surgical emergencies is different based on the etiology. Overall survival is generally good but is influenced by the associated anomalies. PMID:25669890

  6. Method for separating patient and procedural factors while analyzing interdepartmental differences in rates of surgical infections: The Israeli study of surgical infection in abdominal operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Simchen; D. Zucker; Igra Y. Siegman; N. Galai

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method for analyzing differences in the performance of hospitals with respect to outcome by separating patient factors from procedural factors. The setting included a prospective follow-up of a sample of 5571 patients undergoing all types of surgical procedures in general surgery departments of 11 hospitals (20 surgical departments) across Israel. Of

  7. Slide thyrocricotracheoplasty: a novel surgical technique for congenital laryngeal atresia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong Min Kim; Seok Joo Han; Hong Sik Choi; Yong Taek Nam; Jung Tak Oh; Seung Hoon Choi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a new surgical technique for the correction of congenital laryngeal atresia. A female\\u000a baby had laryngeal atresia at birth and received emergency tracheostomy at another hospital. The baby visited our hospital\\u000a at 7 months of age for corrective surgery of airway obstruction. We used a new surgical technique for reconstruction of her\\u000a airway,

  8. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS WASHINGTON, D.C. 20314-1000 (-! T 4 ;'/'y(jsJC rCECW-PC MEMORANDUM FOR COMMAhTDER,GREAT LAKES AND OHIO RIVER DIVISION MEMDRANDUM FOR COMMANDER of these procedures eliminates submission of a formal agreement package to Washington for review and approval. However

  9. Electronic surgical record management.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Justin

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges surgical practices face in coordinating surgeries and how the electronic surgical record management (ESRM) approach to surgical coordination can solve these problems and improve efficiency. Surgical practices continue to experience costly inefficiencies when managing surgical coordination. Application software like practice management and electronic health record systems have enabled practices to "go digital" for their administrative, financial, and clinical data. However, surgical coordination is still a manual and labor-intensive process. Surgical practices need to create a central and secure record of their surgeries. When surgical data are inputted once only and stored in a central repository, the data are transformed into active information that can be outputted to any form, letter, calendar, or report. ESRM is a new approach to surgical coordination. It enables surgical practices to automate and streamline their processes, reduce costs, and ensure that patients receive the best possible care. PMID:20480775

  10. Underestimation of surgical site infection rates in obstetrics and gynecology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Gravel-Tropper; Catherine Oxley; Ziad Memish; Gary E. Garber

    1995-01-01

    Background: With the increasing volume of same-day operations and shortened hospital stays, it becomes more likely that a significant percentage of surgical site infections will occur after these patients' discharges.Methods: To document the true incidence of postdischarge surgical site infection, surveillance was undertaken in a group of obstetric and gynecologic patients. The study consisted of two parts. (1) A questionnaire

  11. Surgical and nutritional management of postoperative duodenal fistulas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. James Garden; Evelyn H. Dykes; David C. Carter

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with postoperative external duodenal fistulas were managed in general surgical units over a six-year period. Management included aggressive nutritional support, localization and drainage of intraabdominal sepsis, and definitive surgical closure for those fistulas which did not close spontaneously. Spontaneous closure occurred in 92% of cases. All but one patient survived admission to hospital, and one patient died following

  12. Information and its impact on satisfaction among surgical patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward Krupat; Marcella Fancey; Paul D. Cleary

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the association between patient characteristics, reported problems with obtaining information and global evaluations of care among surgical patients. Using data from a large scale study of hospital care, a factor analysis of 30 information-relevant items was conducted with data from a sample of 3602 surgical patients; and correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the

  13. Opportunities and challenges in improving surgical work flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Xiao; Peter Fu-ming Hu; Jacqueline A. Moss; J. C. F. De Winter; Daan Venekamp; Colin F. Mackenzie; F. Jacob Seagull; Sherry Perkins

    2008-01-01

    Safe and efficient surgical operations depend on a work environment larger than the individual operating room (OR) and on communications at different levels of the hospital organization. Extensive communication is needed before and during surgery to ensure that surgical rooms, equipment, and supplies; patients; surgeons; supporting personnel; and accompanying documentation are all ready at the appropriate times. In this article,

  14. Current Approaches for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sander Florman; Ronald Lee Nichols

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infection among surgical patients and are commonly caused by the patients' own microbial flora. The prevalence of SSI is a major concern because of the associated increase in the incidence of morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and cost of care for postoperative patients. Key factors that determine whether

  15. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  16. [Pro general hospital].

    PubMed

    Carreras-González, E; Marruecos-Sant, L

    2010-04-01

    Trauma operative systems were created in United States to optimize polytrauma patients' treatment. These systems include prehospital polytrauma care. They determine hospital requirements to treat this kind of patients, standardize physicians' training and implement hospital registries. Initially, this system was applied only in monographic centers. However, trauma services of General Hospitals that fulfill the requirements were authorized progressively by the American Surgery Academy to fulfill this function. This is the model followed in Europe at present. Accreditation requires the qualification of the stay, with specific health care resources and a detailed trauma program. The director is responsible for organizing the creation of the trauma teams, operating 24h, for teaching, protocols and guides and the coordination of pre-hospital emergency groups. In Spain, there is an extensive network of tertiary hospitals that have trauma programs and their consequent accreditation could make it possible to take advantage of their existing resources. An accreditation system should be elaborated in order to homogenize professional training in trauma emergencies and to create a National Polytraumatic Registry. The high level of technology of these hospitals and of their human resources that include all the medical, surgical specialties and central services provide an added value. Care to the trauma patients is complex and multidisciplinary. Thus, we believe that General Hospitals, within a traumas program, are the best setting to offer it with excellent conditions. PMID:19942318

  17. Surgical Planning Laboratory Anatomy Browser

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has made a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. Highlights of the site include the Brain Atlas datasets: complex java applets that allow users to see parts of a schematic brain and heart. Users can rotate the images, and either click on parts of the images or on a listing of anatomical names and have those parts of the images labelled.

  18. Hospital Quality: A PRIDIT Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lieberthal, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to high quality medical care is an important determinant of health outcomes, but the quality of care is difficult to determine. Objective To apply the PRIDIT methodology to determine an aggregate relative measure of hospital quality using individual process measures. Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare hospital data using the PRIDIT methodology. Subjects Four-thousand-two-hundred-seventeen acute care and critical access hospitals that report data to CMS' Hospital Compare database. Measures Twenty quality measures reported in four categories: heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia care, and surgical infection prevention and five structural measures of hospital type. Results Relative hospital quality is tightly distributed, with outliers of both very high and very low quality. The best indicators of hospital quality are patients given assessment of left ventricular function for heart failure and patients given ?-blocker at arrival and patients given ?-blocker at discharge for heart attack. Additionally, teaching status is an important indicator of higher quality of care. Conclusions PRIDIT allows us to rank hospitals with respect to quality of care using process measures and demographic attributes of the hospitals. This method is an alternative to the use of clinical outcome measures in measuring hospital quality. Hospital quality measures should take into account the differential value of different quality indicators, including hospital “demographic” variables. PMID:18454777

  19. Surgical training in Guyana: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brian H; Martin, Carlos; Rambaran, Madan

    2015-02-01

    The pioneering surgical training partnership between the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) and the University of Guyana has successfully graduated 14 surgeons since 2006. The association has recruited 29 surgeons who have made 75 teaching visits to Guyana, and CAGS involvement has been critical to providing local credibility to the program, organizing the curriculum structure and developing rigorous examinations. The program is now locally sustained, with graduates leading a number of clinical hospital programs. The initial diploma qualification is being reassessed, as other specialties have introduced postgraduate Master of Medicine degree programs. Many graduates are pursuing additional training opportunities overseas, and almost all of those remaining in Guyana have returned to the tertiary centre from the regional hospitals. The program has succeeded in training surgeons and raising the standards of surgical care in Guyana, but broader health system efforts are necessary to retain surgeons in outlying regional hospitals. PMID:25621909

  20. Surgical training in Guyana: the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Brian H.; Martin, Carlos; Rambaran, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Summary The pioneering surgical training partnership between the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) and the University of Guyana has successfully graduated 14 surgeons since 2006. The association has recruited 29 surgeons who have made 75 teaching visits to Guyana, and CAGS involvement has been critical to providing local credibility to the program, organizing the curriculum structure and developing rigorous examinations. The program is now locally sustained, with graduates leading a number of clinical hospital programs. The initial diploma qualification is being reassessed, as other specialties have introduced postgraduate Master of Medicine degree programs. Many graduates are pursuing additional training opportunities overseas, and almost all of those remaining in Guyana have returned to the tertiary centre from the regional hospitals. The program has succeeded in training surgeons and raising the standards of surgical care in Guyana, but broader health system efforts are necessary to retain surgeons in outlying regional hospitals. PMID:25621909

  1. Intraoperative nursing activities performed by surgical technologists.

    PubMed

    Abbott, C A

    1994-09-01

    In this study of delegated intraoperative nursing activities performed by surgical technologists (STs) in low-risk and high-risk surgical procedures, 343 OR directors, perioperative nurses, and STs from rural, community, and medical center hospitals reported that STs frequently perform activities related to surgical counts, the sterile field, and equipment and supplies. Surgical technologists do not frequently perform tasks related to patient transportation, teaching, medication administration, OR environment, patient monitoring, and patients' rights. The investigator used nine competency statements of intraoperative nursing as a framework for the research instrument. Data analysis determined that the levels of risk in patient situations affects how frequently STs perform transportation, teaching, sterile field, OR environment, and patients' rights activities. PMID:7979325

  2. Predictors of Suicide and Accident Death in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbaum, Michael; Kessler, Ronald C.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Colpe, Lisa J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Stein, Murray B.; Ursano, Robert J.; Cox, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multicomponent study designed to generate actionable recommendations to reduce Army suicides and increase knowledge of risk and resilience factors for suicidality. OBJECTIVES To present data on prevalence, trends, and basic sociodemographic and Army experience correlates of suicides and accident deaths among active duty Regular Army soldiers between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, and thereby establish a foundation for future Army STARRS investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Analysis of trends and predictors of suicide and accident deaths using Army and Department of Defense administrative data systems. Participants were all members of the US Regular Army serving at any time between 2004 and 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Death by suicide or accident during active Army service. RESULTS The suicide rate rose between 2004 and 2009 among never deployed and currently and previously deployed Regular Army soldiers. The accident death rate fell sharply among currently deployed soldiers, remained constant among the previously deployed, and trended upward among the never deployed. Increased suicide risk was associated with being a man (or a woman during deployment), white race/ethnicity, junior enlisted rank, recent demotion, and current or previous deployment. Sociodemographic and Army experience predictors were generally similar for suicides and accident deaths. Time trends in these predictors and in the Army’s increased use of accession waivers (which relaxed some qualifications for new soldiers) do not explain the rise in Army suicides. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Predictors of Army suicides were largely similar to those reported elsewhere for civilians, although some predictors distinct to Army service emerged that deserve more in-depth analysis. The existence of a time trend in suicide risk among never-deployed soldiers argues indirectly against the view that exposure to combat-related trauma is the exclusive cause of the increase in Army suicides. PMID:24590048

  3. Letterkenny Army Depot: Finance Innovations Support Lean Six Sigma Success

    E-print Network

    Harvey, Roger K.

    2006-09-15

    As a result of significant dollar savings to the Army and U.S. taxpayers, Letterkenny Army Depot received widespread public recognition in 2005. The depot received a public sector Shingo Prize for applying Lean principles ...

  4. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army civil works lands. The...

  5. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326 Army military real property....

  6. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army civil works lands. The...

  7. 32 CFR 644.326 - Army military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Procedure for Placing Real Property in Excess Status § 644.326 Army military real property....

  8. 78 FR 33074 - Army Science Board Summer Study Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Army Science Board...Location: Antlers Hilton, Four South Cascade, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903-1685...study examines and evaluates the data, models and algorithms used for predictive...

  9. ARMI National Atlas for Amphibian Distributions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site, from The Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI), is a compilation of current and historic records of amphibian occurrences. The atlas is organized taxonomically. There are separate sections for frogs and toads, and salamanders and newts. The location of each species is mapped separately. The ARMI Atlas is meant to be an educational tool for people wanting to learn or teach others about amphibians. It can also serve as a reference for habitat managers and researchers, identifying areas where more research is needed, as well as providing information about research that has previously been done.

  10. Spouse Abuse and Child Abuse by Army Soldiers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra L. Martin; Deborah A. Gibbs; Ruby E. Johnson; E. Danielle Rentz; Monique Clinton-Sherrod; Jennifer Hardison

    2007-01-01

    This study analyzed data collected by the U.S. Army’s Family Advocacy Program, the group primarily responsible for family\\u000a violence prevention, identification, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up on Army installations. Patterns of spouse abuse\\u000a and child abuse perpetrated within a five year period (2000–2004) were examined in a sample of 10,864 Army Soldiers who were\\u000a substantiated for family violence offenses. Three groups

  11. Survey of Surgical Indications and Results of Primary Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yusuke Oshima; Kazuyuki Emi; Masanobu Motokura; Shigeki Yamanishi

    1999-01-01

    Background: Several surgical techniques to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment have been developed. Recently, both the method of reattaching the retina and of obtaining an early visual recovery are considered important factors when determining which surgical techniques to perform to treat retinal detachment.Cases: The surgical outcome in a series of 63 consecutive patients, who were treated at Osaka Rosai Hospital between

  12. Repricing Specialty Hospital Outpatient Services Using Ambulatory Surgery Center Prices

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Deborah; Cromwell, Jerry; Thomas, Frederick G.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores whether Medicare pays more for the same outpatient services provided in an acute specialty hospital than in an ambulatory surgery center (ASC). How financially dependent a specialty hospital is on ASC-eligible services is also investigated. Medicare outpatient claims in 43 orthopedic and 12 surgical specialty hospitals in 2004 were repriced using ASC pricing software. Payments for the same surgical procedure were 43 and 64 percent higher in specialty surgical and orthopedic outpatient departments, respectively, compared with simulated ASC payments. Non-ASC-eligible outpatient services were 18-35 percent of all Medicare outpatient payments varying by type of specialty hospital. PMID:18435225

  13. m Miscellaneous Paper A-94-2 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -94-2 June 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment 5m~f'fStation Aquatic Plant Control; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ~ #12;The contents, Maryland Final report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared for U.S. Army Corps

  14. FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-22 (FM 22-100) Army Leadership Competent, Confident, and Agile OCTOBER 2006 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;Foreword Competent leaders of character are necessary for the Army to meet the challenges in the dangerous

  15. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army civil works lands. The Secretary...

  16. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a)...

  17. m Technical Report A-96-6 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -96-6 April 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control; Distribution Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents. Smith, John W. Barko U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road

  18. Miscellaneous Paper A-96-2 us Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -2 July 1996 us Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control Research Release; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The V. Morrow, Jr. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road

  19. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army civil works lands. The Secretary...

  20. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  1. U.S. ARMY GARRISON FORT WAINWRIGHT QUARTERLY UPDATE FOR

    E-print Network

    U.S. ARMY GARRISON FORT WAINWRIGHT QUARTERLY UPDATE FOR ALASKA NATIVE TRIBES January 2013, Issue 30 This is a quarterly update on United States Army Garrison Fort Wainwright activities and issues of interest Teasdale--a retired Major from the U.S. Army, a staff member with the Northway Village tribe, and the host

  2. Instruction Report A-99-1 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    WES Instruction Report A-99-1 July 1999 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position, unless so desig- nated by other authorized

  3. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  4. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works real property. 644.329...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a)...

  5. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  6. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  7. ERDCTR-12-5 Army Environmental Quality/Installations Program

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-12-5 Army Environmental Quality/Installations Program Environmental Assessment During. Morrow April 2012 c Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Army Environmental L. Brandon, Heather K. Smith, and Agnes B. Morrow U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center

  8. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SAMRCQ DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS 111 ARMY PENTAGON WASHINGTON, DC 20310-0111 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Policy Guidance and Clarification for Army-wide Hiring Freeze and Release of Terms and Temporary Civilian Personnel 1. Reference

  9. a Miscellaneous Paper A-96-1 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    A-96-1 June 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising for Control of Hydrilla by Michael D. Netherland, Judy F. Shearer U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways

  10. 32 CFR 644.329 - Army civil works real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army civil works real property. 644.329...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property in Excess Status § 644.329 Army civil works real property. (a)...

  11. Instruction Report A-96-1 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    WES Instruction Report A-96-1 May 1996 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station is Unlimited Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers #12;The contents of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position, unless so desig- nated by other authorized

  12. 32 CFR 644.416 - Army civil works lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army civil works lands. 644.416 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Property and Easement Interests § 644.416 Army civil works lands. The Secretary...

  13. 32 CFR 643.112 - Army exchange activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army exchange activities. 643.112 Section...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE...Authority of Commanders § 643.112 Army exchange activities. Use of space...

  14. m Technical Report A-94-1 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    A-94-1 March 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station Aquatic Plant Control - - --- --- --=:;=== ---- _. Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180

  15. ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDCTR-14-2 Army Net Zero Program Composting Assessment for Organic Solid Waste at Fort Polk is unlimited. #12;The US Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation's toughest, geospatial sciences, water resources, and environmental sciences for the Army, the Department of Defense

  16. m Technical Report A-94-2 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    - - - - -- - - ----- ---- -- m Technical Report A-94-2 May 1994 US Army Corps of Engineers JOHN D -- -- --~;:=== . ======= =--~=~ =~ .==' ---=.- ....- - Approved For Public Release; Distribution Is Unlimited ~ Prepared for Headquarters. U.S. Army Corps.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180

  17. Pattern Formation and Optimization in Army Ant Raids

    E-print Network

    Delgado, Jordi

    Pattern Formation and Optimization in Army Ant Raids Ricard V. Sol´e , Eric Bonabeau Jordi Delgado, Pau Fern´andez Jesus Mar´in Keywords self-organization, army ants, pattern formation, optimization Abstract Army ant colonies display complex foraging raid patterns involving thousands of individuals

  18. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SAMR CQ DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS 111 ARMY PENTAGON WASHINGTON, DC 2031().()111 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Additional Guidance to Backfill Vacancies During the Army-wide Hiring Freeze 1. References: a. ASA M&RA memo, subj: Department

  19. Flagging vigilance: the post-Vietnam "Hollow Army

    E-print Network

    Lee, Robert Matthew

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is an evaluation of the United States Army as it existed in the years following its evacuation from Southeast Asia and its transition from a predominantly conscript army to the all-volunteer concept in 1973. The post-Vietnam army...

  20. An examination of the US Army's Environmental Ethic 

    E-print Network

    Danner, Benton Allen

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis I argue that the best justification for an environmental ethic for the US Army is one which is based on an anthropocentric or humanistic approach, and I evaluate the Armys Environmental Ethic in light of this. I then consider the Army...

  1. An examination of the US Army's Environmental Ethic

    E-print Network

    Danner, Benton Allen

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis I argue that the best justification for an environmental ethic for the US Army is one which is based on an anthropocentric or humanistic approach, and I evaluate the Armys Environmental Ethic in light of this. I then consider the Army...

  2. Army Physicians' Attitudes Towards Physicians' Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Richard B.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    In February 1972 the U. S. Army Medical Field Service School will commence training a new category of health personnel, to be known as the physicians' assistant. This type of allied health personnel will be an assistant to the physician, trained to do many of the traditional tasks usually performed by a physician, but requiring less education.…

  3. Seneca Army Depot EPA ID#: NY0213820830

    E-print Network

    drinking water from private wells within a 3-mile radius of the depot. The Army has stored and disposed demilitarization of munitions had been conducted for forty years by open burning of fuses, projectiles, explosives Depot 1 5/2/12 #12;off-site disposal of soil, solidified soil an

  4. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY WASHINGTON, DC 20310

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY WASHINGTON, DC 20310 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Risk spending. 2. Due to this risk, the Deputy Secretary of Defense has issued guidance authorizing each Service spending across the Total Force and all appropriations. Commanders are permitted to request authority

  5. Renewable Energy Opportunities for the Army

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy E. Solana; Jennifer C. States; William D. Chvala; Mark R. Weimar; Douglas R. Dixon

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has a goal of obtaining 25% of its domestic electricity from renewable sources by 2025, and also must meet federal renewable energy mandates and schedules. This report describes the analyses undertaken to study the renewable resource potential at 15 Army sites, focusing on grid-connected generation of electricity. The resources analyzed at each site include solar,

  6. Technicai Report A943 US Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    as Potential Herbicide Delivery Systems by Michael D. Netherland, R. Michael Stewart David Sisneros U.S. Bureau of Reclamation E. Glenn Turner AScI Corporation Approved For Public Release; Distribution as Potential Herbicide Delivery Systems by Michael D. Netherland, R. Michael Stewart U.S. Army Corps 01

  7. Adjustment and food aversions among Army illiterates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Altus

    1949-01-01

    The author, after making an item analysis of Wallen's food check list, devised another food check list which included 8 of Wallen's list. The list was administered to 100 illiterate Army soldiers. It is concluded that the number of one's food aversions is a partial index of his adjustment.

  8. Poor Design and Management Hamper Army's Basic Skills Education Program. Report to the Secretary of the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The Army's Basic Skills Education Program (BSEP) was studied to consider whether it was properly designed to determine the basic skills needed in Army jobs and to be effectively implemented. Information and reports on BSEP were reviewed, and three major commands were selected for evaluation. In designing the program, the Army did not identify the…

  9. Quality of surgical care and readmission in elderly glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuńo, Miriam; Ly, Diana; Mukherjee, Debraj; Ortega, Alicia; Black, Keith L.; Patil, Chirag G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmissions post medical or surgical discharge have been analyzed extensively. Studies have shown that complex interactions of multiple factors are responsible for these hospitalizations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database of newly diagnosed elderly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who underwent surgical resection between 1991 and 2007. Hospitals were classified into high- or low-readmission rate cohorts using a risk-adjusted methodology. Bivariate comparisons of outcomes were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated differences in quality of care according to hospital readmission rates. Results A total of 1,273 patients underwent surgery in 338 hospitals; 523 patients were treated in 228 high-readmission hospitals and 750 in 110 low-readmission hospitals. Patient characteristics for high-versus low-readmission hospitals were compared. In a confounder-adjusted model, patients treated in high- versus low-readmission hospitals had similar outcomes. The hazard of mortality for patients treated at high- compared to low-readmission hospitals was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.095%–1.19%). While overall complications were comparable between high- and low-readmission hospitals (16.3% vs 14.3%; P = .33), more postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis complications were documented in patients treated at high-readmission hospitals (7.5% vs 4.1%; P = .01). Adverse events and levels of resection achieved during surgery were comparable at high- and low-readmission hospitals. Conclusions For patients undergoing GBM resection, quality of care provided by hospitals with the highest adjusted readmission rates was similar to the care delivered by hospitals with the lowest rates. These findings provide evidence against the preconceived notion that 30-day readmissions can be used as a metric for quality of surgical and postsurgical care.

  10. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples. PMID:24038395

  11. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination. PMID:24318217

  12. Surgical checklists: the human factor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. Methods Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. Results Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. Conclusion In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed. PMID:23672665

  13. 1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section No. 5.' Drawn by V. Steinbrueck for J.C. Boespflug Construction Co. July 23, 1943. HABS 8x10' negative was made from an 8.5 x 11' copy on card stock in the collection of the Community Library, Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis, WA. - Madigan Hospital, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, DuPont, Pierce County, WA

  14. Rural hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; Schur, Claudia; Cheung, Karen; Baernholdt, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The 340B Drug Pricing Program has the potential to reduce outpatient pharmaceutical costs for qualifying hospitals—hut many rural hospital administrators are unaware of their organization’s eligibility. PMID:18637547

  15. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  16. Shared Situation Awareness For Army Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. Farrell; Stephen Jameson; Craig Stoneking

    The real-time manned-unmanned teaming of on-the-move Army assets will provide mobile commanders and warfighters with improved situation awareness from the sharing and fusion of heterogeneous distributed data sources information. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) is improving situation awareness through three ATL-developed technologies: adaptive, modular, multi- sensor information fusion; Grapevine agent-based intelligent data dissemination; and agent-based data discovery. These technologies

  17. Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities 

    E-print Network

    Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    of the squares of the errors between the model and the data points. DARCOM's complex industrial profile can be divided into 10 production categories: propellant and explosive (P&E) plant; load, assemble and pack (LAP) plant; supply and maintenance plant.... The Radford Army Ammunition Plant (RAAP),located in Radford, Va., has the primary mission of manufacturing propellants, explosives and chemical materials. Major end products of manufacture are solvent and solvent less propellants. Intermediate products...

  18. Surgical Management of Adnexal Masses in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent Y. T.; Pun, Ting-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Our objective was to review the surgical management, surgical outcomes, and obstetric outcomes of adnexal masses in pregnancy. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of pregnant women before 20 weeks of gestation who underwent laparoscopy or laparotomy for management of an adnexal mass during the period of January 2005 to June 2012 at a university-affiliated hospital. Results: Thirty-five pregnant women underwent surgical removal of adnexal masses during the 7.5-year study period: 21 (60.0%) underwent laparoscopic surgery, and 14 (40.0%) underwent laparotomy. The left upper quadrant entry technique was used in 20 women. Conversion to laparotomy was required in 2 women because of extensive pelvic adhesions. The mean gestational age at surgery was 15.2 ± 1.9 weeks. All women had undergone ovarian cystectomy. A malignant mass was found in 3 (8.6%) women. The laparoscopy group had a significantly less blood loss (67.4 ± 55.8 vs 153.6 ± 181.0 mL, P = .048) and shorter mean hospital stay (2.8 ± 1.0 vs 3.8 ± 1.1 days, P = .006) than the laparotomy group. One woman miscarried soon after surgery. There was no significant difference in obstetric outcomes between the laparoscopy and laparotomy groups. Conclusion: Surgical management of adnexal masses during pregnancy appears to have favorable outcomes for the mother and the fetus. PMID:24680147

  19. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  20. Battles between an insurgent army and an advanced army - focus on strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Surajit; Shanahan, Linda

    2008-03-01

    Detailed and aggregate analyses of the outcome of past battles focusing on rates of troop losses or on the ratios of forces on each side is at the heart of present knowledge about battles. Here we present non-equilibrium statistical mechanics based studies of possible outcomes of well matched strategic battles by a ``blue'' army against insurgency based attacks by well matched opponents in a ``red'' army in red territory. We assume that the red army attacks with randomly varying force levels to potentially confuse and drive the blue's strategies. The temporal evolution of the model battles incorporate randomness in the deployment of the reds and hence possess attendant history dependence. Our results reveal that while unpredictable events play a major role in battles, a balance between risk of exposure in a battlefield and the use of short range intelligence is needed in determining whether one side can decimate the other, and hence force a battle to end.

  1. Surgical treatment of pulmonary aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Júnior, Raul Lopes; de Oliveira, Frederico Henrique Sobral; Piotto, Bruno Luiz Burgos; Muniz, Felipe Antunes e Silva de Souza Lopes; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Cataneo, Antonio José Maria

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the outcome of surgical treatment of pulmonary aspergilloma. To that end, we evaluated 14 adult patients so treated between 1981 and 2009 at the Botucatu School of Medicine University Hospital, in the city of Botucatu, Brazil. Data were collected from the medical records of the patients. Ten patients (71%) presented with simple pulmonary aspergilloma, and 4 (29%) presented with complex pulmonary aspergilloma. Hemoptysis was the most common symptom, and tuberculosis was the most prevalent preexisting lung disease. Two patients (14%) underwent surgery on more than one occasion. There were no intraoperative deaths. Half of the patients developed postoperative complications, prolonged air leak and empyema being the most common. PMID:21225182

  2. [An apothecary from the Cévennes region on the rolls of Oriental Pyrenees Army in 1793].

    PubMed

    Guibert, Marie-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    In 1793 during the french Revolution, the decret of February 23rd orders a big recruitment of 300 000 people. The city of Alčs (Cevennes) has to supply ninety-seven soldiers to establish the battalion of the Gard. They will be allocated to the "Armée des Pyrénées-Orientales" (Army of the Eastern Pyrenees) which is going to defend the border with Spain. These armies have to face the influx of wounded persons but especially the devastation of the epidemics. Besides the soldiers, are enlisted the officers of health, the doctors, the surgeons and the pharmacists. So the city of Alčs indicates to be of use to this army the youngest of the doctors, freshly honed of the university of Montpellier and two old pharmacists (51 y. and 61 y. old). They were allocated to the hospital of Narbonne where they worked to fight against the epidemics, in particular by the disinfection of rooms. The oldest of them succumbed to the disease. Two others, safe and sound income in their home town, played a notables' role. PMID:25807665

  3. Medicare Payment: Surgical Dressings and Topical Wound Care Products

    PubMed Central

    Schaum, Kathleen D.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare patients' access to surgical dressings and topical wound care products is greatly influenced by the Medicare payment system that exists in each site of care. Qualified healthcare professionals should consider these payment systems, as well as the medical necessity for surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Scientists and manufacturers should also consider these payment systems, in addition to the Food and Drug Administration requirements for clearance or approval, when they are developing new surgical dressings and topical wound care products. Due to the importance of the Medicare payment systems, this article reviews the Medicare payment systems in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, durable medical equipment suppliers, hospital-based outpatient wound care departments, and qualified healthcare professional offices. PMID:25126477

  4. Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial-Intelligence to the Dismounted James E. Richards

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    1 Integrating the Army Geospatial Enterprise: Synchronizing Geospatial. #12;2 [This Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;3 Army`s Geospatial Architecture: delivering Geospatial-Intelligence of complex and urban terrain to the dismounted Soldier by James E. Richards ABSTRACT The Army`s Geospatial

  5. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  6. Volume XVIII, No. 6 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Volume XVIII, No. 6 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command November/December 2006 U.S. Army Installation Management Command In this issue: Annual Report Summaries Army activates publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command, under AR 360-1, The Army Public Affairs Program

  7. Surgical Techniques and Priorities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. Barker

    1977-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary western surgical needs (e.g. the surgery of physical decay) with the surgical needs of less developed countries and shows that these are a function of expectations, real and unreal. An outline of the needs of poor societies follows, with examples from practical experience in the Zulu country: e.g. surgery of trauma, including burns; obstruction; childbirth; congenital

  8. Heritage of Army Audiology and the Road Ahead: The Army Hearing Program

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Kathy; Ciliax, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been documented as early as the 16th century, when a French surgeon, Ambroise Paré, wrote of the treatment of injuries sustained by firearms and described acoustic trauma in great detail. Even so, the protection of hearing would not be addressed for three more centuries, when the jet engine was invented and resulted in a long overdue whirlwind of policy development addressing the prevention of hearing loss. We present a synopsis of hearing loss prevention in the US Army and describe the current Army Hearing Program, which aims to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in soldiers and to ensure their maximum combat effectiveness. PMID:18923117

  9. Heritage of army audiology and the road ahead: the Army Hearing Program.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, D Scott; Gates, Kathy; Ciliax, Donald

    2008-12-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been documented as early as the 16th century, when a French surgeon, Ambroise Paré, wrote of the treatment of injuries sustained by firearms and described acoustic trauma in great detail. Even so, the protection of hearing would not be addressed for three more centuries, when the jet engine was invented and resulted in a long overdue whirlwind of policy development addressing the prevention of hearing loss. We present a synopsis of hearing loss prevention in the US Army and describe the current Army Hearing Program, which aims to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in soldiers and to ensure their maximum combat effectiveness. PMID:18923117

  10. Aggressive Management of Surgical Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bengmark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that two factors significantly influence outcome in a surgical emergency – premorbid health and the degree of inflammation during the first 24 h following trauma. Repeat observations suggest that the depth of post-trauma immunoparalysis reflects the height of early inflammatory response. Administration to surgical emergencies, as was routine in the past, of larger amounts of fluid and electrolytes, fat, sugar and nutrients seems counterproductive as it increases immune dysfunction, impairs resistance to disease and, in fact, increases morbidity. Instead, strong efforts should be made to limit the obvious superinflammation, which occurs during the first 24 h after trauma and, thereby, reduce the subsequent immuno-paralysis. paralysis. Several approaches show efficacy in limiting early superinflammation such as strict control of blood glucose, avoida nce of stored blood when possible, supply of antioxidants, live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres. This review focuses mainly on use of live lactic acid bacteria and plant fibres, often called synbiotics. Encouraging experience is reported from clinical trials in liver transplantation, severe pancreatitis and extensive trauma. Immediate control of inflammation by enteral nutrition and supply of antioxidants, lactic acid bacteria and fibres is facilitated by feeding tubes, introduced as early as possible on arrival at the hospital. PMID:17132308

  11. [Amebiasis. Surgical treatment in 1989].

    PubMed

    Sigler Morales, L; Mier y Díaz, J; Melgoza Ortiz, C; Blanco Benavides, R; Medina González, E

    1989-01-01

    Even when the number of patients with invasive amebiasis has decreased, the internist and surgeon must be alert in case that the patient requires an operation. Amebic liver abscess is treated medically; percutaneous evacuation is rarely used and surgical drainage is made when there is not response to medical treatment or there is high risk of abscess rupture. Operation is mandatory when the abscess has ruptured to the abdominal cavity or through the pericardial sac. In fulminant colitis it is necessary to resect the diseased portion of the colon without primary anastomoses. Amebic apendicitis is difficult to diagnosis before an operation. It may be suspected in cases of apendicitis if the cecal wall is inflammed. Colon ameboma requires medical treatment except if it is associated with necrosis or perforation. In a four year period (1985-1988) 294 patients with diagnosis of invasive amebiasis were admitted to three hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City. 218 had hepatic abscess, 45 required surgical drainage with four deaths (9%) and four not operated patients died. In this series only four patients had their abscess drained percutaneously. 31 patients with amebic colitis were treated; three required colonic resection with one death. Ameboma was seen in five patients and there were 11 cases of amebic apendicitis. No deaths occurred in these last two groups. PMID:2682975

  12. Surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G

    1989-06-01

    The most important diagnostic step in the management of patients with severe acute pancreatitis is the discrimination between acute interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis. Measurement of C-reactive protein, lactic acid dehydrogenase, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and alpha-2-macroglobulin and contrast-enhanced CT are useful in detecting the necrotizing course of acute pancreatitis. C-reactive protein, lactic acid dehydrogenase, and contrast-enhanced CT offer detection rates of 85 per cent to more than 90 per cent for pancreatic necrosis. Surgical decision-making in necrotizing pancreatitis should be based on clinical, morphologic, and bacteriologic data. Patients with focal pancreatic necrosis, in general, respond well to medical treatment and do not need surgery. Extended (50 per cent or more) pancreatic necroses, infected necroses, and intrapancreatic parenchymal necroses plus extrapancreatic fatty tissue necroses are indicators for surgical management. The decision for the timing of operation in patients with proved necrotizing pancreatitis should be based on clinical criteria: the development of an acute surgical abdomen, generalized sepsis, shock, persisting or increasing organ dysfunction, or some combination thereof despite maximum intensive care treatment for at least 3 days. Major pancreatic resection for the treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis appears disadvantageous. Necrosectomy and continuous local lavage allow debridement of devitalized tissue and preservation of vital pancreatic tissue. Postoperative local lavage thus results in an atraumatic evacuation of necrotic tissue, the bacterial material, and biologically active substances. The hospital mortality rate of patients treated with necrosectomy and continuous local lavage (the Ulm protocol) is below 10 per cent. Nevertheless, controlled prospective clinical trials should be performed in order to bring more precision to our clinical decisions in respect to the role of surgery for this disease. PMID:2658162

  13. Teaching Physician Guidelines for Surgical Procedures Minor Surgical Procedures

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Teaching Physician Guidelines for Surgical Procedures Minor Surgical Procedures: § Procedures, the teaching physician must be present for the entire procedure § Teaching physician or resident may document the teaching physician's presence for the entire procedure High Risk and Complex Surgical Procedures

  14. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  15. Surgical scar endometrioma.

    PubMed

    Koger, K E; Shatney, C H; Hodge, K; McClenathan, J H

    1993-09-01

    Relatively few instances of surgical scar endometrioma have been reported. Herein we review 24 patients treated for this condition at the institutions at which we work between 1972 and 1992. The age of the patients ranged from 17 to 47 years, with an average age of 31.7 years. Surgical scar endometriomas occurred after operations including cesarean section (19 patients), appendectomy (two patients), episiotomy (two patients) and hysterectomy (one patient). The interval between prior surgical treatment and the onset of symptoms ranged from one to 20 years, with an average of 4.8 years. All patients were treated by wide excision. Seventeen of 24 patients were available for follow-up evaluation. The interval between excision and follow-up evaluation ranged from 1.2 to 14.0 years, with an average of 6.4 years. None of the patients had recurrence of surgical scar endometrioma. Patients with the classic presentation of a painful surgical scar mass that increases in size or tenderness during menstruation need no further evaluation of the lesion before excision. Ultrasonographic examination and fine needle aspiration biopsy should be used preoperatively in women who have a constantly painful or asymptomatic mass in a surgical scar. Because medical management yields poor results, wide excision of surgical scar endometriomas is the treatment of choice. PMID:8356497

  16. Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate

    E-print Network

    Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas #12;Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate Sustainability Requires Commitment

  17. U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS -HEADQUARTERS REGULATORY COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/CivilWorks/RegulatoryProgramandPermits.aspx

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS - HEADQUARTERS ­ REGULATORY COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/CivilWorks/RegulatoryProgramandPermits.aspx The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announces the process to request evaluation of specific wetland plant collaborating federal agencies--the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, the U

  18. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ER 10-1-54 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Management Programs c. ER 1110-2-1156, Safety of Dams - Policy and Procedures d. ER 1110-1-8158, Corps Wide............................................................................................. 7 APPENDIXES Appendix A ­ Roles and Responsibilities Matrix-Dam Safety Program................... A mandatory center of expertise and standardization located within the Vicksburg District, U.S. Army Corps

  19. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -1000 COMMANDER'S POLICY MEMORANDUM #9 SUBJECT: Managers' Internal Control Program (MICP) Policy 1. References: 06 (MICP), 4 Jan 10, Rapid Action Revision 26 Mar 12. 2. I hold all employees accountable for safeguarding, Appendix A) and Internal Controls over Financial Systems (OMB A-127). 3. I fully support the Army's MICP

  20. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY u.s. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -Dade County, Florida, Project Implementation Report and Integrated Environmental Impact Statement (PIRIEIS) 1 Project Implementation Report and Environmental Impact Statement u.S. Army Corps of Engineers Response Implementation Report (PIR) with integrated Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The !EPR panel reviewed

  1. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY EM 1110-35-1 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -2 Chapter 2. Radioactive and Mixed Waste Project Requirements Introduction 2-1 2-1 Health Physicist WITH RADIOACTIVE AND MIXED WASTE 1. Purpose. This engineer manual (EM) contains planning and management guidelines to be used for United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) work with radioactive waste, either alone

  2. A quantification of the physiological demands of the army emergency responder in the Australian army.

    PubMed

    Tofari, Paul J; Laing Treloar, Alison K; Silk, Aaron J

    2013-05-01

    The Australian Defence Force is reviewing the physical demands of all employment categories in the Australian Army to establish valid and legally defensible assessments. The current assessments, performed in physical training attire, are not specific to job demands. Moreover, the fitness standards decrease based on age and are lower for females, and as job requirements are constant, these assessments are counterintuitive. With regard to the Army Emergency Responder employment category, tasks of physical demand in the present study were selected through consultation with subject-matter experts. Participants consisted of 10 qualified Army Emergency Responder soldiers and three noncareer firefighters under instruction. Real-life firefighting scenarios were witnessed by researchers and helped form task simulations allowing measurement of heart rate and oxygen consumption. Peak oxygen consumption ranged from 21.8 ± 3.8 to 40.0 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during cutting activities and a search and rescue task, respectively, representing values similar to or higher than the current entry standards. Manual handling tasks were also assessed, with the heaviest measured being two soldiers lifting a 37.7-kg Utility Trunk to 150 cm. The findings provide a quantitative assessment of the physiological demands of Army Emergency Responders, and highlight the need for change in current fitness assessments. PMID:23756005

  3. PATROLLING THE HOMEFRONT: THE EMOTIONAL LABOR OF ARMY WIVES VOLUNTEERING IN FAMILY READINESS GROUPS

    E-print Network

    Gassmann, Jaime Nicole Noble

    2010-08-30

    This dissertation examines the emotional labor of Army wives as they volunteer in Army-mandated family-member support groups in each unit called Family Readiness Groups (FRGs). Since its inception, the Army has relied ...

  4. 33 CFR 211.16 - Scope and application of Army Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Scope and application of Army Regulations. 211.16 Section 211... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE... § 211.16 Scope and application of Army Regulations. (a) AR...

  5. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.12 Army administrative actions against...

  6. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. (a) Authorization....

  7. 32 CFR 562.8 - Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs. 562...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS § 562.8 Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs....

  8. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553...of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  9. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against...

  10. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.12 Army administrative actions against...

  11. 32 CFR 562.8 - Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs. 562...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS § 562.8 Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs....

  12. 32 CFR 536.1 - Purpose of the Army Claims System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 true Purpose of the Army Claims System. 536.1 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.1 Purpose...

  13. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1325 - United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE...REGULATIONS § 334.1325 United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak,...

  15. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553...of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  16. 33 CFR 211.16 - Scope and application of Army Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Scope and application of Army Regulations. 211.16 Section 211... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE... § 211.16 Scope and application of Army Regulations. (a) AR...

  17. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.12 Army administrative actions against...

  18. 32 CFR 536.1 - Purpose of the Army Claims System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Purpose of the Army Claims System. 536.1 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.1 Purpose...

  19. 32 CFR 536.1 - Purpose of the Army Claims System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Purpose of the Army Claims System. 536.1 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.1 Purpose...

  20. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553...of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  1. 32 CFR 536.1 - Purpose of the Army Claims System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2009-07-01 true Purpose of the Army Claims System. 536.1 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.1 Purpose...

  2. 32 CFR 562.8 - Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs. 562...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS § 562.8 Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs....

  3. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.12 Army administrative actions against...

  4. 33 CFR 211.16 - Scope and application of Army Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Scope and application of Army Regulations. 211.16 Section 211... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE... § 211.16 Scope and application of Army Regulations. (a) AR...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1325 - United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE...REGULATIONS § 334.1325 United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak,...

  6. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553...of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  7. 32 CFR 634.12 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL...SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.12 Army administrative actions against...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1325 - United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE...REGULATIONS § 334.1325 United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak,...

  9. 32 CFR 636.5 - Army administrative actions against intoxicated drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army administrative actions against intoxicated...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL... Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.5 Army administrative actions against...

  10. 32 CFR 562.8 - Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs. 562...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS § 562.8 Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs....

  11. 33 CFR 334.1325 - United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE...REGULATIONS § 334.1325 United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak,...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1325 - United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak, Alaska... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE...REGULATIONS § 334.1325 United States Army Restricted Area, Kuluk Bay, Adak,...

  13. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553...of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17...

  14. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. (a) Authorization....

  15. 32 CFR 562.8 - Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs. 562...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY ORGANIZED RESERVES RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS § 562.8 Army Advisory Panel on ROTC Affairs....

  16. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. (a) Authorization....

  17. 32 CFR 552.38 - Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. 552.38 Section 552...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES... Acquisition of maneuver agreements for Army commanders. (a) Authorization....

  18. 32 CFR 536.1 - Purpose of the Army Claims System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2009-07-01 true Purpose of the Army Claims System. 536.1 Section 536...Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.1 Purpose...

  19. 33 CFR 211.16 - Scope and application of Army Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Scope and application of Army Regulations. 211.16 Section 211... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE... § 211.16 Scope and application of Army Regulations. (a) AR...

  20. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  1. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  2. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  3. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  4. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728...Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a...Care) to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who...

  5. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries...ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite...

  6. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Design and layout of Army national cemeteries...ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite...

  7. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries...ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite...

  8. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Design and layout of Army national cemeteries...ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite...

  9. 32 CFR 553.7 - Design and layout of Army national cemeteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Design and layout of Army national cemeteries...ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.7 Design and layout of Army national cemeteries. (a) General cemetery layout plans, landscape planting plans and gravesite...

  10. Army Research Concerns in Engine Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    The Army Propulsion Directorate is primarily concerned with small engine technology, where sealing performance is most critical. Tip leakage and secondary flow losses have a much greater performance impact on small engine aero-components than on large engines. A brief survey and critique of presently employed sealing concepts is presented. Some recent new research thrusts that show promise for substantial improvement are discussed. An especially promising approach for small engine applications is brush seals. Brush seal concepts are being considered for outer air seal and secondary airflow system seal locations.

  11. Health profile of Danish army personnel.

    PubMed

    Dahl, S; Kristensen, S

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to delineate a health profile of professional Danish army personnel. Two-hundred twenty officers, noncommissioned officers, and gunners on active duty at Varde Barracks, housing the South Jutland Artillery Regiment and the Danish Army Artillery School, were asked about their physical and psychological health, interpersonal relations, and working conditions as well as their dietary, drinking, and smoking habits. Measurements were made of resting pulse rate, blood pressure, height, weight, waist and hip girth, and pulmonary function. The ratio of waist-to-hip girth and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. Psychological well-being was evaluated using the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Psychosomatic symptoms were frequently reported, but very few of those surveyed appeared to have psychiatric disorders as measured by the GHQ. Also, somatic health problems were frequently reported, the most frequent being lower-back pain, mild chest pain, and sensory disorders. Differences in interpretation and reporting of "lasting health problems" may explain the relatively high score for this question. The interpersonal relations, both upward and downward in the hierarchy rank order, received high scores. Compared with the general population, alcohol consumption was very low, whereas smoking-in particular heavy smoking-was much more frequent among professional Danish army personnel. Lung function testing showed significantly poorer mean values of forced expiratory volume in 1st second of expiration and mean forced expiratory flow 25 to 75% of forced vital capacity among smokers compared with nonsmokers, although the mean values for the whole group of both smokers and nonsmokers were well above reference values for all lung function parameters. The frequency of moderately overweight individuals (25 < BMI < or = 30) was significantly higher among the male army personnel than in the general population, whereas this was not the case for obesity (BMI > 30). Abdominal obesity, regarded as an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, and all-cause mortality, was present in 5%, and 3% belonged to the highest-risk group by having a low BMI as well as abdominal obesity. PMID:9183168

  12. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  13. Results of NASA/Army transmission research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coe, Harold H.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1970 the NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command have shared an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components are outlined. The major goals of the program were (and continue to be) to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability, reduce the weight, noise, and vibration, and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. Major historical milestones are reviewed, significant advances in technology for bearings, gears, and transmissions are discussed, and the outlook for the future is presented. The reference list is comprehensive.

  14. Organizational Determinants of Work Outcomes and Quality Care Ratings Among Army Medical Department Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Patrician, Patricia A.; Shang, Jingjing; Lake, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and several single-item measures were administered to registered nurses (RNs) working within 23 U.S.-based Army Medical Department (AMEDD) hospitals. Data were analyzed with logistic regression for nested data. Unfavorable nursing practice environments had a substantial association with job dissatisfaction (OR 13.75, p < .01), emotional exhaustion (OR 12.70, p < .01), intent to leave (OR 3.03, p < .01), and fair to poor quality of care (OR 10.66, p < .01). This study provides the first system-wide analyses of nursing practice environments in AMEDD hospitals in the U.S. Similar to findings in civilian samples, poor quality work environments are associated with less favorable RN work outcomes and quality of care ratings. PMID:20151409

  15. Efficiency analysis of federally funded hospitals: comparison of DoD and VA hospitals using data envelopment analysis.

    PubMed

    Bannick, R R; Ozcan, Y A

    1995-05-01

    This article applies the technique known as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to assess differences in performance efficiency among two branches of the federal hospital system, The Department of Defense (DoD) and The Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA). The analysis is based on two measures of performance output (inpatient days and outpatient visit, and six measures of resource input (capital investment in operational beds, service mix intensity, and supplies and three components of labor--providers, nurses and support). This study finds that based on these input and output measures, DoD hospitals are, on average, significantly more efficient than their VA counterparts. Within DoD, however, there are no significant differences in efficiency among the service components (US Air Force, Army or Navy), although Army hospitals appear more efficient in using service mix and provider labor. PMID:10143981

  16. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    MedlinePLUS

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... the latest scientific literature of interest to the pediatric surgeon’s practice, but which may be outside your ...

  17. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... available for use are made from man-made (synthetic) materials or animal tissue. Surgical mesh made of synthetic materials can be found in knitted mesh or non-knitted sheet forms. The synthetic materials ...

  18. Guide to Surgical Specialists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tissues, abdomen, extremities, and the gastrointestinal, vascular, and endocrine systems. Surgeons may further specialize in an additional board ... neck, skin and soft tissues, and vascular and endocrine systems. Vascular Surgery A vascular surgeon is a surgical ...

  19. TECHNICAL NOTE Nine novel microsatellite markers for the army ant

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Naomi E.

    Simopelta (subfamily Ponerinae) army ants are specialized predators of other ants in New World tropical culminated in the army ant lifestyle. Keywords Formicidae Á Genetic marker Á Microsatellite Á Population are specialized predators of other ants; (3) although colonies are rarely encountered in the field, several

  20. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Los Angeles Medical Recruiting Company

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Los Angeles Medical Recruiting Company 1551 N. Tustin Avenue, Suite 170, Begin your medical career with unique experience as part of the world's most advanced healthcare.S. Army Health Care Team, visit us at: healthcare.goarmy.com or contact me via this email

  1. January/February 2010 U.S. Army Corps

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    January/February 2010 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers® Afghanistan Engineer District - South KAF receives extreme makeover Serving the Afghanistan Engineer District - South #12;Commander Col. Kevin J.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Afghanistan Engineer District - South (AES); and is an unofficial publication

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Army Nurse Corps Vietnam Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretch, Robert H.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Army nurse veterans. Analysis of questionnaire data (N=712) revealed a current PTSD rate for Vietnam veteran nurses of 3.3 percent. This rate is comparable to that found among nonnurse active duty Army Vietnam veterans and is much lower than estimates for civilian Vietnam veterans.…

  3. Explaining Recent Army and Navy Minority Recruiting Trends. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2007, the representation of blacks among high-quality Army recruits declined, while in the Navy, black representation remained stable; the representation of Hispanics among high-quality recruits in both the Army and Navy grew during this period. RAND researchers identified factors that explain these recruiting trends and found…

  4. Soldier Education in the British Army, 1920-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the history of compulsory education for soldiers' career advancement in the British army. It begins with an examination of the organizational context before analyzing the rationale, syllabus, teaching and assessment of soldier education. It concludes that for members of the army education organization their self-perception as…

  5. 20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of original drawing by US Army Engineer District, Corps of Engineers, 1964 (original in possession of NYC Economic Development Corp.) REPAIRS OF SPALLED CONCRETE-PIERS 2,3, AND 4 - Brooklyn Army Supply Base, Pier 2, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  6. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ...DEFENSE Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 [Docket No. USA-2008-0001...submit comments, identified by 32 CFR Part 655, Docket No. USA-2008-0001 and/or...Department of the Army is revising 32 CFR Part 655 to reflect the changes of the expanded...

  7. Unmanned systems initiative: supporting immediate warfighter needs and army transformation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. B. DiNardo; S. B. Andrews

    2005-01-01

    Unmanned systems have emerged as a critical warfighting capability for operation Iraqi freedom (OIF) and operation enduring freedom (OEF) and form a cornerstone of the Army's transformational flagship program, future combat systems (FCS). The unmanned systems initiative (USI), a congressionally supported program managed by the US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC), is responding to these

  8. Discourses of Gender in the Contemporary British Army

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Woodward; Patricia Winter

    2004-01-01

    This article is about the discourses of gender which circulate within debates about the inclusion of women in the British Army. Drawing on material from elite policy debates within the British Ministry of Defence, Army, and Parliament, the article uses a methodology informed by theories of discourse analysis to examine how the figures of the male and female soldier are

  9. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY NEW YORK DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY NEW YORK DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS JACOB K. JAVITS FEDERAL BUILDING NEW.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District (District) announces the availability of the Draft contact: Jenifer Thalhauser Project Manager New York District Corps of Engineers (917) 790-8632 jenifer

  10. Reuse of waste oil at army installations. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Chicoine; G. L. Gerdes; B. A. Donahue

    1982-01-01

    Typical Army installations produce large amounts of waste oil-up to 250,000 gal annually. In response to the growing need for energy conservation, Army policy requires that these installations reuse oil whenever possible. The objective of this report is to analyze the economics of waste oil reuse, and to examine the environmental aspects of used oil management.

  11. Smart surgical tool.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) guided smart surgical tool using a femtosecond fiber laser is developed. This system provides real-time material identification by processing and analyzing the peak intensity and ratio of atomic emissions of LIBS signals. Algorithms to identify emissions of different tissues and metals are developed and implemented into the real-time control system. This system provides a powerful smart surgical tool for precise robotic microsurgery applications with real-time feedback and control. PMID:25649628

  12. The Women's Army Auxiliary Corps: A Compromise to Overcome the Conflict of Women Serving in the Army

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Permeswaran, Yashila

    2008-01-01

    Though people now take the idea of women in the military for granted, in the 1940s it was a vigorously debated suggestion. Men protected their country; women stayed at home. Because of the conflict over whether women should serve in the army, Congress compromised by creating the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). This article describes the…

  13. Differential Validity of the Army Aptitude Areas for Predicting Army Job Training Performance of Blacks and Whites. Technical Paper 312.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Milton H.; Fuchs, Edmund F.

    Validation studies were conducted on nine revised aptitude areas of the Army Classification Battery (ACB) to determine whether ACB scores provided an equitable indication of the qualifications of blacks and whites for training in major groups of Army jobs. The aptitude areas were: combat, field artillery, electronics repair, operators and food,…

  14. Desarrollo multidisciplinario de la cirugía robótica en un hospital universitario de tercer nivel: organización y resultados

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena Ortiz Oshiro; Ángel Ramos Carrasco; Jesús Moreno Sierra; Cristina Pardo Martínez; Isabel Galante Romo; Fernando Bullón Sopelana; Pluvio Coronado Martín; Iván Mansilla García; María Escudero Mate; José A. Vidart Aragón; Ángel Silmi Moyano; Jesús Álvarez Fernández-Represa

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundDa Vinci system (Intuitive Surgical®) is a surgical telemanipulator providing many technical advantages over conventional laparoscopic approach (3-D vision, ergonomics, highly precise movements, endowrist instrumentation…) and it is currently applied to several specialties throughout the world since 2000. The first Spanish public hospital incorporating this robotic technology was Hospital Clinico San Carlos (HCSC) in Madrid, in July 2006.We present the

  15. Scholarly activities--essential to surgical education.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Mubashir; Penney, David G; ReMine, Stephen G; Mittal, Vijay K

    2003-01-01

    Research and scholarship are an integral part of a surgical residency program. A concerted effort by a Director of Surgical Research and a Residency Program Director at the community hospital were successful in addressing this very important part of medical education. A questionnaire was designed and data gathered on the attitudes and involvement toward research activities of graduates over the past 6 years. Increased research and scholarly activity resulted from a requirement of completing 2 research projects on time for residents. Over the period of this study, the number of published full-length papers, number of resident names as authors, number of attending surgeon's names as authors, and numbers of presentations made in-hospital, and at local, national, and international meetings all increased dramatically. Most strikingly, in 1996, there were 4 publications, whereas in 2000, there were 20. Presentations during this period included orals, posters, and videos. Each former resident did an average of about 3 research projects, of which just over 1 was published. Satisfaction with amount and quality of scholarship was over 70%. More than 85% of residents fulfilled the criteria for graduation, and more than 50% were satisfied with the requirement. On average, each graduate had 1 paper published since graduation. Seventy-five percent thought their scholarship had improved their career. It is essential in a community hospital residency program that resident surgeons be trained in the techniques of research and scholarship. In our program, research activity and scholarship have been dramatically improved over the past 6 years. PMID:14972241

  16. Cost analysis of hospital material management systems.

    PubMed

    Egbelu, P J; Harmonosky, C M; Ventura, J A; O'Brien, W E; Sommer, H J

    1998-01-01

    Integrated healthcare material management begins with manufactures of medical/surgical supplies, uses distributors and ends at the point of use at hospitals. Recent material management philosophies in the healthcare industry, such as just-in-time and stockless systems, are yet to be fully evaluated. In order to evaluate the cost effectiveness of each type of material management technique, a cost model for hospital materials management has been designed. Several case scenarios are analyzed and results are reported. PMID:9785293

  17. Patients' Perceptions of Hospital Discharge Informational Content

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn R. Maloney; Marianne E. Weiss

    2008-01-01

    Ensuring that patients' informational needs have been met prior to hospital discharge sets the stage for successful self-management of recovery at home. This secondary analysis study aims to identify differences in the amount of discharge teaching content needed and received by adult medical-surgical patients on the basis of their sociodemographic characteristics and hospitalization-related factors. The Quality of Discharge Teaching Scale

  18. The Prevalence of Patellofemoral Joint Disorders with Surgical Endpoint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Wilson; Gerald Masterson; Richard Seagrave

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of exercise-related injuries for physical activities and sports that have specifically lead to surgical intervention are rarely reported, especially regarding the patellofemoral articulation. Medical records from 1992 to 2005 of a multisite, urban-based hospital serving both large urban and rural populations were analyzed retrospectively. Injury data were presented by age, gender, and sport of choice. Significant (? =

  19. Creative Handwashing Campaign in an Orthopedic Surgical Institution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Gulczynski

    2004-01-01

    ISSUE: The CDC Guideline for Hand Hygiene was to be implemented at New England Baptist Hospital (NEBH) and education on the use of alcohol-based handwash throughout the facility.PROJECT: In November 2003, a Hand Hygiene Campaign was presented at NEBH, a large orthopedic surgical institution with approximately 900 employees. The purpose was to educate healthcare workers (HCWs) on the CDC Guideline

  20. Critical appraisal of surgical venous access in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Hollyoak; T. H. Ong; J. F. Leditschke

    1997-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) have become an important adjunct to the overall management of paediatric patients, but their use is associated with frequent complications resulting in premature removal. This report evaluates the insertion techniques and complications of 295 consecutive surgically inserted CVC from 1987 to 1991 in a paediatric hospital. Fully implanted catheters had significantly less incidence of catheter-related problems

  1. TMAP [Teleoperated Mobile Antiarmor Platform]: The Army`s near term entree to battlefield robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.K.

    1988-05-01

    TMAP is a remotely operated battlefield system consisting of a 750-pound all terrain vehicle, remotely operated by a solider over a fiber optic communication link 4 km long. Using state-of-the-art automation and robotic technology, Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems is developing a modular prototype system under contract to Sandia National Laboratories. The Army Material developer is the Missile Command (MICOM) at Huntsville, Alabama; the Combat Developer is the Infantry School (USAIS) at Ft. Benning, Georgia. With the weapons removed by Congress in December 1987, the O & O is being rewritten for a ``Tactical Multipurpose Automated Platform`` (TMAP) instead of the original Teleoperated Mobile Antiarmor Platform. With minimal modification the modular TMAP system can be used in many applications (eg., antiarmor or antiair weapons, mine detection, medical support). System acceptance and Army evaluation testing is scheduled for summer and fall of 1988. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The Comparative Assessment and Improvement of Quality of Surgical Care in the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shukri F. Khuri; Jennifer Daley; William G. Henderson

    2002-01-01

    rompted by the need to assess comparatively the quality of surgical care in 133 Veter- ans Affairs (VA) hospitals, the Department of Veterans Affairs conducted the National VA Surgical Risk Study between October 1, 1991, and December 31, 1993, in 44 VA medical centers. The study developed and validated models for risk adjustment of 30- day morbidity and 30-day mortality

  3. The surgical risk of pancreas transplantation in the cyclosporine era: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rainer W. G Gruessner; David E. R Sutherland; Christoph Troppmann; Enrico Benedetti; Nadey Hakim; David L Dunn; Angelika C Gruessner

    1997-01-01

    Background:Pancreas transplants are still associated with the highest surgical complication rate of all routinely performed solid organ transplants. To date, the impact of serious surgical complications in the cyclosporine era on perioperative patient morbidity, graft and patient survival, and hospital costs has not been analyzed in detail.Study Design:We retrospectively studied surgical complications after 445 consecutive pancreas transplants (45% simultaneous pancreas-kidney

  4. Establishing the role of the neonatal surgical outreach nurse for neonates requiring general paediatric surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Reda

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundMost paediatric surgical centres are located in major regional hospitals and are refusing at least 10–20% of neonatal referrals because of lack of surgical cots,1 necessitating the transporting of sick neonates considerable distances from home for surgery and imposing added anguish and hardship on their families. Where the surgical centre is not co-located with maternity services, as is the case

  5. Holmium:YAG surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    1995-03-01

    "Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)" is the shorthand name for a family of solid-state lasers that use the doping element holmium in a laser crystal (e.g., YAG [yttrium-aluminum-garnet]) and that emit energy at approximately 2.1 microns. This wavelength is relatively new to medicine and has been used in laser surgery for only about the last six years. Like the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser when it was first used clinically, the Ho:YAG laser is poised for rapid and wide-spread use. Ho:YAG lasers, like CO2 lasers, offer precise cutting with minimal damage to adjacent tissue; however, unlike CO2 lasers, they also offer fiberoptic delivery (which is ideal for endoscopic use) and the ability to treat tissue in a liquid-filled environment (e.g., saline, blood). The initial specialty for which the Ho:YAG laser was used was arthroscopic surgery, especially diskectomy. Today, it is effectively used in many surgical specialties, including general surgery, urology, laparoscopy, neurosurgery, lithotripsy, angioplasty, orthopedic surgery (which includes procedures such as meniscectomy, bone sculpting [may also be performed in plastic surgery], and some experimental surgery, such as cartilage shrinking to tighten loose joints), and dentistry. Because of its broad range of potential applications, it has been called the "Swiss Army Knife" of lasers. High-powered Ho:YAG lasers, which enable surgeons to work more quickly and cut more smoothly, have been made available only within the last three years (units offering > 20 W) to 18 months (units offering > 60 W). Because of this rapid increase, high-powered units are still relatively expensive, and it is not yet clear whether maximum power outputs will continue to increase or whether the cost of higher-power units will begin to come down. Although low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers can be used for the same procedures, their different ranges of possible clinical techniques make them better suited to different applications: low-power units are preferable for small-joint and some head-and-neck surgeries or for office use, and high-power units are more suitable for use in major surgery, such as gastrointestinal surgery or surgery in large joints. This evaluation includes two units at both ends of the Ho:YAG power spectrum--one 10 W and one 60 W--and thus provides a guide to evaluating other Ho:YAG lasers that are currently available or that will be entering the market.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7782226

  6. The WHO surgical safety checklist: survey of patients’ views

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Stephanie Jane; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Moorthy, Krishna; Mayer, Erik; Darzi, Ara; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that full implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist across NHS operating theatres is still proving a challenge for many surgical teams. The aim of the current study was to assess patients’ views of the checklist, which have yet to be considered and could inform its appropriate use, and influence clinical buy-in. Method Postoperative patients were sampled from surgical wards at two large London teaching hospitals. Patients were shown two professionally produced videos, one demonstrating use of the WHO surgical safety checklist, and one demonstrating the equivalent periods of their operation before its introduction. Patients’ views of the checklist, its use in practice, and their involvement in safety improvement more generally were captured using a bespoke 19-item questionnaire. Results 141 patients participated. Patients were positive towards the checklist, strongly agreeing that it would impact positively on their safety and on surgical team performance. Those worried about coming to harm in hospital were particularly supportive. Views were divided regarding hearing discussions around blood loss/airway before their procedure, supporting appropriate modifications to the tool. Patients did not feel they had a strong role to play in safety improvement more broadly. Conclusions It is feasible and instructive to capture patients’ views of the delivery of safety improvements like the checklist. We have demonstrated strong support for the checklist in a sample of surgical patients, presenting a challenge to those resistant to its use. PMID:25038036

  7. New army biowarfare lab raises concerns.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J

    1984-12-01

    The U.S. Army has requested funds from Congress to develop a laboratory devoted to testing highly infectious, lethal biological agents in aerosol sprays. The proposed $1.4 million laboratory is a small part of an ongoing effort to modernize and expand chemical and biological facilities at Dugway Proving Ground. Several eminent biologists who reviewed the Pentagon's proposal at the request of Science are concerned that the facility will eventually be used to develop prohibited offensive weapons, particularly genetically modified pathogens of enhanced virulence and antibiotic resistance, though some scientists think the danger can be averted through surveillance by an independant panel. The Pentagon denies that such development is planned and claims that the facility is urgently needed to test defensive military equipment. PMID:6505684

  8. Inhospital mortality among clinical and surgical inpatients recently diagnosed with venous thromboembolic disease.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Martínez, María Lourdes; Vázquez, Fernando Javier; Grande-Ratti, María Florencia; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo; Giunta, Diego Hernán

    2015-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the most common cause of preventable mortality in hospitalized patients, and pulmonary embolism is responsible for 5-10 % of all hospital deaths. To estimate the hospital mortality in hospitalized patients who developed VTE during hospitalization. Prospective cohort of all adult inpatients >17 years admitted to the hospital between August 2006 and August 2013, and follow-up until discharge to measure death. VTE incident cases were captured prospectively from the Institutional Registry of Thromboembolic disease in a tertiary hospital care in Buenos Aires. In hospital global mortality and fatality rate of inpatients with VTE was calculated. The cumulative incidence of VTE was 1.8 % (95 % CI 1.77-1.93 %), representing 1.32 % (95 % CI 1.23-1.41 %) in the subgroup of surgical patients and 2.1 % (95 % CI 1.9-2.2 %) in clinical inpatients. The overall hospital mortality was 2.4 % (95 % CI 2.35-2.53); being 3.95 % (95 % CI 3.78-4.12) in clinical inpatients and 1.15 % (95 % CI 1.06-1.23) in surgical patients. The death in patients who had developed VTE, represented between 4 and 7 % of hospital deaths, and it increases with age in both clinical and surgical patients. In Argentina there are few data of hospital mortality in patients with VTE. This information is useful when assessing the need for resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment in inpatients. PMID:25995104

  9. Surgical outcomes in women with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elit, Laurie M.; Bondy, Susan J.; Paszat, Lawrence P.; Holowaty, Eric J.; Thomas, Gillian M.; Stukel, Therese A.; Levine, Mark N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess whether the specialty of the surgeon or the hospital involved in the initial management of women with ovarian cancer determined the likelihood of unnecessary repeated abdominal surgery and long-term patient survival. Methods We conducted a population-based study involving women in Ontario, Canada, who had epithelial ovarian cancer treated initially with abdominal surgery between January 1996 and December 1998. We documented incident surgical cases using hospital contact data and the Ontario Cancer Registry. We obtained data on patient characteristics, clinical findings, surgical techniques and perioperative care from electronic administrative data records and patient charts. We performed regression analyses to assess the influence of surgeon and hospital specialization and of case volumes on the likelihood of repeat surgery and survival. We controlled for stage of disease and other factors associated with these outcomes. We also examined the relation between the adequacy of surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy with survival. Results A total of 1341 women met our inclusion criteria. Our analysis showed that repeat surgery was associated with the surgeon's discipline, younger patient age, well-differentiated tumours and early stage of disease. However, survival was not associated with the surgeon's discipline; rather, it was associated with advanced patient age, increasing comorbidities, advanced stage of disease, poorly differentiated tumours, urgent surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. We observed a trend between inadequate surgery and a decreased likelihood of survival. Conclusion Further study is needed to understand patterns of repeat surgery for ovarian cancer. Improved quality of operative reporting is required to classify surgical adequacy. PMID:18841223

  10. Robotic surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Liss, Michael A; McDougall, Elspeth M

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery has undergone exponential growth and has ever developing utilization. The explosion of new technologies and regulation have led to challenges in training surgeons who desire this skill set. We review the current state of robotic simulation and incorporation of simulation into surgical training curricula. In addition to the literature review, results of a questionnaire survey study of 21 expert and novice surgeons attending a Urologic Robotic Oncology conference using 3 different robotic skill simulation devices are discussed. An increasing number of robotic surgery simulators have had some degree of validation study of their use in surgical education curricula and proficiency testing. Although simulators are advantageous, confirmation of construct and predictive validity of robotic simulators and their reliability as a training tool will be necessary before they are integrated into the surgical credentialing process. PMID:23528719

  11. [Electoro-surgical device].

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yuji

    2009-07-01

    Electro-surgical device is an essential instrument for bloodless surgery after the 1st introduction by Harvey Cushing in 1926. Basal mechanisms of electric scalpels (monopolar and bipolar), current waveforms (cut, coagulation and blend), high-frequency currents and electrical shocks were commented. After 1990s, several new electro-surgical devices such as argon beam coagulator, bipolar scissors and vessel sealing system (LigaSure) were developed and introduced in chest surgery. Argon beam coagulator is useful in sealing and hemostasis of bleeding from chest walls after extrapleural dissections. Bipolar scissors can seal small vessels less than diameter 2 mm and is useful in mediastinal lymphnode dissections. Vessel sealing system is able to seal and cut vessels up to diameter 7 mm. LigaSure V is the most suitable instrument for thymic vein handling in thoracoscopic thymectomy. Clinical applications of these new surgical devices in chest surgery are discussed. PMID:20715684

  12. ATTP 1-19 (FM 12-50) U.S. Army Bands

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ATTP 1-19 (FM 12-50) U.S. Army Bands JULY 2010 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital

  13. Detailed Analysis of Factors Affecting Team Success and Failure in the America's Army Game *

    E-print Network

    Detailed Analysis of Factors Affecting Team Success and Failure in the America's Army Game * CASOS data trace of the on­line multi­player first­person­shooter game America's Army to understand's Army players' distinct behaviors, the optimum size of an America's Army team, the importance of fire

  14. ATP 4-91 (FMI 4-93.41) Army Field Support Brigade

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ATP 4-91 (FMI 4-93.41) Army Field Support Brigade December 2011 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine

  15. HEADQUARTERS FM 3-23.35 (FM 23-35) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    HEADQUARTERS FM 3-23.35 (FM 23-35) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY COMBAT TRAINING WITH PISTOLS, M9 AND M11 publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library at (http://www.train.army.mil). #12;FM 3-23.35, C4 Change 4 Headquarters

  16. ATTP 4-41 (FM 10-23) Army Field Feeding and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ATTP 4-41 (FM 10-23) Army Field Feeding and Class I Operations OCTOBER 2010 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Headquarters, Department of the Army #12;This publication is available at Army Knowledge Online (www.us.army.mil) and General Dennis J. Reimer

  17. Detailed Analysis of Factors Affecting Team Success and Failure in the America's Army Game*

    E-print Network

    Detailed Analysis of Factors Affecting Team Success and Failure in the America's Army Game* CASOS data trace of the on-line multi-player first-person-shooter game America's Army to understand's Army players' distinct behaviors, the optimum size of an America's Army team, the importance of fire

  18. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF TtiE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SAMR DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF TtiE ASSISTANT SECRETARY tltANPOWERAND RESERVE AFF.\\IRS 111 of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) Memorandum, 17 May 2013, subject: Department of Army Fiscal Year~2..'3. Assist ecretary of the Army {M npower and .Reserve Affa1rs) DISTRIBUTION; ADMINISTRATIVE ASSt

  19. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, G-1

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DAPE-CPZ DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, G-1 300 ARMY PENTAGON engaged in Civilian human resources administration in the Department of the Army (DA). The basis's team was responsible, that enhanced Army's mission accomplishment, and was accomplished because

  20. Volume XIX, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Volume XIX, No. 1 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command January/February 2007 U.S. Army Installation Management Command In this issue: Master Planning and Military Construction publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command, under AR 360-1, The Army Public Affairs Program

  1. Volume XIX, No. 3 A publication of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    .................................................................................................................. 16 Army reaffirms cleanup program management by Kristine Kingery 17-18 Corps strategy addresses

  2. Surgical Instrument Restraint in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Mark R.; Dawson, David L.; Melton, Shannon; Hooker, Dona; Cantu, Hilda

    2000-01-01

    Performing a surgical procedure during spaceflight will become more likely with longer duration missions in the near future. Minimal surgical capability has been present on previous missions as the definitive medical care time was short and the likelihood of surgical events too low to justify surgical hardware availability. Early demonstrations of surgical procedures in the weightlessness of parabolic flight indicated the need for careful logistical planning and restraint of surgical hardware. The consideration of human ergonomics also has more impact in weightlessness than in the conventionall-g environment. Three methods of surgical instrument restraint - a Minor Surgical Kit (MSK), a Surgical Restraint Scrub Suit (SRSS), and a Surgical Tray (ST) were evaluated in parabolic flight surgical procedures. The Minor Surgical Kit was easily stored, easily deployed, and demonstrated the best ability to facilitate a surgical procedure in weightlessness. Important factors in this surgical restraint system include excellent organization of supplies, ability to maintain sterility, accessibility while providing secure restraint, ability to dispose of sharp items and biological trash, and ergonomical efficiency.

  3. Dilip Nathwani Ninewells Hospital & Medical School

    E-print Network

    Glasgow, University of

    scientifically rigorous information on antimicrobial resistance trends and antimicrobial use on an ongoing basis.difficile The Scottish Approach #12;Antimicrobial Prescribing FactsAntimicrobial Prescribing Facts · ~ 1/3 of all% of all surgical prophylaxis in inappropriate · Antimicrobials account for upwards of 30% of hospital

  4. Surgical Technician Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide, developed for 10-month postsecondary programs in Connecticut, outlines a program for training surgical technicians. The program is divided into two components, didactic and clinical. Following a list of six general objectives of the program, the guide provides a curriculum outline by major areas with the number of hours…

  5. Surgical treatment of obesity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Näslund; John G Kral

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is very prevalent. Most treatments fail owing to hard-wired survival mechanisms, linking stress and appetite, which have become grossly maladaptive in the industrial era. Antiobesity (bariatric) surgery is a seemingly drastic, efficacious therapy for this serious disease of energy surfeit. Technical progress during the last two decades has greatly improved its safety. The surgical principles of gastric restriction and\\/or

  6. CULTIVATING NETWORKS: IMPLEMENTING SURGICAL

    E-print Network

    Sahay, Sundeep

    i CULTIVATING NETWORKS: IMPLEMENTING SURGICAL TELEMEDICINE Margunn Aanestad THE INTERVENTIONAL TELEMEDICINE by Margunn Aanestad Submitted as partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree Doctor;iii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction 1 2. Telemedicine ­ visions and challenges 3 3. Related research

  7. Anatomy in Surgical Examinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew T Raftery

    2002-01-01

    Today, more than ever, the postgraduate surgical trainee requires instruction in anatomy, for no longer does the undergraduate get a thorough grounding in anatomy. In the past, the postgraduate trainee had formal tuition and examination in anatomy at 2nd M.B. and, therefore, only recall and reinforcement of knowledge were necessary to learn the anatomy required for the old Primary Examination

  8. Surgical Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a 10-month postsecondary program to educate qualified adults to function as surgical technicians in association with surgeons and nurses in operating rooms and delivery rooms. The program provides for both a didactic and a clinical component. Contents include general information, a listing of major…

  9. 3D printing surgical instruments: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Timothy M.; Giovinco, Nicholas A.; Cucher, Daniel J.; Watts, George; Hurwitz, Bonnie; Armstrong, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The applications for rapid prototyping have expanded dramatically over the last 20 years. In recent years, additive manufacturing has been intensely investigated for surgical implants, tissue scaffolds, and organs. There is, however, scant literature to date that has investigated the viability of 3D printing of surgical instruments. Materials and Methods Using a fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) printer, an army/ navy surgical retractor was replicated from polylactic acid (PLA) filament. The retractor was sterilized using standard FDA approved glutaraldehyde protocols, tested for bacteria by PCR, and stressed until fracture in order to determine if the printed instrument could tolerate force beyond the demands of an operating room. Results Printing required roughly 90 minutes. The instrument tolerated 13.6 kg of tangential force before failure, both before and after exposure to the sterilant. Freshly extruded PLA from the printer was sterile and produced no PCR product. Each instrument weighed 16g and required only $0.46 of PLA. Conclusions Our estimates place the cost per unit of a 3D printed retractor to be roughly 1/10th the cost of a stainless steel instrument. The PLA Army/ Navy is strong enough for the demands of the operating room. Freshly extruded PLA in a clean environment, such as an OR, would produce a sterile, ready to use instrument. Due to the unprecedented accessibility of 3D printing technology world wide, and the cost efficiency of these instruments, there are far reaching implications for surgery in some underserved and less developed parts of the world. PMID:24721602

  10. Construction of an integrated surgical suite in a military treatment facility.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Anibal L

    2009-01-01

    The OR has long existed as a highly specialized and distinct entity within a hospital. Recent technological advances have allowed the OR to be seamlessly integrated with the larger hospital and, in a virtual sense, with the world. The modern, integrated OR can enhance patients' surgical experiences, improve surgeons' control of OR technology, and increase OR efficiency by reducing surgical times. The Naval Medical Center in San Diego, California, is one of the first military health care systems in the southwest to build a fully integrated, voice-controlled OR. The renovation project transformed 12 ORs into fully integrated surgical suites. PMID:19121420

  11. Aligning the Core Logistics Processes of the US Army with SAP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Ledwon; Jonathan Roth; Thomas Gulledge

    The US Army is using the ARIS Business Suite and the SAP Solution Manager to manage its implementation of the Single Army\\u000a Logistics Enterprise — one of the largest SAP ERP system implementations to date. For the US Army, this approach enables the\\u000a Army’s transformation from a supply-based and often stove-piped logistics enterprise into an integrated, streamlined, responsive\\u000a distribution-based enterprise

  12. [da Vinci surgical system].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Gou; Ishikawa, Norihiro

    2014-07-01

    The da Vinci surgical system was developed by Intuitive Surgical Inc. in the United States as an endoscopic surgical device to assist remote control surgeries. In 1998, the Da Vinci system was first used for cardiothoracic procedures. Currently a combination of robot-assisted internal thoracic artery harvest together with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) through a mini-incision (ThoraCAB) or totally endoscopic procedures including anastomoses under robotic assistance (TECAB) are being conducted for the treatment of coronary artery diseases. With the recent advances in catheter interventions, hybrid procedures combining catheter intervention with ThoraCAB or TECAB are anticipated in the future.On the other hand, with the decrease in number of coronary artery bypass surgeries, the share of valvular surgeries is expected to increase in the future. Among them, mitral valvuloplasty for mitral regurgitation is anticipated to be conducted mainly by low-invasive procedures, represented by minimally invasive cardiac surgery( MICS) and robot-assisted surgery. Apart from the intrinsic good surgical view, robotic-assisted systems offer additional advantages of the availability of an amplified view and the easy to observe the mitral valve in the physiological position. Thus, robotic surgical surgeries that make complicated procedures easier are expected to accomplish further developments in the future. Furthermore, while the number of surgeries for atrial septal defects has decreased dramatically following the widespread use of Amplatzer septal occluder, robotic surgery may become a good indication for cases in which the Amplatzer device is not indicated. In Japan, clinical trial of the da Vinci robotic system for heart surgeries has been completed. Statutory approval of the da Vinci system for mitral regurgitation and atrial septal defects is anticipated in the next few years. PMID:25138939

  13. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...designated by the Secretary of the Army (SA). The President— (i) Is responsible...the DOD directed responsibilities of the SA on service discharge review matters for...and its panels will be furnished by the SA. (d) Special standards....

  14. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...designated by the Secretary of the Army (SA). The President— (i) Is responsible...the DOD directed responsibilities of the SA on service discharge review matters for...and its panels will be furnished by the SA. (d) Special standards....

  15. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...designated by the Secretary of the Army (SA). The President— (i) Is responsible...the DOD directed responsibilities of the SA on service discharge review matters for...and its panels will be furnished by the SA. (d) Special standards....

  16. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...designated by the Secretary of the Army (SA). The President— (i) Is responsible...the DOD directed responsibilities of the SA on service discharge review matters for...and its panels will be furnished by the SA. (d) Special standards....

  17. 32 CFR 581.2 - Army Discharge Review Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...designated by the Secretary of the Army (SA). The President— (i) Is responsible...the DOD directed responsibilities of the SA on service discharge review matters for...and its panels will be furnished by the SA. (d) Special standards....

  18. The U.S. Army and the lessons of history 

    E-print Network

    Shugart, David Adams

    1997-01-01

    with the belief that lessons learned from its war experience could improve its training, tactical doctrine, and schools. This thesis, using the field artillery as a case study, will appraise how the United States Army institutionalized the lessons learns process...

  19. Development of aeronautical engines by the Army and Navy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Different aircraft engines are categorized as being of interest to only the Army or Navy or to both armed services. A listing of the different engines is presented along with some statistics, namely, horsepower.

  20. Army installations of the future : urban + shrinkage + landscape

    E-print Network

    Howell, Dwight D. (Dwight Dee)

    2015-01-01

    The US Army has set a course to transition to a future force that is adaptive, modern, and at the forefront of change. This strategic vision lacks a refined installation strategy to meet the needs of the future force. In ...